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Sample records for jules horowitz experimental

  1. Experimental validation of photon-heating calculation for the Jules Horowitz Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, M.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Di Salvo, J.; Gruel, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is the next Material-Testing Reactor (MTR) under construction at CEA Cadarache. High values of photon heating (up to 20 W/g) are expected in this MTR. As temperature is a key parameter for material behavior, the accuracy of photon-heating calculation in the different JHR structures is an important stake with regard to JHR safety and performances. In order to experimentally validate the calculation of photon heating in the JHR, an integral experiment called AMMON was carried out in the critical mock-up EOLE at CEA Cadarache to help ascertain the calculation bias and its associated uncertainty. Nuclear heating was measured in different JHR-representative AMMON core configurations using ThermoLuminescent Detectors (TLDs) and Optically Stimulated Luminescent Detectors (OSLDs). This article presents the interpretation methodology and the calculation/experiment (C/E) ratio for all the TLD and OSLD measurements conducted in AMMON. It then deals with representativeness elements of the AMMON experiment regarding the JHR and establishes the calculation biases (and its associated uncertainty) applicable to photon-heating calculation for the JHR.

  2. Power transient analyses of experimental in-reflector devices during safety shutdown in Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Camprini, P. C.; Sumini, M.; Artioli, C.; Gonnier, C.; Pouchin, B.; Bourdon, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is designed to be a 100 MW material testing reactor (MTR) and it is expected to become the reference facility in the framework of European nuclear research activity. As the core neutron spectrum is quite fast, several experimental devices concerning fuel studies have been conceived to be placed in the reflector in order to exploit a proper thermal neutron flux irradiation. Since the core power is relatively high, the neutronic coupling between the reactor core and the reflector devices has to be taken into account for different rod insertions. In fact the thermal power produced within the fuel samples is considerable. Heat removal during shutdown is a main topic in nuclear safety and it is worth to analyse thermal power transients in fuel samples as well. Here a thermal hydraulic model for JHR core is proposed aiming at a simple and representative description as far as reactivity feedbacks are concerned. Then it is coupled with a neutronic pointwise kinetics analysis by means of the DULCINEE code to compute core power transient calculations. Moreover, some reflector-core coupling evaluations are performed through Monte Carlo method using the TRIPOLI 4.7 code. The JHR equilibrium cycle is considered with respect to four fuel compositions namely Beginning of Cycle (BOC), Xenon Saturation Point (XSP), Middle of Cycle (MOC) and End of Cycle (EOC). Then thermal power transients in the experimental reflector devices are evaluated during safety shutdowns and they are verified for all these cycle steps. (authors)

  3. Jules Horowitz Reactor: a high performance material testing reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iracane, Daniel; Chaix, Pascal; Alamo, Ana

    2008-04-01

    The physical modelling of materials' behaviour under severe conditions is an indispensable element for developing future fission and fusion systems: screening, design, optimisation, processing, licensing, and lifetime assessment of a new generation of structure materials and fuels, which will withstand high fast neutron flux at high in-service temperatures with the production of elements like helium and hydrogen. JANNUS and other analytical experimental tools are developed for this objective. However, a purely analytical approach is not sufficient: there is a need for flexible experiments integrating higher scales and coupled phenomena and offering high quality measurements; these experiments are performed in material testing reactors (MTR). Moreover, complementary representative experiments are usually performed in prototypes or dedicated facilities such as IFMIF for fusion. Only such a consistent set of tools operating on a wide range of scales, can provide an actual prediction capability. A program such as the development of silicon carbide composites (600-1200 °C) illustrates this multiscale strategy. Facing the long term needs of experimental irradiations and the ageing of present MTRs, it was thought necessary to implement a new generation high performance MTR in Europe for supporting existing and future nuclear reactors. The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) project copes with this context. It is funded by an international consortium and will start operation in 2014. JHR will provide improved performances such as high neutron flux ( 10 n/cm/s above 0.1 MeV) in representative environments (coolant, pressure, temperature) with online monitoring of experimental parameters (including stress and strain control). Experimental devices designing, such as high dpa and small thermal gradients experiments, is now a key objective requiring a broad collaboration to put together present scientific state of art, end-users requirements and advanced instrumentation. To cite this

  4. Development and experimental qualification of a calculation scheme for the evaluation of gamma heating in experimental reactors. Application to MARIA and Jules Horowitz (JHR) MTR Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tarchalski, M.; Pytel, K.; Wroblewska, M.; Marcinkowska, Z.; Boettcher, A.; Prokopowicz, R.; Sireta, P.; Gonnier, C.; Bignan, G.; Lyoussi, A.; Fourmentel, D.; Barbot, L.; Villard, J.F.; Destouches, C.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Brun, J.; Jagielski, J.; Luks, A.

    2015-07-01

    Precise computational determination of nuclear heating which consists predominantly of gamma heating (more than 80 %) is one of the challenges in material testing reactor exploitation. Due to sophisticated construction and conditions of experimental programs planned in JHR it became essential to use most accurate and precise gamma heating model. Before the JHR starts to operate, gamma heating evaluation methods need to be developed and qualified in other experimental reactor facilities. This is done inter alia using OSIRIS, MINERVE or EOLE research reactors in France. Furthermore, MARIA - Polish material testing reactor - has been chosen to contribute to the qualification of gamma heating calculation schemes/tools. This reactor has some characteristics close to those of JHR (beryllium usage, fuel element geometry). To evaluate gamma heating in JHR and MARIA reactors, both simulation tools and experimental program have been developed and performed. For gamma heating simulation, new calculation scheme and gamma heating model of MARIA have been carried out using TRIPOLI4 and APOLLO2 codes. Calculation outcome has been verified by comparison to experimental measurements in MARIA reactor. To have more precise calculation results, model of MARIA in TRIPOLI4 has been made using the whole geometry of the core. This has been done for the first time in the history of MARIA reactor and was complex due to cut cone shape of all its elements. Material composition of burnt fuel elements has been implemented from APOLLO2 calculations. An experiment for nuclear heating measurements and calculation verification has been done in September 2014. This involved neutron, photon and nuclear heating measurements at selected locations in MARIA reactor using in particular Rh SPND, Ag SPND, Ionization Chamber (all three from CEA), KAROLINA calorimeter (NCBJ) and Gamma Thermometer (CEA/SCK CEN). Measurements were done in forty points using four channels. Maximal nuclear heating evaluated from

  5. Combined analysis of neutron and photon flux measurements for the Jules Horowitz reactor core mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J. P.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J. Y.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Merroun, O.; Brun, J.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J.

    2011-07-01

    We study the combined analysis of nuclear measurements to improve the knowledge of the irradiation conditions in the experimental locations of the future Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The goal of the present work is to measure more accurately neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating in the reactor. In a Material Testing Reactor (MTR), nuclear heating is a crucial parameter to design the experimental devices to be irradiated in harsh nuclear conditions. This parameter drives the temperature of the devices and of the samples. The numerical codes can predict this parameter but in-situ measurements are necessary to reach the expected accuracy. For this reason, one objective of the IN-CORE program [1] is to study the combined measurements of neutron and photon flux and their cross advanced interpretation. It should be reminded that both neutron and photon sensors are not totally selective as their signals are due to neutron and photon interactions. We intend to measure the neutron flux by three different kinds of sensors (Uranium Fission chamber, Plutonium Fission chamber and Self Powered Neutron Detector), the photon flux by two different sensors (Ionization chamber and Self Powered Gamma Detector) and the nuclear heating by two different ones (Differential calorimeter and Gamma Thermometer). For the same parameter, we expect that the use of different kinds of sensors will allow a better estimation of the aimed parameter by mixing different spectrum responses and different neutron and gamma contributions. An experimental test called CARMEN-1 is scheduled in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France) at the end of 2011, with the goal to map irradiation locations in the reactor reflector to get a first validation of the analysis model. This article focuses on the sensor selection for CARMEN-1 experiment and to the way to link neutron and photon flux measurements in view to reduce their uncertainties but also to better assess the neutron and photon contributions to nuclear

  6. Thermal study of a non adiabatic differential calorimeter used for nuclear heating measurements inside an experimental channel of the Jules Horowitz Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Brun, J.; Muraglia, M.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; André, J.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J.-P.; Fourmentel, D.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J.-Y.; Villard, J.-F.

    2012-11-01

    New online in-pile measurement methods are crucial during irradiations in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) for a better understanding of accelerated material ageing and nuclear fuel behaviour. In particular, instrumentation for measurements of one relevant parameter: nuclear heat deposition rate, called nuclear heating, has to be improved. The knowledge of this quantity is a great interest for various safety, scientist and end-user requirements (design of specific irradiation devices and associated cooling systems with imposed conditions). This paper focuses on thermal experimental and numerical studies carried out under non irradiation conditions on an in-pile calorimeter dedicated to nuclear heating quantification inside a new experimental device which will be dedicated to the experimental condition mapping (neutron and photon fluxes and nuclear heating) inside the JHR experimental channels. Experimental results concerning the calorimeter response during its electrical calibration (<3W) under laminar forced convection conditions show that its sensitivity does not depend on the cooling flow. Temperature and heat flux density measurements lead to the conclusion of a good directional conductive heat flow design (increased with a higher Reynolds number). A parametric numerical stationary study highlights a sensor sensitivity increasing. At last, the usual calorimeter design is compared to a single calorimeter which gives promising results (miniaturization, higher sensitivity).

  7. Radiation Transport Calculation of the UGXR Collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chento, Yelko; Hueso, César; Zamora, Imanol; Fabbri, Marco; Fuente, Cristina De La; Larringan, Asier

    2017-09-01

    Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), a major infrastructure of European interest in the fission domain, will be built and operated in the framework of an international cooperation, including the development and qualification of materials and nuclear fuel used in nuclear industry. For this purpose UGXR Collimators, two multi slit gamma and X-ray collimation mechatronic systems, will be installed at the JHR pool and at the Irradiated Components Storage pool. Expected amounts of radiation produced by the spent fuel and X-ray accelerator implies diverse aspects need to be verified to ensure adequate radiological zoning and personnel radiation protection. A computational methodology was devised to validate the Collimators design by means of coupling different engineering codes. In summary, several assessments were performed by means of MCNP5v1.60 to fulfil all the radiological requirements in Nominal scenario (TEDE < 25µSv/h) and in Maintenance scenario (TEDE < 2mSv/h) among others, detailing the methodology, hypotheses and assumptions employed.

  8. Jules Verne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Jules Verne published his first science fiction novel in 1865 called 'From the Earth to the Moon.' As shown here in an illustration, passengers in Verne's space ship enjoy their first taste of weightlessness.

  9. Jules Verne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Jules Verne published his first science fiction novel in 1865 called 'From the Earth to the Moon.' As shown here in an illustration, passengers in Verne's space ship enjoy their first taste of weightlessness.

  10. Juling Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-25

    This high-resolution image of Juling Crater on Ceres reveals, in exquisite detail, features on the rims and crater floor. The crater is about 1.6 miles (2.5 kilometers) deep and the small mountain, seen left of the center of the crater, is about 0.6 miles (1 kilometers) high. The many features indicative of the flow of material suggest the subsurface is rich in ice. The geological structure of this region also generally suggests that ice is involved. The origin of the small depression seen at the top of the mountain is not fully understood but might have formed as a consequence of a landslide, visible on the northeastern flank. Dawn took this image during its extended mission on August 25, 2016, from its low-altitude mapping orbit at a distance of about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 36 degrees south latitude, 167 degrees east longitude. Juling is named after the Sakai/Orang Asli spirit of the crops from Malaysia. NASA's Dawn spacecraft acquired this picture on August 24, 2016. The image was taken during Dawn's extended mission, from its low altitude mapping orbit at about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 38 degrees south latitude, 165 degrees east longitude. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21754

  11. Jule Gregory Charney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagorinsky, J.

    Twelve years ago, Jule Charney was honored by AGU when he was named the 38th William Bowie medalist for having epitomized the Bowie criteria of outstanding contribution to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.Fifty years of Bowie awards were celebrated at a Special Session of the AGU Spring Meeting held in Baltimore, Md., in May. It is a very special distinction that AGU has selected Charney, among others, from a truly impressive field of superachievers, as one meriting extended recall of his contributions and his place in history.

  12. Juling and Kupalo Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-17

    This region on Ceres, located in the vicinity of Toharu Crater, presents two small craters: Juling at top (12 miles, 20 kilometers in diameter) and Kupalo at bottom (16 miles, 26 kilometers in diameter). Both craters are relatively young, as indicated by their sharp rims. These features are located at about the same latitude (about 38 degrees south) as Tawals Crater and show similar crater shapes and rugged terrain. These features may reflect the presence of ice below the surface. Subtle bright features can be distinguished in places. These likely were excavated by small impacts and landslides along the slopes of the crater rims. This suggests that a different type of material, likely rich in salts, is present in the shallow subsurface. Juling is named after the Sakai/Orang Asli spirit of the crops from Malaysia, and Kupalo gets its name from the Russian god of vegetation and of the harvest. NASA's Dawn spacecraft acquired this picture on August 24, 2016. The image was taken during Dawn's extended mission, from its low altitude mapping orbit at about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 38 degrees south latitude, 165 degrees east longitude. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21753

  13. STS-101 Crew Interview / Scott Horowitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Horowitz is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Horowitz became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the reaction and reasons for the splitting-up of the objectives for STS-101 with STS-106. Horowitz also mentions the scheduled space-walk, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the new glass cockpit of Atlantis, the repairs of equipment and change of the batteries. Horowitz also discusses his responsibilities during the space-walk, and docking of the spacecraft. He stresses that he will have an added challenge during the space-walk, his inability to see where he needs to place the Extravehicular Activities (EVA) crew.

  14. STS-101 Crew Interview / Scott Horowitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Horowitz is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Horowitz became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the reaction and reasons for the splitting-up of the objectives for STS-101 with STS-106. Horowitz also mentions the scheduled space-walk, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the new glass cockpit of Atlantis, the repairs of equipment and change of the batteries. Horowitz also discusses his responsibilities during the space-walk, and docking of the spacecraft. He stresses that he will have an added challenge during the space-walk, his inability to see where he needs to place the Extravehicular Activities (EVA) crew.

  15. Jules Verne: a new polishing technique related to FJP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booij, Silvia M.; Faehnle, Oliver W.; Meeder, Mark; Wons, Torsten; Braat, Joseph J. M.

    2004-01-01

    A variation on the fluid jet polishing (FJP) technique, arbitrarily named Jules Verne (JV), will be described in this article. Jules Verne is a glass processing technique that removes material due to the fact that the tool and the surface are in close contact, and a slurry moves in between the tool and the surface. This approach has both advantages and disadvantages with respect to the original FJP modus: it enables a feed-controlled machining process, but deeper lying areas are harder to reach. A simulation model will be presented that predicts the flow of the slurry in the Jules Verne setup, which is followed by the computation of the trajectories of the particles in the flow. Furthermore, experimental data will be reported demonstrating the feasibility of the JV idea. A model will also be presented simulating the interaction between the surface and the impinging abrasives at a microscopic level, enabling the prediction of the final surface roughness.

  16. Discover Paris with Jules Verne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Anna E.

    1996-01-01

    An approach to teaching French literature that uses a Jules Verne novel published only in 1994 is described. The novel, "Paris in the 20th Century," is the basis for a series of written and oral exercises about the novel, its social and cultural context, the author, and the actual changes that have occurred in Paris in comparison with…

  17. STS-82 Pilot Scott Horowitz at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz flashes a wide grin for photographers after he lands his T-38 jet at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility. Horowitz and the other six members of the STS-82 crew came from their home base at Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, to spend the last few days before launch at KSC. STS-82 is scheduled for liftoff on Feb. 11 during a 65-minute launch window which opens at 3:56 a.m. EST. The 10-day flight aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery will be the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission.

  18. STS-105 Crew Interview: Scott Horowitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, training for the mission, and his role in the mission's activities. He gives details on the mission's goals, which include the transfer of supplies from the Discovery Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS) and the change-over of the Expedition 2 and Expedition 3 crews (the resident crews of ISS). Horowitz discusses the importance of the ISS in the future of human spaceflight.

  19. STS-105 Crew Interview: Scott Horowitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, training for the mission, and his role in the mission's activities. He gives details on the mission's goals, which include the transfer of supplies from the Discovery Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS) and the change-over of the Expedition 2 and Expedition 3 crews (the resident crews of ISS). Horowitz discusses the importance of the ISS in the future of human spaceflight.

  20. STS-82 Pilot Scott Horowitz at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz flashes a wide grin for photographers after he lands his T-38 jet at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility. Horowitz and the other six members of the STS-82 crew came from their home base at Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, to spend the last few days before launch at KSC. STS-82 is scheduled for liftoff on Feb. 11 during a 65-minute launch window which opens at 3:56 a.m. EST. The 10-day flight aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery will be the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission.

  1. Astronomy and astronomers in Jules Verne's novels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    Almost all the Voyages Extraordinaires written by Jules Verne refer to astronomy. In some of them, astronomy is even the leading theme. However, Jules Verne was basically not learned in science. His knowledge of astronomy came from contemporaneous popular publications and discussions with specialists among his friends or his family. In this article, I examine, from the text and illustrations of his novels, how astronomy was perceived and conveyed by Jules Verne, with errors and limitations on the one hand, with great respect and enthusiasm on the other hand. This informs us on how astronomy was understood by an ``honnête homme'' in the late 19th century.

  2. Due Process Flexibility in Academic Dismissals: Horowitz and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veron, Enid L.

    1979-01-01

    Both the plurality and dissent in the Horowitz case agree that Horowitz received all the due process guaranteed her by the Constitution and that the core of due process is flexibility, which indicates that the contours of due process on campus will be largely shaped by the university community. (Author/IRT)

  3. STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz Suit Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz puts on a glove of his launch and entry suit with assistance from a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Horowitz''';s second space flight. He and the six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Discovery awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission to service the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This will be the second HST servicing mission. Four back-to-back spacewalks are planned.

  4. STS-75 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with the assistance of a suit technician. STS-75 will be the first trip into space for Horowitz, who was selected by NASA in 1992 to join the astronaut corps. Horowitz and an international crew will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half-hour launch window opening at 3:18 p.m. EST.

  5. STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz Suit Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz puts on a glove of his launch and entry suit with assistance from a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Horowitz''';s second space flight. He and the six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Discovery awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission to service the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This will be the second HST servicing mission. Four back-to-back spacewalks are planned.

  6. STS-75 Pilot Scott Horowitz in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz (center) prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B with assistance from white room closeout crew members Paul Arnold (left), Dave Law and Bob Saulnier.

  7. Pilot Scott Horowitz consults a checklist during a Vernier burn

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-02-15

    S82-E-5436 (15 Feb. 1997) --- Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, STS-82 pilot, at pilot's station during second Extravehicular Activity (EVA) by two of his crew mates. This view was taken with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC).

  8. STS-82 Pilot Scott Horowitz arrives for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz arrives at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet from Houston, TX. Horowitz and the other six crew members are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The crew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on STS-82 will conduct the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. The 10-day flight is targeted for a Feb. 11 liftoff.

  9. Pilot Scott Horowitz consults a checklist during a Vernier burn

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-02-15

    S82-E-5437 (11-21 Feb. 1997) --- Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz mans the pilot's station of the Space Shuttle Discovery. As well as serving as pilot for NASA's second mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Horowitz was instrumental in the crafting of patch pieces to cover worn insulation on the giant telescopes surface. This view was taken with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC).

  10. STS-82 Pilot Scott Horowitz arrives for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz arrives at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet from Houston, TX. Horowitz and the other six crew members are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The crew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on STS-82 will conduct the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. The 10-day flight is targeted for a Feb. 11 liftoff.

  11. Djordje Stanojevic in Works of Jules Janssen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.

    2009-09-01

    Jules Janssen (Paris 1824 - Meudon 1907) is well known as the founder of the "Observatoire d'Astronomie Physique de Paris (sisá Meudon)". He was also teacher and coworker of Djordje Stanojević, who was the first Serbian astrophysicist, rector of the Belgrade University and the second person on the head of Belgrade Astronomical Observatory, the first builder of hydro power plants in Serbia, the author of the first color photography in Serbia and the book with colored photographies ("Srbija u slikama" - Serbia in photos), pioneer of electrification and industrialization of our country. His articles in the journal of the French Academy of Sciences (Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences) are in the Serbian Astronomy the first modern scientific papers. They are presented and commented in Academy by Jules Janssen, who also mentions Stanojevi{ć} in his works in various contexts. In this contribution, the presence of Djordje Stanojevi{ć} in works of Jules Janssen, and his comments on Stanojevi{ć}'s work in Comptes Rendus are analyzed. Also, the work and life of Jules Janssen are presented.

  12. Geophysicists: Jules Aarons (1921-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Jules Aarons, a pioneer in satellite radio beacon studies of the ionosphere, died peacefully at his home in Newton, Mass., on 21 November 2008 at age 87. When considering his college career, Jules was drawn toward the humanities, an interest subsequently redirected by his parents toward science as a more suitable way to earn a living, and then by the U.S. Army Air Corps toward radio technology as a more suitable way to win World War II. Both goals were readily accomplished, perhaps instilling in Jules the value of proper mentorship, that central aspect of his life that so dominates our recollections of him. After the war, and with a variety of options before him, Jules decided upon civilian government service at the U.S. Air Force's then new field station in Cambridge, Mass. This was the founding entity of the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (AFCRL), and those five famous letters became identified with his professional career (1946-1981). With Russia's launch of Sputnik in 1957, the era of space-based radio communications began, and with it the need to understand the sporadic crackling and fading (``scintillations'') of radio transmissions from satellites to ground receiving stations. Wartime efforts also gave birth to radio astronomy. Jules fostered ways to fund the synergies he saw between the radio technologies of space science and those of ground-based radio astronomy in ways almost unimaginable today (and certainly not by former U.S. senator Mike Mansfield, whose 1973 amendment to the U.S. Congress's defense appropriations bill limited the financing of basic research by military agencies only to projects that have direct military consequences; the amendment resulted in a permanent restructuring of how U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) agencies fund university-based research).

  13. Quantifying the Impact of Tropospheric Ozone on Crops Productivity at regional scale using JULES-crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, F.

    2016-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. It is causing significant crop production losses. Currently, O3 concentrations are projected to increase globally, which could have a significant impact on food security. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator modified to include crops (JULES-crop) is used here to quantify the impacts of tropospheric O3 on crop production at the regional scale until 2100. We evaluate JULES-crop against the Soybean Free-Air-Concentration-Enrichment (SoyFACE) experiment in Illinois, USA. Experimental data from SoyFACE and various literature sources is used to calibrate the parameters for soybean and ozone damage parameters in soybean in JULES-crop. The calibrated model is then applied for a transient factorial set of JULES-crop simulations over 1960-2005. Simulated yield changes are attributed to individual environmental drivers, CO2, O3 and climate change, across regions and for different crops. A mixed scenario of RCP 2.6 and RCP 8.5 climatology and ozone are simulated to explore the implication of policy. The overall findings are that regions with high ozone concentration such as China and India suffer the most from ozone damage, soybean is more sensitive to O3 than other crops. JULES-crop predicts CO2 fertilisation would increase the productivity of vegetation. This effect, however, is masked by the negative impacts of tropospheric O3. Using data from FAO and JULES-crop estimated that ozone damage cost around 55.4 Billion USD per year on soybean. Irrigation improves the simulation of rice only, and it increases the relative ozone damage because drought can reduce the ozone from entering the plant stomata. RCP 8.5 scenario results in a high yield for all crops mainly due to the CO2 fertilisation effect. Mixed climate scenarios simulations suggest that RCP 8.5 CO2 concentration and RCP 2.6 O3 concentration result in the highest yield. Further works such as more crop FACE-O3 experiments and more Crop

  14. Jules Janssen's in and out correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, Françoise

    2001-10-01

    When she died in 1924, Miss Antoinette Janssen, the only daughter of Jules Janssen (1824-1907), bequeathed all the letters her parents had received at home to the Library of the Institut de France in Paris. That correspondence is still preserved there, in guard-books containing about 1700 letters, the transcription of which is in progress. It is not so easy to trace the outgoing letters and transcribe them, and any help would be much appreciated!

  15. The rigid Horowitz-Myers conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolgar, Eric

    2017-03-01

    The new positive energy conjecture was first formulated by Horowitz and Myers in the late 1990s to probe for a possible extended, nonsupersymmetric AdS/CFT correspondence. We consider a version formulated for complete, asymptotically Poincaré-Einstein Riemannian metrics ( M, g) with bounded scalar curvature R ≥ - n( n - 1) and with no (inner) boundary except possibly a finite union of compact, totally geodesic hypersurfaces (horizons). This version then asserts that any such ( M, g) must have mass not less than a certain bound which is realized as the mass m 0 of a metric g 0 induced on a time-symmetric slice of a spacetime called an AdS soliton. This conjecture remains unproved, having so far resisted standard techniques. Little is known other than that the conjecture is true for metrics which are sufficiently small perturbations of g 0. We pose another test for the conjecture. We assume its validity and attempt to prove as a corollary the corresponding scalar curvature rigidity statement, which is that g 0 is the unique asymptotically Poincaré-Einstein metric with mass m 0 obeying R ≥ - n( n - 1). Were a second such metric g 1 not isometric to g 0 to exist, it then may well admit perturbations of lower mass, contradicting the assumed validity of the conjecture. We find enough rigidity to show that the minimum mass metric must be static Einstein, so the problem is reduced to that of static uniqueness. When n = 3 the manifold must be isometric to a time-symmetric slice of an AdS soliton spacetime, or must have a non-compact horizon. En route we study the mass aspect, obtaining and generalizing known results: (i) we relate the mass aspect of static metrics to the holographic energy density, (ii) we obtain the conformal invariance of the mass aspect when the bulk dimension is odd, and (iii) we show the vanishing of the mass aspect for negative Einstein manifolds with Einstein conformal boundary.

  16. Evaluating the Unified Model and JULES in a semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Chawn; Brooke, Jennifer; Best, Martin; Scott, Russel; Edwards, John; Weeks, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The Met Office Unified Model (UM) has a significant cold bias in land surface temperature (LST) in semi-arid regions at global resolution, and limited area model (LAM) 4.4 km and 2.2 km configurations. Evaluation of the JULES land surface scheme has been performed for flux tower sites in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in south-eastern Arizona. Flux tower measurements have shown that JULES simulated turbulent heat fluxes are larger compared with observations (21 W m-2, May monthly average) and ground heat fluxes too small (3.5 W m-2, May monthly average). The accurate representation of the bare soil cover fraction is shown to be of particular importance, reducing biases in the sensible heat flux. Offline simulations with JULES are used to compare UM configurations with observed bare soil and vegetation parameters (surface type fractional cover, leaf area index and canopy height) in order to attribute the LST biases to some model parameter errors. JULES observed vegetation simulations increase the modelled daytime surface warming; daytime LST (O-B) biases are reduced to -0.4 K compared with 4.8 K in the standard configuration simulations when compared with ground-based IRT measurements. Similar trends are seen when the model is compared with MODIS LST retrievals; Aqua LST biases showed a large initial bias of 7.4 K with the standard configuration, reduced to 1.0 K in observed vegetation simulations. The results suggest that there is a large component of the LST bias that is due to errors in the way in which the surface energy balance of sparse vegetation is simulated by JULES. The incorrect specification of vegetation parameters, the fractional coverage of each surface type and soil hydraulic and thermal properties have all been shown to lead to errors in the prediction of surface temperatures.

  17. Sustaining Successful School Reform: An Interview With Jordan Horowitz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Inside High School Reform: Making Changes that Matter (WestEd) shares the critical lessons and compelling successes of 28 California Academic Partnership Program school reform efforts. In this interview, lead author Jordan Horowitz, WestEd's senior project director in evaluation research, recently shared some of the book's findings, and answered…

  18. Horowitz fashions MLI patches on Flight Day 7

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-02-17

    STS082-350-021 (11-21 Feb. 1997) --- On Discovery's middeck, astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, STS-82 pilot, works on one of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) patches to be used by two crew mates on an upcoming space walk to repair worn insulation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST).

  19. Jules Aarons - space scientist and mentor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Su.

    2003-04-01

    It is fitting that this session in honor of Jules Aarons is being held in Europe. Indeed, he was a pioneer in beacon satellite studies of the ionosphere and involved many European nations in that effort immediately after the launch of Sputnik I in 1957. His name has now become synonymous with the field of ionospheric scintillations. His studies elucidated scintillation morphology from the magnetic pole to the equator. He showed that it is possible to make a meaningful study of plasma structuring in the ionosphere utilizing a beacon in the sky, and only simple receiving systems on the ground. This allowed many developing countries to participate in this enterprise. His laboratory became a center for scientists from all over the world who were eager to benefit from the global archive he had so assiduously built. His guidance and mentoring transformed the Beacon Satellite Studies Group into a close-knit international community. After his formal retirement from the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory two decades ago, he joined Boston University, where his wise counsel is much appreciated. There he launched global scintillation studies using the GPS system, a phase of his career that is happily continuing. Jules Aarons is one of those rare individuals who has been able to combine his scientific acumen with an internationally recognized ability in the arts, being a critically acclaimed photographer. His photos have been exhibited in galleries in Boston, New York, and Paris.

  20. Planets, comets and small bodies in Jules Verne's novels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, J.

    2011-10-01

    Almost all the Voyages Extraordinaires written by Jules Verne refer to astronomy. In some of them, astronomy is even the leading theme. However, Jules Verne was basically not learned in science. His knowledge of astronomy came from contemporaneous popular publications and discussions with specialists among his friends or his family. In this contribution, I examine, from selected texts and illustrations of his novels, how astronomy — and especially planetary science — was perceived and conveyed by Jules Verne, with errors and limitations on the one hand, with great respect and enthusiasm on the other hand.

  1. STS-75 Pilot Scott Horowitz arrives at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 Pilot Scott J. Horowitz arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Altogether seven crew members are assigned to the second Shuttle flight of 1996, which will be highlighted by the re-flight of the Italian Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1R). Liftoff is slated to occur during a two-and-a-half window opening at 3:18 p.m. EST, Feb. 22.

  2. Fermions tunneling from the Horowitz-Strominger Dilaton black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2009-06-01

    Based on the work of Kerner and Mann, fermions tunneling from the Horowitz-Strominger Dilaton black hole on the membrane is studied. Owing to the coupling among electromagnetic field, matter field and gravity field, the Dirac equation of charged particles is introduced, and according to that, the expected emission temperature is obtained. After the self-gravitational interaction is considered, it is found that the tunneling rate of fermions also satisfies the underlying Unitary theory as the case of scalar particles.

  3. Jules Verne Mare Soils as Revealed by Clementine UVVIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Head, J. W.

    1999-03-01

    To determine the nature of potentially low-Ca pyroxene (noritic) spectra in six South Pole-Aitken basin mare deposits, we undertake a multispectral analysis of a representative of these deposits, that associated with Jules Verne crater.

  4. improved vegetation phenology in the JULES land-surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, S. O.

    2013-12-01

    Sietse Los, Steven Hancock, Peter North, Jose Gomez-Dans Introduction: Land-surface properties such as albedo, soil moisture and vegetation biophysical parameters affect water, energy and carbon fluxes from the land to the atmosphere an this can alter weather patterns. Here we use globally consistent satellite observations to improve modelling of the vegetation seasonal cycle in the JULES land-surface model (LSM) to better represent these fluxes. JULES model: The JULES LSM is the land surface component of the suite of UK MetOffice general circulation models. JULES is used both in operational weather forecasting and for simulations of future climate. Within JULES, seasonal changes in surface albedo are controlled by snow (not covered here) and vegetation dynamics (phenology). Vegetation phenology is controlled by temperature and water availability, with timings and rates set by a number of trigger thresholds and leaf growth/death rates. Satellite data: The ability of JULES to represent vegetation, in terms of its seasonal cycle as well as the interannual variation, was tested on normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI = (near-infrared - red) / (near-infrared + red)) data. JULES uses a 1D radiative transfer model to predict hemispheric surface albedo for a given leaf area whilst satellites measure reflectance from a single view direction and this may not match the hemispheric albedo. To test this, JULES predictions were compared to the FLIGHT (a 3D radiative transfer model) simulations for different view directions. This revealed that either NDVI profiles need to be normalised to allow a direct comparison (as done here) or else the JULES 1D model must be replaced by a full 3D radiative transfer model, which is computationally expensive. Experiments: The original phenology module in JULES was optimised against NDVI observations using a Monte-Carlo Markov chain method. This optimisation was unsuccessful; and we therefore concluded that the JULES phenology cannot

  5. Sharp and the Jules Verne Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.; Cartland, H.

    1996-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has built the worlds largest hydrogen gas gun called SHARP, (Super High Altitude Research Project). Originally designed to launch 5 kg to a 450 km altitude, SHARP is configured horizontally at Site 300 in Tracy, California. SHARP is successfully delivering 5 kg scramjets at Mach 9 in aerophysics tests. Some of the results of the scramjet tests are enlightening and are presented insofar as they are relevant to future launches into space. Using a light gas gun to launch payloads into orbit has been analyzed. We look at LEO (Low Earth Orbit), GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit), and LO (Lunar Orbit). We present a conceptual design for a large light gas gun called the Jules Verne Launcher (JVL). The JVL can deliver 3.3 metric tons to a 500 km low earth orbit. We anticipate one launch per day. We present the history of light gas guns, the SHARP design and performance, and the JVL design. Another section is devoted to the vehicle environment and resultant design. Lastly, we present a cost analysis. Our results indicated that the JVL will be able to deliver 1000 metric tons of payload to LEO yearly. The cost will be 5{percent} of the best US rocket delivery cost. This technology will enable the next phase of man{close_quote}s exploration of space. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Sharp and the Jules Verne Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, John; Cartland, Harry

    1996-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has built the worlds largest hydrogen gas gun called SHARP, (Super High Altitude Research Project). Originally designed to launch 5 kg to a 450 km altitude, SHARP is configured horizontally at Site 300 in Tracy, California. SHARP is successfully delivering 5 kg scramjets at Mach 9 in aerophysics tests. Some of the results of the scramjet tests are enlightening and are presented insofar as they are relevant to future launches into space. Using a light gas gun to launch payloads into orbit has been analyzed. We look at LEO (Low Earth Orbit), GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit), and LO (Lunar Orbit). We present a conceptual design for a large light gas gun called the Jules Verne Launcher (JVL). The JVL can deliver 3.3 metric tons to a 500 km low earth orbit. We anticipate one launch per day. We present the history of light gas guns, the SHARP design and performance, and the JVL design. Another section is devoted to the vehicle environment and resultant design. Lastly, we present a cost analysis. Our results indicated that the JVL will be able to deliver 1000 metric tons of payload to LEO yearly. The cost will be 5% of the best US rocket delivery cost. This technology will enable the next phase of man's exploration of space.

  7. Coupled carbon-nitrogen land surface modelling for UK agricultural landscapes using JULES and JULES-ECOSSE-FUN (JEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comyn-Platt, Edward; Clark, Douglas; Blyth, Eleanor

    2016-04-01

    The UK is required to provide accurate estimates of the UK greenhouse gas (GHG; CO2, CH4 and N2O) emissions for the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). Process based land surface models (LSMs), such as the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), attempt to provide such estimates based on environmental (e.g. land use and soil type) and meteorological conditions. The standard release of JULES focusses on the water and carbon cycles, however, it has long been suggested that a coupled carbon-nitrogen scheme could enhance simulations. This is of particular importance when estimating agricultural emission inventories where the carbon cycle is effectively managed via the human application of nitrogen based fertilizers. JULES-ECOSSE-FUN (JEF) links JULES with the Estimation of Carbon in Organic Soils - Sequestration and Emission (ECOSSE) model and the Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN) model as a means of simulating C:N coupling. This work presents simulations from the standard release of JULES and the most recent incarnation of the JEF coupled system at the point and field scale. Various configurations of JULES and JEF were calibrated and fine-tuned based on comparisons with observations from three UK field campaigns (Crichton, Harwood Forest and Brattleby) specifically chosen to represent the managed vegetation types that cover the UK. The campaigns included flux tower and chamber measurements of CO2, CH4 and N2O amongst other meteorological parameters and records of land management such as application of fertilizer and harvest date at the agricultural sites. Based on the results of these comparisons, JULES and/or JEF will be used to provide simulations on the regional and national scales in order to provide improved estimates of the total UK emission inventory.

  8. Seated at the pilots station, astronaut Scott J. Horowitz uses a mirror to monitor the vertical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Seated at the pilots station, astronaut Scott J. Horowitz uses a mirror to monitor the vertical stabilizer and the aft cargo bay area during the entry phase of the flight. Horowitz, pilot, joined four other astronauts and an international payload specialist for 16 days of scientific research in Earth-orbit.

  9. Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, pilot, looks over tools he may use to perform an Inflight Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 ONBOARD VIEW --- Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, pilot, looks over tools he may use to perform an Inflight Maintenance (IFM) chore on the mid-deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia. The glovebox facility is at upper left. Horowitz joined four other astronauts and an international payload specialist for 16 days of scientific research in Earth-orbit.

  10. Army After Next, Airland Battle 2000, Futuristic Concepts or Jules Verne?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-14

    service or government agency. STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT ARMY AFTER NEXT, AIRLAND BATTLE 2000, FUTURISTIC CONCEPTS OR JULES VERNE ? BY...AIRLAND BATTLE 2000, FUTURISTIC CONCEPTS OR JULES VERNE ? by LTC Francis G. Mahon Dr. Douglas V. Johnson Project Advisor Colonel Ronald Ouellette...Battle 2000, Futuristic Concepts or Jules Verne ? FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 14 April 1998 PAGES: 67 CLASSIFICATION

  11. STS-101 Commander Halsell and Pilot Horowitz practice emergency exit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    As part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration (TCDT) activities, the STS-101 crew practices emergency egress from the orbiter at the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure. Shown heading for the slidewire baskets are Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz (left) and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. The TCDT also includes a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. During their mission to the International Space Station, the STS-101 crew will be delivering logistics and supplies, plus preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A.

  12. STS-101 Pilot Horowitz suits up for second launch attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-101 Pilot Scott J. Horowitz smiles while he finishes suiting up before heading a second time to Launch Pad 39A for launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. The previous day's launch attempt was scrubbed due to high cross winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. Liftoff is targeted for 3:52 p.m. EDT. The mission is expected to last about 10 days, with Atlantis landing at KSC Saturday, May 6, about 11:53 a.m. EDT.

  13. Land surface parameter optimisation through data assimilation: the adJULES system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoult, Nina; Jupp, Tim; Cox, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Land-surface models (LSMs) are crucial components of the Earth system models (ESMs) that are used to make coupled climate-carbon cycle projections for the 21st century. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land-surface model used in the climate and weather forecast models of the UK Met Office. JULES is also extensively used offline as a land-surface impacts tool, forced with climatologies into the future. In this study, JULES is automatically differentiated with respect to JULES parameters using commercial software from FastOpt, resulting in an analytical gradient, or adjoint, of the model. Using this adjoint, the adJULES parameter estimation system has been developed to search for locally optimum parameters by calibrating against observations. We present adJULES in a data assimilation framework and demonstrate its ability to improve the model-data fit using eddy-covariance measurements of gross primary production (GPP) and latent heat (LE) fluxes. adJULES also has the ability to calibrate over multiple sites simultaneously. This feature is used to define new optimised parameter values for the five plant functional types (PFTs) in JULES. The optimised PFT-specific parameters improve the performance of JULES at over 85% of the sites used in the study, at both the calibration and evaluation stages. The new improved parameters for JULES are presented along with the associated uncertainties for each parameter.

  14. STS-101 Commander Halsell and Pilot Horowitz practice emergency exit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Seated in a slidewire basket at the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39A, are (left to right) STS-101 Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz. Halsell is reaching to pull the release lever that will send the basket shooting down the 1,200-foot slidewire to a bunker west of the launch pad. The crew is practicing emergency egress from the orbiter as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration (TCDT) activities that include a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. During their mission to the International Space Station, the STS-101 crew will be delivering logistics and supplies, plus preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A.

  15. STS-101 Commander Halsell and Pilot Horowitz practice emergency exit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Seated in a slidewire basket at the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39A, are (left to right) STS-101 Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz. Halsell is reaching to pull the release lever that will send the basket shooting down the 1,200-foot slidewire to a bunker west of the launch pad. The crew is practicing emergency egress from the orbiter as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration (TCDT) activities that include a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. During their mission to the International Space Station, the STS-101 crew will be delivering logistics and supplies, plus preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A.

  16. Horowitz floats into the ISS U.S. Laboratory/Destiny module where Voss is typing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-08-13

    STS105-304-025 (10-22 August 2001) --- Astronaut James S. Voss, outgoing Space Station flight engineer, performs a task at a work station in the Destiny laboratory as a "guest" arrives from the Space Shuttle Discovery. Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, STS-105 mission commander, floats through the hatchway leading to the Unity node. A 35mm camera, equipped with a "fish-eye" lens, was used to record the image. Voss, who had spent the last five months aboard the orbital outpost with his two Expedition Two crew mates, later joined Horowitz and his crew when they returned to Earth on August 22.

  17. [The wanderings of Jules Cloquet and Gustave Flaubert].

    PubMed

    Dumont, M

    1988-01-01

    This is the story of a picaresque journey in France and in Corsica of Jules Cloquet (1790-1883), the French anatomist who described the well-known Cloquet's node and of Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), the famous author of "Madame Bovary" and of many others novels. They were two vagabonds, Cloquet watching with slackness the young womanizering Flaubert. At 64 years of age, the lazy and meddlesome Cloquet stopped operating and writing. Surrounded by honors, he died at the age of 93, leaving his eponym to the Cloquet's node.

  18. Jules Germain Cloquet (1790-1883)--drawing master and anatomist.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Marios; El-Sedfy, Abraham; Tubbs, R Shane; Wartman, Christopher

    2007-11-01

    Jules Germain Cloquet, the famed French anatomist, surgeon, and professor, may not be remembered as one of the pioneers of hernia surgery; however, his contributions have provided surgeons with detailed anatomical descriptions that have been useful in developing innovative surgical techniques. Cloquet has many eponyms associated with him, including: Cloquet's fascia, Cloquet's gland or lymph node of Cloquet, Cloquet's hernia, Cloquet's ligament, Cloquet's canal, and Cloquet's septum. A man blessed with artistic talents, Cloquet was the author of many theses, as well as anatomical volumes that were comparable to the works of other great anatomists of his time. His first thesis, entitled Recherches Anatomiques sur les Hernies de l'Abdomen, described the locations where inguinal and crural herniae are more likely to occur in terms of the cremaster muscle, the peritoneum, and the spermatic vessels. Wax sculpture training required extensive knowledge in the natural sciences, anatomy, physiology, and pathology, as were acquired by Jules Cloquet as a pupil of Achille-Cléophas Flaubert, the father of the famous French novelist Gustave Flaubert (author of Madame Bovary). Cloquet attracted many pupils with his innovative teaching style and implementation of anatomical preparations, drawings, and sketches on the black board with chalk. The legacy of this famed individual lives on today in the anatomical structures described by Cloquet.

  19. Horowitz shows off the hand-crafted thermal insulation he made for the HST

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-02-18

    S82-E-5686 (17 Feb. 1997) --- Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, STS-82 pilot, shows the hand-crafted thermal insulation blanket to support the goal of the final Extravehicular Activity (EVA) to cover tears in Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) insulation caused by changes in thermal conditions. This view was taken with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC).

  20. [Scientific contributions of Jules Hirsch regarding the physiopathogenesis of obesity].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Jules Hirsch was born in New York City and died at age 88 after a long illness. He was considered notorious leader in the study of human metabolism mainly in the area of lipids and obesity. His research at The Rockefeller University helps establish the mechanism of obesity and lipids metabolism. Hirsch joined Rockefeller´s faculty in 1954 and remained there for the rest of his career. Hirsch´s research helped to support the idea of dynamic interactions among diet, physical activity, general metabolism and obesity. At that time most scientific considered adipose tissue to be biologically inert such as a passive insulator in which the body reserved energy in the form of triglycerides. Hirsch had a natural characteristic of showing a nice smile and greeting for everyone he worked with at the university. Another important contribution was there relationship between diet and cardiovascular ailments as well as metabolism disturbance.

  1. In Jules Verne's Footsteps: Seismology in the source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, Bill; Ito, Hisao; Malin, Peter; Abercrombie, Rachel

    When Professor Otto Lidenbrock led his little band to the center of the Earth in Jules Verne's 1864 classic novel, the intrepid adventurers needed little more than practical 19th century clothes to provide them with comfort and protection. How different the science of earthquakes would be if conditions in the Earth were really so friendly to the would-be observer. Even the operation of seismic sensors at the relatively modest depth of 2-3 km, roughly the depth of the shallowest crustal earthquakes, requires careful precautions against the effects of unstable materials, temperature, pressure, and water for successful long-term observations to be made. Indeed, the handful of successful deep borehole experiments that have been conducted to date have depended on simple sensors with limited bandwidth and dynamic range, and have yielded data that were not ideally suited to investigating the details of the earthquake source.

  2. Land-surface parameter optimisation using data assimilation techniques: the adJULES system V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoult, Nina M.; Jupp, Tim E.; Cox, Peter M.; Luke, Catherine M.

    2016-08-01

    Land-surface models (LSMs) are crucial components of the Earth system models (ESMs) that are used to make coupled climate-carbon cycle projections for the 21st century. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land-surface model used in the climate and weather forecast models of the UK Met Office. JULES is also extensively used offline as a land-surface impacts tool, forced with climatologies into the future. In this study, JULES is automatically differentiated with respect to JULES parameters using commercial software from FastOpt, resulting in an analytical gradient, or adjoint, of the model. Using this adjoint, the adJULES parameter estimation system has been developed to search for locally optimum parameters by calibrating against observations. This paper describes adJULES in a data assimilation framework and demonstrates its ability to improve the model-data fit using eddy-covariance measurements of gross primary production (GPP) and latent heat (LE) fluxes. adJULES also has the ability to calibrate over multiple sites simultaneously. This feature is used to define new optimised parameter values for the five plant functional types (PFTs) in JULES. The optimised PFT-specific parameters improve the performance of JULES at over 85 % of the sites used in the study, at both the calibration and evaluation stages. The new improved parameters for JULES are presented along with the associated uncertainties for each parameter.

  3. Land-surface parameter optimisation using data assimilation techniques: the adJULES system V1.0

    DOE PAGES

    Raoult, Nina M.; Jupp, Tim E.; Cox, Peter M.; ...

    2016-08-25

    Land-surface models (LSMs) are crucial components of the Earth system models (ESMs) that are used to make coupled climate–carbon cycle projections for the 21st century. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land-surface model used in the climate and weather forecast models of the UK Met Office. JULES is also extensively used offline as a land-surface impacts tool, forced with climatologies into the future. In this study, JULES is automatically differentiated with respect to JULES parameters using commercial software from FastOpt, resulting in an analytical gradient, or adjoint, of the model. Using this adjoint, the adJULES parameter estimationmore » system has been developed to search for locally optimum parameters by calibrating against observations. This paper describes adJULES in a data assimilation framework and demonstrates its ability to improve the model–data fit using eddy-covariance measurements of gross primary production (GPP) and latent heat (LE) fluxes. adJULES also has the ability to calibrate over multiple sites simultaneously. This feature is used to define new optimised parameter values for the five plant functional types (PFTs) in JULES. The optimised PFT-specific parameters improve the performance of JULES at over 85 % of the sites used in the study, at both the calibration and evaluation stages. Furthermore, the new improved parameters for JULES are presented along with the associated uncertainties for each parameter.« less

  4. Land-surface parameter optimisation using data assimilation techniques: the adJULES system V1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Raoult, Nina M.; Jupp, Tim E.; Cox, Peter M.; Luke, Catherine M.

    2016-08-25

    Land-surface models (LSMs) are crucial components of the Earth system models (ESMs) that are used to make coupled climate–carbon cycle projections for the 21st century. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land-surface model used in the climate and weather forecast models of the UK Met Office. JULES is also extensively used offline as a land-surface impacts tool, forced with climatologies into the future. In this study, JULES is automatically differentiated with respect to JULES parameters using commercial software from FastOpt, resulting in an analytical gradient, or adjoint, of the model. Using this adjoint, the adJULES parameter estimation system has been developed to search for locally optimum parameters by calibrating against observations. This paper describes adJULES in a data assimilation framework and demonstrates its ability to improve the model–data fit using eddy-covariance measurements of gross primary production (GPP) and latent heat (LE) fluxes. adJULES also has the ability to calibrate over multiple sites simultaneously. This feature is used to define new optimised parameter values for the five plant functional types (PFTs) in JULES. The optimised PFT-specific parameters improve the performance of JULES at over 85 % of the sites used in the study, at both the calibration and evaluation stages. Furthermore, the new improved parameters for JULES are presented along with the associated uncertainties for each parameter.

  5. "Board of Curators of the University of Missouri v. Horowitz": Student Due Process Rights and Judicial Deference to Academic Dismissals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Allan D.

    1979-01-01

    The "Horowitz" case is consistent with the general reluctance of courts to sustain constitutional challenges to decisions by educators in academic matters. Available from Willamette University College of Law, Salem, OR 97301. (Author)

  6. "Board of Curators of the University of Missouri v. Horowitz": Student Due Process Rights and Judicial Deference to Academic Dismissals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Allan D.

    1979-01-01

    The "Horowitz" case is consistent with the general reluctance of courts to sustain constitutional challenges to decisions by educators in academic matters. Available from Willamette University College of Law, Salem, OR 97301. (Author)

  7. Local free-fall temperature of Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Choi, Jaedong; Park, Young-Jai

    2014-02-01

    We obtain a (5+1)-dimensional global flat embedding of the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger spacetime in the Einstein frame and a (5+2)-dimensional global flat embedding in the string frame. We show that the local free-fall temperatures for freely falling observers in each frame are finite at the event horizons, while the local temperatures for fiducial observers are divergent. We also observe that the local free-fall temperatures differ between the two frames.

  8. Hawking radiation from the Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole, effective action, and covariant boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Sunandan

    2008-03-15

    We exploit the expression for the anomalous (chiral) effective action to obtain the Hawking radiation from a Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (stringy) black hole falling in the class of the most general spherically symmetric black holes ({radical}(-g){ne}1), using only covariant boundary conditions at the event horizon. The connection between the anomalous and the normal energy-momentum tensors is also established from the effective action approach.

  9. Pilot Scott Horowitz fashions cord loop fasteners for a contingency spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-02-16

    S82-E-5597 (17 Feb. 1997) --- Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz at pilot's station works with a hand-fashioned loop fastener device to be used in support of the additional STS-82 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) to service Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Note sketches overhead which were sent by ground controllers to guide the pilot's engineering of the task. This view was taken with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC).

  10. Jules Verne Voyager: A Web Interactive Tool for Comparative Planetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estey, L.; Pappalardo, R.; Meertens, C.

    2004-12-01

    A Web interactive map tool called "Jules Verne Voyager" was originally developed in 1999 by UNAVCO and continues to evolve. The Voyager tool can easily be used for comparative planetology studies by grades 8-14. Thematic mapping datasets, now totaling about 70 Gb, can be accessed by the tool and include global-scale maps of the inner solar system planets and moons, plus Jupiter and the Galilean moons. The map images are viewed on a Web browser created on demand by the server system. On the client-side, only a Java-enabled browser is required, and the Voyager Java applet runs well with common browsers like Netscape, Mozilla, Opera, and Internet Explorer. The applet sends a key-value pair URL to the http://jules.unavco.org server which queues incoming requests and sends them to a bank of computers dedicated to map image creation. The engine for map image creation makes use of the "Generic Mapping Tools" (GMT) software of Paul Wessel and Walter Smith, followed by image conversion of the GMT-created PostScript to GIF for raster image export and display back on the client browser. Because of the GMT-based engine on the server system, the student user can easily create the same type of images from real planetary data that researchers create. The tool also gives a student the ability to switch background datasets and overlay certain other thematic datasets, thus providing a minimal GIS capability. To our knowledge, the map tool has not yet formally been used in a 8-14 classroom environment, though informal use by students and teachers in these grades suggest that it would be well received. The server system is currently capable of handing a moderate level of requests that would result from classroom use; for example, as a system benchmark, over 800 Voyager images were created and served in about an hour during a DLESE 2003 annual meeting workshop. The Voyager map tool is being used by instructors in earth science and comparative planetology as a means to create customized

  11. Empirical validation of the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome Questionnaire for suspected Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Citera, Maryalice; Freeman, Phyllis R; Horowitz, Richard I

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is spreading worldwide, with multiple Borrelia species causing a broad range of clinical symptoms that mimic other illnesses. A validated Lyme disease screening questionnaire would be clinically useful for both providers and patients. Three studies evaluated such a screening tool, namely the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome (MSIDS) Questionnaire. The purpose was to see if the questionnaire could accurately distinguish between Lyme patients and healthy individuals. Study 1 examined the construct validity of the scale examining its factor structure and reliability of the questionnaire among 537 individuals being treated for Lyme disease. Study 2 involved an online sample of 999 participants, who self-identified as either healthy (N=217) or suffering from Lyme now (N=782) who completed the Horowitz MSIDS Questionnaire (HMQ) along with an outdoor activity survey. We examined convergent validity among components of the scale and evaluated discriminant validity with the Big Five personality characteristics. The third study compared a sample of 236 patients with confirmed Lyme disease with an online sample of 568 healthy individuals. Factor analysis results identified six underlying latent dimensions; four of these overlapped with critical symptoms identified by Horowitz - neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction, musculoskeletal pain, and fatigue. The HMQ showed acceptable levels of internal reliability using Cronbach's coefficient alpha and exhibited evidence of convergent and divergent validity. Components of the HMQ correlated more highly with each other than with unrelated traits. The results consistently demonstrated that the HMQ accurately differentiated those with Lyme disease from healthy individuals. Three migratory pain survey items (persistent muscular pain, arthritic pain, and nerve pain/paresthesias) robustly identified individuals with verified Lyme disease. The results support the use of the HMQ as a valid, efficient, and low

  12. Empirical validation of the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome Questionnaire for suspected Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Citera, Maryalice; Freeman, Phyllis R; Horowitz, Richard I

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Lyme disease is spreading worldwide, with multiple Borrelia species causing a broad range of clinical symptoms that mimic other illnesses. A validated Lyme disease screening questionnaire would be clinically useful for both providers and patients. Three studies evaluated such a screening tool, namely the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome (MSIDS) Questionnaire. The purpose was to see if the questionnaire could accurately distinguish between Lyme patients and healthy individuals. Methods Study 1 examined the construct validity of the scale examining its factor structure and reliability of the questionnaire among 537 individuals being treated for Lyme disease. Study 2 involved an online sample of 999 participants, who self-identified as either healthy (N=217) or suffering from Lyme now (N=782) who completed the Horowitz MSIDS Questionnaire (HMQ) along with an outdoor activity survey. We examined convergent validity among components of the scale and evaluated discriminant validity with the Big Five personality characteristics. The third study compared a sample of 236 patients with confirmed Lyme disease with an online sample of 568 healthy individuals. Results Factor analysis results identified six underlying latent dimensions; four of these overlapped with critical symptoms identified by Horowitz – neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction, musculoskeletal pain, and fatigue. The HMQ showed acceptable levels of internal reliability using Cronbach’s coefficient alpha and exhibited evidence of convergent and divergent validity. Components of the HMQ correlated more highly with each other than with unrelated traits. Discussion The results consistently demonstrated that the HMQ accurately differentiated those with Lyme disease from healthy individuals. Three migratory pain survey items (persistent muscular pain, arthritic pain, and nerve pain/paresthesias) robustly identified individuals with verified Lyme disease. The results support the use of

  13. Expedition Three Commander Culbertson and STS-105 Commander Horowitz in the White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson (left) and STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz (right), in the White Room at Launch Pad 39A, hold the sign for their mission. Both crews are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  14. STS-105 Commander Horowitz tries on gas mask at Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Pad 39A, STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz puts on a gas mask as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include emergency egress, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  15. Evaluation of JULES-crop performance against site observations of irrigated maize from Mead, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Karina; Gornall, Jemma; Harper, Anna; Wiltshire, Andy; Hemming, Debbie; Quaife, Tristan; Arkebauer, Tim; Scoby, David

    2017-03-01

    The JULES-crop model (Osborne et al., 2015) is a parametrisation of crops within the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), which aims to simulate both the impact of weather and climate on crop productivity and the impact of croplands on weather and climate. In this evaluation paper, observations of maize at three FLUXNET sites in Nebraska (US-Ne1, US-Ne2 and US-Ne3) are used to test model assumptions and make appropriate input parameter choices. JULES runs are performed for the irrigated sites (US-Ne1 and US-Ne2) both with the crop model switched off (prescribing leaf area index (LAI) and canopy height) and with the crop model switched on. These are compared against GPP and carbon pool FLUXNET observations. We use the results to point to future priorities for model development and describe how our methodology can be adapted to set up model runs for other sites and crop varieties.

  16. Entanglement Entropy of the Six-Dimensional Horowitz-Strominger Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huai-Fan; Zhang, Sheng-Li; Wu, Yue-Qin; Ren, Zhao

    By using the entanglement entropy method, the statistical entropy of the Bose and Fermi fields in a thin film is calculated and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of six-dimensional Horowitz-Strominger black hole is obtained. Here, the Bose and Fermi fields are entangled with the quantum states in six-dimensional Horowitz-Strominger black hole and the fields are outside of the horizon. The divergence of brick-wall model is avoided without any cutoff by the new equation of state density obtained with the generalized uncertainty principle. The calculation implies that the high density quantum states near the event horizon are strongly correlated with the quantum states in black hole. The black hole entropy is a quantum effect. It is an intrinsic characteristic of space-time. The ultraviolet cutoff in the brick-wall model is unreasonable. The generalized uncertainty principle should be considered in the high energy quantum field near the event horizon. Using the quantum statistical method, we directly calculate the partition function of the Bose and Fermi fields under the background of the six-dimensional black hole. The difficulty in solving the wave equations of various particles is overcome.

  17. On the Verbal Art of a Modern Painter: The Work of Jules Kirschenbaum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandelman, Claude

    1989-01-01

    Notes that Jules Kirschenbaum, a modern American artist whose work integrates inscriptions and figurative painting, studied under the masters of abstract expressionism yet exhibited with protagonists of "magic realism." States that his later work took a wholly different turn--it became art about meaning and the "meaning of…

  18. On the Verbal Art of a Modern Painter: The Work of Jules Kirschenbaum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandelman, Claude

    1989-01-01

    Notes that Jules Kirschenbaum, a modern American artist whose work integrates inscriptions and figurative painting, studied under the masters of abstract expressionism yet exhibited with protagonists of "magic realism." States that his later work took a wholly different turn--it became art about meaning and the "meaning of…

  19. Towards a Process-based Representation of Annual Crops Within the Land Surface Model JULES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Hoof, C.; Vidale, P.

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce a generic crop structure within the Joint UK Land surface Exchange Scheme JULES (Cox, 1998) that is able to evaluate the interaction between growing crops and the environment at large scales for a wide range of atmospheric conditions. JULES was designed to simulate land surface processes in natural ecosystems. The importance of representing agricultural land within global biosphere models has been pointed out in many studies (De Noblet-Ducoudre et al., 2004; Bondeau 2005 et al.). Prior to any model development, the sensitivity of JULES to morphological and physiological differences between natural vegetation and crops has been investigated by reparameterising a natural C3 grass into a C3 crop. For a case study of fallow versus wheat at Grignon (France), the model output shows important soil water savings after crop harvest at the beginning of the summer. Owing to the lack of a rooting system, the deeper soil moisture cannot contribute anymore to the moisture flux to the atmosphere. On a shorter timescale, the harvest, and by consequence the sudden appearance of bare soil, also disrupt the energy and momentum fluxes between surface and atmosphere. Having established the sensitivity of the JULES system to a crop-like forcing, some components from the crop model SUCROS (Goudriaan and van Laar, 1994) that are relevant to the global water, energy and carbon cycles, have been introduced in JULES. The new version of JULES, denoted by JULES-SUCROS, incorporates crops and natural vegetation within a single modelling framework, without discontinuity in the photosynthesis-assimilation scheme between both vegetation types. Simulations have been performed with JULES-SUCROS for wheat at the Grignon site in current and doubled CO2 atmospheric conditions. Changing atmospheric conditions in JULES-SUCROS affects the sowing date and the length of the growing season. The results show that the positive effect of the CO2 fertilisation partly

  20. Nuclear Heating Measurement in Critical Facilities and Experimental Validation of Code and Libraries - An Application to Prompt and Delayed γ Nuclear Data Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, P.; Di Salvo, J.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Amharrak, H.; Lemaire, M.; Ravaux, S.

    Energy from prompt and delayed gammas in actual and future nuclear systems are more and more taken into account into design studies as they play an important role in the assessment of performance and safety concerns. Their incomplete knowledge (both prompt and delayed) require to take conservative design margins on local dimensioning parameters, thus reducing the awaited performances or flexibility of these facilities, with costs that are far from being negligible. The local energy photon deposit must be accurately known for Generation-III (Gen-III), Generation-IV (Gen-IV) or the new MTR Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The last 2 decades has seen the realization, in Zero Power Reactors (ZPR), of several programs partially devoted to γ-heating measurements. Experimental programs were and are still conducted in different Cadarache facilities such as MASURCA (for SFR), and later in MINERVE and EOLE (for JHR and Gen-III reactors). The adequacy of the γ-heating calculation was compared to experimental data using thermo-luminescent (TL) detectors and γ-fission chambers. Inconsistencies in C/E and associated uncertainties led to improvement of both libraries and experimental techniques. For these last one, characterization for TL and optically stimulated (OSL) detectors (calibration, individual response), and Monte Carlo calculation of charge repartition in those detectors and their environment were carefully checked and optimized. This step enabled to reduce the associated experimental uncertainty by a factor of 2 (8% at 2σ). Nevertheless, interpretation of integral experiment with updated calculation schemes and improved experimental techniques still tend to prove that there are some nuclei for which there are missing or erroneous data, mainly in structural and absorbing materials. New integral and differential measurements are needed to guide new evaluation efforts, which could benefit from consolidated theoretical and experimental modeling techniques.

  1. JULES-crop: a parametrisation of crops in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, T.; Gornall, J.; Hooker, J.; Williams, K.; Wiltshire, A.; Betts, R.; Wheeler, T.

    2015-04-01

    Studies of climate change impacts on the terrestrial biosphere have been completed without recognition of the integrated nature of the biosphere. Improved assessment of the impacts of climate change on food and water security requires the development and use of models not only representing each component but also their interactions. To meet this requirement the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) land surface model has been modified to include a generic parametrisation of annual crops. The new model, JULES-crop, is described and evaluation at global and site levels for the four globally important crops; wheat, soybean, maize and rice. JULES-crop demonstrates skill in simulating the inter-annual variations of yield for maize and soybean at the global and country levels, and for wheat for major spring wheat producing countries. The impact of the new parametrisation, compared to the standard configuration, on the simulation of surface heat fluxes is largely an alteration of the partitioning between latent and sensible heat fluxes during the later part of the growing season. Further evaluation at the site level shows the model captures the seasonality of leaf area index, gross primary production and canopy height better than in the standard JULES. However, this does not lead to an improvement in the simulation of sensible and latent heat fluxes. The performance of JULES-crop from both an Earth system and crop yield model perspective is encouraging. However, more effort is needed to develop the parametrisation of the model for specific applications. Key future model developments identified include the introduction of processes such as irrigation and nitrogen limitation which will enable better representation of the spatial variability in yield.

  2. The climate responses of tropical and boreal ecosystems with an improved land surface model (JULES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Anna; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Cox, Peter; Wiltshire, Andy; Jones, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land surface of the next generation UK Earth System Model (UKESM1). Recently, JULES was updated with new plant functional types and physiology based on a global plant trait database. These developments improved the simulation of terrestrial gross and net primary productivity on local and global scales, and enabled a more realistic representation of the global distribution of vegetation. In this study, we explore the present-day distribution of ecosystems and their vulnerability to climate change in JULES with these improvements, focusing on tropical and boreal ecosystems. Changes to these ecosystems will have implications for biogeophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks to climate change and need to be understood. First, we examine the simulated and observed rainforest-savannah boundary, which is strongly related to annual precipitation and the maximum climatological water deficit. Second, we assess the length of growing season and biomass stored in boreal ecosystems, where 20th century warming has likely extended the growing season. In each case, we first evaluate the ability of JULES to capture observed climate-vegetation relationships and trends. Finally, we run JULES to 2100 using climate data from 3 models and 2 RCP scenarios, and examine potential 21st century changes to these ecosystems. For example, do the tropical forests shrink in response to changes in tropical rainfall seasonality? And, how does the composition of boreal ecosystems change in response to climate warming? Given the potential for climate feedbacks and the inherent value in these ecosystems, it is essential to assess their responses to a range of climate change scenarios.

  3. Supreme Court of the United States Syllabus. Board of Curators of the University of Missouri et al. v. Charlotte Horowitz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    The decision of the U.S. Supreme Court of a case involving the dismissal for academic reasons of a student from the University of Missouri-Kansas City Medical School is presented. The Court upheld that Charlotte Horowitz had been afforded all rights by the fourteenth amendment and that the decision of the Court of Appeals, which held that the…

  4. Board of Curators of the University of Missouri v. Horowitz: Student Due Process Rights and Judicial Deference to Academic Dismissals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Allan D.

    1979-01-01

    The Horowitz case is consistent with the general reluctance of courts to sustain constitutional challenges to decisions by educators in academic matters. Precedent is heavily weighted in favor of the academic community and should be overcome in future challenges. (Journal availability: Willamette University College of Law, Salem, OR 97301, $5.00…

  5. STS-105 Pilot Sturckow and Commander Horowitz give a thumbs up after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. Following the landing of mission STS-105, Pilot Frederick 'Rick' Sturckow (left) and Commander Scott 'Doc' Horowitz give a jubilant thumbs up under orbiter Discovery sitting squarely on the center line of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility runway 15. Main gear touchdown was at 2:22:58 p.m. EDT; wheel stop, at 2:24:06 p.m. EDT. The 11-day, 21-hour, 12-minute STS-105 mission accomplished the goals set for the 11th flight to the International Space Station: swapout of the resident Station crew; delivery of equipment, supplies and scientific experiments; and installation of the Early Ammonia Servicer and heater cables for the S0 truss on the Station. Discovery traveled 4.3 million miles on its 30th flight into space, the 106th mission of the Space Shuttle program. The landing was the first of five in 2001 to occur in daylight at KSC.

  6. Measurement-induced-nonlocality for Dirac particles in Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger dilation space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Juan; Xu, Shuai; Ye, Liu

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the quantum correlation via measurement-induced-nonlocality (MIN) for Dirac particles in Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GHS) dilation space-time. It is shown that the physical accessible quantum correlation decreases as the dilation parameter increases monotonically. Unlike the case of scalar fields, the physical accessible correlation is not zero when the Hawking temperature is infinite owing to the Pauli exclusion principle and the differences between Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Meanwhile, the boundary of MIN related to Bell-violation is derived, which indicates that MIN is more general than quantum nonlocality captured by the violation of Bell-inequality. As a by-product, a tenable quantitative relation about MIN redistribution is obtained whatever the dilation parameter is. In addition, it is worth emphasizing that the underlying reason why the physical accessible correlation and mutual information decrease is that they are redistributed to the physical inaccessible regions.

  7. Expedition Three Commander Culbertson and STS-105 Commander Horowitz in the White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson (left) and STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz (right), in the White Room at Launch Pad 39A, have placed the mission sign at the entrance into Space Shuttle Discovery. Both crews are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  8. Impacts of revised PFTs on JULES simulated carbon and moisture fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Anna; Cox, Peter; Sitch, Stephen; Mercado, Lina; Luke, Catherine; Jupp, Tim; Wiltshire, Andy; Jones, Chris; Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    JULES is the land surface model in the Hadley Centre GCM, which is used for investigations of climate and climate change. We analyze the impacts on the simulated carbon and moisture fluxes of extending the PFTs in a manner consistent with observed leaf traits. The model currently represents global vegetation with five PFTs (needleleaf and broadleaf trees, C3 and C4 grasses, and shrubs). We add three new PFTs to delineate between deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs. Since the inception of JULES in the late 90's, a tremendous amount of new data linking leaf traits and potential photosynthesis is available. We use data from the TRY plant trait data base to revise the relationships between leaf area, leaf lifespan, leaf nitrogen content, and Vcmax. In addition, JULES now includes a canopy radiation scheme based on fractions of sunlit and shaded leaves at 10 levels in the canopy. This results in a vertical distribution of nitrogren and Vcmax through the canopy and enables multilayer scaling from leaf to canopy level photosynthesis. The scheme is more physically realistic than previous canopy radiation schemes, but remains to be evaluated outside of the Tropics. Within the constraints of observed values, we optimize new parameter values related to the canopy radiation and photosynthesis, using optimization software developed at the University of Exeter. Impacts on simulated GPP, respiration, and latent heat flux are examined. In particular, we are interested in a better understanding of carbon cycle dynamics in tropical forests. Using data from TRY, carbon fluxes are improved across all PFTs compared to observations from Fluxnet tower sites. We adopt a regional analysis to compare JULES fluxes in certain regions (e.g. tropical forests, and boreal and tropical shrub-dominated landscapes).

  9. Assimilating ESA-CCI Soil Moisture into the JULES-EMPIRE Data Assimilation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaife, T. L.; Black, E.; Browne, P.; Lewis, J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface models, such as the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES, the land surface component of the Hadley Centre models) are used in a wide variety of applications, such as climate modelling, flood prediction and crop yield forecasting. However, how best to implement Data Assimilation (DA) for these models remains an open question. At a fundamental level these models are very different from atmospheric models for which traditional DA was developed. This poster describes the integration of JULES with the EMPIRE framework. EMPIRE (Employing MPI for Researching Ensembles) implements a test bed for ensemble based DA techniques that makes use of MPI message passing to exploit all available processing power. In particular EMPIRE contains several flavours of Particle Filter which show promise for the land surface DA problem. Examples of assimilating soil moisture observations from the ESA CCI data set into JULES are given for a number of sites in Africa. The model ensemble is generated by considering uncertainty in the driving data taken from the TAMSAT operational rainfall product. The results show considerable improvement in the modelled soil moisture and in particular the seasonal timing of the soil wetness.

  10. Hawking radiation from Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger and nonextremal D1-D5 black holes via covariant anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Sunandan; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-01-15

    We apply the method of Banerjee and Kulkarni [R. Banerjee and S. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. D 77, 024018 (2008).] to provide a derivation of Hawking radiation from the Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (stringy) black hole which falls in the class of the most general spherically symmetric black holes ({radical}(-g){ne}1) and also the nonextremal D1-D5 black hole using only covariant gravitational anomalies.

  11. Performance of the JULES land surface model for UK Biogenic VOC emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Garry; Comyn-Platt, Edward; Vieno, Massimo; Langford, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) are important for air quality and tropospheric composition. Through their contribution to the production of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), biogenic VOCs indirectly contribute to climate forcing and climate feedbacks [1]. Biogenic VOCs encompass a wide range of compounds and are produced by plants for growth, development, reproduction, defence and communication [2]. There are both biological and physico-chemical controls on emissions [3]. Only a few of the many biogenic VOCs are of wider interest and only two or three (isoprene and the monoterpenes, α- and β-pinene) are represented in chemical transport models. We use the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), the UK community land surface model, to estimate biogenic VOC emission fluxes. JULES is a process-based model that describes the water, energy and carbon balances and includes temperature, moisture and carbon stores [4, 5]. JULES currently provides emission fluxes of the 4 largest groups of biogenic VOCs: isoprene, terpenes, methanol and acetone. The JULES isoprene scheme uses gross primary productivity (GPP), leaf internal carbon and the leaf temperature as a proxy for the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis [6]. In this study, we compare JULES biogenic VOC emission estimates of isoprene and terepenes with (a) flux measurements made at selected sites in the UK and Europe and (b) gridded estimates for the UK from the EMEP/EMEP4UK atmospheric chemical transport model [7, 8], using site-specific or EMEP4UK driving meteorological data, respectively. We compare the UK-scale emission estimates with literature estimates. We generally find good agreement in the comparisons but the estimates are sensitive to the choice of the base or reference emission potentials. References (1) Unger, 2014: Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 8563, doi:10.1002/2014GL061616; (2) Laothawornkitkul et al., 2009: New Phytol., 183, 27, doi

  12. Representation of Dissolved Organic Carbon in the JULES Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhavali, Mahdi; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Guenet, Bertrand; Ciais, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Current global models of the carbon cycle consider only vertical gas exchanges between terrestrial or oceanic reservoirs and the atmosphere, hence not considering lateral transport of carbon from the continent to the oceans. This also means that such models implicitly consider that all the CO2 which is not respired to the atmosphere is stored on land, hence overestimating the land sink of carbon. Moving toward a boundless carbon cycle that is integrating the whole continuum from land to ocean to atmosphere is needed in order to better understand Earth's carbon cycle and to make more reliable projection of its future. Here we present an original representation of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) processes in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). The standard version of JULES represent energy, water and carbon cycles and exchanges with the atmosphere, but only account for water run-off, not including export of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems to the aquatic environments. The aim of the project is to include in JULES a representation of DOC production in terrestrial soils, due to incomplete decomposition of organic matter, its decomposition to the atmosphere, and its export to the river network by leaching. In new developed version of JULES (JULES-DOCM), DOC pools, based on their decomposition rate, are classified into labile and recalcitrant within 3 meters of soil. Based on turnover rate, DOC coming from plant material pools and microbial biomass is directed to labile pool, while DOC from humus is directed to recalcitrant pool. Both of these pools have free (dissolved) and locked (adsorbed) form where just the free pool is subjected to decomposition and leaching. DOC production and decomposition are controlled by rate modifiers (moisture, temperature, vegetation fraction and decomposition rate) at each soil layer. Decomposed DOC is released to the atmosphere following a fixed carbon use efficiency. Leaching accounts for both surface (runoff) and

  13. STS-105 MS Barry, Commander Horowitz and Pilot Sturckow give a thumbs up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. Following the landing of mission STS-105, from left, Mission Specialist Daniel Barry, Commander Scott 'Doc' Horowitz, and Pilot Frederick 'Rick' Sturckow give a thumbs up in front of Space Shuttle Discovery on KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility runway 15, as post-landing safing operations continue on the orbiter. Main gear touchdown was at 2:22:58 p.m. EDT; wheel stop, at 2:24:06 p.m. EDT. The 11-day, 21-hour, 12-minute STS-105 mission accomplished the goals set for the 11th flight to the International Space Station: swapout of the resident Station crew; delivery of equipment, supplies and scientific experiments; and installation of the Early Ammonia Servicer and heater cables for the S0 truss on the Station. Discovery traveled 4.3 million miles on its 30th flight into space, the 106th mission of the Space Shuttle program. The landing was the first of five in 2001 to occur in daylight at KSC.

  14. Can we perturbatively expand the \\Qcirc -box in the Bloch-Horowitz Hamiltonian?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Genki; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2014-09-01

    In nuclear many-body problems, it is impossible to diagonalize the Hamiltonian directly because of the huge Hilbert space. We introduce, therefore, the concept of the effective interaction. We first partition the whole Hilbert space into the model space of tractable size and its complement, and then look for the effective Hamiltonian defined in the model space that reproduces exact eigenenergies and model space projections of the corresponding eigenstates. Effective Hamiltonians are categorized into energy-independent and energy-dependent groups. The energy-independent effective Hamiltonian has been calculated by iterative methods, and has been used widely for a long time. The energy-dependent effective Hamiltonian is known as the Bloch-Horowitz (BH) Hamiltonian. Though it requires a self-consistent solution, it can, in principle, give all the eigenenergies of the Hamiltonian, if provided with the exact BH Hamiltonian. In actual calculations, however, we can calculate the \\Qcirc -box only up to a finite order of perturbation expansion. In this work, we clarify its convergence condition and examine what we can obtain with the approximate BH Hamiltonian, and what we cannot.

  15. Jules and Augusta Dejerine, Pierre Marie, Joseph Babiński, Georges Guillain and their students during World War I.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, O

    2017-03-01

    World War I (1914-1918), however tragic, was nonetheless an "edifying school of nervous system experimental pathology" not only because of the various types of injuries, but also because their numbers were greater than any physician could have foreseen. The peripheral nervous system, the spine and the brain were all to benefit from the subsequent advances in clinical and anatomo-functional knowledge. Neurosurgeons took on nerve sutures, spinal injury exploration, and the localization and extraction of intracranial foreign bodies. Little by little, physical medicine and rehabilitation were established. A few of the most famous Parisian neurologists at the time-Jules and Augusta Dejerine, Pierre Marie, Joseph Babiński and Georges Guillain, who directed the military neurology centers-took up the physically and emotionally exhausting challenge of treating thousands of wounded soldiers. They not only cared for them, but also studied them scientifically, with the help of a small but devoted band of colleagues. The examples presented here reveal their courage and their efforts to make discoveries for which we remain grateful today.

  16. Jules Verne Voyager, Jr: An Interactive Map Tool for Teaching Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Meertens, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present an interactive, web-based map utility that can make new geological and geophysical results accessible to a large number and variety of users. The tool provides a user-friendly interface that allows users to access a variety of maps, satellite images, and geophysical data at a range of spatial scales. The map tool, dubbed 'Jules Verne Voyager, Jr.', allows users to interactively create maps of a variety of study areas around the world. The utility was developed in collaboration with the UNAVCO Consortium for study of global-scale tectonic processes. Users can choose from a variety of base maps (including "Face of the Earth" and "Earth at Night" satellite imagery mosaics, global topography, geoid, sea-floor age, strain rate and seismic hazard maps, and others), add a number of geographic and geophysical overlays (coastlines, political boundaries, rivers and lakes, earthquake and volcano locations, stress axes, etc.), and then superimpose both observed and model velocity vectors representing a compilation of 2933 GPS geodetic measurements from around the world. A remarkable characteristic of the geodetic compilation is that users can select from some 21 plates' frames of reference, allowing a visual representation of both 'absolute' plate motion (in a no-net rotation reference frame) and relative motion along all of the world's plate boundaries. The tool allows users to zoom among at least three map scales. The map tool can be viewed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/Earth. A more detailed version of the map utility, developed in conjunction with the EarthScope initiative, focuses on North America geodynamics, and provides more detailed geophysical and geographic information for the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The ‘EarthScope Voyager’ can be accessed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/EarthScope. Because the system uses pre-constructed gif images and overlays, the system can rapidly create and display maps to a large number of users

  17. Global evaluation of gross primary productivity in the JULES land surface model v3.4.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slevin, Darren; Tett, Simon F. B.; Exbrayat, Jean-François; Bloom, A. Anthony; Williams, Mathew

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluates the ability of the JULES land surface model (LSM) to simulate gross primary productivity (GPP) on regional and global scales for 2001-2010. Model simulations, performed at various spatial resolutions and driven with a variety of meteorological datasets (WFDEI-GPCC, WFDEI-CRU and PRINCETON), were compared to the MODIS GPP product, spatially gridded estimates of upscaled GPP from the FLUXNET network (FLUXNET-MTE) and the CARDAMOM terrestrial carbon cycle analysis. Firstly, when JULES was driven with the WFDEI-GPCC dataset (at 0. 5° × 0. 5° spatial resolution), the annual average global GPP simulated by JULES for 2001-2010 was higher than the observation-based estimates (MODIS and FLUXNET-MTE), by 25 and 8 %, respectively, and CARDAMOM estimates by 23 %. JULES was able to simulate the standard deviation of monthly GPP fluxes compared to CARDAMOM and the observation-based estimates on global scales. Secondly, GPP simulated by JULES for various biomes (forests, grasslands and shrubs) on global and regional scales were compared. Differences among JULES, MODIS, FLUXNET-MTE and CARDAMOM on global scales were due to differences in simulated GPP in the tropics. Thirdly, it was shown that spatial resolution (0. 5° × 0. 5°, 1° × 1° and 2° × 2°) had little impact on simulated GPP on these large scales, with global GPP ranging from 140 to 142 PgC year-1. Finally, the sensitivity of JULES to meteorological driving data, a major source of model uncertainty, was examined. Estimates of annual average global GPP were higher when JULES was driven with the PRINCETON meteorological dataset than when driven with the WFDEI-GPCC dataset by 3 PgC year-1. On regional scales, differences between the two were observed, with the WFDEI-GPCC-driven model simulations estimating higher GPP in the tropics (5° N-5° S) and the PRINCETON-driven model simulations estimating higher GPP in the extratropics (30-60° N).

  18. Representing groundwater dynamics in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Rosolem, R.; Kollet, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    The processes in the subsurface and land surface compartments of the terrestrial hydrological cycle are connected via non-linear feedback mechanisms. For example, evapotranspiration is related to shallow groundwater through root zone soil moisture. Despite the existence of such interactions, Land Surface Models (LSMs), such as the widely used Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), consider isolated soil columns with free-drainage lower boundary condition to simulate subsurface hydrology while ignoring groundwater dynamics. In this study, we evaluate the initial impacts of fully implementing a groundwater parameterization scheme based on the ParFlow model into JULES in order to simulate the fluxes and states of the integrated water and energy cycles of the terrestrial system in the UK. Preliminary results on this coupled subsurface-land surface model is shown for the Lambourn catchment located in the Southern UK. The solid geology of this groundwater-dominated catchment is characterized by chalk, which is a porous flow medium traversed by fractures and makes it difficult for typical LSMs to efficiently predict hydrological processes.

  19. Investigating Carbon Cycle Dynamics of Tropical and Boreal Ecosystems with an Improved Land Surface Model (JULES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, A. B.; Wiltshire, A.; Cox, P. M.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land surface of the next generation UK Earth System Model (UKESM1). Recently, the model was updated with new plant functional types and physiology based on a global plant trait database. These developments improved the simulation of terrestrial gross and net primary productivity on local and global scales, and enabled a more realistic representation of the global distribution of vegetation. In this study, we explore the stability of ecosystem dynamics and carbon storage for the historical period and up to 2100, focusing on tropical and boreal ecosystems. These regions will experience large-scale climate change and pressure from anthropogenic activity, and therefore we expect large responses in ecosystem carbon dynamics. JULES predicts a net increase in carbon stored in high latitude ecosystems resulting from the combined effects of warming and increased CO2 (with the caveat that permafrost carbon is not accounted for in this study). Productivity increases due to northward migration of woody vegetation, a longer growing season, and CO2 fertilization, while carbon stored in soils decrease due to warming. In tropical ecosystems, productivity does not significantly increase, possibly due to changes in dry season characteristics, and carbon residence times decrease, resulting a net loss of carbon from these ecosystems. These results, as well as opportunities for observational constraints on the predicted future changes, will be discussed.

  20. Jules-Auguste Soury (1842-1915): A Centennial Call to Mind.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2016-01-01

    Jules-Auguste Soury (1842-1915), a Parisian theorist and historian of science, was the author of 'The Central Nervous System', one of the most comprehensive and original accounts, until 1900, of the history of brain research. A contemporary of Jules Déjerine (1849-1917), Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934), and other pioneers of neurology, with whom he maintained contact, Soury is a rare case of a French philosopher with solid foundations in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. A quaint savant, Soury has been depicted as a strange hybrid produced by nature. His odd personality was coupled with an elegance, solidity and thoroughness in his neurological works. His prodigious facility for assimilating and discoursing the ideas of others has been somewhat clouded by his lamentable ideological tenets. Nevertheless, in his neurological writings, he bequeathed a unique anatomical and physiological history of intelligence, a natural history of the human mind or, as he conceived it, a neurophilosophical sketch of the universe considered a cerebral phenomenon. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. SHARP, a first step towards a full sized Jules Verne Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, L.R.; Hunter, J.W.; Powell, J.R.; Tidman, D.A.

    1993-05-01

    A vital element for space exploration and utilization is the ability to affordably place large quantities of consumables and building material into low earth orbit. Calculations and supportive data indicate this can be done with a large hydrogen gas gun referred to as the Jules Verne Launcher (JVL). We present a design for the JVL based upon the concept of side injecting preheated hydrogen along a long barrel. This dramatically reduces the peak pressures in the launcher as well as the pressures and g-loads at the vehicle. The JVL has the promise of reducing payload delivery costs to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to below $500/kg. The Super High Altitude Research Project (SHARP) is a conventional two-stage hydrogen gas gun which is configured to launch 5 kg packages on suborbital trajectories. It is the first step towards the much larger Jules Verne system and will demonstrate several important features of the larger system. SHARP is currently in the middle of a series of tests aimed at its first milestone. This is to launch 5 kg at 4 km/sec horizontally. In its inclined configuration SHARP should launch vehicles to apogees in excess of 400 km and ranges in excess of 700 km.

  2. Sources of interannual yield variability in JULES-crop and implications for forcing with seasonal weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. E.; Falloon, P. D.

    2015-06-01

    JULES-crop is a parametrisation of crops in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). We investigate the sources of the interannual variability in the modelled maize yield, using global runs driven by reanalysis data, with a view to understanding the impact of various approximations in the driving data and initialisation. The standard forcing dataset for JULES consists of a combination of meteorological variables describing precipitation, radiation, temperature, pressure, specific humidity and wind, at subdaily time resolution. We find that the main characteristics of the modelled yield can be reproduced with a subset of these variables and using daily forcing, with internal disaggregation to the model timestep. This has implications in particular for the use of the model with seasonal forcing data, which may not have been provided at subdaily resolution for all required driving variables. We also investigate the effect on annual yield of initialising the model with climatology on the sowing date. This approximation has the potential to considerably simplify the use of the model with seasonal forecasts, since obtaining observations or reanalysis output for all the initialisation variables required by JULES for the start date of the seasonal forecast would present significant practical challenges.

  3. Sources of interannual yield variability in JULES-crop and implications for forcing with seasonal weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. E.; Falloon, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    JULES-crop is a parametrisation of crops in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). We investigate the sources of the interannual variability in the modelled maize yield, using global runs driven by reanalysis data, with a view to understanding the impact of various approximations in the driving data and initialisation. The standard forcing data set for JULES consists of a combination of meteorological variables describing precipitation, radiation, temperature, pressure, specific humidity and wind, at subdaily time resolution. We find that the main characteristics of the modelled yield can be reproduced with a subset of these variables and using daily forcing, with internal disaggregation to the model time step. This has implications in particular for the use of the model with seasonal forcing data, which may not have been provided at subdaily resolution for all required driving variables. We also investigate the effect on annual yield of initialising the model with climatology on the sowing date. This approximation has the potential to considerably simplify the use of the model with seasonal forecasts, since obtaining observations or reanalysis output for all the initialisation variables required by JULES for the start date of the seasonal forecast would present significant practical challenges.

  4. Testing the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) for flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batelis, Stamatios-Christos; Rosolem, Rafael; Han, Dawei; Rahman, Mostaquimur

    2017-04-01

    Land Surface Models (LSM) are based on physics principles and simulate the exchanges of energy, water and biogeochemical cycles between the land surface and lower atmosphere. Such models are typically applied for climate studies or effects of land use changes but as the resolution of LSMs and supporting observations are continuously increasing, its representation of hydrological processes need to be addressed adequately. For example, changes in climate and land use can alter the hydrology of a region, for instance, by altering its flooding regime. LSMs can be a powerful tool because of their ability to spatially represent a region with much finer resolution. However, despite such advantages, its performance has not been extensively assessed for flood forecasting simply because its representation of typical hydrological processes, such as overland flow and river routing, are still either ignored or roughly represented. In this study, we initially test the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) as a flood forecast tool focusing on its river routing scheme. In particular, JULES river routing parameterization is based on the Rapid Flow Model (RFM) which relies on six prescribed parameters (two surface and two subsurface wave celerities, and two return flow fractions). Although this routing scheme is simple, the prescription of its six default parameters is still too generalized. Our aim is to understand the importance of each RFM parameter in a series of JULES simulations at a number of catchments in the UK for the 2006-2015 period. This is carried out, for instance, by making a number of assumptions of parameter behaviour (e.g., spatially uniform versus varying and/or temporally constant or time-varying parameters within each catchment). Hourly rainfall radar in combination with the CHESS (Climate, Hydrological and Ecological research Support System) meteorological daily data both at 1 km2 resolution are used. The evaluation of the model is based on hourly runoff

  5. Jules Bordet (1870-1961): a bridge between early and modern immunology.

    PubMed

    Schmalstieg, Frank C; Goldman, Armond S

    2009-11-01

    Jules Bordet, a pioneering immunologist, lived until the dawn of molecular immunology. He was born in Belgium in 1870, obtained a medical degree in 1892, worked at l'Institut Pasteur in Paris from 1894 to 1901 and then established the Pasteur Institute of Brabant in Brussels. Before World War I, Bordet found that complement binds to antibody-antigen complexes regardless of the antigen or antibodies involved. Subsequently he developed the complement fixation test that was of diagnostic importance for several decades. For his research concerning complement he was awarded the 1919 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. During that period he also discovered anaphylatoxin, conglutinin, and the cause of whooping cough (Bordetella pertussis). After World War I he found how thrombin forms, how platelets participate in clotting, lysozyme in human milk and much of the biology of bacteriophages. In addition, Bordet worked fervently to limit weapons of mass destruction and promote peace until his death in 1961.

  6. [Citation errors: Uplavici (for Hlava) and William the Silent (for Jules Verne and Mignet)].

    PubMed

    Lienhart, A

    2011-05-01

    A certain 'O Uplavici' was cited for more than fifty years, although he had never existed. This error probably came from a misinterpretation of the Czech language, in which the real author's name--Hlava--can mean 'Title'. It was finally recognized, which was not the case for the author of the sentence: 'I have no need of hope to take action, nor of success to persevere', it is still regularly attributed in France to William I, Prince of Orange, called the Silent. It is a mistake, and no serious reference certifies that an historical figure would have pronounced this sentence. It was written by the historian Mignet in 1841, to describe the character of William III, Prince of Orange and King of England. It was then used in 1875 by Jules Verne, to describe a character in 'The Mysterious Island'. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. Incorporating JULES into NASA's Land Information System (LIS) and Investigations of Land-Atmosphere Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Land Information System (LIS; lis.gsfc.nasa.gov) is a flexible land surface modeling and data assimilation framework developed over the past decade with the goal of integrating satellite- and ground-based observational data products and advanced land surface modeling techniques to produce optimal fields of land surface states and fluxes. LIS features a high performance and flexible design, and operates on an ensemble of land surface models for extension over user-specified regional or global domains. The extensible interfaces of LIS allow the incorporation of new domains, land surface models (LSMs), land surface parameters, meteorological inputs, data assimilation and optimization algorithms. In addition, LIS has also been demonstrated for parameter estimation and uncertainty estimation, and has been coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. A visiting fellowship is currently underway to implement JULES into LIS and to undertake some fundamental science on the feedbacks between the land surface and the atmosphere. An overview of the LIS system, features, and sample results will be presented in an effort to engage the community in the potential advantages of LIS-JULES for a range of applications. Ongoing efforts to develop a framework for diagnosing land-atmosphere coupling will also be presented using the suite of LSM and PBL schemes available in LIS and WRF along with observations from the U. S .. Southern Great Plains. This methodology provides a potential pathway to study factors controlling local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) using the LIS-WRF system, which will serve as a testbed for future experiments to evaluate coupling diagnostics within the community.

  8. Love stories can be unpredictable: Jules et Jim in the vortex of life.

    PubMed

    Dercole, Fabio; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Love stories are dynamic processes that begin, develop, and often stay for a relatively long time in a stationary or fluctuating regime, before possibly fading. Although they are, undoubtedly, the most important dynamic process in our life, they have only recently been cast in the formal frame of dynamical systems theory. In particular, why it is so difficult to predict the evolution of sentimental relationships continues to be largely unexplained. A common reason for this is that love stories reflect the turbulence of the surrounding social environment. But we can also imagine that the interplay of the characters involved contributes to make the story unpredictable-that is, chaotic. In other words, we conjecture that sentimental chaos can have a relevant endogenous origin. To support this intriguing conjecture, we mimic a real and well-documented love story with a mathematical model in which the environment is kept constant, and show that the model is chaotic. The case we analyze is the triangle described in Jules et Jim, an autobiographic novel by Henri-Pierre Roché that became famous worldwide after the success of the homonymous film directed by François Truffaut.

  9. Love stories can be unpredictable: Jules et Jim in the vortex of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dercole, Fabio; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Love stories are dynamic processes that begin, develop, and often stay for a relatively long time in a stationary or fluctuating regime, before possibly fading. Although they are, undoubtedly, the most important dynamic process in our life, they have only recently been cast in the formal frame of dynamical systems theory. In particular, why it is so difficult to predict the evolution of sentimental relationships continues to be largely unexplained. A common reason for this is that love stories reflect the turbulence of the surrounding social environment. But we can also imagine that the interplay of the characters involved contributes to make the story unpredictable—that is, chaotic. In other words, we conjecture that sentimental chaos can have a relevant endogenous origin. To support this intriguing conjecture, we mimic a real and well-documented love story with a mathematical model in which the environment is kept constant, and show that the model is chaotic. The case we analyze is the triangle described in Jules et Jim, an autobiographic novel by Henri-Pierre Roché that became famous worldwide after the success of the homonymous film directed by François Truffaut.

  10. Jules Tinel (1879-1952): Beyond the eponym, the man and his forgotten neurological contributions.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, O

    2017-06-01

    The trauma of World War I had a lasting impact on clinician and physiologist Jules Tinel (1879-1952). His treatment of peripheral nervous system injuries led him, in 1917, to describe the eponymous sign that he linked to activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Among the sequelae of nerve injuries, he was confronted with causalgia that he attributed, here again, to the autonomic nervous system, the main focus of his laboratory research throughout his career. Tinel's sign became so well known that it eclipsed the originality of his seminal descriptions of exertional headache and of hypertensive emergency caused by pheochromocytoma, which could also have been associated with his name. He was always able to marry his clinical practice of neurology and psychiatric consultations with his anatomicopathological, physiological and pathophysiological research, which was based on his daily practice as a physician. At the same time, he directed the work of numerous assistants in his research laboratory, which has since been unjustly forgotten. Several hundreds of scientific publications, including three seminal works, bear witness to his intense activity, which he combined with a genuine talent for teaching and making his findings accessible to a wider public. Those publications alone would fully justify the historical value of extending his renown beyond the existing eponym. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Coupling between the JULES land-surface scheme and the CCATT-BRAMS atmospheric chemistry model (JULES-CCATT-BRAMS1.0): applications to numerical weather forecasting and the CO2 budget in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, D. S.; Freitas, S. R.; Bonatti, J. P.; Mercado, L. M.; Rosário, N. M. É.; Longo, K. M.; Miller, J. B.; Gloor, M.; Gatti, L. V.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the development of a new numerical system denominated JULES-CCATT-BRAMS, which resulted from the coupling of the JULES surface model to the CCATT-BRAMS atmospheric chemistry model. The performance of this system in relation to several meteorological variables (wind speed at 10 m, air temperature at 2 m, dew point temperature at 2 m, pressure reduced to mean sea level and 6 h accumulated precipitation) and the CO2 concentration above an extensive area of South America is also presented, focusing on the Amazon basin. The evaluations were conducted for two periods, the wet (March) and dry (September) seasons of 2010. The statistics used to perform the evaluation included bias (BIAS) and root mean squared error (RMSE). The errors were calculated in relation to observations at conventional stations in airports and automatic stations. In addition, CO2 concentrations in the first model level were compared with meteorological tower measurements and vertical CO2 profiles were compared with aircraft data. The results of this study show that the JULES model coupled to CCATT-BRAMS provided a significant gain in performance in the evaluated atmospheric fields relative to those simulated by the LEAF (version 3) surface model originally utilized by CCATT-BRAMS. Simulations of CO2 concentrations in Amazonia and a comparison with observations are also discussed and show that the system presents a gain in performance relative to previous studies. Finally, we discuss a wide range of numerical studies integrating coupled atmospheric, land surface and chemistry processes that could be produced with the system described here. Therefore, this work presents to the scientific community a free tool, with good performance in relation to the observed data and re-analyses, able to produce atmospheric simulations/forecasts at different resolutions, for any period of time and in any region of the globe.

  12. JHR Project: a future Material Testing Reactor working as an International user Facility: The key-role of instrumentation in support to the development of modern experimental capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Bignan, G.; Gonnier, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Villard, J.F.; Destouches, C.; Chauvin, J.P.; Maugard, B.

    2015-07-01

    Research and development on fuel and material behaviour under irradiation is a key issue for sustainable nuclear energy in order to meet specific needs by keeping the best level of safety. These needs mainly deal with a constant improvement of performances and safety in order to optimize the fuel cycle and hence to reach nuclear energy sustainable objectives. A sustainable nuclear energy requires a high level of performances in order to meet specific needs such as: - Pursuing improvement of the performances and safety of present and coming water cooled reactor technologies. This will require a continuous R and D support following a long-term trend driven by the plant life management, safety demonstration, flexibility and economics improvement. Experimental irradiations of structure materials are necessary to anticipate these material behaviours and will contribute to their optimisation. - Upgrading continuously nuclear fuel technology in present and future nuclear power plants to achieve better performances and to optimise the fuel cycle keeping the best level of safety. Fuel evolution for generation II, III and III+ is a key stake requiring developments, qualification tests and safety experiments to ensure the competitiveness and safety: experimental tests exploring the full range of fuel behaviour determine fuel stability limits and safety margins, as a major input for the fuel reliability analysis. To perform such accurate and innovative progress and developments, specific and ad hoc instrumentation, irradiation devices, measurement methods are necessary to be set up inside or beside the material testing reactor (MTR) core. These experiments require beforehand in situ and on line sophisticated measurements to accurately determine different key parameters such as thermal and fast neutron fluxes and nuclear heating in order to precisely monitor and control the conducted assays. The new Material Testing Reactor JHR (Jules Horowitz Reactor) currently under

  13. A Walk through Graduate Education: Selected Papers and Speeches of Jules B. LaPidus, President of the Council of Graduate Schools, 1984-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamblin, Jane A., Ed.

    This book was created to honor Jules B. LaPidus, retiring president of the Council of Graduate Education, and to preserve his writings and speeches. The papers and speeches of Part 1 show how the author addressed the topical issues of graduate education, moving from observation to direction on research, funding, and preparation of faculty. Part 2…

  14. A critique and empirical assessment of Alexandra Horowitz and Julie Hecht's "Examining dog-human play: the characteristics, affect, and vocalizations of a unique interspecific interaction".

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert W

    2017-02-08

    Horowitz and Hecht (Anim Cog 19:779-788, 2016) presented data about activities and vocalizations during brief videotaped dog-owner play provided by owners, examined these in relation to human affect during play, and made comparisons from their results to other research on activities and vocalizations during dog-human play. In this critique, I describe problems with Horowitz and Hecht's methodology, analyses, and evidence; in their interpretations of the data, evidence, and categorizations provided in other research, particularly my own studies of dog-human play; and in their claims of novelty for their findings. I argue that, to support their ideas about vocalizations and play types during dog-human play and their comparisons to other studies, their study requires fuller descriptions and reliability for their coding of vocalizations and play types, appropriate statistical analyses, and accurate descriptions of prior research. I also argue that their methodology provides results strikingly similar in many aspects to those of other researchers studying dog-human play, contrary to their claims of novel findings. Finally, I examine their suggestions about relationships between human affect and types of play activities and vocalizations using the videos of dog-human play I discussed in earlier publications, discovering minimal, if any, relationship.

  15. Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Identifiability of the Land Surface Model JULES at the point scale in permeable catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakopoulou, C.; Bulygina, N.; Butler, A. P.; McIntyre, N. R.

    2012-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are recognised as important components of Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Simulating exchanges of the moisture, carbon and energy between land surface and atmosphere in a consistent manner requires physics-based LSMs of high complexity, fine vertical resolution and a large number of parameters that need to be estimated. The "physics" that is incorporated in such models is generally based on our knowledge of point (or very small) scale hydrological processes. Therefore, while larger GCM grid-scale performance may be the ultimate goal, the ability of the model to simulate the point-scale processes is, intuitively, a pre-requisite for its reliable use at larger scales. Critical evaluation of model performance and parameter uncertainty at point scales is therefore a rational starting point for critical evaluation of LSMs; and identification of optimal parameter sets at the point scale is a significant stage of the model evaluation at larger scales. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is a complex LSM, which is used to represent surface exchanges in the UK Met Office's forecast and climate change models. This complexity necessitates a large number of model parameters (in total 108) some of which are incapable of being measured directly at large (i.e. kilometer) scales. For this reason, a parameter sensitivity analysis is a vital confidence building process within the framework of every LSM, and as a part of the calibration strategy. The problem of JULES parameter estimation and uncertainty at the point scale with a view to assessing the accuracy and the uncertainty in the default parameter values is addressed. The sensitivity of the JULES output of soil moisture is examined using parameter response surface analysis. The implemented technique is based on the Regional Sensitivity Analysis method (RSA), which evaluates the model response surface over a region of parameter space using Monte Carlo sampling. The modified version of RSA

  16. Further evaluation of wetland emission estimates from the JULES land surface model using SCIAMACHY and GOSAT atmospheric column methane measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Garry; Comyn-Platt, Edward; McNorton, Joey; Chipperfield, Martyn; Gedney, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric concentration of methane began rising again in 2007 after a period of near-zero growth [1,2], with the largest increases observed over polar northern latitudes and the Southern Hemisphere in 2007 and in the tropics since then. The observed inter-annual variability in atmospheric methane concentrations and the associated changes in growth rates have variously been attributed to changes in different methane sources and sinks [2,3]. Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest, but least well quantified, single natural source of CH4, with global emission estimates ranging from 142-284 Tg yr-1 [3]. The modelling of wetlands and their associated emissions of CH4 has become the subject of much current interest [4]. We have previously used the HadGEM2 chemistry-climate model to evaluate the wetland emission estimates derived using the UK community land surface model (JULES, the Joint UK Land Earth Simulator) against atmospheric observations of methane, including SCIAMACHY total methane columns [5] up to 2007. We have undertaken a series of new HadGEM2 runs using new JULES emission estimates extended in time to the end of 2012, thereby allowing comparison with both SCIAMACHY and GOSAT atmospheric column methane measurements. We will describe the results of these runs and the implications for methane wetland emissions. References [1] Rigby, M., et al.: Renewed growth of atmospheric methane. Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L22805, 2008; [2] Nisbet, E.G., et al.: Methane on the Rise-Again, Science 343, 493, 2014; [3] Kirschke, S., et al.,: Three decades of global methane sources and sinks, Nature Geosciences, 6, 813-823, 2013; [4] Melton, J. R., et al.: Present state of global wetland extent and wetland methane modelling: conclusions from a model inter-comparison project (WETCHIMP), Biogeosciences, 10, 753-788, 2013; [5] Hayman, G.D., et al.: Comparison of the HadGEM2 climate-chemistry model against in situ and SCIAMACHY atmospheric methane data, Atmos. Chem

  17. The dependence of land-atmosphere interactions on atmospheric parametrizations in the JULES/UM modelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Helen; Best, Martin

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood for a while now that atmospheric behaviour is affected by land surface processes, modelling this relationship however still presents challenges. Most numerical weather prediction (NWP) models couple an atmospheric model to a land surface model in order to forecast the weather and/or climate. The Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) demonstrated that soil moisture variability has considerable control over atmospheric behaviour, particularly impacting on precipitation and temperature variability. The study also suggested that differences in coupling strengths between models may be due to differences in atmospheric parametrizations. There have since been other studies which support this claim but it is not yet clear which parameters control the land-atmosphere coupling strength or indeed what it should be. In this study we investigate whether certain atmospheric parameters hold more control than others over model sensitivity to land surface changes. We focus on the interaction of the JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) land surface model with the Met Office Unified Model (UM) that is used for operational NWP and climate prediction. For computational efficiency we ran the UM at a single site using a single column model (SCM) rather than running a global model simulation. A site in the Sahel region of West Africa was chosen as this is an area that was identified by GLACE as being especially responsive to changes in soil moisture. JULES was run several times with various different initial soil moisture profiles to create an ensemble of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes that could be used to force a set of different SCM runs in order to simulate a range of different atmospheric conditions. Various atmospheric parameters in the SCM were then perturbed to create additional sets of SCM runs with different sensitivities to soil moisture changes. By analysing the difference in spread between the standard configuration and the

  18. Improved representation of plant functional types and physiology in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES v4.2) using plant trait information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Anna B.; Cox, Peter M.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Wiltshire, Andy J.; Jones, Chris D.; Sitch, Stephen; Mercado, Lina M.; Groenendijk, Margriet; Robertson, Eddy; Kattge, Jens; Bönisch, Gerhard; Atkin, Owen K.; Bahn, Michael; Cornelissen, Johannes; Niinemets, Ülo; Onipchenko, Vladimir; Peñuelas, Josep; Poorter, Lourens; Reich, Peter B.; Soudzilovskaia, Nadjeda A.; van Bodegom, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models are used to predict the response of vegetation to climate change. They are essential for planning ecosystem management, understanding carbon cycle-climate feedbacks, and evaluating the potential impacts of climate change on global ecosystems. JULES (the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) represents terrestrial processes in the UK Hadley Centre family of models and in the first generation UK Earth System Model. Previously, JULES represented five plant functional types (PFTs): broadleaf trees, needle-leaf trees, C3 and C4 grasses, and shrubs. This study addresses three developments in JULES. First, trees and shrubs were split into deciduous and evergreen PFTs to better represent the range of leaf life spans and metabolic capacities that exists in nature. Second, we distinguished between temperate and tropical broadleaf evergreen trees. These first two changes result in a new set of nine PFTs: tropical and temperate broadleaf evergreen trees, broadleaf deciduous trees, needle-leaf evergreen and deciduous trees, C3 and C4 grasses, and evergreen and deciduous shrubs. Third, using data from the TRY database, we updated the relationship between leaf nitrogen and the maximum rate of carboxylation of Rubisco (Vcmax), and updated the leaf turnover and growth rates to include a trade-off between leaf life span and leaf mass per unit area.Overall, the simulation of gross and net primary productivity (GPP and NPP, respectively) is improved with the nine PFTs when compared to FLUXNET sites, a global GPP data set based on FLUXNET, and MODIS NPP. Compared to the standard five PFTs, the new nine PFTs simulate a higher GPP and NPP, with the exception of C3 grasses in cold environments and C4 grasses that were previously over-productive. On a biome scale, GPP is improved for all eight biomes evaluated and NPP is improved for most biomes - the exceptions being the tropical forests, savannahs, and extratropical mixed forests where simulated NPP is too

  19. A vertical representation of soil carbon in the JULES land surface scheme (vn4.3_permafrost) with a focus on permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Eleanor J.; Chadburn, Sarah E.; Ekici, Altug

    2017-02-01

    An improved representation of the carbon cycle in permafrost regions will enable more realistic projections of the future climate-carbon system. Currently JULES (the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) - the land surface model of the UK Earth System Model (UKESM) - uses the standard four-pool RothC soil carbon model. This paper describes a new version of JULES (vn4.3_permafrost) in which the soil vertical dimension is added to the soil carbon model, with a set of four pools in every soil layer. The respiration rate in each soil layer depends on the temperature and moisture conditions in that layer. Cryoturbation/bioturbation processes, which transfer soil carbon between layers, are represented by diffusive mixing. The litter inputs and the soil respiration are both parametrized to decrease with increasing depth. The model now includes a tracer so that selected soil carbon can be labelled and tracked through a simulation. Simulations show an improvement in the large-scale horizontal and vertical distribution of soil carbon over the standard version of JULES (vn4.3). Like the standard version of JULES, the vertically discretized model is still unable to simulate enough soil carbon in the tundra regions. This is in part because JULES underestimates the plant productivity over the tundra, but also because not all of the processes relevant for the accumulation of permafrost carbon, such as peat development, are included in the model. In comparison with the standard model, the vertically discretized model shows a delay in the onset of soil respiration in the spring, resulting in an increased net uptake of carbon during this time. In order to provide a more suitable representation of permafrost carbon for quantifying the permafrost carbon feedback within UKESM, the deep soil carbon in the permafrost region (below 1 m) was initialized using the observed soil carbon. There is now a slight drift in the soil carbon ( < 0.018 % decade-1), but the change in simulated soil

  20. Diagnosing hydrological limitations of a land surface model: application of JULES to a deep-groundwater chalk basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Vine, N.; Butler, A.; McIntyre, N.; Jackson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are prospective starting points to develop a global hyper-resolution model of the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. However, there are some fundamental limitations of LSMs related to how meaningfully hydrological fluxes and stores are represented. A diagnostic approach to model evaluation and improvement is taken here that exploits hydrological expert knowledge to detect LSM inadequacies through consideration of the major behavioural functions of a hydrological system: overall water balance, vertical water redistribution in the unsaturated zone, temporal water redistribution, and spatial water redistribution over the catchment's groundwater and surface-water systems. Three types of information are utilized to improve the model's hydrology: (a) observations, (b) information about expected response from regionalized data, and (c) information from an independent physics-based model. The study considers the JULES (Joint UK Land Environmental Simulator) LSM applied to a deep-groundwater chalk catchment in the UK. The diagnosed hydrological limitations and the proposed ways to address them are indicative of the challenges faced while transitioning to a global high resolution model of the water cycle.

  1. Diagnosing hydrological limitations of a Land Surface Model: application of JULES to a deep-groundwater chalk basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Vine, N.; Butler, A.; McIntyre, N.; Jackson, C.

    2015-08-01

    Land Surface Models (LSMs) are prospective starting points to develop a global hyper-resolution model of the terrestrial water, energy and biogeochemical cycles. However, there are some fundamental limitations of LSMs related to how meaningfully hydrological fluxes and stores are represented. A diagnostic approach to model evaluation is taken here that exploits hydrological expert knowledge to detect LSM inadequacies through consideration of the major behavioural functions of a hydrological system: overall water balance, vertical water redistribution in the unsaturated zone, temporal water redistribution and spatial water redistribution over the catchment's groundwater and surface water systems. Three types of information are utilised to improve the model's hydrology: (a) observations, (b) information about expected response from regionalised data, and (c) information from an independent physics-based model. The study considers the JULES (Joint UK Land Environmental Simulator) LSM applied to a deep-groundwater chalk catchment in the UK. The diagnosed hydrological limitations and the proposed ways to address them are indicative of the challenges faced while transitioning to a global high resolution model of the water cycle.

  2. Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy: key players in the resurrection and preservation of transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Smruti K; Husain, Qasim; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2012-08-01

    Developed over a century ago, the transsphenoidal approach to access lesions of the pituitary gland and sella turcica has transformed the field of neurosurgery, largely due to the work of Oskar Hirsch and Harvey Cushing. Furthermore, its use and modification in the early 1900s was perhaps one of Cushing's greatest legacies to skull base surgery. However, Cushing, who had worked relentlessly to improve the transsphenoidal route to the pituitary region, abandoned the approach by 1929 in his pursuit to master transcranial approaches to the suprasellar region. Hirsch and a few other surgeons continued to perform transsphenoidal operations, but they were unable to maintain the popularity of the approach among their peers. During a time when transsphenoidal surgery was on the brink of extinction, a critical lineage of 3 key surgeons--Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy--would resurrect the art, each working to further improve the procedure. Dott, Cushing's apprentice from 1923 to 1924, brought his experiences with transsphenoidal surgery to Edinburgh, Scotland, and along the way, developed the lighted nasal speculum to provide better illumination in the narrow working area. Guiot, inspired by Dott, adopted his technique and used intraoperative radiofluoroscopic technique for image guidance. Hardy, a fellow of Guiot, from Montreal, Canada, revolutionized transsphenoidal microsurgery with the introduction of the binocular microscope and selective adenomectomy. The teachings of these pioneers have endured over time and are now widely used by neurosurgeons worldwide. In this paper, we review the lineage and contributions of Dott, Guiot, and Hardy who served as crucial players in the preservation of transsphenoidal surgery.

  3. Water Will Be the Coal of the Future-The Untamed Dream of Jules Verne for a Solar Fuel.

    PubMed

    Ryabchuk, Vladimir K; Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav N; Emeline, Alexei V; Artem'ev, Yurii M; Kataeva, Galina V; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Serpone, Nick

    2016-11-29

    This article evokes the futuristic visions of two giants, one a writer, Jules Verne, who foresaw water as the coal of the future, and the other a scientist, Giacomo Ciamician, who foresaw the utilization of solar energy as an energy source with which to drive photochemical and photocatalytic reactions for the betterment of mankind. Specifically, we examine briefly the early work of the 1960s and 1970s on the photosplitting of free water and water adsorbed on solid supports, based mostly on metal oxides, from which both hydrogen and oxygen evolve in the expected stoichiometric ratio of 2 to 1. The two oil crises of the 1970s (1973 and 1979) spurred the interest of researchers from various disciplines (photochemistry, photo-catalysis and photoelectrochemistry) in search of a Holy Grail photocatalyst, process, or strategy to achieve efficient water splitting so as to provide an energy source alternative to fossil fuels. Some approaches to the photosplitting of water adsorbed on solid insulators (high bandgap materials; Ebg ≥ 5 eV) and semiconductor photocatalysts (metal oxides) are described from which we deduce that metal oxides with bandgap energies around 5 eV (e.g., ZrO₂) are more promising materials to achieve significant water splitting on the basis of quantum yields than narrower bandgap photocatalysts (e.g., TiO₂; Ebg ≈ 3.0-3.2 eV), which tend to be relatively inactive by comparison. Although proof of concept of the photosplitting of water has been demonstrated repeatedly in the last four decades, much remains to be done to find the Holy Grail photocatalyst and/or strategy to achieve significant yields of hydrogen.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-82 Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz flashes a wide grin for photographers after landing his T-38 jet at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Horowitz and the other six members of the STS-82 crew came from their home base at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, to spend the last few days before launch at KSC. STS-82 is scheduled for liftoff on Feb. 11 during a 65-minute launch window that opens at 3:56 a.m. EST. The 10-day flight aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery will be the second Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-02-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-82 Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz flashes a wide grin for photographers after landing his T-38 jet at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Horowitz and the other six members of the STS-82 crew came from their home base at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, to spend the last few days before launch at KSC. STS-82 is scheduled for liftoff on Feb. 11 during a 65-minute launch window that opens at 3:56 a.m. EST. The 10-day flight aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery will be the second Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission.

  5. 2nd Charles Richet et Jules Héricourt workshop: therapeutic antibodies and anaphylaxis; May 31-June 1, 2011, Tours, France.

    PubMed

    Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The Charles Richet and Jules Héricourt workshops honor the memory of Jules Héricourt (1850-1938) and Charles Richet (1850-1935) who described the principle of serotherapy in 1888 and made the very first attempts to fight cancer with serotherapy in 1895. In 1902, Charles Richet and Paul Portier described "anaphylaxis," a discovery awarded the Nobel Prize in 1913. The first workshop, "Towards the clinical use of mAbs with higher cytolytic efficacy in cancer" was held in Tours, France on November 20-21, 2008. The second Charles Richet and Jules Héricourt workshop, held May 31-June 1, 2011 at the University of Tours, France, was also organized by the Cancéropôle Grand Ouest. The topic of the workshop was therapeutic antibodies and anaphylaxis, a subject rarely addressed in congresses focused on monoclonal antibodies. To have discussions about mAb side effects with complete objectivity, the congress was organized independently of any sponsorship from pharmaceutical companies. This academic event was motivated by the high incidence of shocks to cetuximab and the need to compile and evaluate scattered information. This growing public health concern was thus analyzed from different scientific and medical angles. The first session was devoted to acute infusion reactions, with an emphasis on deconvolution of the terms "cytokine-release syndrome," "cytokine storms," "anaphylaxis" and their epidemiology. This session concluded with the Charles Richet lecture on cetuximab anaphylaxis and anti-αGal IgE by Thomas Platts-Mills, its discoverer. In the next session, the involvement of anti-glycan antibodies in both anaphylaxis and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to therapeutic antibodies was discussed. A gala dinner was held in the gardens of the beautiful château of Villandry, which was acquired and restored by Joachim Carvalho, a pupil of Charles Richet's and great-grandfather of the present owner. The final session focused on strategies to prevent cetuximab anaphylaxis

  6. [Jules Baretta and the secrets of modeling in pathology in the 19th century. Analysis of wax No. 1364 at the Museum of the Saint Louis hospital].

    PubMed

    Noirot, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    The Museum of the Saint-Louis hospital in Paris presents life casts produced by Jules Baretta in the 19th century: the casts seem incredible as they captured the complex forms of illness. How could Baretta cast in plaster an irregular epithelium or lupus without damaging the pathology or causing deep pains? From this observation, an investigation on those casts took place and especially one on an epithelium of the nose (no 1364) in order to understand the trade secrets. This investigation shows that Baretta used protective films on these pathologies and that he then interpreted them by modelling. The scientific and artistic interest of this discovery is to revise the mechanical objectivity of the casting through the modelling.

  7. The Met Office Unified Model Global Atmosphere 6.0/6.1 and JULES Global Land 6.0/6.1 configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, David; Boutle, Ian; Brooks, Malcolm; Melvin, Thomas; Stratton, Rachel; Vosper, Simon; Wells, Helen; Williams, Keith; Wood, Nigel; Allen, Thomas; Bushell, Andrew; Copsey, Dan; Earnshaw, Paul; Edwards, John; Gross, Markus; Hardiman, Steven; Harris, Chris; Heming, Julian; Klingaman, Nicholas; Levine, Richard; Manners, James; Martin, Gill; Milton, Sean; Mittermaier, Marion; Morcrette, Cyril; Riddick, Thomas; Roberts, Malcolm; Sanchez, Claudio; Selwood, Paul; Stirling, Alison; Smith, Chris; Suri, Dan; Tennant, Warren; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Wilkinson, Jonathan; Willett, Martin; Woolnough, Steve; Xavier, Prince

    2017-04-01

    We describe Global Atmosphere 6.0 and Global Land 6.0 (GA6.0/GL6.0): the latest science configurations of the Met Office Unified Model and JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) land surface model developed for use across all timescales. Global Atmosphere 6.0 includes the ENDGame (Even Newer Dynamics for General atmospheric modelling of the environment) dynamical core, which significantly increases mid-latitude variability improving a known model bias. Alongside developments of the model's physical parametrisations, ENDGame also increases variability in the tropics, which leads to an improved representation of tropical cyclones and other tropical phenomena. Further developments of the atmospheric and land surface parametrisations improve other aspects of model performance, including the forecasting of surface weather phenomena. We also describe GA6.1/GL6.1, which includes a small number of long-standing differences from our main trunk configurations that we continue to require for operational global weather prediction. Since July 2014, GA6.1/GL6.1 has been used by the Met Office for operational global numerical weather prediction, whilst GA6.0/GL6.0 was implemented in its remaining global prediction systems over the following year.

  8. Results of a quality-control study of lyophilized pooled plasmas which have been 'virally inactivated' using a solvent detergent method (modified Horowitz procedure).

    PubMed

    Trobisch, H

    1991-01-01

    (n)butylphosphate and an unspecified detergent. These virucidal properties are assumed on the basis of consequential logic rather than proven by hard experimentally determined fact. Data confirming the efficiency of the process based on legitimate animal experiments has not be presented. In spite of all the efforts to improve safety in transfusion medicine we believe that if certain nonprofit-making blood banks are to retain their credibility, they should be subjected to the same stringent laws and regulations that are applied to the rest of the German pharmaceutical industry.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  9. First feedback with the AMMON integral experiment for the JHR calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Leray, O.; Lemaire, M.; Colombier, A. C.; Hudelot, J. P.

    2013-03-01

    The innovative design of the next international Material Testing Reactor, the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), induced the development of a new neutron and photon calculation formular HORUS3D/P&N, based on deterministic and stochastic codes and the European nuclear data library JEFF3.1.1. A new integral experiment, named the AMMON experiment, was designed in order to make the experimental validation of HORUS3D. The objectives of this experimental program are to calibrate the biases and uncertainties associated with the HORUS3D/N&P calculations for JHR safety and design calculations, but also the validation of some specific nuclear data (concerning mainly hafnium and beryllium isotopes). The experiment began in 2010 and is currently performed in the EOLE zero-power critical mock-up at CEA Cadarache. This paper deals with the first feedback of the AMMON experiments with 3D Monte Carlo TRIPOLI4©/JEFF3.1.1 calculations.

  10. Calculation to experiment comparison of SPND signals in various nuclear reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barbot, Loic; Radulovic, Vladimir; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka; Tarchalski, Mikolaj; Dewynter-Marty, Veronique; Malouch, Fadhel

    2015-07-01

    In the perspective of irradiation experiments in the future Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), the Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory of CEA Cadarache (France) is developing a numerical tool for SPND design, simulation and operation. In the frame of the SPND numerical tool qualification, dedicated experiments have been performed both in the Slovenian TRIGA Mark II reactor (JSI) and very recently in the French CEA Saclay OSIRIS reactor, as well as a test of two detectors in the core of the Polish MARIA reactor (NCBJ). A full description of experimental set-ups and neutron-gamma calculations schemes are provided in the first part of the paper. Calculation to experiment comparison of the various SPNDs in the different reactors is thoroughly described and discussed in the second part. Presented comparisons show promising final results. (authors)

  11. Cats on the Couch: The Experimental Production of Animal Neurosis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Alison

    2016-03-01

    Argument In the 1940s-50s, one of the most central questions in psychological research related to the nature of neurosis. In the final years of the Second World War and the following decade, neurosis became one of the most prominent psychiatric disorders, afflicting a high proportion of military casualties and veterans. The condition became central to the concerns of several psychological fields, from psychoanalysis to Pavlovian psychology. This paper reconstructs the efforts of Chicago psychiatrist Jules Masserman to study neurosis in the laboratory during the 1940s and 1950s. Masserman used Pavlovian techniques in a bid to subject this central psychoanalytic subject to disciplined scientific experimentation. More generally, his project was an effort to bolster the legitimacy of psychoanalysis as a human science by articulating a convergence of psychoanalytic categories across multiple species. Masserman sought to orchestrate a convergence of psychological knowledge between fields that were often taken to be irreconcilable. A central focus of this paper is the role of moving images in this project, not only as a means of recording experimental data but also as a rhetorical device. The paper argues that for Masserman film played an important role in enabling scientific observers (and then subsequent viewers) to see agency and emotion in the animals they observed.

  12. Alexis Carrel: Jules Verne of cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S G

    1988-03-01

    There is in every field one individual who stands apart as a great thinker, leader, or teacher. In the field of cardiovascular surgery, Alexis Carrel was each of these. Proof of this lies in the fact that daily, the modern cardiovascular surgeon is likely to use a concept or technique first developed by Carrel. During the 75th anniversary year of Carrel's receipt of the Nobel Prize, the life and work of this great innovator should be remembered.

  13. ATV "Jules Verne" Tests Campaign at ESA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pery, V.; Bouchery, J.-P.; Le Querrec, L.; Maurel, E.; Ruffino, F.

    2004-08-01

    This paper provides with an overview of the ATV first flight model tests campaign that is to take place at ESTEC Test Centre between summer 2004 and mid- 2005. The ATV vehicle mission, configuration and development logic are first briefly described. The campaign sequence and purposes are then outlined together with the main tests principles and objectives. Some of the main constraints that drive the campaign preparation and performance as well as some particular safety aspects are finally defined.

  14. Experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Kawecki, Tadeusz J; Lenski, Richard E; Ebert, Dieter; Hollis, Brian; Olivieri, Isabelle; Whitlock, Michael C

    2012-10-01

    Experimental evolution is the study of evolutionary processes occurring in experimental populations in response to conditions imposed by the experimenter. This research approach is increasingly used to study adaptation, estimate evolutionary parameters, and test diverse evolutionary hypotheses. Long applied in vaccine development, experimental evolution also finds new applications in biotechnology. Recent technological developments provide a path towards detailed understanding of the genomic and molecular basis of experimental evolutionary change, while new findings raise new questions that can be addressed with this approach. However, experimental evolution has important limitations, and the interpretation of results is subject to caveats resulting from small population sizes, limited timescales, the simplified nature of laboratory environments, and, in some cases, the potential to misinterpret the selective forces and other processes at work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neutron fluxes in test reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    Communicate the fact that high-power water-cooled test reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) or the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) cannot provide fast flux levels as high as sodium-cooled fast test reactors. The memo first presents some basics physics considerations about neutron fluxes in test reactors and then uses ATR, HFIR and JHR as an illustration of the performance of modern high-power water-cooled test reactors.

  16. Experimental Pi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corris, G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of pi by means of experimental methods. Polygon circle ratios, Archimedes' method, Buffon's needles, a Monte Carlo method, and prime number approaches are used. Presents three BASIC programs for the calculations. (YP)

  17. Experimental Pi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corris, G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of pi by means of experimental methods. Polygon circle ratios, Archimedes' method, Buffon's needles, a Monte Carlo method, and prime number approaches are used. Presents three BASIC programs for the calculations. (YP)

  18. Convenience experimentation.

    PubMed

    Krohs, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Systems biology aims at explaining life processes by means of detailed models of molecular networks, mainly on the whole-cell scale. The whole cell perspective distinguishes the new field of systems biology from earlier approaches within molecular cell biology. The shift was made possible by the high throughput methods that were developed for gathering 'omic' (genomic, proteomic, etc.) data. These new techniques are made commercially available as semi-automatic analytic equipment, ready-made analytic kits and probe arrays. There is a whole industry of supplies for what may be called convenience experimentation. My paper inquires some epistemic consequences of strong reliance on convenience experimentation in systems biology. In times when experimentation was automated to a lesser degree, modeling and in part even experimentation could be understood fairly well as either being driven by hypotheses, and thus proceed by the testing of hypothesis, or as being performed in an exploratory mode, intended to sharpen concepts or initially vague phenomena. In systems biology, the situation is dramatically different. Data collection became so easy (though not cheap) that experimentation is, to a high degree, driven by convenience equipment, and model building is driven by the vast amount of data that is produced by convenience experimentation. This results in a shift in the mode of science. The paper shows that convenience driven science is not primarily hypothesis-testing, nor is it in an exploratory mode. It rather proceeds in a gathering mode. This shift demands another shift in the mode of evaluation, which now becomes an exploratory endeavor, in response to the superabundance of gathered data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental philosophy.

    PubMed

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious?

  20. Animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  1. Analysis of gamma-ray dosimetry experiments in the zero power MINERVE facility

    SciTech Connect

    Amharrak, H.; Di Salvo, J.; Lyoussi, A.; Roche, A.; Masson-Fauchier, M.; Bosq, J. C.; Carette, M.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop nuclear heating measurement methods in zero power experimental reactors. These developments contribute to the qualification of photonics calculation schemes for the assessment of gamma heating in the future Jules Horowitz Material Testing Reactor. This paper presents the analysis of thermoluminescent detector (TLD) experiments in the UO{sub 2} core of the MINERVE Research Reactor at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission center in Cadarache. The experimental sources of uncertainty in the gamma dose have been reduced by improving the measurement conditions and the repeatability of the calibration step for each individual TLD. The interpretation of these measurements needs to take into account the calculation of cavity correction factors related to calibration and irradiation configurations, as well as neutron correction calculations. These calculations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of neutron-gamma and gamma-electron transport coupled particles. The comparison between calculated and measured integral gamma-ray absorbed doses in the aluminum material surrounding the TLD shows that calculations slightly overestimate the measurement, with a calculated versus experimental ratio equal to 1.04 {+-} 5.7 % (k=2). (authors)

  2. Experimental macroevolution†

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. PMID:26763705

  3. experimental tectonophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handin, John; Logan, J. M.

    Because virtually all tectonophysical processes are masked by the overburden, or occur too slowly for adequate observation in anthropocentric time, or both, they must be studied in carefully controlled laboratory experiments that simulate the natural environment as realistically as is practicable. Extrapolations of laboratory data in space and time are invalid unless the experimental and natural phenomenologies are essentially the same. The size of conventional specimens is of the order of 10 cm, whereas the discontinuities (defects in a continuum) in real rock-masses are often much larger, of the order of l m of more. Furthermore, such discontinuities as macrofractures (joints) may well dominate the mechanical and fluid-transport properties in nature. Adequate sampling of rock-mass properties will probably always require in-situ testing, but testing machines much larger than any now available could provide useful data at least at intermediate scale.

  4. Experimental tectonophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Handin, J.; Logan, J.M.

    1981-07-01

    Because virtually all tectonophysical processes are marked by the overburden, or occur to slowly for adequate observation in anthropocentric time, or both, they must be studied in carefully controlled laboratory experiments that simulate the natural environment as realistically as is practicable. Extrapolations of laboratory data in space and time are invalid unless the experimental and natural phenomenologies are essentially the same. The size of conventional specimens is of the order of 10 cm, whereas the discontinuities (defects in a continuum) in real rock-masses are often much larger, of the order of 1 m or more. Furthermore, such discontinuities as macrofractures (joints) may well dominate the mechanical and fluid-transport properties in nature. Adequate sampling of rock-mass properties will probably always require in-situ testing, but testing machines much larger than any now available could provide useful data at least at intermediate scale.

  5. An experimental study of psychoanalytic theories of depression.

    PubMed

    Slipp, S; Nissenfeld, S

    1981-10-01

    This study involves an application of a new methodology, subliminal psychodynamic activation, which can be used to experimentally test psychoanalytic "dynamic" propositions. It was found that with a sample of neurotically depressed female patients, there was a significant decrease in depression-related responses following the stimulation of a symbiotic gratification fantasy ("Mommy and I are one"). Subliminal symbiotic stimulation had been shown previously in studies with different populations (schizophrenics, homosexuals, phobics, alcoholics and overeaters) to have similar ameliorative effects. The current results point to the importance of symbiotic dynamics and the relationship dependent on a dominant other, rather than to the retroflexion of aggression in neurotic depression. This is in keeping with the formulations of Arieti (1959), Bemporad (1953), Horowitz (1980), and the senior author (Slipp, 1977). Hypotheses regarding the effects of stimulating fantasies involving success were not supported by the primary data, although secondary data (from correlational analyses) did provide some indirect support for the senior author's hypothesis. The "Autonomous Succeed" message ("Succeed for myself") did not reverse the depressive mood, possibly because autonomy was equated with abandonment. Relatively differentiated depressives tended to respond to the "Exploitative Succeed" ("Succeed for Father or Mother") messages with a decrease in depression, while depressives with a low level of self-object differentiation tended to respond with an increase in depression. For more differentiated depressives, performing for and giving over a part of the self to another is an adaptive style that insures the dependent relationship and bolsters the patient's weak self-image. However, with poorly differentiated depressives, giving over to another raises the threat of total annihilation, since the self is already diminished. These secondary data can be viewed, however, as only

  6. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R. H.

    1898-01-01

    From the results of the various experiments already detailed I feel justified in drawing the following conclusions: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  7. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, R H

    1898-03-01

    FROM THE RESULTS OF THE VARIOUS EXPERIMENTS ALREADY DETAILED I FEEL JUSTIFIED IN DRAWING THE FOLLOWING CONCLUSIONS: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  8. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  9. Status of the MeLoDIE experiment, an advanced device for the study of the irradiation creep of LWR cladding with full online capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Guimbal, P.; Huotilainen, S.; Taehtinen, S.; Thellier, G.; Villard, J.F.

    2015-07-01

    As a prototype of future instrumented material experiments in the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), the MELODIE project was launched in 2009 by the CEA in collaboration with VTT. Being designed as a biaxial creep experiment with online capability, MELODIE is able to apply an online-controlled biaxial loading on a LWR clad sample up to 120 MPa and to perform an online measurement of its biaxial deformation. An important experimental challenge was to perform reliably accurate measurements under the high nuclear heat load of in-core locations while keeping within their tight space. For that purpose, specific sensors were co-designed with and built by IFE Halden. Manufacturing of the MELODIE components was completed one year ago. The complexity of its in-pile section and of the pressurization system requested a step-by-step tuning of the setup. The toughest part of this process dealt with the Diameter gauge which required a partial redesign to take into account unexpected and unwanted electromagnetic interactions with the hosting device. Final cold performance tests of the on-board instrumentation will be presented. The MELODIE device is now ready and irradiation should start in OSIRIS reactor this spring. (authors)

  10. Etienne-Jules Marey: a short biography and appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddleton, Graham P.

    2003-07-01

    As a "son" of Beaune it seems appropriate to give a short appreciation of the work of Marey, as a pioneer in the field of high speed and motion recording photography, at this Congress held in his birthplace. Not only was he a notable physicist but he was a very often under appreciated pioneer of scientific photography, especially as applied to motion recording and analysis. It can be rightfully claimed that his work makes him an important element in the discovery of cinematography in general. His contemporary (and at times collaborator) Muybridge seems to have been credited with much of the acclaim in this field, possible because of his more extrovert character, and possible because of Marey's many other notable scientific achievements. Marey had invented a high-speed camera capable of 700 pps by 1894!

  11. Poincaré, Jules Henri (1854-1912)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Born in Nancy, Lorraine, France, became professor of mathematics at the Sorbonne in Paris, contributed to all areas of mathematics, including the three-body problem of celestial mechanics and studies of the stability of the solar system. He was first to consider the possibility of chaos in planetary orbits, foreshadowing the modern study that restarted in 1963. His work began as the answer to a q...

  12. Historical note: Jules Séglas on language in dementia.

    PubMed

    Obler, L K; Albert, M L

    1985-03-01

    In his book Des troubles du language chez les aliénés (1892) Séglas applied the model of language processing of his teacher, Charcot, to analyze the language disorders of various groups of mentally ill, including patients considered to suffer from dementia. Among the language phenomena he described from dementia are logorrhea, neologisms, embolalia, near-mutism, angophrasia, automatic speech, alexia, and agraphia. Séglas must be credited for his early descriptions of how language behaviors cluster in various psychiatric and dementing diseases.

  13. Theoretical and experimental studies of Cu(II) and Zn(II) coordination compounds with N,O donor bidentate Schiff base ligand containing amino phenol moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmariya, Brajendra S.; Tiwari, Anjali; Mishra, A. P.; Naikoo, Gowhar Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    We report here two mononuclear Cu(II) and Zn(II) coordination compounds of general formula [CuII(L)2].2H2O (1) and [ZnII(L)2].3H2O (2) derived from bidentate 2-chloro-6-{[(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]amino}-4 nitrophenol ligand (HL). These compounds were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, uv-vis, 1H NMR, molar conductance, thermal, PXRD, SEM-EDX and electrochemical studies. The PXRD and SEM analysis shows the amorphous/nanocrystalline nature of 1 and crystalline nature of 2. The diffraction peak broadening was explained in terms of domain size and the crystallite lattice strain. Thermogravimetric analysis in the range of 300-1172 K has been performed to determine the thermal stability of synthesized compounds. The non-isothermal kinetic parameters of degradation process were calculated using Coats-Redfern (C-R), Piloyan-Novikova (P-N) and Horowitz-Metzger (H-M) methods assuming first order degradation and proposed a random nucleation mechanism of thermal decomposition for both compounds. The cyclic voltammetric studies reveal the irreversibility of the oxidation/reduction process of synthesized compounds. To support the experimental findings theoretical calculations by means of DFT and TD-DFT at B3LYP level were incorporated. In addition; frequency calculations, HOMO-LUMO, energy gap (ΔE), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), spin density and crystal packing were also computed at the same level of theory.

  14. Is animal experimentation fundamental?

    PubMed

    d'Acampora, Armando José; Rossi, Lucas Félix; Ely, Jorge Bins; de Vasconcellos, Zulmar Acciolli

    2009-01-01

    The understanding about the utilization of experimental animals in scientific research and in teaching is many times a complex issue. Special attention needs to be paid to attain the understanding by the general public of the importance of animal experimentation in experimental research and in undergraduate medical teaching. Experimental teaching and research based on the availability of animals for experimentation is important and necessary for the personal and scientific development of the physician-to-be. The technological arsenal which intends to mimic experimentation animals and thus fully replace their use many times does not prove to be compatible with the reality of the living animal. The purpose of this paper is to discuss aspects concerning this topic, bringing up an issue which is complex and likely to arouse in-depth reflections.

  15. The Experimental College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiklejohn, Alexander

    "The Experimental College" tells the story of a 4-year academic experiment at the University of Wisconsin established by Alexander Meiklejohn. Aimed at finding a method of teaching that would help students develop "intelligence in the conduct of their own lives," the Experimental College discarded major requirements,…

  16. On experimental oil spills

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, D.; Thornton, D. E.; Blackall, P. J.; Sergy, G. S.; Snow, N.; Hume, H.

    1980-09-01

    Experimental oil spills are an essential component of overall oil pollution research efforts. However, such experiments must be carefully designed and coordinated in order to cull the most information possible. Physical, biological, and ecological impacts must be examined simultaneously. Long-term monitoring of the multidisciplinary effects of experimental oil spills is recommended.

  17. Wind River Experimental Forest.

    Treesearch

    Valerie. Rapp

    2003-01-01

    The Wind River Experimental Forest, known as the cradle of forest research in the Pacific Northwest, is a major center for ecological and silvicultural research in west-side Pacific Northwest forests. In the state of Washington, Wind River Experimental Forest is in the south-central area of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, north of the Columbia River Gorge National...

  18. Questioning and Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutanen, Arto

    2014-01-01

    The paper is a philosophical analysis of experimentation. The philosophical framework of the analysis is the interrogative model of inquiry developed by Hintikka. The basis of the model is explicit and well-formed logic of questions and answers. The framework allows us to formulate a flexible logic of experimentation. In particular, the formulated…

  19. Questioning and Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutanen, Arto

    2014-01-01

    The paper is a philosophical analysis of experimentation. The philosophical framework of the analysis is the interrogative model of inquiry developed by Hintikka. The basis of the model is explicit and well-formed logic of questions and answers. The framework allows us to formulate a flexible logic of experimentation. In particular, the formulated…

  20. 7. VIEW WEST, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST WELL HOUSE, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW WEST, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST WELL HOUSE, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST BUNKHOUSE, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST GARAGE, AND FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST RESIDENCE. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic generator experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, E. S.

    1972-01-01

    The results for an experimental study of a one wavelength MHD induction generator operating on a liquid flow are presented. First the design philosophy and the experimental generator design are summarized, including a description of the flow loop and instrumentation. Next a Fourier series method of treating the fact that the magnetic flux density produced by the stator is not a pure traveling sinusoid is described and some results summarized. This approach appears to be of interest after revisions are made, but the initial results are not accurate. Finally, some of the experimental data is summarized for various methods of excitation.

  2. Experimental Semiotics: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Galantucci, Bruno; Garrod, Simon

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years a new line of research has appeared in the literature. This line of research, which may be referred to as experimental semiotics (ES; Galantucci, 2009; Galantucci and Garrod, 2010), focuses on the experimental investigation of novel forms of human communication. In this review we will (a) situate ES in its conceptual context, (b) illustrate the main varieties of studies thus far conducted by experimental semioticians, (c) illustrate three main themes of investigation which have emerged within this line of research, and (d) consider implications of this work for cognitive neuroscience. PMID:21369364

  3. Summary of experimental talks

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1999-12-08

    This final talk of the meeting briefly discussed a number of experimental topics that the author found particularly interesting in the area of High Energy Physics. It also includes some critical comments about the future direction of their discipline.

  4. Nuclear test experimental science

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Bucciarelli, G.; Carter, J.; Cherniak, J.; Donohue, M.L.; Kirvel, R.D.; MacGregor, P.; Reid, S.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory under the following topics: prompt diagnostics; experimental modeling, design, and analysis; detector development; streak-camera data systems; weapons supporting research.

  5. Designing an Experimental "Accident"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picker, Lester

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experimental "accident" that resulted in much student learning, seeks help in the identification of nematodes, and suggests biology teachers introduce similar accidents into their teaching to stimulate student interest. (PEB)

  6. Theoretical and experimental studies of two Co(II) and Ni(II) coordination complex with N,O donor 2-chloro-6-{[(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]amino}-4 nitrophenol ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmariya, Brajendra S.; Tiwari, Sandeep; Tiwari, Anjali; Mishra, A. P.; Naikoo, Gowhar Ahmad; Pandit, Umar J.

    2016-07-01

    Here we report two mononuclear Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes of general formula [M(L)2(H2O)].2H2O; {M = CoII & NiII} derived from bidentate 2-chloro-6-{[(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]amino}-4 nitrophenol ligand (HL). These compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (FT-IR, electronic and 1H-NMR), molar conductance, thermal, PXRD, SEM and electrochemical studies. Distorted octahedral geometry was proposed around the metal center with ligand (HL). The PXRD and SEM analysis shows the crystalline nature of complexes. The broadening of diffraction peaks were explained in terms of domain size and the lattice strain according to Scherrer and Williamson-Hall method. TG of the synthesized complexes illustrates their general decomposition pattern and thermal stability. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters viz. activation energy (E∗), pre-exponential factor (Z), entropy of activation (ΔS∗), enthalpy of activation (ΔH∗) and free energy of activation (ΔG∗) of degradation process were also evaluated using Coats-Redfern (C-R), Piloyan-Novikova (P-N) and Horowitz-Metzger (H-M) methods for both complexes assuming first order degradation. The optical band gap values of complexes were found to be in good agreement with calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap (ΔE) and lie in semiconducting range. The cyclic voltammetric studies of synthesized compounds were carried out in order to examine their electrochemical behavior. In addition theoretical calculations by means of DFT at B3LYP level were incorporated to support the experimental findings.

  7. Frozen waves: experimental generation.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Tarcio A; Gesualdi, Marcos R R; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2012-06-01

    Frozen waves (FWs) are very interesting particular cases of nondiffracting beams whose envelopes are static and whose longitudinal intensity patterns can be chosen a priori. We present here for the first time (that we know of) the experimental generation of FWs. The experimental realization of these FWs was obtained using a holographic setup for the optical reconstruction of computer generated holograms (CGH), based on a 4-f Fourier filtering system and a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), where FW CGHs were first computationally implemented, and later electronically implemented, on the LC-SLM for optical reconstruction. The experimental results are in agreement with the corresponding theoretical analytical solutions and hold excellent prospects for implementation in scientific and technological applications.

  8. Experimental scattershot boson sampling

    PubMed Central

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J.; Galvão, Ernesto F.; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy. PMID:26601164

  9. Self-experimentation.

    PubMed

    Davis, John K

    2003-01-01

    Except in certain cases of unusual risk, self-experimentation should not be encouraged. It is usually scientifically inadequate for lack of proper controls and sufficient subjects to generate meaningful results. It is also inadequate as an ethical test because even if lay persons are also enrolled, self-experimentation is neither necessary nor sufficient to establish that they may participate. It is not necessary to establish that lay persons may participate because institutional ethics review and informed consent are better ways to determine this. It is not sufficient because the investigator may be more risk accepting or not medically typical. Moreover, because scientific research is now done in teams, self-experimentation may involve undue influence when junior investigators participate as research subjects.

  10. Experimental quantum channel simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, He; Liu, Chang; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Zheng-Da; Yao, Xing-Can; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Sanders, Barry C.; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Quantum simulation is of great importance in quantum information science. Here, we report an experimental quantum channel simulator imbued with an algorithm for imitating the behavior of a general class of quantum systems. The reported quantum channel simulator consists of four single-qubit gates and one controlled-not gate. All types of quantum channels can be decomposed by the algorithm and implemented on this device. We deploy our system to simulate various quantum channels, such as quantum-noise channels and weak quantum measurement. Our results advance experimental quantum channel simulation, which is integral to the goal of quantum information processing.

  11. SPHINX experimenters information package

    SciTech Connect

    Zarick, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    This information package was prepared for both new and experienced users of the SPHINX (Short Pulse High Intensity Nanosecond X-radiator) flash X-Ray facility. It was compiled to help facilitate experiment design and preparation for both the experimenter(s) and the SPHINX operational staff. The major areas covered include: Recording Systems Capabilities,Recording System Cable Plant, Physical Dimensions of SPHINX and the SPHINX Test cell, SPHINX Operating Parameters and Modes, Dose Rate Map, Experiment Safety Approval Form, and a Feedback Questionnaire. This package will be updated as the SPHINX facilities and capabilities are enhanced.

  12. Experimental probes of axions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  13. Questioning and Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutanen, Arto

    2014-08-01

    The paper is a philosophical analysis of experimentation. The philosophical framework of the analysis is the interrogative model of inquiry developed by Hintikka. The basis of the model is explicit and well-formed logic of questions and answers. The framework allows us to formulate a flexible logic of experimentation. In particular, the formulated model can be interpreted realistically. Moreover, the model demonstrates an explicit logic of knowledge acquisition. So, the natural extension of the model is to apply it to an analysis of the learning process.

  14. Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Ward W. McCaughey

    1996-01-01

    The Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, established in 1961, is representative of the vast expanses of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) found east of the Continental Divide in Montana, southwest Alberta, and Wyoming. Discrete generations of even-age lodgepole stands form a mosaic typical of the fireprone forests at moderate to high altitudes in the Northern Rocky...

  15. Research, Innovation and Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    This is the second in a series of annual presentations on the innovative, experimental, and research activities conducted at Santa Fe Junior College. The studies include: classroom activities, college-wide research, short statements on different instructional approaches to formal dissertation abstracts, subjective observations, intricate…

  16. Experimental fluvial geomorphology

    SciTech Connect

    Schumm, S.A.; Mosley, M.P.; Weaver, W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors bring together the results of several years of experimental work in drainage basin evolution, hydrology, river-channel morphology, and sedimentology. These investigations are related to real-world applications, particularly geological exploration and mapping. This text shows how awareness of natural phenomena can improve management of the natural environment, such as the control of rivers and eroding gullies.

  17. Experimental review on pentaquarks

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, M. V. Mizuk, R. V.

    2008-04-15

    The experimental evidence for pentaquarks is reviewed and compared with the experiments that do not see any sign of pentaquarks. This paper is based on a lecture given at the 33rd ITEP Winter School of Physics in the beginning of 2005. Results obtained since then are summarized in the epilogue.

  18. Experimental review on pentaquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, M. V.; Mizuk, R. V.

    2008-04-01

    The experimental evidence for pentaquarks is reviewed and compared with the experiments that do not see any sign of pentaquarks. This paper is based on a lecture given at the 33rd ITEP Winter School of Physics in the beginning of 2005. Results obtained since then are summarized in the epilogue.

  19. Maybeso Experimental Forest.

    Treesearch

    Valerie Rapp

    2004-01-01

    The Maybeso Experimental Forest is in southeast Alaska within the Tongass National Forest, the largest national forest in the United States and home to the Northern Hemi-sphere's largest temperate rain forest. Located about 42 miles west of Ketchikan, Alaska, it is on Prince of Wales Island, the largest island of the Alexander Archipelago and the third largest...

  20. The Experimental College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiklejohn, Alexander; Powell, John Walker, Ed.

    In the early twentieth century, Alexander Meiklejohn believed the undergraduate college must teach students how to think. He aspired to make students into thinking, caring, active citizens with the intellectual skills to participate in a democratic society. In 1927, with the founding of the Experimental College at the University of Wisconsin, he…

  1. Kane Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Northeastern Research Station

    1999-01-01

    The 1,737 acres of forest land that comprise the Kane Experimental Forest (KEF), were originally part of the Allegheny National Forest. On March 23, 1932, the land was formally dedicated to research use for the Allegheny Forest Experiment Station (now the Northeastern Research Station). The KEF was established to promote the study of the unglaciated portion of the...

  2. Communicating Uncertain Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alexander L.; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments examined when laypeople attribute unexpected experimental outcomes to error, in foresight and in hindsight, along with their judgments of whether the data should be published. Participants read vignettes describing hypothetical experiments, along with the result of the initial observation, considered as either a possibility…

  3. The Experimental College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiklejohn, Alexander; Powell, John Walker, Ed.

    In the early twentieth century, Alexander Meiklejohn believed the undergraduate college must teach students how to think. He aspired to make students into thinking, caring, active citizens with the intellectual skills to participate in a democratic society. In 1927, with the founding of the Experimental College at the University of Wisconsin, he…

  4. Communicating Uncertain Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alexander L.; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments examined when laypeople attribute unexpected experimental outcomes to error, in foresight and in hindsight, along with their judgments of whether the data should be published. Participants read vignettes describing hypothetical experiments, along with the result of the initial observation, considered as either a possibility…

  5. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MAINTENANCE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1962-01-22

    A method of housing experimental animals such as mice in individual tube- like plastic enclosures is described. Contrary to experience, when this was tried with metal the mice did not become panicky. Group housing, with its attendant difficulties, may thus be dispensed with. (AEC)

  6. Trends in animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rosangela; Brandau, Ricardo; Gomes, Walter J; Braile, Domingo M

    2009-01-01

    The search of the understanding of etiological factors, mechanisms and treatment of the diseases has been taking to the development of several animal models in the last decades. To discuss aspects related to animal models of experimentation, animal choice and current trends in this field in our country. In addition, this study evaluated the frequency of experimental articles in medical journals. Five Brazilian journals indexed by LILACS, SciELO, MEDLINE, and recently incorporate for Institute for Scientific Information Journal of Citation Reports were analyzed. All the papers published in those journals, between 2007 and 2008, that used animal models, were selected based on the abstracts. Of the total of 832 articles published in the period, 92 (11.1%) experimentation papers were selected. The number of experimental articles ranged from 5.2% to 17.9% of the global content of the journal. In the instructions to the authors, four (80%) journals presented explicit reference to the ethical principles in the conduction of studies with animals. The induced animal models represented 100% of the articles analyzed in this study. The rat was the most employed animal in the analyzed articles (78.3%). The present study can contribute, supplying subsidies for adoption of future editorials policies regarding the publication of animal research papers in Brazilian Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery.

  7. Bartlett Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Jane Gamal-Eldin

    1998-01-01

    The Bartlett Experimental Forest is a field laboratory for research on the ecology and management of northern forest ecosystems. Research on the Bartlett includes: 1) extensive investigations on structure and dynamics of forests at several levels, and developing management alternatives to reflect an array of values and benefits sought by users of forest lands, 2) a...

  8. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  9. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  10. Experimental design and husbandry.

    PubMed

    Festing, M F

    1997-01-01

    Rodent gerontology experiments should be carefully designed and correctly analyzed so as to provide the maximum amount of information for the minimum amount of work. There are five criteria for a "good" experimental design. These are applicable both to in vivo and in vitro experiments: (1) The experiment should be unbiased so that it is possible to make a true comparison between treatment groups in the knowledge that no one group has a more favorable "environment." (2) The experiment should have high precision so that if there is a true treatment effect there will be a good chance of detecting it. This is obtained by selecting uniform material such as isogenic strains, which are free of pathogenic microorganisms, and by using randomized block experimental designs. It can also be increased by increasing the number of observations. However, increasing the size of the experiment beyond a certain point will only marginally increase precision. (3) The experiment should have a wide range of applicability so it should be designed to explore the sensitivity of the observed experimental treatment effect to other variables such as the strain, sex, diet, husbandry, and age of the animals. With in vitro data, variables such as media composition and incubation times may also be important. The importance of such variables can often be evaluated efficiently using "factorial" experimental designs, without any substantial increase in the overall number of animals. (4) The experiment should be simple so that there is little chance of groups becoming muddled. Generally, formal experimental designs that are planned before the work starts should be used. (5) The experiment should provide the ability to calculate uncertainty. In other words, it should be capable of being statistically analyzed so that the level of confidence in the results can be quantified.

  11. Teaching experimental design.

    PubMed

    Fry, Derek J

    2014-01-01

    Awareness of poor design and published concerns over study quality stimulated the development of courses on experimental design intended to improve matters. This article describes some of the thinking behind these courses and how the topics can be presented in a variety of formats. The premises are that education in experimental design should be undertaken with an awareness of educational principles, of how adults learn, and of the particular topics in the subject that need emphasis. For those using laboratory animals, it should include ethical considerations, particularly severity issues, and accommodate learners not confident with mathematics. Basic principles, explanation of fully randomized, randomized block, and factorial designs, and discussion of how to size an experiment form the minimum set of topics. A problem-solving approach can help develop the skills of deciding what are correct experimental units and suitable controls in different experimental scenarios, identifying when an experiment has not been properly randomized or blinded, and selecting the most efficient design for particular experimental situations. Content, pace, and presentation should suit the audience and time available, and variety both within a presentation and in ways of interacting with those being taught is likely to be effective. Details are given of a three-day course based on these ideas, which has been rated informative, educational, and enjoyable, and can form a postgraduate module. It has oral presentations reinforced by group exercises and discussions based on realistic problems, and computer exercises which include some analysis. Other case studies consider a half-day format and a module for animal technicians. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Experimental temporal quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2016-11-01

    Temporal steering is a form of temporal correlation between the initial and final state of a quantum system. It is a temporal analogue of the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (spatial) steering. We demonstrate, by measuring the photon polarization, that temporal steering allows two parties to verify if they have been interacting with the same particle, even if they have no information about what happened with the particle in between the measurements. This is the first experimental study of temporal steering. We also performed experimental tests, based on the violation of temporal steering inequalities, of the security of two quantum key distribution protocols against individual attacks. Thus, these results can lead to applications for secure quantum communications and quantum engineering.

  13. Geoengineering as Collective Experimentation.

    PubMed

    Stilgoe, Jack

    2016-06-01

    Geoengineering is defined as the 'deliberate and large-scale intervention in the Earth's climatic system with the aim of reducing global warming'. The technological proposals for doing this are highly speculative. Research is at an early stage, but there is a strong consensus that technologies would, if realisable, have profound and surprising ramifications. Geoengineering would seem to be an archetype of technology as social experiment, blurring lines that separate research from deployment and scientific knowledge from technological artefacts. Looking into the experimental systems of geoengineering, we can see the negotiation of what is known and unknown. The paper argues that, in renegotiating such systems, we can approach a new mode of governance-collective experimentation. This has important ramifications not just for how we imagine future geoengineering technologies, but also for how we govern geoengineering experiments currently under discussion.

  14. Experimental temporal quantum steering

    PubMed Central

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Temporal steering is a form of temporal correlation between the initial and final state of a quantum system. It is a temporal analogue of the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (spatial) steering. We demonstrate, by measuring the photon polarization, that temporal steering allows two parties to verify if they have been interacting with the same particle, even if they have no information about what happened with the particle in between the measurements. This is the first experimental study of temporal steering. We also performed experimental tests, based on the violation of temporal steering inequalities, of the security of two quantum key distribution protocols against individual attacks. Thus, these results can lead to applications for secure quantum communications and quantum engineering. PMID:27901121

  15. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Walter, Chris [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States

    2016-07-12

    In this talk, I will review how a set of experiments in the last decade has given us our current understanding of neutrino properties.  I will show how experiments in the last year or two have clarified this picture, and will discuss how new experiments about to start will address remaining questions.  I will particularly emphasize the relationship between various experimental techniques.

  16. Experimental Robot Psychology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-05

    Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be...05 NOV 1985 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-11-1985 to 00-11-1985 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Robot Psychology 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 21 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE

  17. USACDEC Experimentation Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Evaluated impact of assigning five crewmen per tank in selected armor units (conducted in West Germany and several CONUS posts). TASYAAL Effectiveness of...in the form of findings, assessments, and suggested Improvements. These test results have great potential impact on the decision making process. They...reports of experimentation are ODEC’s most widely distributed and visible product. Many CDEC reports have had significant impact on the organization

  18. MSFC Skylab experimenter's reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The methods and techniques for experiment development and integration that evolved during the Skylab Program are described to facilitate transferring this experience to experimenters in future manned space programs. Management responsibilities and the sequential process of experiment evolution from initial concept through definition, development, integration, operation and postflight analysis are outlined in the main text and amplified, as appropriate, in appendixes. Emphasis is placed on specific lessons learned on Skylab that are worthy of consideration by future programs.

  19. Network Science Experimentation Vision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Collaborative Research Alliance (CS CRA) and Applied Research and Experimentation Partner (AREP) Programs 19 3.3 Researcher Empowerment and...comprising of social, communications and information networks. Sometimes it is better for users to look for information that can be found on websites or...in data repositories; other times it is better for users to consult subject matter experts (SMEs); and many times users should employ a hybrid

  20. Blois V: Experimental summary

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.G.

    1993-09-01

    The author gives a summary talk of the best experimental data given at the Vth Blois Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering. He addresses the following eight areas in his talk: total and elastic cross sections; single diffractive excitation; electron-proton scattering; di-jets and rapidity gaps; areas of future study; spins and asymmetries; high-transverse momentum and masses at the Tevatron; and disoriented chiral condensates and cosmic radiation.

  1. The Massabesic Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Thomas W. McConkey; Wendell E. Smith

    1958-01-01

    White pine and fire! These two - the tree and its destroyer, fire - are keys to the history and present make-up of the research program on the Massabesic Experimental Forest at Alfred, Maine. The Forest was established in the late 1930's to study the management of eastern white pine. During World War II, it was shut down, and reopened again in 1946. Then, in 1947...

  2. SAA drift: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  3. Genetics of experimental hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dominiczak, A F; Clark, J S; Jeffs, B; Anderson, N H; Negrin, C D; Lee, W K; Brosnan, M J

    1998-12-01

    Experimental models of genetic hypertension are used to develop paradigms to study human essential hypertension while removing some of the complexity inherent in the study of human subjects. Since 1991 several quantitative trait loci responsible for blood pressure regulation have been identified in various rat crosses. More recently, a series of interesting quantitative trait loci influencing cardiac hypertrophy, stroke, metabolic syndrome and renal damage has also been described. It is recognized that the identification of large chromosomal regions containing a quantitative trait locus is only a first step towards gene identification. The next step is the production of congenic strains and substrains to confirm the existence of the quantitative trait locus and to narrow down the chromosomal region of interest. Several congenic strains have already been produced, with further refinement of the methodology currently in progress. The ultimate goal is to achieve positional cloning of the causal gene, a task which has so far been elusive. There are several areas of cross-fertilization between experimental and human genetics of hypertension, with a successful transfer of two loci directly from rats to humans and with new pharmacogenetic approaches which may be utilized in both experimental and clinical settings.

  4. Woodward Effect Experimental Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Paul

    2004-02-01

    The work of J. F. Woodward (1990 1996a; 1996b; 1998; 2002a; 2002b; 2004) on the existence of ``mass fluctuations'' and their use in exotic propulsion schemes was examined for possible application in improving space flight propulsion and power generation. Woodward examined Einstein's General Relativity Theory (GRT) and assumed that if the strong Machian interpretation of GRT as well as gravitational / inertia like Wheeler-Feynman radiation reaction forces hold, then when an elementary particle is accelerated through a potential gradient, its rest mass should fluctuate around its mean value during its acceleration. Woodward also used GRT to clarify the precise experimental conditions necessary for observing and exploiting these mass fluctuations or ``Woodward effect'' (W-E). Later, in collaboration with his ex-graduate student T. Mahood, they also pushed the experimental verification boundaries of these proposals. If these purported mass fluctuations occur as Woodward claims, and his assumption that gravity and inertia are both byproducts of the same GRT based phenomenon per Mach's Principle is correct, then many innovative applications such as propellantless propulsion and gravitational exotic matter generators may be feasible. This paper examines the reality of mass fluctuations and the feasibility of using the W-E to design propellantless propulsion devices in the near to mid-term future. The latest experimental results, utilizing MHD-like force rectification systems, will also be presented.

  5. Play, experimentation and creativity.

    PubMed

    Caper, R

    1996-10-01

    Beginning with Klein's description of a psychotic boy's inability to play, published in 1930, the author explores the relationship between play and symbol-formation, and the use of play by children and adults as a serious type of experimentation by means of which one learns about the internal and external worlds. In this view, play is a way of externalising fantasies originating in one's inner world so they may be seen and learned about. Play is also a vehicle of projection, a fact that allows one to use it to assess the impact of one's inner world on the external world, especially on the minds of one's objects. In this way, playing becomes a way of probing external reality as well. This type of learning depends on the ability to keep internal and external realities distinct even while projecting the former into the latter. In psychotic states, this ability is lost, and the psychotic patient's projections, instead of being usable as a form of playful experimentation, lead to delusions and claustrophobic anxiety. A brief clinical vignette is presented to illustrate these points. The author then explores the application of these ideas to an understanding of artistic creativity, and makes some observations about possible underlying unities between play, scientific experimentation and artistic creativity.

  6. Experimental alcohol blastopathy.

    PubMed

    Sandor, S

    1988-01-01

    Experimental data are presented with respect to "experimental alcohol blastopathy" performed in our laboratory. As in our interpretation the notion of blastopathy involves both pathological changes during preimplantation development due to previous, preconceptional or preimplantation influences and later, pre- or postnatal effects induced by factors active during the preimplantation period, up to now the following experimental models were applied (on rats and mice): chronic and acute maternal, biparental or paternal ethanol alcoholization; preimplantation treatment with acetaldehyde or disulfiram followed by ethanol administration; acute ethanol intoxication before implantation on the background of chronic maternal ethanol intake; chronic maternal intake of various beverages. The main components of experimental alcohol blastopathy detected (by using a complex control methodology) were: pathological changes during the preimplantation developmental stages (lower mean number of embryos/animal, retardation of development, lowered migration rate of the embryos from the oviduct to the uterus, higher number of pathological morphological features), delayed implantation, disturbances of the early postimplantation development, retarded late foetal and placental growth. The effect of ethanol may be direct (ethanol being detectable in the oviductal and uterine fluid after both acute and chronic alcoholization) or indirect, via changes of the maternal macro- or microenvironment. The increase of the maternal blood acetaldehyde level may contribute to the appearance of alcohol blastopathy. Chronic beer and wine intake and acute intoxication with cognac suggest - up to now - the enhancing effect of beverage congeners. The noxious effect of acute ethanol intoxication superposed to chronic alcoholization is more marked that the separate effect of the two kinds of treatment. The chronic ethanol intake of fertilizing males (in mice) leads, both in the case of treated or untreated

  7. Experimental turbine VT-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Milčák, Petr; Noga, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The experimental air turbine VT400 is located in hall laboratories of the Department of Power System Engineering. It is a single-stage air turbine located in the suction of the compressor. It is able to solve various problems concerning the construction solution of turbine stages. The content of the article will deal mainly with the description of measurements on this turbine. The up-to-now research on this test rig will be briefly mentioned, too, as well as the description of the ongoing reconstruction.

  8. Experimental models of stress

    PubMed Central

    Patchev, Vladimir K.; Patchev, Alexandre V.

    2006-01-01

    Illustrating the complexity of the stress response and its multifaceted manifestations is the leading idea of this overview of experimental paradigms used for stress induction in laboratory animals. The description of key features of models based on naturalistic stressors, pharmacological challenges, and genomic manipulations is complemented by comprehensive analysis of physiological, behavioral, neurochemical, and endocrine changes and their appropriatness as outcome readouts. Particular attention has been paid to the role of sex and age as determinants of the dynamics of the stress response. Possible translational applications of stress-inducing paradigms as models of disease are briefly sketched. PMID:17290800

  9. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1964-04-01

    A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

  10. Outsourcing of experimental work.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    With the development of new technologies for simultaneous analysis of many genes, transcripts, or proteins (the "omics" revolution), it has become common to outsource parts of the experimental work. In order to maintain the integrity of the research projects, it is important that the interphase between the researcher and the service is further developed. This involves robust protocols for sample preparation, an informed choice of analytical tool, development of standards for individual technologies, and transparent data analysis. This chapter introduces some of the problems related to analysis of RNA samples in the "omics" context and gives a few hints and key references related to sample preparation for the non-specialist.

  11. [Animal experimentation in Israel].

    PubMed

    Epstein, Yoram; Leshem, Micah

    2002-04-01

    In 1994 the Israeli parliament (Knesset) amended the Cruelty to Animals Act to regulate the use of experimental animals. Accordingly, animal experiments can only be carried out for the purposes of promoting health and medical science, reducing suffering, advancing scientific research, testing or production of materials and products (excluding cosmetics and cleaning products) and education. Animal experiments are only permitted if alternative methods are not possible. The National Board for Animal Experimentation was established to implement the law. Its members are drawn from government ministries, representatives of doctors, veterinarians, and industry organizations, animal rights groups, and academia. In order to carry out an animal experiment, the institution, researchers involved, and the specific experiment, all require approval by the Board. To date the Board has approved some 35 institutions, about half are public institutions (universities, hospitals and colleges) and the rest industrial firms in biotechnology and pharmaceutics. In 2000, 250,000 animals were used in research, 85% were rodents, 11% fowls, 1,000 other farm animals, 350 dogs and cats, and 39 monkeys. Academic institutions used 74% of the animals and industry the remainder. We also present summarized data on the use of animals in research in other countries.

  12. Experimentation in machine discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Simon, Herbert A.

    1990-01-01

    KEKADA, a system that is capable of carrying out a complex series of experiments on problems from the history of science, is described. The system incorporates a set of experimentation strategies that were extracted from the traces of the scientists' behavior. It focuses on surprises to constrain its search, and uses its strategies to generate hypotheses and to carry out experiments. Some strategies are domain independent, whereas others incorporate knowledge of a specific domain. The domain independent strategies include magnification, determining scope, divide and conquer, factor analysis, and relating different anomalous phenomena. KEKADA represents an experiment as a set of independent and dependent entities, with apparatus variables and a goal. It represents a theory either as a sequence of processes or as abstract hypotheses. KEKADA's response is described to a particular problem in biochemistry. On this and other problems, the system is capable of carrying out a complex series of experiments to refine domain theories. Analysis of the system and its behavior on a number of different problems has established its generality, but it has also revealed the reasons why the system would not be a good experimental scientist.

  13. Experimental Models of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, depending on its severity. Regardless of the extent of tissue injury, acute pancreatitis is a completely reversible process with evident normal tissue architecture after recovery. Its pathogenic mechanism has been known to be closely related to intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible tissue damage such as acinar cell atrophy and pancreatic fibrosis that results in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Recently, many studies of chronic pancreatitis have been prompted by the discovery of the pancreatic stellate cell, which has been identified and distinguished as the key effector cell of pancreatic fibrosis. However, investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of pancreatitis face many obstacles because of its anatomical location and disparate clinical course. Due to these difficulties, most of our knowledge on pancreatitis is based on research conducted using experimental models of pancreatitis. In this review, several experimental models of pancreatitis will be discussed in terms of technique, advantages, and limitations. PMID:24944983

  14. Experimental data filtration algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanta, E.; Tamas, R.; Danisor, A.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental data reduction is an important topic because the resulting information is used to calibrate the theoretical models and to verify the accuracy of their results. The paper presents some ideas used to extract a subset of points from the initial set of points which defines an experimentally acquired curve. The objective is to get a subset with significantly fewer points as the initial data set and which accurately defines a smooth curve that preserves the shape of the initial curve. Being a general study we used only data filtering criteria based geometric features that at a later stage may be related to upper level conditions specific to the phenomenon under investigation. Five algorithms were conceived and implemented in an original software consisting of more than 1800 computer code lines which has a flexible structure that allows us to easily update it using new algorithms. The software instrument was used to process the data of several case studies. Conclusions are drawn regarding the values of the parameters used in the algorithms to decide if a series of points may be considered either noise, or a relevant part of the curve. Being a general analysis, the result is a computer based trial-and-error method that efficiently solves this kind of problems.

  15. Experimental trichinellosis in goats.

    PubMed

    Reina, D; Muñoz-Ojeda, M C; Serrano, F; Molina, J M; Navarrete, I

    1996-03-01

    The susceptibility and distribution of Trichinella spiralis infection in goats were examined in ten autochthonous kids, 2 months old and about 10 kg body weight. The animals were divided into two groups: one experimental group with eight animals, infected with 10,000 T. spiralis 'T1' encysted larvae and a control group with two non-infected animals. All the animals of the experimental group infected by the parasite showed that Trichinella larvae have a special affinity for the tongue, masseters, diaphragm, flexor-extensor muscles, intercostal muscles and myocardium in decreasing order. The ELISA test carried out showed the first increments of optical density (OD) on Day 16 postinfection (p.i), peaking on Days 37-44 p.i. and remaining elevated from this day on, with a slight fall at the end of the experiment (Day 90 p.i.). No alterations were observed in the OD obtained in control animals throughout the experiment. The great muscular establishment of T. spiralis larvae and the sigmoidal evolution of antibody levels confirm the host character of the goat to the parasite.

  16. Experimental evolution of multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, William C.; Denison, R. Ford; Borrello, Mark; Travisano, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Multicellularity was one of the most significant innovations in the history of life, but its initial evolution remains poorly understood. Using experimental evolution, we show that key steps in this transition could have occurred quickly. We subjected the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to an environment in which we expected multicellularity to be adaptive. We observed the rapid evolution of clustering genotypes that display a novel multicellular life history characterized by reproduction via multicellular propagules, a juvenile phase, and determinate growth. The multicellular clusters are uniclonal, minimizing within-cluster genetic conflicts of interest. Simple among-cell division of labor rapidly evolved. Early multicellular strains were composed of physiologically similar cells, but these subsequently evolved higher rates of programmed cell death (apoptosis), an adaptation that increases propagule production. These results show that key aspects of multicellular complexity, a subject of central importance to biology, can readily evolve from unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:22307617

  17. Experimental evolution gone wild.

    PubMed

    Scheinin, M; Riebesell, U; Rynearson, T A; Lohbeck, K T; Collins, S

    2015-05-06

    Because of their large population sizes and rapid cell division rates, marine microbes have, or can generate, ample variation to fuel evolution over a few weeks or months, and subsequently have the potential to evolve in response to global change. Here we measure evolution in the marine diatom Skeletonema marinoi evolved in a natural plankton community in CO2-enriched mesocosms deployed in situ. Mesocosm enclosures are typically used to study how the species composition and biogeochemistry of marine communities respond to environmental shifts, but have not been used for experimental evolution to date. Using this approach, we detect a large evolutionary response to CO2 enrichment in a focal marine diatom, where population growth rate increased by 1.3-fold in high CO2-evolved lineages. This study opens an exciting new possibility of carrying out in situ evolution experiments to understand how marine microbial communities evolve in response to environmental change.

  18. An Experimental LISP Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lun, Wang

    1987-04-01

    This paper presents a multi-microprocessor LISP machine whose goal is to exploit the inherent parallelism in the LISP programs fully. The base architecture is a MIMD architecture based on a hybrid model for combinating data driven, demand driven and VoN Neumann process schemes. The basic evaluation strategy is data driven. Lazy evaluation mechanism is introduced to avoid unnecessary and unsafe computations. An experimental system with the four processor elements has been built in HIT, China. The system consists of a Z80 microcomputer and three TP8O1s interconnected through three buses. Each processor evaluates a part of programs asynchronously. The shared memory is divided into two parts: list cell area and enviroment area, each of which has the indepen-dent common bus to avoid the bus bottleneck.

  19. Planetary impact experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Schultz, Peter H.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1987-01-01

    An understanding of impact processes in low- and microgravity environments would be advanced significantly by the construction and use of an impact facility on the Space Station. It is proposed that initial studies begin as soon as possible in ground-based impact laboratories, on the NASA KC-135 Reduced-Gravity Aircraft, and in existing drop towers. The resulting experience and information base could then be applied toward an experiment package designed for use on Shuttle orbiters to support pilot studies in orbital environments. These experiments, as well as the first efforts made on the IOC Space Station, should involve the impact of various free-floating targets; such studies would yield a substantial scientific return while providing valuable experience and engineering information for use in refining the design of the dedicated Space Station Impact Facility. The dedicated facility should be designed to support impact experimentation, including but not limited to cratering, asteroid and ring-particle dynamics, and accretional processes.

  20. Experimental Sloshing Reference Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lada, C.; Such-Taboada, M.; Ngan, I.; Grigore, L.; Appolloni, M.; Roure, S.; Murray, N.; Mendes Leal, M.; de Wilde, D.; Longo, J.; Bureo-Dacal, R.; Cozzani, A.; Laine, B.

    2014-06-01

    This article describes the sloshing experiment performed on the HYDRA multi-axis hydraulic shaker at ESTEC. Two tank geometries, a rectangular tank and a pill shaped tank, were excited in the lateral direction. Both tanks, manufactured from a transparent material in order to provide high visibility of the phenomenon, were filled with water and several fill ratios were tested, varying the amplitude of the input and the sweep rate. The results of the test are presented from a structural point of view, with the main objective to study the interface force due to dynamic fluid sloshing motion. An investigation of the behaviour of the water around the main resonance of the assembly is conducted through the observation of the identified modes and the damping values. The experimental results confirm the amplification effect at low frequency caused by water sloshing motion and a comparison with data from numerical simulation is provided.

  1. Future experimental programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2013-12-01

    I was asked to discuss future experimental programs even though I am a theorist. As a result, I present my own personal views on where the field is, and where it is going, based on what I myself have been working on. In particular, I discuss why we need expeditions into high energies to find clues to where the relevant energy scale is for dark matter, baryon asymmetry and neutrino mass. I also argue that the next energy frontier machine should be justified on the basis of what we know, namely the mass of the Higgs boson, so that we will learn what energy we should aim at once we nail the Higgs sector. Finally, I make remarks on dark energy.

  2. Experimental Quantum Coin Tossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Terriza, G.; Vaziri, A.; Ursin, R.; Zeilinger, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter we present the first implementation of a quantum coin-tossing protocol. This protocol belongs to a class of “two-party” cryptographic problems, where the communication partners distrust each other. As with a number of such two-party protocols, the best implementation of the quantum coin tossing requires qutrits, resulting in a higher security than using qubits. In this way, we have also performed the first complete quantum communication protocol with qutrits. In our experiment the two partners succeeded to remotely toss a row of coins using photons entangled in the orbital angular momentum. We also show the experimental bounds of a possible cheater and the ways of detecting him.

  3. Fusion of experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gesú, Vito; Maccarone, Maria Concetta

    The integration of information from various sensory systems is one of the most difficult challenges in understanding both perception and cognition. For example, the problem of auditory-visual integration is a correspondence problem between perceived auditory and visual scenes. Two main questions arise when designing data analysis systems: what is the useful information to be integrated?, and what are the integration rules? The problem of integrating information becomes relevant whenever: (a) the same kind of data are detected by spatially distributed sensors; (b) heterogeneous data are detected by different sensors; (c) heterogeneous distributed data are involved. General problems concerning the integration of experimental data are reviewed. The case of the BeppoSAX X-ray astronomical satellite is given as an example.

  4. Experimental evolution gone wild

    PubMed Central

    Scheinin, M.; Riebesell, U.; Rynearson, T. A.; Lohbeck, K. T.; Collins, S.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their large population sizes and rapid cell division rates, marine microbes have, or can generate, ample variation to fuel evolution over a few weeks or months, and subsequently have the potential to evolve in response to global change. Here we measure evolution in the marine diatom Skeletonema marinoi evolved in a natural plankton community in CO2-enriched mesocosms deployed in situ. Mesocosm enclosures are typically used to study how the species composition and biogeochemistry of marine communities respond to environmental shifts, but have not been used for experimental evolution to date. Using this approach, we detect a large evolutionary response to CO2 enrichment in a focal marine diatom, where population growth rate increased by 1.3-fold in high CO2-evolved lineages. This study opens an exciting new possibility of carrying out in situ evolution experiments to understand how marine microbial communities evolve in response to environmental change. PMID:25833241

  5. Experimentalism in bioethics research.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, T F

    1983-05-01

    Basson's commentary on my proposals regarding the structure and function of research in bioethics provides a welcome opportunity for extended comparison of standard approaches with the suggestions made in 'What Bioethics Should Be.' I begin by noting a common assumption underlying our respective views. I then address points of fundamental difference, indicating why the experimental method proposed in my original essay presents a potentially more productive strategy for examining moral issues in biomedicine. In the latter respect, I certainly disagree with Basson's contention that "we are unable to test" metaethical hypotheses "against reality" (Basson, p. 185) - a proposition which seems no more defensible than the equally untenable claim that we cannot refine methods of natural science research through examination of their usefulness in advancing our understanding of the correlation of events in nature.

  6. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  7. Experimental quantum Hamiltonian learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Paesani, Stefano; Santagati, Raffaele; Knauer, Sebastian; Gentile, Antonio A.; Wiebe, Nathan; Petruzzella, Maurangelo; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Rarity, John G.; Laing, Anthony; Thompson, Mark G.

    2017-06-01

    The efficient characterization of quantum systems, the verification of the operations of quantum devices and the validation of underpinning physical models, are central challenges for quantum technologies and fundamental physics. The computational cost of such studies could be improved by machine learning enhanced by quantum simulators. Here we interface two different quantum systems through a classical channel--a silicon-photonics quantum simulator and an electron spin in a diamond nitrogen-vacancy centre--and use the former to learn the Hamiltonian of the latter via Bayesian inference. We learn the salient Hamiltonian parameter with an uncertainty of approximately 10-5. Furthermore, an observed saturation in the learning algorithm suggests deficiencies in the underlying Hamiltonian model, which we exploit to further improve the model. We implement an interactive version of the protocol and experimentally show its ability to characterize the operation of the quantum photonic device.

  8. Experimental Quantum Error Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xian-Min; Yi, Zhen-Huan; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Fei; Yang, Tao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Faithful transmission of quantum information is a crucial ingredient in quantum communication networks. To overcome the unavoidable decoherence in a noisy channel, to date, many efforts have been made to transmit one state by consuming large numbers of time-synchronized ancilla states. However, such huge demands of quantum resources are hard to meet with current technology and this restricts practical applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate quantum error detection, an economical approach to reliably protecting a qubit against bit-flip errors. Arbitrary unknown polarization states of single photons and entangled photons are converted into time bins deterministically via a modified Franson interferometer. Noise arising in both 10 m and 0.8 km fiber, which induces associated errors on the reference frame of time bins, is filtered when photons are detected. The demonstrated resource efficiency and state independence make this protocol a promising candidate for implementing a real-world quantum communication network. PMID:22953047

  9. Experimental Boson Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Andrew; Broome, Matthew; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Rahimi-Keshari, Saleh; Ralph, Timothy; Dove, Justin; Aaronson, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Quantum computers are unnecessary for exponentially-efficient computation or simulation if the Extended Church-Turing thesis--a foundational tenet of computer science--is correct. The thesis would be directly contradicted by a physical device that efficiently performs a task believed to be intractable for classical computers. Such a task is BOSONSAMPLING: obtaining a distribution of n bosons scattered by some linear-optical unitary process. Here we test the central premise of BOSONSAMPLING, experimentally verifying that the amplitudes of 3-photon scattering processes are given by the permanents of submatrices generated from a unitary describing a 6-mode integrated optical circuit. We find the protocol to be robust, working even with the unavoidable effects of photon loss, non-ideal sources, and imperfect detection. Strong evidence against the Extended-Church-Turing thesis will come from scaling to large numbers of photons, which is a much simpler task than building a universal quantum computer.

  10. Experimental adaptive process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, I. A.; Struchalin, G. I.; Straupe, S. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Kravtsov, K. S.; Kulik, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive measurements were recently shown to significantly improve the performance of quantum state tomography. Utilizing information about the system for the online choice of optimal measurements allows one to reach the ultimate bounds of precision for state reconstruction. In this article we generalize an adaptive Bayesian approach to the case of process tomography and experimentally show its superiority in the task of learning unknown quantum operations. Our experiments with photonic polarization qubits cover all types of single-qubit channels. We also discuss instrumental errors and the criteria for evaluation of the ultimate achievable precision in an experiment. It turns out that adaptive tomography provides a lower noise floor in the presence of strong technical noise.

  11. Experimental Physics - Modern Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, R. A.

    1988-10-01

    Designed for physics students treating the underlying basis for modern techniques and the devices used, this timely survey describes current experimental methods in a clear and accessible text. This up-to-date volume provides an essential part of undergraduate physics training; until now, students were often expected to learn many of these methods in the laboratory without proper introduction. The broad coverage of available techniques includes discussion of state-of-the-art electronic equipment, as well as such topics as discrete semiconductor devices, signal processing, thermometry, optical components, nuclear instrumentation, and x-ray diffraction methods. Professor Dunlap's text will serve not only as a complete introduction for majors but also as a reference work for technicians throughout a professional career. In addition to tutorial discussions presented, tables of numerical data and constants are included, further enhancing the book as a permanent reference.

  12. Experimental Literacy Assessment Battery (LAB).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    READING, * LITERACY , EDUCATION, HUMAN RESOURCES, MODELS, EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN, AIR FORCE TRAINING, LANGUAGE, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, VOCABULARY, INFORMATION PROCESSING, COMPREHENSION.

  13. Experimental Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Carl; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Purohit, Milind V.

    2014-08-31

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina, under the leadership of Profs. S.R. Mishra, R. Petti, M.V. Purohit, J.R. Wilson (co-PI's), and C. Rosenfeld (PI), engaged in studies in "Experimental Particle Physics." The group collaborated with similar groups at other universities and at national laboratories to conduct experimental studies of elementary particle properties. We utilized the particle accelerators at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California, and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. Mishra, Rosenfeld, and Petti worked predominantly on neutrino experiments. Experiments conducted in the last fifteen years that used cosmic rays and the core of the sun as a source of neutrinos showed conclusively that, contrary to the former conventional wisdom, the "flavor" of a neutrino is not immutable. A neutrino of flavor "e," "mu," or "tau," as determined from its provenance, may swap its identity with one of the other flavors -- in our jargon, they "oscillate." The oscillation phenomenon is extraordinarily difficult to study because neutrino interactions with our instruments are exceedingly rare -- they travel through the earth mostly unimpeded -- and because they must travel great distances before a substantial proportion have made the identity swap. Three of the experiments that we worked on, MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE utilize a beam of neutrinos from an accelerator at Fermilab to determine the parameters governing the oscillation. Two other experiments that we worked on, NOMAD and MIPP, provide measurements supportive of the oscillation experiments. Good measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters may constitute a "low energy window" on related phenomena that are otherwise unobservable because they would occur only at energies way above the reach of conceivable accelerators. Purohit and Wilson participated in the BaBar experiment

  14. Experimental quantum data locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Zhu; Wu, Cheng; Fukuda, Daiji; You, Lixing; Zhong, Jiaqiang; Numata, Takayuki; Chen, Sijing; Zhang, Weijun; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Lu, Chao-Yang; Wang, Zhen; Ma, Xiongfeng; Fan, Jingyun; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Classical correlation can be locked via quantum means: quantum data locking. With a short secret key, one can lock an exponentially large amount of information in order to make it inaccessible to unauthorized users without the key. Quantum data locking presents a resource-efficient alternative to one-time pad encryption which requires a key no shorter than the message. We report experimental demonstrations of a quantum data locking scheme originally proposed by D. P. DiVincenzo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 067902 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.067902] and a loss-tolerant scheme developed by O. Fawzi et al. [J. ACM 60, 44 (2013), 10.1145/2518131]. We observe that the unlocked amount of information is larger than the key size in both experiments, exhibiting strong violation of the incremental proportionality property of classical information theory. As an application example, we show the successful transmission of a photo over a lossy channel with quantum data (un)locking and error correction.

  15. [Liver transplantation. Experimental aspects].

    PubMed

    Duca, S

    1981-01-01

    Following an overview of the data published in the specialized literature in connection with liver transplantation the author presents original experimental studies in this field. One of the first aspects considered is the stage of obtaining the graft of liver tissue. The selective perfusion was used, in situ, of the dog liver, and conditions were achieved which were similar to those obtained in other methods of graft preparation. Two washing solutions were used: a simple one, currently used in the practice, and another one which was enriched with various substrates. Biochemical parameters of tissue sampled by bioptic puncture have demonstrated that the first solution induces a lowering of the glycogen contents of hepatocytes, and this alters the biological qualities or the graft. The fact is stressed that the obtention of the hepatic tissue for grafting should be considered in fact as an in situ conservation. With regard to the liver transplantation proper it is shown that the author has performed the sector heterotopic procedure in the rat. Vascular anastomoses have been made with histoacryl-N-blau by the method of prosthesis with lost tubing. Problems raised by the vascular re-connection of the auxilliary hepatic tissue, and those related to the space where this tissue should be placed are also discussed in detail. The survival time was not longer than 30 hours.

  16. Experimental Toxoplasmosis in Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Draper, C. C.; Killick-Kendrick, R.; Hutchison, W. M.; Siim, J. Chr.; Garnham, P. C. C.

    1971-01-01

    Two chimpanzees were given by mouth large numbers of viable oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii obtained from the faeces of experimentally infected cats. Before the experiment the first chimpanzee had a positive dye test reaction (1:250), an indication that it had undergone an earlier infection of toxoplasmosis; the serum antibody titres remained unchanged, no evidence of illness was found, and oocysts did not appear in its faeces during the subsequent six weeks. The second chimpanzee showed a negative dye test reaction before infection, and this converted to positive on the 7th day, rose to a peak on the 35th day, and remained high for six months. This animal appeared unwell during the first week, and on the 7th day its blood proved infective to mice; on the 40th day the lymph nodes became enlarged and biopsy specimens of a node and muscle in the 11th week were also infective to mice. No oocysts were passed in the faeces. The presumed cycle in the chimpanzee and in man and the relationships between Toxoplasma and Isospora are discussed. PMID:5575975

  17. Particle physics---Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J.J.; Boynton, P.E.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1991-08-21

    We are continuing a research program in particle astrophysics and high energy experimental particle physics. We have joined the DUMAND Collaboration, which is constructing a deep undersea astrophysical neutrino detector near Hawaii. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions using emulsion chamber techniques were also continued, using balloon flight exposures to ultra-high cosmic ray nuclei (JACEE) and accelerator beams. As members of the DUMAND Collaboration, we have responsibility for development a construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility. We have designed and developed the acoustical positioning system required to permit reconstruction of muon tracks with sufficient precision to meet the astrophysical goals of the experiment. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the database and triggering system to be used. Work has been continuing in other aspects of the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators, using balloon-borne emulsion chambers. On one of the flights we found two nuclear interactions of multiplicity over 1000 -- one with a multiplicity of over 2000 and pseudorapidity density {approximately} 800 in the central region. At the statistical level of the JACEE experiment, the frequency of occurrence of such events is orders of magnitude too large. We have continued our ongoing program to study hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams.

  18. Experimental Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite is an important iron ore mineral and the most prominent Fe-oxide phase in the Earth's crust. The systematic occurrence of magnetite in zones of intense deformation in oceanic core complexes suggests that it may play a role in strain localization in some silicate rocks. We performed a series of high-temperature deformation experiments on synthetic magnetite aggregates and natural single crystals to characterize the rheological behavior of magnetite. As starting material, we used fine-grained magnetite powder that was hot isostatically pressed at 1100°C for several hours, resulting in polycrystalline material with a mean grain size of around 40 μm and containing 3-5% porosity. Samples were deformed to 15-20% axial strain under constant load (approximating constant stress) conditions in a Paterson-type gas apparatus for triaxial deformation at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The aggregates exhibit typical power-law creep behavior. At high stresses, samples deformed by dislocation creep exhibit stress exponents close to 3, revealing a transition to near-Newtonian creep with stress exponents around 1.3 at lower stresses. Natural magnetite single crystals deformed at 1 atm pressure and temperatures between 950°C and 1150 °C also exhibit stress exponents close to 3, but with lower flow stresses and a lower apparent activation energy than the aggregates. Such behavior may result from the different oxygen fugacity buffers used. Crystallographic-preferred orientations in all polycrystalline samples are very weak and corroborate numerical models of CPO development, suggesting that texture development in magnetite may be inherently slow compared with lower symmetry phases. Comparison of our results with experimental deformation data for various silicate minerals suggests that magnetite should be weaker than most silicates during ductile creep in dry igneous rocks.

  19. X-38 Experimental Aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Merski, N. Ronald; Fitzgerald, Steve M.

    2000-01-01

    The X-38 program seeks to demonstrate an autonomously returned orbital test flight vehicle to support the development of an operational Crew Return Vehicle for the International Space Station. The test flight, anticipated in 2002, is intended to demonstrate the entire mission profile of returning Space Station crew members safely back to earth in the event of medical or mechanical emergency. Integral to the formulation of the X-38 flight data book and the design of the thermal protection system, the aerothermodynamic environment is being defined through a synergistic combination of ground based testing and computational fluid dynamics. This report provides an overview of the hypersonic aerothermodynamic wind tunnel program conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in support of the X-38 development. Global and discrete surface heat transfer force and moment, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on scaled models of the proposed X-38 configuration in different test gases at Mach 6, 10 and 20. The test parametrics include angle of attack from 0 to 50 degs, unit Reynolds numbers from 0.3 x 10 (exp 6) to 16 x 10 (exp 6)/ ft, rudder deflections of 0, 2, and 5 deg. and body flap deflections from 0 to 30 deg. Results from hypersonic aerodynamic screening studies that were conducted as the configuration evolved to the present shape at, presented. Heavy gas simulation tests have indicated that the primary real gas effects on X-38 aerodynamics at trim conditions are expected to favorably influence flap effectiveness. Comparisons of the experimental heating and force and moment data to prediction and the current aerodynamic data book are highlighted. The effects of discrete roughness elements on boundary layer transition were investigated at Mach 6 and the development of a transition correlation for the X-38 vehicle is described. Extrapolation of ground based heating measurements to flight radiation equilibrium wall temperatures at Mach 6 and 10 were

  20. [Experimental nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    An earlier study of unusual electromagnetic decays in {sup 86}Zr was extended in order to make comparisons with its isotone {sup 84}Sr and with {sup 84}Zr. The K=14 (t {sub {1/2}} = 70 ns) high-spin isomer in {sup 176}W was found to have a 13% branch directly to the K=O ground-state band, one of the strongest violations of K-selection rules known. A new program to search for a predicted region of oblate deformation involving neutron deficient isotopes in the Rn/Fr/Ra region was begun. In the area of nuclear astrophysics, as part of a study of the onset of the rp-Process, a set of measurements searching for possible new resonances for {sup 14}O+{alpha} and {sup 17}F+p reactions was completed and a coincidence experiment measuring the {sup 19}F({sup 3}He,t){sup 19}Ne({alpha}){sup 15}O and {sup 19}F({sup 3}He,t){sup 19}Ne(p){sup 18}F reactions in order to determine the rates of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O and {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}){sup 19}Ne reactions was begun. Experimental measurements of {beta}n{alpha} coincidences from the {sup 15}N(d,p){sup 16}N({beta}{sup {minus}}{nu}){sup 16}O({alpha}){sup 12}C reaction have also been completed and are currently being analyzed to determine the rate of the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}) reaction. In the APEX collaboration, we have completed the assembly and testing of two position-sensitive Na barrels which surround the axial silicon detector arrays and serve as the e{sup +} triggers by detecting their back-to-back annihilation quanta were completed. The HI@AGS and RHIC collaborations, construction and implementation activities associated with the space-time-tracker detector and in the design of the central detector for the PHENIX experiment were carried out. Operation of the ESTU tandem accelerator has been reliable, delivering beam on target at terminal voltages as high as 19.3 MV and running for as long as 143 days between tank openings. Fabrication and bench testing of a new negative ion source system have been completed.

  1. Experimental Design and Some Threats to Experimental Validity: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skidmore, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Experimental designs are distinguished as the best method to respond to questions involving causality. The purpose of the present paper is to explicate the logic of experimental design and why it is so vital to questions that demand causal conclusions. In addition, types of internal and external validity threats are discussed. To emphasize the…

  2. Priest River Experimental Forest (Idaho)

    Treesearch

    Russell T. Graham; Theresa B. Jain

    2004-01-01

    Priest River Experimental Forest was among the first experimental forests: it was set aside as a forestry research center in September 1911. The forest served as the headquarters for the Priest River Experiment Station until 1930 when it was incorporated into the Northern Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, which, in turn, joined the Intermountain...

  3. Experimental Mathematics and Computational Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2009-04-30

    The field of statistics has long been noted for techniques to detect patterns and regularities in numerical data. In this article we explore connections between statistics and the emerging field of 'experimental mathematics'. These includes both applications of experimental mathematics in statistics, as well as statistical methods applied to computational mathematics.

  4. Assessing Pupils' Skills in Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammann, Marcus; Phan, Thi Thanh Hoi; Ehmer, Maike; Grimm, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    This study is concerned with different forms of assessment of pupils' skills in experimentation. The findings of three studies are reported. Study 1 investigates whether it is possible to develop reliable multiple-choice tests for the skills of forming hypotheses, designing experiments and analysing experimental data. Study 2 compares scores from…

  5. Experimental Learning Enhancing Improvisation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira Christopoulos, Tania; Wilner, Adriana; Trindade Bestetti, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to present improvisation training and experimentation as an alternative method to deal with unexpected events in which structured processes do not seem to work. Design/Methodology/Approach: Based on the literature of sensemaking and improvisation, the study designs a framework and process model of experimental learning…

  6. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Douglas J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Munley, John T.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the experimental setup of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR thermosyphon prototype cooling system. A nitrogen thermosyphon prototype of such a system has been built and tested at PNNL. This document presents the experimental setup of the prototype that successfully demonstrated the heat transfer performance of the system.

  7. Experimental Learning Enhancing Improvisation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira Christopoulos, Tania; Wilner, Adriana; Trindade Bestetti, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to present improvisation training and experimentation as an alternative method to deal with unexpected events in which structured processes do not seem to work. Design/Methodology/Approach: Based on the literature of sensemaking and improvisation, the study designs a framework and process model of experimental learning…

  8. Assessing Pupils' Skills in Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammann, Marcus; Phan, Thi Thanh Hoi; Ehmer, Maike; Grimm, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    This study is concerned with different forms of assessment of pupils' skills in experimentation. The findings of three studies are reported. Study 1 investigates whether it is possible to develop reliable multiple-choice tests for the skills of forming hypotheses, designing experiments and analysing experimental data. Study 2 compares scores from…

  9. Psychopharmacology's debt to experimental psychology.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Lori A; Steinberg, Hannah; Sykes, Elizabeth A B

    2006-05-01

    The role of experimental psychology in the development of psychopharmacology has largely been ignored in recent historical accounts. In this article the authors attempt to redress that gap by outlining work in early experimental psychology that contributed significantly to the field. While psychiatrists focused on the therapeutic nature of drugs or their mimicry of psychopathology, experimental psychologists used psychoactive drugs as tools to study individual differences in normal behavior as well as to develop methodologies using behavior to study mechanisms of drug action. Experimental work by Kraepelin, Rivers, and Hollingworth was particularly important in establishing drug-screening protocols still used today. Research on nitrous oxide and on the effects of drug combinations is discussed to illustrate the importance of experimental psychology to psychopharmacology.

  10. Experimental Evolution with Caenorhabditis Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Teotónio, Henrique; Estes, Suzanne; Phillips, Patrick C.; Baer, Charles F.

    2017-01-01

    The hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been one of the primary model systems in biology since the 1970s, but only within the last two decades has this nematode also become a useful model for experimental evolution. Here, we outline the goals and major foci of experimental evolution with C. elegans and related species, such as C. briggsae and C. remanei, by discussing the principles of experimental design, and highlighting the strengths and limitations of Caenorhabditis as model systems. We then review three exemplars of Caenorhabditis experimental evolution studies, underlining representative evolution experiments that have addressed the: (1) maintenance of genetic variation; (2) role of natural selection during transitions from outcrossing to selfing, as well as the maintenance of mixed breeding modes during evolution; and (3) evolution of phenotypic plasticity and its role in adaptation to variable environments, including host–pathogen coevolution. We conclude by suggesting some future directions for which experimental evolution with Caenorhabditis would be particularly informative. PMID:28592504

  11. Space Debris Conjunction Risk Assessment for the ATV-Jules Verne Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavault, S.; Dupuis, G.; Perrachon, P.

    2009-03-01

    This paper focuses on the collision risk assessment, between ATV and space debris, managed in ATV-CC at CNES during phasing to docking and de-orbit phases. First, the methods and results of middle and short term mission analyses are detailed. The effects of the two fragmentation events which occurred shortly before and after the launch (the US ASAT on USA 193 and the natural fragmentation of the Russian satellite COSMOS 2421) have been evaluated using models and data from GRAVES and USSTRATCOM catalogues. The results showed a important impact on the foreseen conjunction rate. Second, the operational procedure of the conjunction management is described. The operational organization within ATV-CC teams and with the international partners is also presented. Then, a statement of the operational conjunction management is done, showing a good consistency level with the predictions. Eventually this led to 3 avoidance events (but only one avoidance maneuver).

  12. Fundus autofluorescence imaging in dry AMD: 2014 Jules Gonin lecture of the Retina Research Foundation.

    PubMed

    Holz, Frank G; Steinberg, Julia S; Göbel, Arno; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging allows for topographic mapping of intrisnic fluorophores in the retinal pigment epithelial cell monolayer, as well as mapping of other fluorophores that may occur with disease in the outer retina and the sub-neurosensory space. FAF imaging provides information not obtainable with other imaging modalities. Near-infrared fundus autofluorescence images can also be obtained in vivo, and may be largely melanin-derived. FAF imaging has been shown to be useful in a wide spectrum of macular and retinal diseases. The scope of applications now includes identification of diseased RPE in macular/retinal diseases, elucidating pathophysiological mechanisms, identification of early disease stages, refined phenotyping, identification of prognostic markers for disease progression, monitoring disease progression in the context of both natural history and interventional therapeutic studies, and objective assessment of luteal pigment distribution and density as well as RPE melanin distribution. Here, we review the use of FAF imaging in various phenotypic manifestations of dry AMD.

  13. Jules Verne's "Around the World in Eighty Days": Helping Teach the National Geography Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Daniel P.; Kuhlke, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with developments in American education pedagogy, geography educators have made great strides exploring a wide range of high- and low-tech methods for teaching and learning geographic concepts. This article draws on a qualitative analysis of essays in which college students discuss tenets of the National Geography Standards in the…

  14. Jules Verne Network: Extending and federating efforts to promote Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, V.; Bonnefond, P.; Stewart, R.

    2003-04-01

    Earth sciences are a key element of the many issues concerning the environment, natural resource management and the place of humankind on Earth today. Earth science disciplines have taken a giant leap with the emergence of space-based observation techniques, but the benefits of advances achieved have not always been felt outside specialist circles. Our aim is to develop, encourage and raise awareness of these achievements, through outreach actions and educational programs, by informing persons likely to use and exploit results, as well as decision-makers and elected representatives, and by communicating to scientists working in related disciplines. We propose, within an international framework, to bring together scientists, engineers, teachers and science communicators to raise awareness among a broad spectrum of audiences of the current state of Earth science knowledge, especially what we have learned through space-based observations. By Earth sciences we mean all sciences studying the lithosphere, oceans, atmosphere, cryosphere, biosphere and other components of our planet and the way they interact.

  15. Comparison of Calibration of Sensors Used for the Quantification of Nuclear Energy Rate Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, J.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Tarchalski, M.; Pytel, K.; Lyoussi, A.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.F.; Jagielski, J.

    2015-07-01

    This present work deals with a collaborative program called GAMMA-MAJOR 'Development and qualification of a deterministic scheme for the evaluation of GAMMA heating in MTR reactors with exploitation as example MARIA reactor and Jules Horowitz Reactor' between the National Centre for Nuclear Research of Poland, the French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission and Aix Marseille University. One of main objectives of this program is to optimize the nuclear heating quantification thanks to calculation validated from experimental measurements of radiation energy deposition carried out in irradiation reactors. The quantification of the nuclear heating is a key data especially for the thermal, mechanical design and sizing of irradiation experimental devices in specific irradiated conditions and locations. The determination of this data is usually performed by differential calorimeters and gamma thermometers such as used in the experimental multi-sensors device called CARMEN 'Calorimetric en Reacteur et Mesures des Emissions Nucleaires'. In the framework of the GAMMA-MAJOR program a new calorimeter was designed for the nuclear energy deposition quantification. It corresponds to a single-cell calorimeter and it is called KAROLINA. This calorimeter was recently tested during an irradiation campaign inside MARIA reactor in Poland. This new single-cell calorimeter differs from previous CALMOS or CARMEN type differential calorimeters according to three main points: its geometry, its preliminary out-of-pile calibration, and its in-pile measurement method. The differential calorimeter, which is made of two identical cells containing heaters, has a calibration method based on the use of steady thermal states reached by simulating the nuclear energy deposition into the calorimeter sample by Joule effect; whereas the single-cell calorimeter, which has no heater, is calibrated by using the transient thermal response of the sensor (heating and cooling steps). The paper will

  16. Experimentation on humans and nonhumans.

    PubMed

    Pluhar, Evelyn B

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I argue that it is wrong to conduct any experiment on a nonhuman which we would regard as immoral were it to be conducted on a human, because such experimentation violates the basic moral rights of sentient beings. After distinguishing the rights approach from the utilitarian approach, I delineate basic concepts. I then raise the classic "argument from marginal cases" against those who support experimentation on nonhumans but not on humans. After next replying to six important objections against that argument, I contend that moral agents are logically required to accord basic moral rights to every sentient being. I conclude by providing criteria for distinguishing ethical from unethical experimentation.

  17. The Beginnings of Experimental Petrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eugster, Hans P.

    1971-01-01

    An account of Van't Hoff's change from theoretical chemistry to petrology provides data on the European intellectual climate of the early 1900's and shows how his work laid the foundation for experimental petrology of hard rocks." (AL)

  18. Experimental models of uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Paula L; Caissie, Amanda L; Burnier, Miguel N

    2004-06-01

    Over the past several decades, considerable effort has been directed toward developing suitable experimental models for the study of uveal melanoma. Animal models of uveal melanoma have undergone many improvements, leading to the development of experimental systems that better represent the disease in human beings. A major advance has come from the use of human uveal melanoma cell lines capable of inducing tumour growth and metastatic disease in immunodeficient hosts. Knowledge gained from the use of experimental models will ultimately be translated into better diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with uveal melanoma. In this review the authors describe the current state-of-the-art designs of experimental models of uveal melanoma, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of the available models. Novel findings from a rabbit model of uveal melanoma are also presented.

  19. The Beginnings of Experimental Petrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eugster, Hans P.

    1971-01-01

    An account of Van't Hoff's change from theoretical chemistry to petrology provides data on the European intellectual climate of the early 1900's and shows how his work laid the foundation for experimental petrology of hard rocks." (AL)

  20. Experimental techniques and measurement accuracies

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.; DiIorio, G.; Nakamura, T.; Maekawa, H.

    1985-02-01

    A brief description of the experimental tools available for fusion neutronics experiments is given. Attention is paid to error estimates mainly for the measurement of tritium breeding ratio in simulated blankets using various techniques.

  1. Animal Experimentation in High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansevin, Kystyna D.

    1970-01-01

    Recommends that teacher and student be provided with the broadest possible spectrum of meaningful and feasible experiments in which the comfort of the experimental animal is protected by the design of the experiment. (BR)

  2. Experimental studies: randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gjorgov, A N

    1998-01-01

    There are two major approaches to medical investigations: observational studies and experimental trials. The classical application of the experimental design to studies of human populations is the randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of a new drug or treatment. A further application of the experimental studies is to the testing of hypotheses about the etiology of a disease, already tested and corroborated from various forms of observational studies. Ethical considerations and requirements for consent of the experimental subjects are of primary concern in the clinical trials, and those concerns set the first and final limits for implementing a trial. General moral principles in research with human and animal beings, defined by the "Nuremberg Code," deal with strict criteria for approval, endorsement and evaluation of a clinical trial.

  3. Animal Experimentation in High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansevin, Kystyna D.

    1970-01-01

    Recommends that teacher and student be provided with the broadest possible spectrum of meaningful and feasible experiments in which the comfort of the experimental animal is protected by the design of the experiment. (BR)

  4. Experimental realization of quantum illumination.

    PubMed

    Lopaeva, E D; Ruo Berchera, I; Degiovanni, I P; Olivares, S; Brida, G; Genovese, M

    2013-04-12

    We present the first experimental realization of the quantum illumination protocol proposed by Lloyd [Science 321, 1463 (2008)] and S. Tan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 253601 (2008)], achieved in a simple feasible experimental scheme based on photon-number correlations. A main achievement of our result is the demonstration of a strong robustness of the quantum protocol to noise and losses that challenges some widespread wisdom about quantum technologies.

  5. [The ethics of animal experimentation].

    PubMed

    Goffi, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    The paper starts with a short definition of animal experimentation, then three main approaches to the practice are considered: unconditional approval (as advocated by Claude Bernard), conditional and restricted approval (as advocated by Peter Singer) and strict prohibition (as advocated by Tom Regan and Gary Francione). It is argued that what is actually approved or condemned in animal experimentation is the value of the scientific enterprise.

  6. Design approaches to experimental mediation☆

    PubMed Central

    Pirlott, Angela G.; MacKinnon, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying causal mechanisms has become a cornerstone of experimental social psychology, and editors in top social psychology journals champion the use of mediation methods, particularly innovative ones when possible (e.g. Halberstadt, 2010, Smith, 2012). Commonly, studies in experimental social psychology randomly assign participants to levels of the independent variable and measure the mediating and dependent variables, and the mediator is assumed to causally affect the dependent variable. However, participants are not randomly assigned to levels of the mediating variable(s), i.e., the relationship between the mediating and dependent variables is correlational. Although researchers likely know that correlational studies pose a risk of confounding, this problem seems forgotten when thinking about experimental designs randomly assigning participants to levels of the independent variable and measuring the mediator (i.e., “measurement-of-mediation” designs). Experimentally manipulating the mediator provides an approach to solving these problems, yet these methods contain their own set of challenges (e.g., Bullock, Green, & Ha, 2010). We describe types of experimental manipulations targeting the mediator (manipulations demonstrating a causal effect of the mediator on the dependent variable and manipulations targeting the strength of the causal effect of the mediator) and types of experimental designs (double randomization, concurrent double randomization, and parallel), provide published examples of the designs, and discuss the strengths and challenges of each design. Therefore, the goals of this paper include providing a practical guide to manipulation-of-mediator designs in light of their challenges and encouraging researchers to use more rigorous approaches to mediation because manipulation-of-mediator designs strengthen the ability to infer causality of the mediating variable on the dependent variable. PMID:27570259

  7. Graphical Models for Quasi-Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yongnam; Steiner, Peter M.; Hall, Courtney E.; Su, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and quasi-experimental designs play a central role in estimating cause-effect relationships in education, psychology, and many other fields of the social and behavioral sciences. This paper presents and discusses the causal graphs of experimental and quasi-experimental designs. For quasi-experimental designs the authors demonstrate…

  8. Animal experimentation ethics from an experimenter's point of view.

    PubMed

    Ehinger, B E

    1986-01-01

    The experimental biologist faces two kinds of ethical problems: practical and philosophical. The practical problems comprise increased costs of experimental animals, and the risk of being harassed or even raided by animal activists. There is also today a growing bureaucratic ethics overhead that has to be paid for, one way or another. The philosophical problems are the true ethical problems. Most laws and regulations emphasize that pain and agony should be minimized, but it is shown that this is neither always necessary nor always adequate. Scientists expect logical reasoning and opinions based on facts, but it is easy to find examples that the public opinion is quite illogical concerning pain and agony. For instance, you may under certain circumstances very well torture and kill animals just for pleasure. Our present legislation should be amended so as to concur better with current public views on how animals should be treated. The Swedish Committees on Animal Experimentation Ethics were intended to help scientists understand the demands of the public opinion. It is doubtful if they have been successful. The ethics of animal experimentation are perforce centered on the experimenter. He alone, at the final moment, makes the decision whether or not to use and, eventually, to kill the animal. When he kills, he obviously has a reason for doing so, and has decided that the purpose justifies the action. With the very large increase in the number of animal experiments in the last few decades, society has justifiably become increasingly concerned about the ethical considerations involved.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Qualitative tools and experimental philosophy

    PubMed Central

    Andow, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Experimental philosophy brings empirical methods to philosophy. These methods are used to probe how people think about philosophically interesting things such as knowledge, morality, and freedom. This paper explores the contribution that qualitative methods have to make in this enterprise. I argue that qualitative methods have the potential to make a much greater contribution than they have so far. Along the way, I acknowledge a few types of resistance that proponents of qualitative methods in experimental philosophy might encounter, and provide reasons to think they are ill-founded.

  10. Experimental Approach to Teaching Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Catalina

    2015-11-01

    For the last 15 years we have promoted experimental work even in the theoretical courses. Fluids appear in the Physics curriculum of the National University of Mexico in two courses: Collective Phenomena in their sophomore year and Continuum Mechanics in their senior year. In both, students are asked for a final project. Surprisingly, at least 85% choose an experimental subject even though this means working extra hours every week. Some of the experiments were shown in this congress two years ago. This time we present some new results and the methodology we use in the classroom. I acknowledge support from the Physics Department, Facultad de Ciencias, UNAM.

  11. Delayed Gamma Measurements in Different Nuclear Research Reactors Bringing Out the Importance of the Delayed Contribution in Gamma Flux Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Radulovic, V.; Barbot, L.; Villard, J-F.; Zerovnik, G.; Snoj, L.; Tarchalski, M.; Pytel, K.; Malouch, F.

    2015-07-01

    Neutron and gamma flux levels are key parameters in nuclear research reactors. In Material Testing Reactors, such as the future Jules Horowitz Reactor, under construction at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache, France), the expected gamma flux levels are very high (nuclear heating is of the order of 20 W/g at 100 MWth). As gamma rays deposit their energy in the reactor structures and structural materials it is important to take them into account when designing irradiation devices. There are only a few sensors which allow measurements of the nuclear heating ; a recent development at the CEA Cadarache allows measurements of the gamma flux using a miniature ionization chamber (MIC). The measured MIC response is often compared with calculation using modern Monte Carlo (MC) neutron and photon transport codes, such as TRIPOLI-4 and MCNP6. In these calculations only the production of prompt gamma rays in the reactor is usually modelled thus neglecting the delayed gamma rays. Hence calculations and measurements are usually in better accordance for the neutron flux than for the gamma flux. In this paper we study the contribution of delayed gamma rays to the total MIC signal in order to estimate the systematic error in gamma flux MC calculations. In order to experimentally determine the delayed gamma flux contributions to the MIC response, we performed gamma flux measurements with CEA developed MIC at three different research reactors: the OSIRIS reactor (MTR - 70 MWth at CEA Saclay, France), the TRIGA MARK II reactor (TRIGA - 250 kWth at the Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia) and the MARIA reactor (MTR - 30 MWth at the National Center for Nuclear Research, Poland). In order to experimentally assess the delayed gamma flux contribution to the total gamma flux, several reactor shut down (scram) experiments were performed specifically for the purpose of the measurements. Results show that on average about 30 % of the MIC signal is due to

  12. The Caspar Creek Experimental Watershed

    Treesearch

    T. E. Lisle

    1979-01-01

    The Caspar Creek Experimental Watershed was set up as a traditional paired watershed to investigate the effects of logging and road construction on erosion and sedimentation. Research participants have come from the California Division of Forestry, the Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, the California Department of Water Resources, the California...

  13. Exchange asymmetry in experimental settings

    Treesearch

    Thomas C. Brown; Mark D. Morrison; Jacob A. Benfield; Gretchen Nurse Rainbolt; Paul A. Bell

    2015-01-01

    We review past trading experiments and present 11 new experiments designed to show how the trading rate responds to alterations of the experimental procedure. In agreement with earlier studies, results show that if the trade decision is converted to one resembling a choice between goods the exchange asymmetry disappears, but otherwise the asymmetry is...

  14. An experimenter and his methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonovich, S. R.

    1990-12-01

    A review of experimental works by Ernst Mach has been given. The works reffer to optics and acoustics. The author is representing Ernst Mach as a physicist rather than a phylosopher, which contradicts the point of view obviously accepted in Soviet history of sciences and philosophy.

  15. Skill Development in Experimental Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagán, Héctor; Sayós, Rosa; García, José F.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental courses offer a good opportunity to work with competences, promoting the incorporation of strategies oriented towards motivating students to actively involve in the learning process, promoting reflexive learning and developing generic skills. This study presents different ways of developing and evaluating some important general…

  16. Desert Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Treesearch

    E. Durant McArthur; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    Entries qualify for inclusion if they were conducted in whole or part at the Desert Experimental Range (DER, also known as the Desert Range Experiment Station) or were based on DER research in whole or part. They do not qualify merely by the author having worked at the DER when the research was performed or prepared. Entries were drawn from the original abstracts or...

  17. The Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Alexander; Ross K. Watkins

    1977-01-01

    This report provides a general overview of work done on the Fraser Experimental Forest. It replaces Station Paper No.8, published in 1952 and revised by L. D. Love in 1960. Included are descriptions of physical features and resource values, and highlights of past and current research programs.

  18. Learning Experimentation through Science Fairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Jürgen; Lederman, Norman G.; Groß, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Experiments are essential for both doing science and learning science. The aim of the German youth science fair, "Jugend forscht," is to encourage scientific thinking and inquiry methods such as experimentation. Based on 57 interviews with participants of the competition, this study summarises students' conceptions and steps of learning…

  19. An Experimental Approach To… Everything!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Taylor; Flowers, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The goal of formal education is student learning. By emphasizing experimentation in the classroom or lab, students learn about the results of a particular inquiry. But more importantly, they learn to refine their approach to learning by creating new knowledge rather than merely remembering what they have been told. An inquiry approach where…

  20. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  1. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  2. Deception Creek Experimental Forest (Idaho)

    Treesearch

    Russell T. Graham; Theresa B. Jain

    2004-01-01

    Deception Creek Experimental Forest is located in one of the most productive forests of the Rocky Mountains. When the forest was established in 1933, large, old western white pines were important for producing lumber products, matches, and toothpicks. Deception Creek is located in the heart of the western white pine forest type, allowing researchers to focus on the...

  3. Evaluating E-Labs' Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plaisent, Michel; Maguiraga, Lassana; Bernard, Prosper; Larhrib, Samir

    2004-01-01

    This communication discusses preliminary results on an experimentation of e-Learning with MIS students, mainly in order to cope with the logistics of lab organization. A learning management software was installed which changed completely the learning process, from content to logistics. Students have expressed their satisfaction with the e-Learning…

  4. Learning Experimentation through Science Fairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Jürgen; Lederman, Norman G.; Groß, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Experiments are essential for both doing science and learning science. The aim of the German youth science fair, "Jugend forscht," is to encourage scientific thinking and inquiry methods such as experimentation. Based on 57 interviews with participants of the competition, this study summarises students' conceptions and steps of learning…

  5. Experimental analysis of armouring process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, Alberto; Paris, Ennio

    Preliminary results from an experimental investigation on armouring processes are presented. Particularly, the process of development and formation of the armour layer under different steady flow conditions has been analyzed in terms of grain size variations and sediment transport rate associated to each size fraction.

  6. Experimental Disability: A Gestalt Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofaro, Gregory A.; James, Fleming, III

    1980-01-01

    Experimental disability offers rehabilitation counselor educators and trainers a vehicle for developing student-counselor awareness and sensitivity to psychosocial problems of disability. Gestalt counseling techniques, which emphasize the bipolarities of the disability experience, are used to explore the feelings, behaviors, and attitudes…

  7. An Experimental Approach To… Everything!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Taylor; Flowers, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The goal of formal education is student learning. By emphasizing experimentation in the classroom or lab, students learn about the results of a particular inquiry. But more importantly, they learn to refine their approach to learning by creating new knowledge rather than merely remembering what they have been told. An inquiry approach where…

  8. Open Architecture / FORCEnet Experimentation Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-04

    Louis CNI LCS 11OA – FORCEnet Experimentation • Requirements input (SME/warfighters) • Metrics (MOP/MOE) • Data Collection and Analysis Plan ( DCAP ...MOE) • Data Collection and Analysis Plan ( DCAP ) Environment Design • Experiment Architecture • CONOPS/Scenario supporting metrics Fosters Teamwork

  9. Experimental medicine 1000 years ago

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Halim, Rabie E.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the state of experimentation in the field of medicine during the Medieval Islamic era. With few exceptions, most of the contemporary sources on history of medicine propagate the idea that the roots of experimental medicine in its modern form, including clinical trials and drug-potency studies, first started during the European Renaissance in the 16th to the 18th centuries. This study is part of an ongoing multidisciplinary primary-source investigation of the original Arabic works of 11 Islamic medical scholars who lived and practiced between the 9th and the 13th centuries. The study critically evaluated and documented their contributions to the development of the scientific method and experimental medicine during that medieval Islamic era in several areas including critical appraisal of previous knowledge, clinical observations and case reports, clinical therapeutic trials, drug potency trials, experimentation on animals, dissection and dissection experiments as well as postmortem examinations. In each of the above-mentioned areas, significant contributions were made during the Medieval Islamic era from as early as the ninth century AD. PMID:21747591

  10. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  11. Experimental Evidence for the Pentaquark

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Carman

    2005-02-01

    The present experimental evidence for the existence of light pentaquarks is reviewed, including both positive and null results. I also discuss the CLAS experiments at Jefferson Laboratory that are forthcoming in the near future to address questions regarding existence, mass, width, and other quantum numbers of these five-quark baryon states.

  12. [Ethical issue in animal experimentation].

    PubMed

    Parodi, André-Laurent

    2009-11-01

    In the 1970s, under pressure from certain sections of society and thanks to initiatives by several scientific research teams, committees charged with improving the conditions of laboratory animals started to be created, first in the United States and subsequently in Europe. This led to the development of an ethical approach to animal experimentation, taking into account new scientific advances. In addition to the legislation designed to provide a legal framework for animal experimentation and to avoid abuses, this ethical approach, based on the concept that animals are sentient beings, encourages greater respect of laboratory animals and the implementation of measures designed to reduce their suffering. Now, all animal experiments must first receive ethical approval--from in-house committees in the private sector and from regional committees for public institutions. Very recently, under the impetus of the French ministries of research and agriculture, the National committee for ethical animal experimentation published a national ethical charter on animal experimentation, setting the basis for responsible use of animals for scientific research and providing guidelines for the composition and functioning of ethics committees. Inspired by the scientific community itself this ethical standardization should help to assuage--but not eliminate--the reticence and hostility expressed by several sections of society.

  13. 47 CFR 73.1510 - Experimental authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... during the experimental period (12 midnight local time to local sunrise) and at additional hours if... experimental transmissions. (d) The FCC may request a report of the research, experimentation and results at...

  14. Rheology of welding: experimental constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quane, S. L.; Russell, J. K.; Kennedy, L. A.

    2003-04-01

    The rheological behavior of pyroclastic deposits during welding is incompletely understood and is based on a surprisingly small number of experimental studies. Previous pioneering experimental studies were done on small (1 cm thick) samples of ash/crystal mixtures under constant load. They established minimum welding temperatures between 600 and 700^oC under loads of 0.7 MPa (˜40 m of ignimbrite) to 3.6 MPa (˜250 m depth of ignimbrite). However, these data are neither sufficiently comprehensive nor coherent enough to fully describe the rheology of pyroclastic mixtures. In addition, previous studies did not examine the microstructural and geometric changes associated with welding compaction. Our goal is to provide accurate and comprehensive constitutive relationships between material properties, temperature, load and strain rate for pyroclastic material undergoing welding. Here we present results from a newly designed experimental apparatus. The experimental apparatus consists of a LoadTrac II fully automated uniaxial compression load frame manufactured by Geocomp Corporation. The load frame has a built in displacement transducer and can run both constant strain rate (10-6 to 0.25 cm/s) and constant load (up to 1150 kg) tests to a maximum displacement of 7.5 cm. The sample assembly comprises 5 cm diameter cylindrical upper and lower pistons (insulating ceramic with steel conductive ends) housed in a copper jacket. Samples are 5 cm diameter cores and can vary in length from 1 to 15 cm depending on experimental needs. A fiber insulated tube furnace capable of reaching temperatures ≈1000^oC surrounds the sample assembly. Temperature is measured using a thermocouple located inside the sample through the bottom piston; the furnace controller is capable of maintaining temperature fluctuations to <5^oC. Deformation experiments are performed on pre-fabricated cylinders of soda-lime glass beads and rhyolitic volcanic ash, as well as, cores of pumiceous rhyodacite

  15. Experimental research on air propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, William F

    1918-01-01

    The purposes of the experimental investigation on the performance of air propellers described in this report are as follows: (1) the development of a series of design factors and coefficients drawn from model forms distributed with some regularity over the field of air-propeller design and intended to furnish a basis of check with similar work done in other aerodynamic laboratories, and as a point of departure for the further study of special or individual types and forms; (2) the establishment of a series of experimental values derived from models and intended for later use as a basis for comparison with similar results drawn from certain selected full-sized forms and tested in free flight.

  16. Experimental coevolution of species interactions.

    PubMed

    Brockhurst, Michael A; Koskella, Britt

    2013-06-01

    Coevolution, the process of reciprocal adaptation and counter-adaptation between ecologically interacting species, affects most organisms and is considered a key force structuring biological diversity. Our understanding of the pattern and process of coevolution, particularly of antagonistic species interactions, has been hugely advanced in recent years by an upsurge in experimental studies that directly observe coevolution in the laboratory. These experiments pose new questions by revealing novel facets of the coevolutionary process not captured by current theory, while also providing the first empirical tests of longstanding coevolutionary ideas, including the influential Red Queen hypothesis. In this article, we highlight emerging directions for this field, including experimental coevolution of mutualistic interactions and understanding how pairwise coevolutionary processes scale up within species-rich communities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Melioration and self-experimentation

    PubMed Central

    Neuringer, Allen

    1984-01-01

    Operant researchers rarely use the arena of applied psychology to motivate or to judge their research. Absence of tests by application weakens the field of basic operant research. Early in their development, the physical and biological sciences emphasized meliorative aspects of research. Improvement of human life was a major goal of these young sciences. This paper argues that if basic operant researchers analogously invoked a melioration criterion, the operant field might avoid its tendency toward ingrowth and instead generate a broadly influential science. Operant researchers could incorporate melioration by (a) creating animal models to study applied problems; (b) confronting questions raised by applied analysts and testing hypotheses in applied settings; or (c) performing self-experiments—that is, using experimental methods and behavioral techniques to study and change the experimenter's behavior. PMID:16812398

  18. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m/sup 3/ lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion.

  19. [Experimental treatment or medical research?].

    PubMed

    Ploem, M C Corette; Terwiel, Jim

    2010-01-01

    If in the Netherlands a doctor offers experimental treatment to patients purely because it is in their patients' best interest, thus without serving any scientific goal, this does not fall under the scope of the Dutch Medical Research involving Human Subjects Act (WMO), but under specifications on the medical treatment agreement (WGBO) laid down in the civil code. If the doctor deviates from professional standards and the current protocols and guidelines, he or she must be able to account for that. The WMO applies as soon as doctors offer experimental treatments within the context of a research protocol, or perform research interventions such as randomization or the removal of extra tissue. Then specific provisions regarding medical ethical protocol review and written informed consent should be met.

  20. Experimental Unconditionally Secure Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Yuan; Curty, Marcos; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Li, Yu-Huai; Lin, Ze-Hong; Sun, Qi-Chao; Li, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Teng-Yun; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Cabello, Adán; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Quantum physics allows for unconditionally secure communication between parties that trust each other. However, when the parties do not trust each other such as in the bit commitment scenario, quantum physics is not enough to guarantee security unless extra assumptions are made. Unconditionally secure bit commitment only becomes feasible when quantum physics is combined with relativistic causality constraints. Here we experimentally implement a quantum bit commitment protocol with relativistic constraints that offers unconditional security. The commitment is made through quantum measurements in two quantum key distribution systems in which the results are transmitted via free-space optical communication to two agents separated with more than 20 km. The security of the protocol relies on the properties of quantum information and relativity theory. In each run of the experiment, a bit is successfully committed with less than 5.68×10-2 cheating probability. This demonstrates the experimental feasibility of quantum communication with relativistic constraints.

  1. Experimental unconditionally secure bit commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Yuan; Curty, Marcos; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Li, Yu-Huai; Lin, Ze-Hong; Sun, Qi-Chao; Li, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Teng-Yun; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Cabello, Adan; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-03-01

    Quantum physics allows unconditionally secure communication between parties that trust each other. However, when they do not trust each other such as in the bit commitment, quantum physics is not enough to guarantee security. Only when relativistic causality constraints combined, the unconditional secure bit commitment becomes feasible. Here we experimentally implement a quantum bit commitment with relativistic constraints that offers unconditional security. The commitment is made through quantum measurements in two quantum key distribution systems in which the results are transmitted via free-space optical communication to two agents separated with more than 20 km. Bits are successfully committed with less than 5 . 68 ×10-2 cheating probability. This provides an experimental proof of unconditional secure bit commitment and demonstrates the feasibility of relativistic quantum communication.

  2. Multimodal MRI of experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. Brain imaging data from experimental stroke models and stroke patients have shown that there is often a gradual progression of potentially reversible ischemic injury toward infarction. Reestablishing tissue perfusion and/or treating with neuroprotective drugs in a timely fashion are expected to salvage some ischemic tissues. Diffusion-weighted imaging based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in which contrast is based on water motion can detect ischemic injury within minutes after onsets, whereas computed tomography and other imaging modalities fail to detect stroke injury for at least a few hours. Along with quantitative perfusion imaging, the perfusion-diffusion mismatch which approximates the ischemic penumbra could be imaged non-invasively. This review describes recent progresses in the development and application of multimodal MRI and image analysis techniques to study ischemic tissue at risk in experimental stroke in rats. PMID:24323751

  3. The Bigfoot Drive; Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin; Thomas, Cliff; Khan, Shahab; Casey, Daniel; Spears, Brian; Nora, Ryan; Munro, Davis; Eder, David; Milovich, Jose; Berger, Dick; Strozzi, David; Goyon, Clement; Turnbull, David; Ma, Tammy; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Benedetti, Robin; Millot, Marius; Celliers, Peter; Yeamans, Charles; Hatarik, Robert; Landen, Nino; Hurricane, Omar; Callahan, Debbie

    2016-10-01

    The Bigfoot platform was developed on the National Ignition Facility to investigate low convergence, high adiabat, high rhoR hotspot implosions. This platform was designed to be less susceptible to wall motion, LPI and CBET and to be more robust against capsule hydrodynamic instabilities. To date experimental studies have been carried out at two hohlraum scales, a 5.75 and 5.4 mm diameter hohlraum. We will present experimental results from these tuning campaigns including the shape vs. cone fraction, surrogacy comparisons of self-emission from the capsules vs. radiography of the imploding capsule and doped vs. undoped capsules. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Experimental Determination of Ramsey Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Zhengbing; Chudak, Fabian; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n). Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(m,2) for 4≤m≤8. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date.

  5. Experimental determination of Ramsey numbers.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhengbing; Chudak, Fabian; Macready, William G; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2013-09-27

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n). Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(m,2) for 4≤m≤8. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date.

  6. Elements of Bayesian experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Sivia, D.S.

    1997-09-01

    We consider some elements of the Bayesian approach that are important for optimal experimental design. While the underlying principles used are very general, and are explained in detail in a recent tutorial text, they are applied here to the specific case of characterising the inferential value of different resolution peakshapes. This particular issue was considered earlier by Silver, Sivia and Pynn (1989, 1990a, 1990b), and the following presentation confirms and extends the conclusions of their analysis.

  7. [Histopathologic studies in experimental uveitis].

    PubMed

    Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Woźniak, Zdzisław; Szymaniec, Stanisław; Lugowski, Czesław; Agopsowicz, Karolina

    2004-01-01

    Experimental uveitis is one of the main models in the diseases of autoimmunological background. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the quantitative histological changes in the experimental uveitis, induced by different types of homogenous endotoxin salts of Havnia alvei. We studied 74 eyes of Lewis rats (males) divided into 4 groups. Each group received a homogenous salt of Havnia alvei in a single subcutaneous injection. In the 1 group-LPS Ca++, in 2 group-LPS Na++, in 3 group-LPS 981, in 4 group physiological salt (control group). The histologic and immunocitochemical examinations were performed after 24, 48 hours, and after 4 and 7 days following the injection. The histologic changes were analyzed (he intensity of inflammatory reaction) using a Highly Optimazed Microscope Enviroment system. The most intensive inflammation was observed in experimental group after 24 hours (n the LPS 981D group in 5 rats out of 6, in LPS Ca++ group in 3 rats out of 6). After 48 hours the intensity of inflammatory reaction visibly decreased. On the fourth day the inflammation revealed a minimal intensity and after 7 days was practically absent. In the control group minimal inflammation was observed only in a few rats. Cilliary body hypermia was present for 48 hours in most of the experimental rats. Only a few of them had hyperemia on the fourth day. In the posterior segment minimal inflammation was noted at the end of the first day (I and II-nd group after 24 hours); this process continued until the fourth day, on the 7th day disappeared. The most intensive inflammation of the anterior and posterior choroidal segment is caused by homogenous salts of Havnia alvei 981.

  8. Data archiving in experimental physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dalesio, L.R.; Watson, W. III; Bickley, M. |; Clausen, M. |

    1998-07-01

    In experimental physics, data is archived from a wide variety of sources and used for a wide variety of purposes. In each of these environments, trade-offs are made between data storage rate, data availability, and retrieval rate. This paper presents archive alternatives in EPICS, the overall archiver design and details on the data collection and retrieval requirements, performance studies, design choices, design alternatives, and measurements made on the beta version of the archiver.

  9. Starkey experimental forest and range.

    Treesearch

    Valerie. Rapp

    2004-01-01

    The Starkey Experimental Forest and Range. (Starkey) is a one-of-a-kind, world class research facility, located in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. Starkey is the primary field location for scientific study of the effects of deer, elk, and cattle on ecosystems. Most of the 28,000-acre forest and range is enclosed by a game-proof fence.The research...

  10. Experimental Mathematics and Mathematical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Broadhurst, David; Zudilin, Wadim

    2009-06-26

    One of the most effective techniques of experimental mathematics is to compute mathematical entities such as integrals, series or limits to high precision, then attempt to recognize the resulting numerical values. Recently these techniques have been applied with great success to problems in mathematical physics. Notable among these applications are the identification of some key multi-dimensional integrals that arise in Ising theory, quantum field theory and in magnetic spin theory.

  11. Experimental data confronts nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The physical content of experimental data for a variety of excitation energies and angular momenta is summarized. The specific nuclear structure questions which these data address are considered. The specific regions discussed are: low-spin data near the particle separation thresholds; low-spin data at intermediate excitation energies; high-spin, near-yrast data and high-spin data at larger excitation energies. 63 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Nonisothermal hydrologic transport experimental plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D.

    1992-09-01

    A field heater experimental plan is presented for investigating hydrologic transport processes in unsaturated fractured rock related to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in an underground repository. The experimental plan provides a methodology for obtaining data required for evaluating conceptual and computer models related to HLW isolation in an environment where significant heat energy is produced. Coupled-process models are currently limited by the lack of validation data appropriate for field scales that incorporate relevant transport processes. Presented in this document is a discussion of previous nonisothermal experiments. Processes expected to dominate heat-driven liquid, vapor, gas, and solute flow during the experiment are explained, and the conceptual model for nonisothermal flow and transport in unsaturated, fractured rock is described. Of particular concern is the ability to confirm the hypothesized conceptual model specifically, the establishment of higher water saturation zones within the host rock around the heat source, and the establishment of countercurrent flow conditions within the host rock near the heat source. Field experimental plans are presented using the Apache Leap Tuff Site to illustrate the implementation of the proposed methodology. Both small-scale preliminary experiments and a long-term experiment are described.

  13. Experimental Crystallization of Yamato 980459

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Galenas, M. G.; Danielson, L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, only two martian meteorites QUE 94201 (QUE) and Yamato 980459 (Y98) have been experimentally shown to me true melt compositions. Most martian meteorites are instead, cumulates or partial cumulates. We have performed experiments on a Y98 composition to assess whether QUE could be related to Y98 by some fractionation process [1]. Y98 is a basaltic shergottite from the SNC (Shergotty, Nakhla, Chassigny) meteorite group. Y98 is composed of 26% olivine, 48% pyroxene, 25% mesostasis, and no plagioclase [2]. The large size of the olivine megacrysts and absence of plagioclase suggest that the parental melt which formed this meteorite had begun cooling slowly until some mechanism, such as magma ascent, caused rapid cooling [3]. Y98 s olivines have the highest Mg content of all the shergottites suggesting that it is the most primitive [4]. Y98 has been determined to be a melt composition by comparing the composition of experimental liquidus olivines with the composition of the cores of Y98 olivines [4]. The liquidus of Y98 is predicted by MELTS [5] and by experimentation [6] to be 1450 C. Analyses of Y98 show it to be very depleted in LREEs and it has similar depleted patterns as other shergottites such as QUE [7].

  14. Experimental Studies on Rutile Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Klemme, S.; Butler, I. B.; Harley, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Rutile (TiO2) is an important high field strength element (HFSE) sequestering mineral, and has been implicated in the observed depletion of HFSE in arc magmas. It is thought that rutile is insoluble in slab-derived fluids, and remains residual in the subducted slab. Indeed, experimental data indicates a very low solubility of rutile in pure H2O (Tropper and Manning, 2005), and this low solubility may result in HFSE depleted fluids imparting a depleted signature to arc magmas. However, there is scant experimental data available on rutile solubility in fluids of more complex compositions (Ayers and Watson, 1993). We are carrying out a systematic experimental study into the effect of specific chemical components on rutile solubility in fluids and also silicate melts. This should further our understanding of HFSE mobility in metamorphic rocks within subduction zones. References: J. C. Ayers and E. B. Watson (1993) Rutile solubility in supercritical aqueous fluids and the high P-T mobility of elements it concentrates. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 114, 321-330. P. Tropper and C. E. Manning (2005) Very low solubility of rutile in H2O at high pressure and temperature, and its implications for Ti mobility in subduction zones. American Mineralogist 90(2-3), 502-505.

  15. Moriond QCD 2013 Experimental Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, Dmitri

    2013-06-28

    The article presents experimental highlights of Moriond 2013 QCD conference. This was fantastic conference and the first Moriond QCD since the discovery of the Higgs boson. Many new results about its properties have been presented at the conference with Higgs-like particle becoming a Higgs as it properties match expected for the Higgs boson pretty well. There were many new results presented in all experimental areas including QCD, elecroweak, studies of the top, bottom and charm quarks, searches for physics beyond Standard Model as well as studies of the heavy ion collisions. 56 experimental talks have been presented at the conference and it is impossible to cover each result in the summary, so highlights are limited to what I was able to present in my summary talk presented on March 16 2013. The proceedings of the conference cover in depth all talks presented and I urge you to get familiar with all of them. Theoretical Summary of the conference was given by Michelangelo Mangano, so theory talks are not covered in the article.

  16. National Ignition Facility: Experimental plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    As part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE), and EG&G formed an NIF Target Diagnostics Working Group. The purpose of the Target Diagnostics Working Group is to prepare conceptual designs of target diagnostics for inclusion in the facility CDR and to determine how these specifications impact the CDR. To accomplish this, a subgroup has directed its efforts at constructing an approximate experimental plan for the ignition campaign of the NIF CDR. The results of this effort are contained in this document, the Experimental Plan for achieving fusion ignition in the NIF. This group initially concentrated on the flow-down requirements of the experimental campaign leading to ignition, which will dominate the initial efforts of the NIF. It is envisaged, however, that before ignition, there will be parallel campaigns supporting weapons physics, weapons effects, and other research. This plan was developed by analyzing the sequence of activities required to finally fire the laser at the level of power and precision necessary to achieve the conditions of an ignition hohlraum target, and to then use our experience in activating and running Nova experiments to estimate the rate of completing these activities.

  17. Joint Experimentation on Scalable Parallel Processors (JESPP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    constructive simulation runs and live tests). The nature of joint experimentation relies on a discovery -type of approach when dealing with 2015 (or later...Continuous Experimentation Environment gets underway in 2004. Analysis vs. Discovery Before describing the joint experimentation data...collection strategy, a short description of the difference between analysis and discovery experimentation is warranted. Analytical data is largely derived

  18. Problems of the experimental implementation of MTJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaletskiy, L. A.; Rudy, A. S.; Trushin, O. S.; Naumov, V. V.; Mironenko, A. A.; Vasilev, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of experimental studies of MRAM technology based on standard magnetic tunneling junctions are presented. Basic steps of experimental fabrication of MRAM cell are considered. Experimental samples of MTJ with variable lateral sizes are fabricated. Current-voltage characteristics of the tunnel barriers are investigated. Main parameters of the tunnel barriers are estimated from comparison of the experimental data with the theory.

  19. Analysis of fission gas release kinetics by on-line mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zerega, Y.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Parrat, D.; Carette, M.; Brkic, B.; Lyoussi, A.; Bignan, G.; Janulyte, A.; Andre, J.; Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G.; Taylor, S.

    2011-07-01

    a gamma spectrometer in the fission product laboratory of the future Jules Horowitz Material Test Reactor. An intermediate step will consist of testing first equipment on an existing experimental facility in the LECA-STAR Hot Cell Laboratory of the CEA Cadarache. This paper presents the scientific and operational stakes linked to fission gas issues, resumes the current state of art for analyzing them in nuclear facilities, then presents the skills gathered through this collaboration to overcome technological bottlenecks. Finally it describes the implementation strategy in nuclear research facilities of the CEA Cadarache. (authors)

  20. The philosophy of scientific experimentation: a review.

    PubMed

    Radder, Hans

    2009-10-29

    Practicing and studying automated experimentation may benefit from philosophical reflection on experimental science in general. This paper reviews the relevant literature and discusses central issues in the philosophy of scientific experimentation. The first two sections present brief accounts of the rise of experimental science and of its philosophical study. The next sections discuss three central issues of scientific experimentation: the scientific and philosophical significance of intervention and production, the relationship between experimental science and technology, and the interactions between experimental and theoretical work. The concluding section identifies three issues for further research: the role of computing and, more specifically, automating, in experimental research, the nature of experimentation in the social and human sciences, and the significance of normative, including ethical, problems in experimental science.

  1. The philosophy of scientific experimentation: a review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Practicing and studying automated experimentation may benefit from philosophical reflection on experimental science in general. This paper reviews the relevant literature and discusses central issues in the philosophy of scientific experimentation. The first two sections present brief accounts of the rise of experimental science and of its philosophical study. The next sections discuss three central issues of scientific experimentation: the scientific and philosophical significance of intervention and production, the relationship between experimental science and technology, and the interactions between experimental and theoretical work. The concluding section identifies three issues for further research: the role of computing and, more specifically, automating, in experimental research, the nature of experimentation in the social and human sciences, and the significance of normative, including ethical, problems in experimental science. PMID:20098589

  2. Experimental Plasma Research project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Diagnostics; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

  3. Experimental Cryosurgery Investigations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gage, A.A.; Baust, J.M.; Baust, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Cryosurgery is the use of freezing temperatures to elicit an ablative response in a targeted tissue. This review provides a global overview of experimentation in vivo which has been the basis of advancement of this widely applied therapeutic option. The cellular and tissue-related events that underlie the mechanisms of destruction, including direct cell injury (cryolysis), vascular stasis, apoptosis and necrosis, are described and are related to the optimal methods of technique of freezing to achieve efficacious therapy. In vivo experiments with major organs, including wound healing, the putative immunological response following thawing, and the use of cryoadjunctive strategies to enhance cancer cell sensitivity to freezing, are described. PMID:19833119

  4. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  5. NATO IST 124 Experimentation Instructions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-10

    machine templates built to run the scenario defined by the NATO-IST-124 panel; and flexible scripting and EMANE configuration files that give users the...virtual machine (EMANE_9.2.1_13G) is registered with DAVC version 2.0. • Users have access to the NATO-IST-124 experimentation package (nato...EMANE_9.2_13G” virtual machine with the following 2 networks: 172.15.0.0/24 and 172.16.0.0/24 (Figs. 2 and 3). Approved for public release

  6. Engine Combustion Network Experimental Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Maintained by the Engine Combustion Department of Sandia National Laboratories, data currently available on the website includes reacting and non-reacting sprays in a constant-volume chamber at conditions typical of diesel combustion. The data are useful for model development and validation because of the well-defined boundary conditions and the wide range of conditions employed. A search utility displays data based on experimental conditions such as ambient temperature, ambient density, injection pressure, nozzle size, fuel, etc. Experiment-related visualizations are also available. (Specialized Interface)

  7. Experimental investigation of hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Intrieri, Peter F.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive series of ballistic range tests are currently being conducted at the Ames Research Center. These tests are intended to investigate the hypersonic aerodynamic characteristics of two basic configurations, which are: the blunt-cone Galileo probe which is scheduled to be launched in late 1989 and will enter the atmosphere of Jupiter in 1994, and a generic slender cone configuration to provide experimental aerodynamic data including good flow-field definition which computational aerodynamicists could use to validate their computer codes. Some of the results obtained thus far are presented and work for the near future is discussed.

  8. Experimental therapeutics in the Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Norton, Stata

    2003-02-01

    Detailed accounts of therapeutics at the time of the European Renaissance written by the participants have not survived in large numbers. One manuscript, dated 1562, was written by friars in a religious order in Italy dedicated to the care of the sick. Their remedies, methods of preparation, and uses were detailed by the friars and offer a glimpse into the beginnings of experimentation with drugs and rejection of tradition and authority in determining the effectiveness of a remedy. These developing concepts were combined in the manuscript with traditional treatments dating back through the Middle Ages to the medical methods of Greece and Rome.

  9. Experimental quantum multiparty communication protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Massimiliano; Elhassan, Ashraf M.; Tavakoli, Armin; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Quantum information science breaks limitations of conventional information transfer, cryptography and computation by using quantum superpositions or entanglement as resources for information processing. Here we report on the experimental realisation of three-party quantum communication protocols using single three-level quantum system (qutrit) communication: secret-sharing, detectable Byzantine agreement and communication complexity reduction for a three-valued function. We have implemented these three schemes using the same optical fibre interferometric setup. Our realisation is easily scalable without compromising on detection efficiency or generating extremely complex many-particle entangled states.

  10. Experimental studies of glass refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.; Kondos, P.

    1984-01-01

    The basic components of the experimental apparatus were selected and acquired. Techniques were developed for the fabrication of the special crucibles necessary for the experiments. Arrangements were made for the analysis of glass and gas bubble samples for composition information. Donations of major equipment were received for this project from Owens, Illinois where a similar study had been conducted a few year ago. Decisions were made regarding the actual glass composition to be used, the gas to be used in the first experiments, and the temperatures at which the experiments should be conducted. A microcomputer was acquired, and work was begun on interfacing the video analyzer to it.

  11. SAA drift:experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Kudela, K.; Romashova, V. V.; Drozdov, A. Yu.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth's magnetic field connected with magnetic momentum changing. Besides these variations affects on the trapped belt South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations including Space Shuttle short-time flights approved the existence SAA westward drift with speed 0.1-1.0 (deg/year) and northward drift with speed approximately 0.1 (deg/year). In this work we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in SINP MSU in 1972-2003 from different satellites. There were analyzed the fluxes of protons with energy > 50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy > 500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1-1.0 MeV in SAA area and their maxima location. The data about fluxes were obtained onboard the orbital stations ``Salut-6'' (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the identical experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact of the SAA westward drift. Moreover the same analysis of maximum flux location of electrons with hundreds keV energy (satellites ``Kosmos-484'' (1972), ``Interkosmos-17'' (1977) and ``Activny'' (``Interkosmos-24'', 1991)) confirmed not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  12. Animal husbandry and experimental design.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    If the scientist needs to contact the animal facility after any study to inquire about husbandry details, this represents a lost opportunity, which can ultimately interfere with the study results and their interpretation. There is a clear tendency for authors to describe methodological procedures down to the smallest detail, but at the same time to provide minimal information on animals and their husbandry. Controlling all major variables as far as possible is the key issue when establishing an experimental design. The other common mechanism affecting study results is a change in the variation. Factors causing bias or variation changes are also detectable within husbandry. Our lives and the lives of animals are governed by cycles: the seasons, the reproductive cycle, the weekend-working days, the cage change/room sanitation cycle, and the diurnal rhythm. Some of these may be attributable to routine husbandry, and the rest are cycles, which may be affected by husbandry procedures. Other issues to be considered are consequences of in-house transport, restrictions caused by caging, randomization of cage location, the physical environment inside the cage, the acoustic environment audible to animals, olfactory environment, materials in the cage, cage complexity, feeding regimens, kinship, and humans. Laboratory animal husbandry issues are an integral but underappreciated part of investigators' experimental design, which if ignored can cause major interference with the results. All researchers should familiarize themselves with the current routine animal care of the facility serving them, including their capabilities for the monitoring of biological and physicochemical environment.

  13. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute pancreatitis, as well as the mortality, vary considerably between these different models. Animal models reproducibly produce mild, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis. One of the most commonly used models of acute pancreatitis is created by administration of supramaximal doses of cerulein, an analog of cholecystokinin. This model produces acute mild edematous pancreatitis in rats, whereas administration of cerulein in mice leads to the development of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis evoked by retrograde administration of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct is the most often used model of acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Ex vivo models allow to eliminate the influence of hormonal and nervous factors on the development of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    PubMed Central

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  15. X-38 Experimental Controls Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, Steve; Estes, Jay; Bordano, Aldo J.

    2000-01-01

    X-38 Experimental Control Laws X-38 is a NASA JSC/DFRC experimental flight test program developing a series of prototypes for an International Space Station (ISS) Crew Return Vehicle, often called an ISS "lifeboat." X- 38 Vehicle 132 Free Flight 3, currently scheduled for the end of this month, will be the first flight test of a modem FCS architecture called Multi-Application Control-Honeywell (MACH), originally developed by the Honeywell Technology Center. MACH wraps classical P&I outer attitude loops around a modem dynamic inversion attitude rate loop. The dynamic inversion process requires that the flight computer have an onboard aircraft model of expected vehicle dynamics based upon the aerodynamic database. Dynamic inversion is computationally intensive, so some timing modifications were made to implement MACH on the slower flight computers of the subsonic test vehicles. In addition to linear stability margin analyses and high fidelity 6-DOF simulation, hardware-in-the-loop testing is used to verify the implementation of MACH and its robustness to aerodynamic and environmental uncertainties and disturbances.

  16. Experimental telemanipulation in endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Schurr, M O; Breitwieser, H; Melzer, A; Kunert, W; Schmitt, M; Voges, U; Buess, G

    1996-06-01

    Today's rigid endoscopic instruments limit the intracorporeal mobility of the surgical tool and are a severe impediment for the further spread of endoscopic techniques in operative medicine. Since 1992 flexible, steerable instruments with additional links for pivoting and rotating the tip have been developed and experimentally evaluated. The latest versions of this series of instruments are equipped with electromotors for better handling. The next aim in this development is a fully mobile telemanipulator with six motion axes dedicated to use in endoscopic surgery. Its first tests are planned for 1995. For successful operation of an electric telemanipulator, the man-machine interface (MMI) is of cardinal importance. For the definition of surgical requirements for the MMI, a conventional master-slave manipulator designed for technical application was modified for use in guiding a laparoscopic instrument. Master and slave sites of the system were 1.3 km apart and linked by means of a fiber-optic cable. Using this modified telepresence system, remote laparoscopic cholecystectomy was feasible in a phantom model. In a standardized test series using a test parcours, different parameters of the control system were modified, and their influence on the execution time of the parcours tasks was recorded. Well-suited parameter configurations were found and allowed experimental verification and completion of the important aspects of our concepts for development of an endoscopic manipulator MMI.

  17. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2014-05-09

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ρ0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ρ0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ρ0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  18. Experimental models of developmental hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Argumedo, G S; Sanz, C R; Olguín, H J

    2012-02-01

    Hypothyroidism is a systemic disease resulting from either thyroid gland's anatomical and functional absence or lack of hypophyseal stimulation, both of which can lead to deficiency in thyroid hormone (TH) production. TH is essential for human and animal development, growth, and function of multiple organs. Children with deficient TH can develop alterations in central nervous system (CNS), striated muscle, bone tissue, liver, bone marrow, and cardiorespiratory system. Among the clinical outlook are signs like breathing difficulty, cardiac insufficiency, dysphagia, and repeated bronchial aspiration, constipation, muscle weakness, cognitive alterations, cochlear dysfunction, reduced height, defects in temperature regulation, anaemia, jaundice, susceptibility to infection, and others. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that TH is very essential for normal brain development. Other research work based on mice pointed out that a reduced level of TH in pregnant mother leads to congenital hypothyroidism in animal models and it is associated with mental retardation, deep neurologic deficiency that impacts on cognitive, learning, and memory functions. The principal experimental model studies that have focused on hypothyroidism are reviewed in this study. This is important on considering the fact that almost all animal species require thyroid hormones for their metabolism.

  19. Experimental results on evaporation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grana Otero, Jose; Parra Fabian, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    A liquid contained in a vertical glass tube is suddenly depressurized from a high initial pressure down to one for which the stable state is vapour, so vaporization sets off at the free surface. For large enough evaporation rates, the planar vapour-liquid interface is Darrieus-Landau unstable [1], leading to the interface surface rippling close to the instability threshold. Further increasing the initial to final pressure ratio brings about evaporation waves [2,3], in which a highly corrugated front propagates downwards into the liquid. A new experimental method is presented as well as some experimental results obtained by tracking the evolution of the front with a high speed camera. In addition, a number of new phenomena related to the dynamics of bubbles growth at the walls has been uncovered. In particular, a new mode of propagation of the evaporation front is found. In this mode the front originates from below the interface, so the propagation is upwards against gravity with a curved but smooth front.[4pt] [1] F. J. Higuera, Phys. Fluids, V. 30, 679 (1987).[0pt] [2] J.E.Shepherd and B.Sturtevant, J.Fluid Mech., V.121,379 (1982).[0pt] [3] P.Reinke and G.Yadigaroglu, Int.J.Multiph. Flow, V.27,1487 (2001).

  20. Experimental stress remagnetization of magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.

    1996-09-01

    Pseudo-single-domain (PSD) and multidomain (MD) magnetite grains remagnetize in weak magnetic field (30 μT) during experimental triaxial deformation. The magnetite is supported in a calcite-cement matrix. Minor remagnetization occurs with hydrostatic stress of 100 MPa. Significant remagnetization requires hydrostatic pressure of 150 MPa with differential stress of ≥5 MPa superposed on the sample. Intergranular differential stresses must be much higher due to amplification at grain asperities. Stress remagnetization does not need chemical or thermal energy. New components of magnetic remanence are added parallel to the remagnetizing field. However, this only happens in grains or parts of grains with coercivities of remanence < 15 and > 60 mT. Grains with coercivities of 20-55 mT remember the primary magnetization and are not stress magnetized. These coercivity limits do not depend on the differential stress or strain rate of the experiment. The spatial distribution of vector components of remanence was isolated by AF demagnetization. After deforming a magnetized sample, the components of remanence spread along a partial great circle between the initial remanence and the direction of the remagnetizing field. The directions of the original magnetization and the remagnetizing field are the only factors controlling the course of the remagnetization path. Triaxial deformation shortened these samples by < 17%. Thus, grain rotation fails to explain the changes in directions of magnetism. The remagnetization is attributed to the low field during stress deflection of domain walls that were possibly locked in place by deformation features. If the experimental results are transferable to nature, it is possible that a pulse of excess crustal stress > 25 MPa could partially remagnetize low-dislocation-density magnetite. The experiments show that the directions of the remagnetizing field and the primary magnetization are the only variables that affect the demagnetization

  1. The beginnings of experimental petrology.

    PubMed

    Eugster, H P

    1971-08-06

    Van't Hoff's work constitutes the first systematic contribution to experimental petrology. At all times, the problem was perceived as geologic in nature and the laboratory results were checked against natural assemblages whenever possible. The phase rule was not used, nor, for that matter, was chemical thermodynamics, except for the Van't Hoff equation. However, the work of Van't Hoff and Van Deventer was indirectly involved in the evolution of phase theory by Roozeboom, Van Rijn van Alkemade, and Schreinemakers. Meyerhoffer himself wrote the first text explicitly devoted to the phase rule. The impact of Van't Hoff's study was enormous, but it was restricted to those geologists willing and able to cope with chemistry. Foremost among them were igneous petrologists who had long since accepted chemical arguments for classification purposes. I consider the Geophysical Laboratory program to be the most direct heir of the Van't Hoff approach. Although the shape of that program was formulated independently by Van Hise, Becker, Day, and others, the inspiration they derived from Van't Hoff's successes is clearly acknowledged. The study of the fusion of plagioclases by Day and Allen (41), which directly led to the authorization for the Geophysical Laboratory, was the igneous counterpart of Van't Hoff's low-temperature experimental petrology. On metamorphic petrology, too, Van't Hoff left his mark, with V. M. Goldschmidt acting as his disciple. The interpretation of the Kristiania contact rocks was explicitly based on Van't Hoff's double salt law in preference to the phase rule. Sedimentologists remained unaffected and continued their preoccupation with description and classification. Chemical arguments remained subordinate in their work and of an elementary nature, underscoring the chasm between "hard" rocks and "soft" rocks. This gulf is only now beginning to close as a result of the blossoming of experimental petrology and geochemistry since World War II. At last the

  2. 'Impulsar': Experimental and Theoretical Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonov, V. V.

    2008-04-28

    The Objective of the 'Impulsar' project is to accomplish a circle of experimental, engineering and technological works on creation of a high efficiency laser rocket engine. The project includes many organizations of the rocket industry and Academy of Sciences of Russia. High repetition rate pulse-periodic CO{sub 2} laser system project for launching will be presented. Optical system for 15 MW laser energy delivery and optical matrix of laser engine receiver will by discussed as well. Basic characteristics of the laser-based engine will be compared with theoretical predictions and important stages of further technology implementation (low frequency resonance). Relying on a wide cooperation of different branches of science and industry organizations it is very possible to use the accumulated potential for launching of nano-vehicles during the upcoming 4-5 years.

  3. The ethics of animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Lane-Petter, W

    1976-09-01

    Animal experimentation arouses great emotion in many people, perhaps more especially in Britain, and this has increased as more sophisticated medical and non-medical animal experiments are demanded by modern research. The Cruelty to Animals Act of 1876 is the only legal regulation of experiments in animals, and many of its clauses are ambiguous. So in 1963 a committee of enquiry - the Littlewood Committee - was set up. Dr Lane-Petter examines the emotional and factual background to the enquiry, and discusses in an ethical context the usefulness and positive advantages of animal experiments compared with those of possible substitutes and in some detail three of the questions left unanswered by the Littlewood Committee.

  4. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  5. [Experimental study of vestibular neurectomy].

    PubMed

    Pech, A; Cannoni, M; Appaix, M; Cahier, S; Lacour, M; Roll, J P

    1976-06-01

    The authors describe an experimental study carried out on baboons. After unilateral vestibular neurectomy, the behaviour disorders on the one hand, and on the other, modifications and temporal development of reflex muotatic excitability of the spine using Hoffmann's reflex method are analyzed. As far as behaviour is concerned, a four-day period of motor restriction following the operation causes more marked residual disorders in comparison with controls. From the neurophysiological point of view, neurectomy results in seriously disordered spinal reflexes characterized by ipsilateral hypo-excitability developing in there stages: a tw-day initial critical phase during which the disorders are at their worst, a four-day recuperative stage with partial regression of the disorders, finally a chronic compensation stage in which spinal excitability returns to normal after several months.

  6. Experimental contextuality in classical light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Zeng, Qiang; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2017-03-01

    The Klyachko, Can, Binicioglu, and Shumovsky (KCBS) inequality is an important contextuality inequality in three-level system, which has been demonstrated experimentally by using quantum states. Using the path and polarization degrees of freedom of classical optics fields, we have constructed the classical trit (cetrit), tested the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form (Wright’s inequality) in this work. The projection measurement has been implemented, the clear violations of the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form have been observed. This means that the contextuality inequality, which is commonly used in test of the conflict between quantum theory and noncontextual realism, may be used as a quantitative tool in classical optical coherence to describe correlation characteristics of the classical fields.

  7. Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Marmosets.

    PubMed

    Jagessar, S Anwar; Dijkman, Karin; Dunham, Jordon; 't Hart, Bert A; Kap, Yolanda S

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset, a small-bodied Neotropical primate, is a well-known and validated animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). This model can be used for exploratory research, i.e., investigating the pathogenic mechanisms involved in MS, and applied research, testing the efficacy of new potential drugs.In this chapter, we will describe a method to induce EAE in the marmoset. In addition, we will explain the most common immunological techniques involved in the marmoset EAE research, namely isolation of mononuclear cells (MNC) from peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue, assaying T cell proliferation by thymidine incorporation, MNC phenotyping by flow cytometry, antibody measurement by ELISA, generation of B cell lines and antigen-specific T cell lines, and assaying cytotoxic T cells.

  8. Experimental parvovirus infection in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Potgieter, L N; Jones, J B; Patton, C S; Webb-Martin, T A

    1981-01-01

    Five eight week old dogs were inoculated orally and intranasally with cell culture origin canine parvovirus. Three dogs became depressed and anorectic and developed a mild (one dog) to severe diarrhea five days postinfection. The remaining dogs had subclinical infections but developed a lymphopenia followed by a transient lymphocytosis. The ill dogs developed mild (one dog) to severe neutropenia and a moderate lymphopenia. One died nine days postinfection. Recovery was associated with cessation of viral excretion and with lymphocytosis and antibody production. Two of three dogs challenged intragastrically developed mild clinical signs and a moderate panleukopenia four to eight days postinfection. The pathological changes of the experimental disease were very similar to that of spontaneous disease. Bone marrow changes included a severe granulocytic and mild erythroid depletion. The pathogenesis of canine parvovirus infection is discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7340906

  9. Experimental Tests of Special Relativity

    ScienceCinema

    Roberts, Tom [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2016-07-12

    Over the past century Special Relativity has become a cornerstone of modern physics, and its Lorentz invariance is a foundation of every current fundamental theory of physics. So it is crucial that it be thoroughly tested experimentally. The many tests of SR will be discussed, including several modern high-precision measurements. Several experiments that appear to be in conflict with SR will also be discussed, such as claims that the famous measurements of Michelson and Morley actually have a non-null result, and the similar but far more extensive measurements of Dayton Miller that 'determined the absolute motion of the earth'. But the errorbars for these old experiments are huge, and are larger than their purported signals. In short, SR has been tested extremely well and stands un-refuted today, but current thoughts about quantum gravity suggest that it might not truly be a symmetry of nature.

  10. Experimental computation with oscillatory integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2009-06-26

    A previous study by one of the present authors, together with D. Borwein and I. Leonard [8], studied the asymptotic behavior of the p-norm of the sinc function: sinc(x) = (sin x)/x and along the way looked at closed forms for integer values of p. In this study we address these integrals with the tools of experimental mathematics, namely by computing their numerical values to high precision, both as a challenge in itself, and also in an attempt to recognize the numerical values as closed-form constants. With this approach, we are able to reproduce several of the results of [8] and to find new results, both numeric and analytic, that go beyond the previous study.

  11. Experimental compressive phase space tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lei; Lee, Justin; Oh, Se Baek; Barbastathis, George

    2012-01-01

    Phase space tomography estimates correlation functions entirely from snapshots in the evolution of the wave function along a time or space variable. In contrast, traditional interferometric methods require measurement of multiple two–point correlations. However, as in every tomographic formulation, undersampling poses a severe limitation. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, experimental demonstration of compressive reconstruction of the classical optical correlation function, i.e. the mutual intensity function. Our compressive algorithm makes explicit use of the physically justifiable assumption of a low–entropy source (or state.) Since the source was directly accessible in our classical experiment, we were able to compare the compressive estimate of the mutual intensity to an independent ground–truth estimate from the van Cittert–Zernike theorem and verify substantial quantitative improvements in the reconstruction. PMID:22513541

  12. Experimental Internet Environment Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.

    1998-01-01

    Geographically distributed project teams need an Internet based collaborative work environment or "Intranet." The Virtual Research Center (VRC) is an experimental Intranet server that combines several services such as desktop conferencing, file archives, on-line publishing, and security. Using the World Wide Web (WWW) as a shared space paradigm, the Graphical User Interface (GUI) presents users with images of a lunar colony. Each project has a wing of the colony and each wing has a conference room, library, laboratory, and mail station. In FY95, the VRC development team proved the feasibility of this shared space concept by building a prototype using a Netscape commerce server and several public domain programs. Successful demonstrations of the prototype resulted in approval for a second phase. Phase 2, documented by this report, will produce a seamlessly integrated environment by introducing new technologies such as Java and Adobe Web Links to replace less efficient interface software.

  13. Overview of Experimental Capabilities - Supersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of experimental capabilities applicable to the area of supersonic research. The contents include: 1) EC Objectives; 2) SUP.11: Elements; 3) NRA; 4) Advanced Flight Simulator Flexible Aircraft Simulation Studies; 5) Advanced Flight Simulator Flying Qualities Guideline Development for Flexible Supersonic Transport Aircraft; 6) Advanced Flight Simulator Rigid/Flex Flight Control; 7) Advanced Flight Simulator Rapid Sim Model Exchange; 8) Flight Test Capabilities Advanced In-Flight Infrared (IR) Thermography; 9) Flight Test Capabilities In-Flight Schlieren; 10) Flight Test Capabilities CLIP Flow Calibration; 11) Flight Test Capabilities PFTF Flowfield Survey; 12) Ground Test Capabilities Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA); 13) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); 14) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); and 15) Ground Test Capabilities EDL Optical Measurement Capability (PIV) for Rigid/Flexible Decelerator Models.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Microstructured Evaporators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibel, W.; Westermann, S.; Maikowske, S.; Brandner, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Microfluidic devices have become more and more popular over the last decades [1]. Cooling is a topic where microstructures offer significant advantages compared to conventional techniques due the much higher possible surface to volume ratios and short heat transfer lengths. By evaporating of a fluid in microchannels, compact, fast and powerful cooling devices become possible [2]. Experimental results for different designs of microstructured evaporators are presented here. They have been obtained either using water as evaporating coolant or the refrigerant R134a (Tetrafluoroethane). A new microstructured evaporator design consisting of bended microchannels instead of straight channels for a better performance is shown and compared to previous results [2] for the evaporation of R134a in straight microchannels.

  15. A device for experimental radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Bova, F; Spiegelmann, R; Friedman, W A

    1991-01-01

    As radiosurgery evolves into a widely available treatment modality for a variety of intracranial lesions, the need for basic research concerning the radiobiology of high-dose single-fraction ionizing radiation becomes crucial. A device especially designed for experimental radiosurgery in the cat is described. It incorporates basic parts of the Kopf stereotactic frame for accurate target positioning. A motorized pendular movement of the machine is used to describe a radiation arc, while the radiation source (either a linear accelerator or a cobalt machine) remains stationary. The pathway of the different radiation arcs is modified by rotation of the animal platform around the machine isocenter. Mechanical accuracy tests have shown a maximal alignment error of 0.15 mm, comparing favorably with that reported for modern clinical radiosurgical systems.

  16. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

  17. CHLORIDE RETENTION IN EXPERIMENTAL HYDRONEPHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Norman M.; Pulford, D. Schuyler

    1923-01-01

    1. In acute experimental hydronephrosis chloride retention occurs as well as retention of water, urea, and phenolsulfonephthalein. 2. If both water and chlorides are retained there may be no appreciable rise in the plasma chloride content. 3. When chlorides are retained, but not water, the chloride content of the plasma rises strikingly. 4. After the removal of the ureteral obstruction in acute hydronephrosis all renal functions, water, urea, and chloride excretion, may be rapidly restored in equal degree, or the chlorides may be retained temporarily while there is free excretion of water and urea. 5. In chronic hydronephrosis adequate daily excretion of urea and chlorides may be maintained by a compensatory polyuria. 6. Chloride retention or an abnormal chloride excretion may occur in certain renal lesions when there is no change in the urea, phenolsulfonephthalein, or water excretion. PMID:19868720

  18. [Experimental coronary stenoses and occlusions].

    PubMed

    Neef, H; Pannwitz, H G; Pauer, H D; Bretschneider, G; Beschauner, B; Gabriel, G; Kentsch, G

    1977-01-01

    A constrictor for experimentally inducing stenoses and obstructions of the coronary artery is described. Smallness, good adaptability to every vascular diameter, atraumatic insertion, and slow swelling are its advantages. Within 12 months a coronary artery could be constricted by two thirds. In one third of the cases the lumen was narrowed by more than 75 per cent. Just 50 per cent of the cases showed chronic infarction after coronary obstruction, the other half developed differently marked myocardiac fibrosis. At high-degree narrowing of the arteries, 75 per cent of the cases showed disseminated myocardiac fibrosis. The occlusion of the vessel is caused by constrictor, by fibroplastic alteration of the vascular wall, and by thrombosis. Different degrees of myocardiac ischemia are sequelae of different development of collaterals. The constrictor may be used for studies on the development of collaterals as well as on therapeutic measures in chronic ischemia of the myocardium.

  19. Communications satellites - The experimental years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, B. I.

    1983-01-01

    Only eight years after the launc of Sputnik-1 by the Soviet Union, the first commercial satellite, 'Early Bird', entered service. In just twelve years commercial satellite service extended around the earth and became profitable. The reasons for the successful development of the communications satellite services in a comparatively short time are considered. These reasons are related to the presence of three ingredients, taking into account technology to create the system, communications requirements to form a market, and a management structure to implement the system. The formation of the concept of using earth orbiting satellites for telecommunications is discussed. It is pointed out that the years from 1958 to 1964 were the true 'experimental years' for satellite communications. The rapid development of technology during this crucial period is described, giving attention to passive satellites, active systems, and development satellites.

  20. Experimental applications of smart composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Yang, Qiang; MacDonald, Douglas O.; Westhaver, Paul A. D.

    1997-03-01

    The issues of fabrication, evaluation and experimental testing of smart composites are discussed. The technology for the fabrication of fiber reinforced polymer composites with embedded fiber optic sensors is developed. Smart composites are produced by a custom built pultruder. It is shown that the mechanical properties of pultruded carbon reinforced composites with and without optical fiber are superior to that of pultruded glass analogue. The embedded optical fibers do not have significant effect on the tensile properties of pultruded FRP, but they deteriorate the shear strength of composites. Polyimide coating on optical fiber results in a good interface between optical fiber and host material; whereas acrylate coating cannot withstand the high production temperature and causes sever debonding of optical fiber and resin. The specific application in view is the use of smart reinforcements for innovative concrete structures.

  1. VENUS-2 Experimental Benchmark Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    The VENUS critical facility is a zero power reactor located at SCK-CEN, Mol, Belgium, which for the VENUS-2 experiment utilized a mixed-oxide core with near-weapons-grade plutonium. In addition to the VENUS-2 Core, additional computational variants based on each type of fuel cycle VENUS-2 core (3.3 wt. % UO{sub 2}, 4.0 wt. % UO{sub 2}, and 2.0/2.7 wt.% MOX) were also calculated. The VENUS-2 critical configuration and cell variants have been calculated with MCU-REA, which is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code system developed at Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' and is used extensively in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. The calculations resulted in a k{sub eff} of 0.99652 {+-} 0.00025 and relative pin powers within 2% for UO{sub 2} pins and 3% for MOX pins of the experimental values.

  2. Experimental subjects are not different

    PubMed Central

    Exadaktylos, Filippos; Espín, Antonio M.; Brañas-Garza, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Experiments using economic games are becoming a major source for the study of human social behavior. These experiments are usually conducted with university students who voluntarily choose to participate. Across the natural and social sciences, there is some concern about how this “particular” subject pool may systematically produce biased results. Focusing on social preferences, this study employs data from a survey-experiment conducted with a representative sample of a city's population (N = 765). We report behavioral data from five experimental decisions in three canonical games: dictator, ultimatum and trust games. The dataset includes students and non-students as well as volunteers and non-volunteers. We separately examine the effects of being a student and being a volunteer on behavior, which allows a ceteris paribus comparison between self-selected students (students*volunteers) and the representative population. Our results suggest that self-selected students are an appropriate subject pool for the study of social behavior. PMID:23429162

  3. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Philippa; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L.; Koike, Kazuhiko; Llovet, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and deadly cancer whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Comparative genomic studies from human HCC samples have classified HCCs into different molecular subgroups; yet, the unifying feature of this tumor is its propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. This review seeks to analyze the available experimental models in HCC research and to correlate data from human populations with them in order to consolidate our efforts to date, as it is increasingly clear that different models will be required to mimic different subclasses of the neoplasm. These models will be instrumental in the evaluation of compounds targeting specific molecular pathways in future preclinical studies. PMID:18314222

  4. Experimental Ten-Photon Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi-Lin; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, W.; Huang, H.-L.; Liu, C.; Chen, C.; Luo, Y.-H.; Su, Z.-E.; Wu, D.; Li, Z.-D.; Lu, H.; Hu, Y.; Jiang, X.; Peng, C.-Z.; Li, L.; Liu, N.-L.; Chen, Yu-Ao; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-11-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of quantum entanglement among ten spatially separated single photons. A near-optimal entangled photon-pair source was developed with simultaneously a source brightness of ˜12 MHz /W , a collection efficiency of ˜70 % , and an indistinguishability of ˜91 % between independent photons, which was used for a step-by-step engineering of multiphoton entanglement. Under a pump power of 0.57 W, the ten-photon count rate was increased by about 2 orders of magnitude compared to previous experiments, while maintaining a state fidelity sufficiently high for proving the genuine ten-particle entanglement. Our work created a state-of-the-art platform for multiphoton experiments, and enabled technologies for challenging optical quantum information tasks, such as the realization of Shor's error correction code and high-efficiency scattershot boson sampling.

  5. [Experimental models of Huntington's disease].

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, R; del Val-Fernández, J; Catalán-Alonso, M J; Barcia-Albacar, J A; Matías-Guiu, J

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease caused by triplet repetition in exon 1 of the huntingtin protein located in chromosome 4. Medium spiny neurons in the striatum are selectively affected. Clinical manifestations include progressive behavioural, motor and cognitive disorders. There is no treatment available today capable of modifying the natural course of the disease. A great amount of research work is being carried out, much of which involves animal models of the disease. We reviewed the articles published in PubMed on basic research into HD and analysed the most frequently used models. Transgenic mouse models, excitotoxic models, transgenic fly models and cell cultures are all used in studies into HD. The advantages and disadvantages of each of them are highlighted. The contribution made by each model of HD must be known in order to draw up a correct design in experimental studies of the disease.

  6. Experimental Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneque, David

    2012-07-01

    Our knowledge of the γ-ray sky has dramatically changed due to the advent of the new ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VEPJTAS) and the satellite-borne instruments (AGILE and Fermi). These facilities boosted the number of γ-ray sources by one order of magnitude in the last 6 years, providing us with about 2000 sources detected above 100 MeV (from space) and about 100 sources detected above 100 GeV (from the ground). The combination of this large leap in experimental capabilities together with the fact that the Universe is still quite unexplored at these extreme energies is evidence of a large scientific discovery potential that will surely make the decade 2010-2020 a golden age for γ-ray astronomy. In this manuscript I provide a subjective review of some of the most exciting observations from this rapidly evolving field during the last two years.

  7. Experimental contextuality in classical light.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zeng, Qiang; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2017-03-14

    The Klyachko, Can, Binicioglu, and Shumovsky (KCBS) inequality is an important contextuality inequality in three-level system, which has been demonstrated experimentally by using quantum states. Using the path and polarization degrees of freedom of classical optics fields, we have constructed the classical trit (cetrit), tested the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form (Wright's inequality) in this work. The projection measurement has been implemented, the clear violations of the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form have been observed. This means that the contextuality inequality, which is commonly used in test of the conflict between quantum theory and noncontextual realism, may be used as a quantitative tool in classical optical coherence to describe correlation characteristics of the classical fields.

  8. Experimental contextuality in classical light

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Zeng, Qiang; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    The Klyachko, Can, Binicioglu, and Shumovsky (KCBS) inequality is an important contextuality inequality in three-level system, which has been demonstrated experimentally by using quantum states. Using the path and polarization degrees of freedom of classical optics fields, we have constructed the classical trit (cetrit), tested the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form (Wright’s inequality) in this work. The projection measurement has been implemented, the clear violations of the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form have been observed. This means that the contextuality inequality, which is commonly used in test of the conflict between quantum theory and noncontextual realism, may be used as a quantitative tool in classical optical coherence to describe correlation characteristics of the classical fields. PMID:28291227

  9. Experimental quantum computing without entanglement.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, B P; Barbieri, M; Almeida, M P; White, A G

    2008-11-14

    Deterministic quantum computation with one pure qubit (DQC1) is an efficient model of computation that uses highly mixed states. Unlike pure-state models, its power is not derived from the generation of a large amount of entanglement. Instead it has been proposed that other nonclassical correlations are responsible for the computational speedup, and that these can be captured by the quantum discord. In this Letter we implement DQC1 in an all-optical architecture, and experimentally observe the generated correlations. We find no entanglement, but large amounts of quantum discord-except in three cases where an efficient classical simulation is always possible. Our results show that even fully separable, highly mixed, states can contain intrinsically quantum mechanical correlations and that these could offer a valuable resource for quantum information technologies.

  10. Loxiglumide protects against experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Setnikar, I; Bani, M; Cereda, R; Chisté, R; Makovec, F; Pacini, M A; Revel, L

    1987-10-01

    Loxiglumide (D,L-4-(3,4-dichloro-benzoylamino)- 5-(N-3-methoxypropyl-pentylamino)-5-oxo-pentanoic acid, CR 1505) is a derivative of pentanoic acid and belongs to a newly discovered class of agents with cholecystokinin antagonistic activities. Loxiglumide has preventive effects on different types of experimental pancreatitis, induced e.g. by ceruletide (i.p. ED50 ca. 9 mumol/kg), by intrapancreatic taurocholate (i.p. ED50 ca. 80 mumol/kg) or by choline-deficient ethionine-supplemented diet (i.p. ED50 ca. 45 mumol/kg). Loxiglumide has a simple, non-polypeptidic chemical structure and may be a candidate for clinical investigations in man, e.g. for pancreatitis.

  11. Communications satellites - The experimental years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, B. I.

    1983-01-01

    Only eight years after the launc of Sputnik-1 by the Soviet Union, the first commercial satellite, 'Early Bird', entered service. In just twelve years commercial satellite service extended around the earth and became profitable. The reasons for the successful development of the communications satellite services in a comparatively short time are considered. These reasons are related to the presence of three ingredients, taking into account technology to create the system, communications requirements to form a market, and a management structure to implement the system. The formation of the concept of using earth orbiting satellites for telecommunications is discussed. It is pointed out that the years from 1958 to 1964 were the true 'experimental years' for satellite communications. The rapid development of technology during this crucial period is described, giving attention to passive satellites, active systems, and development satellites.

  12. TOOTH GROWTH IN EXPERIMENTAL SCURVY

    PubMed Central

    Dalldorf, Gilbert; Zall, Celia

    1930-01-01

    1. The incisor teeth of guinea pigs have a constant rate of growth in health. 2. Deprivation of Vitamin C causes the teeth to cease growing. Readministration of the vitamin restores the growth. 3. Administration of small amounts of antiscorbutic substance results in rates of growth roughly proportional to dosage. 4. Under standard experimental conditions used in the testing of foodstuffs for antiscorbutic value, the rate of tooth growth would appear to be a precise indication of the degree of scurvy, being more delicate than the Sherman score, and more constant as well as more simple, than the Höjer method. 5. Stress in terms of usage appears to exaggerate the scorbutic lesions in the teeth. PMID:19869749

  13. Ten Problems in Experimental Mathematics

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Kapoor, Vishaal; Weisstein, Eric

    2004-09-30

    This article was stimulated by the recent SIAM ''100 DigitChallenge'' of Nick Trefethen, beautifully described in a recent book. Indeed, these ten numeric challenge problems are also listed in a recent book by two of present authors, where they are followed by the ten symbolic/numeric challenge problems that are discussed in this article. Our intent was to present ten problems that are characteristic of the sorts of problems that commonly arise in ''experimental mathematics''. The challenge in each case is to obtain a high precision numeric evaluation of the quantity, and then, if possible, to obtain a symbolic answer, ideally one with proof. Our goal in this article is to provide solutions to these ten problems, and in the process present a concise account of how one combines symbolic and numeric computation, which may be termed ''hybrid computation'', in the process of mathematical discovery.

  14. Cervical carcinoma: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Cowan, M E; Skinner, G R

    1988-01-01

    A mouse model system was used to investigate the preventive efficacy of a subunit herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccine on the development of HSV induced cervical carcinoma. Ten groups of mice were vaccinated before receiving repeated intravaginal exposure to HSV-type 2 inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation. At 20 months postvaccination, neutralizing antibody activity to herpes simplex viruses was detected in the sera of the mice which had received the highest vaccine dose. Although three experimental mice and one control mouse developed cervical tumours and five mice developed preinvasive malignant changes, 87% of cervices were of normal or koilocytotic appearance on histological examination. There was therefore no evidence from this study that repeated exposure of mouse cervices to inactivated HSV-2 induced a significant incidence of preinvasive or invasive cervical carcinoma.

  15. The ethics of animal experimentation.

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Petter, W.

    1976-01-01

    Animal experimentation arouses great emotion in many people, perhaps more especially in Britain, and this has increased as more sophisticated medical and non-medical animal experiments are demanded by modern research. The Cruelty to Animals Act of 1876 is the only legal regulation of experiments in animals, and many of its clauses are ambiguous. So in 1963 a committee of enquiry - the Littlewood Committee - was set up. Dr Lane-Petter examines the emotional and factual background to the enquiry, and discusses in an ethical context the usefulness and positive advantages of animal experiments compared with those of possible substitutes and in some detail three of the questions left unanswered by the Littlewood Committee. PMID:966259

  16. Experimental Ten-Photon Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-Lin; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, W; Huang, H-L; Liu, C; Chen, C; Luo, Y-H; Su, Z-E; Wu, D; Li, Z-D; Lu, H; Hu, Y; Jiang, X; Peng, C-Z; Li, L; Liu, N-L; Chen, Yu-Ao; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-11-18

    We report the first experimental demonstration of quantum entanglement among ten spatially separated single photons. A near-optimal entangled photon-pair source was developed with simultaneously a source brightness of ∼12  MHz/W, a collection efficiency of ∼70%, and an indistinguishability of ∼91% between independent photons, which was used for a step-by-step engineering of multiphoton entanglement. Under a pump power of 0.57 W, the ten-photon count rate was increased by about 2 orders of magnitude compared to previous experiments, while maintaining a state fidelity sufficiently high for proving the genuine ten-particle entanglement. Our work created a state-of-the-art platform for multiphoton experiments, and enabled technologies for challenging optical quantum information tasks, such as the realization of Shor's error correction code and high-efficiency scattershot boson sampling.

  17. [Vitamins in rat experimental diets].

    PubMed

    Kodentsova, V M; Beketova, N A; Vrzhesinskaia, O A

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of full semisynthetic diets used in different laboratories has shown that its vitamin content covers physiological requirements of rats in these micronutrients. The significant fluctuations in group B vitamin concentrations may take place when one uses brewer's yeast as a source of these vitamins. A preliminary assessment of vitamin content in brewer's yeasts is required in this case. An essential contribution of basic components in diet vitamin content must be taken in consideration when one creates a vitamin-deficient diet. Casein contains substantial amounts of group B vitamins and vitamin D. Therefore decontamination of casein from water and / or fat-soluble vitamins or the use of commercial purified casein is required. Vegetable oils are usually used as a fatty component of a diet and they simultaneously serve as an additional source of vitamin E. A choice of naturally containing vitamin E oil as a fat component of a diet is crucial for the creating an alimentary deficiency of vitamin E. The content of fat-soluble vitamins in the diet of control group (group of comparison) and vitamin level in the diet of experimental group of animals must be equivalent in investigations with modified (quality and quantitative) fat diet component. Caloric restriction by simple reducing of food without increasing the amount of vitamins to an adequate level is incorrect. With these considerations in mind proper attention to the equivalence of vitamin content in the diet of animals in experimental and control groups should be paid during experiments scheduling. Otherwise, the studies carried out under deficient or excessive intake of vitamins can lead to incorrect interpretation of the results and difficulties in their comparison with the data obtained under different conditions.

  18. Pharmacology of human experimental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Graeff, F G; Parente, A; Del-Ben, C M; Guimarães, F S

    2003-04-01

    This review covers the effect of drugs affecting anxiety using four psychological procedures for inducing experimental anxiety applied to healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety disorders. The first is aversive conditioning of the skin conductance responses to tones. The second is simulated public speaking, which consists of speaking in front of a video camera, with anxiety being measured with psychometric scales. The third is the Stroop Color-Word test, in which words naming colors are painted in the same or in a different shade, the incongruence generating a cognitive conflict. The last test is a human version of a thoroughly studied animal model of anxiety, fear-potentiated startle, in which the eye-blink reflex to a loud noise is recorded. The evidence reviewed led to the conclusion that the aversive conditioning and potentiated startle tests are based on classical conditioning of anticipatory anxiety. Their sensitivity to benzodiazepine anxiolytics suggests that these models generate an emotional state related to generalized anxiety disorder. On the other hand, the increase in anxiety determined by simulated public speaking is resistant to benzodiazepines and sensitive to drugs affecting serotonergic neurotransmission. This pharmacological profile, together with epidemiological evidence indicating its widespread prevalence, suggests that the emotional state generated by public speaking represents a species-specific response that may be related to social phobia and panic disorder. Because of scant pharmacological data, the status of the Stroop Color-Word test remains uncertain. In spite of ethical and economic constraints, human experimental anxiety constitutes a valuable tool for the study of the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders.

  19. Remote experimental site concept development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Thomas A.; Meyer, William; Butner, David

    1995-01-01

    Scientific research is now often conducted on large and expensive experiments that utilize collaborative efforts on a national or international scale to explore physics and engineering issues. This is particularly true for the current US magnetic fusion energy program where collaboration on existing facilities has increased in importance and will form the basis for future efforts. As fusion energy research approaches reactor conditions, the trend is towards fewer large and expensive experimental facilities, leaving many major institutions without local experiments. Since the expertise of various groups is a valuable resource, it is important to integrate these teams into an overall scientific program. To sustain continued involvement in experiments, scientists are now often required to travel frequently, or to move their families, to the new large facilities. This problem is common to many other different fields of scientific research. The next-generation tokamaks, such as the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) or the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will operate in steady-state or long pulse mode and produce fluxes of fusion reaction products sufficient to activate the surrounding structures. As a direct consequence, remote operation requiring robotics and video monitoring will become necessary, with only brief and limited access to the vessel area allowed. Even the on-site control room, data acquisition facilities, and work areas will be remotely located from the experiment, isolated by large biological barriers, and connected with fiber-optics. Current planning for the ITER experiment includes a network of control room facilities to be located in the countries of the four major international partners; USA, Russian Federation, Japan, and the European Community.

  20. Disposal phase experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility comprises surface and subsurface facilities, including a repository mined in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2,150 feet. It has been developed to safely and permanently isolate transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes in a deep geological disposal site. On April 12, 1996, the DOE submitted a revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The DOE anticipates receiving an operating permit from the NMED; this permit is required prior to the start of disposal operations. On October 29, 1996, the DOE submitted a Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the WIPP land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-579) as amended, and the requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Parts 191 and 194. The DOE plans to begin disposal operations at the WIPP in November 1997 following receipt of certification by the EPA. The disposal phase is expected to last for 35 years, and will include recertification activities no less than once every five years. This Disposal Phase Experimental Program (DPEP) Plan outlines the experimental program to be conducted during the first 5-year recertification period. It also forms the basis for longer-term activities to be carried out throughout the 35-year disposal phase. Once the WIPP has been shown to be in compliance with regulatory requirements, the disposal phase gives an opportunity to affirm the compliance status of the WIPP, enhance the operations of the WIPP and the national TRU system, and contribute to the resolution of national and international nuclear waste management technical needs. The WIPP is the first facility of its kind in the world. As such, it provides a unique opportunity to advance the technical state of the art for permanent disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes.

  1. Experimental Constraints on Ureilite Petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singletary, Steven; Grove, Timothy L.

    2006-01-01

    This experimental study explores the petrogenesis of ureilites by a partial melting/smelting process. Experiments have been performed over temperature (1150-1280 C), pressure (5-12.5 MPa), and low oxygen fugacity (graphite-CO gas) conditions appropriate for a hypothetical ureilite parent body approximately 200 km in size. Experimental and modeling results indicate that a partial melting/smelting model of ureilite petrogenesis can explain many of the unique characteristics displayed by this meteorite group. Compositional information preserved in the pigeonite-olivine ureilites was used to estimate the composition of melts in equilibrium with the ureilites. The results of 20 experiments saturated with olivine, pyroxene, metal, and liquid with appropriate ureilite compositions are used to calibrate the phase coefficients and pressure-temperature dependence of the smelting reaction. The calibrated coefficients are used to model the behavior of a hypothetical residue that is experiencing fractional smelting. The residue is initially olivine-rich and smelting progressively depletes the olivine content and enriches the pyroxene and metal contents of the residues. The modeled residue composition at 1260 C best reproduces the trend of ureilite bulk compositions. The model results also indicate that as a ureilite residue undergoes isothermal decompression smelting over a range of temperatures, Ca/Al values and Cr203 contents are enriched at lower temperatures (below about 1240 C) and tend to decrease at higher temperatures. Therefore, fractional smelting can account for the high Ca/A1 and Cr203 wt% values observed in ureilites. We propose that ureilites were generated from an olivine-rich, cpx-bearing residue. Smelting began when the residue was partially melted and contained liquid, olivine, and carbon. These residues experienced varying degrees of fractional smelting to produce the compositional variability observed within the pigeonite-bearing ureilites. Variations in

  2. Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Lengyel, E; Burdette, JE; Kenny, HA; Matei, D; Pilrose, J; Haluska, P.; Nephew, KP; Hales, DB; Stack, MS

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) is associated with high mortality and, as the majority (>75%) of women with OvCa have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, rates of survival have not changed appreciably over 30 years. A mechanistic understanding of OvCa initiation and progression is hindered by the complexity of genetic and/or environmental initiating events and lack of clarity regarding the cell(s) or tissue(s) of origin. Metastasis of OvCa involves direct extension or exfoliation of cells and cellular aggregates into the peritoneal cavity, survival of matrix-detached cells in a complex ascites fluid phase, and subsequent adhesion to the mesothelium lining covering abdominal organs to establish secondary lesions containing host stromal and inflammatory components. Development of experimental models to recapitulate this unique mechanism of metastasis presents a remarkable scientific challenge and many approaches used to study other solid tumors (lung, colon, and breast, for example) are not transferable to OvCa research given the distinct metastasis pattern and unique tumor microenvironment. This review will discuss recent progress in the development and refinement of experimental models to study OvCa. Novel cellular, three-dimensional organotypic, and ex vivo models are considered and the current in vivo models summarized. The review critically evaluates currently available genetic mouse models of OvCa, the emergence of xenopatients, and the utility of the hen model to study OvCa prevention, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance. As these new approaches more accurately recapitulate the complex tumor microenvironment, it is predicted that new opportunities for enhanced understanding of disease progression, metastasis and therapeutic response will emerge. PMID:23934194

  3. The 1986 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1986 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium will provide a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that will be flown in the future.

  4. Experimental "evolutional machines": mathematical and experimental modeling of biological evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilkov, A. V.; Loginov, I. A.; Morozova, E. V.; Shuvaev, A. N.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    Experimentalists possess model systems of two major types for study of evolution continuous cultivation in the chemostat and long-term development in closed laboratory microecosystems with several trophic structure If evolutionary changes or transfer from one steady state to another in the result of changing qualitative properties of the system take place in such systems the main characteristics of these evolution steps can be measured By now this has not been realized from the point of view of methodology though a lot of data on the work of both types of evolutionary machines has been collected In our experiments with long-term continuous cultivation we used the bacterial strains containing in plasmids the cloned genes of bioluminescence and green fluorescent protein which expression level can be easily changed and controlled In spite of the apparent kinetic diversity of evolutionary transfers in two types of systems the general mechanisms characterizing the increase of used energy flow by populations of primer producent can be revealed at their study According to the energy approach at spontaneous transfer from one steady state to another e g in the process of microevolution competition or selection heat dissipation characterizing the rate of entropy growth should increase rather then decrease or maintain steady as usually believed The results of our observations of experimental evolution require further development of thermodynamic theory of open and closed biological systems and further study of general mechanisms of biological

  5. Control design for the SERC experimental testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacques, Robert; Blackwood, Gary; Macmartin, Douglas G.; How, Jonathan; Anderson, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on control design for the Space Engineering Research Center experimental testbeds are presented. Topics covered include: SISO control design and results; sensor and actuator location; model identification; control design; experimental results; preliminary LAC experimental results; active vibration isolation problem statement; base flexibility coupling into isolation feedback loop; cantilever beam testbed; and closed loop results.

  6. H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest.

    Treesearch

    Art McKee; Pamela. Druliner

    1998-01-01

    The H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest is a world renowned center for research and education about the ecology and management of forests and streams. Located about 50 miles (80 km) east of Eugene, Oregon, the Andrews Experimental Forest lies in the Blue River Ranger District of the Willamette National Forest. Established in 1948, the Experimental Forest is administered...

  7. The '3Is' of animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    2012-05-29

    Animal experimentation in scientific research is a good thing: important, increasing and often irreplaceable. Careful experimental design and reporting are at least as important as attention to welfare in ensuring that the knowledge we gain justifies using live animals as experimental tools.

  8. Experimental insights into angiosperm origins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Barry; Lee, Alex; Smilie, Ian; Knight, Charles; Upchurch, Garland

    2017-04-01

    The angiosperms occupy almost every habitat type on Earth and comprise nearly 90% of extant plant species. Yet this ascendency is a relatively recent (geological) phenomenon. Palaeobotanical evidence indicates a likely first occurrence in the Early Cretaceous followed by a relatively rapid increase in diversity with their rise to dominance marking the onset of modern world. Understanding this diversification event has been a key research question since Darwin commented on this "abominable mystery", and it remains one of the most significant unanswered questions in plant biology. Sequencing work shows that the diversification and radiation was accompanied by successive whole genome duplication (WGD) events. Furthermore proxy data and predictions from long-term carbon cycle models indicate that the angiosperm diversification was accompanied by a decline in atmospheric CO2. These observation raise the intriguing possibility that declining atmospheric CO2 concentration and capacity to undergo polyploidy could have given angiosperms a competitive advantage when compared to other plant groups. Using comparative ecophysiology we set out to test the effects of declining atmospheric CO2 by growing a six species (Ranunculus acris and Polypodium vulgare, chosen to represent Cretaceous understorey angiosperms and pteridophytes respectively. Liquidambar styraciflua and Laurus nobilis represented canopy angiosperms and Ginkgo biloba and Metasequoia glyptostroboides canopy gymnosperms) in controlled conditions across a CO2 gradient (2000, 1200, 800 and 400 ppm) to simulate Cretaceous CO2decline. To test for WGDs we use the relationship between guard cell size and genome size to reconstruct angiosperm genome size as they radiated. Analysis of our fossil dataset shows that earliest angiosperms had a small genome size. Our experimental work shows that angiosperms have a greater capacity for acclimation suggesting that declining CO2 could have acted as a trigger for the angiosperm

  9. Experimental Trichinella infection in seals.

    PubMed

    Kapel, C M O; Measures, L; Møller, L N; Forbes, L; Gajadhar, A

    2003-11-01

    The susceptibility of seals to infection with Trichinella nativa and the cold tolerant characteristics of muscle larvae in seal meat were evaluated. Two grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, were inoculated with 5000 (100 larvae/kg) T. nativa larvae and two grey seals with 50000 (1000 larvae/kg). One seal from each dose group and two control seals were killed at 5 and 10 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.). At 5 weeks p.i., infection was established in both low and high dose seals with mean larval densities of 68 and 472 larvae per gram (lpg), respectively, using eight different muscles for analyses. At 10 weeks p.i., mean larval densities were 531 and 2649 lpg, respectively, suggesting an extended persistence of intestinal worms. In seals with high larval density infections, the distribution of larvae in various muscles was uniform, but in one seal with a low larval density infection, predilection sites of larvae included muscle groups with a relative high blood flow, i.e. diaphragm, intercostal and rear flipper muscles. Trichinella-specific antibody levels, as measured by ELISA, increased during the 10 week experimental period. Infected seal muscle was stored at 5, -5 and -18 degrees C for 1, 4 and 8 weeks. Muscle larvae released from stored seal muscle by artificial digestion were inoculated into mice to assess viability and infectivity. Larvae from seal muscle 10 weeks p.i. tolerated -18 degrees C for 8 weeks but larvae from seal muscle 5 weeks p.i. tolerated only 1 week at -18 degrees C, supporting the hypothesis that freeze tolerance increases with the age of the host-parasite tissue complex. The expressed susceptibility to infection, extended production of larvae, antibody response and freeze tolerance of T. nativa in seals are new findings from the first experimental Trichinella infection in any marine mammal and suggest that pinnipeds (phocids, otariiids or walrus) may acquire Trichinella infection by scavenging even small amounts of infected tissue left by hunters or

  10. Experimental evolution meets marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Thorsten B H; Boyd, Philip W

    2013-07-01

    Our perspective highlights potentially important links between disparate fields-biological oceanography, climate change research, and experimental evolutionary biology. We focus on one important functional group-photoautotrophic microbes (phytoplankton), which are responsible for ∼50% of global primary productivity. Global climate change currently results in the simultaneous change of several conditions such as warming, acidification, and nutrient supply. It thus has the potential to dramatically change phytoplankton physiology, community composition, and may result in adaptive evolution. Although their large population sizes, standing genetic variation, and rapid turnover time should promote swift evolutionary change, oceanographers have focussed on describing patterns of present day physiological differentiation rather than measure potential adaptation in evolution experiments, the only direct way to address whether and at which rate phytoplankton species will adapt to environmental change. Important open questions are (1) is adaptation limited by existing genetic variation or fundamental constraints? (2) Will complex ecological settings such as gradual versus abrupt environmental change influence adaptation processes? (3) How will increasing environmental variability affect the evolution of phenotypic plasticity patterns? Because marine phytoplankton species display rapid acclimation capacity (phenotypic buffering), a systematic study of reaction norms renders them particularly interesting to the evolutionary biology research community. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Experimental high-speed network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, Kevin M.; Klein, William P.; Vercillo, Richard; Alsafadi, Yasser H.; Parra, Miguel V.; Dallas, William J.

    1993-09-01

    Many existing local area networking protocols currently applied in medical imaging were originally designed for relatively low-speed, low-volume networking. These protocols utilize small packet sizes appropriate for text based communication. Local area networks of this type typically provide raw bandwidth under 125 MHz. These older network technologies are not optimized for the low delay, high data traffic environment of a totally digital radiology department. Some current implementations use point-to-point links when greater bandwidth is required. However, the use of point-to-point communications for a total digital radiology department network presents many disadvantages. This paper describes work on an experimental multi-access local area network called XFT. The work includes the protocol specification, and the design and implementation of network interface hardware and software. The protocol specifies the Physical and Data Link layers (OSI layers 1 & 2) for a fiber-optic based token ring providing a raw bandwidth of 500 MHz. The protocol design and implementation of the XFT interface hardware includes many features to optimize image transfer and provide flexibility for additional future enhancements which include: a modular hardware design supporting easy portability to a variety of host system buses, a versatile message buffer design providing 16 MB of memory, and the capability to extend the raw bandwidth of the network to 3.0 GHz.

  12. Experimental research control software system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, I. A.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Vystavkin, A. N.

    2014-05-01

    A software system, intended for automation of a small scale research, has been developed. The software allows one to control equipment, acquire and process data by means of simple scripts. The main purpose of that development is to increase experiment automation easiness, thus significantly reducing experimental setup automation efforts. In particular, minimal programming skills are required and supervisors have no reviewing troubles. Interactions between scripts and equipment are managed automatically, thus allowing to run multiple scripts simultaneously. Unlike well-known data acquisition commercial software systems, the control is performed by an imperative scripting language. This approach eases complex control and data acquisition algorithms implementation. A modular interface library performs interaction with external interfaces. While most widely used interfaces are already implemented, a simple framework is developed for fast implementations of new software and hardware interfaces. While the software is in continuous development with new features being implemented, it is already used in our laboratory for automation of a helium-3 cryostat control and data acquisition. The software is open source and distributed under Gnu Public License.

  13. Experimental overview of axion searches

    SciTech Connect

    van Bibber, K.

    1995-06-28

    Experimental methods to search for the ``invisible axion`` (f{sub a} {much_gt} 250 GeV) are reviewed. The report focuses on the axion-photon coupling, both for laboratory experiments as well as those looking for stellar or cosmologically produced axions. The conclusion is that while the axion-photon mixing in principle would permit laboratory axion searches which are broadband in mass, in fact no such experiment could have the sensitivity to the axion, where m{sub afa} {approx} m{sub {pi}f{pi}}. The only experiments which promise to have any chance to find the axion are the microwave cavity experiments, which presume axions to constitute our galactic halo dark matter. The conversion of axions into a monochromatic microwave signal in a resonant circuit affords the experiment the extraordinary sensitivity required to see the axion, at the expense of being narrow-band in mass, i.e. a tuning experiment. Two such efforts are underway in the world.

  14. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  15. Experimental Evolution of Species Recognition.

    PubMed

    Rogers, David W; Denton, Jai A; McConnell, Ellen; Greig, Duncan

    2015-06-29

    Sex with another species can be disastrous, especially for organisms that mate only once, like yeast. Courtship signals, including pheromones, often differ between species and can provide a basis for distinguishing between reproductively compatible and incompatible partners. Remarkably, we show that the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not reject mates engineered to produce pheromones from highly diverged species, including species that have been reproductively isolated for up to 100 million years. To determine whether effective discrimination against mates producing pheromones from other species is possible, we experimentally evolved pheromone receptors under conditions that imposed high fitness costs on mating with cells producing diverged pheromones. Evolved receptors allowed both efficient mating with cells producing the S. cerevisiae pheromone and near-perfect discrimination against cells producing diverged pheromones. Sequencing evolved receptors revealed that each contained multiple mutations that altered the amino acid sequence. By isolating individual mutations, we identified specific amino acid changes that dramatically improved discrimination. However, the improved discrimination conferred by these individual mutations came at the cost of reduced mating efficiency with cells producing the S. cerevisiae pheromone, resulting in low fitness. This tradeoff could be overcome by simultaneous introduction of separate mutations that improved mating efficiency alongside those that improved discrimination. Thus, if mutations occur sequentially, the shape of the fitness landscape may prevent evolution of the optimal phenotype--offering a possible explanation for the poor discrimination of receptors found in nature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental investigations of elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Various experimental studies of elastohydrodynamic lubrication have been reviewed. The various types of machines used in these investigations, such as the disc, two and four ball, crossed-cylinders, and crossed-axes rolling disc machine, are described. The measurement of the most important parameters, such as film shape, film thickness, pressure, temperature, and traction, is considered. Determination of the film thickness is generally the most important of these effects since it dictates the extent to which the asperities on opposing surfaces can come into contact and thus has a direct bearing on wear and fatigue failure of the contacting surfaces. Several different techniques for measuring film thickness have been described, including electrical resistance, capacitance, X-ray, optical interferometry, laser beam diffraction, strain gage, and spring dynamometer methods. An attempt has been made to describe the basic concepts and limitations of each of these techniques. These various methods have been used by individual researchers, but there is no universally acceptable technique for measuring elastohydrodynamic film thickness. Capacitance methods have provided most of the reliable data for nominal line or rectangular conjunctions, but optical interferometry has proved to be the most effective procedure for elliptical contacts. Optical interferometry has the great advantage that it reveals not only the film thickness, but also details of the film shape over the complete area of the conjunction.

  17. Experimental investigation of plasmofluidic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bonwoo; Kwon, Min-Suk; Shin, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-16

    Plasmofluidic waveguides are based on guiding light which is strongly confined in fluid with the assistance of a surface plasmon polariton. To realize plasmofluidic waveguides, metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal (MISIM) waveguides, which are hybrid plasmonic waveguides fabricated using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, are employed. The insulator of the MISIM waveguide is removed to form 30-nm-wide channels, and they are filled with fluid. The plasmofluidic waveguide has a subwavelength-scale mode area since its mode is strongly confined in the fluid. The waveguides are experimentally characterized for different fluids. When the refractive index of the fluid is 1.440, the plasmofluidic waveguide with 190-nm-wide silicon has propagation loss of 0.46 dB/μm; the coupling loss between it and an ordinary silicon photonic waveguide is 1.79 dB. The propagation and coupling losses may be reduced if a few fabrication-induced imperfections are removed. The plasmofluidic waveguide may pave the way to a dynamically phase-tunable ultracompact device.

  18. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  19. Experimental animal models of osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Meng; Peng, Jiang; Qin, Ling; Lu, Shibi

    2011-08-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) or avascular necrosis (AVN) is a common bone metabolic disorder, mostly affecting femoral head. Although many biological, biophysical, and surgical methods have been tested to preserve the femoral head with ON, none has been proven fully satisfactory. It lacks consensus on an optimal approach for treatment. This is due, at least in part, to the lack of ability to systematically compare treatment efficacy using an ideal animal model that mimics full-range osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) in humans with high incidence of joint collapse accompanied by reparative reaction adjacent to the necrotic bone in a reproducible and accessible way. A number of preclinical animal ON models have been established for testing potential efficacy of various modalities developed for prevention and treatment of ON before introduction into clinics for potential applications. This paper describes a number of different methods for creating animal experimental ON models. Advantages and disadvantages of such models are also discussed as reference for future research in battle against this important medical condition.

  20. Experimental Tests Of Paleoclassical Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J D; Anderson, J K; Arlen, T C; Bateman, G; Budny, R V; Fujita, T; Greenfield, C M; Greenwald, M; Groebner, R J; Hill, D N; Hogeweij, G D; Kaye, S M; Kritz, A H; Lazarus, E A; Leonard, A C; Mahdavi, M A; McLean, H S; Osborne, T H; Pankin, A Y; Petty, C C; Sarff, J S; St. John, H E; Stacey, W M; Stutman, D; Synakowski, E J; Tritz, K

    2006-09-12

    Predictions of the recently developed paleoclassical transport model are compared with data from many toroidal plasma experiments: electron heat diffusivity in DIII-D, C-Mod and NSTX ohmic and near-ohmic plasmas; transport modeling of DIII-D ohmic-level discharges and of the RTP ECH 'stair-step' experiments with eITBs at low order rational surfaces; investigation of a strong eITB in JT-60U; H-mode Te edge pedestal properties in DIII-D; and electron heat diffusivities in non-tokamak experiments (NSTX/ST, MST/RFP, SSPX/spheromak). The radial electron heat transport predicted by the paleoclassical model is found to agree with a wide variety of ohmic-level experimental results and to set the lower limit (within a factor {approx} 2) for the radial electron heat transport in most resistive, current-carrying toroidal plasmas -- unless it is exceeded by fluctuation-induced transport, which often occurs in the edge of L-mode plasmas and when the electron temperature is high ({approx}>T{sub e}{sup crit} {approx}B{sup 2/3}{bar {alpha}}{sup 1/2} keV) because then paleoclassical transport becomes less than gyro-Bohm-level anomalous transport.

  1. The Experimental MJO Prediction Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waliser, Duane; Weickmann, Klaus; Dole, Randall; Schubert, Siegfried; Alves, Oscar; Jones, Charles; Newman, Matthew; Pan, Hua-Lu; Roubicek, Andres; Saha, Suranjana; hide

    2006-01-01

    Weather prediction is typically concerned with lead times of hours to days, while seasonal-to-interannual climate prediction is concerned with lead times of months to seasons. Recently, there has been growing interest in 'subseasonal' forecasts---those that have lead times on the order of weeks (e.g., Schubert et al. 2002; Waliser et al. 2003; Waliser et al. 2005). The basis for developing and exploiting subseasonal predictions largely resides with phenomena such as the Pacific North American (PNA) pattern, the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO), the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), mid-latitude blocking, and the memory associated with soil moisture, as well as modeling techniques that rely on both initial conditions and slowly varying boundary conditions (e.g., tropical Pacific SST). An outgrowth of this interest has been the development of an Experimental MJO Prediction Project (EMPP). Th project provides real-time weather and climate information and predictions for a variety of applications, broadly encompassing the subseasonal weather-climate connection. Th focus is on the MJO because it represents a repeatable, low-frequency phenomenon. MJO's importance among the subseasonal phenomena is very similar to that of El Nino-Southern Oscillation(ENSO) among the interannual phenomena. This note describes the history and objectives of EMPP, its status,capabilities, and plans.

  2. Experimental test of induced rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincher, Curtis R.; Gochanour, Craig R.

    1987-02-01

    Recent theoretical models for the nematic phase of semiflexible polymer chains predict a strong coupling between order and the conformational degrees of freedom of the chain. The presence of order in the nematic phase results in a strong preference for linear or rod-like conformations over flexible, random coil conformations. This conformational selection or induced rigidity is predicted to be general phenomenon associated with semiflexible chains. We have tested these predictions using a soluble polydiacetylene (4BCMU) as a probe. The 4BCMU chain undergoes a conformational transition (rod-coil) as a function of temperature in toluene which is accompanied by a large change in optical properties allowing the conformational transition to be followed spectroscopically in extremely dilute solutions. 4BCMU is miscible with both isotropic and nematic solutions of poly-(n-hexyl isocyanate) in toluene. If current models of induced rigidity are accurate, there should be a large shift in the transition temperature for the 4BCMU transition in nematic poly-(n-hexyl isocyanate) solutions. Experimentally we find no shift in the transition for nematic solutions when compared to dilute isotropic solutions. Possible explanations for the discrepancy between theory and experiment are discussed.

  3. Elementary particle physics---Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J.J.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1990-09-20

    We are continuing a research program in high energy experimental particle physics and particle astrophysics. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions were performed using several techniques, in addition, a high energy leptoproduction experiment was continued at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators. The data are being collected with ballon-borne emulsion chambers. The properties of nuclear interactions at these high energies will reveal whether new production mechanisms come into play due to the high nuclear densities and temperatures obtained. We carried out closely related studies of hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams. We are members of a large international collaboration which has exposed emulsion chamber detectors to beams of {sup 32}S and {sup 16}O with energy 60 and 200 GeV/n at CERN and 15 GeV/n at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The primary objectives of this program are to determine the existence and properties of the hypothesized quark-gluon phase of matter, and its possible relation to a variety of anomalous observations. Studies of leptoproduction processes at high energies involve two separate experiments, one using the Tevatron 500 GeV muon beam and the other exploring the >TeV regime. We are participants in Fermilab experiment E665 employing a comprehensive counter/streamer chamber detector system. During the past year we joined the DUMAND Collaboration, and have been assigned responsibility for development and construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility, to be deployed in 1991. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the triggering system to be used.

  4. Experimental Tests of Nucleation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dea, Jack Yuen

    1982-03-01

    In recent years there has been controversy surrounding experimental nucleation data that did not conform to classical nucleation theory. More recent data, however, suggest good agreement between theory and experiment. At the Desert Research Institute (DRI), it was decided to perform sensitive tests of nucleation in soluble aerosol particles using newly developed instruments and techniques. Very steady aerosol generation was accomplished with a newly developed atomizer; very high monodispersity in the sample aerosol was achieved using two electrical mobility analyzers in series; and, very fine control over the supersaturation was achieved using a newly developed CFD (Continuous Flow Diffusion) cloud chamber built for NASA for use in zero -gravity situations. The results of a series of experiments indicated that the supersaturation needs to be about 15% greater than predicted by theory. However, a mass correction, taking into account the shape of the salt particles produced data that are in excellent agreement with theory. Moreover, the relative hygroscopicity of several soluble substances and the slopes of the Kohler curves obtained agreed very well with theory. The results mean that the hygroscopicity of various substances can be rated using the Kohler curves. Calculations have been done to determine the hygroscopicity of a number of sulfate compounds. The results of these calculations indicate that under restricted conditions (aerosol diameters < 0.1 (mu)m and aerosol particles composed of either one soluble compound or one soluble compound plus an insoluble component), it is possible to distinguish apart most of the sulfate species using either the DFC cloud chamber or an instantaneous version of the CFD cloud chamber. These results point to a possible application of nucleation theory to aerosol species differentiation in the atmosphere.

  5. [Regeneration of planarians: experimental object].

    PubMed

    Sheĭman, I M; Kreshchenko, I D

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the expediency of using invertebrates, such as flatworms and planarians, as experimental objects. Free-living planarian flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes, class Turbellaria) are invertebrate animals in which a bilateral symmetry appears for the first time in evolution and organs and tissues form. As the highest ecological link of the food chain--predators--these animals are characterized by a set of behavioral reactions controlled by a differentiated central nervous system. Planarians have unsurpassed ability to regenerate lost or damaged body parts. Owing to the ease of their breeding and their convenience for manipulations, these animals are used to study the influence of chemical and physical factors on the processes of life, growth, and reproduction. Currently, planarians are recognized as a model for biological research in the field of regeneration, stem cell biology, study of their proliferation and differentiation, as well as the regulatory mechanisms of morphogenetic processes. The genome of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea was fully sequenced, which opened up the opportunity to work with this object at the molecular biological level. Furthermore, planarians are used in neurobiological and toxicological studies, in studying the evolutionary aspects of centralization of the nervous system, mechanisms of muscle contraction, and in the development of new antiparasitic drugs. This review aims to demonstrate the relevance and diversity of research conducted on simple biological objects--planarians--to awider audience to show the historical continuity of these studies and their wide geographical distribution and to focus on the studies carried out in Russia, which, as a rule, are not included in the foreign reviews on planarian regeneration.

  6. Experimental Infrasound Studies in Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrin, E. T.; Negraru, P. T.; Golden, P.; Williams, A.

    2009-12-01

    An experimental propagation study was carried out in Nevada in June 2009 on Julian days 173-177. During this field experiment we deployed 16 single channel digital infrasound recorders to monitor the munitions disposal activities near Hawthorne, NV. The sensors were deployed in a single line and placed approximately 12 km apart at distances ranging from 2 to 177 km. A four element semi-permanent infrasound array named FNIAR was installed approximately 154 km north of the detonation site in line with the individual temporary recorders. Tropospheric arrivals were observed during all days of the experiment, but during day 176 the observed arrivals had very large amplitudes. A large signal was observed at 58 km from the detonation site with amplitude as large as 4 Pascals, while at 94 km no signal was observed. At FNIAR the amplitude of the tropospheric arrival was 1 Pascal. During this day meteorological data acquired in the propagation path showed a strong jet stream to the north. On day 177 we were not able to identify tropospheric arrivals beyond 34 km, but at stations beyond 152 km we observed stratospheric arrivals. Continuous monitoring of these signals at FNIAR shows that stratospheric arrivals are the most numerous. In a two month period, from 06/15/2009 to 08/15/2009 there were 35 operational days at the Hawthorne disposal facility resulting in 212 explosions with known origin times. Based on the celerity values there were 115 explosions that have only stratospheric arrivals (celerities of 300-275 m/s), 72 explosions with both tropospheric (celerities above 330 m/s) and stratospheric arrivals, 20 explosions that were not detected and five explosions that have only tropospheric arrivals.

  7. Experimental investigation of hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intrieri, Peter F.

    1988-01-01

    An extensive series of ballistic range tests were conducted at the Ames Research Center to determine precisely the aerodynamic characteristics of the Galileo entry probe vehicle. Figures and tables are presented which summarize the results of these ballistic range tests. Drag data were obtained for both a nonablated and a hypothesized ablated Galileo configuration at Mach numbers from about 0.7 to 14 and at Reynolds numbers from 1000 to 4 million. The tests were conducted in air and the experimental results were compared with available Pioneer Venus data since these two configurations are similar in geometry. The nonablated Galileo configuration was also tested with two different center-of-gravity positions to obtain values of pitching-moment-curve slope which could be used in determining values of lift and center-of-pressure location for this configuration. The results indicate that the drag characteristics of the Galileo probe are qualitatively similar to that of Pioneer Venus, however, the drag of the nonablated Galileo is about 3 percent lower at the higher Mach numbers and as much as 5 percent greater at transonic Mach numbers of about 1.0 to 1.5. Also, the drag of the hypothesized ablated configuration is about 3 percent lower than that of the nonablated configuration at the higher Mach numbers but about the same at the lower Mach numbers. Additional tests are required at Reynolds numbers of 1000, 500, and 250 to determine if the dramatic rise in drag coefficient measured for Pioneer Venus at these low Reynolds numbers also occurs for Galileo, as might be expected.

  8. Magnetic Launch Assist Experimental Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this photograph, a futuristic spacecraft model sits atop a carrier on the Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly known as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) System, experimental track at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Engineers at MSFC have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies that would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at very high speeds. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would electromagnetically drive a space vehicle along the track. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. This track is an advanced linear induction motor. Induction motors are common in fans, power drills, and sewing machines. Instead of spinning in a circular motion to turn a shaft or gears, a linear induction motor produces thrust in a straight line. Mounted on concrete pedestals, the track is 100-feet long, about 2-feet wide, and about 1.5-feet high. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  9. Experimental Volcanology: Fragmentation and Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieler, O.

    2005-12-01

    An increasing number of scientists design new experiments to analyse processes that control the dynamics of explosive eruptions. There research is mostly coupled to numerical models and aims toward its controlling parameters. The fragmentation process, its threshold and the speed of the fragmentation wave as well as the energy consumed by the fragmentation are some hot spots of the experimental volcanology. Analysing the fragmentation behaviour of volcaniclastics as close to the natural system as possible, we found a number of physical constrains. Identifying the porosity as determining factor of the threshold, we realised that neither threshold nor the speed of the fragmentation process are solely controlled by the rock density. The later results of the shock tube type apparatus lead to the analysis of the specific surface area and permeability as direct links to textural features. Permeability analysis performed in a modified shock tube type apparatus, show two clear, distinct trends for dome rock and pyroclastic samples. The specific surface determined by Argon sorbtion (BET) as well as textural features of pumices from Campi Flegrei, Montserrat and Krakatoa (1883) give in contrary evidence of a more complex story. Large spherical, or ellipsoidal bubbles around fractured crystals prove that the high permeability of the pumice has partially developed after the fixing of the bubble size distribution. This puts up the question, if permeability measurements on pyroclastic samples reveal relevant numbers! The surface tension controlled 'self sealing' behaviour of surfaces from foaming obsidian hinders in situ measurements. Close textural investigations will have to clarify how the 'post process' samples deviate from the syneruptive conduit filling.

  10. Experimental simulation of simultaneous vision.

    PubMed

    de Gracia, Pablo; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Sánchez-González, Álvaro; Sawides, Lucie; Marcos, Susana

    2013-01-17

    To present and validate a prototype of an optical instrument that allows experimental simulation of pure bifocal vision. To evaluate the influence of different power additions on image contrast and visual acuity. The instrument provides the eye with two superimposed images, aligned and with the same magnification, but with different defocus states. Subjects looking through the instrument are able to experience pure simultaneous vision, with adjustable refractive correction and addition power. The instrument is used to investigate the impact of the amount of addition of an ideal bifocal simultaneous vision correction, both on image contrast and on visual performance. the instrument is validated through computer simulations of the letter contrast and by equivalent optical experiments with an artificial eye (camera). Visual acuity (VA) was measured in four subjects (AGE: 34.3 ± 3.4 years; spherical error: -2.1 ± 2.7 diopters [D]) for low and high contrast letters and different amounts of addition. The largest degradation in contrast and visual acuity (∼25%) occurred for additions around ±2 D, while additions of ±4 D produced lower degradation (14%). Low additions (1-2 D) result in lower VA than high additions (3-4 D). A simultaneous vision instrument is an excellent tool to simulate bifocal vision and to gain understanding of multifocal solutions for presbyopia. Simultaneous vision induces a pattern of visual performance degradation, which is well predicted by the degradation found in image quality. Neural effects, claimed to be crucial in the patients' tolerance of simultaneous vision, can be therefore compared with pure optical effects.

  11. Magnetic Launch Assist Experimental Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this photograph, a futuristic spacecraft model sits atop a carrier on the Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly known as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) System, experimental track at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Engineers at MSFC have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies that would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at very high speeds. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would electromagnetically drive a space vehicle along the track. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. This track is an advanced linear induction motor. Induction motors are common in fans, power drills, and sewing machines. Instead of spinning in a circular motion to turn a shaft or gears, a linear induction motor produces thrust in a straight line. Mounted on concrete pedestals, the track is 100-feet long, about 2-feet wide, and about 1.5-feet high. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  12. Epistemological Dizziness in the Psychology Laboratory: Lively Subjects, Anxious Experimenters, and Experimental Relations, 1950-1970.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Jill

    2015-09-01

    Since the demise of introspective techniques in the early twentieth century, experimental psychology has largely assumed an administrative arrangement between experimenters and subjects wherein subjects respond to experimenters' instructions and experimenters meticulously constrain that relationship through experimental controls. During the postwar era this standard arrangement came to be questioned, initiating reflections that resonated with Cold War anxieties about the nature of the subjects and the experimenters alike. Albeit relatively short lived, these interrogations of laboratory relationships gave rise to unconventional testimonies and critiques of experimental method and epistemology. Researchers voiced serious concerns about the honesty and normality of subjects, the politics of the laboratory, and their own experimental conduct. Their reflective commentaries record the intimacy of subject and experimenter relations and the plentiful cultural materials that constituted the experimental situation, revealing the permeable boundaries between laboratory and everyday life.

  13. FURTHER STUDIES IN EXPERIMENTAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Adler, I.

    1917-01-01

    by the very extensive but more or less intermittent blocking of the pulmonary circulation by the oil. The musculature of the artery appears to be the main force applied to overcome the resistance in the circulation. In no case has hypertrophy of the right heart been found. The lesions in the pulmonary arteries of the dogs produced experimentally are closely analogous to atherosclerosis of the human pulmonary artery. PMID:19868168

  14. Mars Radiator Characterization Experimental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.; Hollingsworth, D. Keith

    2004-01-01

    Radiators are an enabling technology for the human exploration and development of the moon and Mars. As standard components of the heat rejection subsystem of space vehicles, radiators are used to reject waste heat to space and/or a planetary environment. They are typically large components of the thermal control system for a space vehicle or human habitation facility, and in some cases safety factors are used to oversize them when the operating environment cannot be fully characterized. Over-sizing can impose significant weight and size penalties that might be prohibitive for future missions. Radiator performance depends on the size of the radiator surface, its emittance and absorptance, the radiator temperature, the effective sky temperature surrounding the radiator, solar radiation and atmospheric irradiation levels, convection to or from the atmosphere (on Mars), and other conditions that could affect the nature of the radiator surface, such as dust accumulation. Most particularly, dust is expected to be a major contributor to the local environmental conditions on either the lunar or Martian surface. This conclusion regarding Mars is supported by measurements of dust accumulation on the Mars Sojourner Rover solar array during the Pathfinder mission. This Final Report describes a study of the effect of Martian dust accumulation on radiator performance. It is comprised of quantitative measurements of effective emittance for a range of dust accumulation levels on surfaces of known emittance under clean conditions. The test radiator coatings were Z-93P, NS-43G, and Silver Teflon (10 mil) film. The Martian dust simulant was Carbondale Red Clay. Results were obtained under vacuum conditions sufficient to reduce convection effects virtually to zero. The experiments required the development of a calorimetric apparatus that allows simultaneous measurements of the effective emittance for all the coatings at each set of experimental conditions. A method of adding dust to

  15. Experimental generation of volcanic lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    the plume that emerge as the key variables in volcanic lightning generation. A proportionality between fine ash content of the jet and number of lightning strikes is also evident in our experiments. This first recorded experimental generation of volcanic lightning means that rapid progress can now be expected (under controlled laboratory conditions) in understanding electrical phenomena produced during explosive volcanic eruptions. This in turn may aid the development of lightning monitoring systems for the forecasting of volcanic ash emissions into the atmosphere. Furthermore, our experiments are significant for the investigation of self-charging mechanism of particles that are relevant for atmospheric phenomena (such as dust storms) on Earth and other planetary bodies.

  16. Experimental toxoplasmosis in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, C N; Costa, A J; Paulillo, A C; Moraes, F R; Murakami, T O; Meireles, M V

    1997-05-01

    To evaluate chicken toxoplasmosis both as an economic and a public health subject, 84 broiler chicks of a commercial strain, 30 days old, were distributed into seven groups of 12 birds (three replications of four chicks) experimentally infected with three developing T. gondii stages of the P strain as follows: tachyzoites, intravenous (two groups: 5.0 x 10(5) and 5.0 x 10(6)), cysts, per os (two groups: 1.0 x 10(2) and 1.0 x 10(3)) and oocysts, per os (three groups: 5.0 x 10(2), 5.0 x 10(3) and 5.0 x 10(4)). Twelve chicks received only a placebo (control group). During the next 30 days the following parameters were estimated: productivity (weight gain and feed conversion), clinical signs, including rectal temperature and parasitemia (bioassay). No clinical signs suggesting toxoplasmosis were seen and no statistical differences on productivity standards were found in comparison between inoculated and control chicks. However, fowls inoculated with tachyzoites and oocysts occasionally showed hyperthermia. Some haematological changes were detected in fowls inoculated with T. gondii. Anatomo-histopathological changes were not observed. From 14 parasitemias detected, 35.7% appeared on the 5th day after inoculation and 57.1% of them resulted from oocysts inoculation. After 30-35 days all birds were slaughtered: fragments from 12 organs or tissues from each of them were subjected to artificial peptic digestion and after that injected into T. gondii antibody-free mice (IIFR). T. gondii was detected in brain (12), pancreas (five), spleen (five), retina (five), kidney (two), heart (four), proventriculus (three), liver (two), intestine (two), lung (one), and skeletal muscle (one). Similar to observations with parasitemia, from 42 T. gondii isolations, 59.5% came from chicks which had received oocysts. It can thus be inferred that the developing form, expelled by cats, is the most important for T. gondii chicken infection and that brain is the most infected organ in birds

  17. [Experimental antitriatomic program in Santiago].

    PubMed

    Neghme, A; Schenone, H; Villarroel, F; Rojas, A

    1991-01-01

    The rural migration to urban centers occurred since the 40s in many Latin American countries, including Santiago the capital city of Chile, originated a growing belt of premises built with light poor material (the rests of previous rural habitations, mud, pieces of timber, plastic and cardboard for walls, and cane stalks and artificial clinkstones for roofs) giving raise to many types of slums. This situation facilitated the passive transport of the different instars, including eggs, of triatomine bugs. Due to the fact that in the 1959-1960 warm seasons, the Santiago province health institutions had received an increasing reported number of triatomine bugs (Triatoma infestans) in dwellings from different periurban, even urban and rural sections of the province, the central local health authorities with the advise of the University of Chile, Department of Parasitology decided to carry out an experimental program against these vectors of Chagas' disease. The program consisted basically in an spray and thorough application of liquid forms (emulsion, suspension, solution) of 1% lindane (average > or = 500 mg per 1 m2), depending on the material of the constructions, to all the surfaces of walls, ceilings, attics and peridomiciliary structures of all the infested dwellings in a sector and those located less than 100 m around. In order to reach triatomine bugs not affected, for different reasons, in the first spraying, a second application, identical to the first was performed to the total number of premises between 30 and 120 days later. Periodical evaluations were made, and positive dwellings found and neighboring ones were sprayed again. During insecticide applications adequate protection measures for spraying workers, inhabitants, domestic animals, household goods and food were adopted. All the steps of the program were accompanied by health education activities directed to individuals, families, school teachers and community institutions, tending to motivate the

  18. Experimental Aerobraking with Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedhem, Hakan

    2013-10-01

    Venus Express has successfully orbited Venus in its polar 24 hour, 250km by 66000 km, orbit since April 2006 and has provided a wealth of new data from our sister planet. Approaching the end of the mission we are now planning an experimental campaign dedicated to aerobraking at altitudes down to as low as about 130km. These low pericentre passes will provide direct measurements of density, temperature, magnetic field and energetic particles in a region not accessible by other methods. Experience of operations and studies of spacecraft responses will be valuable knowledge for possible future missions that might need this techniques as a part of its nominal operations. Aerobraking was considered in the early design phase of the mission but it was fairly soon realised that the nominal mission would not need this. However, a few important design features were maintained in order to allow for this in case it should be needed at a later stage. The inherently stable geometry of the spacecraft configuration and the inclusion of a software mode for aerobraking are the two most important elements from this early design phase. An recent study by industry has determined the constraints for the spacecraft and identified several potential scenarios. The present highly elliptical orbit has as one of its inherent features a downward drift of the pericentre altitude of between 1 and 4 km/day. However, at certain times, when the Sun is in the orbital plane, this drift disappears for a period of up to two weeks. This is a very well suited time to carry out these initial experiments as it is makes operations safer and it reduces the heat input on the spacecraft as the solar panels will be edge-on towards the sun during the aerobraking. Already a number of low altitude operations have been carried out during the so called atmospheric drag campaigns. The spacecraft has then dipped down to altitudes as low as 165 km and a good characterisation of this region has been performed. This

  19. Experimental reproduction of tsunami deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, T.; Matsuyama, M.; Tanaka, S.

    2015-12-01

    in reproducing tsunami deposit and would show typical pattern of topography change and deposition caused by the tsunami incursion. The experimental method used in this study and the obtained deposition patterns will help understanding the relationship between hydraulic condition and resulting tsunami deposition.

  20. Charge of the containerless experimentation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark C.

    1990-01-01

    The experimentation was undertaken to study the elimination or reduction of surface contamination for which there is adequate Earth-based technology along with the reduction of dynamic nucleation for which there a paucity of reliable data. One objective is to delineate scientific justification of the U.S. Containerless Experimentation Program in Microgravity for the next decade and beyond. Another objective is for the guidance of NASA to define the next generation of containerless experimentation instruments in microgravity.

  1. Experimental methods for identifying failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental methods for identifying failure mechanisms in fibrous composites are studied. Methods to identify failure in composite materials includes interferometry, holography, fractography and ultrasonics.

  2. Experimental Approaches at Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, John A

    2002-02-13

    Precision measurements have played a vital role in our understanding of elementary particle physics. Experiments performed using e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions have contributed an essential part. Recently, the precision measurements at LEP and SLC have probed the standard model at the quantum level and severely constrained the mass of the Higgs boson [1]. Coupled with the limits on the Higgs mass from direct searches [2], this enables the mass to be constrained to be in the range 115-205 GeV. Developments in accelerator R and D have matured to the point where one could contemplate construction of a linear collider with initial energy in the 500 GeV range and a credible upgrade path to {approx} 1 TeV. Now is therefore the correct time to critically evaluate the case for such a facility. The Working Group E3, Experimental Approaches at Linear Colliders, was encouraged to make this evaluation. The group was charged with examining critically the physics case for a Linear Collider (LC) of energy of order 1 TeV as well as the cases for higher energy machines, assessing the performance requirements and exploring the viability of several special options. In addition it was asked to identify the critical areas where R and D is required (the complete text of the charge can be found in the Appendix). In order to address this, the group was organized into subgroups, each of which was given a specific task. Three main groups were assigned to the TeV-class Machines, Multi-TeV Machines and Detector Issues. The central activity of our working group was the exploration of TeV class machines, since they are being considered as the next major initiative in high energy physics. We have considered the physics potential of these machines, the special options that could be added to the collider after its initial running, and addressed a number of important questions. Several physics scenarios were suggested in order to benchmark the physics reach of the linear collider and persons were

  3. The 1988 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium was held to provide a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that have been flown on shuttle missions and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future. Experiment design and payload integration issues are also examined.

  4. The 1987 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelme, Neal (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The 1987 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's symposium provides a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium was on payloads that were flown on Shuttle missions, and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future.

  5. The Stephen F. Austin Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Cary C. Russell; Ronald E. Thill; David L. Kulhavy

    2002-01-01

    On December 14, 1944, the Seventy-Eighth United States Congress passed a bill that authorized the transfer of 2,560 acres in Nacogdoches County, Texas, to the research branch of the United States Forest Service (USFS). This land became the Stephen F. Austin Experimental Forest (SFAEF) on September 19. 1945. One of eighty-one federal experimental forests and ranges...

  6. Penobscot Experimental Forest: resources, administration, and mission

    Treesearch

    Alan J. Kimball

    2014-01-01

    The Penobscot Experimental Forest (PEF) was established more than 60 years ago as a result of private forest landowners' interest in supporting forest research in Maine. In 1950, nine pulp and paper and land-holding companies pooled resources and purchased almost 4,000 acres of land in east-central Maine. The property was named the Penobscot Experimental Forest...

  7. Valuable lessons-learned in transcriptomics experimentation

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, Oskar; Rauwerda, Han; Dekker, Rob J; de Leeuw, Wim C; Wackers, Paul F K; Ensink, Wim A; Jonker, Martijs J; Breit, Timo M

    2015-01-01

    We have collected several valuable lessons that will help improve transcriptomics experimentation. These lessons relate to experiment design, execution, and analysis. The cautions, but also the pointers, may help biologists avoid common pitfalls in transcriptomics experimentation and achieve better results with their transcriptome studies. PMID:26098945

  8. Fernow Experimental Forest: Research History and Opportunities

    Treesearch

    Mary Beth Adams; Pamela J. Edwards; W. Mark Ford; Thomas M. Schuler; Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy; Frederica. Wood

    2012-01-01

    The Fernow Experimental Forest (39.03° N, 79.67° W) is located in north-central West Virginia near the community of Parsons, in the Allegheny Mountain section of the mixed mesophytic forest (Braun 1950). Named after Bernhard Fernow, an early forestry research pioneer, the Fernow Experimental Forest (Fernow) was established in 1934 from land originally...

  9. The 1985 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. R. (Editor); Mosier, F. L. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium provided a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus is on payloads that have been flown on Shuttle missions, and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the near future.

  10. Optimizing Experimental Designs: Finding Hidden Treasure.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical experimental design theory, the predominant treatment in most textbooks, promotes the use of blocking designs for control of spatial variability in field studies and other situations in which there is significant variation among heterogeneity among experimental units. Many blocking design...

  11. Experimental Influence Coefficients and Vibration Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, Deene J.; Kordes, Eldon E.

    1959-01-01

    Test results are presented for both symmetrical and antisymmetrical static loading of a wing model mounted on a three-point support system. The first six free-free vibration modes were determined experimentally. A comparison is made of the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies with the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies calculated from the experimental influence coefficients.

  12. New model systems for experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sinéad

    2013-07-01

    Microbial experimental evolution uses a few well-characterized model systems to answer fundamental questions about how evolution works. This special section highlights novel model systems for experimental evolution, with a focus on marine model systems that can be used to understand evolutionary responses to global change in the oceans.

  13. Assessing Students' Experimentation Processes in Guided Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emden, Markus; Sumfleth, Elke

    2016-01-01

    In recent science education, experimentation features ever more strongly as a method of inquiry in science classes rather than as a means to illustrate phenomena. Ideas and materials to teach inquiry abound. Yet, tools for assessing students' achievement in their processes of experimentation are lacking. The present study assumes a basal,…

  14. 27 CFR 24.77 - Experimental wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Experimental wine. 24.77... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Tax Exempt Wine § 24.77 Experimental wine. (a) General. Any scientific university, college of learning, or institution of scientific...

  15. 27 CFR 24.77 - Experimental wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Experimental wine. 24.77... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Tax Exempt Wine § 24.77 Experimental wine. (a) General. Any scientific university, college of learning, or institution of scientific...

  16. 27 CFR 24.77 - Experimental wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Experimental wine. 24.77... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Tax Exempt Wine § 24.77 Experimental wine. (a) General. Any scientific university, college of learning, or institution of scientific...

  17. 27 CFR 24.77 - Experimental wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Experimental wine. 24.77... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Tax Exempt Wine § 24.77 Experimental wine. (a) General. Any scientific university, college of learning, or institution of scientific...

  18. Flora of the Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado

    Treesearch

    Steve J. Popovich; Wayne D. Shepperd; Donald W. Reichert; Michael A. Cone

    1993-01-01

    This report lists 441 vascular plant taxa in 228 genera and 63 families encountered on the 9,300-ha Fraser Experimental Forest in central Colorado. Synonyms appearing in previous publications and other works pertaining to the Fraser Experimental Forest, as well as appropriate Colorado floras and less-technical field guides, are included. Plant communities and habitats...

  19. Assessing Students' Experimentation Processes in Guided Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emden, Markus; Sumfleth, Elke

    2016-01-01

    In recent science education, experimentation features ever more strongly as a method of inquiry in science classes rather than as a means to illustrate phenomena. Ideas and materials to teach inquiry abound. Yet, tools for assessing students' achievement in their processes of experimentation are lacking. The present study assumes a basal,…

  20. 27 CFR 24.77 - Experimental wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Experimental wine. 24.77... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Tax Exempt Wine § 24.77 Experimental wine. (a) General. Any scientific university, college of learning, or institution of...

  1. Quasi-Experimental Designs for Causal Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yongnam; Steiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    When randomized experiments are infeasible, quasi-experimental designs can be exploited to evaluate causal treatment effects. The strongest quasi-experimental designs for causal inference are regression discontinuity designs, instrumental variable designs, matching and propensity score designs, and comparative interrupted time series designs. This…

  2. A new dimension in space experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Space experimentation, cosmic origins, the long-term effects of the space environment on living things, the long-term effects of space environment on materials and hardware, seeds in space, power generation in space, experimentation with crystals, and thermal control are discussed.

  3. Leveraging the Cloud for Integrated Network Experimentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    network experimentation. This research continues Project Everest’s efforts to leverage cloud services for network experimentation. Project Everest is a...11 2.2.3.1 Live Network Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.2.3.2 Everest ...VINI, Live Network Testing, Everest and techniques implemented by this research. The Conclusion section summarizes the techniques and research

  4. FELIX construction status and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.; Knott, M.J.; Lari, R.J.; McGhee, D.G.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    FELIX (Fusion Electromagnetic Induction Experiment) is an experimental test facility being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the study of electromagnetic effects in the first wall/blanket/shield (FWBS) systems of fusion reactors. The facility design, construction status, experimental program, instrumentation, and associated computer-code comparisons are described.

  5. Quasi-Experimental Designs for Causal Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yongnam; Steiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    When randomized experiments are infeasible, quasi-experimental designs can be exploited to evaluate causal treatment effects. The strongest quasi-experimental designs for causal inference are regression discontinuity designs, instrumental variable designs, matching and propensity score designs, and comparative interrupted time series designs. This…

  6. 50 CFR 665.17 - Experimental fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Experimental fishing. 665.17 Section 665... fishing. (a) General. The Regional Administrator may authorize, for limited purposes, the direct or incidental harvest of MUS that would otherwise be prohibited by this part. No experimental fishing may be...

  7. 50 CFR 665.17 - Experimental fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Experimental fishing. 665.17 Section 665... fishing. (a) General. The Regional Administrator may authorize, for limited purposes, the direct or incidental harvest of MUS that would otherwise be prohibited by this part. No experimental fishing may be...

  8. ISABELLE. Volume 3. Experimental areas, large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This section presents the papers which resulted from work in the Experimental Areas portion of the Workshop. The immediate task of the group was to address three topics. The topics were dictated by the present state of ISABELLE experimental areas construction, the possibility of a phased ISABELLE and trends in physics and detectors.

  9. Great Basin Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Treesearch

    E. Durant McArthur; Bryce A. Richardson; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    This annotated bibliography documents the research that has been conducted on the Great Basin Experimental Range (GBER, also known as the Utah Experiment Station, Great Basin Station, the Great Basin Branch Experiment Station, Great Basin Experimental Center, and other similar name variants) over the 102 years of its existence. Entries were drawn from the original...

  10. Valuable lessons-learned in transcriptomics experimentation.

    PubMed

    Bruning, Oskar; Rauwerda, Han; Dekker, Rob J; de Leeuw, Wim C; Wackers, Paul F K; Ensink, Wim A; Jonker, Martijs J; Breit, Timo M

    2015-01-01

    We have collected several valuable lessons that will help improve transcriptomics experimentation. These lessons relate to experiment design, execution, and analysis. The cautions, but also the pointers, may help biologists avoid common pitfalls in transcriptomics experimentation and achieve better results with their transcriptome studies.

  11. Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary

    2013-11-30

    Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

  12. Mainstreaming Caenorhabditis elegans in experimental evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jeremy C.; Cutter, Asher D.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evolution provides a powerful manipulative tool for probing evolutionary process and mechanism. As this approach to hypothesis testing has taken purchase in biology, so too has the number of experimental systems that use it, each with its own unique strengths and weaknesses. The depth of biological knowledge about Caenorhabditis nematodes, combined with their laboratory tractability, positions them well for exploiting experimental evolution in animal systems to understand deep questions in evolution and ecology, as well as in molecular genetics and systems biology. To date, Caenorhabditis elegans and related species have proved themselves in experimental evolution studies of the process of mutation, host–pathogen coevolution, mating system evolution and life-history theory. Yet these organisms are not broadly recognized for their utility for evolution experiments and remain underexploited. Here, we outline this experimental evolution work undertaken so far in Caenorhabditis, detail simple methodological tricks that can be exploited and identify research areas that are ripe for future discovery. PMID:24430852

  13. Experimental chaos detection in the Duffing oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyebe Fouda, J. S. Armand; Bodo, Bertrand; Djeufa, Guy M. D.; Sabat, Samrat L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of four algorithms namely the maximal Lyapunov exponent (MLE), 0-1 test, conditional entropy of ordinal patterns (CPE) and recently developed permutation largest slope entropy (PLSE) algorithm for experimental chaos detection in the Duffing oscillator. We consider an electrical model of the Duffing oscillator and its equivalent electronic circuit for generating the data to validate the effectiveness of the algorithms. The performance of the PLSE is compared with the 0-1 test and the CPE algorithms on the data set obtained from the simulated circuit; and with the MLE for the data collected from the experimental circuit. The experimental data are acquired using a digital oscilloscope with 1 MHz sampling frequency. From the comparison of the experimental spectra of the four methods with the analog phase portraits of the real system, it appears that the PLSE is the more reliable algorithm for chaos detection from experimental data.

  14. Mainstreaming Caenorhabditis elegans in experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jeremy C; Cutter, Asher D

    2014-03-07

    Experimental evolution provides a powerful manipulative tool for probing evolutionary process and mechanism. As this approach to hypothesis testing has taken purchase in biology, so too has the number of experimental systems that use it, each with its own unique strengths and weaknesses. The depth of biological knowledge about Caenorhabditis nematodes, combined with their laboratory tractability, positions them well for exploiting experimental evolution in animal systems to understand deep questions in evolution and ecology, as well as in molecular genetics and systems biology. To date, Caenorhabditis elegans and related species have proved themselves in experimental evolution studies of the process of mutation, host-pathogen coevolution, mating system evolution and life-history theory. Yet these organisms are not broadly recognized for their utility for evolution experiments and remain underexploited. Here, we outline this experimental evolution work undertaken so far in Caenorhabditis, detail simple methodological tricks that can be exploited and identify research areas that are ripe for future discovery.

  15. Early Invasive Cancer and Partial Intraoperative Electron Radiation Therapy of the Breast: Experience of the Jules Bordet Institute

    PubMed Central

    Philippson, C.; Simon, S.; Vandekerkhove, C.; Hertens, D.; Veys, I.; Noterman, D.; De Neubourg, F.; Larsimont, D.; Bourgeois, P.; Van Houtte, P.; Nogaret, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this prospective phase II study is to evaluate the treatment of early-stage breast cancer (T1 N0) with intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) in terms of local control, early complications, and cosmesis. Patients and Methods. From February 2010 to February 2012, 200 patients underwent partial IOERT of the breast. Inclusion criteria were unifocal invasive ductal carcinoma, age ≥40 years, histological tumour size ≤20 mm, and no lymph node involvement. A 21 Gy dose was prescribed over the 90% isodose line in the tumour bed. Median follow-up is 23.3 months (7–37). Results. Acute toxicity was not frequent (Grade 1: 4.5%, Grade 2: 1%). The cosmetic result was considered to be very good or good in 92.5%. One ipsi lateral out-quadrant recurrence at 18 months was observed. The crude and actuarial local recurrence rates after median follow-up were 0.5% and 0.9%, respectively. Conclusion. The preoperative diagnostic work-up must be comprehensive and the selection process must be rigorous for this therapeutic approach reserved for small ductal unifocal cancers. After a 23.3-month median follow-up time, the clinical results of IOERT for selected patients are encouraging for the locoregional recurrence and the toxicity rates. The satisfaction of our patients in terms of quality of life was extremely high. PMID:25009747

  16. [Experimental studies in Polish psychiatric journals].

    PubMed

    Małyszczak, Krzysztof; Sieradzki, Adrian; Kiejna, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Scientific studies in psychiatry from a methodological point of view could be divided into correlational and experimental. Experimental studies are based on active selection of independent and dependent variables, attributing values of the independent variable to persons under study and measuring values of dependent variables. An example of the experimental study is a comparison of two therapeutic methods. Experiments are feeble to selection, informational and confounding bias. This review comprises experimental papers published in journals: "Psychiatria Polska", "Postepy Psychiatrii i Neurologii", "Farmakoterapia w Psychiatrii i Neurologii", "Rocznik Psychogeriatryczny", "Wiadomości Psychiatryczne" oraz "Alkoholizm i Narkomania" from January 1998 to December 2002. 11 experimental publications, 6 randomised, 2 probably randomised and 3 case-control studies were found. The smallest study included 14 persons, the largest 180 persons. The number of experimental groups varied from 2 to 4. 9 studies evaluated features of specific methods of therapy and rehabilitation, among them 6 evaluated efficacy of medications. 2 studies evaluated relations between psychopathological and physiological variables. Experiments were based on groups of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (3), alcohol and drug dependence (2), depression (3), insomnia (1), bronchial asthma (1), and hypertension (1). The review showed that experimental studies do not form a main-stream in Polish psychiatric journals.

  17. [Experimental evaluation of the wound healing dynamics].

    PubMed

    Minaev, S V

    2003-01-01

    The experimental clinical investigation of the influence of systemic enzymotherapy on the course of the wound process was carried out in rats and in clinic. The rats of the experimental group have demonstrated more rapid debridement of the wound from blood clots and tissue detritus, intensive formation of granular tissue and its ripening. The experimental investigation has shown that using the preparation of systemic enzymotherapy (Vobenzyme) stimulates processes of healing at the expense of quicker changing the inflammation phases as well as prevents the development of early and late complications on the side of postoperative wounds. It was confirmed by clinical observations in 36 patients from 4 to 14 years of age.

  18. Experimental millimeter-wave satellite communications system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Shimada, Masaaki; Arimoto, Yoshinori; Shiomi, Tadashi; Kitazume, Susumu

    This paper describes an experimental system of millimeter-wave satellite communications via Japan's Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) and a plan of experiments. Two experimental missions are planned using ETS-VI millimeter-wave (43/38 GHz bands) transponder, considering the millimeter-wave characteristics such as large transmission capacity and possibility to construct a small earth station with a high gain antenna. They are a personal communication system and an inter-satellite communication system. Experimental system including the configuration and the fundamental functions of the onboard transponder and the outline of the experiments are presented.

  19. Experimental economics' inconsistent ban on deception.

    PubMed

    Hersch, Gil

    2015-08-01

    According to what I call the 'argument from public bads', if a researcher deceived subjects in the past, there is a chance that subjects will discount the information that a subsequent researcher provides, thus compromising the validity of the subsequent researcher's experiment. While this argument is taken to justify an existing informal ban on explicit deception in experimental economics, it can also apply to implicit deception, yet implicit deception is not banned and is sometimes used in experimental economics. Thus, experimental economists are being inconsistent when they appeal to the argument from public bads to justify banning explicit deception but not implicit deception.

  20. Experimental area power monitoring during shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Pathiyil, J.

    1989-03-01

    The power consumption at the site is increasing every year and the power consumption in the fixed target beam lines is constantly changing for each run. Since we do not have an energy monitoring program in effect in the experimental areas; we are not in a position to tell whether we are using the electrical energy efficiently. The purpose of this study is to find the summer and winter base load of the three experimental areas while the beamlines are off and also to identify what kind loads are on. The most important purpose was to find the base loads in each of the big experimental halls during the shutdown.

  1. EXFOR Library of Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data up to 1 GeV. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle(up to carbon) and photon reactions have been covered less extensively. Files contain nuclear reaction data such as cross sections, spectra, angular distributions, polarizations, etc, along with information on experimental technique, error analysis, and applied standards. Numerous search parameters include: target, beam, product, experimental method, and even author and publication names. The library contains data from more than 20,000 experiments. (Specialized Interface)

  2. Drought Adaptation Mechanisms Should Guide Experimental Design.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Matthew E; Medina, Viviana

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism, or hypothesis, of how a plant might be adapted to drought should strongly influence experimental design. For instance, an experiment testing for water conservation should be distinct from a damage-tolerance evaluation. We define here four new, general mechanisms for plant adaptation to drought such that experiments can be more easily designed based upon the definitions. A series of experimental methods are suggested together with appropriate physiological measurements related to the drought adaptation mechanisms. The suggestion is made that the experimental manipulation should match the rate, length, and severity of soil water deficit (SWD) necessary to test the hypothesized type of drought adaptation mechanism.

  3. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  4. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  5. Experimental Garden Plots for Botany Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorodnicheva, V. V.; Vasil'eva, E. I.

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of the botany lessons used at two schools points out the need for fifth and sixth grade students to be taught the principles of plant life through observations made at an experimental garden plot at the school. (ND)

  6. [Systemic enzyme therapy of experimental gout glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Ignatenko, G A; Mukhin, I V

    2004-01-01

    Renal lesion deteriorates the course and prognosis of gouty glomerulonephritis. Current pathogenetic therapy is not sufficiently effective. Effects of different treatments on morphological and functional manifestations of renal disorders in experimental gouty glomerulonephritis are reviewed.

  7. Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Weng, C.K. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Lindsay, R.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

  8. Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M.; Weng, C.K.; Lindsay, R.W.

    1992-06-01

    A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

  9. Experimental Evidence of Chaos from Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Gale, Ella

    Until now, most memristor-based chaotic circuits proposed in the literature are based on mathematical models which assume ideal characteristics such as piecewise-linear or cubic nonlinearities. The idea, illustrated here and originating from the experimental approach for device characterization, is to realize a chaotic system exploiting the nonlinearity of only one memristor with a very simple experimental set-up using feedback. In this way, a simple circuit is obtained and chaos is experimentally observed and is confirmed by the calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent. Numerical results using the Strukov model support the existence of robust chaos in our circuit. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration of chaos in a real memristor circuit and suggests that memristors are well placed for hardware encryption.

  10. Teaching the Inquiry Process through Experimental Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pudwell, Lara

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the Experimental Mathematics course taught at Valparaiso University since 2009. We focus on aspects of the course that facilitate students' abilities to ask and explore their own research questions.

  11. Yakima Hatchery Experimental Design : Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Curtis; Marshall, Anne

    1991-08-01

    This progress report details the results and status of Washington Department of Fisheries' (WDF) pre-facility monitoring, research, and evaluation efforts, through May 1991, designed to support the development of an Experimental Design Plan (EDP) for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), previously termed the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project (YKPP or Y/KPP). This pre- facility work has been guided by planning efforts of various research and quality control teams of the project that are annually captured as revisions to the experimental design and pre-facility work plans. The current objective are as follows: to develop genetic monitoring and evaluation approach for the Y/KPP; to evaluate stock identification monitoring tools, approaches, and opportunities available to meet specific objectives of the experimental plan; and to evaluate adult and juvenile enumeration and sampling/collection capabilities in the Y/KPP necessary to measure experimental response variables.

  12. Experimental Drug Shows Promise Against Dangerous Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... 166953.html Experimental Drug Shows Promise Against Dangerous Viruses Medicine worked in lab tests against germs that ... researchers say. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that infect birds and mammals, including humans. These ...

  13. Cancer in Light of Experimental Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sprouffske, Kathleen; Merlo, Lauren M.F.; Gerrish, Philip J.; Maley, Carlo C.; Sniegowski, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer initiation, progression, and the emergence of therapeutic resistance are evolutionary phenomena of clonal somatic cell populations. Studies in microbial experimental evolution and the theoretical work inspired by such studies are yielding deep insights into the evolutionary dynamics of clonal populations, yet there has been little explicit consideration of the relevance of this rapidly growing field to cancer biology. Here, we examine how the understanding of mutation, selection, and spatial structure in clonal populations that is emerging from experimental evolution may be applicable to cancer. Along the way, we discuss some significant ways in which cancer differs from the model systems used in experimental evolution. Despite these differences, we argue that enhanced prediction and control of cancer may be possible using ideas developed in the context of experimental evolution, and we point out some prospects for future research at the interface between these traditionally separate areas. PMID:22975007

  14. Demonstration before Experimentation: A Laboratory Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Ding-Yu; Bedworth, David D.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the need for laboratory demonstrations prior to experimentation. Describes an introductory computer-assisted manufacturing (CAM) course and includes suggestions for teachers. Provides a model exercise on train control. (YP)

  15. Experimental Investigations of Flow past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Thangam, Siva

    2015-11-01

    Experimental investigations of flow past spinning cylinders is presented in the context of their application and relevance to flow past projectiles. A subsonic wind tunnel is used to perform experiments on flow past spinning cylinders that are sting-mounted and oriented such that their axis of rotation is aligned with the mean flow. The experiments cover a Reynolds number range of up to 300000 and rotation numbers of up to 2 (based on cylinder diameter). The experimental validation of the tunnel characteristics and the benchmarking of the flow field in the tunnel are described. The experimental results for spinning cylinders with both rear-mounted and fore-mounted stings are presented along with available computational and experimental findings. This work was funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC.

  16. International review of experimental pathology. Volume 27

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, G.W.; Epstein, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book reviews the experimental pathology advancements made in recent years. Specifically discussed are - Epstein-Barr virus pathogenesis, immune deficient diseases, Hodgkin's disease, lymphomas and other lymphoproliferative disorders.

  17. Experimental evidence of the compressibility of arteries.

    PubMed

    Yosibash, Zohar; Manor, Itay; Gilad, Ilan; Willentz, Udi

    2014-11-01

    A definitive answer to the question whether artery walls are incompressible is to our opinion not yet categorically provided. Experimental-based evidence on the level of compressibility in artery walls is not easily achieved because of the difficulties associated with the measurement of very small differences in volumes under physiological pressure in these biological tissues. Past experiments aimed at addressing the question considered different species, different arteries, the experimental devices were not accurate enough and a statistical analysis of the results was missing. A precise experimental device together with a thorough testing protocol, a careful selection of arteries and a statistical analysis is presented for a definitive evaluation of the artery wall compressibility. We provide experimental evidence that in saphenous and femoral porcine arteries under physiological pressure range a relative compressibility of 2-6% is observed. The pre-assumption of incompressibility in many phenomenological constitutive models of artery walls should probably be re-evaluated.

  18. Experimental study and evaluation of radioprotective drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Thomson, J. F.

    1968-01-01

    Experimental study evaluates radioprotective drugs administered before exposure either orally or intravenously. Specifically studied are the sources of radiation, choice of radiation dose, choice of animals, administration of drugs, the toxicity of protective agents and types of protective drug.

  19. Teaching the Inquiry Process through Experimental Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pudwell, Lara

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the Experimental Mathematics course taught at Valparaiso University since 2009. We focus on aspects of the course that facilitate students' abilities to ask and explore their own research questions.

  20. Experimental design methods for bioengineering applications.

    PubMed

    Keskin Gündoğdu, Tuğba; Deniz, İrem; Çalışkan, Gülizar; Şahin, Erdem Sefa; Azbar, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Experimental design is a form of process analysis in which certain factors are selected to obtain the desired responses of interest. It may also be used for the determination of the effects of various independent factors on a dependent factor. The bioengineering discipline includes many different areas of scientific interest, and each study area is affected and governed by many different factors. Briefly analyzing the important factors and selecting an experimental design for optimization are very effective tools for the design of any bioprocess under question. This review summarizes experimental design methods that can be used to investigate various factors relating to bioengineering processes. The experimental methods generally used in bioengineering are as follows: full factorial design, fractional factorial design, Plackett-Burman design, Taguchi design, Box-Behnken design and central composite design. These design methods are briefly introduced, and then the application of these design methods to study different bioengineering processes is analyzed.

  1. Relaxation and Distraction in Experimental Desensitization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, R. O.; Marshall, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Compared experimental desensitization with a procedure that replaced relaxation with a distraction task and with an approach that combined both relaxation and distraction. Desensitization generally was more effective than the other two procedures. (Author)

  2. Experimental Garden Plots for Botany Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorodnicheva, V. V.; Vasil'eva, E. I.

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of the botany lessons used at two schools points out the need for fifth and sixth grade students to be taught the principles of plant life through observations made at an experimental garden plot at the school. (ND)

  3. A Cognitive Approach to Experimental Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Donald J.

    1976-01-01

    A review of selected experiments indicates that not all examples of experimental amnesia are due to the failure of a memory to fixate. In sum, the empirical retrograde amnesia gradient does not necessarily support traditional consolidation theory. (Editor)

  4. Depressed mood and smoking experimentation among preteens.

    PubMed

    Polen, Michael R; Curry, Susan J; Grothaus, Louis C; Bush, Terry M; Hollis, Jack F; Ludman, Evette J; McAfee, Timothy A

    2004-06-01

    The authors examined children's depressed mood, parental depressed mood, and parental smoking in relation to children's smoking susceptibility and experimentation over 20 months in a cohort of 418 preteens (ages 10-12 at baseline) and their parents. Depressed mood in preteens was strongly related to experimentation but not to susceptibility. In cross-sectional analyses parental depressed mood was related to children's experimentation, but in longitudinal analyses parental depressed mood at baseline did not differentiate children who experimented from those who did not. Although parental smoking was strongly related to experimentation, it was not related to susceptibility either cross-sectionally or longitudinally. Depressed mood among preteens and parents appeared to be more strongly related to children's smoking behaviors than to their intentions to smoke.

  5. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Multiple sclerosis: Experimental and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, L.; Raine, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the experimental and clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis. Specifically discussed are - Association of Epstein Barr Virus with pathology of central nervous system; immunology of viruses; and immunosuppression.

  7. Flutter Calculations for an Experimental Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Panovsky, Josef; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.

    2003-01-01

    During testing, an experimental forward-swept fan encountered flutter at part-speed conditions. A three-dimensional propulsion aeroelasticity code, based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach, was used to model the aeroelastic behavior of this fan. This paper describes the flutter calculations and compares the results to the experimental measurements. Results of sensitivity studies are also presented that show the relative importance of different aspects of aeroelastic modeling.

  8. Experimental models of anxiety. Problems and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Griez, E

    1984-01-01

    In a brief review of the field of experimental psychopathology, the author observes that few adequate laboratory models of anxiety have been produced. Criteria to set up valid anxiety models are discussed. The carbon dioxide inhalation technique, an anxiomimetic intervention, is then proposed as a new human panic attack model and compared to the existing lactate infusion method. Both appear as promising agents in the experimental study of panic anxiety.

  9. An Experimental Analysis of Another Privacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okouchi, Hiroto

    2006-01-01

    The present article discusses how events outside a subject's skin and not accessible to another subject but to an experimenter may contribute to experimental analyses of private events. Of 16 undergraduates, 8, referred to as instructors, first learned conditional discriminations (i.e., B1C1, B2C2, B3C3, and B4C4) in a standard matching-to-sample…

  10. Practical High-Throughput Experimentation for Chemists

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Large arrays of hypothesis-driven, rationally designed experiments are powerful tools for solving complex chemical problems. Conceptual and practical aspects of chemical high-throughput experimentation are discussed. A case study in the application of high-throughput experimentation to a key synthetic step in a drug discovery program and subsequent optimization for the first large scale synthesis of a drug candidate is exemplified. PMID:28626518

  11. An experimental study on microwave electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Wu, J.; Wang, Y.

    1995-12-31

    We report both the simulation and experimental results of using a ring cathode instead of the solid cathode to reduce the back bombardment effect of a thermionic cathode microwave electron gun. The result shows that the back bombardment power is decreased about 2/3 without changing the beam quality apparently which allows operation at higher repetition rate. Experimental results are compared with the simulation with good agreement.

  12. Experimental Proteus mirabilis Burn Surface Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Reprinted from the Achie of Surgery ECTE February 1982, Volume 117 Copyright 19 2. American Medical Association MAY 2 8 1982 V0A Experimental Proteus ... mirabilis Burn Surface Infection Albert T. McManus, PhD; Charles G. McLeod, Jr, DVM; Arthur D. Mason, Jr, MD * We established a human burn Isolate of... Proteus mirabills as have examined human burn isolates from the genera an experimental pathogen. Infliction of a nonfatal scald injury Enterobacter

  13. Experimental Evaluation of StRATUS (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TP-2014-0142 EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF StRATUS (PREPRINT) Michael A. Falugi Structures Technology Branch Aerospace...Conference Paper Preprint 01 May 2012 – 28 February 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF StRATUS (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Steel Reinforced Advanced Thin Unitized Structure ( StRATUS ) is a new hybrid laminate concept composed of carbon fiber composite sandwiched between thin

  14. [An experimental model of suppurative osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Privalov, V A; Svetlakov, A L; Kushakovskiĭ, O S; Ebert, L Ia; Giniatullin, R U; Svetlakova, I A; Iarovoĭ, N N

    2000-01-01

    A new experimental rabbit model of acute purulent osteomyelitis is proposed. The model is reproduced by percutaneous introduction of 4 million St. aureus microorganisms into the medullary channel of the femoral bone after aseptic destruction of the bone marrow by ethyl alcohol and hot saline. The model satisfies the demands of good reproduction, reduces probability of contamination of periosteal tissues during intraosteal inoculation and provides reproduction of local inflammation without its generalization which results in reduced number of fatal outcomes among experimental animals.

  15. [Animal experimentation, computer simulation and surgical research].

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Alain

    2009-11-01

    We live in a digital world In medicine, computers are providing new tools for data collection, imaging, and treatment. During research and development of complex technologies and devices such as artificial hearts, computer simulation can provide more reliable information than experimentation on large animals. In these specific settings, animal experimentation should serve more to validate computer models of complex devices than to demonstrate their reliability.

  16. An Experimental Analysis of Another Privacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okouchi, Hiroto

    2006-01-01

    The present article discusses how events outside a subject's skin and not accessible to another subject but to an experimenter may contribute to experimental analyses of private events. Of 16 undergraduates, 8, referred to as instructors, first learned conditional discriminations (i.e., B1C1, B2C2, B3C3, and B4C4) in a standard matching-to-sample…

  17. New experimental techniques for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenk, R.

    1993-01-01

    Solar cell capacitance has special importance for an array controlled by shunting. Experimental measurements of solar cell capacitance in the past have shown disagreements of orders of magnitude. Correct measurement technique depends on maintaining the excitation voltage less than the thermal voltage. Two different experimental methods are shown to match theory well, and two effective capacitances are defined for quantifying the effect of the solar cell capacitance on the shunting system.

  18. [Correlation between retention force of experimental plates and viscosity of experimental fluids].

    PubMed

    Mladenović, Dragan; Stanković, Dragutin; Stanković, Jasmina; Stanković, Saša; Mladenović, Lidija

    2011-01-01

    Saliva viscosity plays a significant role in the biophysical segment of the total retention potential of total dentures. The aim of the paper was to establish the dependence of dynamic retention force of experimental plates on experimental fluid viscosity and especially time dependence of these parameters, following at the same time relative changes of the distance between the experimental plate and dentures support established by the dislocation of the experimental plate in both directions. For experimental verification we used an original device with the aim to enable in vivo simulation on the phantom made of the upper total denture prosthesis support and experimental plate. The experiment consisted of two parts. In the first part we determined the value of the dynamic retention force with plates without and with achieved ventilation effect. In the second part we determined time dependence of the dynamic retention force of experimental plates on the viscosity of experimental fluids that had been priorly determined on identical samples (8 ml of experimental fluid samples) using a rotational viscometer (Haake RV-12) with a sensor (MV, Germany). Under the conditions of variable viscosity rates of seven experimental fluids (from 0.02 to 1309.04 mPa s), we registered the time dependence of dynamic retention force of the experimental plate related to fluid viscosity during the action of the continual dislocating force of the separating directions. In addition, the maximal height of the dislocation of the experimental plate was registered. The dynamic retention force, manifested by the separating direction of the experimental plate dislocation, was increased concurrently with increased viscosity. The increase of dynamic retention force depends directly on medium viscosity. Close border values of fluid viscosity above the investigated ones, the impossibility of experimental layer thinning and the decrease of distance height probably influence the onset of separating

  19. Evaluation of an experimental dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M; El-Waseffy, Noha A; Hasan, Ahmed M; El-Falal, Abeer A

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture toughness, hardness, ceramic/metal bond strength and microstructure of experimental dental porcelain and compare it with commercial type. Specimens of specific dimensions were prepared. Fracture toughness was assessed by a three-point bending test. The Vickers hardness was measured using a microhardness tester. The ceramometal bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. The load was applied at the porcelain/metal interface via a chisel edged blade with a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min until fracture. The polished specimens of dental porcelain were chemically etched and the microstructure was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. The results showed comparable fracture toughness and bond strength for both materials, while the experimental porcelain exhibited higher hardness. The experimental porcelain showed uniform cohesive failure while the commercial type showed mixed mode of failure. The microstructure of the experimental porcelain was tetragonal leucite crystals dispersed randomly in a glass matrix. The leucite crystals exist in two forms, acicular and rod like structures. It was concluded that the experimental porcelain has adequate fracture toughness and ceramic/metal bond strength that can resist the rapid crack propagation and its consequent catastrophic failure, which indicates a material serviceability in the oral cavity.

  20. In vivo experimental models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carmen; Rubio-Osornio, Moises; Retana-Márquez, Socorro; Verónica Custodio, Marisol López; Paz, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    This study reviews the different in vivo experimental models that have been used for the study of epileptogenesis. In this review we will focus on how to replicate the different models that have led to the study of partial seizures, as well as generalized seizures and the status epilepticus. The main characteristics that participate in the processes that generate and modulate the manifestations of different models of epileptogenesis are described. The development of several models of experimental epilepsy in animals has clearly helped the study of specific brain areas capable of causing convulsions. The experimental models of epilepsy also have helped in the study the mechanisms and actions of epilepsy drugs. In order to develop experimental animal models of epilepsy, animals are generally chosen according to the kind of epilepsy that can be developed and studied. It is currently known that animal species can have epileptic seizures similar to those in humans. However, it is important to keep in mind that it has not been possible to entirely evaluate all manifestations of human epilepsy. Notwithstanding, these experimental models of epilepsy have allowed a partial understanding of most of the underlying mechanisms of this disease.