Science.gov

Sample records for julius christauskas eslovas

  1. Clinical catecholamine neurochemistry: a legacy of Julius Axelrod.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Kopin, Irwin J

    2006-01-01

    1. Discoveries, insights, and concepts that Julius Axelrod introduced about the disposition and metabolism of catecholamines provided the scientific basis and spurred the development of clinical catecholamine neurochemistry. 2. Here, we provide examples of this aspect of Axelrod's scientific legacy.

  2. Doctor Julius Robert Mayer and Energy Processes in Living Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    2007-01-01

    The overwhelming majority of important papers in physics are written by physicists. But the physician Julius Robert Mayer (1814-1878, see photo) did a valid theoretical calculation of the mechanical equivalent of heat just before Joule reported on his results from his well-known paddle-wheel experiments. Joule is well-known to physics people and…

  3. JULIUS CAESAR. PLUTARCH'S LIVES. AUTOBIOGRAPHY. LITERATURE CURRICULUM IV, TEACHER VERSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    THIS 10TH-GRADE ENGLISH CURRICULUM GUIDE WAS PREPARED TO ASSIST TEACHERS IN THE PRESENTATION OF AN ENRICHED READING AND STUDY PROGRAM OF SHAKESPEARE'S "JULIUS CAESAR," GIVING SOME ATTENTION TO PLUTARCH'S BIOGRAPHIES OF CAESAR, BRUTUS, AND MARK ANTONY WHICH BEAR DIRECTLY ON SHAKESPEARE'S PLAY. AN INSTRUCTIONAL UNIT ON…

  4. JULIUS CAESAR. PLUTARCH'S LIVES. AUTOBIOGRAPHY. LITERATURE CURRICULUM IV, STUDENT VERSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    THIS 10TH-GRADE STUDENT GUIDE POSED SOME QUESTIONS AND CLARIFIED OTHERS ON SHAKESPEARE'S "JULIUS CAESAR," AND PRESENTED SHORT SELECTIONS FROM PLUTARCH'S "LIVES" (ON CAESAR, BRUTUS, AND MARK ANTONY) WITH ACCOMPANYING DISCUSSION QUESTIONS. A UNIT OF AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL READINGS OF EARLY LIFE EXPERIENCES WAS ALSO OUTLINED. BY…

  5. LITERATURE CURRICULUM IV--TESTS FOR "JULIUS CAESAR" AND "AUTOBIOGRAPHY."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    THESE TWO TESTS--"JULIUS CAESAR" AND "AUTOBIOGRAPHY"--WERE DESIGNED BY THE OREGON CURRICULUM STUDY CENTER FOR A 10TH-GRADE LITERATURE CURRICULUM. THEY ARE INTENDED TO ACCOMPANY CURRICULUM UNITS AVAILABLE AS ED 010 817 AND ED 010 818. (MM)

  6. Julius Streicher and the Rhetorical Foundations of the Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bytwerk, Randall L.; Brooks, Robert D.

    Julius Streicher, the German publisher sentenced to death in the Nuremberg trials for rhetorical crimes against humanity, published the widely-read and virulently anti-semitic weekly tabloid "Der Stuermer" from 1923 to 1945. Through Streicher's rhetoric and through the publication's cartoons, Jews were depicted as bacilli, vampires,…

  7. Julius Caesar and the Gallic Campaign: A Roadmap to the Use of the Instruments of Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-30

    of Military Studies Research Paper September 2009- April 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Julius Caesar and the Gallic Campaign: A Road...During the campaign, Rome’s premiere statesman-general Julius Caesar used the instruments of power to pacify Gaul. The purpose of this monograph is to...

  8. Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar": The Initial Classroom Presentation. An Introduction to Theatre, Volume 2. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoetker, James; Englesman, Alan

    A set of lessons to introduce "Julius Caesar" to secondary school students unfamiliar with Shakespeare is provided in this teaching guide. Only a critical fraction of the play is covered in the lessons. First, a synopsis of a modern high school situation whose conflicts parallel those in "Julius Caesar" is presented; then,…

  9. Understanding Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" Online: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Thomas

    This casebook of materials about William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" will enrich students' understanding of the historical context of the play and encourage interpretations of its cultural meaning. Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" reflects perennial cultural concerns about order and freedom, particularly as they clash in the…

  10. Julius Sachs (1832-1897) and the Unity of Life.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    In 1865, the German botanist Julius Sachs published a seminal monograph entitled Experimental-Physiologie der Pflanzen (Experimental Physiology of Plants) and hence became the founder of a new scientific discipline that originated 150 y ago. Here, we outline the significance of the achievements of Sachs. In addition, we document, with reference to his Vorlesungen über Pflanzen-Physiologie (Lectures on the Physiology of Plants, 1882), that Sachs was one of the first experimentalists who proposed the functional unity of all organisms alive today (humans, animals, plants and other "vegetable" organisms, such as algae, cyanophyceae, fungi, myxomycetes, and bacteria).

  11. Julius Sachs (1832–1897) and the Unity of Life

    PubMed Central

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    In 1865, the German botanist Julius Sachs published a seminal monograph entitled Experimental-Physiologie der Pflanzen (Experimental Physiology of Plants) and hence became the founder of a new scientific discipline that originated 150 y ago. Here, we outline the significance of the achievements of Sachs. In addition, we document, with reference to his Vorlesungen über Pflanzen-Physiologie (Lectures on the Physiology of Plants, 1882), that Sachs was one of the first experimentalists who proposed the functional unity of all organisms alive today (humans, animals, plants and other “vegetable” organisms, such as algae, cyanophyceae, fungi, myxomycetes, and bacteria). PMID:26359706

  12. Doctor Julius Robert Mayer and Energy Processes in Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2007-12-01

    The overwhelming majority of important papers in physics are written by physicists. But the physician Julius Robert Mayer (1814-1878, see photo) did a valid theoretical calculation of the mechanical equivalent of heat just before Joule reported on his results from his well-known paddle-wheel experiments. Joule is well-known to physics people and Mayer is a relatively obscure and unknown name. Joule was part of the physics establishment; Mayer was not. Joule's paddle-wheel experiments were easy to understand, and physics people appreciated the painstaking manner in which he made corrections in his experiments. The fame of Joule is well-deserved. On the other hand, Mayer's work is not traditional and there will almost certainly never be a Mayer physics laboratory experiment. We can admire the tenacity with which Mayer pushed his priority case, but that is all.

  13. Noncommutativity and Humanity — Julius Wess and his Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Goran S.

    2012-03-01

    A personal view on Julius Wess's human and scientific legacy in Serbia and the Balkan region is given. Motivation for using noncommutative and nonarchimedean geometry on very short distances is presented. In addition to some mathematical preliminaries, we present a short introduction in adelic quantum mechanics in a way suitable for its noncommutative generalization. We also review the basic ideas and tools embedded in q-deformed and noncommutative quantum mechanics. A rather fundamental approach, called deformation quantization, is noted. A few relations between noncommutativity and nonarchimedean spaces, as well as similarities between corresponding quantum theories, in particular, quantum cosmology are pointed out. An extended Moyal product in a frame of an adelic noncommutative quantum mechanics is also considered.

  14. Karl Julius Lohnert - an unknown astronomer, experimental psychologist and teacher (German Title: Karl Julius Lohnert - ein unbekannter Astronom, experimenteller Psychologe und Lehrer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmadel, Lutz D.; Guski-Leinwand, Susanne

    2011-08-01

    Karl Julius Lohnert (1885-1944) with his double biography as astronomer and psychologist is hardly known in both fields. As a student of astronomy in Heidelberg, Lohnert discovered a couple of minor planets and he dedicated one to his PhD supervisor, the famous Leipzig professor for philosophy, Wilhelm Wundt. This connection is discussed for the first time almost one century after the naming of (635) Vundtia. The paper elucidates some biographical stations of Lohnert.

  15. Julius Eichberg: String and Vocal Instruction in Nineteenth-Century Boston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Sondra Wieland

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the career and contributions of Julius Eichberg (1824-93), a pioneer in string and vocal instruction in Boston (Massachusetts). Eichberg founded the Boston Conservatory, supervised music education for the Boston public school system, and taught teacher-training courses. In addition, he composed choral works and operas, and edited several…

  16. Emanuel Haldeman-Julius and the Education of the Poor of America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, W. P.

    2006-01-01

    Emanuel Haldeman-Julius was born in Philadelphia in 1889, the son of poor Russian immigrants. Emanuel did not achieve much at school and worked in various jobs until he found his niche as a reporter for a variety of socialist newspapers. He married a wealthy heiress, became a publisher and eventually achieved fame and wealth. The cornerstone of…

  17. Julius Elster and Hans Geitel - Dioscuri of physics and pioneer investigators in atmospheric electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, Rudolf G. A.; Schlegel, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Julius Elster and Hans Geitel contributed to the physics at the turn of the 19-20th century in many ways. We first summarize the life of these exceptional scientists. Then - owing to the topic of this journal - we focus on their atmospheric electricity research. With their experiments, careful evaluations and ingenious interpretation, Elster and Geitel made important contributions to precipitation electricity, the influence of solar radiation on the electric state of the atmosphere, the nature of charge carriers and the ionization of air by radioactivity. They proved their experimental skills by inventing new instruments with unprecedented accuracy and reliability. A very modern concept was their attitude to undertake long-term measurements at various locations. A section on their recognition in the physics community and their scientific distinctions concludes the paper.

  18. Scripture in the Sky: Jeremias Drexel, Julius Schiller, and the Christianizing of the Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, M.; Shapiro, A.

    2011-06-01

    From the times of early Christians up to the Enlightenment, the twelve ancient signs of the zodiac were challenged as highly inappropriate pagan images. The most concerted efforts to replace those signs with names, mottos, and images taken from Holy Scripture occurred in the early decades of the 17th century. We review the background that led to the proposed use of sacred mottos by Jeremias Drexel, and then of the names and images of the Twelve Apostles by Julius Schiller. The reaction of a leading seventeenth-century astronomer is presented to suggest why such changes were never adopted. Finally, we address issues of conflict and motivation that might have led to efforts to Christianize the Heavens.

  19. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling due to Atmospheric Tides (Julius Bartels Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey M.

    2016-04-01

    Within the last decade, a new realization has arrived on the scene of ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) science: terrestrial weather significantly influences space weather. The aspect of space weather referred to here consists of electron density variability that translates to uncertainties in navigation and communications systems, and neutral density variability that translates to uncertainties in orbital and reentry predictions. In the present context "terrestrial weather" primarily refers to the meteorological conditions that determine the spatial-temporal distribution of tropospheric water vapor and latent heating associated with tropical convection, and the middle atmosphere disturbances associated with sudden stratosphere warmings. The net effect of these processes is a spatially- and temporally-evolving spectrum of waves (gravity waves, tides, planetary waves, Kelvin waves) that grows in amplitude with height and enters the IT system near ~100 km. Some members of the wave spectrum penetrate all the way to the base of the exosphere (ca. 500 km). Along the way, nonlinear interactions between different wave components occur, modifying the interacting waves and giving rise to secondary waves. Finally, the IT wind perturbations carried by the waves can redistribute ionospheric plasma, either through the electric fields generated via the dynamo mechanism between 100 and 150 km, or directly by moving plasma along magnetic field lines at higher levels. Additionally, the signatures of wave-driven dynamo currents are reflected in magnetic perturbations observed at the ground. This is how terrestrial atmospheric variability, through the spectrum of vertically- propagating waves that it produces, can effectively drive IT space weather. The primary objective of this Julius Bartels Lecture is to provide an overview of the global observational evidence for the IT consequences of these upward-propagating waves. In honor of Julius Bartels, who performed much research (including

  20. Basic versus applied research: Julius Sachs (1832–1897) and the experimental physiology of plants

    PubMed Central

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The German biologist Julius Sachs was the first to introduce controlled, accurate, quantitative experimentation into the botanical sciences, and is regarded as the founder of modern plant physiology. His seminal monograph Experimental-Physiologie der Pflanzen (Experimental Physiology of Plants) was published 150 y ago (1865), when Sachs was employed as a lecturer at the Agricultural Academy in Poppelsdorf/Bonn (now part of the University). This book marks the beginning of a new era of basic and applied plant science. In this contribution, I summarize the achievements of Sachs and outline his lasting legacy. In addition, I show that Sachs was one of the first biologists who integrated bacteria, which he considered to be descendants of fungi, into the botanical sciences and discussed their interaction with land plants (degradation of wood etc.). This “plant-microbe-view” of green organisms was extended and elaborated by the laboratory botanist Wilhelm Pfeffer (1845–1920), so that the term “Sachs-Pfeffer-Principle of Experimental Plant Research” appears to be appropriate to characterize this novel way of performing scientific studies on green, photoautotrophic organisms (embryophytes, algae, cyanobacteria). PMID:26146794

  1. Basic versus applied research: Julius Sachs (1832-1897) and the experimental physiology of plants.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The German biologist Julius Sachs was the first to introduce controlled, accurate, quantitative experimentation into the botanical sciences, and is regarded as the founder of modern plant physiology. His seminal monograph Experimental-Physiologie der Pflanzen (Experimental Physiology of Plants) was published 150 y ago (1865), when Sachs was employed as a lecturer at the Agricultural Academy in Poppelsdorf/Bonn (now part of the University). This book marks the beginning of a new era of basic and applied plant science. In this contribution, I summarize the achievements of Sachs and outline his lasting legacy. In addition, I show that Sachs was one of the first biologists who integrated bacteria, which he considered to be descendants of fungi, into the botanical sciences and discussed their interaction with land plants (degradation of wood etc.). This "plant-microbe-view" of green organisms was extended and elaborated by the laboratory botanist Wilhelm Pfeffer (1845-1920), so that the term "Sachs-Pfeffer-Principle of Experimental Plant Research" appears to be appropriate to characterize this novel way of performing scientific studies on green, photoautotrophic organisms (embryophytes, algae, cyanobacteria).

  2. Julius Caesar Arantius (Giulio Cesare Aranzi, 1530-1589) and the hippocampus of the human brain: history behind the discovery.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Ambekar, Sudheer; Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2015-04-01

    Julius Caesar Arantius is one of the pioneer anatomists and surgeons of the 16th century who discovered the different anatomical structures of the human body. One of his prominent discoveries is the hippocampus. At that time, Arantius originated the term hippocampus, from the Greek word for seahorse (hippos ["horse"] and kampos ["sea monster"]). Arantius published his description of the hippocampus in 1587, in the first chapter of his work titled De Humano Foetu Liber. Numerous nomenclatures of this structure, including "white silkworm," "Ammon's horn," and "ram's horn" were proposed by different scholars at that time. However, the term hippocampus has become the most widely used in the literature.

  3. ["100 rats and 20 children!"--Julius Moses and the debate over human experiments in the Weimar Republic].

    PubMed

    Reuland, A

    2002-01-01

    In 1900, the Prussian ministry of cultural affairs for the first time issued ethical guidelines on human experimentation. These guidelines were not able to prevent questionable human experiments in Germany during the Weimar Republic. In 1928 the testing of a vitamin-D-medication in the Berlin "Kaiserin Auguste Victoria-Haus" led to a public scandal. The physician and active social democrat Julius Moses played a decisive role in the disclosure of this scandal and of other inadmissible experiments. Subsequently in 1930, the "Reichsgesundheitsrat" developed improved guidelines distinguishing between scientific and therapeutic experiments.

  4. Julius Wagner-Jauregg (1857-1940): Introducing fever therapy in the treatment of neurosyphilis.

    PubMed

    Karamanou, M; Liappas, I; Antoniou, Ch; Androutsos, G; Lykouras, E

    2013-01-01

    For centuries, heat has been used in various ways for the cure of mental diseases. Hippocrates noted that malarial fever could have a calming effect in epileptics. Centuries later, Galen described a case of melancholy cured as a result of an attack of quartan fever. In 19th century, the eminent French psychiatrist Philippe Pinel, in his treatise on insanity referred to the beneficial effect of fever. An opinion expressed few years later by his pupil Jean-Étienne Dominique Esquirol in his treatise entitled Des maladies mentales considérées sous les rapports médical, hygiénique et médico-légal. However, in 1917, the Austrian neuro-psychiatrist Julius Wagner Jauregg pointed out the therapeutic value of malaria inoculation in the treatment of dementia paralytica. In 1927, Wagner Jauregg received for this work the Nobel Prize in Medicine, being actually the first psychiatrist to win the Nobel Prize. He studied medicine at the University of Vienna and received his doctorate in 1880. In 1889, he was appointed Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Graz's Psychiatric Clinic, a position that he held until 1928. Working in the asylum, Wagner Jauregg noted that insane patients with general paralysis occasionally became sane after some febrile episode. After experimenting with several artificial methods (streptococci, tuberculin) to induce fever, he concluded that malaria was the most satisfactory. Actually, malaria infection was an acceptable risk for the patients, as quinine would be administered as soon as syphilis was cured. In 1917, he reported the first favorable results of his study. Patients were inoculated via intravenous injections with malaria. Some physicians were starting the administration of anti-syphilitic treatment (bismuth, salvarsan and later penicillin) after 10-12 febrile paroxysms, while others initiated the regimen the first febrile-free day after 8 malarial paroxysms. The therapeutic regimen was completed with the administration of quinine

  5. Julius Wagner-Jauregg and the Legacy of Malarial Therapy for the Treatment of General Paresis of the Insane

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, Cynthia J.

    2013-01-01

    Julius Wagner-Jauregg, a preeminent Austrian psychiatrist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1927 for the development of malaria therapy for the treatment of neurosyphilis, or general paresis of the insane. Despite being only one of three psychiatrists to win a Nobel Prize, he has faded from public consciousness and his name recognition pales in comparison to his contemporary and fellow Austrian, Sigmund Freud. This paper explores his contributions to the field of biological psychiatry and also touches upon reasons, such as the growing bioethics movement, his controversial affiliation with the Nazi Party, and the evolution of neurosyphilis, that explain why Wagner-Jauregg is not more widely celebrated for his contributions to the field of psychiatry, even though his malarial treatment could be considered the earliest triumph of biological psychiatry over psychoanalysis. PMID:23766744

  6. The pre-Anschluss Vienna School of Medicine - the physicians: Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), Julius Wagner-Jauregg (1857-1940) and Karel Wenckebach (1864-1940).

    PubMed

    Shaw, Lily Bzl; Shaw, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Three physicians are discussed. Sigmund Freud, probably the best-known member of the Vienna School of Medicine, was the path-breaking pioneer in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. Julius Wagner-Jauregg was a psychiatrist who discovered the link between iodine deficiency and goitre and also developed malaria therapy to treat progressive paralysis caused by syphilis for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize. Karel Wenckebach, the pioneering Dutch cardiologist, is best known for the Wenckebach block. After the Anschluss, fate dealt very different hands to these three physicians. Freud fled to London where he soon died. Wagner-Jauregg, who had some pan-Germanic sympathies as well as views on eugenics, left a controversial legacy. The Dutch cardiologist Wenckebach died in Vienna shortly after his homeland had been invaded in 1940 by that of his hosts.

  7. Ernst Julius Öpik's (1916) note on the theory of explosion cratering on the Moon's surface—The complex case of a long-overlooked benchmark paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racki, Grzegorz; Koeberl, Christian; Viik, Tõnu; Jagt-Yazykova, Elena A.; Jagt, John W. M.

    2014-10-01

    High-velocity impact as a common phenomenon in planetary evolution was ignored until well into the twentieth century, mostly because of inadequate understanding of cratering processes. An eight-page note, published in Russian by the young Ernst Julius Öpik, a great Estonian astronomer, was among the key selenological papers, but due to the language barrier, it was barely known and mostly incorrectly cited. This particular paper is here intended to serve as an explanatory supplement to an English translation of Öpik's article, but also to document an early stage in our understanding of cratering. First, we outline the historical-biographical background of this benchmark paper, and second, a comprehensive discussion of its merits is presented, from past and present perspectives alike. In his theoretical research, Öpik analyzed the explosive formation of craters numerically, albeit in a very simple way. For the first time, he approximated relationships among minimal meteorite size, impact energy, and crater diameter; this scaling focused solely on the gravitational energy of excavating the crater (a "useful" working approach). This initial physical model, with a rational mechanical basis, was developed in a series of papers up to 1961. Öpik should certainly be viewed as the founder of the numerical simulation approach in planetary sciences. In addition, the present note also briefly describes Nikolai A. Morozov as a remarkable man, a forgotten Russian scientist and, surprisingly, the true initiator of Öpik's explosive impact theory. In fact, already between 1909 and 1911, Morozov probably was the first to consider conclusively that explosion craters would be circular, bowl-shaped depressions even when formed under different impact angles.

  8. [Knowledge of German neurologists on migraine around 1890. Paul Julius Möbius and his 1894 monograph Die Migräne].

    PubMed

    Schobeß, C; Steinberg, H

    2013-08-01

    Paul Julius Möbius (1853-1907), a Leipzig-based author and editor on a vast majority of subjects, has often been acknowledged as a leading 19th-century German neurologist. His impact on the development of knowledge on migraine has likewise been pointed to. This study compares the monograph published by Möbius on the illness in 1894 with contemporary publications and with present day best practice to establish if the author really made an essential contribution to the problem of migraine. As a representative of the central theory Möbius assumed that migraine was caused by aberrations in the brain. At the same time he made it clear that due to very limited diagnostic options this was only a hypothesis. Apart from a genetic factor and these cerebral changes, for Möbius the general state of health was a decisive factor and prevention and change in lifestyle therefore played a crucial role in his therapeutic recommendations. Basically there were only few differences between the views of Möbius and his colleagues, the major dissimilarity being that Möbius postulated a merely suggestive impact but no physical effect of electrotherapy. Although Möbius's monograph on migraine lacks originality, it provides a concise, easy to understand and stylistically impressive overview on the state of knowledge at that time. Therefore, the book can be considered as a benchmark publication of German speaking neurology around 1890 on migraine and it is highly recommended to present day headache and migraine researchers as well as historians of psychiatry and neurology.

  9. Planets in Space (Julius Bartels Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Interplanetary space is not void, but filled with photons and energetic particle of solar origin as well as the fast stream solar wind plasma. Planets and other planetary bodies such as comets and asteroids need to interact with this interplanetary medium. Different types of interaction are known, dependent on the properties of the planetary body. The parameter space in which the interaction is described is mainly spanned by the magnetic field of the body, the density of its atmosphere, and the solar wind dynamic pressure. Using the concept of ternary triangles, different possible interaction scenarios will be described. As no active planetary scale experiments are possible only a few points in the interaction space can be visited right now. The discovery of exo-planets will allow exploring the parameter space further. Also, temporal changes of the terrestrial magnetic field strength and the resulting paleo-interaction situations will be discussed as they represent additional points in parameter space. Furthermore, the interaction between a planetary body and the interplanetary medium will not only modify the solar wind streaming past, but the body itself experiences changes. Planetary bodies are thus treated as embedded systems. As an example the impact of an external magnetic field on planetary dynamo action is discussed. Possible connections with the small observed magnetic field of Mercury are mentioned.

  10. Oppenheimer, Julius Robert (1904-67)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Nuclear physicist, born in New York City, joined the Manhattan Project and directed the Los Alamos Laboratory, where he became known as the `father of the atomic bomb'. He directed the Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton, NJ. He worked on cosmic rays and calculated theoretically the structure of neutron stars, remarking that it seemed unlikely that they existed. Neutron stars were discovere...

  11. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize: Lilienfeld Prize Lecture: Emergent Behavior in Quantum Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pines, David

    We live in an emergent universe in which interactions between the basic building blocks of matter and their environment give rise to unpredicted and unexpected emergent behavior at every scale. As physicists we seek to identify the organizing principles responsible for that behavior, construct soluble models that incorporate these, and explain experiment. In this lecture, I illustrate this approach to understanding emergent behavior in quantum matter through three examples: collective modes in electron, helium, and nuclear liquids; the emergence of superconductivity in conventional and unconventional superconductors, nuclei, and neutron stars; and the emergence of heavy electrons in Kondo lattice materials.

  12. Data-Based Mapping of Our Dynamical Magnetosphere (Julius Bartels Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganenko, Nikolai A.

    2013-04-01

    The geomagnetic field is a principal agent connecting our planet's ionosphere with thehighly variable interplanetary medium, incessantly disturbed by dynamical processesat the Sun. The Earth's magnetosphere serves as a giant storage reservoir of energy pumped in from the solar wind and intermittently spilled into the upperatmosphere during space storms. As the humankindgets more and more dependent on space technologies, it becomes increasingly important to be able to accurately map the distant geomagnetic field and predict its dynamicsusing data of upstream solar wind monitors. Two approaches to the problem have beensuccessfully pursued over last decades. The first one is to treat the solar wind asa flow of magnetized conducting fluid and to numerically solve first-principle equations,governing its interaction with the terrestrial magnetic dipole. Based on pure theory, that approachaddresses the question: "What the magnetosphere would look like and behaveunder assumption thatthe underlying approximations and techniques were universally accurate?" This lecturewill focus on the other, completely different approach, based on direct observations. Its essence is to develop an empirical description of the global geomagnetic field and its response to the solar wind driving by fitting model parameters to large multi-year sets of spacecraft data. Models of that kind seek to answer the question: "What can in situ measurements tell us about the global magnetospheric configuration and its storm-time dynamics, provided our approximations are realistic, flexible, and the data coverage is sufficiently dense and broad?" Five decades of spaceflight produced enormous amount of archived data anda number of empirical models have already been developed on that basis. Recent and ongoing multi-spacecraft missions keep pouring in new data and further expandthe huge and yet largely untapped resource of valuable information. The main goal of the data-based modeling is to extract the largest possible knowledge from the accumulated data, thus synergistically maximizing the output of present and past space experiments.

  13. [Quo vadis cardiologia? Or: An nescis, mi fili, quantilla prudentia mundus regatur? (Pope Julius III)].

    PubMed

    Kübler, W

    2003-02-01

    In order to recognize and to solve problems, a look in the future is essential despite many uncertainties. Besides sound bed side-teaching, the main aim in the education of the students should be to acquire self-responsiveness and an attitude of permanent learning. It is more than doubtful whether the high expectations of health politicians will be met to limit the cost of in-patient treatment by introducing diagnosis-related groups in combination with evidence-based medicine, as this method has several severe limitations in order to fulfill this duty. The new financial system based on diagnosis-related groups will be in favor of private investors compared to the government-dependent university hospitals. The changing population pyramid implies not only higher costs but in addition severe medical problems. Within the changing society, alterations in the patient's behavior are to be expected. Several factors will contribute to make the doctor's profession less attractive. In the developing countries a rapid increase in the non-communicative diseases, i.e., in coronary heart disease, has to be expected. Apart from the prolongation of life - especially during its terminal phase - it is mainly the allocation of resources between industrialized and developing countries which will determine the ethical discussion. Germany has lost its leading position of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century in medical sciences. This was based on the liberal university system introduced by Wilhelm von Humboldt. Several pioneering innovations of German cardiologists during the 20th century have not strengthened German industry - in contrast to the situation in the 19th century. The general conditions in Germany, which are not research oriented, have prompted the majority of the pharmaceutical firms to transfer their research activities into foreign countries. In addition Germany's cardiological research has lost basic sciences partners for clinically orientated basic research, as many institutes which formerly worked in the cardiovascular field, are now devoted to other specialties. Restrictive legal regulations--such as the law regulating working hours, anti-corruption laws and the new legal university framework--are not conducive to internationally competitive research. Creative and innovative research requires liberal general conditions and cannot be planed.

  14. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize Talk: Measuring the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, Gerald

    2011-05-01

    The electron magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons has been measured to a precision of 3 parts in 1013. This measurement, with quantum electrodynamics (AED) theory, provides the most precise value of the fine structure constant. This measurement, with a value of the fine structure from other measurements, also tests QED and sets a limit on the internal structure of the electron. A one-electron quantum cyclotron is at the heart of the measurement -- an electron suspended in a magnetic field and cooled enough that its lowest cyclotron and spin quantum states can be deduced with quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements. A cylindrical Penning trap cavity inhibits spontaneous emission and feedback methods make the electron excite and sustain its own motion for detection. A new apparatus is being commissioned in pursuit of more precise measurements. Adapted methods are promising for observing a proton spin flip, which should make it possible to compare the antiproton and proton magnetic moments a million times more accurately than is currently possible.

  15. Perspectivism and Form in Drama: A Burkean Analysis of "Julius Caesar."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weier, Gary M.

    1996-01-01

    Employs a critical application of Kenneth Burke's notions of form and perspectivism. Argues for the potential of a complementary relationship between form and perspectivism in the appeal of rhetorical artifacts. Claims that form is perspectival, limiting possibilities for appropriate interpretations within a text. Applies this theoretical…

  16. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize Talk: Catastrophic cascade of failures in interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo

    2010-03-01

    We study interdependent networks, where nodes fail in one network, cause dependent nodes in another network to also fail. We provide a framework for understanding the robustness of such interacting networks. We calculate the critical fraction of nodes that upon removal will lead to a failure cascade and to a complete fragmentation of two interdependent networks. Surprisingly, while for a single network a broader degree distribution results in the network being more robust to random failures, for interdependent networks, the broader the distribution is, the more vulnerable the networks become to random failures.

  17. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize: Chaotic Dynamics in the Physical Sciences: Some Comments and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Chaos was first discovered by Poincare in his famous 1887 work on the motion of N >2 bodies interacting through gravitational attraction. Although steady progress was made by mathematicians following Poincare's work, widespread impact and development of chaos in the physical sciences is only comparatively recent, i.e., approximately starting in the 1970's. This talk will review this history and give some examples illustrating the types of questions, problems and results arising from perspectives resulting from widespread participation of physical scientists.

  18. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize Talk: The Fermi Pasta Ulam (FPU) Problem and The Birth of Nonlinear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, David K.

    2010-03-01

    In 1953, Enrico Fermi, John Pasta, and Stan Ulam initiated a series of computer studies aimed at exploring how simple, multi-degree of freedom nonlinear mechanical systems obeying reversible deterministic dynamics evolve in time to an equilibrium state describable by statistical mechanics. Their expectation was that this would occur by mixing behavior among the many linear modes. Their intention was then to study more complex nonlinear systems, with the hope of modeling turbulence computationally. The results of this first study of the so-called Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) problem, which were published in 1955 and characterized by Fermi as a ``little discovery,'' showed instead of the expected mixing of linear modes a striking series of (near) recurrences of the initial state and no evidence of equipartition. This work heralded the beginning of both computational physics and (modern) nonlinear science. In particular, the work marked the first systematic study of a nonlinear system by digital computers (``experimental mathematics'') and led directly to the discovery of ``solitons,'' as well as to deep insights into deterministic chaos and statistical mechanics. In this talk, I will review the original FPU studies and show how they led to the understanding of two key paradigms of nonlinear science. Specifically, I will show how a continuum approximation to the original discrete system led to the discovery of ``solitions'' whereas a low-mode approximation led to an early example of ``deterministic chaos.'' I will close with a brief indication of how the recurrence phenomenon observed by behavior by FPU can be reconciled with mixing, equipartition, and statistical mechanics.

  19. Julius F. Neumueller Award Paper--1977. Static fracture resistance of Schott S-1005 lenses as a function of thickness.

    PubMed

    Scaief, A L; Wood, S A

    1978-01-01

    High-Lite S-1005 lenses (Schott Optical Company) of various center thicknesses were tested for static load fracture resistance. Chemically tempered High-Lite lenses of 1.7-mm center thickness were found to be equivalent in strength to 3.0-mm heat-tempered crown lenses; 1.34-mm chemically tempered High-Lite lenses were equivalent in strength to 2.07-mm heat-tempered crown lenses. These findings agree closely with earlier data on chemically tempered crown glass and therefore illustrate that chemically hardened lenses can be made significantly thinner than Z-80 specifications and still meet FDA strength requirements.

  20. Alpha List of Prime Contract Awards. Oct 91 - Sep 92. FY 92 (Branscome Julius Inc - Chriscott Supply)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    LL M Mn AULA oLALALALAWW0WfL A LAWII* n~LntLAWOLAUmLAiflLALA LAWWLA WIALAWLALA it I (0-4ŕ ifI -4-1-4 _q4 -1 -f -4 -1- -4 -4 -4 .- f ’ -4 ’ -4 -.4. -4...cc M tic o 0 C113 ɛ -4 11 Z)0000anionoon => u C) 0 U u (-) C) 0 :D (-) D C) D C) (.) = 0 D a : uj I m C, -- 4 It m 0 o v Cp 0 o 0 Cý 0 C> o 00 cr) 0...Z -4O0 C -- 0 MC C O C 4 0 C 00 OC- ccN wm0’)- a0CC- C0 2 2 C- "c) CD(I.- 2 O) CC 0) C 030N 14zCC .20 <>Z 0z 02 tic CX 0.1 z 2 2 00 0 Wcoc CC E C

  1. Basic Lessons in ORA and AutoMap 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-11

    people, places and things are made up of two or more words. For example Julius Caesar , Brutus’s House, status of Caesar . Before producing any files...lesson. It contains concepts from the Julius Caesar text. juliusCaesar-GenThes.csv Ides of March,Ides_of_March Julius Caesar ,Julius_Caesar Julius ...Caesar’s,Julius_Caesar Julius Caesar’s status,statue_of_Julius_Caesar kill Caesar ,kill_Caesar kills herself,commit_suicide king,emperor letter

  2. Social background of the discovery and the reception of the periodic law of the elements: recognizing the contributions of Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev and Julius Lothar Meyer.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Masanori

    2003-05-01

    The favorable and relatively rapid reception of Mendeleev's periodic table of the elements can be attributed, in part at least, to his social connections. These connections were evident in the recently organized Russian Chemical Society. In addition, Mendeleev enjoyed the support of the editorial board of the journal of the German Chemical Society.

  3. Keeping the Dogs in the Fight: What Combatant Commanders Need to Know about MWDs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-20

    1 William Shakespeare. “ Julius Caesar ,” The Literature Network. Last modified 2012, http://www.online...dogs-outdone-by-electronic-sensors-in- afghanistan/?page=all. Shakespeare, William. “ Julius Caesar .” The Literature Network. Last modified 2012

  4. Project on Social Architecture in Education. Final Report. Part III: Case Studies. Chapter 8: Innovation in Lakeport. Two Case Studies. College High School: A Planning Case Study. The Founding of Julius Appelbaum High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Matthew B.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 8 of the final report of the Project on Social Architecture in Education. Chapter 8 contains two case studies, set in a large urban district with an entrenched central office bureaucracy and a militant teachers' union. The pressures of a fiscal crisis surrounded both efforts. College High School was intended to serve…

  5. Spontaneous Analogy by Piggybacking on a Perceptual System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    analogical schema found in both Romeo & Juliet and in Julius Caesar . In the former, Romeo thinks that Juliet is dead, which causes him to kill himself...Juliet, who is actually alive, finds that Romeo has died, which causes her to kill herself. Likewise, in Julius Caesar , Cassius kills him- self after...Suicide schema, which happens in both Romeo & Juliet and in Julius Caesar . the 100 training stories. Whereas MAC/FAC returns entire stories, Spontol

  6. Network Visualization Design Using Prefuse Visualization Toolkit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Lipinski. “ JULIUS - An Extendable Software Framework for Surgi- cal Planning”. Caesar , Berlin, Germany, 2001. URL http://www.caesar.de/ fileadmin/user upload... Julius framework and Ball modelar . . . . . 13 2.9 PNode class hierarchy showing monolithic Piccolo toolkit design [3... JULIUS [24] (used for medical imaging). However, all frameworks studied, except one, selected OpenGL as 12 their graphical visualization toolkit. This

  7. Basic Lessons in ORA and AutoMap 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-13

    Julius Caesar Meta-network. both the play and spark notes were used as reference. As with the Stargate Meta-network. many decisions were made about how...finding information much harder. The Julius Caesar Agent NodeSet was also easy using the cast of characters but it too had it’s construction...problems. Julius Caesar had limited resources so knowledge and resources were essentially combined into one NodeSet called knowledge. Node sets can be

  8. Diversity within the Joint Team: Understanding the Different Operational Perspectives of the Army and Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-06

    teacher of all things.”19 The words Julius Caesar wrote centuries ago imply that the tree of all human knowledge is rooted in human experience; therefore...decisive battle, as was evident in his 19 Julius Caesar , de Bello Civili, quoted in...Dictionary.com, “Quotes,” http://quotes.dictionary.com /author/ julius + Caesar (accessed September 29, 1012). 20 James J. Schneider, Vulcan’s Anvil: The

  9. Operational Intelligence and Operational Design: Thinking about Operational Art

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    examples and discussions on analysis by ancient commanders, see also Exodus 17:8-13; Herodotus, The Histories, 476-483; Julius Caesar , Caesar’s...translated by Samuel B. Griffith, (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2005), 236; Julius Caesar , Caesar’s Commentaries: On the Gallic War & On The...Unpublished Monograph, Ft. Leavenworth, KS: School of Advanced Military Studies, 21 April 1987. Caesar , Julius . Caesar’s Commentaries: On the Gallic War

  10. Effects-Based Operations: Useful or Useless

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-03

    Julius Caesar . 332. 3 Mattis, “Assessment of Effects Based Operations” (Commander, U.S. Joint Forces Command for U.S. Joint Forces Command, August 14...Among the Romans Down to the End of the Roman Empire, With a Detailed Account of the Campaigns of Caius Julius Caesar . Boston and New York: Houghton...compelled both by fear and thirst to surrender. - Caius Julius Caesar’s Capture of Uxellodunum (51 BC) 2

  11. Strategies for Civilian-Military Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    studiesabroad.com/about/press (accessed February 25, 2013). 30 Julius Caesar , Gaius Julius Caesar Commentaries on the Gallic War, trans. W.A. McDevitte and W.S...concerns, and capture lessons learned; from a small project to a major military mission. One of the first known examples of an AAR is Julius Caesar’s...Bohn (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1869), http://www.forumromanum.org/literature/ caesar /gallic_e1.html (accessed February 21, 2013). 31 Gerard

  12. "How Many Ages Hence..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebbeck, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    Ninth graders explored the theme of power and ambition by reading William Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar," studying daily life in ancient Rome, comparing the play's plot to the attempted overthrow of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, examining other power struggles, and developing scripts for modern-day "Julius Caesar"…

  13. Greater Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Patrick J.

    2006-01-01

    Julius Bennett was once a disinterested student destined to become a dropout. Then he enrolled in Amistad Academy, an academically focused charter middle school intent on narrowing the achievement gap between urban and suburban kids located in New Haven, Connecticut. Now Julius is making plans for college. In this article the author details the…

  14. Parts, Materials, and Processes Control Program for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    Kysela United Launch Alliance george.f.kysela@ulalaunch.c om Brian Julius SpaceX Brian.Julius@spacex.com Vivek Hazari SpaceX Vivek.Hazari@spacex.com... SpaceX Hans.Koenigsmann@ spacex . com Paul R. Croll Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers pcroll@computer.org Steve Henry Northrop Grumman

  15. Developing 21st Century Senior Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    leader must have ambition to succeed, and Julius Caesar had plenty of it. He set Rome on the path to empire, but his success made him believe he was a...after the assassination of Julius Caesar and ruled it for more than forty years; bringing the empire to the height of its power. What made him

  16. Shall We Bury "Caesar" or Praise Him? Ideas for the Revitalization of an Old Standard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sklar, Stacey M.

    2002-01-01

    Notes that "Julius Caesar" is required in nearly every high school curriculum, but that making the play accessible to students is not easy. Tries new teaching ideas to see whether students would more readily take to "Julius Caesar" using a more interdisciplinary approach. Describes three of these ideas that were particularly…

  17. Review Essay: Recent Additions to the Rosenwald Historiography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beilke, Jayne R.

    2011-01-01

    This essay reviews two books on Julius Rosenwald and the Rosenwald Fund and places them within the historiography of the Fund. "Julius Rosenwald: The Man Who Built Sears, Roebuck and Advanced the Cause of Black Education in the American South," is a biography written by Peter M. Ascoli. The book entitled "The Rosenwald Schools of…

  18. Noncommutative QFT and renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, H.; Wulkenhaar, R.

    2006-03-01

    It was a great pleasure for me (Harald Grosse) to be invited to talk at the meeting celebrating the 70th birthday of Prof. Julius Wess. I remember various interactions with Julius during the last years: At the time of my studies at Vienna with Walter Thirring, Julius left already Vienna, I learned from his work on effective chiral Lagrangians. Next we met at various conferences and places like CERN (were I worked with Andre Martin, an old friend of Julius), and we all learned from Julius' and Bruno's creation of supersymmetry, next we realized our common interests in noncommutative quantum field theory and did have an intensive exchange. Julius influenced our perturbative approach to gauge field theories were we used the Seiberg-Witten map after his advice. And finally I lively remember the sad days when during my invitation to Vienna Julius did have the serious heart attack. So we are very happy, that you recovered so well, and we wish you all the best for the forthcoming years. Many happy recurrences.

  19. Effectiveness and Efficiencies of Private Military Corporations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    in his examination of Rome’s use of mercenaries, reports that when Gaius Julius Caesar undertook his campaign against the Germans in 58 BC he...Dyck. “Gaius Julius Caesar took advantage of his German enemies ferocity by enlisting them in his cavalry.” Military History, 22(4), (2005): 66...Monica, CA: 2005). Childers, T. and N.A. van House. “The grail of goodness.” Library Journal, 114(16), (1989): 44-50. Dyck, Ludwig H. “Gaius Julius

  20. Basic Lessons in *ORA and Automap 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    and make finding information much harder. 26.2.1.1.1 The Julius Caesar Agent NodeSet was also easy using the cast of characters but it too had it’s...construction problems. Julius Caesar had limited resources so knowledge and resources were essentially combined into one NodeSet called knowledge...agent’s gender or time of death or the order in which events happened. 26.2.1.2.1 Use the Julius Caesar attributes alligence and persuasion as a

  1. History into Drama: The Perspective of "1 Henry IV."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Larry S.

    1978-01-01

    Contrasts Shakespeare's "Henry V" and "Henry IV" series, in which human interaction becomes history, with plays such as "Julius Caesar," which focus on psychological analysis and the internalized protagonist. (MB)

  2. Supplements to Textbook Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Ken

    1994-01-01

    Describes the many kinds of materials that English teachers can draw upon to enrich and expand students' experiences with literature. Outlines ancillary materials used to supplement the study of William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." (HB)

  3. Use it or lose it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatheway, Alson E.

    2014-11-01

    Brutus to Cassius in Julius Caesar: "There is a tide in the affairs of men which taken at the flood leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries." - W. Shakespeare

  4. And Then They Asked for Hamlet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Barbara

    1989-01-01

    A teacher in an inner-city London school describes how she involves low income, minority group students in learning classics such as Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." Emphasizes cooperative learning and active student involvement using their urban background. (FMW)

  5. A Symposium on Pre-1900 Classics Worth Using in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Journal, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various contributors recommend "The Odyssey,""Julius Caesar,""A Dog's Tale,""Ivanhoe,""Star Wars,""The Red Badge of Courage,""Demian,""Antigone,""Children of Crisis," and "Frankenstein" for use in literature classes and justify their recommendations. (JL)

  6. Malaria Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laveran and the Discovery of the Malaria Parasite Ross and the Discovery that Mosquitoes Transmit Malaria Parasites ... for work associated with malaria: to Sir Ronald Ross (1902), Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran (1907), Julius Wagner- ...

  7. South Africa: ANC Youth League President found guilty of hate speech.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Kelly

    2010-06-01

    On 15 March 2010, the Johannesburg Equality Court found African National Congress (ANC) Youth League President Julius Malema guilty of hate speech and harassment for his comments regarding rape survivors.

  8. Building on Deep Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    this figure we see a “Double Suicide” analogical schema found in both Romeo and Juliet and in Julius Caesar . In the former, Romeo thinks that Juliet is...represents a Double Suicide schema, which happens in both Romeo and Juliet and in Julius Caesar . Once the relational structures are transformed, the process...Juliet Caesar , Cassius Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to

  9. ORA User’s Guide 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-03

    www.casos.cs.cmu.edu/computational_tools/datasets/inter nal/stargate/index2.html As an added data set to use, a network model of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar will...build a network model of the people, resources, tasks, events and knowledge that comprised the world of Julius Caesar as portrayed by The Great...125 Inferred Result Sharing Network ............................................................ 126 Visualization by CAESAR III

  10. Novel Target for Ameliorating Pain and Other Problems after SCI: Spontaneous Activity in Nociceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    A, Malmberg, AB, Martin, WJ, Trafton, J, Petersen-Zeitz, KR, Koltzenburg, M, Basbaum, AI, Julius, D (2000) Impaired nociception and pain sensation...in painful neuropathies. J Peripher Nerv Syst, 11:262–271. Liu, M, Wood, JN (2011) The roles of sodium channels in nociception : implications for...AI, Julius D. Impaired nociception and pain sensation in mice lacking the capsaicin receptor. Science 2000;288:306–13. [14] Caterina MJ, Schumacher MA

  11. Breaking the Chains of Command: C4I in the Information Age

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    trend must be reversed to unleash NCW’s full potential. End Notes 1 Julius Caesar , The African Wars...Barnett, Thomas, P.M. “The Seven Deadly Sins of Network-Centric Warfare.” U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings (January 1999). Caesar , Julius . The African Wars...to how doctrine and concepts can best fit NCW. This trend must be reversed to unleash NCW’s full potential. 1 INTRODUCTION Caesar dispatched letters

  12. The birth of Caesar and the cesarean misnomer.

    PubMed

    Raju, Tonse N K

    2007-11-01

    Although cesarean section is one of the most ancient surgical procedures, the origin of its name remains obscure. The term, however, did not originate because of the birth of the Roman Emperor Julius Caesar through this route. In fact, historians are certain that Julius Caesar was not delivered by the dangerous cesarean section. The evidence for this comes from indirect inferences. Cesarean sections were rarely attempted on living women until the early 17th century, and Julius Caesar's mother was alive and well through her son's adult life. Two other possible reasons for the origin of the term are discussed in this article. Mention is also made of the cesarean birth histories of some mythological characters and a few historical personalities.

  13. Proconsuls and CINCs from the Roman Republic to the Republic of the United States of America: Lessons for the Pax Americana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    legal requirements of the job, Agricola busied himself with inspecting new public roads, buildings, and bridges. He traveled ceaselessly throughout...Republic……………………………….. 5 Cornelius Publius Scipio ’Africanus’..…………………………….. 11 Legates of the Roman Empire…….…….………………………… 15 Gnaeus Julius Agricola ...during the days of the Republic, and the victor over Hannibal in the 2d Punic War will be analyzed. Secondly, Gnaeus Julius Agricola , Legate of

  14. Health Is Academic. A Guide to Coordinated School Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Eva, Ed.; Wooley, Susan Frelick, Ed.; Northrop, Daphne, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of papers that define comprehensive school health programs and their components and provide action steps for their implementation at the local, state, and national levels: (1) "Linking Health and Learning: An Overview of Coordinated School Health Programs" (Floretta Dukes McKenzie and Julius B. Richmond); (2)…

  15. Chances only 50-50 for "Superfund" Legislation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the Surgeon General Julius B. Richmond, report, "Health Effects of Toxic Pollution: A Report from the Surgeon General," which considers toxic chemicals as "adding to the disease burden of the U.S. in a significant, although ill-defined, way." The reports ramifications are deliberated in view of future funding and legislation. (DS)

  16. Appropriate Technology: Value Adding Application for Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicklein, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate Technology (AT) concepts have been discussed throughout this past century by notable leaders and scholars such as Mohandas Gandhi and Julius Nyerere; however, the undisputed founder of the AT movement was E. F. Schumacher, a British economist who worked extensively in India and Burma during the 1950s and 60s. Schumacher encapsulated…

  17. East Meets West: Rome. Grade 6 Model Lesson for Unit V. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    This unit for sixth-grade students provides a fuller understanding of Julius Caesar's significance. Before students delve into the sample topic, they need an understanding of Roman values, lore, republican ideals, and structure of early Roman history. The first few activities in this lesson are to be taught prior to beginning the actual study of…

  18. Kaiser's Systematic Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a system of subject indexing developed by Julius Kaiser (1868-1927) which is based on "concretes" and "processes" to govern the form of subject headings and subdivisions. Elements of amplification, guides for the subject index, and criticism of Kaiser's systematic indexing are noted. Five sources are given. (EJS)

  19. The State of Black America 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewart, Janet, Ed.

    This book consists of 12 papers on current issues affecting black Americans. Titles (and authors) are the following: (1) "Black America 1986: An Overview" (John E. Jacob); (2) "The Law and Black Americans: Retreat from Civil Rights" (Julius L. Chambers); (3) "Taking Charge: An Approach to Making the Educational Problems of Blacks Comprehensible…

  20. The Rosenberg Trial: Uncovering the Layers of History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragsdale, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    The trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg on charges of conspiring to spy for the Soviet Union remains one of the defining moments of the Cold War era. The dramatic allegations of stolen atomic secrets and networks of Communist spies riveted the public's attention. The determination of government prosecutors reflected a widely shared belief that the…

  1. Control of Fretting Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    ADVISORY BOARD (7/1/77) Chairman: Mr. Julius J. Harwood Director, Materials Science Laboratory Engineering and Research Staff Ford Motor Company...VV. HOEPPNER, Professor, College of Engineering, University of Missouri. Columbia, Missouri ROBERT L. JOHNSON, Lubrication Consultant, Edina...San Antonio, Texas Liaison Representatives ROBERT C. BII L, U. S. Armv Air Mobilitv Research and Development. National Aeronautics and Space

  2. Total Quality Management: Implications for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.; Julius, Daniel J., Ed.

    This book contains 19 papers describing the implementation of Total Quality Management in a variety of higher education settings. Following a Foreword by Peter Likins and a Preface by Daniel J. Julius, the chapter titles and authors are: (1) "TQM: Implications for Higher Education--A Look Back to the Future" (Allan M. Hoffman and Randall…

  3. Sparking Interest in Nonfiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCully, Emily Arnold; Hopkinson, Deborah; Ryder, Joanne; Peters, Lisa Westberg; Arnosky, Jim; Geisert, Arthur; Krull, Kathleen; Murphy, Jim; Fritz, Jean; Stanley, Diane; Winter, Jeannette; Lester, Julius

    2000-01-01

    These 12 authors discuss how they write appealing nonfiction books for children: Emily Arnold McCully; Deborah Hopkinson; Joanne Ryder; Lisa Westberg Peters; Jim Arnosky; Arthur Geisert; Kathleen Krull; Jim Murphy; Jean Fritz; Diane Stanley; Jeanette Winter; and Julius Lester. Discussion includes research; illustrations; stylistic approach and…

  4. Reframing Alice's Restaurant: Reflections on Globalisation, Adult Education, and Transformative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etmanski, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    In the mid-1960s, the foundations of Participatory Research were being laid in Tanzania and around the world through the work of muckraking adult educators--President Julius Nyerere, Marja-Liisa Swantz, Orlando Fals Borda, Rajesh Tandon, Budd Hall and many more of their friends and colleagues. At the same time, a bunch of American kids were over…

  5. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  6. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity of the United States Senate, Ninety-Second Congress, First Session on Equal Educational Opportunity. Part II--Status of School Desegregation Law. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., June 15, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity.

    The hearings on the status of school desegregation law called several witnesses to testify: Mr. Julius Chambers (NAACP); Prof. Alexander M. Bickel (Yale Law School); Prof. Charles Hamilton (Columbia University); Prof. Owen Fiss (University of Chicago Law School); and, Senator George McGovern of South Dakota. The appendixes of the report contain…

  7. John Henry: Then and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikola-Lisa, W.

    1998-01-01

    Compares three children's books retelling the legend of John Henry: "John Henry: An American Legend" by Ezra Jack Keats (1965), "John Henry" by Julius Lester (1994), and "The Legend of John Henry" by Terry Small (1994). Differences in imagery, language, symbolism, and themes are discussed. (MAK)

  8. More than Blue Skies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granat, Diane

    2003-01-01

    Describes efforts to find and preserve some 5,000 Rosenwald schools. These buildings were funded with seed money during the 1920s from Julius Rosenwald, president of Sears, Roebuck and Company, and served as schools and public buildings for black residents in the rural South. (EV)

  9. Shakespeare on Film in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullin, Michael

    A course at the University of Illinois entitled "Shakespeare on Film" is discussed briefly, and an annotated list of Shakespeare films for the classroom teacher is provided in this paper. Thirteen films are listed: three versions of "Hamlet,""Henry V,""Julius Caesar," four versions of…

  10. Windows of War: A View on African Piracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    Since the beginning of state-sponsored navies, piracy suppression has been one of their major responsibilities-when Julius Caesar was captured by...ships to take his revenge.” 2 From the tactical level of Caesars ‟ revenge, this paper makes the 2 time travelled leap into the United States theory

  11. Sosigenes of Alexandria (c. 50 or 90 BC-?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Peripatetic Greek philosopher, born in Alexandria, astronomer and mathematician who advised Julius Caesar on calendar reform. He recommended a year of 365.25 days, and inserted extra days into the year 46 BC to bring the calendar back in register with the seasons. His account of Eudoxus's planetary system is the most complete surviving account....

  12. Scholarly Appraisals of Literary Works Taught in High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning, Stephen, Ed.; Sams, Henry W., Ed.

    Critical essays on eight literary works--four from the conventional literature curriculum and four less widely taught--are collected in this publication. Each o f the four standard selections--"Great Expectations,""Julius Caesar,""The Scarlet Letter," and "Macbeth"--is treated in two essays and a bibliography; and each of the less widely taught…

  13. The Monk's Tale: Nero's Nets and Caesar's Father -- An Inquiry into the Transformations of Classical Roman History in Medieval Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Martha S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the lack of consistent accuracy about historical figures in Chaucer's "Monk's Tale." The story of Nero fishing in the Tiber with golden nets is corroborated by many other ancient and medieval authors; however, the reference to Julius Caesar as being of lowly birth is peculiar only to Chaucer and a few medieval English authors.…

  14. Solving Multi-variate Polynomial Equations in a Finite Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xviii CHAPTER 1: Introduction The need to deliver secure information pervades society and daily life. Since Julius Caesar’s time...leaders have attempted to protect important communications from being read by unau- thorized people or governments. Caesar is credited with the first

  15. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteoric references in Ovid's Metamorphoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, A. D.; McBeath, A.

    2003-10-01

    Three sections of Ovid's Metamorphoses are examined, providing further information on meteoric beliefs in ancient Roman times. These include meteoric imagery among the portents associated with the death of Julius Caesar, which we mentioned previously from the works of William Shakespeare (McBeath and Gheorghe, 2003b).

  16. HISTORY OF ENGLISH, PART TWO. LANGUAGE CURRICULUM IV, STUDENT VERSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    A DISCUSSION OF THE HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE WAS CONTINUED (PART 1 IS ED 010 823) TO GIVE THE 10TH-GRADE STUDENT AN ACCURATE PICTURE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AT AN IMPORTANT STAGE IN ITS DEVELOPMENT. THE TIME CHOSEN WAS THE 17TH CENTURY, AND THE EXAMPLE WAS SHAKESPEARE'S "JULIUS CAESAR." THIS PLAY WAS CHOSEN AS AN EXAMPLE BECAUSE…

  17. Shakespeare: Kabuki-Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turse, Paul Leonard, Jr.

    This study examines the theatrical and thematic aspects of Kabuki and provides recommendations for using these aspects in the production of plays by Shakespeare. Sequences from "Hamlet,""Macbeth," and "Julius Caesar" were chosen because they are adaptable to Kabuki design. In order to help a director view these plays…

  18. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pencek, Bruce; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews of five books are presented. Topics are public property and private power (Hartog, 1983), essays on Julius Caesar (Blits, 1982), changes in the American political system (Shafer, 1983), the spiritual crisis in western civilizations (Harrington, 1983), and justice, pluralism and equality (Walzer, 1983). (JDH)

  19. The Comet Of 44 B.C. and Caesar's Funeral Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, John T.; Licht, A. Lewis

    1997-05-01

    Using insights from physics and classics, this book explores the social and cultural implications of the spectacular, daylight comet that was observed in 44 B.C. during the games that the future emperor Augustus gave in honor of the late Julius Caesar.

  20. Notes on the Emergence of Protestant Education in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, David W.

    2012-01-01

    The movement of the Germanic peoples from the barbaric state that the Romans found them in during the days of Julius Caesar to the highly civilized and educated condition of today is a long and complex history. At the heart of that development over the centuries was first the shift to Roman culture; then the slow adoption of Roman Catholicism and…

  1. Educators Weigh E-Textbook Cost Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomassini, Jason

    2012-01-01

    During the first-ever Digital Learning Day, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Federal Communications Commission chief Julius Genachowski unveiled an ambitious plan earlier this year to get schools to switch from print to digital textbooks by 2017. Dubbed the Digital Textbook Playbook, it's a recommendation for how schools could transform…

  2. Scaliger, Joseph (1540-1609)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    French mathematician who, in 1582, founded the system of the Julian day, a continuous reckoning of time which starts at midday GMT on 1 January 4713 BC. The system has the advantage that it is able to set aside issues of leap years, the different lengths of months, `lost' days at changes of calendars etc. The label `Julian' commemorates Scaliger's father Julius....

  3. Theoretical Developments in SUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifman, M.

    2009-01-01

    I am proud that I was personally acquainted with Julius Wess. We first met in 1999 when I was working on the Yuri Golfand Memorial Volume (The Many Faces of the Superworld, World Scientific, Singapore, 2000). I invited him to contribute, and he accepted this invitation with enthusiasm. After that, we met many times, mostly at various conferences in Germany and elsewhere. I was lucky to discuss with Julius questions of theoretical physics, and hear his recollections on how supersymmetry was born. In physics Julius was a visionary, who paved the way to generations of followers. In everyday life he was a kind and modest person, always ready to extend a helping hand to people who were in need of his help. I remember him telling me how concerned he was about the fate of theoretical physicists in Eastern Europe after the demise of communism. His ties with Israeli physicists bore a special character. I am honored by the opportunity to contribute an article to the Julius Wess Memorial Volume. I will review theoretical developments of the recent years in non-perturbative supersymmetry.

  4. School Law Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This law-related education teaching resource calls attention to civil rights in the school. Julius Menacker gives an overview of major national school legislation and the federal courts' roles in the constitutional areas of equal protection, freedom of expression, and due process. Aggie Alvez offers new perspectives on the constitutional,…

  5. The Loss of Jobs and the Rise of the Underclass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Norman

    1988-01-01

    William Julius Wilson's "The Truly Disadvantaged" blames the rise in the Black urban underclass on the rapid, systemic, and structural changes in the economy in the 1970s, which left Black unemployment at a spectacularly high rate. His insights should be acknowledged and his recommendations heeded. (BJV)

  6. South Africa: ANC Youth League President issues apology following conviction for hate speech.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shalini

    2011-10-01

    In June 2011, fifteen months after he had been found guilty of hate speech and discrimination, African National Congress (ANC)Youth President Julius issued a formal apology and agreed to pay a R50,000 (CAN$7,120) fine that was part of the conviction.

  7. Our Litigious Schools: A Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menacker, Julius; Wynne, Edward A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents opposing viewpoints on how liberal court decisions that protect student rights have affected adult authority and youth behavior: Julius Menacker argues that social trends unrelated to court decisions have had a greater effect on delinquency, and Edward Wynne responds that generally, recent changes in court decisions have had negative…

  8. How Have Deployments During the War on Terrorism Affected Reenlistment?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2007-001, 2007. Ajzen , Icek , “From Intentions to Actions: A Theory of Planned Behavior,” in Julius Kuhl and Jürgen Beckmann, eds., Action Control: From...the theory of planned behavior in social psychology ( Ajzen , 1985, 1991). In this formulation, the individual has behavioral beliefs about the

  9. Teacher Negotiations and Solutions to Impasse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Sidney P., Ed.

    This document contains edited presentations given during a conference on teacher negotiations and solutions to impasse in Rhode Island. The principal speakers were Henry J. Nardone, chairman of the Elementary and Secondary Education Sub-Committee of the Board of Regents; Julius C. Michaelson, Attorney General for Rhode Island; and Dr. Peter…

  10. Command History for 1991 (Naval Personnel Research and Development Center)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Awards 35 Years Ben Garcia Gene Stout 30 Years Jim Julius Ramona Mouzon Hal Rosen 32 25 Years Jim Chadbourne Bob Harris Dorothy Martin Jan Reynolds 20...Years Craig Borland* Mike Flaningam 15 Years Mark Chipman Carmen Fendelman Murray Rowe 10 Years James Apple Jessie Grier Ana Guerrero* Loralee Hartmann

  11. Willingness to Communicate and Action Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntyre, Peter D.; Doucette, Jesslyn

    2010-01-01

    Being willing to communicate is part of becoming fluent in a second language, which often is the ultimate goal of L2 learners. Julius Kuhl's theory of action control is introduced as an expansion of the conceptual framework for the study of Willingness to Communicate. Kuhl proposed three key concepts, preoccupation, volatility, and hesitation,…

  12. Aesthetic Patterning of Verbal Art and the Performance-Centered Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Elizabeth C.

    An artistic verbal performance is something more than words, yet most critical commentary on this genre focuses on the word, on the linguistic level. A methodology for making performance-centered texts is described based on the performance of "Stagolee," a story that originated from Julius Lester's book, "Black Folktales." A…

  13. Racemization of Isobornyl Chloride via Carbocations: A Nonclassical Look at a Classic Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rzepa, Henry S.; Allan, Charlotte S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of carbonium ions as intermediates in chemical reaction mechanisms derives from the early work of Julius Stieglitz and the more famous Hans Meerwein, the latter studying the racemization of isobornyl chloride when treated with Lewis acids. This review analyzes how key mechanistic concepts for this reaction evolved and gives the…

  14. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch Debate over Communism, 1940-1955.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Daniel W.

    The liberal bias of the "St. Louis Post-Dispatch" has been well-documented, but memoranda between editor-publisher Joseph Pulitzer II and two of his key editors, Julius Klyman and Irving Dilliard, reveal a tug-of-war over the newspaper's liberal treatment of communism from 1940 to 1955. Klyman, editor of the "Pictures"…

  15. Distorting the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klehr, Harvey

    2004-01-01

    Many historians on the left are unwilling to renounce communism and the agents in this country who ran its insidious errands. Despite damning evidence from Soviet archives, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, Alger Hiss, and other traitors remain the darlings of many leaders of the profession. Harvey Klehr documents how, in journals and recent textbooks,…

  16. Modern Piracy: The Impact on Maritime Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    consequences. There are accounts of piracy incidents as far back as 2000 B.C. amongst the Phoenicians and Greeks.2 It is rumored, that in 75 B.C. Julius ... Caesar was captured by pirates, only to escape and then return to crucify his captors.3 Piracy has threatened maritime transportation since the

  17. Remedial Investigation Report, Presidio Main Installation, Presidio of San Francisco. Volume 5: Figures 7-15

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    Composita ) LFISS01 I (Com/pasite,~ -~== -(, FILL SITEl 1N BOUNDARY - LFlTP03 JULIUS LF2SS03 DEPTH 3.0’ KAHN DEPTH 0.0 0 50 LL 2 LITHOLOGY FILL jRY...L.. ’ 4.-" I ’, -o,-". I - - S-’ " 4.. L FISS01 (Composite) LFISS01 ’/ I ( Composita ! FILL SITE 1 BOUNDARY LF 1TP03 S "lTP0 JULIUS DEPTH 3.0’ KAHN...0.120cU LF4SS01 ( Composita ) LANDFILL 4 DET 10.0’ Clrae < 0.088 DEPT -an Chodae - -- - - - --0- *% 6 / IE ,,,/,. LF4TP01 - OCETAIOSO FDPH1.0EPH, .’U

  18. Visible and Infrared Obscuration Effects of Ice Fog

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Huntsville, AL 35812 US Army Missile Command ATTN: DRSMI-RHC (Dr. Julius Q. Lilly) Nichols Research Corporation Redstone Arsenal, AL 35809 ATTN: Dr. Lary W...GTE Products Corporation ATTN: Technical Reports Library Commander P.O. Box 205 US Army Yuma Provinq Ground Mountain View, CA 94042 ATTN: STEYP-MSA-TL...Bldg 2105 Sylvania Systems Group Yuma, AZ 85364 Western Division GTE Products Corporation Northrop Corporation ATTN: Mr. Lee W. Carrier Electro

  19. Auftragstaktik: We Can’t Get There from Here

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-04

    Harwood Title of Monograph: Auftragataktik: We Can’t Get There From Here Approved by: 1c6v,) Monograph Director Dr, Robert Me Eps%,ein, Ph.D. Director...statement. Lieutenant General Julius Becton, Jr. was in agreement with this when he said that "unfortunately, across the board, the system does not...Former Chief of Staff, General Edward C, Mayer , recognized the centralized control which exists in the Army. He further recognized that AirLand battle

  20. Homosexuality and the U.S. Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    was dismissed in district court...U.S. Surgeon General Julius Richmond declared that homosexuality per se no longer was viewed by the Public Health...decision was arbitrary and unjustified." Steven Mayer , an attorney representing Preston, made the following statement concerning the Army’s treatment of...supported by Reagan, Ford and Carter "which would allow the firing of homosexual teachers in the California state school system," Robert Reilly stated "the

  1. Placing US Air Force Information Technology Investment Under the "Nanoscope" A Clear Vision of Nanotechnology’s Impact on Computing in 2030

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    the Bottom.” Lecture . American Physical Society, California Institute of Technology, CA, 29 December 1959. http://www.zyvex.com/nanotech...including the 2000 Julius Springer Award for Applied Physics , the 2000 Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology, the Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award and the...go back to December 1959 when Dr. Richard Feynman gave a landmark lecture titled “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom.” This talk to the American

  2. Buying Influence: The Relationship of Incentives and Values

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Monterey, CA 93943-5000 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING N/A AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY...New York: Oxford University Press, 2013), 66. 25 Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky “Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision Under Risk...Policy Analysis, edited by Robert H. Haveman and Julius Margolis. Oakland, CA : University of California Press, 1970. Bandura, Albert. “Self-Efficacy

  3. An Overview of the Nigel Text Generation Grammar.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    in systemic linguistics (introduced by Halliday ), the grammar provides for three relatively independent kinds of specification of each syntactic unit... Linguistics and Social Interaction, Julius Groos Verlag Heidelberg and Exeter University, 1980. [ Halliday 76a] Halliday , M. A. K., and R. Hasan, Cohesion in...University Press, London, 1976. [ Halliday 81] Halliday , M.A.K., and J. R. Martin (eds.), Readings in Systemic Linguistics , Batsford, London, 1981

  4. Inquiry Semantics: A Functional Semantics of Natural Language Grammar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    Cognitive Linguistics and Social Interaction, Julius Groos Verlag and Exeter Univesty Proms, 1980. (Hallday 761 Halliday , M. A. K., System and Function...Engi ih Language Series, Title No. 9. [ Halliday 6 Martin 81] Halliday , MAK., and J. R. Martin (eds.), Readings In Systemic Linguistics , Batetord, London...reprint of a paper that appears In the proceedings of the First Annual Conference ofF the Association for Computational Linguistics , held in Pisa

  5. Long Term Psychological and Physical Effects of the POW Experience: A Review of the Literature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-01

    are seen along ,i single dimension in which somatic and psychodynamic factors are intertwined. The Isolation of Cause and Effect ...AD-A014 080 LONG TERM PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF THE POW EXPERIENCE: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE Julius Segal Naval Health Research...DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 248072 LONG-TERM PSVCHOLOSiCAL AND PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF THE POW EXPERIENCE: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE 0 0 **! H D ,=35 J

  6. Creating, Using and Updating Thesauri Files for AutoMap and ORA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-26

    connected with each other, we summarize the Julius Caesar plot very briefly. Brutus (Agent) and other senators (Roles) agree that Rome (Location) would be...administration, but also the plan to kill Caesar . 5. Organizations are collectives of people that try to reach a common goal. An Organization could be a specific...a better place without Caesar (Belief). To kill Caesar (Task) they form a group of assassins (Organization). To accomplish their task they need to

  7. The Principles of War Reconsidered

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Africanus, Julius Caesar , Genghis Khan, Suleiman the Magnificent, Jomini, Douhet, and Giap (John M. Collins, Military Strategy: Principles, Practices...Alexander, Hannibal and Caesar have all acted on the same principles. To keep your forces united, to be vulnerable at no point, to bear down with...and circumstances. Originally, the principles were not expressed by the warriors (most simply did not have the time to write – Caesar being a notable

  8. Bacterial Chemotaxis: The Early Years of Molecular Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hazelbauer, Gerald L.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the early years of molecular studies of bacterial chemotaxis and motility, beginning in the 1960s with Julius Adler's pioneering work. It describes key observations that established the field and made bacterial chemotaxis a paradigm for the molecular understanding of biological signaling. Consideration of those early years includes aspects of science seldom described in journals: the accidental findings, personal interactions, and scientific culture that often drive scientific progress. PMID:22994495

  9. A Guide to the Microform Collections of the USMA Library.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    see Griffing, Elizabeth ) Sargent, Winthrop. Papers, 1789-1820. (7 reels) Schuyler , Phillip John, Maj Gen, Orderly books, Continental Army, June 1775...Buell, Herbert L. Historical documents relating to the Corps. of Engineers, 1801-1819. (3 reels) Burt, Elizabeth J. Papers, 1797-1917. Carleton, Guy...Maps and Correspondence, 1775. Cowdry, Nathaniel. Diary, 27 Jul 1780-15 Oct 1780. (See Griffing, Elizabeth ) Deming, Julius. Accounts, 1778-1780

  10. Analogies and China: U.S. Grand Strategy and the Pivot to Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-14

    when Julius Caesar paused before crossing the Rubicon River in northern Italy towards Rome with his legions. By Roman law, no general could cross the...Most Favored Nation status with human rights reform in China. CCP officials did not yield and the Clinton administration eventually dropped its stance...framing the challenge of China. The answer to the question, “What does China want?” must be discerned in a different way. For thirty years now

  11. The Mayer-Joule Principle: The Foundation of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Ronald; Leff, Harvey S.

    2011-11-01

    To most students today the mechanical equivalent of heat, called the Mayer-Joule principle, is simply a way to convert from calories to joules and vice versa. However, in linking work and heat—once thought to be disjointed concepts—it goes far beyond unit conversion. Heat had eluded understanding for two centuries after Galileo Galilei constructed an early thermometer. Independently, Julius Robert Mayer and James Prescott Joule found the connection between heat and work, the Mayer-Joule principle.

  12. On the origin of the cosmic elements and the nuclear history of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi; Asplund, Martin; Charbonel, Corinne; Cherchneff, Isabelle; Diehl, Roland; Korn, Andreas; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-08-01

    The quest for the energy source of stars, capable of maintaining their long-lasting brightness, has puzzled physicists during centuries. Early suggestions, due to Julius R. von Mayer, John James Waterson, Hermann von Helmholtz, and William Thomson (Lord Kelvin), among others, relied on the conversion of gravitational potential energy into heat. However, the age of the Sun inferred in this framework was only a few million years, a value clearly at odds with estimates based on geological records.

  13. [Historical development of anthropology in Basel].

    PubMed

    Bay, R

    1986-12-01

    The author reports on the history of physical anthropology in Basel (Switzerland). The anthropological research activities of Carl Gustav Jung (1794-1864), Wilhelm His-Vischer (1831-1904), Ludwig Rütimeyer (1825-1895), Julius Kollmann (1834-1918), Paul and Fritz Sarasin (P.: 1856-1924; F.: 1859-1942), Felix Speiser (1880-1949) and the author himself (b. 1909) are described in detail.

  14. Encyclopedia of Explosives and Related Items. Volume 7. H2 to Lysol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    as its effect upon the insurance rate. It dication of the risk involved in handling or may well be that in the final analysis, the cost of storing... MANAGEMENT SCIENCE ASSOCIATES U.S. ARMY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND TACOM, ARDEC WARHEADS, ENERGETICS AND COMBAT SUPPORT CENTER PICATINNY ARSENAL...Julius Roth, principal scientist at Management Science Associates, Los Altos, California, contributed significantly in the literature searching and

  15. [Images of epilepsy in Shakespeare].

    PubMed

    Breuer, Horst

    2002-01-01

    Epilepsy and the "falling sickness" are mentioned three times in Shakespeare, in Julius Caesar, I.ii, Othello, IV.i., and figuratively in King Lear, II.ii. The present article surveys these passages in the context of modern research findings, literary as well as medico-historical. It adds further material from Renaissance texts and concludes that epilepsy is an omnibus term for a variety of symptoms and pathological conditions, and that Shakespeare's idea of epilepsy is closer to popular stereotypes than has hitherto been assumed.

  16. [Private clinics in Nuremberg in the 19th and 20th century].

    PubMed

    Vasold, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    As a consequence of the industrialization German cities grew very rapidly during the 19th century. Nuremberg reached the number of 100 000 in 1881. Although that city had a large Municipality Hospital (since 1845), a number of specialized private hospitals was founded. Julius Cnopf, a doctor from Nuremberg, founded a children's hospital, one of the first children's hospitals in Germany. The Nuremberg Muncipality Hospital had more than 1000 beds before 1914 and many more than 2000 after 1945, for this reason the number of private owned hospitals remained rather small. Nonetheless were these small and highly specialized hospitals quite important for the city population of Nuremberg.

  17. Piracy the Somali Way

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    his History of the Peloponnesian War, that Minos, the King of Crete, “first possessed a navy for suppression of piracy.”3 In 75 B.C. Julius Caesar was...kidnapped for ransom by pirates operating on the Mediterranean. Legend has it that Caesar was insulted by the ransom of 20 talents and instructed...the pirates to raise their demand to 50. Caesar also promised the pirates when freed he would hunt them down. The ransom was paid and good to the

  18. Combinatorics of the christian calendar (French Title: Combinatoire du calendrier chretien)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoli, J.

    2005-09-01

    The main goal of the Roman calendar of Julius Caesar was to fix the dates of the seasons by introducing leap years. Christians adopted this calendar, but associated to it the Judaic cycle of the week for reference to some events of Christ's life. This paper defines some problems which arose from the empiric association of the two chronological scales. Solutions to these problems can be obtained by exhaustive computer generated enumeration. Here we will solve these problems by matrix analysis which displays all arithmetical operations involved thereby making the solutions verifiable.

  19. Venus - Crater Aurelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This Magellan image shows a complex crater, 31.9 kilometers (20 miles) in diameter with a circular rim, terraced walls, and central peaks, located at 20.3 degrees north latitude and 331.8 degrees east longitude. Several unusual features are evidenced in this image: large dark surface up range from the crater; lobate flows emanating from crater ejecta, and very radar-bright ejecta and floor. Aurelia has been proposed to the International Astronomical Union, Subcommittee of Planetary Nomenclature as a candidate name. Aurelia is the mother of Julius Caesar.

  20. The reconstructive microsurgery ladder in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Tintle, Scott M; Levin, L Scott

    2013-03-01

    Since the advent of the operating microscope by Julius Jacobson in 1960, reconstructive microsurgery has become an integral part of extremity reconstruction and orthopaedics. During World War I, with the influx of severe extremity trauma Harold Gillies introduced the concept of the reconstructive ladder for wound closure. The concept of the reconstructive ladder goes from simple to complex means of attaining wound closure. Over the last half century microsurgery has continued to evolve and progress. We now have a microsurgical reconstructive ladder. The microsurgical reconstruction ladder is based upon the early work on revascularization and replantation extending through the procedures that are described in this article.

  1. My Continuing Evolution as a Surgeon-Scientist: A Decade after the Jacobson Promising Investigator Award.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Edith

    2017-01-01

    THE SECOND JOAN L AND JULIUS H JACOBSON PROMISING INVESTIGATOR AWARDEE, EDITH TZENG MD, FACS: In 2005, the Surgical Research Committee of the American College of Surgeons was tasked with selecting the recipient of a newly established award, "The Joan L and Julius H Jacobson Promising Investigator Award." According to the Jacobsons, the award funded by Dr Jacobson should be given at least once every 2 years to a surgeon investigator at "the tipping point," who can demonstrate that his or her research shows the promise of leading to a significant contribution to the practice of surgery and patient safety. Every year, the Surgical Research Committee receives many excellent nominations and has the difficult task of selecting one awardee. The first awardee was Michael Longaker MD, FACS, who 10 years later reflected on the award and the impact it had on his career.(1) This year, Edith Tzeng, MD, FACS, the second Jacobson awardee, reflects on her 10-year journey after receiving the award. Dr Tzeng is now a national and international figure in the field of vascular surgery and has studied the effect of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide on intimal hyperplasia. Kamal MF Itani, MD, FACS and Leigh Neumayer, MD, FACS, on behalf of the Surgical Research Committee of the American College of Surgeons.

  2. Special regulatory T cell review: The suppression problem!

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The concept of T-cell mediated suppression evolved more than 30 years ago. At that time it spawned many claims that have not stood the test of time. The rediscovery of suppression phenomena and regulatory T cells over the past 15 years created schizophrenic responses amongst immunologists. Some claimed that the new proponents of suppression were, once again, bringing immunology into disrepute, whilst others have embraced the field with great enthusiasm and novel approaches to clarification. Without faithful repetition of the "old" experiments, it is difficult to establish what was right and what was wrong. Nevertheless, immunologists must now accept that a good number of the old claims were overstated, and reflected poor scientific discipline. "I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know" Shakespeare. Julius Caesar Act 3, Scene 2.

  3. Berengario da Carpi.

    PubMed

    De Santo, N G; Bisaccia, C; De Santo, L S; De Santo, R M; Di Leo, V A; Papalia, T; Cirillo, M; Touwaide, A

    1999-01-01

    Berengario da Carpi was magister of anatomy and surgery at the University of Bologna from 1502 to 1527. Eustachio and Falloppia defined him as 'the restaurator of anatomy'. He was a great surgeon, anatomist and physician of illustrious patients including Lorenzo II dei Medici, Giovanni dalle Bande Nere, Galeazzo Pallavicini, Cardinal Colonna, and Alessandro Soderini. He had strong links to the intellectuals of his time (Forni, Bonamici, Manuzio, Pomponazzi) as well as with the Medici family. He was respected by the Popes Julius II, Leo X and Clement VII. His main contributions are the Isogogae Breves, De Fractura calvae sive cranei, and the illustrated Commentaria on the Anatomy of Mondino de Liucci, a textbook utilized for more than 200 years, which Berengario aimed to restore to its initial text. The Commentaria constitutes the material for the last part of this paper which concludes with a personal translation of some passages on 'The kidney', where the author gives poignant examples of experimental ingenuity.

  4. Apollo 14 Road Trip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleli, P.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) In January-February 1971, five astronomy enthusiasts, Dennis Milon, Alan Rowher, Sal LaRiccia, Mike Mattei, and Paul Valleli, drove from New Haven, Connecticut, to the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida. They joined with ALPO Jupiter Recorder Julius Benton in Atlanta. After several stops along the way, the six arrived at the Apollo 14 launch site to observe pre-launch activity, met NASA personnel, and toured various facilities. On launch day, thanks to press passes provided by Dennis Milon who was there as the official photojournalist for Sky & Telescope, they met the Apollo crew and witnessed the launch. On the return trip, they made time to meet Mike Mattei's new girlfriend, Janet Akyü;z, who was working on her Master's at Leander-McCormick Observatory in Charlottesville, Virginia. Janet gave the six men a tour of the observatory, including the the 26-inch Clark Telescope.

  5. Special regulatory T cell review: The suppression problem!

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The concept of T-cell mediated suppression evolved more than 30 years ago. At that time it spawned many claims that have not stood the test of time. The rediscovery of suppression phenomena and regulatory T cells over the past 15 years created schizophrenic responses amongst immunologists. Some claimed that the new proponents of suppression were, once again, bringing immunology into disrepute, whilst others have embraced the field with great enthusiasm and novel approaches to clarification. Without faithful repetition of the “old” experiments, it is difficult to establish what was right and what was wrong. Nevertheless, immunologists must now accept that a good number of the old claims were overstated, and reflected poor scientific discipline. “I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know” Shakespeare. Julius Caesar Act 3, Scene 2. PMID:18154612

  6. Plant sulfur nutrition: From Sachs to Big Data

    PubMed Central

    Kopriva, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Together with water and carbon dioxide plants require 14 essential mineral nutrients to finish their life cycle. The research in plant nutrition can be traced back to Julius Sachs, who was the first to experimentally prove the essentiality of mineral nutrients for plants. Among those elements Sachs showed to be essential is sulfur. Plant sulfur nutrition has been not as extensively studied as the nutrition of nitrogen and phosphate, probably because sulfur was not limiting for agriculture. However, with the reduction of atmospheric sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur deficiency has become common. The research in sulfur nutrition has changed over the years from using yeast and algae as experimental material to adopting Arabidopsis as the plant model as well as from simple biochemical measurements of individual parameters to system biology. Here the evolution of sulfur research from the times of Sachs to the current Big Data is outlined. PMID:26305261

  7. The biochemistry of memory.

    PubMed

    Stock, Jeffry B; Zhang, Sherry

    2013-09-09

    Almost fifty years ago, Julius Adler initiated a program of research to gain insights into the basic biochemistry of intelligent behavior by studying the molecular mechanisms that underlie the chemotactic responses of Escherichia coli. All living organisms share elements of a common biochemistry for metabolism, growth and heredity - why not intelligence? Neurobiologists have demonstrated that this is the case for nervous systems in animals ranging from worms to man. Motile unicellular organisms such as E. coli exhibit rudimentary behaviors that can be loosely described in terms of cognitive phenomena such as memory and learning. Adler's initiative at least raised the prospect that, because of the numerous experimental advantages provided by E. coli, it would be the first organism whose behavior could be understood at molecular resolution.

  8. 'Magic coins' and 'magic squares': the discovery of astrological sigils in the Oldenburg Letters.

    PubMed

    Roos, Anna Marie

    2008-09-20

    Enclosed in a 1673 letter to Henry Oldenburg were two drawings of a series of astrological sigils, coins and amulets from the collection of Strasbourg mathematician Julius Reichelt (1637-1719). As portrayals of particular medieval and early modern sigils are relatively rare, this paper will analyse the role of these medals in medieval and early modern medicine, the logic behind their perceived efficacy, and their significance in early modern astrological and cabalistic practice. I shall also demonstrate their change in status in the late seventeenth century from potent magical healing amulets tied to the mysteries of the heavens to objects kept in a cabinet for curiosos. The evolving perception of the purpose of sigils mirrored changing early modem beliefs in the occult influences of the heavens upon the body and the natural world, as well as the growing interests among virtuosi in collecting, numismatics and antiquities.

  9. Hydrotherapeutic institutions in the Austro-Hungarian health resort Abbazia / Opatija owned by the South Railways Company.

    PubMed

    Fischinger, Aleš; Fischinger, Janez; Fischinger, Duša

    2015-01-01

    The South Railways Company built two hydrotherapeutic institutions Warm baths (Warmbade-Pavillion) and Hydrotherapeutic Institution (Hydropatische Anstalt) in the Angiolina Park in Opatija in 1884. The both institutions were in operation till 1904. Due to the deterioration of the both hydrotherapeutic institutions and increasing number of guests (in 1899 - 4009 guests, in 1902 - 19.001 guests) the South Railways Company built in 1902-1904 new modern hydrotherapeutic treatment institution the Covered Bath of the Archduke Ludwig Viktor (Erherzog Ludwig Viktor Bad). The leading physician (dirigierender Arzt) of these institutions was Professor Dr. Julius Glax, who added the thalassotherapy to the balneology. In 1907 the post of the leading physician of the Covered Bath of the Archduke Ludvig Victor (Erherzog Ludwig Viktor Bad) took over Dr. Albert Nussbaum. The Covered Bath of the Archduke Ludvig Victor institution was operating till 1919, when it was transformed into a hotel.

  10. History of the cushing reflex.

    PubMed

    Fodstad, Harald; Kelly, Patrick J; Buchfelder, Michael

    2006-11-01

    Increasing systolic and pulse pressure with bradycardia and respiratory irregularity are signs of increased intracranial pressure, leading to cerebral herniation and fatal brainstem compression. This phenomenon, the vasopressor response, is generally known as the Cushing reflex based on Harvey Cushing's experimental work in Europe in 1901 and 1902. However, similar experiments had been carried out decades earlier by others, notably Paul Cramer, Ernst von Bergmann, Ernst von Leyden, Georg Althann, Friedrich Jolly, Friedrich Pagenstecher, Henri Duret, Bernard Naunyn, and Julius Schreiber. Cushing initially failed to give credit to the work of these predecessors. Nonetheless, he studied the brain's reaction to compression more carefully than previous researchers and offered an improved explanation of the pathophysiology of the phenomenon named after him.

  11. Perception of the Relevance of Organic Chemistry in a German Pharmacy Students' Course.

    PubMed

    Wehle, Sarah; Decker, Michael

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To investigate German pharmacy students' attitudes toward the relevance of organic chemistry training in Julius Maximilian University (JMU) of Würzburg with regard to subsequent courses in the curricula and in later prospective career options. Methods. Surveys were conducted in the second-year organic chemistry course (50 participants) as well as during the third-year and fourth-year lecture cycle on medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry (66 participants) in 2014. Results. Students' attitudes were surprisingly consistent throughout the progress of the degree course. Students considered organic chemistry very relevant to the pharmacy study program (95% junior and 97% senior students), and of importance for their future pharmacy program (88% junior and 94% senior students). With regard to prospective career options, the perceived relevance was considerably lower and attitudes were less homogenous. Conclusions. German pharmacy students at JMU Würzburg consider organic chemistry of high relevance for medicinal chemistry and other courses in JMU's pharmacy program.

  12. Paul Ehrlich and the Early History of Granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Kay, A Barry

    2016-08-01

    Paul Ehrlich's techniques, published between 1879 and 1880, for staining blood films using coal tar dyes, and his method of differential blood cell counting, ended years of speculation regarding the classification of white cells. Acidic and basic dyes had allowed him to recognize eosinophil and basophil granules, respectively, work that was a direct continuation of his discovery of the tissue mast cell described in his doctoral thesis. Ehrlich went on to develop neutral dyes that identified epsilon granules in neutrophils ("cells with polymorphous nuclei"). He also speculated, for the most part correctly, on the formation, function, and fate of blood neutrophils and eosinophils. Before Ehrlich, a number of important observations had been made on white cells and their role in health and disease. Among the most notable were William Hewson's studies of blood and lymph; the early descriptions of leukemia by Alfred Donné, John Hughes Bennett, Rudolf Virchow, and others; as well as seminal observations on inflammation by William Addison, Friedrich von Recklinghausen, and Julius Cohnheim. Eosinophils were almost certainly recognized previously by others. In 1846, Thomas Wharton Jones (1808-1891) described "granule blood-cells" in several species including humans. The term "granule cell" had also been used by Julius Vogel (1814-1880), who had previously observed similar cells in inflammatory exudates. Vogel, in turn, was aware of the work of Gottlieb Gluge (1812-1898), who had observed "compound inflammatory globules" in pus and serum that resembled eosinophils. Almost 20 years before Ehrlich developed his staining methods, Max Johann Schultze (1825-1874) performed functional experiments on fine and coarse granular cells using a warm stage microscopic technique and showed they had amoeboid movement and phagocytic abilities. Despite these earlier observations, it was Ehrlich's use of stains that heralded the modern era of studies of leukocyte biology and pathology.

  13. Representations of epilepsy on the stage: From the Greeks to the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Michael; Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy is a disorder that has been used by dramatists in various ways over the ages and therefore highlights the views of the disorder as people saw it at the time the plays were written and performed. In the 6th century BC, links between tragedy and epilepsy were developed by Greek playwrights, especially Euripides, in Iphigenia among the Taureans and Heracles where epilepsy and madness associated with extreme violence occur together. Both Heracles and Orestes have episodes after a long period of physical exhaustion and nutritional deprivation. During the Renaissance, Shakespeare wrote plays featuring different neurological disorders, including epilepsy. Epilepsy plays a crucial part in the stories of Julius Caesar and Othello. Julius Caesar is a play about politics, and Caesar's epilepsy is used to illustrate his weakness and vulnerability which stigmatizes him and leads to his assassination. Othello is a play about jealousy, and Othello, an outsider, is stigmatized by his color, his weakness, and his 'seizures' as a form of demonic possession. In modern times, Night Mother portrays the hard life of Jessie, who lives with her mother. Jessie has no friends, her father has abandoned the family, and she has no privacy and is ashamed. Stigma and social pressures lead her to commit suicide. Henry James' novella, The Turn of the Screw, portrays a governess with dream-like states, déjà vu, and loss of temporal awareness who has been sent to the country to look after two small children and ends up killing one. This novella was turned into an opera by Benjamin Britten. Most recently, performance art has been portraying epilepsy as the reality of a personally provoked seizure. Both Allan Sutherland and Rita Marcalo have purposely provoked themselves to have a seizure in front of an audience. They do this to show that seizures are just one disability. Whether this provokes stigma in audiences is unknown. Whether the performance artists understand the potential for

  14. Feast or famine: the sympathetic nervous system response to nutrient intake.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    : 1. The use of tritiated norepinephrine (NE) to measure the turnover rate of NE in sympathetically innervated organs was pioneered in the laboratory of Julius Axelrod. This technique provides an organ specific assessment of sympathetic activity, integrated over a 24 h period, in free living laboratory animals. As such it has proved useful in estimating changes in sympathetic outflow in different physiologic and patho-physiologic states. 2. Studies employing NE turnover techniques in laboratory rodents have demonstrated conclusively that fasting suppresses and overfeeding stimulates the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). These changes in sympathetic activity also occur in humans. 3. Diet-induced changes in SNS activity are regulated by insulin-mediated glucose uptake and metabolism in central neurons sensitive to insulin and located anatomically in the ventro-medial hypothalamus. The regulation is imposed by descending inhibition of tonically active sympathetic brainstem centers. 4. Diet-induced changes in SNS activity mediate changes in energy production known as dietary thermogenesis. The capacity for dietary thermogenesis serves as a potential buffer against weight gain.5. Insulin stimulated SNS activity contributes to obesity-related hypertension. The insulin resistance of obesity, and consequent hyperinsulinemia, drives sympathetically mediated thermogenesis, restoring energy balance at the expense of SNS over activity. The association of obesity and hypertension, therefore, may be the unintended consequence of mechanisms recruited in the obese to limit further weight gain.

  15. Listening to the whispers of matter through Arabic hermeticism: new studies on The Book of the Treasure of Alexander.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Goldfarb, Ana Maria; Jubran, Safa Abou Chahla

    2008-07-01

    The Jabirian Corpus refers to the K. Thahirat Al-'Iskandar, "The Book of the Treasure of Alexander" (hereafter BTA), as one of several forgeries suggesting that alchemical secrets were hidden in inscriptions in various places. The book was neglected until 1926, when Julius Ruska discussed it in his work on the Emerald Tablet, placing the BTA within the literature related to the development of Arabic alchemy. His preliminary study became an essential reference and encouraged many scholars to work on the BTA in the following decades. Some years ago, we completed the first translation of the BTA into a Western language. The work was based on the acephalous Escorial manuscript, which we identified as a fourteenth-century copy of the BTA. This manuscript is peculiar, as part of it is encoded. After finishing our translation, we started to establish the text of the BTA. At present, the text is in process of fixation--to be followed by textual criticism--and has been the main focus of a thorough study of ours on medieval hermeticism and alchemy. A sample of the work currently in progress is presented in this paper: an analysis of the variations between different manuscripts along with a study and English translation of its alchemical chapter.

  16. The INQUA Loess Commission as a Central European Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Ian; Markovic, Slobodan; O'Hara-Dhand, Ken

    2010-03-01

    The International Union of Quaternary Research (INQUA) organized the study and consideration of the Quaternary Period (the last 2.6 million years in Earth's history) via a set of commissions, sub-commissions, working groups, projects and programmes. One of the most successful and best records was the Loess Commission (LC) which functioned assub-commission and then commission from 1961 to 2003, resulting in 40 years of useful activity. The history of the LC can be divided into three phases: 1, from 1961-1977 when the President was Julius Fink; 2, from 1977-1991, with President Marton Pecsi; 3, from 1991-2003 with Presidents An Zhi-Sheng and Ian Smalley. Fink, from Vienna, and Pecsi, from Budapest, gave the LC a distinctly Central European aspect. The nature of loess in Central Europe influenced the nature of the LC but the settings for phases 1 and 2 were quite distinct. Phase 1 was a small scale academic operation, carried out in German. As phase 2 began in 1977 the scope expanded and Central Europe became a base for worldwide loess studies. where the LC language changed to English. Phase 2 was run from a National Geographical Institute and demonstrated a different approach to loess research, although the basic programmes of continent-wide mapping and stratigraphy remained the same. The Commission benefited from this change of style and emphasis. In phase 3 the administration moved away from Central Europe but the Finkian ethos remained solid.

  17. Recent Progress in the Discovery and Development of TRPA1 Modulators.

    PubMed

    Skerratt, S

    2017-01-01

    TRPA1 is a well-validated therapeutic target in areas of high unmet medical need that include pain and respiratory disorders. The human genetic rationale for TRPA1 as a pain target is provided by a study describing a rare gain-of-function mutation in TRPA1, causing familial episodic pain syndrome. There is a growing interest in the TRPA1 field, with many pharmaceutical companies reporting the discovery of TRPA1 chemical matter; however, GRC 17536 remains to date the only TRPA1 antagonist to have completed Phase IIa studies. A key issue in the progression of TRPA1 programmes is the identification of high-quality orally bioavailable molecules. Most published TRPA1 ligands are commonly not suitable for clinical progression due to low lipophilic efficiency and/or poor absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and pharmaceutical properties. The recent TRPA1 cryogenic electron microscopy structure from the Cheng and Julius labs determined the structure of full-length human TRPA1 at up to 4Å resolution in the presence of TRPA1 ligands. This ground-breaking science paves the way to enable structure-based drug design within the TRPA1 field.

  18. Demetrios Eginitis: Restorer of the Athens Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, E. Th.; Manimanis, V. N.; Mantarakis, P.

    2007-07-01

    Demetrios Eginitis (1862-1934), one of the most eminent modern Greek astronomers, directed the National Observatory of Athens for 44 years (1890-1933). He was the fourth director since its founding, and was responsible for the restoration and modernization of the Observatory, which was in a state of inactivity after the death of Julius Schmidt in 1884. Eginitis ordered the purchase of modern instruments, educated the personnel, enriched the library with necessary and up-to-date books and arranged for new buildings to be built to house new telescopes and accommodate the personnel. Moreover, he divided the National Observatory of Athens into three separate Departments: the Astronomical, the Meteorological and the Geodynamic. D. Eginitis' contribution to Greek society went beyond his astronomical accomplishments. He was instrumental in the adoption of the Eastern European time zone for local time in Greece, and he succeeded in changing the official calendar from the Julian to the Gregorian. Having served twice as Minister of Education, he created many schools, founded the Academy of Athens and the Experimental School of the University of Athens. Eginitis was fluent in French, German and English, and therefore was the official representative of his country in numerous international conferences and councils.

  19. Production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against the Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa16.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamadou-Charfi, Dorra; Sauer, Annette Juliane; Abdelkafi-Mesrati, Lobna; Jaoua, Samir; Stephan, Dietrich

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to establish a quantitative determination of the vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3A from the culture supernatant of Bacillus thuringiensis either by ELISA or by the conventional quantification method of the Western blot band. The Vip3A protein was produced by fermentation of the B. thuringiensis reference strain BUPM95 in 3 L. By Western blot, the Vip3Aa16 toxin was detected in the culture supernatant during the exponential growth phase of B. thuringiensis BUPM95. However, the detection of Vip3Aa16 on Western blot showed in addition to the toxin two other strips (62 and 180 kDa) recognized by the anti-Vip3Aa16 polyclonal antibodies prepared at the Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax Tunisia. For that reason and in order to develop a technique for reliable quantification of the toxin, we have considered the production of polyclonal antibodies at the Julius Kühn Institute, Germany. These antibodies were the basis for the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against the protein produced by the Vip3Aa16 recombinant strain Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). These monoclonal antibodies were tested by plate-trapped antigen (PTA) and triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA). The selection of hybridoma supernatants gave us four positive clones producing monoclonal antibodies.

  20. [Brief history of lead poisoning: from Egyptian civilization to the Renaissance].

    PubMed

    Robles-Osorio, María Ludivina; Sabath, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The exposition to lead in the Antiquity is one of the first environmental health risks in the history of the mankind. In the ancient cultures of Egypt, Crete and Sumer there was no reports of an important exposition to this metal. The first clinical data is described in the Corpus Hipocraticcus, however was Nicandrus of Colophon the first to make a thorough description of the clinical manifestations of this disease. There was an increase in the exposition to this metal in times of the Roman empire and even some researchers propose that Julius Cesar and Octavio had clinical manifestations associated with lead poisoning. Paul of Aegina in the 7th century (a.C.) describes the first epidemic associated with lead intoxication, however in the Middle Ages the use of lead decrease until the Renaissance period in which lead poisoning affects mostly painters, metal-smithers and miners. Some studies done in the ice-layers of Greenland showed that the environmental pollution by lead during the Roman empire and the Renaissance was important.

  1. UV-A/Blue-Light responses in algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senger, Horst; Hermsmeier, Dieter

    1994-01-01

    All life on earth depends on light. A variety of photoreceptors capture the light for a wide range of reactions. Photosynthetic organisms absorb the light necessary for energy transformation and charge separation facilitating photosynthesis. In addition to the bulk pigments there is a great diversity of photoreceptors present in minute concentrations that control development, metabolism and orientation of plants and microorganisms. Based on its spectral absorbance, the well-studied phytochrome system acts in the RL (red light) region as well as in the UV-A/BL (blue light) region where the above mentioned reactions are mediated by a variety of photoreceptors whose natures are largely unknown. Phyllogenetically the UV-A/BL photoreceptors seem to be more ancient pigments that eventually were replaced by the phytochrome system. However, there are many reports that suggest a coaction between the UV-A/BL receptors and the phytochrome system. In several cases the UV-A/BL activation is the prerequisite for the phytochrome reaction. Historically it was the German botanist Julius Sachs who first discovered in 1864 that phototropism in plants was due to BL reactions. It took over 70 years until Bunning (1937) and Galston and Baker (1949) rediscovered the BL response. Since then, an ever-increasing attention has been paid to this effect. In this contribution, the general aspect of UV-A/BL responses and especially the responsiveness of algae will be covered.

  2. Exploring story grammar structure in the book reading interactions of African American mothers and their preschool children: a pilot investigation

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Yvette R.; Rothstein, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to identify the book reading behaviors and book reading styles of middle class African American mothers engaged in a shared book reading activity with their preschool children. To this end, the mothers and their children were videotaped reading one of three books, Julius, Grandfather and I, or Somewhere in Africa. Both maternal and child behaviors were coded for the frequency of occurrence of story grammar elements contained in their stories and maternal behaviors were also coded for their use of narrative eliciting strategies. In addition, mothers were queried about the quality and quantity of book reading/story telling interactions in the home environment. The results suggest that there is a great deal of individual variation in how mothers use the story grammar elements and narrative eliciting strategies to engage their children in a shared book reading activity. Findings are discussed in terms of suggestions for additional research and practical applications are offered on ways to optimally engage African American preschool children and African American families from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds in shared book reading interactions. PMID:24926276

  3. John Tyndall and the Early History of Diamagnetism.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Roland

    2015-01-01

    John Tyndall, Irish-born natural philosopher, completed his PhD at the University of Marburg in 1850 while starting his first substantial period of research into the phenomenon of diamagnetism. This paper provides a detailed analysis and evaluation of his contribution to the understanding of magnetism and of the impact of this work on establishing his own career and reputation; it was instrumental in his election as a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1852 and as Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Royal Institution in 1853. Tyndall's interactions and relationships with Michael Faraday, William Thomson, Julius Plücker and others are explored, alongside his contributions to experimental practice and to emerging theory. Tyndall's approach, challenging Faraday's developing field theory with a model of diamagnetic polarity and the effect of magnetic forces acting in couples, was based on his belief in the importance of underlying molecular structure, an idea which suffused his later work, for example in relation to the study of glaciers and to the interaction of substances with radiant heat.

  4. John Tyndall and the Early History of Diamagnetism

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Summary John Tyndall, Irish-born natural philosopher, completed his PhD at the University of Marburg in 1850 while starting his first substantial period of research into the phenomenon of diamagnetism. This paper provides a detailed analysis and evaluation of his contribution to the understanding of magnetism and of the impact of this work on establishing his own career and reputation; it was instrumental in his election as a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1852 and as Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Royal Institution in 1853. Tyndall's interactions and relationships with Michael Faraday, William Thomson, Julius Plücker and others are explored, alongside his contributions to experimental practice and to emerging theory. Tyndall's approach, challenging Faraday's developing field theory with a model of diamagnetic polarity and the effect of magnetic forces acting in couples, was based on his belief in the importance of underlying molecular structure, an idea which suffused his later work, for example in relation to the study of glaciers and to the interaction of substances with radiant heat. PMID:26221835

  5. [Ernst Rüdin: distinguished scientist, radical racial hygienist].

    PubMed

    Roelcke, V

    2012-03-01

    Ernst Rüdin (1874–1952) was one of the founders of psychiatric genetics. From 1931 until 1945, he was Director of the German Institute for Psychiatric Research (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Psychiatrie, DFA) and from 1935 until 1945 President of the German Association of Neurologists and Psychiatrists. The historical knowledge on Rüdin is reconsidered, using new sources, and with a focus on Rüdin’s involvement in the Nazi program of patient killings („euthanasia"). It is documented that (1) it is a misconception to interpret psychiatric genetics as „instrumentalised" by the Nazi regime; (2) Rüdin belonged to the group of psychiatric perpetrators who worked to give the Nazi selection policies scientific authority; (3) Rüdin knew early on about the patient killings and refused to support others in their efforts to stop them; and (4) the research in the context of the patient killings carried out by Julius Deussen, a member of Rüdin’s team at the DFA, was initiated and actively supported by Rüdin, and co-financed by the DFA.

  6. Perception of the Relevance of Organic Chemistry in a German Pharmacy Students’ Course

    PubMed Central

    Wehle, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate German pharmacy students’ attitudes toward the relevance of organic chemistry training in Julius Maximilian University (JMU) of Würzburg with regard to subsequent courses in the curricula and in later prospective career options. Methods. Surveys were conducted in the second-year organic chemistry course (50 participants) as well as during the third-year and fourth-year lecture cycle on medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry (66 participants) in 2014. Results. Students’ attitudes were surprisingly consistent throughout the progress of the degree course. Students considered organic chemistry very relevant to the pharmacy study program (95% junior and 97% senior students), and of importance for their future pharmacy program (88% junior and 94% senior students). With regard to prospective career options, the perceived relevance was considerably lower and attitudes were less homogenous. Conclusions. German pharmacy students at JMU Würzburg consider organic chemistry of high relevance for medicinal chemistry and other courses in JMU’s pharmacy program. PMID:27170811

  7. Legends about Legends: Abraham Eleazar's Adaptation of Nicolas Flamel.

    PubMed

    Priesner, Claus

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores the relationship between three illustrated alchemical treatises, all of which are associated with Jewish adepts: the famous Le Livre des figures hieroglyphiques attributed to Nicolas Flamel, and two treatises published in 1735 in Erfurt-the Uraltes Chymisches Werckh and the Donum Dei. The Werckh is supposedly written by Rabbi Abraham Eleazar, while the Donum Dei is attributed to an ancient alchemist-cabalist, Rabbi Samuel Baruch. I argue that these authors are fictitious, and that both works were in fact written in the early eighteenth century by their supposed editor, the probably pseudonymous Julius Gervasius. Gervasius connects the Werckh with the legend of Nicolas Flamel by suggesting that it is based on the original, Jewish manuscript which helped Flamel to find the Stone of the Sages. Gervasius used various strategies to confer a sense of Jewish "authenticity" on these works, borrowing from contemporary (non-Jewish) perceptions of Jewish ritual, Hebrew language, and Christian Cabala. The Werckh also borrows and adapts a sequence of allegorical illustrations from those in pseudo-Flamel's Livre, and I compare the two sets of figures and, where possible, interpret them. I conclude that the later works in fact teach us far more about the state of alchemy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries than they do about either medieval alchemy or Judaism.

  8. [The incredible story about the cesarean section from ancient times till nowadays].

    PubMed

    Zilberlicht, Ariel; Kedar, Reuven; Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit; Lavie, Ofer

    2014-08-01

    During its evolution the cesarean section has meant different things to different people. The indications for it have changed throughout the course of history. From the initial purpose to retrieve an infant from a dead or dying mother in order to bury the child separately from his mother, to contemporary indications. This article strives to follow the roots of this common procedure--starting from the descriptions in the ancient Greek mythology, through the imperial Roman law, aspects of Judaism and the evolution of the procedure throughout modern history. Major improvements in the surgical techniques, the introduction of anesthesia and aseptic procedures contributed to the decline in mortality and morbidity rates. We will attempt to find the etymology for the expression "cesarean section" which has commonly been accounted to Julius Caesar's name, although history denies it. This review takes us on a historical journey, from ancient times to nowadays, in which we follow the course and nature of a procedure being performed daily in thousands of hospitals.

  9. Fitness to stand trial under international criminal law: the historical context.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian; Karagiannakis, Magda

    2014-06-01

    Decision-making about fitness to stand trial and the consequences of a finding of unfitness are fundamental to the integrity of any criminal justice system. They create thresholds for when mentally and physically unwell people are mandated to participate in criminal proceedings and they address the outcomes of such decisions for unwell accused persons. The jurisprudence relating to fitness to stand trial under international criminal law has particular challenges and complexities. The origins of contemporary controversies and the bases for modern decisions lie in rulings by the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. The decisions relating to Gustav Krupp, Rudolf Hess, Julius Streicher and Shumei Okawa wrestled with issues that have since recurred in respect of how trial systems should respond to unwellness going to the heart of whether persons can participate meaningfully in their own trials but dealing too with the temptation for persons accused of matters as serious as crimes against humanity and genocide to malinger, exaggerate symptomatology and to generate delays for strategic objectives.

  10. Epilepsy: A Disruptive Force in History.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rohaid; Connolly, Ian D; Feroze, Abdullah H; Awad, Ahmed J; Choudhri, Omar A; Grant, Gerald A

    2016-06-01

    Since it was first described in a Mesopotamian text in 2000 bc, countless individuals have offered their perspectives on epilepsy's cause, treatment, and even deeper spiritual significance. However, despite the attention the disease has received through the millennia, it has only been within the past half-century that truly effective treatment options have been available. As a result, for the vast majority of recorded history, individuals with epilepsy have not only had to deal with the uncertainty of their next epileptic seizure but also the concomitant stigma and ostracization. Interestingly, these individuals have included several prominent historical figures, including Julius Caesar, Vladimir Lenin, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky. The fact that epilepsy has appeared in the lives of influential historical people means that the disease has played some role in affecting the progress of human civilization. Epilepsy has cut short the lives of key political leaders, affected the output of talented cultural icons, and, especially within the past half century, influenced the collective understanding of neuroscience and the human nervous system. In this article, the authors review how epilepsy throughout history has manifested itself in the lives of prominent figures and how the disease has helped shape the course of humanity's political, cultural, and scientific evolution.

  11. Beginning of biometeorology in Abbazia/Opatija.

    PubMed

    Fischinger, Barbara; Fischinger, Janez

    2012-01-01

    In addition to health facilities and many other organizations, there was also a functioning weather station in the health and seaside resort of Abbazia/Opatija, known as the Nice of the Austrian riviera. Formal observation of weather in Abbazia/Opatija began in 1886 with the setting up of the weather station in Angiolina Park. During the period 1898-1915, the warden of this station and data collector was the local doctor, dr Franz Tripold. On the basis of the collected data, he wrote the first study of Abbazia/Opatija's climate and its effects on people. The study das Klima in Abbazia was published in 1906 in Abbazia als Kurort on the 60th birthday of Professor Julius Glax, head of the health resort in Abbazia/Opatija. The study highlighted the physiological effects of the maritime climate on people and examined the beneficial effects of the local climate on patients. The weather station in Opatija is still operating in Angiolina Park. Weather parameters to be gathered were determined by the First international Meteorological Congress in Vienna in 1873 and are still valid. The parameter of human well being÷bio meteorological prognosis has been added. Today, the collected data are sent to the National Meteorological and Hydrological service in Zagreb, from where they are returned to Opatija to be displayed on a screen in the town centre to help people to plan their daily activities and take appropriate measures to protect their health, which is especially important for patients.

  12. Different chemical cues originating from a shared predator induce common defense responses in two prey species.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Teruhiko; Doi, Hideyuki; Kohmatsu, Yukihiro; Yamaoka, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    In freshwater ecosystems, inducible defenses that involve behavioral or morphological changes in response to chemical cue detection are key phenomena in prey-predator interactions. Many species with different phylogenetic and ecological traits (e.g., general activity patterns and microhabitats) use chemical cues to avoid predators. We hypothesized that prey species with a shared predator, but having different ecological traits, would be adapted to detect different chemical cues from the predator. However, the proximate mechanisms by which prey use chemical cues to avoid predation remain little known. Here, we tested our hypothesis by using fractionated chemical components from predatory dragonfly nymphs (Lesser Emperor, Anax parthenope julius) to trigger anti-predator behavioral responses in two anuran tadpoles, the wrinkled frog Glandirana (Rana) rugosa and the Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica. Glandirana rugosa detected chemical cues that had either high or low hydrophobic properties, but H. japonica responded only to chemical cues with hydrophilic properties. During the normal behaviors of these tadpole species, G. rugosa remains immobile in benthic habitats, whereas H. japonica exhibits active swimming at the surface or in the middle of the water column. As we had hypothesized, these tadpole species, which have different general activity levels and microhabitats, detected different chemical cues that were exuded by their shared predator and responded by changing their activities to avoid predation. The specific chemical cues detected by each tadpole species are likely to have characteristics that optimize effective predator detection and encounter avoidance of the shared dragonfly predator.

  13. Biographical sketch: Georg Hermann von Meyer (1815-1892).

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Brand, Richard A

    2011-11-01

    This biographical sketch on Georg Hermann von Meyer highlights the interactions in the 1860s that von Meyer, a famous anatomist, had with Karl Culmann, a famous structural engineer and mathematician. The published papers from this interaction caught the attention of Julius Wolff and stimulated his development of the trajectorial hypothesis of bone adaptation--now called "Wolff's Law." The corresponding translations are provided: (1) von Meyer's 1867 paper that highlights the regularity of arched trabecular patterns in various human bones, and his discussions with Culmann about their possible mechanical relevance; and (2) Wolff's 1869 paper that first mentions the correspondence of stress trajectories in a solid, crane-like structure to the arched trabecular patterns in the proximal human femur. This biographical sketch on Georg Hermann von Meyer corresponds to the historic texts, The Classic: The Architecture of the Trabecular bone (by von Meyer), and The Classic: On the Significance of the Architecture of the Spongy Substance for the Question of Bone Growth. A preliminary publication (by Wolff) available at DOIs 10.1007/s11999-011-2041-5 , 10.1007/s11999-011-2042-4 .

  14. Review of the " Chirurgia" of Giovanni de Vigo: estimate of his position in the history of surgery.

    PubMed

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Gurunluoglu, Aslin; Piza-Katzer, Hildegunde

    2003-05-01

    Giovanni de Vigo, who was born in at Rapallo, Italy, lived in the early Renaissance period (1450-1525). In 1503, De Vigo became the personal surgeon to Pope Julius II. He wrote a surgical book, " Practica Copiosa in Arte Chirurgia," which was completed in 1514 and published in Latin. It was translated into English by Richard Traheron and printed by Edward Whytchurch in 1543. Vigo's " Chirurgia" consists of nine books ranging from a consideration of anatomy necessary for a surgeon, to sections on abscesses, wounds, ulcers, benign and malignant tumors, fractures and dislocations, pharmaceuticals, ointments and plasters, as well as sections on dentistry, exercise, diet, syphilis, among others. De Vigo introduces a novel approach for treating mandible dislocations and describes a trephine he invented, as well as a number of new instruments. Examination of his surgical piece demonstrates that he had a broad spectrum of knowledge in surgery based in part on the ancient Greek and Arabic medical literature but mainly on his personal experience. Giovanni de Vigo contributed significantly to the revival of medicine in the sixteenth century, and he can be considered as a bridge between Greek medicine of antiquity, Arabic medicine, and the Renaissance.

  15. Some major events in the development of the scientific study of loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, I. J.; Jefferson, I. F.; Dijkstra, T. A.; Derbyshire, E.

    2001-06-01

    A European view of loess history is presented. The major events, or 'great moments', considered are (1) Karl Caesar von Leonhard names loess; (2) Charles Lyell popularises loess; (3) Richthofen solves 'The Loess Problem'; (4) John Hardcastle relates loess to climate; (5) Pavel Tutkovskii makes clear the role of glaciers in loess genesis; (6) V.A. Obruchev makes the case for desert loess; (7) L.S. Berg propounds the 'in-situ' theory of loess formation; (8) Rudolf Grahmann maps loess in 'Europa'; (9) R.J. Russell adopts the 'in-situ' idea; (10) Liu Tungsheng pioneers Chinese loess stratigraphy; (11) Julius Fink focuses loess research in the INQUA Loess Commission; and (12) George Kukla reshapes the Quaternary by way of loess research. The need for Chinese, Russian, and North American accounts to balance an authoritative view of loess history is recognized. The truly critical moment in the 20th century was the discovery by Liu Tungsheng and his colleagues of multiple palaeosols within the Chinese loess and the associated realization that these implied a multi-event Quaternary.

  16. From Goethe's plant archetype via Haeckel's biogenetic law to plant evo-devo 2016.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2016-10-18

    In 1790, the German poet Johann W. v. Goethe (1749-1832) proposed the concept of a hypothetical sessile organism known as the 'Plant Archetype,' which was subsequently reconstructed and depicted by 19th-century botanists, such as Franz Unger (1800-1870) and Julius Sachs (1832-1897), and can be considered one of the first expressions of Evo-Devo thinking. Here, we present the history of this concept in the context of Ernst Haeckel's (1834-1919) biogenetic law espoused in his Generelle Morphologie der Organismen of 1866. We show that Haeckel's idea of biological recapitulation may help to explain why various phenomena, such as the ontogenetic transformations in the stellar anatomy of lycopods and ferns, the transition from primary to secondary anatomy of seed plants, the presence of unfused juvenile cone scale segments in the Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica), and the transition of C3- to C4-photosynthesis in the ontogeny of maize (Zea mays), appear to support his theories. In addition, we outline the current status of plant evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-Devo), which can be traced back to Haeckel's (1866) biogenetic law, with a focus on the model plant thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana).

  17. Trauma and the state with Sigmund Freud as witness.

    PubMed

    Danto, Elizabeth Ann

    Just before and after the end of World War I, Sigmund Freud took on an activist role and in his writings and speeches, redirected the concept of war trauma from individual failure to a larger issue of community responsibility. Testifying in Vienna as an expert witness for the state, Freud said that the military psychiatrists-not the soldiers-had "acted like machine guns behind the front" and were the "immediate cause of all war neurosis." Freud was called on by the legal community when Julius Wagner-Jauregg, a future Nobel Prize winner (and also future Nazi Party adherent), head of the municipal Clinic for Psychiatry and Nervous Diseases, was accused of the lethal use of electrotherapy on shell-shocked soldiers. As sociological as psychoanalytic in his responses, Freud's withering critique came just 2years after he avowed that "it is possible to foresee that the conscience of society will awake." That speech on the human right to mental health care affirmed Freud's alliance to the social democratic position and inspired the second generation of psychoanalysts to develop community-based clinics throughout Europe where treatment was free of cost, for war neurosis and beyond.

  18. [Illustrations of of alchemy vessels in a manuscript of Pseudo-Geber].

    PubMed

    Kurzmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Manuscript ric. 933 "Geber de investigatione perfectionis magisterii", kept in the Libreria Riccardiana in Florence, is a 13th century Latin version of the "Book of the Secret of the Secrets" ("kitab sirr al-asrar") by the Arabian alchemist al-Razi (865-925). The manuscript shows on page 25r a series of drawings of alchemistic vessels and apparatus which do not figure in the Arabian original but which are of particular interest as they date from as early as the 13th century and are numbered amongst the earliest drawings of this kind which we possess. The publication of the manuscript by Julius Ruska in 1935 shows only copied drawings with his interpretations of the legends. There was considerable interest in the publication of the original page 25r and in the course of further study it became clear that these interpretations had to be revised. These new interpretations presented in detail in this paper are justified and put into an alchemistic context. In some cases they give a new understanding and differ considerably from Ruska's versions.

  19. The 19th century discussion of climate variability and climate change: Analogies for the present debate?

    SciTech Connect

    Stehr, N.; Storch, H. von; Fluegel, M.

    1995-12-01

    Toward the end of the nineteenth and at the beginning of twentieth century significant discussions occurred among geographers, meteorologists and climatologists concerned with the notion of climate variability and anthropogenic climate change, for instance, due to deforestation and reforestation. The authors identify two protagonists of this debate, Eduard Brueckner and Julius Hann, who both accept the notion of climate variability on the decadal scale, but respond in very different ways to the discovery of climate change. Brueckner assessed the impact of climate variability on society (e.g., on health, the balance of trade, emigration to the US), and tried to bring these to the attention of the public, whereas Hann limited himself to the immediate natural scientific problem of monitoring and documenting climate variability. The authors suggest that these discussions and the formation of national governmental and parliamentary committees almost 100 hundred years ago, are not merely of historical interest. In view of present discussions of climate variability and anthropogenic climate change, and the need for adequate socio-economic response strategies, past and now neglected arguments may prove important for methodological and theoretical as well as for practical reasons. The past discussions represent a significant social and intellectual analogy for the present situation. 51 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 11. (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Duerbeck, H. W.; Hamel, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    The contributions deal with astronomical concepts, historical observatories and biographical studies. Newly found copies of Copernicus' principal work are described, the development of the concepts "sphaera" and "orbis coelestis" from ancient times via Copernicus to Kepler is investigated. The concept of harmonical cosmology of Kepler and A. Kircher is analyzed in a major paper. A rediscovered letter by Kepler is interpreted. Other papers deal with the university observatory of Bützow (Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania), the observatories installed in Strasbourg in the 17th and early 19th centuries, and the Jesuit observatory which existed in Graz (Styria) in the 18th century, as well as the unrealized plans for an observing station of Vienna University Observatory in the 1940s. Einstein's thoughts about Friedmann's cosmological papers are presented. Biographical sketches on Philipp Feselius (1565-1610), Ferdinand Adolph Freiherr von Ende (1760-1816), Wilhelm Ebert (1871-1916) and Karl Julius Lohnert (1885-1944) are supplemented by an analysis of the social background of the important Astronomers of the 20th century. The claim that Jupiter's moons were described already 105 years before Galilei is contradicted in a discussion. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  1. Calbindin-D28k is a more reliable marker of human Purkinje cells than standard Nissl stains: a stereological experiment.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Elizabeth R; Kemper, Thomas L; Rosene, Douglas L; Bauman, Margaret L; Blatt, Gene J

    2008-02-15

    In a study of human Purkinje cell (PC) number, a striking mismatch between the number of PCs observed with the Nissl stain and the number of PCs immunopositive for calbindin-D28k (CB) was identified in 2 of the 10 brains examined. In the remaining eight brains this mismatch was not observed. Further, in these eight brains, analysis of CB immunostained sections counterstained with the Nissl stain revealed that more than 99% Nissl stained PCs were also immunopositive for CB. In contrast, in the two discordant brains, only 10-20% of CB immunopositive PCs were also identified with the Nissl stain. Although this finding was unexpected, a historical survey of the literature revealed that Spielmeyer [Spielmeyer W. Histopathologie des nervensystems. Julius Springer: Berlin; 1922. p. 56-79] described human cases with PCs that lacked the expected Nissl staining intensity, an important historical finding and critical issue when studying postmortem human brains. The reason for this failure in Nissl staining is not entirely clear, but it may result from premortem circumstances since it is not accounted for by postmortem delay or processing variables. Regardless of the exact cause, these observations suggest that Nissl staining may not be a reliable marker for PCs and that CB is an excellent alternative marker.

  2. [Samuel Hahnemann: physician and adviser to the Princess Luise of Prussia from 1829 to 1835].

    PubMed

    Heinz, Inge Christine

    2009-01-01

    The nearly 500 pages of letters (edited and commented in a medical dissertation by the author), written by a Prussian Princess in the 19th century to Dr. Samuel Hahnemann, the founder of homoeopathy, provide a fairly complete patient history thanks to the homoeopathic method which obliges patients to observe and describe the complaints and the changes they experience during treatment. The achievements of Hahnemann's therapy were so remarkable that the patient engaged his disciple Dr.Julius Aegidi as her court physician during the years 1831 to 1834. In no other of Hahnemann's published case histories so many dreams are described. The diagnosis within the historical context could be hysteria, hypochondria and melancholy. The therapy consisted in the prescription of homoeopathic remedies but also, among other prescriptions, in taking placebos, application of mesmerism, diet and life style advice. Hahnemann was opposed to vaccination. The doctor-patient-relationship became very intense. It can be said that Hahnemann acted as a psychotherapist. As the Princess rather liked speaking about her complaints her compliance in describing symptoms was excellent. It was less so in taking verum, applying mesmerism and changing her lifestyle. The success of the treatment was limited by the Princess's court and family circumstances and probably by Hahnemann's restriction to psora theory and C30 potencies. The dissertation is the most extensive patient history from Hahnemann's medical practice ever published.

  3. Strasbourg's "First" astronomical observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André

    2011-08-01

    The turret lantern located at the top of the Strasbourg Hospital Gate is generally considered as the first astronomical observatory of the city, but such a qualification must be treated with caution. The thesis of this paper is that the idea of a tower-observatory was brought back by a local scholar, Julius Reichelt (1637-1717), after he made a trip to Northern Europe around 1666 and saw the "Rundetårn" (Round Tower) recently completed in Copenhagen. There, however, a terrace allowed (and still allows) the full viewing of the sky, and especially of the zenith area where the atmospheric transparency is best. However, there is no such terrace in Strasbourg around the Hospital Gate lantern. Reichelt had also visited Johannes Hevelius who was then developing advanced observational astronomy in Gdansk, but nothing of the kind followed in Strasbourg. Rather, the Hospital Gate observatory was built essentially for the prestige of the city and for the notoriety of the university, and the users of this observing post did not make any significant contributions to the progress of astronomical knowledge. We conclude that the Hospital Gate observatory was only used for rudimentary viewing of bright celestial objects or phenomena relatively low on the horizon.

  4. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  5. Evaluation of free non-diagnostic DICOM software tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei; Deserno, Thomas M.; Spitzer, Klaus

    2008-03-01

    A variety of software exists to interpret files or directories compliant to the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard and display them as individual images or volume rendered objects. Some of them offer further processing and analysis features. The surveys that have been published so far are partly not up-to-date anymore, and neither a detailed description of the software functions nor a comprehensive comparison is given. This paper aims at evaluation and comparison of freely available, non-diagnostic DICOM software with respect to the following aspects: (i) data import; (ii) data export; (iii) header viewing; (iv) 2D image viewing; (v) 3D volume viewing; (vi) support; (vii) portability; (viii) workability; and (ix) usability. In total, 21 tools were included: 3D Slicer, AMIDE, BioImage Suite, DicomWorks, EViewBox, ezDICOM, FPImage, ImageJ, JiveX, Julius, MedImaView, MedINRIA, MicroView, MIPAV, MRIcron, Osiris, PMSDView, Syngo FastView, TomoVision, UniViewer, and XMedCon. Our results in table form can ease the selection of appropriate DICOM software tools. In particular, we discuss use cases for the inexperienced user, data conversion, and volume rendering, and suggest Syngo FastView or PMSDView, DicomWorks or XMedCon, and ImageJ or UniViewer, respectively.

  6. Ambiguous Cells: The Emergence of the Stem Cell Concept in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

    PubMed Central

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2013-01-01

    Summary This paper elucidates the origins of scientific work on stem cells. From the late nineteenth century onwards, the notion of stem cells became customary in scientific communities of Imperial Germany. Adopting the term ‘Stammzelle’ from Ernst Haeckel, Theodor Boveri was influential in introducing the concept in embryological studies and early genetics around 1900, describing a capacity of stem cells for self-renewal as well as differentiation. Blood stem cells were at the same time conceptualized by histologists such as Ernst Neumann and Artur Pappenheim in studies of physiological haematopoiesis and various forms of leukaemia. Furthermore, building on Julius Cohnheim’s theory that tumours arise from ‘embryonic remnants’ in the adult body, pathologists aimed at identifying the cells of origin, particularly in the embryo-like teratomas. Embryonic stem cells thus assumed an ambiguous status, partly representing common heritage and normal development, partly being seen as potential causes of cancer if they had been left behind or displaced during ontogeny. In the 1950s and 1960s experimental research on teratocarcinomas by Leroy Stevens and Barry Pierce in the USA brought the strands of embryological and pathological work together. Alongside the work of Ernest McCulloch and James Till at the Ontario Cancer Institute, from the early 1960s, on stem cells in haematopoiesis, this led into the beginnings of modern stem cell research. PMID:22332468

  7. Events Leading to J. J. Thomson's Electron in 1897

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Per F.

    1997-03-01

    The electron had its genesis in the glow discharge studies of the German school of Julius Plucker and company, who viewed their Kathodenstrahlen as a form of aetheral wave propagation. Next on the scene came the Victorian amateur scientists, personified by the incomparable William Crookes, who interpreted the rays in terms of material particulate behavior. Back on the Continent, meanwhile, there was Heinrich Hertz and his disciple Philipp Lenard--the latter with his metallic ``window'' and all it stood for. In England, an experimental rivalry ensued between J. J. Thomson and Arthur Schuster, who nearly beat ``J.J.'' to his corpuscle in 1890, while in Paris, about then, Jean Perrin's cathode ray studies were provoked by the lingering anti-atomic stance of his academic countrymen. The chronicle culminated in the charge-to-mass experiments of 1896-97, in which Emil Wiechert and Walter Kaufmann narrowly missed the electron in favor of Thomson and his classic e/m determinations.

  8. John Bardeen and transistor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    John Bardeen and Walter Brattain invented the point-contact semiconductor amplifier (transistor action) in polycrystalline germanium (also observed in polycrystalline silicon) on Dec. 15, 1947, for which they received a patent on Oct. 3, 1950. Bill Shockley was not a co-patent holder on Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier patent since Julius Lilienfeld had already received a patent in 1930 for what would have been Shockley's contribution; namely, the field-effect methodology. Shockley received patents for both his minority-carrier injection concept and junction transistor theory, however, and deservedly shared the Nobel prize with Bardeen and Brattain for his seminal contributions of injection, p-n junction theory and junction transistor theory. We will review the events leading up to the invention of Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier during the magic month of November 17-December 16, 1947 and the invention of Shockley's junction semiconductor amplifier during his magic month of December 24, 1947-January 23, 1948. It was during the course of Bardeen and Brattain's research in November, 1947 that Bardeen also patented the essence of the MOS transistor, wherein the induced minority carriers were confined to the inversion layer enroute to the collector. C. T. Sah has described this device as a sourceless MOS transistor. Indeed, John Bardeen, co-inventor of the point-contact semiconductor amplifier and inventor of the MOS transistor, may rightly be called the father of modern electronics.

  9. [Hormone-based classification and therapy concepts in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Himmerich, H; Steinberg, H

    2011-07-01

    This study retells key aspects of the history of the idea of hormone-based classification and therapy concepts in psychiatry. Different contributions to the history are not only represented from a historical, but also from a current medico-scientific perspective. One of the oldest, yet ethically most problematic, indications concerning hormonal methods to modify undesirable behaviour and sexuality was castration, which was widely used in the 20th century to "cure" homosexuality. Felix Platter, whose concept was humoral-pathological in nature, documented the first postpartum psychosis in the German-speaking countries, the pathogenesis of which according to present-day expertise is brought about by changes in female hormones. The concept of an "endocrine psychiatry" was developed at the beginning of the 20th century. Some protagonists for neuroendocrinology are highlighted, such as Paul Julius Möbius around 1900 or, in the 1950s, Manfred Bleuler, the nestor of this new discipline. Only the discovery of the hormones as such and the development of technologies like radioimmunassay to measure and quantify these hormone changes in mental illnesses allowed investigating these conditions properly. Ever since hormone-based therapeutic and classification concepts have played an important role, above all, in sexual, affective and eating disorders as well as alcohol dependence.

  10. Exploring story grammar structure in the book reading interactions of African American mothers and their preschool children: a pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Yvette R; Rothstein, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to identify the book reading behaviors and book reading styles of middle class African American mothers engaged in a shared book reading activity with their preschool children. To this end, the mothers and their children were videotaped reading one of three books, Julius, Grandfather and I, or Somewhere in Africa. Both maternal and child behaviors were coded for the frequency of occurrence of story grammar elements contained in their stories and maternal behaviors were also coded for their use of narrative eliciting strategies. In addition, mothers were queried about the quality and quantity of book reading/story telling interactions in the home environment. The results suggest that there is a great deal of individual variation in how mothers use the story grammar elements and narrative eliciting strategies to engage their children in a shared book reading activity. Findings are discussed in terms of suggestions for additional research and practical applications are offered on ways to optimally engage African American preschool children and African American families from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds in shared book reading interactions.

  11. Quantum Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, Caroline Kilbourne; McCammon, Dan; Irwin, Kent D.

    1999-01-01

    Your opponent's serve was almost perfect, but you vigorously returned it beyond his outstretched racquet to win the point. Now the tennis ball sits wedged in the chain-link fence around the court. What happened to the ball's kinetic energy? It has gone to heat the fence, of course, and you realize that if the fence were quite colder, you might be able to measure that heat and determine just how energetic your swing really was. Calorimetry has been a standard measurement technique since James Joule and Julius von Mayer independently concluded, about 150 years ago, that heat is a form of energy. But only in the past 15 years or so has calorimetry been applied, at millikelvin temperatures, to the measurement of the energy of individual photons and particles with exquisite sensitivity. In this article, we have tried to show that continuing research in low-temperature physics leads to a greater understanding of high-temperature astrophysics. Adaptations of the resulting spectrometers will be useful tool for fields of research beyond astrophysics.

  12. Do GPs know their patients with cancer? Assessing the quality of cancer registration in Dutch primary care: a cross-sectional validation study

    PubMed Central

    Sollie, Annet; Roskam, Jessika; Sijmons, Rolf H; Numans, Mattijs E; Helsper, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the quality of cancer registry in primary care. Design and setting A cross-sectional validation study using linked data from primary care electronic health records (EHRs) and the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). Population 290 000 patients, registered with 120 general practitioners (GPs), from 50 practice centres in the Utrecht area, the Netherlands, in January 2013. Intervention Linking the EHRs of all patients in the Julius General Practitioners’ Network database at an individual patient level to the full NCR (∼1.7 million tumours between 1989 and 2011), to determine the proportion of matching cancer diagnoses. Full-text EHR extraction and manual analysis for non-matching diagnoses. Main outcome measures Proportions of matching and non-matching breast, lung, colorectal and prostate cancer diagnoses between 2007 and 2011, stratified by age category, cancer type and EHR system. Differences in year of diagnosis between the EHR and the NCR. Reasons for non-matching diagnoses. Results In the Primary Care EHR, 60.6% of cancer cases were registered and coded in accordance with the NCR. Of the EHR diagnoses, 48.9% were potentially false positive (not registered in the NCR). Results differed between EHR systems but not between age categories or cancer types. The year of diagnosis corresponded in 80.6% of matching coded diagnoses. Adding full-text EHR analysis improved results substantially. A national disease registry (the NCR) proved incomplete. Conclusions Even though GPs do know their patients with cancer, only 60.6% are coded in concordance with the NCR. Reusers of coded EHR data should be aware that 40% of cases can be missed, and almost half can be false positive. The type of EHR system influences registration quality. If full-text manual EHR analysis is used, only 10% of cases will be missed and 20% of cases found will be wrong. EHR data should only be reused with care. PMID:27633642

  13. Michelangelo's Apollo and pathos: an anatomical and anthropometric interpretation.

    PubMed

    Hilloowala, Rumy

    2010-06-01

    Michelangelo was a complex personality with strong conflicting emotions. Most prevalent, in both his life and subsequently his work, were the contrasting feelings of grandeur (Apollo) and pathos. He used his extensive knowledge of anatomy to convey expressions of justice, power and awe in works like David, Moses, and Christ in the Last Judgment. In his more mature years he gravitates to works depicting suffering (pathos) and the physical decline of the human body as seen in the captives for the tomb of Pope Julius II and the female subjects in the Medici Chapel. The Renaissance belief in humanism, influenced by the study of antiquity, put man at the centre of the universe. Michelangelo, more than any other artist of the time, was an ardent exponent of this trend. His interest in the human body, though paramount, ranged far beyond the mere depiction of anatomical details or naturalism in art. The human body, which no artist since the ancient Greeks held in such high esteem, was the vehicle through which he sought to portray the inner life of the spirit. He was more interested in the universal spirit shining through the individual. It is this quality that enables him to speak to us across the boundaries of time and space. He never says, "I want you to recognize this man." Instead, he says, "I want you to recognize yourself and through yourself all mankind". Some of the outward manifestations of the life of the spirit were, to Michelangelo and to men of his time, beauty, justice, noble courage and awe-inspiring righteousness. It is not surprising, therefore, that two of the most important themes expressed in his art are Apollo (beauty and justice) and pathos (the spiritual struggle of man on earth) and that the sole form he deemed appropriate for embodiment of these lofty ideas was the human nude.

  14. Marking Time: The Epic Quest to Invent the Perfect Calendar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, Duncan

    2000-12-01

    "If you lie awake worrying about the overnight transition from December 31, 1 b.c., to January 1, a.d. 1 (there is no year zero), then you will enjoy Duncan Steel's Marking Time."--American Scientist "No book could serve as a better guide to the cumulative invention that defines the imaginary threshold to the new millennium."--Booklist A Fascinating March through History and the Evolution of the Modern-Day Calendar . . . In this vivid, fast-moving narrative, you'll discover the surprising story of how our modern calendar came about and how it has changed dramatically through the years. Acclaimed author Duncan Steel explores each major step in creating the current calendar along with the many different systems for defining the number of days in a week, the length of a month, and the number of days in a year. From the definition of the lunar month by Meton of Athens in 432 b.c. to the roles played by Julius Caesar, William the Conqueror, and Isaac Newton to present-day proposals to reform our calendar, this entertaining read also presents "timely" tidbits that will take you across the full span of recorded history. Find out how and why comets have been used as clocks, why there is no year zero between 1 b.c. and a.d. 1, and why for centuries Britain and its colonies rang in the New Year on March 25th. Marking Time will leave you with a sense of awe at the haphazard nature of our calendar's development. Once you've read this eye-opening book, you'll never look at the calendar the same way again.

  15. Van Gogh's Starry Nights, Lincoln's Moon, Shakespeare's Stars, and More: Tales of Astronomy in Art, History, and Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    How do astronomical methods make it possible to calculate dates and times for Vincent van Gogh's night-sky paintings? Why is there a blood-red sky in Edvard Munch's The Scream? How can the 18.6-year cycle of the lunar nodes and the Moon's declination on the night of August 29-30, 1857, explain a long-standing mystery about Abraham Lincoln's honesty in the murder case known as the almanac trial? Why is a bright star described in Act 1, Scene 1, of Hamlet? There is a long tradition of astronomical methods employed to analyze works of art, to understand historical events, and to elucidate passages in literature. Both Edmond Halley and George Biddell Airy calculated lunar phases and tide tables in attempts to determine the landing beach where Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 B.C. Henry Norris Russell computed configurations of Jupiter and Saturn to determine a date for a 14th-century celestial event mentioned in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde. In this tradition, our Texas State group has published a series of articles in Sky & Telescope over the last two decades, applying astronomy to art, history, and literature. Don Osterbrock worked with us 3 years ago when my students and I calculated dates for moonrise photographs taken by Ansel Adams in Yosemite National Park. The peaks of the Sierra Nevada crest in Yosemite are more than 125 miles from Lick Observatory, but the mountains can become visible from Lick on clear winter days and were photographed from there on early infrared-sensitive plates during the 1920s and 1930s. As we tested our topographic software by identifying the peaks that appear in the Lick plates, it was a pleasure to come to know Don, a former director of Lick Observatory and the person in whose honor this talk is dedicated.

  16. ["With all measures...". Appeal proceedings and political specialty disputes about orthopedics at the Berlin University and the Charité during the time of the Kaiser Empire, the Weimar Republic and national socialism].

    PubMed

    Philipp, Osten

    2012-01-01

    In 1934 the NSDAP University-Commission forced the president of the German Society of Surgery and the chairman of the German Orthopaedic Society to sign a reconciliation agreement. First of all, orthopaedists and surgeons were ordered to refrain from attacking each other in public. In the future, in the event of any complaints, they were to address the 'Reichsärzteführung' at the Ministry of the Interior. On the basis of papers and documents from the archives of the medical faculty, the East German Ministry for State Security and the former Berlin Document Centre, this article describes the history of the emerging medical specialty orthopaedics at the University of Berlin and the Charité hospital. It covers a period from 1890 through 1945 and focuses on the varying relations between political authorities, medical associations and the faculty. The main attention is given to ethical and economic disputes and to the way in which professors for orthopaedics were appointed. The two pioneers of orthopaedic surgery, Julius Wolff and Albert Hoffa had to overcome less resistance than their successors Georg Joachimsthal and Hermann Gocht. Gocht's fate changed, when the NSDAP took Power. As a protégé of the regime he represented the medical faculty during the period of political cleansing. In 1937 the appointment of the orthopaedist Lothar Kreuz as a full member of the medical faculty was no longer a university matter anymore. His appointment was negotiated entirely within the organisations of the NSDAP. Politically approved, Kreuz served as dean of the medical faculty and later was to be the last rector of the University of Berlin. For the first time, this article documents the connections between Kreuz, the paramilitary squadron of the party SS, and key political figures.

  17. A 2003 update of bone physiology and Wolff's Law for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Frost, Harold M

    2004-02-01

    By 1892, Julius Wolff and others realized that mechanical loads can affect bone architecture in living beings, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect were unknown, and it had no known clinical applications. In 2003 we know how this effect occurs and some of its applications. Our load-bearing bones (LBBs) include tibias, femurs, humeri, vertebrae, radii, mandibles, maxillae, wrists, hips, etc (so LBBs are not limited to weight-bearing ones). The strength of such bones and their trabeculae would represent their most important physiologic feature but in the special sense of relative to the size of the typical peak voluntary loads on them. The biologic "machinery" that determines whole-bone strength forms a tissue-level negative feedback system called the mechanostat. Two thresholds make a bone's strains determine its strength by switching on and off the biologic mechanisms that increase or decrease its strength. Equally, two thermostats can determine a room's temperature by switching on and off the room's heating and cooling systems. General features show that the largest voluntary loads on LBBs determine most of their strength after birth. These loads come from muscle forces so muscle strength strongly influences the strength of our LBBs. This process affects, in part, the healing of fractures, bone grafts, osteotomies, and arthrodeses; the bone's ability to endure load-bearing joint and dental endoprostheses; why healthy bones are stronger than the minimum needed to keep voluntary loads from breaking them suddenly or from fatigue; some general functions and disorders of bone modeling and basic multicellular unit-based bone remodeling; some limitations of in vitro data and of pharmaceutical actions; and the fact that many bone-active humoral and local agents have permissive roles in a bone's adaptations and healing, instead of forcing them to occur.

  18. Paul Ehrlich: pathfinder in cell biology. 1. Chronicle of his life and accomplishments in immunology, cancer research, and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kasten, F H

    1996-01-01

    The paper reviews the life of Paul Ehrlich and his biomedical accomplishments in immunology, cancer research, and chemotherapy. Ehrlich achieved renown as an organic chemist, histologist, hematologist, immunologist, and pharmacologist. He disliked the formality of school but managed to excel in Latin and mathematics. His role model was an older cousin, Carl Weigert, who became a lifelong friend. Ehrlich studied medicine at Breslau, Strasbourg, Freiburg, and Leipzig, coming under the influence of Wilhelm Waldeyer, Julius Cohnheim, Rudolf Heidenhein, and Ferdinand Cohn. As a medical student, Ehrlich was captivated by structural organic chemistry and dyes. When he was 23, his first paper was published on selective staining. His doctoral thesis, "Contribution to the Theory and Practice of Histological Staining" contained most of the germinal ideas that would guide his future career. Most of his early work was centered in Berlin at Charite Hospital, where he did pioneering studies on blood and intravital staining, and at Robert Koch's Institute for Infectious Diseases, where he undertook important investigations in immunology. Ehrlich became an authority on antitoxin standardization and developed the "side-chain theory" of antibody formation for which he was later awarded the Nobel Prize. He became director of an Institute for Experimental Therapy in Frankfurt where he continued research in immunology and carried out routine serum testing. He developed new lines of investigation in cancer research and originated the field of chemotherapy. Using principles developed in his early work with dyes, he successfully treated certain experimental trypanosomal infections with azo dyes. His crowning accomplishment was discovering that the compound Salvarsan could control human syphilis. Ehrlich's legacy in immunology and chemotherapy is discussed and an intimate portrait is drawn of Ehrlich the person.

  19. Moon-Struck: Artists Rediscover Nature And Observe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, Roberta J. M.

    We discuss rare early depictions of the Moon by artists who actually observed Earth's nearest neighbor rather than relying on stylized formulas. The earliest, from the 14th and 15th centuries, reveal that revolutionary advances in both pre-telescopic astronomy and naturalistic painting could go hand-in-hand. This link suggests that when painters observed the world, their definition of world could also include the heavens and the Moon. Many of the artists we discuss - e.g., Pietro Lorenzetti, Giotto, and Jan Van Eyck - actually studied the Moon, incorporating their studies into several works. We also consider the star map on the dome over the altar in the Old Sacristy of San Lorenzo, Florence (c. 1442), whose likely advisor was Toscanelli. In addition, we examine representations by artists who painted for Popes Julius II and Leo X - Raphael and Sebastiano del Piombo, both of whom were influenced by individuals at the papal court, such as the astronomer, painter, and cartographer Johann (Giovanni) Ruysch and Leonardo da Vinci. We also discuss Leonardo's pre-telescopic notes and lunar drawings as they impacted on art and science in Florence, where Galileo would study perspective and chiaroscuro. Galileo's representations of the Moon (engraved in his Sidereus Nuncius, 1610) are noted, together with those by Harriot and Galileo's friend, the painter Cigoli. During the 17th century, the Moon's features were telescopically mapped by astronomers with repercussions in art, e.g., paintings by Donati Creti and Raimondo Manzini as well as Adam Elsheimer. Ending with a consideration of the 19th-century artists/astronomers John Russell and John Brett and early lunar photography, we demonstrate that artistic and scientific visual acuity belonged to the burgeoning empiricism of the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries that eventually yielded modern observational astronomy.

  20. Space flight and the skeleton: lessons for the earthbound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1997-01-01

    Loss of bone during extended space flight has long been a concern that could limit the ability of humans to explore the universe. Surprisingly, the available data do not support the concept that weightlessness leads inexorably to a depleted skeleton unable to withstand the stress of a return to a 1-g environment. Nevertheless, some bone loss does occur, especially in those bones most stressed by gravity prior to flight, which provides confirmation of the proposal formulated over a century ago by Julius Wolff that mechanical stress determines the form and function of bone. Although the phenomenon of bone loss with skeletal unloading, whether by space flight or immobilization or just taking a load off your feet (literally) is well established, the mechanisms by which bone senses load and adjusts to it are not so clear. What actually is the stimulus, and what are the sensors? What are the target cells? How do the sensors communicate the message into the cells, and by what pathways do the cells respond? What is the role of endocrine, factors vs. paracrine or autocrine factors in mediating or modulating the response? None of these questions has been answered with certainty, but, as will become apparent in this review, we have some clues directing us to the answers. Although the focus of this review concerns space flight, it seems highly likely that the mechanisms mediating the transmission of mechanical load to changes in bone formation and resorption apply equally well to all forms of disuse osteoporosis and are likely to be the same mechanisms affected by other etiologies of osteoporosis.

  1. Spaceflight and the skeleton: lessons for the earthbound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1997-01-01

    Loss of bone during extended space flight has long been a concern that could limit the ability of humans to explore the universe. Surprisingly the available data do not support the concept that weightlessness leads inexorably to a depleted skeleton unable to withstand the stress of a return to a 1g environment. Nevertheless, some bone loss does occur especially in those bones most stressed by gravity prior to flight, providing confirmation of the proposal formulated over a century ago by Julius Wolff that mechanical stress determines the form and function of bone. Although the phenomenon of bone loss with skeletal unloading, whether by space flight or immobilization or just taking a load off your feet (literally) is well established, the mechanisms by which bone senses load and adjusts to it are not so clear. What actually is the stimulus and what are the sensors? What are the target cells? How do the sensors communicate the message into the cells, and by what pathways do the cells respond? What is the role of endocrine factors versus paracrine or autocrine factors in mediating or modulating the response? None of these questions has been answered with certainty, but as will become apparent in this review, we have some clues directing us to the answers. Although the focus of this review concerns space flight, it seems highly likely that the mechanisms mediating the transmission of mechanical load to changes in bone formation and resorption apply equally well to all forms of disuse osteoporosis, and are likely to be the same mechanisms affected by other etiologies of osteoporosis.

  2. Kleiber's Law: How the Fire of Life ignited debate, fueled theory, and neglected plants as model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Size is a key feature of any organism since it influences the rate at which resources are consumed and thus affects metabolic rates. In the 1930s, size-dependent relationships were codified as “allometry” and it was shown that most of these could be quantified using the slopes of log-log plots of any 2 variables of interest. During the decades that followed, physiologists explored how animal respiration rates varied as a function of body size across taxa. The expectation was that rates would scale as the 2/3 power of body size as a reflection of the Euclidean relationship between surface area and volume. However, the work of Max Kleiber (1893–1976) and others revealed that animal respiration rates apparently scale more closely as the 3/4 power of body size. This phenomenology, which is called “Kleiber's Law,” has been described for a broad range of organisms, including some algae and plants. It has also been severely criticized on theoretical and empirical grounds. Here, we review the history of the analysis of metabolism, which originated with the works of Antoine L. Lavoisier (1743–1794) and Julius Sachs (1832–1897), and culminated in Kleiber's book The Fire of Life (1961; 2. ed. 1975). We then evaluate some of the criticisms that have been leveled against Kleiber's Law and some examples of the theories that have tried to explain it. We revive the speculation that intracellular exo- and endocytotic processes are resource delivery-systems, analogous to the supercellular systems in multicellular organisms. Finally, we present data that cast doubt on the existence of a single scaling relationship between growth and body size in plants. PMID:26156204

  3. Eternal Rome: Guardian of the Heavenly Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latura, G.

    2016-01-01

    The power of the Roman Empire did not come solely by way of brutal force. A spiritual vision inherited from the Greeks inspired the Romans—an ascent through the classical Planets to the intersections with the Milky Way, where stood the gates of heaven. This vision stretches back, through Macrobius and Cicero, to Plato's Republic and Timaeus. The Eternal City, capital of the Empire for four centuries, claimed control over the celestial portals, a tradition that is traced on Roman coins and medals over thousands of years. Julius Caesar borrowed enormous sums to campaign for the office of Pontifex Maximus—high priest of Rome—spending a fortune on “bread and circuses” to secure the support of the masses. Consolidating power at every turn, Caesar as dictator-for-life became absolute master of Rome, the city that, according to its coins, ruled the cosmos. Though his mortal frame fell to the knives of the senators, Caesar's soul was seen ascending to heaven as a comet. Thus was born the myth of Divvs Ivlivs—the divine avatar of the Roman Empire, whose name would become synonymous with the title of emperor over millennia (German Kaiser, Hungarian Csaszar, Russian Tsar, to name a few). Caesar's heir, Octavian, piously waited for Lepidus to die of old age before grabbing the office of Pontifex Maximus for himself, a title that would define the celestial authority of the ruler of Rome until Gratian renounced it four centuries later. Ambrose, bishop of Milan, convinced Gratian that such a pagan title was not fit for a Christian. Once the Roman emperor discarded the title Pontifex Maximus, the bishop of Rome picked it up and placed it above his own head, as can be seen on coins and medals of the Vatican to this day. In Jubilee years, the Pope knocks down the brick wall that has kept closed the Holy Door for a generation, a ceremony that reaffirms Rome's control of the celestial gates.

  4. French neuropsychiatry in the Great War: between moral support and electricity.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Tatu, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    In World War I, an unprecedented number of soldiers were suffering from nervous disturbances, known as war psychoneuroses. Mechanisms of commotion, emotion, and suggestion were defined in order to explain these disturbances. In France, emphasis was placed on the mechanism of suggestion, based on pithiatism, introduced by Joseph Babinski (1857-1932) before the war to highlight the concept of suggestion and its hazy border with simulation. As a result, many soldiers suffering from war neuroses became considered as simulators or malingerers who were merely attempting to escape the front. A medical-military collusion ensued with the aim of sending as many of these nervous cases back to the front as possible through the use of painful or experimental therapies. Aggressive therapies flourished including torpillage, a particularly painful form of electrotherapy developed by Clovis Vincent (1879-1947) and subsequently by Gustave Roussy (1874-1948). At the end of the war, some psychiatrists, such as Paul Sollier (1861-1933), Georges Dumas (1866-1946), and Paul Voivenel (1880-1975), developed a more psychological approach. In Great Britain, where Charles Myers (1873-1946) coined the term shell shock in 1915 to describe these cases, psychological theories were more successful. In Germany, aggressive therapies developed by Fritz Kaufmann (1875-1941) emerged in the second part of the war. In Austria, the future Nobel Prize winner Julius Wagner-Jauregg (1857-1940) was accused of performing violent therapies on patients with war neuroses. These methods, which now seem barbarian or inhuman, were largely accepted at the time in the medical community and today should be judged with caution given the cultural, patriotic, and medical background of the Great War.

  5. Kleiber's Law: How the Fire of Life ignited debate, fueled theory, and neglected plants as model organisms.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Size is a key feature of any organism since it influences the rate at which resources are consumed and thus affects metabolic rates. In the 1930s, size-dependent relationships were codified as "allometry" and it was shown that most of these could be quantified using the slopes of log-log plots of any 2 variables of interest. During the decades that followed, physiologists explored how animal respiration rates varied as a function of body size across taxa. The expectation was that rates would scale as the 2/3 power of body size as a reflection of the Euclidean relationship between surface area and volume. However, the work of Max Kleiber (1893-1976) and others revealed that animal respiration rates apparently scale more closely as the 3/4 power of body size. This phenomenology, which is called "Kleiber's Law," has been described for a broad range of organisms, including some algae and plants. It has also been severely criticized on theoretical and empirical grounds. Here, we review the history of the analysis of metabolism, which originated with the works of Antoine L. Lavoisier (1743-1794) and Julius Sachs (1832-1897), and culminated in Kleiber's book The Fire of Life (1961; 2. ed. 1975). We then evaluate some of the criticisms that have been leveled against Kleiber's Law and some examples of the theories that have tried to explain it. We revive the speculation that intracellular exo- and endocytotic processes are resource delivery-systems, analogous to the supercellular systems in multicellular organisms. Finally, we present data that cast doubt on the existence of a single scaling relationship between growth and body size in plants.

  6. 100th anniversary of the Fourth International Congress of Thalassotherapy in Opatija.

    PubMed

    Fischinger, Ales; Fischinger, Dusa; Fischinger, Janez; Skrobonja, Ante

    2008-01-01

    The authors of the text have been particularly interested into the organization, the procedure,the accompanying activities as well as the themes covered at 4th International Congress of Thalassotherapy in Opatija in 1908. The Congress was organised by the then head of the thermal spa resort Professor Dr.Julius Glax. The official languages at the Congress were German, French, English, and also Italian and Croatian as the languages of the hosting country. Each lecturer had twenty minutes time to give a lecture or a co-lecture, ten minutes for papers and five for a follow-up discussion. The participants could make use of the information centre of the Congress, in the centre of Opatija, the whole day. Unofficially, the Congress started on 27th September 1908 with the introductory evening for all the participants in Adria Club. The Congress officially began on 28th September 1908 when all the participants gathered at the theatre hall of Hotel Stephanie. The lectures were presented in the morning. In the afternoon, the participants were taken to visit some exhibitions (e.g. the medical exhibition at Hotel Palace, the exhibition of the native Istrian-Dalmatian home crafts and antiquates and the painting exhibition at Vila Angiolina), a short sea voyage through the bay of Kvarner. On the last day of the Congress, the participants observed the sanitary conditions in Opatija (the water supply, the sewer system, litter incinerator, and quarantine for infectious illnesses), three sanatoriums, Zander's Institute, the rehabilitating-heart paths and the Archduke Ludwig-Viktor's indoor baths. The round-Opatija tour was followed by the concluding meeting and the conclusion of the Congress. The authors of this research have established that there are no important differences in the organization and realization of the congresses in the past and now.

  7. [German neurology and neurologists during the Third Reich: the aftermath].

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Fangerau, H; Karenberg, A

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the consequences for neurology as a discipline which resulted from neurologists' participation in the crimes committed under National Socialism (NS). Chronologically, the current literature distinguishes mainly four overlapping stages: (1) a first phase was characterized by legal persecution and "denazification", which was also the time of the Nuremberg doctors' trial in which no neurologists were on trial. A detailed documentation of the trial for the German medical profession was published by Alexander Mitscherlich. (2) In the subsequent practice of wide amnestying and reintegration of former Nazi followers during the 1950s, neurologists were no exception as its elite continued in their positions. The year 1953 was the year of the Lisbon scandal, when chiefly Dutch representatives protested against the participation of Julius Hallervorden in the International Congress of Neurology. The newly founded societies, the German Society for Neurology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurologie, DGN) and the German Society for Psychiatry and Neurology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychiatrie und Neurologie, DGPN), unanimously supported their member. (3) The next period was characterized by a nascent criticism of the prevailing attitude of covering up the crimes committed by physicians during the Nazi period. The discovery of incriminating brain sections at various Max Planck Institutes brought neurology to the focus of the debate. (4) Since the 1980s and 1990s historians (of medicine) have been systematically examining medicine's Nazi past in a professional way, which resulted in a noticeable increase of knowledge. Additionally, a new generation of scholars provoked a change of mind insofar as they recognized medicine's responsibility for the crimes committed between 1933 and 1945. We expect that future historical research will further elucidate the history of neurology during the NS regime and have consequences for our current understanding of research

  8. Mine-to-Mill Optimization of Aggregate Production

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Adel; Toni Kojovic; Darren Thornton

    2006-06-01

    Mine-to-Mill optimization is a total systems approach to the reduction of energy and cost in mining and mineral processing operations. Developed at the Julius Krutschnitt Mineral Research Centre (JKMRC) in Queensland, Australia, the Mine-to-Mill approach attempts to minimize energy consumption through the optimization of all steps in the size reduction process. The approach involves sampling and modeling of blasting and processing, followed by computer simulation to optimize the operation and develop alternatives. The most promising alternatives are implemented, and sampling is conducted to quantify energy savings. In the current project, the primary objective is to adapt the JKMRC Mine-to-Mill technology to the aggregates industry. The second phase of this project is being carried out at the Pittsboro Quarry located south of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. This quarry is owned by 3M Corporation and operated by Luck Stone. Based on lessons learned from the first phase work, long-term monitoring ({approx} three months) of all quarry operations is being carried out to minimize the impact of geological changes during the mining process. To date, the blasting and processing operations have been audited and modeled, the long-term monitoring of current Luck Stone practice has been completed, and a modified blasting approach has been implemented based on the results of simulations using JKSimBlast and JKSimPlant. The modified blasting approach is expected to increase the primary throughput by 15% and the secondary throughput by approximately 6%, with an overall specific energy reduction of around 1%. Long-term monitoring is currently underway to evaluate the impact the modified blasting approach. This report summarizes the current status of work at the Pittsboro Quarry.

  9. Epic Moon: a history of lunar exploration in the age of the telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, William P.; Dobbins, Thomas A.

    As early as 1609 Galileo's first telescope showed the Moon to be another world. The Moon has thus been the object of intense study not only since the 1960s but for at least the previous three and a half centuries. The first "race to the Moon" was not undertaken by American astronauts and Soviet cosmonauts but by German and British selenographers in the nineteenth century, who mapped lunar detail so painstakingly that by 1878 - the year Julius Schmidt of the Athens Observatory published his great Moon map. In part, the reason for the long preoccupation with lunar surface details lay in the fact that the mapping of the Moon provided a form of therapy for astronomically inclined obsessive personalities. In part, too, it lay in the partiality of selenographers for the project - first systematically pursued by Johann Schroeter at the end of the eighteenth century - of discovering evidence of minor changes in the lunar surface. What became a Promethean quest for changes - veils, clouds, landslips, eruptions - was initially tied in with the theory that the lunar surface features had been formed by volcanic eruptions; however, it curiously survived the demise of the volcanic theory and still shows intermittent gasps of life in the largely amateur-driven search for transient lunar phenomena, or TLP. The long era of pre-Apollo lunar studies is a fascinating subject that has never been told in detail. Though there was a lapse of interest in the Moon in the immediate post-Apollo era, there has been a recent "return to the Moon" with the successful Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions. There is also growing evidence of a return of amateur observers to the Moon as an object worthy of their attentions. This is understandable inasmuch as the Moon remains the most accessible planetary realm; it is, moreover, the only alien world open to geological prospecting from the eyepiece of the backyard telescope. In that sense, this book is - like the Moon itself - both timely and

  10. The Tenth Frederick H. Verhoeff lecture. What else did 1864 contribute to ophthalmology?

    PubMed Central

    Blodi, F C

    1989-01-01

    In summary we can say that the AOS was founded at a time when ophthalmology established itself as an independent scientific medical specialty. A hundred years earlier, in 1750, ophthalmology became an independent surgical specialty when Jacques Daviel of Marseille had begun extracting a cataract instead of merely couching or dislocating the lens. Now in the middle of the 19th century a new era dawned on the ophthalmic horizon. An era which Julius Hirschberg calls "the reform of ophthalmology." It was effected mainly by a group of unusual, gifted and genial scholars. Hermann v. Helmholtz, who not only invented the ophthalmoscope, but established with his handbook physiologic optics as an advanced, sophisticated branch of optics and mathematics; F.C. Donders, who put refraction, refractive errors and accommodation on a sound scientific footing, the great A. v. Graefe, who contributed so much to the concept and treatment of glaucoma, to strabismus, to various diseases of the fundus, to neuro-ophthalmology and to many other fields and finally William Bowman, the great investigator, clinician and surgeon. It was during this time of reform, of fermentation, of maturation, that a group of farsighted American ophthalmologists decided to establish a society to further the aims and objectives of our specialty in America. The time was right; the effort succeeded and our society developed into one of the decisive forces of American ophthalmology. I hope that my address has met the objectives which I had outlined earlier: To present and illuminate the circumstances and external conditions which were effective in 1864 when our society was founded. At the same time I hope I have done justice to the memory of this outstanding American ophthalmologist, Frederick Verhoeff, who contributed so much to the American Ophthalmological Society. On this the quasquicentennial jubilee of the AOS we find the Society healthy and flourishing. May it continue as an association of the most

  11. If bone is the answer, then what is the question?

    PubMed Central

    HUISKES, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the 19th century, several scientists attempted to relate bone trabecular morphology to its mechanical, load-bearing function. It was suggested that bone architecture was an answer to requirements of optimal stress transfer, pairing maximal strength to minimal weight, according to particular mathematical design rules. Using contemporary methods of analysis, stress transfer in bones was studied and compared with anatomical specimens, from which it was hypothesised that trabecular architecture is associated with stress trajectories. Others focused on the biological processes by which trabecular architectures are formed and on the question of how bone could maintain the relationship between external load and architecture in a variable functional environment. Wilhelm Roux introduced the principle of functional adaptation as a self-organising process based in the tissues. Julius Wolff, anatomist and orthopaedic surgeon, entwined these 3 issues in his book The Law of Bone Remodeling (translation), which set the stage for biomechanical research goals in our day. ‘Wolff's Law’ is a question rather than a law, asking for the requirements of structural optimisation. In this article, based on finite element analysis (FEA) results of stress transfer in bones, it is argued that it was the wrong question, putting us on the wrong foot. The maximal strength/minimal weight principle does not provide a rationale for architectural formation or adaptation; the similarity between trabecular orientation and stress trajectories is circumstantial, not causal. Based on computer simulations of bone remodelling as a regulatory process, governed by mechanical usage and orchestrated by osteocyte mechanosensitivity, it is shown that Roux's paradigm, conversely, is a realistic proposition. Put in a quantitative regulatory context, it can predict both trabecular formation and adaptation. Hence, trabecular architecture is not an answer to Wolff's question, in the sense of this article

  12. [The concise history of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Tamás

    2007-01-01

    The author reviews the history of atrial fibrillation, the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. The chaotic irregularity of arterial pulse was clearly acknowledged by most of physicians of the ancient China, Egypt and Greece. William Harvey (1578-1657), who first described the circulatory system appropriately, was probably the first to describe fibrillation of the auricles in animals in 1628. The French "clinical pathologist", Jean Baptist de Sénac (1693-1770) was the first who assumed a correlation between "rebellious palpitation" and stenosis of the mitral valve. Robert Adams (1791-1875) also reported in 1827 the association of irregular pulses and mitral stenosis. The discovery of digitalis leaf in 1785 by William Withering (1741-1799) brought relief to patients with atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure by reducing the ventricular rate. From an analysis of simultaneously recorded arterial and venous pressure curves, the Scottish Sir James Mackenzie (1853-11925) demonstrated that a presystolic wave cannot be seen during "pulsus irregularis perpetuus", a term very first used by Heinrich Ewald Hering (1866-1948). Arthur Cushny (1866-1926) noted the similarity between pulse curves in clinical "delirium cordis" and those in dogs with atrial fibrillation. The first human ECG depicting atrial fibrillation was published by Willem Einthoven (1860-1927) in 1906. The proof of a direct connection between absolute arrhythmia and atrial fibrillation was established by two Viennese physicians, Carl Julius Rothberger and Heinrich Winterberg in 1909. Sir Thomas Lewis (1881-1945), the father of modem electrocardiography, studied electrophysiological characteristics of atrial fibrillation and has shown that its basic perpetuating mechanism is circus movement of electrical impulse (re-entry). After him, the major discoveries relating to the pathophysiology and clinical features of atrial fibrillation in the 20th century stemmed from Karel Frederick Wenckebach

  13. ["Nicolaus Ficke... who practiced physiognomy, astrology, etc. was also a bad man"].

    PubMed

    Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    This arcticle summarizes what could be learned from newly discovered documents about the biography of Nicolas von Vicken, first known reader of Kepler's "Astronomia Nova" and Kepler's partner in an exchange of more than a dozen letters over several years. Von Vicken stems from a rich and influential family of merchants in Riga, made noble by the Polish King (who ruled Riga at the time) in 1580. His education included legal studies at the universities of Königsberg, Leipzig and Rostock, partially overlapping with a stay of ten years at the Polish court. There von Vicken pursued family business but also served in an official court role. In 1600/1 von Vicken switched sides and started to serve the Swedish ruler (and later king) Duke Carl IX, who was at war with Poland to gain control over Riga and Livonia. In 1602 a mission for Sweden to Northern Germany brought him in conflict with Francis II, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg, who accused von Vicken of withholding money from him, which was supposed to be used for hiring troops. Von Vicken, together with his brother Heinrich, was imprisoned, but could flee. During a mission to Maximilian III, Archduke of Austria, in 1599/1600 von Vicken had been initiated as an alchemist and astrologer through reading the works of Paracelsus and his future stations in life were influenced by this. These include an attempt to get employed at the Saxon court in Dresden, and stays in Wolfenbiittel and Halberstadt, both ruled by Duke Henry Julius of Brunswick-Lüneburg. Von Vicken offered various astrological and alchemical services to the Duke and private investors. With one of them he got into a serious conflict over the alleged non-fillment of a contract to produce steel in an alchemical way. During that von Vicken got imprisoned twice, in 1609 and between 1611 and 1614. A subsequent attempt to get employed by Ernst of Schaumburg left us with several letters that detail von Vicken's alchemical and astrological thinking, two of these are

  14. Effect of early intensive multifactorial therapy on 5-year cardiovascular outcomes in individuals with type 2 diabetes detected by screening (ADDITION-Europe): a cluster-randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Simon J; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh; Rutten, Guy EHM; Sandbæk, Annelli; Sharp, Stephen J; Simmons, Rebecca K; van den Donk, Maureen; Wareham, Nicholas J; Lauritzen, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Foundation for General Practice, Danish Centre for Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment, Danish National Board of Health, Danish Medical Research Council, Aarhus University Research Foundation, Wellcome Trust, UK Medical Research Council, UK NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme, UK National Health Service R&D, UK National Institute for Health Research, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Novo Nordisk, Astra, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Servier, HemoCue, Merck. PMID:21705063

  15. Eclipses and the Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

    2000-12-01

    Like returns of Halley's comet the Olympic games occur periodically, though not as regularly in antiquity. Dates were also imprecise due to the chaotic calendars in use. Reported sightings of comets and eclipses can be used with game dates to help fix ancient events. However some reported darkening of the sun, e.g., after Julius Caesar's murder in 44 BC, was due to volcanic eruptions. A red comet, visible in daylight, first appeared during the games that year. It was also seen from China and Korea (Pang, Sciences 31, 30). Phlegon's ``Olympiads" (2nd century) says that Christ's crucifixion was in the 4th year of the 202nd Olympiad (AD 29-33), when a total solar eclipse occurred in the 6th hour. Only the Nov. 24, AD 29 eclipse over Asia Minor can match that, and Joel's prophecy (Acts 2, 14-21) that ``the sun will be turned to darkness and moon to blood." However it conflicts with ``the first day of Passover," as recorded by Mathew, Mark and Luke, i.e., full moon in early spring. Humphreys and Waddington (Nature 306, 743) have suggested meteorological darkening and the April 3, AD 33 lunar eclipse instead. Schaefer has questioned the eclipse's visibility from Jerusalem (31.46N, 35.14E). The six computations he cited gave dissimilar answers due to the imprecise rates of the secular lunar acceleration, and lengthening of the day used (Q.Jl.R.astr.Soc. 31, 53). Lunar laser ranging has since fixed the former at -26"/cen2. Analysis of ancient Chinese solar eclipse records, e.g., the April 21, 899 BC and April 4, AD 368 ``double dawns" over Zheng, has given us a delta T (in sec) = 30t2, where t is centuries before 1800 (Pang, Yau and Chou, in ``Dynamics of Ice Age Earth: A Modern Perspective," 1998). Our computations show that the moon rose over Jerusalem, with 1/3 still in the umbra and the rest in penumbra. Holdover meteorological darkening with long absorption air mass could have help reddened the moon also. Finally the first ``eclipse season" (the Aug. 21 lunar, and

  16. ``But I am constant as the North Star*'' - The Return of Polaris as a Low Amplitude Classical Cepheid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. J.; Tracey, J. C.; Engle, S. G.; Guinan, E. F.

    2002-12-01

    * Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare Polaris ( ≈ +2.0 mag; B-V = +0.60; F7 Ib) is a low amplitude Classical Cepheid with a pulsation period of P = 3.97 days. Polaris is one of the nearest (dHipparcos = 132 +/- 8 pc) and brightest Cepheid. This Cepheid (Polaris A) is the luminous member of the multiple star system (ADS 1477). Over the last century amazing changing have been occurring for this famous star. The pulsation period has been increasing a rate of dP/dt = +3.2 sec/yr while the light amplitude has decreased from ~0.12 mag (1900s) to ~0.02 mag (early1990s). A recent summary and thorough discussion of Polaris's interesting properties are given by Evans et al. (2002, ApJ, 567, 1121). We have been carrying out photoelectric photometry of Polaris starting in early 2002. This photometry is a continuation of the work done on Polaris by Kamper and Fernie. Our observations were made to obtain new epochal light curves and accurate times of maximum light. We secured well defined 450 nm and 550 nm light curves from which we extracted accurate measures of light amplitudes of 0.033 +/- 0.004 mag and 0.028 +/- 0.003 mag, respectively. These light amplitudes are slightly larger than those observed during the early 1990s. So it appears that the century long decrease in the light amplitude has halted (or paused). Our time of maximum light was combined with previous timings and reaffirms the increase in period of +3.2 sec/yr. These observations lend strong support to overtone nature of Polaris's pulsations, whose transition from moderate to low amplitude pulsator will be discussed in more detail in this poster. In addition to the long-term secular increase in the Polaris's pulsation period, an analysis of the O-Cs indicates +/-0.25 day cyclic oscillations in the apparent period with time scale of 11-12 years. The nature of these period oscillations is being investigated and will be discussed. We gratefully acknowledge the support for this research from NSF/RUI Grant AST 00

  17. In vivo osteoinductive effect and in vitro isolation and cultivation bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Redzić, Amira; Smajilagić, Amer; Aljicević, Mufida; Berberović, Ljubomir

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow contains cell type termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), first recognized in bone marrow by a German pathologist, Julius Cohnheim in 1867. That MSCs have potential to differentiate in vitro in to the various cells lines as osteoblast, chondroblast, myoblast and adipoblast cells lines. Aims of our study were to show in vivo capacity of bone marrow MSC to produce bone in surgically created non critical size mandible defects New Zeland Rabbits, and then in second part of study to isolate in vitro MSC from bone marrow, as potential cell transplantation model in bone regeneration. In vivo study showed new bone detected on 3D CT reconstruction day 30, on all 3 animals non critical size defects, treated with bone marrow MSC exposed to the human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 (rhBMP-7). Average values of bone mineral density (BMD), was 530 mg/cm3, on MSC treated animals, and 553 mg/cm3 on control group of 3 animals where non critical size defects were treated with iliac crest autologue bone graft. Activity of the Alkaline Phosphatase enzyme were measurement on 0.5, 14, 21, 30 day and increased activity were detected day 14 on animals treated with bone marrow MSCs compared with day 30 on iliac crest treated animals. That results indicates strong osteoinduction activity of the experimental bone marrow MSCs models exposed to the rhBMP-7 factor Comparing ALP activity, that model showed superiorly results than control group. That result initiates us in opinion that MSCs alone should be alternative for the autolologue bone transplantation and in vitro study we isolated singles MSCs from the bone marrow of rat's tibia and femora and cultivated according to the method of Maniatopoulos et all. The small initial colonies of fibroblast like cells were photo-documented after 2 days of primary culture. Such isolated and cultivated MSCs in future studies will be exposed to the growth factors to differentiate in osteoblast and indicate their clinically potential as alternative

  18. "Interred with their bones" - linking soil micromorphology and chemistry to unlock the hidden archive of archaeological human burials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothwell, Don; Usai, Maria-Raimonda; Keely, Brendan; Pickering, Matt; Wilson, Clare

    2010-05-01

    "Interred with their bones" Acronym: InterArChive - an ERC-funded project *** " Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; " I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. " The evil that men do lives after them; " The good is oft 'interred with their bones'; " So let it be with Caesar. William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene 2. *** Background The state of decay within soils in archaeological graves is often such that degradable objects are not preserved in a condition that can be visually recognised. However, microscopic soil features, inorganic element distributions and organic residues can be measured. Thus, archaeological burial soils have the potential to reveal signatures of decay; pre-burial treatment; presence and nature of associated clothing and perishable artefacts; diet of the individual; cause of death; evidence of morbidity and drug-use. Aims • To develop and test a multidisciplinary approach linking soil micromorphology and chemistry to recover environmental and cultural information; • Revealing the hidden archaeological archive within the burial soil • Developing soil sampling and analysis recommendations for archaeological human burials Methods 1: Sampling and soil field description from archaeological sites contrasting in soil, geology, age, and culture and from experimental piglet burials 2: Microscopic/micromorphological analysis (micro-scale observations) of remains and features in burial soils. We will establish the order of occurrence, spatial patterns, displacement, mode of formation and decay of micromorphological features including exotic components, parasites, hair and remnants of footwear and clothing [cf. pilot study of soils from Yemen]; microfabrics and textural pedofeatures, also to facilitate resolution of body decay products from other accumulations. 3: Microprobe analysis (nano-scale) will generate elemental maps of soil thin sections, allowing identification of features with distinct chemical signatures

  19. [Obstetrics--a gear in the machinery of history].

    PubMed

    Schaller, A

    1998-01-01

    It was not Julius Caesar who was born by Caesarean section, as generally assumed, but Scipio Cornelius Africanus, who subdued Spain 100 years before Caesar's time. In chambers with walls of porphyrite, the Byzantine empresses used to give birth to the heirs to the throne. In England, the infertility of Queen Anne, who suffered from porphyria, led to the succession of the Protestant House of Hannover following the Catholic Stuarts. Christina of Sweden, called 'queen of baroque, rebel and scholar', was born in the 'caul'. At the age of 39 years, Johanna of Pfirt, married to Albrecht the Lame, secured the continuation of the Habsburg dynasty by giving birth to Rudolf the Founder. Maria Theresia, who had 16 children, was called 'mother-in-law of Europe'. She was delivered of her first child at the age of 19. The death of her sister Maria-Anna in childbed was one of the reasons why Gerard van Swieten was called to Vienna. Elisabeth of Württemberg, first wife of Franz I of Austria, died, not as a consequence of. but after a forceps operation carried out by Johann Lukas Boër. In England, Princess Charlotte, daughter of George IV, and her baby son died at the delivery; Sir Richard Croft, who had not used the forceps, committed suicide after this tragic incident. Being the next in succession, Victoria ascended the throne. The term 'narcose au chloroforme' (first used by James Young Simpson) was changed to 'narcose à la reine' after this method had been used at the birth of Victoria's eighth child by John Snow. It was Queen Victoria, who passed on haemophilia in European dynasties. When Marie Louise of Habsburg had her first child, Napoleon's son, the later Duke of Reichstadt, Antoine Dubois had to perform a turning of the transverse presentation and use the forceps on the head following after. The birth of Napoleon himself was a case of precipitate labour. Johann Klein, the successor of Boër, applied the forceps when Archduchess Sophie was delivered of her first child

  20. Adapting coastal structures to a moving relative sea level: Roman Time geoarchaeological evidence from Posillipo promontory (Naples, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucelli, Pietro; Cinque, Aldo; Giordano, Francesco; Mattei, Gaia; Pappone, Gerardo; Rizzo, Angela

    2016-04-01

    The Posillipo promontory belongs to the southern periphery the active volcanic complex called Campi Flegrei. Especially the central caldera of CF is well known for offering a rich geoarchaeological record of the vertical ground movements it has been suffering since Roman times; which includes the ruins of Portus Julius (built in 37 BC) presently found between 10 and 5 m bsl and the Middle Ages Lithophaga perforations at about 7m asl on the marble columns of the Serapeo building (Morhange, 2006 and references therein). In order to better constraint the vertical movements suffered by the Posillipo promontory during the last two millennia, we selected three geoarcaeolgical coastal sites (Nisida Roman port, Marechiaro Roman port and Villa Robery) and we studied them by means of both geomorphological observations and geophysical surveys (Side Scan Sonar and Single Beam echo-sounder). Within the submerged Roman port of Nisida, built in the 1st AD, we found two pilae of the ancient pier. The submersion measuring of the well-preserved one provided a palaeo-sea level at 3.1±0.30 m bsl. In the submerged Roman port of Marechiaro, we recognized a still preserved breakwater connected to the tuffaceous sea cliff, and submerged foundations of a 1st century small sea-side villa. Nearby there is also a two-storeyed Roman building (Palazzo degli Spiriti), built in the 1st cent. BC and later restructured to adapt to a phase of subsidence (Gunther 1908). From our submersion measurements, two different paleo-sea levels can be deduced: one for the 1st cent. BC at -4.4 + -0.50 m and another for the 1st cent. AD at -3 + - 0.30 m. Finally, in front of the modern Villa Rosebery the sea bottom shows a sub-horizontal element at -3m to -3.5m bsl, emerged during the 1st BC century. In fact, at least three houses were erected there during said century (Gunther, 1908). As the area was very little elevated, an alignment of pilae was also constructed to protect those houses from the breakers. By

  1. Mine-to-Mill Optimization of Aggregate Production

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Adel; Toni Kojovic; Darren Thornton

    2006-09-30

    Mine-to-Mill optimization is a total systems approach to the reduction of energy and cost in mining and processing. Developed at the Julius Krutschnitt Mineral Research Center in Queensland, Australia, the Mine-to-Mill approach attempts to minimize energy consumption through optimization of all steps in the size reduction process. The approach involves sampling and modeling of blasting and processing, followed by computer simulation to optimize the operation and develop alternatives. The most promising alternatives are implemented, and sampling is conducted to quantify benefits. In the current project, the primary objective was to adapt Mine-to-Mill technology to the aggregates industry. The first phase of this work was carried out at the Bealeton Quarry near Fredericksburg, Virginia. The second phase was carried out at the Pittsboro Quarry south of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Both quarries are operated by Luck Stone Corporation of Richmond, Virginia. As a result of the work, several conclusions can be drawn from the project which should assist DOE in assessing the applicability of the Mine-to-Mill approach to the aggregates industry. 1. Implementation of MTM guidelines at Pittsboro has resulted in tangible improvements in productivity. It is clear that MTM guidelines represent an energy savings of around 5% (primary and secondary) and an overall energy savings of 1%. This 1-5% energy savings is also consistent with simulated results for Bealeton had side-by-side shots used to evaluate the technology been carried out in the same rockmass. 2. Luck Stone clearly runs their operations at a high standard. Hence the percentage improvement realized in this project may represent the lower end of what might be expected overall in the aggregates industry. 3. Variability in ore types across both Bealeton and Pittsboro suggests a 2:1 difference in hardness which contradicts the misconception that quarry rock is homogenous. Therefore, the idea of comparing side-by-side blasts

  2. [Steadiness and progress. Medicine in Würzburg in the mirror of the centuries - a contribution to the foundation of the University of Würzburg 600 years ago].

    PubMed

    Vollmuth, Ralf; Keil, Gundolf

    2003-01-01

    In the year 1402 one of the first German universities was founded by bishop Johann von Egloffstein, but it had last in its full composition for only a few decades. Nevertheless, the 600th anniversary has a great importance, because in the 16th century, during the second foundation, there was an adequate tradition of university in Würzburg to lean on and go back to.Although, in a medical-history view, in 1402 this university had been without a greater importance, the medicine in Würzburg in the Middle Ages and the Early modern Times had been on a high level, what is shown by representatives like Ortolf von Baierland (13th century) and Berthold Blumentrost (14th century) or by documents like the 'Würzburger Wundarznei' at the end of the 15th century and the 'Nüttzlicher Bericht' by Walther Hermann Ryff, printed 1548 in Würzburg, as one of the first dental mongraphies.A lasting success was finally the university opened in the year 1582. In 1575/6 bishop Julius Echter von Mespelbrunn had reached, using the traditions of the university of 1402, a new privilege by the pope and the emperor. The medical faculty which was functional deeply connected with the Juliusspital as a kind of hospital right from the beginning, was determined by Wilhelm Schefferlein, Gottfriedt van der Steighe and Adriaen van Roomen. In the beginning of the 17th century the medical faculty turned pale, but two representatives of the philosophic faculty, Athanasius Kircher and Caspar Schott, accomplished remarkable outcomes in medical fields. Heavily stricken by the Thirty Years' War the medicine at the University of Würzburg was changed by the prince-bishops to the model of the University of Leiden, in order to improve the feeble position of the medical faculty. After not being successful in the beginning, the foundation of the blossom and of its worldwide importance had been laid in the last third of the 18th century. Karl Kaspar Siebold had, with the help of some of his fellows, students, and

  3. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP'09)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruntorad, Jan; Lokajicek, Milos

    2010-11-01

    Physics Milos Lokajicek (co-chair), Institute of Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague Vojtech Petracek, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering and especially the Programme Committee for their careful choice of conference contributions and their enormous work with organization of 340 post conference proceedings paper review Ludek Matyska (chair), CESNET Online Computing Volker Gülzow, DESY Jiri Masik, University of Manchester/on leave from Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague Event Processing Elizabeth Sexton-Kennedy, FNAL Tomas Davidek, Charles University, Prague Software Components, Tools and Databases Paolo Calafiura, LBNL Julius Hrivnac, LAL Track 4 Hardware and Computing Fabrics Takashi Sasaki, KEK Jiri Chudoba, Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague Grid Middleware and Networking Technologies Francesco Giacomini, CERN Ales Krenek, Masaryk University, Brno/CESNET Distributed Processing and Analysis Latchezar Betev, CERN Simon Lin, ASGC, Taipei Dagmar Adamova, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Prague Collaborative Tools Eva Hladka, Masaryk University, Brno/CESNET Thank you to all who made CHEP'09 a success. Jan Gruntorad and Milos Lokajicek CHEP'09 Conference Chairs Prague, March 2010 The PDF and HTML files contain a list of all CHEP'09 contributions.

  4. FOREWORD: Corfu Summer Institute on Elementary Particle Physics (CORFU2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, Konstantinos; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Fanourakis, George; Kehagias, Alexandros; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Wess, Julius; Zoupanos, George

    2006-12-01

    the CORFU2005:

  5. European Research Training Network: The Third Generation as a Probe for New Physics: Experimental and Technological Approach; The Quest for Unification Theory Confronts Experiment; Constituents Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe
  6. Greek Ministry of Education
  7. Municipality of Corfu and the Municipal Development Enterprise (ANEDK)
  8. Latsis Institution
  9. National Technical University and Ionian University
  10. CERN
  11. DESY
  12. Max--Planck--Institute for Physics, Munich
  13. Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics
  14. National Center of Scientific Research ``Demokritos'' and the Greek Atomic Energy Commission
  15. Olympic Airlines
  16. The Companies: Educational Tetras, Infoware, Kleos, Terra Kerkyra
  17. The telecommunication companies OTE and FORTHNET
  18. Konstantinos Anagnostopoulos, Ignatios Antoniadis, George Fanourakis, Alexandros Kehagias, Aurore Savoy-Navarro, Julius Wess and George Zoupanos Editors

  19. EDITORIAL More than a wire More than a wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-10-01

    from the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the US tackle this challenge by demonstrating a top-down method for fabricating nickel mono-silicide (NiSi) nanowires or nanolines. The work demonstrates a constant room temperature electrical resistivity of the NiSi nanowires as the line widths are reduced to as low as 23 nm [5]. The field effect transistor, the closest device under current research to that comprising the transistor first patented by physicist Julius Edgar Lilienfeld in Canada in 1925, has become the focus of a large proportion of research in nanoscale science and technology. Up to now, most devices have been based on natural n-type transition metal oxides, but synthesis of p-type metal oxide nanowires enables the development of novel complementary nanowire devices and circuits, including LEDs, electrically driven nanolasers and multiplexing biosensors. Doping is the most common means of producing p-type semiconductor nanowires but the stability and reproducibility of these structures are often poor. A collaboration of researchers in China and Singapore has demonstrated that CuO nanowires could be a promising candidate for a p-type field-effect transistor [6]. The sensitivity of nanowires to gases in their surroundings has stimulated considerable interest for applications in sensing, and the CuO nanowires in this report also exhibit a high response to CO gas in air at 200 °C. In this issue, researchers in Korea and the US provide an overview of the use of nanomaterials in memory technology [7]. The review provides details of the current status and future prospects of alternatives that may become available in the near future for phase-change RAM, ferroelectric RAM and magnetic RAM, as well as other novel architectures under investigation such as molecular memory and devices based on carbon nanotubes. Nanowires feature here as well. Although, as pointed out in the review the use of nanowires in phase-change RAM is still far from being at the

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Multipole Theory in Electromagnetism: Classical, Quantum and Symmetry Aspects, with Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihvola, Ari

    2005-03-01

    `Good reasons must, of force, give place to better', observes Brutus to Cassius, according to William Shakespeare in Julius Caesar. Roger Raab and Owen de Lange seem to agree, as they cite this sentence in the concluding chapter of their new book on the importance of exact multipole analysis in macroscopic electromagnetics. Very true and essential to remember in our daily research work. The two scientists from the University of Natal in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa (presently University of KwaZulu-Natal) have been working for a very long time on the accurate description of electric and magnetic response of matter and have published much of their findings in various physics journals. The present book gives us a clear and coherent exposition of many of these results. The important message of Raab and de Lange is that in the macroscopic description of matter, a correct balance between the various orders of electric and magnetic multipole terms has to be respected. If the inclusion of magnetic dipole terms is not complemented with electric quadrupoles, there is a risk of losing the translational invariance of certain important quantities. This means that the values of these quantities depend on the choice of the origin! `It canÂ't be Nature, for it is not sense' is another of the apt literary citations in the book. Often monographs written by researchers look like they have been produced using a cut-and-paste technique; earlier published articles are included in the same book but, unfortunately, too little additional effort is expended into moulding the totality into a unified story. This is not the case with Raab and de Lange. The structure and the text flow of the book serve perfectly its important message. After the obligatory introduction of material response to electromagnetic fields, constitutive relations, basic quantum theory and spacetime properties, a chapter follows with transmission and scattering effects where everything seems to work well with the `old

  21. Arsenic and Old Mustard: Chemical Problems of Old Arsenical and 'Mustard' Munitions (Joseph F. Bunnett and Marian Mikotajczyk, Eds.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Benjamin

    1999-10-01

    What do Knute Rockne, Notre Dame's famed football coach, and Lewisite, a chemical warfare agent dubbed "the dew of death", have in common? Both owe their discovery to Father Julius Arthur Nieuwland.1 Rockne's legacy lives on in the Fighting Irish and their tradition of excellence on the gridiron. Lewisite, together with other arsenical- and mustard-type chemical warfare agents, provide a legacy that lives on, too, but with less cheerful consequences. The book Arsenic and Old Mustard: Chemical Problems of Old Arsenical and 'Mustard' Munitions makes clear the challenges faced in dealing with those consequences. This book documents the proceedings of a workshop devoted to arsenical- and mustard-type chemical warfare agents and their associated munitions. The workshop, held in Poland in 1996, included nine lectures, eight posters, and three discussion groups; and the contents of all these are presented. Major support for the workshop came from the Scientific Affairs Division of NATO as part of on ongoing series of meetings, cooperative research projects, and related efforts dealing with problems leftover from the Cold War and, in the case of the arsenicals and mustards, from conflicts dating to World War I. These problems can be seen in contemporary accounts, including a January 1999 news report that the U.S. Department of Defense intends to survey Washington, DC, areas near both American University and the Catholic University of America (CUA), site of the original synthesis of Lewisite, for chemical warfare agents and other materials disposed at the end of World War I.2 The first nine chapters of the book present the workshop's lectures. Of these, readers interested in chemical weapon destruction might find especially useful the first chapter, in which Ron Mansley of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons presents a scholarly overview covering historical aspects of the arsenicals and mustards; their production and use; prospective destruction

  22. Obituary: Hans Albrecht Bethe, 1906-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijers, Ralph

    2007-12-01

    One of the unquestioned giants of physics and astrophysics, Hans Bethe, died on 6 March 2005, at the venerable age of 98, in his home town of Ithaca, New York. Seven decades of contributing to research and a Nobel Prize for his work on stellar hydrogen burning make a listing of his honors superfluous (besides being impossible in this space). Bethe was born in Strassburg, in then German Alsass Lothringen, on 2 July 1906. His father, Albrecht Julius Bethe (1872-1954), taught physiology at the University, and his mother, Anna Kuhn (1876-1966), was a musician and writer. Both his grandfathers were physicians. He spent his youth in Strassburg, Kiel, and Frankfurt, and some time in sanatoria due to tuberculosis. Hans's first scientific paper, at age 18, was with his father and a colleague, on dialysis. His education and early career in Germany brought him into contact with many top stars in the quantum revolution. Starting in Frankfurt in chemistry, Bethe soon switched to physics, taught there by Walter Gerlach and Karl Meissner, among others. In 1926, he successfully applied to join Arnold Sommerfeld's group in Munich, where he met one of his later long-term collaborators, Rudolf Peierls. Bethe considered his entry into physics to have come at an ideal time, with the new ideas of wave mechanics being developed and discussed right there; it was certainly also at an ideal place. His doctoral thesis was on the theory of electron diffraction by crystals, following the experimental work by Clinton Davisson and Lester Germer and the work on X-ray diffraction by Max von Laue and Paul Ewald. The newly minted doctor went from there briefly to Frankfurt and then to Ewald in Stuttgart, where he felt at home academically and personally. In 1939, Bethe would marry Ewald's daughter Rose. Not much later, though, Sommerfeld recalled him to Munich, where Sommerfeld created a Privatdozent position for him. There he worked out the solution for a linear chain of coupled spins by what we