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Sample records for junction resolvase subunit

  1. Holliday Junction Resolvases

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Haley D.M.; West, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. PMID:25183833

  2. Holliday junction resolvases.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Haley D M; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-02

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Crystal structure of RuvC resolvase in complex with Holliday junction substrate

    PubMed Central

    Górecka, Karolina M.; Komorowska, Weronika; Nowotny, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    The key intermediate in genetic recombination is the Holliday junction (HJ), a four-way DNA structure. At the end of recombination, HJs are cleaved by specific nucleases called resolvases. In Gram-negative bacteria, this cleavage is performed by RuvC, a dimeric endonuclease that belongs to the retroviral integrase superfamily. Here, we report the first crystal structure of RuvC in complex with a synthetic HJ solved at 3.75 Å resolution. The junction in the complex is in an unfolded 2-fold symmetrical conformation, in which the four arms point toward the vertices of a tetrahedron. The two scissile phosphates are located one nucleotide from the strand exchange point, and RuvC approaches them from the minor groove side. The key protein–DNA contacts observed in the structure were verified using a thiol-based site-specific cross-linking approach. Compared with known complex structures of the phage resolvases endonuclease I and endonuclease VII, the RuvC structure exhibits striking differences in the mode of substrate binding and location of the cleavage site. PMID:23980027

  4. Crystal structure of RuvC resolvase in complex with Holliday junction substrate.

    PubMed

    Górecka, Karolina M; Komorowska, Weronika; Nowotny, Marcin

    2013-11-01

    The key intermediate in genetic recombination is the Holliday junction (HJ), a four-way DNA structure. At the end of recombination, HJs are cleaved by specific nucleases called resolvases. In Gram-negative bacteria, this cleavage is performed by RuvC, a dimeric endonuclease that belongs to the retroviral integrase superfamily. Here, we report the first crystal structure of RuvC in complex with a synthetic HJ solved at 3.75 Å resolution. The junction in the complex is in an unfolded 2-fold symmetrical conformation, in which the four arms point toward the vertices of a tetrahedron. The two scissile phosphates are located one nucleotide from the strand exchange point, and RuvC approaches them from the minor groove side. The key protein-DNA contacts observed in the structure were verified using a thiol-based site-specific cross-linking approach. Compared with known complex structures of the phage resolvases endonuclease I and endonuclease VII, the RuvC structure exhibits striking differences in the mode of substrate binding and location of the cleavage site.

  5. Replication intermediates that escape Dna2 activity are processed by Holliday junction resolvase Yen1

    PubMed Central

    Ölmezer, Gizem; Levikova, Maryna; Klein, Dominique; Falquet, Benoît; Fontana, Gabriele Alessandro; Cejka, Petr; Rass, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved mechanisms to protect, restart and repair perturbed replication forks, allowing full genome duplication, even under replication stress. Interrogating the interplay between nuclease-helicase Dna2 and Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase Yen1, we find the Dna2 helicase activity acts parallel to homologous recombination (HR) in promoting DNA replication and chromosome detachment at mitosis after replication fork stalling. Yen1, but not the HJ resolvases Slx1-Slx4 and Mus81-Mms4, safeguards chromosome segregation by removing replication intermediates that escape Dna2. Post-replicative DNA damage checkpoint activation in Dna2 helicase-defective cells causes terminal G2/M arrest by precluding Yen1-dependent repair, whose activation requires progression into anaphase. These findings explain the exquisite replication stress sensitivity of Dna2 helicase-defective cells, and identify a non-canonical role for Yen1 in the processing of replication intermediates that is distinct from HJ resolution. The involvement of Dna2 helicase activity in completing replication may have implications for DNA2-associated pathologies, including cancer and Seckel syndrome. PMID:27779184

  6. AtGEN1 and AtSEND1, two paralogs in Arabidopsis, possess holliday junction resolvase activity.

    PubMed

    Bauknecht, Markus; Kobbe, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are physical links between homologous DNA molecules that arise as central intermediary structures during homologous recombination and repair in meiotic and somatic cells. It is necessary for these structures to be resolved to ensure correct chromosome segregation and other functions. In eukaryotes, including plants, homologs of a gene called XPG-like endonuclease1 (GEN1) have been identified that process HJs in a manner analogous to the HJ resolvases of phages, archaea, and bacteria. Here, we report that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a eukaryotic organism, has two functional GEN1 homologs instead of one. Like all known eukaryotic resolvases, AtGEN1 and Arabidopsis single-strand DNA endonuclease1 both belong to class IV of the Rad2/XPG family of nucleases. Their resolvase activity shares the characteristics of the Escherichia coli radiation and UV sensitive C paradigm for resolvases, which involves resolving HJs by symmetrically oriented incisions in two opposing strands. This leads to ligatable products without the need for further processing. The observation that the sequence context influences the cleavage by the enzymes can be interpreted as a hint for the existence of sequence specificity. The two Arabidopsis paralogs differ in their preferred sequences. The precise cleavage positions observed for the resolution of mobile nicked HJs suggest that these cleavage positions are determined by both the substrate structure and the sequence context at the junction point. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Cdc14 targets the Holliday junction resolvase Yen1 to the nucleus in early anaphase

    PubMed Central

    García-Luis, Jonay; Clemente-Blanco, Andrés; Aragón, Luis; Machín, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The only canonical Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase identified in eukaryotes thus far is Yen1/GEN1. Nevertheless, Yen1/GEN1 appears to have a minor role in HJ resolution, and, instead, other structure-specific endonucleases (SSE) that recognize branched DNA play the leading roles, Mus81-Mms4/EME1 being the most important in budding yeast. Interestingly, cells tightly regulate the activity of each HJ resolvase during the yeast cell cycle. Thus, Mus81-Mms4 is activated in G2/M, while Yen1 gets activated shortly afterwards. Nevertheless, cytological studies have shown that Yen1 is sequestered out of the nucleus when cyclin-dependent kinase activity is high, i.e., all of the cell cycle but G1. We here show that the mitotic master phosphatase Cdc14 targets Yen1 to the nucleus in early anaphase through the FEAR network. We will further show that this FEAR-mediated Cdc14-driven event is sufficient to back-up Mus81-Mms4 in removing branched DNA structures, which are especially found in the long chromosome arms upon replication stress. Finally, we found that MEN-driven Cdc14 re-activation in late anaphase is essential to keep Yen1 in the nucleus until the next G1. Our results highlight the essential role that early-activated Cdc14, i.e., through the FEAR network, has in removing all kind of non-proteinaceous linkages that preclude faithful sister chromatid segregation in anaphase. In addition, our results support the general idea of Yen1 acting as a last resource endonuclease to deal with any remaining HJ that might compromise genetic stability during chromosome segregation. PMID:24626187

  8. Human Holliday junction resolvase GEN1 uses a chromodomain for efficient DNA recognition and cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shun-Hsiao; Princz, Lissa Nicola; Klügel, Maren Felizitas; Habermann, Bianca; Pfander, Boris; Biertümpfel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are key DNA intermediates in homologous recombination. They link homologous DNA strands and have to be faithfully removed for proper DNA segregation and genome integrity. Here, we present the crystal structure of human HJ resolvase GEN1 complexed with DNA at 3.0 Å resolution. The GEN1 core is similar to other Rad2/XPG nucleases. However, unlike other members of the superfamily, GEN1 contains a chromodomain as an additional DNA interaction site. Chromodomains are known for their chromatin-targeting function in chromatin remodelers and histone(de)acetylases but they have not previously been found in nucleases. The GEN1 chromodomain directly contacts DNA and its truncation severely hampers GEN1’s catalytic activity. Structure-guided mutations in vitro and in vivo in yeast validated our mechanistic findings. Our study provides the missing structure in the Rad2/XPG family and insights how a well-conserved nuclease core acquires versatility in recognizing diverse substrates for DNA repair and maintenance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12256.001 PMID:26682650

  9. Human Holliday junction resolvase GEN1 uses a chromodomain for efficient DNA recognition and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shun-Hsiao; Princz, Lissa Nicola; Klügel, Maren Felizitas; Habermann, Bianca; Pfander, Boris; Biertümpfel, Christian

    2015-12-18

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are key DNA intermediates in homologous recombination. They link homologous DNA strands and have to be faithfully removed for proper DNA segregation and genome integrity. Here, we present the crystal structure of human HJ resolvase GEN1 complexed with DNA at 3.0 Å resolution. The GEN1 core is similar to other Rad2/XPG nucleases. However, unlike other members of the superfamily, GEN1 contains a chromodomain as an additional DNA interaction site. Chromodomains are known for their chromatin-targeting function in chromatin remodelers and histone(de)acetylases but they have not previously been found in nucleases. The GEN1 chromodomain directly contacts DNA and its truncation severely hampers GEN1's catalytic activity. Structure-guided mutations in vitro and in vivo in yeast validated our mechanistic findings. Our study provides the missing structure in the Rad2/XPG family and insights how a well-conserved nuclease core acquires versatility in recognizing diverse substrates for DNA repair and maintenance.

  10. The role of Holliday junction resolvases in the repair of spontaneous and induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Agmon, Neta; Yovel, Moran; Harari, Yaniv; Liefshitz, Batia; Kupiec, Martin

    2011-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and other lesions occur frequently during cell growth and in meiosis. These are often repaired by homologous recombination (HR). HR may result in the formation of DNA structures called Holliday junctions (HJs), which need to be resolved to allow chromosome segregation. Whereas HJs are present in most HR events in meiosis, it has been proposed that in vegetative cells most HR events occur through intermediates lacking HJs. A recent screen in yeast has shown HJ resolution activity for a protein called Yen1, in addition to the previously known Mus81/Mms4 complex. Yeast strains deleted for both YEN1 and MMS4 show a reduction in growth rate, and are very sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. In addition, we investigate the genetic interaction of yen1 and mms4 with mutants defective in different repair pathways. We find that in the absence of Yen1 and Mms4 deletion of RAD1 or RAD52 have no further effect, whereas additional sensitivity is seen if RAD51 is deleted. Finally, we show that yeast cells are unable to carry out meiosis in the absence of both resolvases. Our results show that both Yen1 and Mms4/Mus81 play important (although not identical) roles during vegetative growth and in meiosis.

  11. The RecU Holliday junction resolvase acts at early stages of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Cristina; Carrasco, Begoña; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is essential for DNA repair and generation of genetic diversity in all organisms. It occurs through a series of presynaptic steps where the substrate is presented to the recombinase (RecA in bacteria). Then, the recombinase nucleoprotein filament mediates synapsis by first promoting the formation of a D-loop and later of a Holliday junction (HJ) that is subsequently cleaved by the HJ resolvase. The coordination of the synaptic step with the late resolution step is poorly understood. Bacillus subtilis RecU catalyzes resolution of HJs, and biochemical evidence suggests that it might modulate RecA. We report here the isolation and characterization of two mutants of RecU (recU56 and recU71), which promote resolution of HJs, but do not promote RecA modulation. In vitro, the RecU mutant proteins (RecUK56A or RecUR71A) bind and cleave HJs and interact with RuvB. RecU interacts with RecA and inhibits its single-stranded DNA-dependent dATP hydrolysis, but RecUK56A and RecUR71A do not exert a negative effect on the RecA dATPase and fail to interact with it. Both activities are important in vivo since RecU mutants impaired only in RecA interaction are as sensitive to DNA damaging agents as a deletion mutant. PMID:18684995

  12. Mammalian BTBD12/SLX4 assembles a Holliday junction resolvase and is required for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Jennifer M.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Sowa, Mathew E.; O’Connell, Brenda C.; Gygi, Steven P.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Harper, J. Wade

    2009-01-01

    Summary Structure-specific endonucleases mediate repair of DNA structures formed from replication fork collapse or during double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here we identify BTBD12 as the human ortholog of the budding yeast DNA repair factor Slx4p and D. melanogaster MUS312. Human SLX4 forms a multiprotein complex with the ERCC4(XPF)-ERCC1, MUS81-EME1, and SLX1 endonucleases, and also associates with MSH2/MSH3 mismatch repair complex, telomere binding complex TERF2(TRF2)-TERF2IP(RAP1), the protein kinase PLK1 and the uncharacterized protein C20orf94. Depletion of SLX4 causes sensitivity to mitomycin C and camptothecin, and reduces the efficiency of DSB repair in vivo. SLX4 complexes cleave 3’-flap, 5’-flap and replication fork structures; yet unlike other endonucleases associated with SLX4, the SLX1-SLX4 module promotes symmetrical cleavage of static and migrating Holliday junctions (HJs), identifying SLX1-SLX4 as a HJ resolvase. Thus, SLX4 assembles a modular tool-kit for repair of specific types of DNA lesions and is critical for cellular responses to replication fork failure. PMID:19596235

  13. The RecU Holliday junction resolvase acts at early stages of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Cristina; Carrasco, Begoña; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C

    2008-09-01

    Homologous recombination is essential for DNA repair and generation of genetic diversity in all organisms. It occurs through a series of presynaptic steps where the substrate is presented to the recombinase (RecA in bacteria). Then, the recombinase nucleoprotein filament mediates synapsis by first promoting the formation of a D-loop and later of a Holliday junction (HJ) that is subsequently cleaved by the HJ resolvase. The coordination of the synaptic step with the late resolution step is poorly understood. Bacillus subtilis RecU catalyzes resolution of HJs, and biochemical evidence suggests that it might modulate RecA. We report here the isolation and characterization of two mutants of RecU (recU56 and recU71), which promote resolution of HJs, but do not promote RecA modulation. In vitro, the RecU mutant proteins (RecUK56A or RecUR71A) bind and cleave HJs and interact with RuvB. RecU interacts with RecA and inhibits its single-stranded DNA-dependent dATP hydrolysis, but RecUK56A and RecUR71A do not exert a negative effect on the RecA dATPase and fail to interact with it. Both activities are important in vivo since RecU mutants impaired only in RecA interaction are as sensitive to DNA damaging agents as a deletion mutant.

  14. The role of Holliday junction resolvases in the repair of spontaneous and induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Agmon, Neta; Yovel, Moran; Harari, Yaniv; Liefshitz, Batia; Kupiec, Martin

    2011-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and other lesions occur frequently during cell growth and in meiosis. These are often repaired by homologous recombination (HR). HR may result in the formation of DNA structures called Holliday junctions (HJs), which need to be resolved to allow chromosome segregation. Whereas HJs are present in most HR events in meiosis, it has been proposed that in vegetative cells most HR events occur through intermediates lacking HJs. A recent screen in yeast has shown HJ resolution activity for a protein called Yen1, in addition to the previously known Mus81/Mms4 complex. Yeast strains deleted for both YEN1 and MMS4 show a reduction in growth rate, and are very sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. In addition, we investigate the genetic interaction of yen1 and mms4 with mutants defective in different repair pathways. We find that in the absence of Yen1 and Mms4 deletion of RAD1 or RAD52 have no further effect, whereas additional sensitivity is seen if RAD51 is deleted. Finally, we show that yeast cells are unable to carry out meiosis in the absence of both resolvases. Our results show that both Yen1 and Mms4/Mus81 play important (although not identical) roles during vegetative growth and in meiosis. PMID:21609961

  15. Holliday junction resolvases and related nucleases: identification of new families, phyletic distribution and evolutionary trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, L.; Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2000-01-01

    Holliday junction resolvases (HJRs) are key enzymes of DNA recombination. A detailed computer analysis of the structural and evolutionary relationships of HJRs and related nucleases suggests that the HJR function has evolved independently from at least four distinct structural folds, namely RNase H, endonuclease, endonuclease VII–colicin E and RusA. The endonuclease fold, whose structural prototypes are the phage λ exonuclease, the very short patch repair nuclease (Vsr) and type II restriction enzymes, is shown to encompass by far a greater diversity of nucleases than previously suspected. This fold unifies archaeal HJRs, repair nucleases such as RecB and Vsr, restriction enzymes and a variety of predicted nucleases whose specific activities remain to be determined. Within the RNase H fold a new family of predicted HJRs, which is nearly ubiquitous in bacteria, was discovered, in addition to the previously characterized RuvC family. The proteins of this family, typified by Escherichia coli YqgF, are likely to function as an alternative to RuvC in most bacteria, but could be the principal HJRs in low-GC Gram-positive bacteria and Aquifex. Endonuclease VII of phage T4 is shown to serve as a structural template for many nucleases, including McrA and other type II restriction enzymes. Together with colicin E7, endonuclease VII defines a distinct metal-dependent nuclease fold. As a result of this analysis, the principal HJRs are now known or confidently predicted for all bacteria and archaea whose genomes have been completely sequenced, with many species encoding multiple potential HJRs. Horizontal gene transfer, lineage-specific gene loss and gene family expansion, and non-orthologous gene displacement seem to have been major forces in the evolution of HJRs and related nucleases. A remarkable case of displacement is seen in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which does not possess any of the typical HJRs, but instead encodes, in its chromosome and each

  16. Piv site-specific invertase requires a DEDD motif analogous to the catalytic center of the RuvC Holliday junction resolvases.

    PubMed

    Buchner, John M; Robertson, Anne E; Poynter, David J; Denniston, Shelby S; Karls, Anna C

    2005-05-01

    Piv, a unique prokaryotic site-specific DNA invertase, is related to transposases of the insertion elements from the IS110/IS492 family and shows no similarity to the site-specific recombinases of the tyrosine- or serine-recombinase families. Piv tertiary structure is predicted to include the RNase H-like fold that typically encompasses the catalytic site of the recombinases or nucleases of the retroviral integrase superfamily, including transposases and RuvC-like Holliday junction resolvases. Analogous to the DDE and DEDD catalytic motifs of transposases and RuvC, respectively, four Piv acidic residues D9, E59, D101, and D104 appear to be positioned appropriately within the RNase H fold to coordinate two divalent metal cations. This suggests mechanistic similarity between site-specific inversion mediated by Piv and transposition or endonucleolytic reactions catalyzed by enzymes of the retroviral integrase superfamily. The role of the DEDD motif in Piv catalytic activity was addressed using Piv variants that are substituted individually or multiply at these acidic residues and assaying for in vivo inversion, intermolecular recombination, and DNA binding activities. The results indicate that all four residues of the DEDD motif are required for Piv catalytic activity. The DEDD residues are not essential for inv recombination site recognition and binding, but this acidic tetrad does appear to contribute to the stability of Piv-inv interactions. On the basis of these results, a working model for Piv-mediated inversion that includes resolution of a Holliday junction is presented.

  17. The archaeal Xpf/Mus81/FANCM homolog Hef and the Holliday junction resolvase Hjc define alternative pathways that are essential for cell viability in Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Roxane; Duan, Zhenhong; Allers, Thorsten

    2010-09-04

    The XPF/MUS81 family of endonucleases is found in eukaryotes and archaea, in the former they play a critical role in DNA repair and replication fork restart. Hef is a XPF/MUS81 family member found in Euryarchaea and is related to the Fanconi anemia protein FANCM. We have studied the role of Hef in the euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. Unlike Xpf in eukaryotes, Hef is not involved in nucleotide excision repair; instead, this function is encoded by the uvrABC genes. Similarly, deletion of hef confers only moderate sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, whereas mutation of FANCM in leads to hypersensitivity in eukaryotes. However, Hef is essential for cell viability when the Holliday junction resolvase Hjc is absent, and both the helicase and nuclease activities of Hef are indispensable. By contrast, single mutants of hjc and hef display no significant defects in growth or homologous recombination. This suggests that Hef and Hjc are redundant for the resolution of recombination intermediates, and that Hef is the functional homolog of eukaryotic Mus81. Furthermore, deletion of hef in a recombination-deficient DeltaradA background is highly deleterious but deletion of hjc has no effect. Therefore, Hjc acts exclusively in homologous recombination whereas Hef, in addition to its role in resolving recombination intermediates, can act in a pathway that avoids the use of homologous recombination. We propose that Hef and Hjc provide alternative means to restart stalled DNA replication forks.

  18. A new role for Holliday junction resolvase Yen1 in processing DNA replication intermediates exposes Dna2 as an accessory replicative helicase.

    PubMed

    Falquet, Benoît; Rass, Ulrich

    2017-01-02

    DNA replication is mediated by a multi-protein complex known as the replisome. With the hexameric MCM (minichromosome maintenance) replicative helicase at its core, the replisome splits the parental DNA strands, forming replication forks (RFs), where it catalyses coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis. While replication is a highly effective process, intrinsic and oncogene-induced replication stress impedes the progression of replisomes along chromosomes. As a consequence, RFs stall, arrest, and collapse, jeopardizing genome stability. In these instances, accessory fork progression and repair factors, orchestrated by the replication checkpoint, promote RF recovery, ensuring the chromosomes are fully replicated and can be safely segregated at cell division. Homologous recombination (HR) proteins play key roles in negotiating replication stress, binding at stalled RFs and shielding them from inappropriate processing. In addition, HR-mediated strand exchange reactions restart stalled or collapsed RFs and mediate error-free post-replicative repair. DNA transactions at stalled RFs further involve various DNA editing factors, notably helicases and nucleases. A study by Ölmezer et al. (2016) has recently identified a role for the structure-specific nuclease Yen1 (GEN1 in human) in the resolution of dead-end DNA replication intermediates after RF arrest. This new function of Yen1 is distinct from its previously known role as a Holliday junction resolvase, mediating the removal of branched HR intermediates, and it becomes essential for viable chromosome segregation in cells with a defective Dna2 helicase. These findings have revealed greater complexity in the tasks mediated by Yen1 and expose a replicative role for the elusive helicase activity of the conserved Dna2 nuclease-helicase.

  19. A new role for Holliday junction resolvase Yen1 in processing DNA replication intermediates exposes Dna2 as an accessory replicative helicase

    PubMed Central

    Falquet, Benoît; Rass, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication is mediated by a multi-protein complex known as the replisome. With the hexameric MCM (minichromosome maintenance) replicative helicase at its core, the replisome splits the parental DNA strands, forming replication forks (RFs), where it catalyses coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis. While replication is a highly effective process, intrinsic and oncogene-induced replication stress impedes the progression of replisomes along chromosomes. As a consequence, RFs stall, arrest, and collapse, jeopardizing genome stability. In these instances, accessory fork progression and repair factors, orchestrated by the replication checkpoint, promote RF recovery, ensuring the chromosomes are fully replicated and can be safely segregated at cell division. Homologous recombination (HR) proteins play key roles in negotiating replication stress, binding at stalled RFs and shielding them from inappropriate processing. In addition, HR-mediated strand exchange reactions restart stalled or collapsed RFs and mediate error-free post-replicative repair. DNA transactions at stalled RFs further involve various DNA editing factors, notably helicases and nucleases. A study by Ölmezer et al. (2016) has recently identified a role for the structure-specific nuclease Yen1 (GEN1 in human) in the resolution of dead-end DNA replication intermediates after RF arrest. This new function of Yen1 is distinct from its previously known role as a Holliday junction resolvase, mediating the removal of branched HR intermediates, and it becomes essential for viable chromosome segregation in cells with a defective Dna2 helicase. These findings have revealed greater complexity in the tasks mediated by Yen1 and expose a replicative role for the elusive helicase activity of the conserved Dna2 nuclease-helicase. PMID:28357386

  20. The N-terminal region of the RecU holliday junction resolvase is essential for homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Begoña; Cañas, Cristina; Sharples, Gary J; Alonso, Juan C; Ayora, Silvia

    2009-07-03

    The RecU Holliday junction (HJ)-resolving enzyme is highly conserved in the Firmicutes phylum of bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis, the recU gene has two putative initiation codons, at positions 1 and 33. In rec(+) cells, only the full-length RecU polypeptide (206 residues, 23.9 kDa) was detected even after different stress treatments. To address the relevance of the flexible N-terminus, we constructed mutant variants. Experiments in vivo revealed that recUDelta1-32 (which initiates at Met33 and encodes RecUDelta1-32) and recU31 (the conserved Arg31 residue was substituted with alanine to give RecUR31A) are genuine RecU mutants, rendering cells impaired in DNA repair and chromosomal segregation. RecU has three activities: It (i) cleaves HJs, (ii) anneals complementary strands and (iii) modulates RecA activities. RecUR31A binds and cleaves HJ DNA in vitro as efficiently as wild-type RecU, but RuvB.ATPgammaS.Mg(2+) fails to stimulate the RecUR31A cleavage reaction. In contrast, RecUDelta1-32 forms unstable complexes with DNA and fails to cleave HJs. RecU and its variants are capable of promoting DNA strand annealing and exert a negative effect on deoxy-ATP-dependent RecA-mediated DNA strand exchange. This study shows that the flexible N-terminus of RecU is essential for protein activity.

  1. The stalk region of the RecU resolvase is essential for Holliday junction recognition and distortion.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Cristina; Carrasco, Begoña; García-Tirado, Esther; Rafferty, John B; Alonso, Juan C; Ayora, Silvia

    2011-07-01

    The Bacillus subtilis RecU protein has two activities: to recognize, distort, and cleave four-stranded recombination intermediates and to modulate RecA activities. The RecU structure shows a mushroom-like appearance, with a cap and a stalk region. The RuvB interaction and the catalytic residues are located in the cap region of dimeric RecU. We report here that the stalk region is essential not only for RecA modulation but also for Holliday junction (HJ) recognition. Two recU mutants, which map in the stalk region, were isolated and characterized. In vivo, a RecU variant with a Phe81-to-Ala substitution (F81A) was as sensitive to DNA-damaging agents as a null recU strain, and a similar substitution at tyrosine 80 (Y80A) showed an intermediate phenotype. RecUY80A and RecUF81A poorly recognize and distort HJs. RecUY80A cleaves HJs with low efficiency, and RuvB modulates cleavage. At high concentrations, RecUF81A binds to HJs but fails to cleave them. Unlike wild-type RecU, RecUY80A and RecUF81A do not inhibit RecA dATPase and strand-exchange activities. The RecU stalk region is involved in RecA interaction, but once an HJ is bound, RecU fails to modulate RecA activities. Our biochemical study provides a mechanistic basis for the connections between these two mutually exclusive stages (i.e., RecA modulation and HJ resolution) of the recombination reaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Holliday junction resolvase from Pyrococcus furiosus: Functional similarity to Escherichia coli RuvC provides evidence for conserved mechanism of homologous recombination in Bacteria, Eukarya, and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Kayoko; Sakae, Shinzi; Shinagawa, Hideo; Morikawa, Kosuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    1999-01-01

    The Holliday junction is an essential intermediate of homologous recombination. RecA of Bacteria, Rad51 of Eukarya, and RadA of Archaea are structural and functional homologs. These proteins play a pivotal role in the formation of Holliday junctions from two homologous DNA duplexes. RuvC is a specific endonuclease that resolves Holliday junctions in Bacteria. A Holliday junction-resolving activity has been found in both yeast and mammalian cells. To examine whether the paradigm of homologous recombination apply to Archaea, we assayed and found the activity to resolve a synthetic Holliday junction in crude extract of Pyrococcus furiosus cells. The gene, hjc (Holliday junction cleavage), encodes a protein composed of 123 amino acids, whose sequence is not similar to that of any proteins with known function. However, all four archaea, whose total genome sequences have been published, have the homologous genes. The purified Hjc protein cleaved the recombination intermediates formed by RecA in vitro. These results support the notion that the formation and resolution of Holliday junction is the common mechanism of homologous recombination in the three domains of life. PMID:10430863

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the archaeal virus resolvase SIRV2

    SciTech Connect

    Ennifar, Eric; Basquin, Jerôme; Birkenbihl, Rainer; Suck, Dietrich

    2005-05-01

    The Holliday junction resolvase of the archaeal virus SIRV2 infecting the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus has been crystallized and a full data set has been collected at 3.4 Å resolution. Analysis of the self-rotation function suggests the presence of two dimers in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 77%. The Holliday junction (or four-way junction) is the universal DNA intermediate whose interaction with resolving proteins is one of the major events in the recombinational process. These proteins, called DNA junction-resolving enzymes or resolvases, bind to the junction and catalyse DNA cleavage, promoting the release of two DNA duplexes. SIRV2 Hjc, a viral resolvase infecting a thermophylic archaeon, has been cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals have been obtained in space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 147.8, b = 99.9, c = 87.6, β = 109.46°, and a full data set has been collected at 3.4 Å resolution. The self-rotation function indicates the presence of two dimers in the asymmetric unit and a high solvent content (77%). Molecular-replacement trials using known similar resolvase structures have so far been unsuccessful, indicating possible significant structural rearrangements.

  4. Exon junction complex subunits are required to splice Drosophila MAP kinase, a large heterochromatic gene

    PubMed Central

    Roignant, Jean-Yves; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The exon junction complex (EJC) is assembled on spliced mRNAs upstream of exon-exon junctions, and can regulate their subsequent translation, localization, or degradation. We isolated mutations in Drosophila mago nashi (mago), which encodes a core EJC subunit, based on their unexpectedly specific effects on photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of Mago prevents Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, due to a large reduction in MAPK mRNA levels. MAPK expression also requires the EJC subunits Y14 and eIF4AIII, and EJC-associated splicing factors. Mago depletion does not affect the transcription or stability of MAPK mRNA, but alters its splicing pattern. MAPK expression from an exogenous promoter requires Mago only when the template includes introns. MAPK is the primary functional target of mago in eye development; in cultured cells, Mago knockdown disproportionately affects other large genes located in heterochromatin. These data support a nuclear role for EJC components in splicing a specific subset of introns. PMID:20946982

  5. Structural asymmetry in the Thermus thermophilus RuvC dimer suggests a basis for sequential strand cleavages during Holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luan; Shi, Ke; Yin, Zhiqi; Aihara, Hideki

    2013-01-07

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolvases are structure-specific endonucleases that cleave four-way DNA junctions (HJs) generated during DNA recombination and repair. Bacterial RuvC, a prototypical HJ resolvase, functions as homodimer and nicks DNA strands precisely across the junction point. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying symmetrical strand cleavages by RuvC, we performed crystallographic and biochemical analyses of RuvC from Thermus thermophilus (T.th. RuvC). The crystal structure of T.th. RuvC shows an overall protein fold similar to that of Escherichia coli RuvC, but T.th. RuvC has a more tightly associated dimer interface possibly reflecting its thermostability. The binding mode of a HJ-DNA substrate can be inferred from the shape/charge complementarity between the T.th. RuvC dimer and HJ-DNA, as well as positions of sulfate ions bound on the protein surface. Unexpectedly, the structure of T.th. RuvC homodimer refined at 1.28 Å resolution shows distinct asymmetry near the dimer interface, in the region harboring catalytically important aromatic residues. The observation suggests that the T.th. RuvC homodimer interconverts between two asymmetric conformations, with alternating subunits switched on for DNA strand cleavage. This model provides a structural basis for the 'nick-counter-nick' mechanism in HJ resolution, a mode of HJ processing shared by prokaryotic and eukaryotic HJ resolvases.

  6. Crystal structure of the Holliday junction DNA in complex with a single RuvA tetramer

    PubMed Central

    Ariyoshi, Mariko; Nishino, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Shinagawa, Hideo; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2000-01-01

    In the major pathway of homologous DNA recombination in prokaryotic cells, the Holliday junction intermediate is processed through its association with RuvA, RuvB, and RuvC proteins. Specific binding of the RuvA tetramer to the Holliday junction is required for the RuvB motor protein to be loaded onto the junction DNA, and the RuvAB complex drives the ATP-dependent branch migration. We solved the crystal structure of the Holliday junction bound to a single Escherichia coli RuvA tetramer at 3.1-Å resolution. In this complex, one side of DNA is accessible for cleavage by RuvC resolvase at the junction center. The refined junction DNA structure revealed an open concave architecture with a four-fold symmetry. Each arm, with B-form DNA, in the Holliday junction is predominantly recognized in the minor groove through hydrogen bonds with two repeated helix-hairpin-helix motifs of each RuvA subunit. The local conformation near the crossover point, where two base pairs are disrupted, suggests a possible scheme for successive base pair rearrangements, which may account for smooth Holliday junction movement without segmental unwinding. PMID:10890893

  7. A Specific Set of Exon Junction Complex Subunits Is Required for the Nuclear Retention of Unspliced RNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Shiimori, Masami; Inoue, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is highly conserved in many organisms and is involved in various steps of mRNA metabolism. During the course of investigating the role of EJC in the germ line sex determination of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that depletion of one of the three core subunits (Y14, MAG-1, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4III [eIF4AIII]) or one auxiliary subunit (UAP56) of EJC resulted in the cytoplasmic leakage of unspliced RNAs from almost all of the C. elegans protein-coding genes examined thus far. This leakage was also observed with the depletion of several splicing factors, including SF3b, IBP160, and PRP19, all of which genetically interacted with Y14. We also found that Y14 physically interacts with both pre-mRNA and spliceosomal U snRNAs, especially U2 snRNA, and that the interaction was abolished when both IBP160 and PRP19 were depleted. Our results strongly suggest that a specific set of EJC subunits is recruited onto introns and interacts with components of the spliceosome, including U2 snRNP, to provide a critical signal for the surveillance and nuclear retention of unspliced RNAs in C. elegans. PMID:23149939

  8. The resolvase protein from the transposon Tn21.

    PubMed

    Halford, S E; Jordan, S L; Kirkbride, E A

    1985-01-01

    The tac promoter was inserted into Tn21 upstream of the tnpR gene and the resultant plasmid was used to generate substantial amounts of resolvase. This protein was purified to homogeneity. The protein was characterized by amino acid sequence studies (which showed that an open-reading frame previously identified by DNA sequencing had been correctly assigned to the tnpR gene) and by molecular weight measurements (which demonstrated that the only active for of the protein in solution was dimeric). Pure Tn21 resolvase catalysed site-specific recombinations between directly repeated res sites from Tn21 or Tn1721 but not from Tn3 nor on inverted res sites from Tn21.

  9. Relating proton pumps with gap junctions: colocalization of ductin, the channel-forming subunit c of V-ATPase, with subunit a and with innexins 2 and 3 during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lautemann, Julia; Bohrmann, Johannes

    2016-07-13

    Ion-transport mechanisms and gap junctions are known to cooperate in creating bioelectric phenomena, like pH gradients, voltage gradients and ion fluxes within single cells, tissues, organs, and whole organisms. Such phenomena have been shown to play regulatory roles in a variety of developmental and regenerative processes. Using Drosophila oogenesis as a model system, we aim at characterizing in detail the mechanisms underlying bioelectric phenomena in order to reveal their regulatory functions. We, therefore, investigated the stage-specific distribution patterns of V-ATPase components in relation to gap-junction proteins. We analysed the localization of the V-ATPase components ductin (subunit c) and subunit a, and the gap-junction components innexins 2 and 3, especially in polar cells, border cells, stalk cells and centripetally migrating cells. These types of follicle cells had previously been shown to exhibit characteristic patterns of membrane channels as well as membrane potential and intracellular pH. Stage-specifically, ductin and subunit a were found either colocalized or separately enriched in different regions of soma and germ-line cells. While ductin was often more prominent in plasma membranes, subunit a was more prominent in cytoplasmic and nuclear vesicles. Particularly, ductin was enriched in polar cells, stalk cells, and nurse-cell membranes, whereas subunit a was enriched in the cytoplasm of border cells, columnar follicle cells and germ-line cells. Comparably, ductin and both innexins 2 and 3 were either colocalized or separately enriched in different cellular regions. While ductin often showed a continuous membrane distribution, the distribution of both innexins was mostly punctate. Particularly, ductin was enriched in polar cells and stalk cells, whereas innexin 2 was enriched in the oolemma, and innexin 3 in centripetally migrating follicle cells. In lateral follicle-cell membranes, the three proteins were found colocalized as well as

  10. Resolvase OsGEN1 Mediates DNA Repair by Homologous Recombination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Pingli

    2017-01-01

    Yen1/GEN1 are canonical Holliday junction resolvases that belong to the RAD2/XPG family. In eukaryotes, such as budding yeast, mice, worms, and humans, Yen1/GEN1 work together with Mus81-Mms4/MUS81-EME1 and Slx1-Slx4/SLX1-SLX4 in DNA repair by homologous recombination to maintain genome stability. In plants, the biological function of Yen1/GEN1 remains largely unclear. In this study, we characterized the loss of function mutants of OsGEN1 and OsSEND1, a pair of paralogs of Yen1/GEN1 in rice (Oryza sativa). We first investigated the role of OsGEN1 during meiosis and found a reduction in chiasma frequency by ∼6% in osgen1 mutants, compared to the wild type, suggesting a possible involvement of OsGEN1 in the formation of crossovers. Postmeiosis, OsGEN1 foci were detected in wild-type microspore nuclei, but not in the osgen1 mutant concomitant with an increase in double-strand breaks. Persistent double-strand breaks led to programmed cell death of the male gametes and complete male sterility. In contrast, depletion of OsSEND1 had no effects on plant development and did not enhance osgen1 defects. Our results indicate that OsGEN1 is essential for homologous recombinational DNA repair at two stages of microsporogenesis in rice. PMID:28049740

  11. The identification and characterization of a G4-DNA resolvase activity.

    PubMed

    Harrington, C; Lan, Y; Akman, S A

    1997-09-26

    There is increasing evidence that four-stranded Hoogsteen-bonded DNA structures, G4-DNA, play an important role in cellular processes such as meiosis and recombination. The Hoogsteen-bonded G4-DNA is thermodynamically more stable than duplex DNA, and many guanine-rich genomic DNA sequences with the ability to form G4-DNA have been identified. A protein-dependent activity that resolves G4-DNA into single-stranded DNA has been identified in human placental tissue. The resolvase activity was purified from any apparent nuclease activity and is dependent on NTP hydrolysis and MgCl2. Resolvase activity is optimal with 5 mM MgCl2. The Vmax/Km of ATP is 0. 055%/min/microM, higher than the Vmax/Km of the other dNTPs. The products of the resolvase reaction are unmodified single-stranded DNA. The resolvase is not a duplex DNA helicase or a topoisomerase II activity and does not unwind Hoogsteen-bonded triplex DNA. Resolvase is a novel activity that unwinds stable G4-DNA structures using a dNTP-dependent mechanism producing unmodified single-stranded DNA. Potential in vivo roles for this G4-DNA resolvase activity are discussed.

  12. The Caenorhabditis elegans Homolog of Gen1/Yen1 Resolvases Links DNA Damage Signaling to DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Aymeric P.; Alpi, Arno; Lilley, David M. J.; Ahmed, Shawn; Gartner, Anton

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR), which can involve Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates that are ultimately resolved by nucleolytic enzymes. An N-terminal fragment of human GEN1 has recently been shown to act as a Holliday junction resolvase, but little is known about the role of GEN-1 in vivo. Holliday junction resolution signifies the completion of DNA repair, a step that may be coupled to signaling proteins that regulate cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Using forward genetic approaches, we identified a Caenorhabditis elegans dual function DNA double-strand break repair and DNA damage signaling protein orthologous to the human GEN1 Holliday junction resolving enzyme. GEN-1 has biochemical activities related to the human enzyme and facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but is not essential for DNA double-strand break repair during meiotic recombination. Mutational analysis reveals that the DNA damage-signaling function of GEN-1 is separable from its role in DNA repair. GEN-1 promotes germ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a pathway that acts in parallel to the canonical DNA damage response pathway mediated by RPA loading, CHK1 activation, and CEP-1/p53–mediated apoptosis induction. Furthermore, GEN-1 acts redundantly with the 9-1-1 complex to ensure genome stability. Our study suggests that GEN-1 might act as a dual function Holliday junction resolvase that may coordinate DNA damage signaling with a late step in DNA double-strand break repair. PMID:20661466

  13. Direct analysis of Holliday junction resolving enzyme in a DNA origami nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yuki; Endo, Masayuki; Cañas, Cristina; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolution is a fundamental step for completion of homologous recombination. HJ resolving enzymes (resolvases) distort the junction structure upon binding and prior cleavage, raising the possibility that the reactivity of the enzyme can be affected by a particular geometry and topology at the junction. Here, we employed a DNA origami nano-scaffold in which each arm of a HJ was tethered through the base-pair hybridization, allowing us to make the junction core either flexible or inflexible by adjusting the length of the DNA arms. Both flexible and inflexible junctions bound to Bacillus subtilis RecU HJ resolvase, while only the flexible junction was efficiently resolved into two duplexes by this enzyme. This result indicates the importance of the structural malleability of the junction core for the reaction to proceed. Moreover, cleavage preferences of RecU-mediated reaction were addressed by analyzing morphology of the reaction products. PMID:24792171

  14. Direct analysis of Holliday junction resolving enzyme in a DNA origami nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuki; Endo, Masayuki; Cañas, Cristina; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2014-06-01

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolution is a fundamental step for completion of homologous recombination. HJ resolving enzymes (resolvases) distort the junction structure upon binding and prior cleavage, raising the possibility that the reactivity of the enzyme can be affected by a particular geometry and topology at the junction. Here, we employed a DNA origami nano-scaffold in which each arm of a HJ was tethered through the base-pair hybridization, allowing us to make the junction core either flexible or inflexible by adjusting the length of the DNA arms. Both flexible and inflexible junctions bound to Bacillus subtilis RecU HJ resolvase, while only the flexible junction was efficiently resolved into two duplexes by this enzyme. This result indicates the importance of the structural malleability of the junction core for the reaction to proceed. Moreover, cleavage preferences of RecU-mediated reaction were addressed by analyzing morphology of the reaction products.

  15. The Dissolution of Double Holliday Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Bizard, Anna H.; Hickson, Ian D.

    2014-01-01

    Double Holliday junctions (dHJS) are important intermediates of homologous recombination. The separate junctions can each be cleaved by DNA structure-selective endonucleases known as Holliday junction resolvases. Alternatively, double Holliday junctions can be processed by a reaction known as “double Holliday junction dissolution.” This reaction requires the cooperative action of a so-called “dissolvasome” comprising a Holliday junction branch migration enzyme (Sgs1/BLM RecQ helicase) and a type IA topoisomerase (Top3/TopoIIIα) in complex with its OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold containing accessory factor (Rmi1). This review details our current knowledge of the dissolution process and the players involved in catalyzing this mechanistically complex means of completing homologous recombination reactions. PMID:24984776

  16. Mutants of Tn3 resolvase which do not require accessory binding sites for recombination activity.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, P H; Blake, D G; Grindley, N D; Boocock, M R; Stark, W M

    1999-01-01

    Tn3 resolvase promotes site-specific recombination between two res sites, each of which has three resolvase dimer-binding sites. Catalysis of DNA-strand cleavage and rejoining occurs at binding site I, but binding sites II and III are required for recombination. We used an in vivo screen to detect resolvase mutants that were active on res sites with binding sites II and III deleted (that is, only site I remaining). Mutations of amino acids Asp102 (D102) or Met103 (M103) were sufficient to permit catalysis of recombination between site I and a full res, but not between two copies of site I. A double mutant resolvase, with a D102Y mutation and an additional activating mutation at Glu124 (E124Q), recombined substrates containing only two copies of site I, in vivo and in vitro. In these novel site Ixsite I reactions, product topology is no longer restricted to the normal simple catenane, indicating synapsis by random collision. Furthermore, the mutants have lost the normal specificity for directly repeated sites and supercoiled substrates; that is, they promote recombination between pairs of res sites in linear molecules, or in inverted repeat in a supercoiled molecule, or in separate molecules. PMID:10064606

  17. A G-quadruplex DNA structure resolvase, RHAU, is essential for spermatogonia differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, X; Ma, W; Nie, J; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Yao, G; Han, J; Xu, J; Hu, B; Du, Y; Shi, Q; Yang, Z; Huang, X; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) DNA and G4 DNA resolvase are involved in a variety of biological processes. To understand the biological function of G4 DNA structures and their resolvases in spermatogenesis, we investigated the distribution of G4 structures in mouse testis and identified their alterations during spermatogenesis. Meanwhile, we studied the function of RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element (RHAU), a G4 DNA resolvase, in spermatogenesis with a germ-cell-specific knockout mouse model. The results showed that the ablation of RHAU in germ cells caused the increase of G4 structures and thus resulted in the decrease of spermatogonial differentiation. c-kit, a spermatogonia differentiation-related gene, contains two G4 DNA motifs on its promoter. We found its expression was significantly downregulated in RHAU conditional knockout testis. A further analysis demonstrated that RHAU directly bound to the G4 structures to activate c-kit expression. We concluded that RHAU regulates spermatogonia differentiation by promoting c-kit expression via directly binding to the G4 DNA motifs c-kit promoter. PMID:25611385

  18. Mutants of phage bIL67 RuvC with enhanced Holliday junction binding selectivity and resolution symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Green, Victoria; Curtis, Fiona A; Sedelnikova, Svetlana; Rafferty, John B; Sharples, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Viral and bacterial Holliday junction resolvases differ in specificity with the former typically being more promiscuous, acting on a variety of branched DNA substrates, while the latter exclusively targets Holliday junctions. We have determined the crystal structure of a RuvC resolvase from bacteriophage bIL67 to help identify features responsible for DNA branch discrimination. Comparisons between phage and bacterial RuvC structures revealed significant differences in the number and position of positively-charged residues in the outer sides of the junction binding cleft. Substitutions were generated in phage RuvC residues implicated in branch recognition and six were found to confer defects in Holliday junction and replication fork cleavage in vivo. Two mutants, R121A and R124A that flank the DNA binding site were purified and exhibited reduced in vitro binding to fork and linear duplex substrates relative to the wild-type, while retaining the ability to bind X junctions. Crucially, these two variants cleaved Holliday junctions with enhanced specificity and symmetry, a feature more akin to cellular RuvC resolvases. Thus, additional positive charges in the phage RuvC binding site apparently stabilize productive interactions with branched structures other than the canonical Holliday junction, a feature advantageous for viral DNA processing but deleterious for their cellular counterparts. PMID:23888987

  19. Mutants of phage bIL67 RuvC with enhanced Holliday junction binding selectivity and resolution symmetry.

    PubMed

    Green, Victoria; Curtis, Fiona A; Sedelnikova, Svetlana; Rafferty, John B; Sharples, Gary J

    2013-09-01

    Viral and bacterial Holliday junction resolvases differ in specificity with the former typically being more promiscuous, acting on a variety of branched DNA substrates, while the latter exclusively targets Holliday junctions. We have determined the crystal structure of a RuvC resolvase from bacteriophage bIL67 to help identify features responsible for DNA branch discrimination. Comparisons between phage and bacterial RuvC structures revealed significant differences in the number and position of positively-charged residues in the outer sides of the junction binding cleft. Substitutions were generated in phage RuvC residues implicated in branch recognition and six were found to confer defects in Holliday junction and replication fork cleavage in vivo. Two mutants, R121A and R124A that flank the DNA binding site were purified and exhibited reduced in vitro binding to fork and linear duplex substrates relative to the wild-type, while retaining the ability to bind X junctions. Crucially, these two variants cleaved Holliday junctions with enhanced specificity and symmetry, a feature more akin to cellular RuvC resolvases. Thus, additional positive charges in the phage RuvC binding site apparently stabilize productive interactions with branched structures other than the canonical Holliday junction, a feature advantageous for viral DNA processing but deleterious for their cellular counterparts. © 2013 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Interactions of protein complexes on supercoiled DNA: the mechanism of selective synapsis by Tn3 resolvase.

    PubMed

    Brown, J Lesley; He, Jiuya; Sherratt, David J; Stark, W Marshall; Boocock, Martin R

    2002-05-31

    "Looping" interactions of distant sites on DNA molecules, mediated by DNA-binding proteins, feature in many regulated genetic processes. We used plasmids containing up to six res recombination sites for Tn3 resolvase to analyse looping interactions (synapsis) in this system. We observed that in plasmids with four or more res sites, certain pairs of sites recombine faster than others. The relative rates of recombination depend on the number, relative orientation, and arrangement of the sites. To account for the differences in rate, we propose that pairing interactions between resolvase-bound res sites are in a state of rapid flux, leading to configurations in which the maximum number of sites within each supercoiled substrate molecule are synapsed in a topologically simple arrangement. Recombination rates reflect the steady state concentrations of these synapse configurations. Our results are at variance with models for selective synapsis that rely on ordered motions within supercoiled DNA, "slithering" or "tracking", but are compatible with models that call for reversible synapsis of pairs of sites by random collision, followed by formation of an interwound productive synapse. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. The genes for nicein/kalinin 125- and 100-kDa subunits, candidates for junctional epidermiolysis bullosa, map to chromosomes 1q32 and 1q25-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Vailly, J.; Ortonne, J.P.; Meneguzzi, G.; Szepetowski, P.; Pedeutour, F. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Burgeson, R. )

    1994-05-01

    Expression of nicein is specifically hampered in the severe form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), a recessive genodermatosis characterized by blister formation of integument believed to be due to defects in hemidesmosomes. Nicein genes are therefore the prime candidates for involvement in JEB. To map the gene encoding the 125-kDa subunit of nicein, the authors used the cDNA Kal5.5C coding for the amino-terminal domain of the protein. In situ hybridization was carried out on chromosomes in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood lymphocytes of healthy donors. In 100 metaphases examined, 153 silver grains were found associated with chromosomes; 45 (29%) of these were located on chromosome 1, and 33 (73%) of these 45 grains mapped to region 1q32.1-q41 with a maximum in band 1q32. To confirm the regional localization of the genes for nicein subunits of 100 and 125 kDa, fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on normal lymphocytes from two unrelated normal males and fibroblast cell lines GM00257 (karyotype 46,XX, t(1;2)(1q32;2p23)) and GM004088 (46,XY,t(1;4)(q32;p16)). It was thus confirmed that the genes for nicein 125- and 100-kDa subunits are localized at 1q32 and 1q25-q31, respectively. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  2. The Borrelia burgdorferi telomere resolvase, ResT, possesses ATP-dependent DNA unwinding activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu Hui; Cozart, McKayla R; Hart, Madison A; Kobryn, Kerri

    2016-12-09

    Spirochetes of the genus Borrelia possess unusual genomes harboring multiple linear and circular replicons. The linear replicons are terminated by covalently closed hairpin (hp) telomeres. Hairpin telomeres are formed from replicated intermediates by the telomere resolvase, ResT, in a phosphoryl transfer reaction with mechanistic similarities to those promoted by type 1B topoisomerases and tyrosine recombinases. There is growing evidence that ResT is multifunctional. Upon ResT depletion DNA replication unexpectedly ceases. Additionally, ResT possesses RecO-like biochemical activities being able to promote single-strand annealing on both free ssDNA and ssDNA complexed with cognate single-stranded DNA binding protein. We report here that ResT possesses DNA-dependent ATPase activity that promotes DNA unwinding with a 3'-5' polarity. ResT can unwind a variety of substrates including synthetic replication forks and D-loops. We demonstrate that ResT's twin activities of DNA unwinding and annealing can drive regression of a model replication fork. These properties are similar to those of the RecQ helicase of the RecF pathway involved in DNA gap repair. We propose that ResT's combination of activities implicates it in replication and recombination processes operating on the linear chromosome and plasmids of Borrelia burgdorferi.

  3. The Caenorhabditis elegans voltage-gated calcium channel subunits UNC-2 and UNC-36 and the calcium-dependent kinase UNC-43/CaMKII regulate neuromuscular junction morphology.

    PubMed

    Caylor, Raymond C; Jin, Yishi; Ackley, Brian D

    2013-05-10

    The conserved Caenorhabditis elegans proteins NID-1/nidogen and PTP-3A/LAR-RPTP function to efficiently localize the presynaptic scaffold protein SYD-2/α-liprin at active zones. Loss of function in these molecules results in defects in the size, morphology and spacing of neuromuscular junctions. Here we show that the Cav2-like voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) proteins, UNC-2 and UNC-36, and the calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), UNC-43, function to regulate the size and morphology of presynaptic domains in C. elegans. Loss of function in unc-2, unc-36 or unc-43 resulted in slightly larger GABAergic neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), but could suppress the synaptic morphology defects found in nid-1/nidogen or ptp-3/LAR mutants. A gain-of-function mutation in unc-43 caused defects similar to those found in nid-1 mutants. Mutations in egl-19, Cav1-like, or cca-1, Cav3-like, α1 subunits, or the second α2/δ subunit, tag-180, did not suppress nid-1, suggesting a specific interaction between unc-2 and the synaptic extracellular matrix (ECM) component nidogen. Using a synaptic vesicle marker in time-lapse microscopy studies, we observed GABAergic motor neurons adding NMJ-like structures during late larval development. The synaptic bouton addition appeared to form in at least two ways: (1) de novo formation, where a cluster of vesicles appeared to coalesce, or (2) when a single punctum became enlarged and then divided to form two discrete fluorescent puncta. In comparison to wild type animals, we found unc-2 mutants exhibited reduced NMJ dynamics, with fewer observed divisions during a similar stage of development. We identified UNC-2/UNC-36 VGCCs and UNC-43/CaMKII as regulators of C. elegans synaptogenesis. UNC-2 has a modest role in synapse formation, but a broader role in regulating dynamic changes in the size and morphology of synapses that occur during organismal development. During the late 4th larval stage (L4), wild type animals exhibit synaptic morphologies that

  4. The Caenorhabditis elegans voltage-gated calcium channel subunits UNC-2 and UNC-36 and the calcium-dependent kinase UNC-43/CaMKII regulate neuromuscular junction morphology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The conserved Caenorhabditis elegans proteins NID-1/nidogen and PTP-3A/LAR-RPTP function to efficiently localize the presynaptic scaffold protein SYD-2/α-liprin at active zones. Loss of function in these molecules results in defects in the size, morphology and spacing of neuromuscular junctions. Results Here we show that the Cav2-like voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) proteins, UNC-2 and UNC-36, and the calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), UNC-43, function to regulate the size and morphology of presynaptic domains in C. elegans. Loss of function in unc-2, unc-36 or unc-43 resulted in slightly larger GABAergic neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), but could suppress the synaptic morphology defects found in nid-1/nidogen or ptp-3/LAR mutants. A gain-of-function mutation in unc-43 caused defects similar to those found in nid-1 mutants. Mutations in egl-19, Cav1-like, or cca-1, Cav3-like, α1 subunits, or the second α2/δ subunit, tag-180, did not suppress nid-1, suggesting a specific interaction between unc-2 and the synaptic extracellular matrix (ECM) component nidogen. Using a synaptic vesicle marker in time-lapse microscopy studies, we observed GABAergic motor neurons adding NMJ-like structures during late larval development. The synaptic bouton addition appeared to form in at least two ways: (1) de novo formation, where a cluster of vesicles appeared to coalesce, or (2) when a single punctum became enlarged and then divided to form two discrete fluorescent puncta. In comparison to wild type animals, we found unc-2 mutants exhibited reduced NMJ dynamics, with fewer observed divisions during a similar stage of development. Conclusions We identified UNC-2/UNC-36 VGCCs and UNC-43/CaMKII as regulators of C. elegans synaptogenesis. UNC-2 has a modest role in synapse formation, but a broader role in regulating dynamic changes in the size and morphology of synapses that occur during organismal development. During the late 4th larval stage (L4), wild type animals

  5. Mus81 cleavage of Holliday junctions: a failsafe for processing meiotic recombination intermediates?

    PubMed Central

    Gaskell, Louise J; Osman, Fekret; Gilbert, Robert J C; Whitby, Matthew C

    2007-01-01

    The Holliday junction (HJ) is a central intermediate of homologous recombination. Its cleavage is critical for the formation of crossover recombinants during meiosis, which in turn helps to establish chiasmata and promote genetic diversity. Enzymes that cleave HJs, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in all domains of life except eukaryotic nuclei. Controversially, the Mus81-Eme1 endonuclease has been proposed to be an example of a eukaryotic nuclear resolvase. However, hitherto little or no HJ cleavage has been detected in recombinant preparations of Mus81-Eme1. Here, we report the purification of active forms of recombinant Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mus81-Eme1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mus81-Mms4, which display robust HJ cleavage in vitro, which, in the case of Mus81-Eme1, is as good as the archetypal HJ resolvase RuvC in single turnover kinetic analysis. We also present genetic evidence that suggests that this activity might be utilised as a back-up to Mus81-Eme1's main activity of cleaving nicked HJs during meiosis in S. pombe. PMID:17363897

  6. Mus81 cleavage of Holliday junctions: a failsafe for processing meiotic recombination intermediates?

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Louise J; Osman, Fekret; Gilbert, Robert J C; Whitby, Matthew C

    2007-04-04

    The Holliday junction (HJ) is a central intermediate of homologous recombination. Its cleavage is critical for the formation of crossover recombinants during meiosis, which in turn helps to establish chiasmata and promote genetic diversity. Enzymes that cleave HJs, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in all domains of life except eukaryotic nuclei. Controversially, the Mus81-Eme1 endonuclease has been proposed to be an example of a eukaryotic nuclear resolvase. However, hitherto little or no HJ cleavage has been detected in recombinant preparations of Mus81-Eme1. Here, we report the purification of active forms of recombinant Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mus81-Eme1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mus81-Mms4, which display robust HJ cleavage in vitro, which, in the case of Mus81-Eme1, is as good as the archetypal HJ resolvase RuvC in single turnover kinetic analysis. We also present genetic evidence that suggests that this activity might be utilised as a back-up to Mus81-Eme1's main activity of cleaving nicked HJs during meiosis in S. pombe.

  7. GEN1 promotes Holliday junction resolution by a coordinated nick and counter-nick mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ying Wai; West, Stephen

    2015-12-15

    Holliday junctions (HJs) that physically link sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes are formed as intermediates during DNA repair by homologous recombination. Persistent recombination intermediates are acted upon by structure-selective endonucleases that are required for proper chromosome segregation at mitosis. Here, we have purified full-length human GEN1 protein and show that it promotes Holliday junction resolution by a mechanism that is analogous to that exhibited by the prototypic HJ resolvase E. coli RuvC. We find that GEN1 cleaves HJs by a nick and counter-nick mechanism involving dual co-ordinated incisions that lead to the formation of ligatable nicked duplex products. As observed with RuvC, cleavage of the first strand is rate limiting, while second strand cleavage is rapid. In contrast to RuvC, however, GEN1 is largely monomeric in solution, but dimerizes on the HJ. Using HJs containing non-cleavable phosphorothioate-containing linkages in one strand, we show that the two incisions can be uncoupled and that the first nick occurs upon GEN1 dimerization at the junction. These results indicate that the mechanism of HJ resolution is largely conserved from bacteria to man, despite a lack of sequence homology between the resolvases. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Holliday junction processing enzymes as guardians of genome stability.

    PubMed

    Sarbajna, Shriparna; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are four-stranded DNA intermediates that arise during the recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Their timely removal is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation and genome stability. In mammalian cells, HJs are processed by the BTR (BLM-topoisomerase IIIα-RMI1-RMI2) complex, the SLX-MUS (SLX1-SLX4-MUS81-EME1) complex, and the GEN1 resolvase. Recent studies have linked the deficiency of one or more of these enzymes to perturbed DNA replication, impaired crosslink repair, chromosomal instability, and defective mitoses, coupled with the transmission of widespread DNA damage and high levels of mortality. We review these key advances and how they have cemented the status of HJ-processing enzymes as guardians of genome integrity and viability in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  10. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  11. Resolution of single and double Holliday junction recombination intermediates by GEN1

    PubMed Central

    Shah Punatar, Rajvee; Martin, Maria Jose; Wyatt, Haley D. M.; Chan, Ying Wai

    2017-01-01

    Genetic recombination provides an important mechanism for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Homologous pairing and strand exchange lead to the formation of DNA intermediates, in which sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes are covalently linked by four-way Holliday junctions (HJs). Depending on the type of recombination reaction that takes place, intermediates may have single or double HJs, and their resolution is essential for proper chromosome segregation. In mitotic cells, double HJs are primarily dissolved by the BLM helicase-TopoisomeraseIIIα-RMI1-RMI2 (BTR) complex, whereas single HJs (and double HJs that have escaped the attention of BTR) are resolved by structure-selective endonucleases known as HJ resolvases. These enzymes are ubiquitous in nature, because they are present in bacteriophage, bacteria, archaea, and simple and complex eukaryotes. The human HJ resolvase GEN1 is a member of the XPG/Rad2 family of 5′-flap endonucleases. Biochemical studies of GEN1 revealed that it cleaves synthetic DNA substrates containing a single HJ by a mechanism similar to that shown by the prototypic HJ resolvase, Escherichia coli RuvC protein, but it is unclear whether these substrates fully recapitulate the properties of recombination intermediates that arise within a physiological context. Here, we show that GEN1 efficiently cleaves both single and double HJs contained within large recombination intermediates. Moreover, we find that GEN1 exhibits a weak sequence preference for incision between two G residues that reside in a T-rich region of DNA. These results contrast with those obtained with RuvC, which exhibits a strict requirement for the consensus sequence 5′-A/TTTG/C-3′. PMID:28049850

  12. Resolution of single and double Holliday junction recombination intermediates by GEN1.

    PubMed

    Shah Punatar, Rajvee; Martin, Maria Jose; Wyatt, Haley D M; Chan, Ying Wai; West, Stephen C

    2017-01-17

    Genetic recombination provides an important mechanism for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Homologous pairing and strand exchange lead to the formation of DNA intermediates, in which sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes are covalently linked by four-way Holliday junctions (HJs). Depending on the type of recombination reaction that takes place, intermediates may have single or double HJs, and their resolution is essential for proper chromosome segregation. In mitotic cells, double HJs are primarily dissolved by the BLM helicase-TopoisomeraseIIIα-RMI1-RMI2 (BTR) complex, whereas single HJs (and double HJs that have escaped the attention of BTR) are resolved by structure-selective endonucleases known as HJ resolvases. These enzymes are ubiquitous in nature, because they are present in bacteriophage, bacteria, archaea, and simple and complex eukaryotes. The human HJ resolvase GEN1 is a member of the XPG/Rad2 family of 5'-flap endonucleases. Biochemical studies of GEN1 revealed that it cleaves synthetic DNA substrates containing a single HJ by a mechanism similar to that shown by the prototypic HJ resolvase, Escherichia coli RuvC protein, but it is unclear whether these substrates fully recapitulate the properties of recombination intermediates that arise within a physiological context. Here, we show that GEN1 efficiently cleaves both single and double HJs contained within large recombination intermediates. Moreover, we find that GEN1 exhibits a weak sequence preference for incision between two G residues that reside in a T-rich region of DNA. These results contrast with those obtained with RuvC, which exhibits a strict requirement for the consensus sequence 5'-(A)/TTT(G)/C-3'.

  13. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  14. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  15. Transgene excision in pollen using a codon optimized serine resolvase CinH-RS2 site-specific recombination system.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hong S; Abercrombie, Laura L; Eda, Shigetoshi; Blanvillain, Robert; Thomson, James G; Ow, David W; Stewart, C N

    2011-04-01

    Transgene escape, a major environmental and regulatory concern in transgenic crop cultivation, could be alleviated by removing transgenes from pollen, the most frequent vector for transgene flow. A transgene excision vector containing a codon optimized serine resolvase CinH recombinase (CinH) and its recognition sites RS2 were constructed and transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi). CinH recombinase recognized 119 bp of nucleic acid sequences, RS2, in pollen and excised the transgene flanked by the RS2 sites. In this system, the pollen-specific LAT52 promoter from tomato was employed to control the expression of CinH recombinase. Loss of expression of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene under the control of the LAT59 promoter from tomato was used as an indicator of transgene excision. Efficiency of transgene excision from pollen was determined by flow cytometry (FCM)-based pollen screening. While a transgenic event in the absence of CinH recombinase contained about 70% of GFP-synthesizing pollen, three single-copy transgene events contained less than 1% of GFP-synthesizing pollen based on 30,000 pollen grains analyzed per event. This suggests that CinH-RS2 recombination system could be effectively utilized for transgene biocontainment.

  16. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  17. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  18. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  19. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  20. In vitro formation of gap junction vesicles.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A

    1976-02-01

    A method is described that uses trypsin digestion combined with collagenase-hyaluronidase which produces a population of gap junction vesicles. The hexagonal lattice of subunits ("connexons") comprising the gapjunctions appears unaltered by various structural criteria and by buoyant density measurements. The gap junction vesciles are closed by either a single or a double profile of nonjunctional "membrane," which presents a smooth, particle-free fracture face. Horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c studies have revealed that about 20% of the gap junction vesicles are impermeable to proteins 12,000 daltons or larger. The increased purity of the trypsinized junction preparation suggests that one of the disulfide reduction products of the gap-junction principal protein may be a nonjunctional contaminating peptide. The gap junction appears to be composed of a single 18,000-dalton protein, connexin, which may be reduced to a single 9,000-dalton peak. The number of peptides in this reduced peak are still unknown.

  1. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazumichi; Stopfer, Mark

    2013-12-02

    In vertebrates and invertebrates, signaling among neurons is most commonly mediated by chemical synapses. At these synapses neurotransmitter released by presynaptic neurons is detected by receptors on the postsynaptic neurons, leading to an influx of ions through the receptors themselves or through channels activated by intracellular signaling downstream of the receptors. But neurons can communicate with each other in a more direct way, by passing signals composed of small molecules and ions through pores called gap junctions. Gap junctions that transmit electrical signals are called electrical synapses. Unlike most chemical synapses, electrical synapses interact through axon-to-axon or dendrite-to-dendrite contacts. Found throughout the nervous system, they are probably best known for linking the relatively few inhibitory, GABAergic, neurons into large, effective networks within vertebrate brains. They are particularly important early in development before the formation of most chemical synapses, but recent work shows gap junctions play important roles in the adult nervous system, too. Gap junctions are sometimes thought to be mere passageways between cells. But, as recent work shows, their properties can be complex and surprising. Gap junctions help generate, propagate, and regulate neural oscillations, can filter electrical signals, and can be modulated in a variety of ways. Here we discuss recent work highlighting the diversity and importance of gap junctions throughout the nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. LOW RESISTANCE JUNCTIONS IN CRAYFISH

    PubMed Central

    Peracchia, Camillo

    1973-01-01

    The ultrastructure of low resistance junctions between segments of lateral giant fibers in crayfish is studied in sections from specimens fixed either by conventional methods or by glutaraldehyde-H2O2 or by glutaraldehyde-lanthanum. Cross sections through junctions fixed by conventional glutaraldehyde display the usual trilaminar profile of two parallel membranes separated by a narrow gap. Most of the junctional regions appear covered by 500–800 Å vesicles which lie on both sides of the junction in rows adjacent to the membranes. Gross sections through junctions fixed by glutaraldehyde-H2O2 display, in regions containing vesicles, membranes with a beaded profile. The beads correspond to globules ∼125 Å in width and ∼170 Å in height arranged in a hexagonal pattern with a unit cell of ∼200 Å. The globules of one membrane match precisely with those of the adjacent membrane, and opposite globules seem to come in contact with each other at the center of the junction. The membrane of the vesicles also contains globules. Occasionally the globules of the vesicles seem to join with those of the junctional membranes, apparently forming intracellular junctions. Injunctions negatively stained by lanthanum the globules are seen organized into two arrangements. Areas containing globules in a hexagonal array with a unit cell of ∼200 Å (swollen pattern) are seen adjacent to areas in which the globules are more closely and disorderly packed (close packing), the minimum center-to-center distance between adjacent globules being ∼125 Å. At higher magnification each globule appears composed of six subunits arranged in a circle around a central region occupied by lanthanum (possibly a pit). PMID:4120610

  3. Interplay between tight junctions & adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Hannah K; Maiers, Jessica L; DeMali, Kris A

    2017-09-01

    Cell-cell adhesions are critical for the development and maintenance of tissues. Present at sites of cell-cell contact are the adherens junctions and tight junctions. The adherens junctions mediate cell-cell adhesion via the actions of nectins and cadherins. The tight junctions regulate passage of ions and small molecules between cells and establish cell polarity. Historically, the adherens and tight junctions have been thought of as discrete complexes. However, it is now clear that a high level of interdependency exists between the two junctional complexes. The adherens junctions and tight junctions are physically linked, by the zonula occludens proteins, and linked via signaling molecules including several polarity complexes and actin cytoskeletal modifiers. This review will first describe the individual components of both the adherens and tight junctions and then discuss the coupling of the two complexes with an emphasis on the signaling links and physical interactions between the two junctional complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. GEN1/Yen1 and the SLX4 complex: solutions to the problem of Holliday junction resolution

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Jennifer M.; Harper, J. Wade

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be among the most deleterious DNA lesions found in eukaryotic cells due to their propensity to promote genome instability. DSBs occur as a result of exogenous or endogenous DNA damage, and also occur during meiotic recombination. DSBs are often repaired through a process called homologous recombination (HR), which employs the sister chromatid in mitotic cells or the homologous chromosome in meiotic cells, as a template for repair. HR frequently involves the formation and resolution of four-way DNA structures referred to as the Holliday junction (HJ). Despite extensive study, the machinery and mechanisms used to process these structures in eukaryotes have remained poorly understood. Recent work has identified XPG and UvrC/GIY domain-containing structure-specific endonucleases that can symmetrically cleave HJs in vitro in a manner that allows for religation without additional processing, properties that are reminiscent of the classical RuvC HJ resolvase in bacteria. Genetic studies reveal potential roles for these HJ resolvases in repair after DNA damage and during meiosis. The stage is now set for a more comprehensive understanding of the specific roles these enzymes play in the response of cells to DSBs, collapsed replication forks, telomere dysfunction, and meiotic recombination. PMID:20203129

  5. On the structural organization of isolated bovine lens fiber junctions.

    PubMed

    Zampighi, G; Simon, S A; Robertson, J D; McIntosh, T J; Costello, M J

    1982-04-01

    Junctions between fiber cells of bovine lenses have been isolated in milligram quantities, without using detergents or proteases. The structure of the isolated junctions has been studied by thin-section, negative-stain, and freeze-fracture electron microscopy and by x-ray diffraction. The junctions are large and most often have an undulating surface topology as determined by thin sectioning and freeze-fracture. These undulations resemble the tongue-and-groove interdigitations between lens fiber cells previously seen by others (D. H. Dickson and G. W. Crock, 1972, Invest. Ophthalmol. 11:809-815). In sections, the isolated junctions display a pentalamellar structure approximately 13-14 nm in overall thickness, which is significantly thinner than liver gap junctions. Each junctional membrane contains in the plane of the lipid bilayers distinct units arranged in a square lattice with a center-to-center spacing of 6.6 nm. Freeze-fracture replicas of the junctions fractured transversely show that the repeating units extend across the entire thickness of each membrane. Each unit is probably constructed from four identical subunits, with each subunit containing a protein of an apparent molecular weight of 27,000. We conclude that the lens junctions are structurally and chemically, different from gap junctions and could represent a new kind of intercellular contact, not simply another crystalline state of the gap junction protein.

  6. Characterization of crystals of the Hjc resolvase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus grown in gel by counter-diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biertümpfel, Christian; Basquin, Jérôme; Birkenbihl, Rainer P.; Suck, Dietrich; Sauter, Claude

    2005-07-01

    The Holliday junction-cutting enzyme Hjc from A. fulgidus was crystallized by the counter-diffusion method in agarose gel and complete data were collected at 2.7 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Holliday junction-resolving enzymes are ubiquitous proteins that play a key role in DNA repair and reorganization by homologous recombination. The Holliday junction-cutting enzyme (Hjc) from the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus is a member of this group. The first Hjc crystals were obtained by conventional sparse-matrix screening. They exhibited an unusually elongated unit cell and their X-ray characterization required special care to avoid spot overlaps along the c* axis. The use of an arc appended to the goniometric head allowed proper orientatation of plate-like crystals grown in agarose gel by counter-diffusion. Thus, complete diffraction data were collected at 2.7 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. They belong to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 37.4, c = 271.8 Å.

  7. Interaction of Branch Migration Translocases with the Holliday Junction-resolving Enzyme and Their Implications in Holliday Junction Resolution*

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Cristina; Suzuki, Yuki; Marchisone, Chiara; Carrasco, Begoña; Freire-Benéitez, Verónica; Takeyasu, Kunio; Alonso, Juan C.; Ayora, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Double-strand break repair involves the formation of Holliday junction (HJ) structures that need to be resolved to promote correct replication and chromosomal segregation. The molecular mechanisms of HJ branch migration and/or resolution are poorly characterized in Firmicutes. Genetic evidence suggested that the absence of the RuvAB branch migration translocase and the RecU HJ resolvase is synthetically lethal in Bacillus subtilis, whereas a recU recG mutant was viable. In vitro RecU, which is restricted to bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, binds HJs with high affinity. In this work we found that RecU does not bind simultaneously with RecG to a HJ. RuvB by interacting with RecU bound to the central region of HJ DNA, loses its nonspecific association with DNA, and re-localizes with RecU to form a ternary complex. RecU cannot stimulate the ATPase or branch migration activity of RuvB. The presence of RuvB·ATPγS greatly stimulates RecU-mediated HJ resolution, but the addition of ATP or RuvA abolishes this stimulatory effect. A RecU·HJ·RuvAB complex might be formed. RecU does not increase the RuvAB activities but slightly inhibits them. PMID:24770420

  8. Interaction of branch migration translocases with the Holliday junction-resolving enzyme and their implications in Holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Cristina; Suzuki, Yuki; Marchisone, Chiara; Carrasco, Begoña; Freire-Benéitez, Verónica; Takeyasu, Kunio; Alonso, Juan C; Ayora, Silvia

    2014-06-20

    Double-strand break repair involves the formation of Holliday junction (HJ) structures that need to be resolved to promote correct replication and chromosomal segregation. The molecular mechanisms of HJ branch migration and/or resolution are poorly characterized in Firmicutes. Genetic evidence suggested that the absence of the RuvAB branch migration translocase and the RecU HJ resolvase is synthetically lethal in Bacillus subtilis, whereas a recU recG mutant was viable. In vitro RecU, which is restricted to bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, binds HJs with high affinity. In this work we found that RecU does not bind simultaneously with RecG to a HJ. RuvB by interacting with RecU bound to the central region of HJ DNA, loses its nonspecific association with DNA, and re-localizes with RecU to form a ternary complex. RecU cannot stimulate the ATPase or branch migration activity of RuvB. The presence of RuvB·ATPγS greatly stimulates RecU-mediated HJ resolution, but the addition of ATP or RuvA abolishes this stimulatory effect. A RecU·HJ·RuvAB complex might be formed. RecU does not increase the RuvAB activities but slightly inhibits them. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Characterization of the Holliday Junction Resolving Enzyme Encoded by the Bacillus subtilis Bacteriophage SPP1

    PubMed Central

    Zecchi, Lisa; Lo Piano, Ambra; Suzuki, Yuki; Cañas, Cristina; Takeyasu, Kunio; Ayora, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Recombination-dependent DNA replication, which is a central component of viral replication restart, is poorly understood in Firmicutes bacteriophages. Phage SPP1 initiates unidirectional theta DNA replication from a discrete replication origin (oriL), and when replication progresses, the fork might stall by the binding of the origin binding protein G38P to the late replication origin (oriR). Replication restart is dependent on viral recombination proteins to synthesize a linear head-to-tail concatemer, which is the substrate for viral DNA packaging. To identify new functions involved in this process, uncharacterized genes from phage SPP1 were analyzed. Immediately after infection, SPP1 transcribes a number of genes involved in recombination and replication from PE2 and PE3 promoters. Resequencing the region corresponding to the last two hypothetical genes transcribed from the PE2 operon (genes 44 and 45) showed that they are in fact a single gene, re-annotated here as gene 44, that encodes a single polypeptide, named gene 44 product (G44P, 27.5 kDa). G44P shares a low but significant degree of identity in its C-terminal region with virus-encoded RusA-like resolvases. The data presented here demonstrate that G44P, which is a dimer in solution, binds with high affinity but without sequence specificity to several double-stranded DNA recombination intermediates. G44P preferentially cleaves Holliday junctions, but also, with lower efficiency, replicated D-loops. It also partially complemented the loss of RecU resolvase activity in B. subtilis cells. These in vitro and in vivo data suggest a role for G44P in replication restart during the transition to concatemeric viral replication. PMID:23119018

  10. LOW RESISTANCE JUNCTIONS IN CRAYFISH

    PubMed Central

    Peracchia, Camillo

    1973-01-01

    Low resistance junctions between axons of crayfish ganglia are studied by freeze-fracture and negative staining. In freeze-fracture, fracture planes that go through a junctional membrane expose two faces, both internal, called face A and face B. Face A belongs to the internal membrane leaflet and faces the gap. Face B belongs to the external membrane leaflet and faces the axoplasm. Face A displays pits, 60–100 Å in diameter, arranged in a hexagonal array with a unit cell of ∼200 Å. An ∼25 Å bump is frequently seen at the center of each pit. Some pits are occupied by a globule ∼125 Å in diameter, which displays a central depression ∼25 Å in size. Face B contains globules also arranged in a fairly regular hexagonal pattern. The center-to-center distance between adjacent globules is most frequently ∼200 Å; however, occasionally certain globules are seen separated by a distance as short as ∼125 Å. The top surface of the globules occasionally displays a starlike profile and seems to contain a central depression ∼25 Å in diameter. In negatively stained preparations of membranes from the nerve cord, two types of membranes are seen containing a fairly regular pattern. In one, globules ∼95 Å in diameter form a hexagonal close packing with a unit cell of ∼95 Å. In the other, globules of the same size are organized in a larger hexagonal array with a unit cell of ∼155 Å (swollen arrangement). Some of the globules forming the swollen arrangement are seen containing six subunits. The six subunits form a hexagon which is skewed with respect to the main rows of hexagons in such a way that the subunits lie on rows which make an angle of ∼37° with the main rows. PMID:4120611

  11. Sodium channel auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tsai-Tien; McMahon, Allison M; Johnson, Victoria T; Mangubat, Erwin Z; Zahm, Robert J; Pacold, Mary E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are well known for their functional roles in excitable tissues. Excitable tissues rely on voltage-gated ion channels and their auxiliary subunits to achieve concerted electrical activity in living cells. Auxiliary subunits are also known to provide functional diversity towards the transport and biogenesis properties of the principal subunits. Recent interests in pharmacological properties of these auxiliary subunits have prompted significant amounts of efforts in understanding their physiological roles. Some auxiliary subunits can potentially serve as drug targets for novel analgesics. Three families of sodium channel auxiliary subunits are described here: beta1 and beta3, beta2 and beta4, and temperature-induced paralytic E (TipE). While sodium channel beta-subunits are encoded in many animal genomes, TipE has only been found exclusively in insects. In this review, we present phylogenetic analyses, discuss potential evolutionary origins and functional data available for each of these subunits. For each family, we also correlate the functional specificity with the history of evolution for the individual auxiliary subunits.

  12. The Borrelia burgdorferi telomere resolvase, ResT, anneals ssDNA complexed with its cognate ssDNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu Hui; Kobryn, Kerri

    2016-01-01

    Spirochetes of the genus Borrelia possess unusual genomes that consist in a linear chromosome and multiple linear and circular plasmids. The linear replicons are terminated by covalently closed hairpin ends, referred to as hairpin telomeres. The hairpin telomeres represent a simple solution to the end-replication problem. Deoxyribonucleic acid replication initiates internally and proceeds bidirectionally toward the hairpin telomeres. The telomere resolvase, ResT, forms the hairpin telomeres from replicated telomere intermediates in a reaction with similarities to those promoted by type IB topoisomerases and tyrosine recombinases. ResT has also been shown to possess DNA single-strand annealing activity. We report here that ResT promotes single-strand annealing of both free DNA strands and ssDNA complexed with single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB). The annealing of complementary strands bound by SSB requires a ResT–SSB interaction that is mediated by the conserved amphipathic C-terminal tail of SSB. These properties of ResT are similar to those demonstrated for the recombination mediator protein, RecO, of the RecF pathway. Borrelia burgdorferi is unusual in lacking identifiable homologs of the RecFOR proteins. We propose that ResT may provide missing RecFOR functions. PMID:27131360

  13. The cap-snatching endonuclease of influenza virus polymerase resides in the PA subunit.

    PubMed

    Dias, Alexandre; Bouvier, Denis; Crépin, Thibaut; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Baudin, Florence; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W H

    2009-04-16

    The influenza virus polymerase, a heterotrimer composed of three subunits, PA, PB1 and PB2, is responsible for replication and transcription of the eight separate segments of the viral RNA genome in the nuclei of infected cells. The polymerase synthesizes viral messenger RNAs using short capped primers derived from cellular transcripts by a unique 'cap-snatching' mechanism. The PB2 subunit binds the 5' cap of host pre-mRNAs, which are subsequently cleaved after 10-13 nucleotides by the viral endonuclease, hitherto thought to reside in the PB2 (ref. 5) or PB1 (ref. 2) subunits. Here we describe biochemical and structural studies showing that the amino-terminal 209 residues of the PA subunit contain the endonuclease active site. We show that this domain has intrinsic RNA and DNA endonuclease activity that is strongly activated by manganese ions, matching observations reported for the endonuclease activity of the intact trimeric polymerase. Furthermore, this activity is inhibited by 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid, a known inhibitor of the influenza endonuclease. The crystal structure of the domain reveals a structural core closely resembling resolvases and type II restriction endonucleases. The active site comprises a histidine and a cluster of three acidic residues, conserved in all influenza viruses, which bind two manganese ions in a configuration similar to other two-metal-dependent endonucleases. Two active site residues have previously been shown to specifically eliminate the polymerase endonuclease activity when mutated. These results will facilitate the optimisation of endonuclease inhibitors as potential new anti-influenza drugs.

  14. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  15. Mechanism of Holliday junction resolution by the human GEN1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Rass, Ulrich; Compton, Sarah A.; Matos, Joao; Singleton, Martin R.; Ip, Stephen C.Y.; Blanco, Miguel G.; Griffith, Jack D.; West, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolution is essential for chromosome segregation at meiosis and the repair of stalled/collapsed replication forks in mitotic cells. All organisms possess nucleases that promote HJ resolution by the introduction of symmetrically related nicks in two strands at, or close to, the junction point. GEN1, a member of the Rad2/XPG nuclease family, was isolated recently from human cells and shown to promote HJ resolution in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide the first biochemical/structural characterization of GEN1, showing that, like the Escherichia coli HJ resolvase RuvC, it binds specifically to HJs and resolves them by a dual incision mechanism in which nicks are introduced in the pair of continuous (noncrossing) strands within the lifetime of the GEN1–HJ complex. In contrast to RuvC, but like other Rad2/XPG family members such as FEN1, GEN1 is a monomeric 5′-flap endonuclease. However, the unique feature of GEN1 that distinguishes it from other Rad2/XPG nucleases is its ability to dimerize on HJs. This functional adaptation provides the two symmetrically aligned active sites required for HJ resolution. PMID:20634321

  16. Mechanism of Holliday junction resolution by the human GEN1 protein.

    PubMed

    Rass, Ulrich; Compton, Sarah A; Matos, Joao; Singleton, Martin R; Ip, Stephen C Y; Blanco, Miguel G; Griffith, Jack D; West, Stephen C

    2010-07-15

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolution is essential for chromosome segregation at meiosis and the repair of stalled/collapsed replication forks in mitotic cells. All organisms possess nucleases that promote HJ resolution by the introduction of symmetrically related nicks in two strands at, or close to, the junction point. GEN1, a member of the Rad2/XPG nuclease family, was isolated recently from human cells and shown to promote HJ resolution in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide the first biochemical/structural characterization of GEN1, showing that, like the Escherichia coli HJ resolvase RuvC, it binds specifically to HJs and resolves them by a dual incision mechanism in which nicks are introduced in the pair of continuous (noncrossing) strands within the lifetime of the GEN1-HJ complex. In contrast to RuvC, but like other Rad2/XPG family members such as FEN1, GEN1 is a monomeric 5'-flap endonuclease. However, the unique feature of GEN1 that distinguishes it from other Rad2/XPG nucleases is its ability to dimerize on HJs. This functional adaptation provides the two symmetrically aligned active sites required for HJ resolution.

  17. Glial Connexins and Gap Junctions in CNS inflammation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kielian, Tammy

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions facilitate direct cytoplasmic communication between neighboring cells, facilitating the transfer of small molecular weight molecules involved in cell signaling and metabolism. Gap junction channels are formed by the joining of two hemichannels from adjacent cells, each composed of six oligomeric protein subunits called connexins (Cx). Of paramount importance to CNS homeostasis are astrocyte networks formed by gap junctions, which play a critical role in maintaining the homeostatic regulation of extracellular pH, K+, and glutamate levels. Inflammation is a hallmark of several diseases afflicting the CNS. Within the past several years, the number of publications reporting effects of cytokines and pathogenic stimuli on glial gap junction communication has increased dramatically. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent observations characterizing the consequences of inflammatory stimuli on homocellular gap junction coupling in astrocytes and microglia as well as changes in connexin expression during various CNS inflammatory conditions. PMID:18410504

  18. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  19. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    Conductus 969 West Maude Avenue ř ’AEOTR. 19 4 0 0 75 Sunnyvale CA 94086 9. SPONSORING MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) ’C 510 N’_ ; i )N !’->.G...the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in the community) was the bi-epitaxial structure [4...achieved. 2.1 Junctions At the time of proposal, the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in

  20. Myosins in cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Katy C.; Cheney, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The development of cell-cell junctions was a fundamental step in metazoan evolution, and human health depends on the formation and function of cell junctions. Although it has long been known that actin and conventional myosin have important roles in cell junctions, research has begun to reveal the specific functions of the different forms of conventional myosin. Exciting new data also reveals that a growing number of unconventional myosins have important roles in cell junctions. Experiments showing that cell junctions act as mechanosensors have also provided new impetus to understand the functions of myosins and the forces they exert. In this review we will summarize recent developments on the roles of myosins in cell junctions. PMID:22954512

  1. Indian Ocean Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.

    1980-09-10

    The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the Indian Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central Indian Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast Indian Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest Indian Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest Indian Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.

  2. Gap Junctions in Developing Thalamic and Neocortical Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Dragos; Lohmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The presence of direct, cytoplasmatic, communication between neurons in the brain of vertebrates has been demonstrated a long time ago. These gap junctions have been characterized in many brain areas in terms of subunit composition, biophysical properties, neuronal connectivity patterns, and developmental regulation. Although interesting findings emerged, showing that different subunits are specifically regulated during development, or that excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks exhibit various electrical connectivity patterns, gap junctions did not receive much further interest. Originally, it was believed that gap junctions represent simple passageways for electrical and biochemical coordination early in development. Today, we know that gap junction connectivity is tightly regulated, following independent developmental patterns for excitatory and inhibitory networks. Electrical connections are important for many specific functions of neurons, and are, for example, required for the development of neuronal stimulus tuning in the visual system. Here, we integrate the available data on neuronal connectivity and gap junction properties, as well as the most recent findings concerning the functional implications of electrical connections in the developing thalamus and neocortex. PMID:23843439

  3. Gap junctions in developing thalamic and neocortical neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Dragos; Lohmann, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The presence of direct, cytoplasmatic, communication between neurons in the brain of vertebrates has been demonstrated a long time ago. These gap junctions have been characterized in many brain areas in terms of subunit composition, biophysical properties, neuronal connectivity patterns, and developmental regulation. Although interesting findings emerged, showing that different subunits are specifically regulated during development, or that excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks exhibit various electrical connectivity patterns, gap junctions did not receive much further interest. Originally, it was believed that gap junctions represent simple passageways for electrical and biochemical coordination early in development. Today, we know that gap junction connectivity is tightly regulated, following independent developmental patterns for excitatory and inhibitory networks. Electrical connections are important for many specific functions of neurons, and are, for example, required for the development of neuronal stimulus tuning in the visual system. Here, we integrate the available data on neuronal connectivity and gap junction properties, as well as the most recent findings concerning the functional implications of electrical connections in the developing thalamus and neocortex.

  4. Combinatorial regulation of meiotic holliday junction resolution in C. elegans by HIM-6 (BLM) helicase, SLX-4, and the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Sonneville, Remi; Jagut, Marlène; Woglar, Alexander; Blow, Julian; Jantsch, Verena; Gartner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are cruciform DNA structures that are created during recombination events. It is a matter of considerable importance to determine the resolvase(s) that promote resolution of these structures. We previously reported that C. elegans GEN-1 is a symmetrically cleaving HJ resolving enzyme required for recombinational repair, but we could not find an overt role in meiotic recombination. Here we identify C. elegans proteins involved in resolving meiotic HJs. We found no evidence for a redundant meiotic function of GEN-1. In contrast, we discovered two redundant HJ resolution pathways likely coordinated by the SLX-4 scaffold protein and also involving the HIM-6/BLM helicase. SLX-4 associates with the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases and has been implicated in meiotic recombination in C. elegans. We found that C. elegans [mus-81; xpf-1], [slx-1; xpf-1], [mus-81; him-6] and [slx-1; him-6] double mutants showed a similar reduction in survival rates as slx-4. Analysis of meiotic diakinesis chromosomes revealed a distinct phenotype in these double mutants. Instead of wild-type bivalent chromosomes, pairs of "univalents" linked by chromatin bridges occur. These linkages depend on the conserved meiosis-specific transesterase SPO-11 and can be restored by ionizing radiation, suggesting that they represent unresolved meiotic HJs. This suggests the existence of two major resolvase activities, one provided by XPF-1 and HIM-6, the other by SLX-1 and MUS-81. In all double mutants crossover (CO) recombination is reduced but not abolished, indicative of further redundancy in meiotic HJ resolution. Real time imaging revealed extensive chromatin bridges during the first meiotic division that appear to be eventually resolved in meiosis II, suggesting back-up resolution activities acting at or after anaphase I. We also show that in HJ resolution mutants, the restructuring of chromosome arms distal and proximal to the CO still occurs, suggesting that CO initiation

  5. Combinatorial Regulation of Meiotic Holliday Junction Resolution in C. elegans by HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase, SLX-4, and the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Sonneville, Remi; Jagut, Marlène; Woglar, Alexander; Blow, Julian; Jantsch, Verena; Gartner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are cruciform DNA structures that are created during recombination events. It is a matter of considerable importance to determine the resolvase(s) that promote resolution of these structures. We previously reported that C. elegans GEN-1 is a symmetrically cleaving HJ resolving enzyme required for recombinational repair, but we could not find an overt role in meiotic recombination. Here we identify C. elegans proteins involved in resolving meiotic HJs. We found no evidence for a redundant meiotic function of GEN-1. In contrast, we discovered two redundant HJ resolution pathways likely coordinated by the SLX-4 scaffold protein and also involving the HIM-6/BLM helicase. SLX-4 associates with the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases and has been implicated in meiotic recombination in C. elegans. We found that C. elegans [mus-81; xpf-1], [slx-1; xpf-1], [mus-81; him-6] and [slx-1; him-6] double mutants showed a similar reduction in survival rates as slx-4. Analysis of meiotic diakinesis chromosomes revealed a distinct phenotype in these double mutants. Instead of wild-type bivalent chromosomes, pairs of “univalents” linked by chromatin bridges occur. These linkages depend on the conserved meiosis-specific transesterase SPO-11 and can be restored by ionizing radiation, suggesting that they represent unresolved meiotic HJs. This suggests the existence of two major resolvase activities, one provided by XPF-1 and HIM-6, the other by SLX-1 and MUS-81. In all double mutants crossover (CO) recombination is reduced but not abolished, indicative of further redundancy in meiotic HJ resolution. Real time imaging revealed extensive chromatin bridges during the first meiotic division that appear to be eventually resolved in meiosis II, suggesting back-up resolution activities acting at or after anaphase I. We also show that in HJ resolution mutants, the restructuring of chromosome arms distal and proximal to the CO still occurs, suggesting that CO

  6. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics.

  7. Gap junctions, homeostasis, and injury.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Antonio; Vega, Virginia L; Contreras, Jorge E

    2002-06-01

    Gap junctions (Gj) play an important role in the communication between cells of many tissues. They are composed of channels that permit the passage of ions and low molecular weight metabolites between adjacent cells, without exposure to the extracellular environment. These pathways are formed by the interaction between two hemichannels on the surface of opposing cells. These hemichannels are formed by the association of six identical subunits, named connexins (Cx), which are integral membrane proteins. Cell coupling via Gj is dependent on the specific pattern of Cx gene expression. This pattern of gene expression is altered during several pathological conditions resulting in changes of cell coupling. The regulation of Cx gene expression is affected at different levels from transcription to post translational processes during injury. In addition, Gj cellular communication is regulated by gating mechanisms. The alteration of Gj communication during injury could be rationalized by two opposite theories. One hypothesis proposes that the alteration of Gj communication attenuates the spread of toxic metabolites from the injured area to healthy organ regions. The alternative proposition is that a reduction of cellular communication reduces the loss of important cellular metabolisms, such as ATP and glucose. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Ocular and generalized myasthenia gravis induced by human acetylcholine receptor γ subunit immunization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaorong; Tuzun, Erdem; Li, Jing; Xiao, Tianlin; Saini, Shamsher S; Qi, Huibin; Allman, Windy; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2012-02-01

    HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice develop ocular myasthenia gravis (oMG), which then progresses to generalized MG (gMG) when immunized with the human acetylcholine receptor (H-AChR) α subunit. Because the fetal AChR γ subunit is expressed in adult extraocular muscles, we anticipated that γ subunit immunization would generate an immune response to mouse AChR and induce MG in mice. H-AChR γ subunit immunization in HLA-DQ8 mice induced an autoimmune response to mouse AChR and led to the destruction of AChR in the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) by anti-AChR antibody and complement activation, and it triggered upregulation of AChR gene transcription. Our findings indicate that oMG may be induced by immunity to the AChR γ subunit. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Unraveling a novel mechanism for the up-regulation of connexin43 gap junctions between cells derived from the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Juan C

    2017-02-15

    Endothelial cells from different vascular territories in mammals express at least three connexins (Cxs: Cx37, Cx40 and Cx43), which are protein subunits of gap junction channels. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  11. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  12. Dot junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1986-01-01

    A design of solar cells with reduced junction area on the cell surface is investigated for reduction of saturation current and increase in open-circuit voltage. Equidiameter dot junctions distributed across the surface of the cell offer an efficient alternative, with variations in dot diameter and in the spacing between dots giving the required variations in the ratio of junction area to total surface area. A simplified analysis for short-circuit current and other cell parameters, which enables cell design optimization, is presented. Experimental solar-cell performance results, as functions of different area ratios, are presented and compared with the model. It is shown that saturation current reduction is possible for achieving efficiencies as high as 18 percent in flat-plate terrestrial applications.

  13. Interactions among rice ORC subunits.

    PubMed

    Tan, Deyong; Lv, Qundan; Chen, Xinai; Shi, Jianghua; Ren, Meiyan; Wu, Ping; Mao, Chuanzao

    2013-08-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) is composed of six subunits and plays an important role in DNA replication in all eukaryotes. The ORC subunits OsORC6 as well as the other five ORC subunits in rice were experimentally isolated and sequenced. It indicated that there also exist six ORC subunits in rice. Results of RT-PCR indicated that expression of all the rice ORC genes are no significant difference under 26°C and 34°C. Yeast two hybridization indicated that OsORC2, -3, -5 interact with each other. OsORC5 can then bind OsORC4 to form the OsORC2, -3,-4,-5 core complex. It suggested that the basic interactions have been conserved through evolution. No binding of OsORC1 and OsORC6 with the other subunits were observed. A model of ORC complex in rice is proposed.

  14. Evidence for inhibition mediated by coassembly of GABAA and GABAC receptor subunits in native central neurons.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Carol J; Buckley, Noel J; Garret, Maurice; Deuchars, Jim; Deuchars, Susan A

    2004-08-18

    Fast inhibition in the nervous system is commonly mediated by GABA(A) receptors comprised of 2alpha/2beta/1gamma subunits. In contrast, GABA(C) receptors containing only rho subunits (rho1-rho3) have been predominantly detected in the retina. However, here using reverse transcription-PCR and in situ hybridization we show that mRNA encoding the rho1 subunit is highly expressed in brainstem neurons. Immunohistochemistry localized the rho1 subunit to neurons at light and electron microscopic levels, where it was detected at synaptic junctions. Application of the GABA(C) receptor agonist cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (100-800 microM) requires the rho1 subunit to elicit responses, which surprisingly are blocked independently by antagonists to GABA(A) (bicuculline, 10 microM) and GABA(C) [(1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA); 40-160 microM] receptors. Responses to GABA(C) agonists were also enhanced by the GABA(A) receptor modulator pentobarbitone (300 microM). Spontaneous and evoked IPSPs were reduced in amplitude but never abolished by TPMPA, but were completely blocked by bicuculline. We therefore tested the hypothesis that GABA(A) and GABA(C) subunits formed a heteromeric receptor. Immunohistochemistry indicated that rho1 and alpha1 subunits were colocalized at light and electron microscopic levels. Electrophysiology revealed that responses to GABA(C) receptor agonists were enhanced by the GABA(A) receptor modulator zolpidem (500 nm), which acts on the alpha1 subunit when the gamma2 subunit is also present. Finally, coimmunoprecipitation indicated that the rho1 subunit formed complexes that also containedalpha1 and gamma2 subunits. Taken together these separate lines of evidence suggest that the effects of GABA in central neurons can be mediated by heteromeric complexes of GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptor subunits.

  15. A single mutation in the acetylcholine receptor δ-subunit causes distinct effects in two types of neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee-Young; Mott, Meghan; Williams, Tory; Ikeda, Hiromi; Wen, Hua; Linhoff, Michael; Ono, Fumihito

    2014-07-30

    Mutations in AChR subunits, expressed as pentamers in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), cause various types of congenital myasthenic syndromes. In AChR pentamers, the adult ε subunit gradually replaces the embryonic γ subunit as the animal develops. Because of this switch in subunit composition, mutations in specific subunits result in synaptic phenotypes that change with developmental age. However, a mutation in any AChR subunit is considered to affect the NMJs of all muscle fibers equally. Here, we report a zebrafish mutant of the AChR δ subunit that exhibits two distinct NMJ phenotypes specific to two muscle fiber types: slow or fast. Homozygous fish harboring a point mutation in the δ subunit form functional AChRs in slow muscles, whereas receptors in fast muscles are nonfunctional. To test the hypothesis that different subunit compositions in slow and fast muscles underlie distinct phenotypes, we examined the presence of ε/γ subunits in NMJs using specific antibodies. Both wild-type and mutant larvae lacked ε/γ subunits in slow muscle synapses. These findings in zebrafish suggest that some mutations in human congenital myasthenic syndromes may affect slow and fast muscle fibers differently. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410211-08$15.00/0.

  16. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  17. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

    PubMed

    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  18. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Silvia; Engelhardt, Britta

    2015-05-25

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. © 2015 Tietz and Engelhardt.

  19. Intercellular junctions in myriapods.

    PubMed

    Dallai, R; Bigliardi, E; Lane, N J

    1990-01-01

    Tissue from the intestinal tract of myriapods, including millipedes, centipedes and pauropods were examined in tracer-impregnated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The foregut and hindgut of all three classes exhibit pleated septate junctions; these display undulating intercellular ribbons in thin sections. In replicas they show discrete intramembranous particle (IMP) arrays aligned in rows in parallel; with one another. The tissues of the hindgut also possess scalariform junctions, characterized by cross-striated intercellular clefts in sections and IMP-enriched membranes in replicas. Gap junctions occur in all groups, but they are atypical in replicas in that their component IMPs do not always fracture onto the E face, as is characteristic of other arthropods; some IMPs cleave to the P face and others to the E face. The midgut of these organisms exhibits smooth septate junctions with conventional straight septal ribbons and occasional interseptal columns. However the intramembranous appearance in replicas is variable, particularly in centipedes, in that the rows of IMPs in chemically-unfixed propanecryofixed tissues, are prominent and adhere preferentially to the E face, with complementary P face grooves, while in fixed tissues the IMPs are much less distinct and fracture to either P face or E face. They tend not to protrude far beyond the mid-plane of the membrane bilayer and lie in rows which commonly take on the form of a network. Individual rows of the network sometimes curve to run beside a second row, over a short distance, before bending away into another part of the network. The aligned particle rows, which are much more prominent in millipedes, where they frequently lie in close parallel appositions, do not fuse into ridges as often occurs in insect tissues. The myriapod junctions, therefore, are of the same general kind as are found in the gut tract of other arthropod groups, but differ with respect to the subtleties of their intramembranous

  20. Topoisomerase IIIα and Bloom’s helicase can resolve a mobile double Holliday junction substrate through convergent branch migration

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Jody L.; Wu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Tao-shih

    2006-01-01

    It has long been suspected that a double Holliday junction (dHJ) could be resolved by a topoisomerase partnered with a helicase by convergent branch migration of the HJs. Genetic analysis of yeast TOP3 and SGS1 has lent considerable evidence to the notion that the protein products of these genes are involved in just such a process, although biochemical analysis of the metabolism of a dHJ has been hindered by the lack of a substrate that adequately replicates the endogenous structure. We have synthesized a dHJ substrate that recapitulates many of the features of an endogenous dHJ and represents a much earlier intermediate in the resolution pathway. Here, we show that Drosophila topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα) and Blm (a homolog of Sgs1) are capable of resolving this substrate to non-cross-over products and that this activity is stimulated by replication protein A (RPA). We investigated the ability of other Drosophila topoisomerases to perform this reaction in concert with Blm and RPA and discovered that this resolution activity is unique to Topo IIIα. Examination of the mechanism of resolution reveals that Topo IIIα, Blm, and RPA resolve this substrate by convergent migration of the two HJs toward each other, collapsing the dHJ. This mechanism stands in contrast to classic resolvase activities that use a structure-specific endonuclease to cleave the HJs. PMID:16849422

  1. Coordinated actions of SLX1-SLX4 and MUS81-EME1 for Holliday junction resolution in human cells.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Haley D M; Sarbajna, Shriparna; Matos, Joao; West, Stephen C

    2013-10-24

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are four-way DNA intermediates that form during homologous recombination, and their efficient resolution is essential for chromosome segregation. Here, we show that three structure-selective endonucleases, namely SLX1-SLX4, MUS81-EME1, and GEN1, define two pathways of HJ resolution in human cells. One pathway is mediated by GEN1, whereas SLX1-SLX4 and MUS81-EME1 provide a second and genetically distinct pathway (SLX-MUS). Cells depleted for SLX-MUS or GEN1 pathway proteins exhibit severe defects in chromosome segregation and reduced survival. In response to CDK-mediated phosphorylation, SLX1-SLX4 and MUS81-EME1 associate at the G2/M transition to form a stable SLX-MUS holoenzyme, which can be reconstituted in vitro. Biochemical studies show that SLX-MUS is a HJ resolvase that coordinates the active sites of two distinct endonucleases during HJ resolution. This cleavage reaction is more efficient and orchestrated than that mediated by SLX1-SLX4 alone, which exhibits a potent nickase activity that acts promiscuously upon DNA secondary structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Topoisomerase IIIalpha and Bloom's helicase can resolve a mobile double Holliday junction substrate through convergent branch migration.

    PubMed

    Plank, Jody L; Wu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Tao-Shih

    2006-07-25

    It has long been suspected that a double Holliday junction (dHJ) could be resolved by a topoisomerase partnered with a helicase by convergent branch migration of the HJs. Genetic analysis of yeast TOP3 and SGS1 has lent considerable evidence to the notion that the protein products of these genes are involved in just such a process, although biochemical analysis of the metabolism of a dHJ has been hindered by the lack of a substrate that adequately replicates the endogenous structure. We have synthesized a dHJ substrate that recapitulates many of the features of an endogenous dHJ and represents a much earlier intermediate in the resolution pathway. Here, we show that Drosophila topoisomerase IIIalpha (Topo IIIalpha) and Blm (a homolog of Sgs1) are capable of resolving this substrate to non-cross-over products and that this activity is stimulated by replication protein A (RPA). We investigated the ability of other Drosophila topoisomerases to perform this reaction in concert with Blm and RPA and discovered that this resolution activity is unique to Topo IIIalpha. Examination of the mechanism of resolution reveals that Topo IIIalpha, Blm, and RPA resolve this substrate by convergent migration of the two HJs toward each other, collapsing the dHJ. This mechanism stands in contrast to classic resolvase activities that use a structure-specific endonuclease to cleave the HJs.

  3. Telomeric protein TRF2 protects Holliday junctions with telomeric arms from displacement by the Werner syndrome helicase.

    PubMed

    Nora, Gerald J; Buncher, Noah A; Opresko, Patricia L

    2010-07-01

    WRN protein loss causes Werner syndrome (WS), which is characterized by premature aging as well as genomic and telomeric instability. WRN prevents telomere loss, but the telomeric protein complex must regulate WRN activities to prevent aberrant telomere processing. Telomere-binding TRF2 protein inhibits telomere t-loop deletion by blocking Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase cleavage activity, but whether TRF2 also modulates HJ displacement at t-loops is unknown. In this study, we used multiplex fluorophore imaging to track the fate of individual strands of HJ substrates. We report the novel finding that TRF2 inhibits WRN helicase strand displacement of HJs with telomeric repeats in duplex arms, but unwinding of HJs with a telomeric center or lacking telomeric sequence is unaffected. These data, together with results using TRF2 fragments and TRF2 HJ binding assays, indicate that both the TRF2 B- and Myb domains are required to inhibit WRN HJ activity. We propose a novel model whereby simultaneous binding of the TRF2 B-domain to the HJ core and the Myb domain to telomeric arms promote and stabilize HJs in a stacked arm conformation that is unfavorable for unwinding. Our biochemical study provides a mechanistic basis for the cellular findings that TRF2 regulates WRN activity at telomeres.

  4. Chlorpromazine reduces the intercellular communication via gap junctions in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orellana, Juan A.; Palacios-Prado, Nicolas; Saez, Juan C. . E-mail: jsaez@bio.puc.cl

    2006-06-15

    In the work presented herein, we evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on gap junctions expressed by two mammalian cell types; Gn-11 cells (cell line derived from mouse LHRH neurons) and rat cortical astrocytes maintained in culture. We also attempted to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of CPZ effects on gap junctions. CPZ, in concentrations comparable with doses used to treat human diseases, was found to reduce the intercellular communication via gap junctions as evaluated with measurements of dye coupling (Lucifer yellow). In both cell types, maximal inhibition of functional gap junctions was reached within about 1 h of treatment with CPZ, an recovery was almost complete at about 5 h after CPZ wash out. In both cell types, CPZ treatment increased the phosphorylation state of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit. Moreover, CPZ reduced the reactivity of Cx43 (immunofluorescence) at cell interfaces and concomitantly increased its reactivity in intracellular vesicles, suggesting an increased retrieval from and/or reduced insertion into the plasma membrane. CPZ also caused cellular retraction reducing cell-cell contacts in a reversible manner. The reduction in contact area might destabilize existing gap junctions and abrogate formation of new ones. Moreover, the CPZ-induced reduction in gap junctional communication may depend on the connexins (Cxs) forming the junctions. If Cx43 were the only connexin expressed, MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of this connexin would induce closure of gap junction channels.

  5. Differential assembly of 16S rRNA domains during 30S subunit formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhili; Culver, Gloria M

    2010-10-01

    Rapid and accurate assembly of the ribosomal subunits, which are responsible for protein synthesis, is required to sustain cell growth. Our best understanding of the interaction of 30S ribosomal subunit components (16S ribosomal RNA [rRNA] and 20 ribosomal proteins [r-proteins]) comes from in vitro work using Escherichia coli ribosomal components. However, detailed information regarding the essential elements involved in the assembly of 30S subunits still remains elusive. Here, we defined a set of rRNA nucleotides that are critical for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit in E. coli. Using an RNA modification interference approach, we identified 54 nucleotides in 16S rRNA whose modification prevents the formation of a functional small ribosomal subunit. The majority of these nucleotides are located in the head and interdomain junction of the 30S subunit, suggesting that these regions are critical for small subunit assembly. In vivo analysis of specific identified sites, using engineered mutations in 16S rRNA, revealed defective protein synthesis capability, aberrant polysome profiles, and abnormal 16S rRNA processing, indicating the importance of these residues in vivo. These studies reveal that specific segments of 16S rRNA are more critical for small subunit assembly than others, and suggest a hierarchy of importance.

  6. Rabies virus binding at neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Burrage, T G; Tignor, G H; Smith, A L

    1985-04-01

    Morphological, immunocytochemical, biochemical, and immunological techniques have been used to describe rabies virus binding to a sub-cellular unit and molecular complex at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Early after infection in vivo, virus antigen and virus particles were found by immunofluorescence, electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy in regions of high density acetylcholine receptors (AChR) at NMJs. One monoclonal antibody (alpha-Mab) to the alpha subunit of the AChR blocked attachment of radio-labeled rabies virus to cultured muscle cells bearing high density patches of AChR. A sub-cellular structure, resembling an array of AChR monomers, bound both rabies virus antigens and alpha-Mab. By immunoblotting with electrophoretically transferred motor endplate proteins, rabies virus proteins and alpha-Mab bound to two proteins of 43 000 and 110 000 daltons. A rabies virus glycoprotein antibody detected virus antigen bound to the 110 000 dalton protein. An auto-immune (anti-idiotypic) response followed immunization of mice with rabies virus glycoprotein antigen; the antibody was directed to the 110 000 dalton protein. This auto-antibody altered the kinetics of neutralization by rabies virus antibody and induced the formation of rabies virus antibody after inoculation of mice. These results define, at the neuromuscular junction, a rabies virus receptor which may be part of the acetylcholine receptor complex.

  7. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  8. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion.

  9. Binding interactions with the complementary subunit of nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Blum, Angela P; Van Arnam, Ethan B; German, Laurel A; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2013-03-08

    The agonist-binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) spans an interface between two subunits of the pentameric receptor. The principal component of this binding site is contributed by an α subunit, and it binds the cationic moiety of the nicotinic pharmacophore. The other part of the pharmacophore, a hydrogen bond acceptor, has recently been shown to bind to the complementary non-α subunit via the backbone NH of a conserved Leu. This interaction was predicted by studies of ACh-binding proteins and confirmed by functional studies of the neuronal (CNS) nAChR, α4β2. The ACh-binding protein structures further suggested that the hydrogen bond to the backbone NH is mediated by a water molecule and that a second hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the water molecule and the backbone CO of a conserved Asn, also on the non-α subunit. Here, we provide new insights into the nature of the interactions between the hydrogen bond acceptor of nicotinic agonists and the complementary subunit backbone. We studied both the nAChR of the neuromuscular junction (muscle-type) and a neuronal subtype, (α4)2(β4)3. In the muscle-type receptor, both ACh and nicotine showed a strong interaction with the Leu NH, but the potent nicotine analog epibatidine did not. This interaction was much attenuated in the α4β4 receptor. Surprisingly, we found no evidence for a functionally significant interaction with the backbone carbonyl of the relevant Asn in either receptor with an array of agonists.

  10. Mic13 Is Essential for Formation of Crista Junctions in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ruchika; Strecker, Valentina; Urbach, Jennifer; Wittig, Ilka; Reichert, Andreas S

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are connected to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions which are implicated in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis, and import of lipids and proteins. The MICOS complex determines formation of crista junctions. We performed complexome profiling and identified Mic13, also termed Qil1, as a subunit of the MICOS complex. We show that MIC13 is an inner membrane protein physically interacting with MIC60, a central subunit of the MICOS complex. Using the CRISPR/Cas method we generated the first cell line deleted for MIC13. These knockout cells show a complete loss of crista junctions demonstrating that MIC13 is strictly required for the formation of crista junctions. MIC13 is required for the assembly of MIC10, MIC26, and MIC27 into the MICOS complex. However, it is not needed for the formation of the MIC60/MIC19/MIC25 subcomplex suggesting that the latter is not sufficient for crista junction formation. MIC13 is also dispensable for assembly of respiratory chain complexes and for maintaining mitochondrial network morphology. Still, lack of MIC13 resulted in a moderate reduction of mitochondrial respiration. In summary, we show that MIC13 has a fundamental role in crista junction formation and that assembly of respiratory chain supercomplexes is independent of mitochondrial cristae shape.

  11. Mic13 Is Essential for Formation of Crista Junctions in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ruchika; Strecker, Valentina; Urbach, Jennifer; Wittig, Ilka; Reichert, Andreas S.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are connected to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions which are implicated in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis, and import of lipids and proteins. The MICOS complex determines formation of crista junctions. We performed complexome profiling and identified Mic13, also termed Qil1, as a subunit of the MICOS complex. We show that MIC13 is an inner membrane protein physically interacting with MIC60, a central subunit of the MICOS complex. Using the CRISPR/Cas method we generated the first cell line deleted for MIC13. These knockout cells show a complete loss of crista junctions demonstrating that MIC13 is strictly required for the formation of crista junctions. MIC13 is required for the assembly of MIC10, MIC26, and MIC27 into the MICOS complex. However, it is not needed for the formation of the MIC60/MIC19/MIC25 subcomplex suggesting that the latter is not sufficient for crista junction formation. MIC13 is also dispensable for assembly of respiratory chain complexes and for maintaining mitochondrial network morphology. Still, lack of MIC13 resulted in a moderate reduction of mitochondrial respiration. In summary, we show that MIC13 has a fundamental role in crista junction formation and that assembly of respiratory chain supercomplexes is independent of mitochondrial cristae shape. PMID:27479602

  12. Differential regulation of the levels of three gap junction mRNAs in Xenopus embryos

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Xenopus mRNAs that potentially encode gap junction proteins in the oocyte and early embryo have been identified by low-stringency screening of cDNA libraries with cloned mammalian gap junction cDNAs. The levels of these mRNAs show strikingly different temporal regulation and tissue distribution. Using a nomenclature designed to stress important structural similarities of distinct gap junction gene products, the deduced polypeptides have been designated the Xenopus alpha 1 and alpha 2 gap junction proteins. The alpha 2 gap junction mRNA is a maternal transcript that disappears by the late gastrula stage. It is not detected in any organ of the adult except the ovary, and resides primarily, if not exclusively, in the oocytes and early embryos. The alpha 1 gap junction mRNA appears during organogenesis, and is detected in RNA from a wide variety of organs. It is also found in full-grown oocytes, but is rapidly degraded upon oocyte maturation, both in vivo and in vitro. The alpha 1 and alpha 2 mRNAs encode proteins with different degrees of amino acid sequence similarity to the predominant gap junction subunit of the mammalian heart (connexin 43). Together with our earlier report of a mid-embryonic (beta 1) gap junction mRNA, the results suggest that intercellular communication during oocyte growth and postfertilization development is a complex phenomenon involving the coordinated regulation of several genes. PMID:2155241

  13. A fine structural analysis of intercellular junctions in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A; Revel, J P

    1970-05-01

    Zonulae occludentes and gap junctions were examined both in the intact mouse liver and in a junction-rich membrane fraction from homogenized mouse liver. These preparations were visualized with the techniques of uranyl acetate staining en bloc, staining with colloidal lanthanum, negative staining with phosphotungstate, and freeze-cleaving. The zonula occludens is arranged as a meshwork of branching and anastomosing threadlike contacts sealing the lumen of the bile canaliculus from the liver intercellular space. The gap junction is characterized in section by a 20 A gap between the apposed junctional membrane outer leaflets, and permeation of this space with lanthanum or phosphotungstate reveals a polygonal lattice of subunits with a center-to-center spacing of 90-100 A. Freeze-cleaved gap junctions show a similar lattice. Extraction of junction-rich fractions with 60% aqueous acetone results in a disappearance of the 20 A gap in sectioned pellets and an inability to demonstrate the polygonal lattice with either the freeze-cleave or negative staining techniques. Extraction of the membranes with 50% acetone does not produce this effect. Thin-layer chromatography of the acetone extracts reveals a group of phospholipids in the 60% extract that are not detectable in the 50% extract. Acetone does not cause any detectable change in the structure of the zonula occludens, but the occluding junction becomes leaky to lanthanum following acetone treatment. The effects of other reagents on the junctions are reported.

  14. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  15. Josephson junctions with delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Blackburn, James A.; Huberman, Bernardo A.; Smith, H. J. T.

    1992-12-01

    We study a simple model of an overdamped Josephson junction coupled to a transmission line, which is regarded as a delayed feedback to the junction. It is demonstrated analytically how the nonlocal time dependence can give rise to hysteresis and steps in the current-voltage characteristics of the junction and the fundamental difference between positive and negative feedback is discussed. Excellent agreement between the analytical results and the results of numerical simulations is found.

  16. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  17. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  18. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-09-23

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells.

  19. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  20. Disordered graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, W. A.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-02-01

    A tight-binding approach based on the Chebyshev-Bogoliubov-de Gennes method is used to describe disordered single-layer graphene Josephson junctions. Scattering by vacancies, ripples, or charged impurities is included. We compute the Josephson current and investigate the nature of multiple Andreev reflections, which induce bound states appearing as peaks in the density of states for energies below the superconducting gap. In the presence of single-atom vacancies, we observe a strong suppression of the supercurrent, which is a consequence of strong intervalley scattering. Although lattice deformations should not induce intervalley scattering, we find that the supercurrent is still suppressed, which is due to the presence of pseudomagnetic barriers. For charged impurities, we consider two cases depending on whether the average doping is zero, i.e., existence of electron-hole puddles, or finite. In both cases, short-range impurities strongly affect the supercurrent, similar to the vacancies scenario.

  1. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated.

  2. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  3. Mutational Dissection of Telomeric DNA Binding Requirements of G4 Resolvase 1 Shows that G4-Structure and Certain 3’-Tail Sequences Are Sufficient for Tight and Complete Binding

    PubMed Central

    Smaldino, Philip J.; Routh, Eric D.; Kim, Jung H.; Giri, Banabihari; Creacy, Steven D.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Akman, Steven A.; Vaughn, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Ends of human chromosomes consist of the six nucleotide repeat d[pTTAGGG]n known as telomeric DNA, which protects chromosomes. We have previously shown that the DHX36 gene product, G4 Resolvase 1 (G4R1), binds parallel G-quadruplex (G4) DNA with an unusually tight apparent Kd. Recent work associates G4R1 with the telomerase holoenzyme, which may allow it to access telomeric G4-DNA. Here we show that G4R1 can tightly bind telomeric G4-DNA, and in the context of the telomeric sequence, we determine length, sequence, and structural requirements sufficient for tight G4R1 telomeric binding. Specifically, G4R1 binds telomeric DNA in the K+-induced “3+1” G4-topology with an apparent Kd = 10 ±1.9 pM, a value similar as previously found for binding to unimolecular parallel G4-DNA. G4R1 binds to the Na+-induced “2+2” basket G4-structure formed by the same DNA sequence with an apparent Kd = 71 ± 2.2 pM. While the minimal G4-structure is not sufficient for G4R1 binding, a 5’ G4-structure with a 3’ unstructured tail containing a guanine flanked by adenine(s) is sufficient for maximal binding. Mutations directed to disrupt G4-structure similarly disrupt G4R1 binding; secondary mutations that restore G4-structure also restore G4R1 binding. We present a model showing that a replication fork disrupting a T-loop could create a 5’ quadruplex with an opened 3’tail structure that is recognized by G4R1. PMID:26172836

  4. Mutational Dissection of Telomeric DNA Binding Requirements of G4 Resolvase 1 Shows that G4-Structure and Certain 3'-Tail Sequences Are Sufficient for Tight and Complete Binding.

    PubMed

    Smaldino, Philip J; Routh, Eric D; Kim, Jung H; Giri, Banabihari; Creacy, Steven D; Hantgan, Roy R; Akman, Steven A; Vaughn, James P

    2015-01-01

    Ends of human chromosomes consist of the six nucleotide repeat d[pTTAGGG]n known as telomeric DNA, which protects chromosomes. We have previously shown that the DHX36 gene product, G4 Resolvase 1 (G4R1), binds parallel G-quadruplex (G4) DNA with an unusually tight apparent Kd. Recent work associates G4R1 with the telomerase holoenzyme, which may allow it to access telomeric G4-DNA. Here we show that G4R1 can tightly bind telomeric G4-DNA, and in the context of the telomeric sequence, we determine length, sequence, and structural requirements sufficient for tight G4R1 telomeric binding. Specifically, G4R1 binds telomeric DNA in the K+-induced "3+1" G4-topology with an apparent Kd = 10 ± 1.9 pM, a value similar as previously found for binding to unimolecular parallel G4-DNA. G4R1 binds to the Na+-induced "2+2" basket G4-structure formed by the same DNA sequence with an apparent Kd = 71 ± 2.2 pM. While the minimal G4-structure is not sufficient for G4R1 binding, a 5' G4-structure with a 3' unstructured tail containing a guanine flanked by adenine(s) is sufficient for maximal binding. Mutations directed to disrupt G4-structure similarly disrupt G4R1 binding; secondary mutations that restore G4-structure also restore G4R1 binding. We present a model showing that a replication fork disrupting a T-loop could create a 5' quadruplex with an opened 3'tail structure that is recognized by G4R1.

  5. Human GEN1 and the SLX4-associated nucleases MUS81 and SLX1 are essential for the resolution of replication-induced Holliday junctions.

    PubMed

    Garner, Elizabeth; Kim, Yonghwan; Lach, Francis P; Kottemann, Molly C; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2013-10-17

    Holliday junctions (HJs), the DNA intermediates of homologous recombination, need to be faithfully processed in order to preserve genome integrity. In human cells, the BLM helicase complex promotes nonnucleolytic dissolution of double HJs. In vitro, HJs may be nucleolytically processed by MUS81-EME1, GEN1, and SLX4-SLX1. Here, we exploit human SLX4-null cells to examine the requirements for HJ resolution in vivo. Lack of BLM and SLX4 or GEN1 and SLX4 is synthetically lethal in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, and lethality is a consequence of dysfunctional mitosis proceeding in the presence of unprocessed HJs. Thus, GEN1 activity cannot be substituted for the SLX4-associated nucleases, and one of the HJ resolvase activities, either of those associated with SLX4 or with GEN1, is required for cell viability, even in the presence of BLM. In vivo HJ resolution depends on both SLX4-associated MUS81-EME1 and SLX1, suggesting that they are acting in concert in the context of SLX4. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rotating proton pumping ATPases: subunit/subunit interactions and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Sekiya, Mizuki; Futai, Masamitsu

    2013-03-01

    In this article, we discuss single molecule observation of rotational catalysis by E. coli ATP synthase (F-ATPase) using small gold beads. Studies involving a low viscous drag probe showed the stochastic properties of the enzyme in alternating catalytically active and inhibited states. The importance of subunit interaction between the rotor and the stator, and thermodynamics of the catalysis are also discussed. "Single Molecule Enzymology" is a new trend for understanding enzyme mechanisms in biochemistry and physiology.

  7. Gap junctions, pannexins and pain.

    PubMed

    Spray, David C; Hanani, Menachem

    2017-06-22

    Enhanced expression and function of gap junctions and pannexin (Panx) channels have been associated with both peripheral and central mechanisms of pain sensitization. At the level of the sensory ganglia, evidence includes augmented gap junction and pannexin1 expression in glial cells and neurons in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models and increased synchrony and enhanced cross-excitation among sensory neurons by gap junction-mediated coupling. In spinal cord and in suprapinal areas, evidence is largely limited to increased expression of relevant proteins, although in several rodent pain models, hypersensitivity is reduced by treatment with gap junction/Panx1 channel blocking compounds. Moreover, targeted modulation of Cx43 expression was shown to modulate pain thresholds, albeit in somewhat contradictory ways, and mice lacking Panx1 expression globally or in specific cell types show depressed hyperalgesia. We here review the evidence for involvement of gap junctions and Panx channels in a variety of animal pain studies and then discuss ways in which gap junctions and Panx channels may mediate their action in pain processing. This discussion focusses on spread of signals among satellite glial cells, in particular intercellular Ca(2+) waves, which are propagated through both gap junction and Panx1-dependent routes and have been associated with the phenomenon of spreading depression and the malady of migraine headache with aura. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Metallic Junction Thermoelectric Device Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duzik, Adam J.; Choi, Sang H.

    2017-01-01

    Thermoelectric junctions made of semiconductors have existed in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) for deep space missions, but are currently being adapted for terrestrial energy harvesting. Unfortunately, these devices are inefficient, operating at only 7% efficiency. This low efficiency has driven efforts to make high-figure-of-merit thermoelectric devices, which require a high electrical conductivity but a low thermal conductivity, a combination that is difficult to achieve. Lowered thermal conductivity has increased efficiency, but at the cost of power output. An alternative setup is to use metallic junctions rather than semiconductors as thermoelectric devices. Metals have orders of magnitude more electrons and electronic conductivities higher than semiconductors, but thermal conductivity is higher as well. To evaluate the viability of metallic junction thermoelectrics, a two dimensional heat transfer MATLAB simulation was constructed to calculate efficiency and power output. High Seebeck coefficient alloys, Chromel (90%Ni-10%Cr) and Constantan (55%Cu-45%Ni), produced efficiencies of around 20-30%. Parameters such as the number of layers of junctions, lateral junction density, and junction sizes for both series- and parallel-connected junctions were explored.

  9. Spatial subunit distribution and in vitro functions of the novel trimeric PCNA complex from Sulfolobus tokodaii

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Shuhong; Li Zhuo; Wang Zhiyu; Ma Xiaoqing; Sheng Duohong; Ni Jinfeng; Shen Yulong

    2008-11-14

    The relationships among three PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) subunits in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii (StoPCNAs) were analyzed and the effects of two PCNA complexes on the activities of the DNA helicase Hjm, DNA Ligase I, and Holliday junction specific endonuclease Hjc were tested. There was no strong self-interaction of each StoPCNA. StoPCNA1 and StoPCNA3 interacted with each other, so did StoPCNA2 and StoPCNA3, but no interaction between StoPCNA1 and StoPCNA2 was observed. Two trimeric complexes (designed StoPCNA123 and StoPCNA323) were formed in vitro and it was determined that StoPCNA323 was composed of one StoPCNA2 and two StoPCNA3 subunits, with StoPCNA2 bridging the two StoPCNA3 subunits. Both complexes inhibited the unwinding activity of Hjm and the ligation activity of DNA Ligase I. In contrast, both stimulated the Holliday junction cleavage activity of Hjc. Our results provide further evidence that in crenarchaea, the PCNAs exhibit diversity in subunit interaction and complex formation.

  10. Thermopower measurements in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Rincón-García, Laura; Evangeli, Charalambos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2016-08-07

    The measurement of thermopower in molecular junctions offers complementary information to conductance measurements and is becoming essential for the understanding of transport processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the study of the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. After presenting the theoretical background for thermoelectricity at the nanoscale, we review the experimental techniques for measuring the thermopower in these systems and discuss the main results. Finally, we consider the challenges in the application of molecular junctions in viable thermoelectric devices.

  11. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River Junction...

  12. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River Junction...

  13. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  14. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  15. Shalbatana/Simud Vallis Junction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-11

    The sinuous channels and streamlined islands at the junction of Shalbatana and Simud Vallis, seen in this NASA Mars Odyssey image, present an erosional history of the catastrophic floods that scoured the Martian surface hundreds of millions of years ago.

  16. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  17. Tunable φ Josephson junction ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menditto, R.; Sickinger, H.; Weides, M.; Kohlstedt, H.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R.; Goldobin, E.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the operation of a deterministic Josephson ratchet with tunable asymmetry. The ratchet is based on a φ Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic barrier operating in the underdamped regime. The system is probed also under the action of an additional dc current, which acts as a counterforce trying to stop the ratchet. Under these conditions the ratchet works against the counterforce, thus producing a nonzero output power. Finally, we estimate the efficiency of the φ Josephson junction ratchet.

  18. Tight junctions as regulators of tissue remodelling.

    PubMed

    Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2016-10-01

    Formation of tissue barriers by epithelial and endothelial cells requires neighbouring cells to interact via intercellular junctions, which includes tight junctions. Tight junctions form a semipermeable paracellular diffusion barrier and act as signalling hubs that guide cell behaviour and differentiation. Components of tight junctions are also expressed in cell types not forming tight junctions, such as cardiomyocytes, where they associate with facia adherens and/or gap junctions. This review will focus on tight junction proteins and their importance in tissue homeostasis and remodelling with a particular emphasis on what we have learned from animal models and human diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  20. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  1. Formation of triads without the dihydropyridine receptor alpha subunits in cell lines from dysgenic skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Muscular dysgenesis (mdg/mdg), a mutation of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) alpha 1 subunit, has served as a model to study the functions of the DHPR in excitation-contraction coupling and its role in triad formation. We have investigated the question of whether the lack of the DHPR in dysgenic skeletal muscle results in a failure of triad formation, using cell lines (GLT and NLT) derived from dysgenic (mdg/mdg) and normal (+/+) muscle, respectively. The lines were generated by transfection of myoblasts with a plasmid encoding a Large T antigen. Both cell lines express muscle-specific proteins and begin organization of sarcomeres as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. Similar to primary cultures, dysgenic (GLT) myoblasts show a higher incidence of cell fusion than their normal counterparts (NLT). NLT myotubes develop spontaneous contractile activity, and fluorescent Ca2+ recordings show Ca2+ release in response to depolarization. In contrast, GLTs show neither spontaneous nor depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients, but do release Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in response to caffeine. Despite normal transverse tubule (T-tubule) formation, GLT myotubes lack the alpha 1 subunit of the skeletal muscle DHPR, and the alpha 2 subunit is mistargeted. Nevertheless, the ryanodine receptor (RyR) frequently develops its normal, clustered organization in the absence of both DHPR alpha subunits in the T-tubules. In EM, these RyR clusters correspond to T-tubule/SR junctions with regularly spaced feet. These findings provide conclusive evidence that interactions between the DHPR and RyR are not involved in the formation of triad junctions or in the normal organization of the RyR in the junctional SR. PMID:8707823

  2. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Experimental Approach Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9′ serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Key Results Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose–response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9′S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Conclusions and Implications Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. PMID:24206220

  3. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  4. The Subunit Structure of Benzylsuccinate Synthase†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Patterson, Dustin P.; Fox, Christel C.; Lin, Brian; Coschigano, Peter W.; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2010-01-01

    Benzylsuccinate synthase is a member of the glycyl radical family of enzymes. It catalyzes the addition of toluene to fumarate to form benzylsuccinate as the first step in the anaerobic pathway of toluene fermentation. The enzyme comprises three subunits α, β and γ that in Thauera Aromatica T1 strain are encoded by the tutD, tutG and tutF genes respectively. The large α-subunit contains the essential glycine and cysteine residues that are conserved in all glycyl radical enzymes. However, the function of the small β- and γ-subunits has remained unclear. We have over-expressed all three subunits of benzylsuccinate synthase in E. coli, both individually and in combination. Co-expression of the γ-subunit (but not the β-subunit) is essential for efficient expression of the α-subunit. The benzylsuccinate synthase complex lacking the glycyl radical could be purified as an α2β2γ2 hexamer by nickel-affinity chromatography through a ‘His6’ affinity tag engineered onto the C-terminus of the α-subunit. Unexpectedly, BSS was found to contain two iron-sulfur clusters, one associated with the β-subunit and the other with the γ-subunit that appear to be necessary for the structural integrity of the complex. The spectroscopic properties of these clusters suggest that they are most likely [4Fe-4S] clusters. Removal of iron with chelating agents results in dissociation of the complex; similarly a mutant γ-subunit lacking the [4Fe-4S] cluster is unable to stabilize the α-subunit when the proteins are co-expressed. PMID:19159265

  5. Gap junctions - guards of excitability.

    PubMed

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus; Delmar, Mario; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2015-06-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane.

  6. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  7. Predicting coaxial helical stacking in RNA junctions

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Christian; Wen, Dongrong; Wang, Jason T. L.; Schlick, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    RNA junctions are important structural elements that form when three or more helices come together in space in the tertiary structures of RNA molecules. Determining their structural configuration is important for predicting RNA 3D structure. We introduce a computational method to predict, at the secondary structure level, the coaxial helical stacking arrangement in junctions, as well as classify the junction topology. Our approach uses a data mining approach known as random forests, which relies on a set of decision trees trained using length, sequence and other variables specified for any given junction. The resulting protocol predicts coaxial stacking within three- and four-way junctions with an accuracy of 81% and 77%, respectively; the accuracy increases to 83% and 87%, respectively, when knowledge from the junction family type is included. Coaxial stacking predictions for the five to ten-way junctions are less accurate (60%) due to sparse data available for training. Additionally, our application predicts the junction family with an accuracy of 85% for three-way junctions and 74% for four-way junctions. Comparisons with other methods, as well applications to unsolved RNAs, are also presented. The web server Junction-Explorer to predict junction topologies is freely available at: http://bioinformatics.njit.edu/junction. PMID:21917853

  8. Degradation and resynthesis of gap junction protein in plasma membranes of regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy or cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Otto; Drüge, Petra Maria; Willecke, Klaus

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the total amount of the gap junction protein (Mr 26,000) after partial hepatectomy or bile duct ligation and recanalization were investigated in rat liver membranes by quantitative immunoblot with rabbit antiserum to the Mr 26,000 protein. The loss and reappearance of the Mr 26,000 protein roughly paralleled loss and reappearance of gap junction plaques analyzed previously under similar physiological conditions by freeze-fracture of hepatocyte surfaces. The total amount of the hepatic Mr 26,000 protein in liver plasma membranes and the total area of the hepatocyte surface occupied by gap junction plaques appeared to be proportional under these conditions. However, at the minimum, 28-35 hr after partial hepatectomy we still find about 15% of the Mr 26,000 protein, in contrast to <1% of gap junction plaques, determined by morphometric analysis. This discrepancy is probably due to the fact that very small gap junction plaques, single connexons, and free Mr 26,000 gap junction subunits are missed by the morphometric analysis. At the times of the minimal amount of the Mr 26,000 protein in hepatic plasma membranes after partial hepatectomy or bile duct ligation we found that crude hepatic lysosomal membranes of these rats contained less Mr 26,000 protein than lysosomal membranes of nonoperated control animals. Thus, we conclude that the decrease and increase of the total amount of the Mr 26,000 protein cannot be explained only by dispersal and reuse of gap junction subunits but are largely due to degradation and resynthesis of the Mr 26,000 protein. No significant change in the amount of the Mr 21,000 protein that had been isolated with gap junction plaques was observed in liver plasma membranes after partial hepatectomy. This confirms our previous conclusion that the Mr 26,000 and Mr 21,000 proteins are independent of each other. Images PMID:6298773

  9. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  10. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  11. Role of the Rubisco Small Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, Robert Joseph

    2016-11-05

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. However, it is a slow enzyme, and O2 competes with CO2 at the active site. Oxygenation initiates the photorespiratory pathway, which also results in the loss of CO2. If carboxylation could be increased or oxygenation decreased, an increase in net CO2 fixation would be realized. Because Rubisco provides the primary means by which carbon enters all life on earth, there is much interest in engineering Rubisco to increase the production of food and renewable energy. Rubisco is located in the chloroplasts of plants, and it is comprised of two subunits. Much is known about the chloroplast-gene-encoded large subunit (rbcL gene), which contains the active site, but much less is known about the role of the nuclear-gene-encoded small subunit in Rubisco function (rbcS gene). Both subunits are coded by multiple genes in plants, which makes genetic engineering difficult. In the eukaryotic, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it has been possible to eliminate all the Rubisco genes. These Rubisco-less mutants can be maintained by providing acetate as an alternative carbon source. In this project, focus has been placed on determining whether the small subunit might be a better genetic-engineering target for improving Rubisco. Analysis of a variable-loop structure (βA-βB loop) of the small subunit by genetic selection, directed mutagenesis, and construction of chimeras has shown that the small subunit can influence CO2/O2 specificity. X-ray crystal structures of engineered chimeric-loop enzymes have indicated that additional residues and regions of the small subunit may also contribute to Rubisco function. Structural dynamics of the small-subunit carboxyl terminus was also investigated. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the most-conserved small-subunit residues has identified a

  12. The Yolla Bolly junction revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, M.C.; Jayko, A.S. ); Jones, D.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Engebretson, D.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    West of Red Bluff, California, rocks of the northern Coast Ranges, Klamath-Sierra Nevada, and Great Valley provinces come together at what has been called the Yolla Bolly junction. Mapping of the Red Bluff and Willows 1:100,000 quadrangles has greatly clarified the enigmatic features of this complex area. Terranes of the Klamath Mountains and their Cretaceous sedimentary cover have been thrust northwestward over the Elder Creek terrane and Franciscan rocks, north of the left-lateral Cold Fork fault zone. The Condrey Mountain window (Franciscan Pickett Peak terrane) provides a measure of the magnitude of this thrusting (ca 90 km). South of the Cold Fork fault zone, the Franciscan and Elder Creek terranes were driven southeastward as tectonic wedges onto Sierran-Klamath basement. Timing of this scissor-tectonics is not constrained near the junction, but further north in southwest Oregon, Lower Eocene strata were deformed by overthrusting of the Klamath block whereas Upper Eocene strata overlap the thrust, indicating that thrusting occurred between about 52 and 60 Ma. Plate reconstructions for this time interval indicate the close proximity of the Kula-Farallon-North America triple junction and that old (ca 100 m.y.) Farallon lithosphere was being subducted north of the junction whereas to the south, very young (ca 10 m.y.) Kula plate was presumably obducted onto North America.

  13. Improved Solar-Cell Tunnel Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Kachare, A.

    1986-01-01

    Efficiency of multiple-junction silicon solar cells increased by inclusion of p+/n+ tunnel junctions of highly doped GaP between component cells. Relatively low recombination velocity at GaP junction principal reason for recommending this material. Relatively wide band gap also helps increase efficiency by reducing optical losses.

  14. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  15. Spectroscopic properties of Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeva, Stanka; Dolashka, Pavlina; Bankov, Banko; Voelter, Wolfgang; Salvato, Benedeto; Genov, Nicolay

    1995-10-01

    The two major subunits of the Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin were isolated and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. They consist of 641 and 652 residues, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the structural integrity of the isolated polypeptide chains is preserved. Tryptophan fluorescence parameters were determined for the hemocyanin aggregates and for the subunits Cs1 and Cs2. The emitting tryptophyl fluorophores in the native hemocyanin are deeply buried in hydrophobic regions and are shielded from the solvent by the quaternary structure of the protein aggregates. In two subunits, obtained after dissociation of the aggregates, these residues become "exposed". It is concluded that the tryptophyl side chains in Cs1 and Cs2 are located in subunit interfaces (contact regions) in a negatively charged environment when the polypeptide chains are aggregated. Most probably they participate in hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. The environment of these fluorophores is more negatively charged after the dissociation of the aggregates to subunits.

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of the ribosomal L1 stalk three-way junction

    PubMed Central

    Réblová, Kamila; Šponer, Jiří; Lankaš, Filip

    2012-01-01

    The L1 stalk is a key mobile element of the large ribosomal subunit which interacts with tRNA during translocation. Here, we investigate the structure and mechanical properties of the rRNA H76/H75/H79 three-way junction at the base of the L1 stalk from four different prokaryotic organisms. We propose a coarse-grained elastic model and parameterize it using large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Global properties of the junction are well described by a model in which the H76 helix is represented by a straight, isotropically flexible elastic rod, while the junction core is represented by an isotropically flexible spherical hinge. Both the core and the helix contribute substantially to the overall H76 bending fluctuations. The presence of wobble pairs in H76 does not induce any increased flexibility or anisotropy to the helix. The half-closed conformation of the L1 stalk seems to be accessible by thermal fluctuations of the junction itself, without any long-range allosteric effects. Bending fluctuations of H76 with a bulge introduced in it suggest a rationale for the precise position of the bulge in eukaryotes. Our elastic model can be generalized to other RNA junctions found in biological systems or in nanotechnology. PMID:22451682

  17. Tight junction proteins: from barrier to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Runkle, E Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-08-28

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis.

  18. Tight Junction Proteins: From Barrier to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, E. Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-01-01

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis. PMID:23743355

  19. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  20. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β.

  1. The herpes zoster subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Anthony L

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) causes severe pain and rash in older people and may be complicated by prolonged pain (postherpetic neuralgia; PHN). HZ results from reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, often associated with age related or other causes of decreased T cell immunity. A concentrated live attenuated vaccine boosts this immunity and provides partial protection against HZ, but this decreases with age and declines over 5-8 years. The new HZ subunit (HZ/su or Shingrix) vaccine combines a key surface VZV glycoprotein (E) with T cell boosting adjuvant (AS01B). It is highly efficacious in protection (97%) against HZ in immunocompetent subjects, with no decline in advancing age and protection maintained for >3 years. Phase I-II trials showed safety and similar immunogenicity in severely immunocompromised patients. Local injection site pain and swelling can be severe in a minority (9.5%) but is transient (2 days). The HZ/su vaccine appears very promising in immunocompetent patients in the ZoE-50 controlled trial. The unblinding of the current ZoE-50 trial and publication of results from the accompanying ZoE-70 trial will reveal more about its mechanism of action and its efficacy against PHN, particularly in subjects >70 years. Phase III trial results in immunocompromised patients are eagerly awaited.

  2. Role of gap junctions in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Miao-Miao; Chen, Zhong

    2011-12-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by periodic and unpredictable seizures. Gap junctions have recently been proposed to be involved in the generation, synchronization and maintenance of seizure events. The present review mainly summarizes recent reports concerning the contribution of gap junctions to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, together with the regulation of connexin after clinical and experimental seizure activity. The anticonvulsant effects of gap junction blockers both in vitro and in vivo suggest that the gap junction is a candidate target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. It is also of interest that the roles of neuronal and astrocytic gap junctions in epilepsy have been investigated independently, based on evidence from pharmacological manipulations and connexin-knockout mice. Further studies using more specific manipulations of gap junctions in different cell types and in human epileptic tissue are needed to fully uncover the role of gap junctions in epilepsy.

  3. [Co-expression of beta-subunit with other subunits of Qbeta replicase].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong

    2004-12-01

    In researches involving in vitro protein synthesis and self-replication system, Qbeta replicase is one of the key enzymes, which are demanded for the high availability. Qbeta replicase is a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Qbeta coliphage. It consists of four subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunit), where the beta-subunit is encoded by the viral genome, while the other three subunits are host proteins normally involved in protein synthesis, namely, ribosomal protein S1 (alpha), elongation factors EF-Tu (gamma) and EF-Ts (delta). To increase the production of the Qbeta replicase holoenzyme, several types of expression vectors, including pKK, pET and others, were employed to produce Qbeta replicase. However, the beta-subunit was almost in the precipitate fraction. Considering that the four subunits of Qbeta replicase holoenzyme are in equivalent molar ratio and the amount of the subunits, ribosomal S1 and EF-Ts, being produced by the host cells is relatively low, co-expression of beta-subunit with the other three subunits was performed to know whether the availability of the host subunits is the contributing factor for the solubility of the Qbeta replicase. pBAD33-rep was constructed by cloning the beta-subunit gene into pBAD 33, a pACYC derivative, and pET21a(+) was employed as expression vector for the three other subunits. Among the different combinations of co-expression experiments, solubility was found to slightly increase by SDS-PAGE analysis when the beta-subunit was co-expressed with EF-Tu-Ts. And the replicase activity assay showed this soluble enzyme is in active form. The expression of beta-subunit was enhanced by decreasing the level of inducer IPTG in co-expression, and more soluble enzyme were obtained.

  4. Gap junctional coupling in the vertebrate retina: variations on one theme?

    PubMed

    Völgyi, Béla; Kovács-Oller, Tamás; Atlasz, Tamás; Wilhelm, Márta; Gábriel, Róbert

    2013-05-01

    Gap junctions connect cells in the bodies of all multicellular organisms, forming either homologous or heterologous (i.e. established between identical or different cell types, respectively) cell-to-cell contacts by utilizing identical (homotypic) or different (heterotypic) connexin protein subunits. Gap junctions in the nervous system serve electrical signaling between neurons, thus they are also called electrical synapses. Such electrical synapses are particularly abundant in the vertebrate retina where they are specialized to form links between neurons as well as glial cells. In this article, we summarize recent findings on retinal cell-to-cell coupling in different vertebrates and identify general features in the light of the evergrowing body of data. In particular, we describe and discuss tracer coupling patterns, connexin proteins, junctional conductances and modulatory processes. This multispecies comparison serves to point out that most features are remarkably conserved across the vertebrate classes, including (i) the cell types connected via electrical synapses; (ii) the connexin makeup and the conductance of each cell-to-cell contact; (iii) the probable function of each gap junction in retinal circuitry; (iv) the fact that gap junctions underlie both electrical and/or tracer coupling between glial cells. These pan-vertebrate features thus demonstrate that retinal gap junctions have changed little during the over 500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Therefore, the fundamental architecture of electrically coupled retinal circuits seems as old as the retina itself, indicating that gap junctions deeply incorporated in retinal wiring from the very beginning of the eye formation of vertebrates. In addition to hard wiring provided by fast synaptic transmitter-releasing neurons and soft wiring contributed by peptidergic, aminergic and purinergic systems, electrical coupling may serve as the 'skeleton' of lateral processing, enabling important functions such

  5. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-01-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake Ac

  6. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-09-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake AcChoR.

  7. The gap junction cellular internet: connexin hemichannels enter the signalling limelight.

    PubMed

    Evans, W Howard; De Vuyst, Elke; Leybaert, Luc

    2006-07-01

    Cxs (connexins), the protein subunits forming gap junction intercellular communication channels, are transported to the plasma membrane after oligomerizing into hexameric assemblies called connexin hemichannels (CxHcs) or connexons, which dock head-to-head with partner hexameric channels positioned on neighbouring cells. The double membrane channel or gap junction generated directly couples the cytoplasms of interacting cells and underpins the integration and co-ordination of cellular metabolism, signalling and functions, such as secretion or contraction in cell assemblies. In contrast, CxHcs prior to forming gap junctions provide a pathway for the release from cells of ATP, glutamate, NAD+ and prostaglandin E2, which act as paracrine messengers. ATP activates purinergic receptors on neighbouring cells and forms the basis of intercellular Ca2+ signal propagation, complementing that occuring more directly via gap junctions. CxHcs open in response to various types of external changes, including mechanical, shear, ionic and ischaemic stress. In addition, CxHcs are influenced by intracellular signals, such as membrane potential, phosphorylation and redox status, which translate external stresses to CxHc responses. Also, recent studies demonstrate that cytoplasmic Ca2+ changes in the physiological range act to trigger CxHc opening, indicating their involvement under normal non-pathological conditions. CxHcs not only respond to cytoplasmic Ca2+, but also determine cytoplasmic Ca2+, as they are large conductance channels, suggesting a prominent role in cellular Ca2+ homoeostasis and signalling. The functions of gap-junction channels and CxHcs have been difficult to separate, but synthetic peptides that mimic short sequences in the Cx subunit are emerging as promising tools to determine the role of CxHcs in physiology and pathology.

  8. The gap junction cellular internet: connexin hemichannels enter the signalling limelight

    PubMed Central

    Evans, W. Howard; De Vuyst, Elke; Leybaert, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Cxs (connexins), the protein subunits forming gap junction intercellular communication channels, are transported to the plasma membrane after oligomerizing into hexameric assemblies called connexin hemichannels (CxHcs) or connexons, which dock head-to-head with partner hexameric channels positioned on neighbouring cells. The double membrane channel or gap junction generated directly couples the cytoplasms of interacting cells and underpins the integration and co-ordination of cellular metabolism, signalling and functions, such as secretion or contraction in cell assemblies. In contrast, CxHcs prior to forming gap junctions provide a pathway for the release from cells of ATP, glutamate, NAD+ and prostaglandin E2, which act as paracrine messengers. ATP activates purinergic receptors on neighbouring cells and forms the basis of intercellular Ca2+ signal propagation, complementing that occuring more directly via gap junctions. CxHcs open in response to various types of external changes, including mechanical, shear, ionic and ischaemic stress. In addition, CxHcs are influenced by intracellular signals, such as membrane potential, phosphorylation and redox status, which translate external stresses to CxHc responses. Also, recent studies demonstrate that cytoplasmic Ca2+ changes in the physiological range act to trigger CxHc opening, indicating their involvement under normal non-pathological conditions. CxHcs not only respond to cytoplasmic Ca2+, but also determine cytoplasmic Ca2+, as they are large conductance channels, suggesting a prominent role in cellular Ca2+ homoeostasis and signalling. The functions of gap-junction channels and CxHcs have been difficult to separate, but synthetic peptides that mimic short sequences in the Cx subunit are emerging as promising tools to determine the role of CxHcs in physiology and pathology. PMID:16761954

  9. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  10. Thermocouple, multiple junction reference oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved oven for maintaining the junctions of a plurality of reference thermocouples at a common and constant temperature is described. The oven is characterized by a cylindrical body defining a heat sink with axially extended-cylindrical cavity a singularized heating element which comprises a unitary cylindrical heating element consisting of a resistance heating coil wound about the surface of metallic spool with an axial bore defined and seated in the cavity. Other features of the oven include an annular array of radially extended bores defined in the cylindrical body and a plurality of reference thermocouple junctions seated in the bores in uniformly spaced relation with the heating element, and a temperature sensing device seated in the axial bore for detecting temperature changes as they occur in the spool and circuit to apply a voltage across the coil in response to detected drops in temperatures of the spool.

  11. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  12. Morphogenesis of rat myotendinous junction.

    PubMed

    Curzi, Davide; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Burattini, Sabrina

    2013-10-01

    Myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the highly specialized complex which connects the skeletal muscle to the tendon for transmitting the contractile force between the two tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MTJ development and rat EDL was chosen as a model. 1, 15, 30 day animals were considered and the junctions were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The MTJ interface architecture increased during the development, extending the interaction between muscle and tendon. 1-day-old rats showed disorganized myofibril bundles, spread cytosol and incomplete rough endoplasmic reticulum, features partially improved in 15-day-old rats, and completely developed in 30-day-old animals. These findings indicate that muscle-tendon interface displays, during rat lifetime, numerically increased and longer tendon interdigitations, correlated with an improved organization of both tissues and with a progressive acquirement of full functionality.

  13. Morphogenesis of rat myotendinous junction

    PubMed Central

    Curzi, Davide; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Burattini, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Summary Myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the highly specialized complex which connects the skeletal muscle to the tendon for transmitting the contractile force between the two tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MTJ development and rat EDL was chosen as a model. 1, 15, 30 day animals were considered and the junctions were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The MTJ interface architecture increased during the development, extending the interaction between muscle and tendon. 1-day-old rats showed disorganized myofibril bundles, spread cytosol and incomplete rough endoplasmic reticulum, features partially improved in 15-day-old rats, and completely developed in 30-day-old animals. These findings indicate that muscle-tendon interface displays, during rat lifetime, numerically increased and longer tendon interdigitations, correlated with an improved organization of both tissues and with a progressive acquirement of full functionality. PMID:24596690

  14. Subunit mass analysis for monitoring antibody oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowska, Izabela; Mo, Jingjie; Dong, Jia; Lewis, Michael J.; Hu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methionine oxidation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM) of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Oxidation can reduce the in-vivo half-life, efficacy and stability of the product. Peptide mapping is commonly used to monitor the levels of oxidation, but this is a relatively time-consuming method. A high-throughput, automated subunit mass analysis method was developed to monitor antibody methionine oxidation. In this method, samples were treated with IdeS, EndoS and dithiothreitol to generate three individual IgG subunits (light chain, Fd’ and single chain Fc). These subunits were analyzed by reversed phase-ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with an online quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the levels of oxidation on each subunit were quantitated based on the deconvoluted mass spectra using the UNIFI software. The oxidation results obtained by subunit mass analysis correlated well with the results obtained by peptide mapping. Method qualification demonstrated that this subunit method had excellent repeatability and intermediate precision. In addition, UNIFI software used in this application allows automated data acquisition and processing, which makes this method suitable for high-throughput process monitoring and product characterization. Finally, subunit mass analysis revealed the different patterns of Fc methionine oxidation induced by chemical and photo stress, which makes it attractive for investigating the root cause of oxidation. PMID:28106519

  15. Subunit mass analysis for monitoring antibody oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sokolowska, Izabela; Mo, Jingjie; Dong, Jia; Lewis, Michael J; Hu, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Methionine oxidation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM) of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Oxidation can reduce the in-vivo half-life, efficacy and stability of the product. Peptide mapping is commonly used to monitor the levels of oxidation, but this is a relatively time-consuming method. A high-throughput, automated subunit mass analysis method was developed to monitor antibody methionine oxidation. In this method, samples were treated with IdeS, EndoS and dithiothreitol to generate three individual IgG subunits (light chain, Fd' and single chain Fc). These subunits were analyzed by reversed phase-ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with an online quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the levels of oxidation on each subunit were quantitated based on the deconvoluted mass spectra using the UNIFI software. The oxidation results obtained by subunit mass analysis correlated well with the results obtained by peptide mapping. Method qualification demonstrated that this subunit method had excellent repeatability and intermediate precision. In addition, UNIFI software used in this application allows automated data acquisition and processing, which makes this method suitable for high-throughput process monitoring and product characterization. Finally, subunit mass analysis revealed the different patterns of Fc methionine oxidation induced by chemical and photo stress, which makes it attractive for investigating the root cause of oxidation.

  16. Inelastic effects of Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Samir

    We have investigated the effects of the inelastic interaction of electrons with phonons in the barrier region of S-I-S and S-N-S Josephson junctions. We find that under suitable conditions this mechanism can cause substantial modifications of the temperature dependence of the critical current jsb{c} as the inevitable loss of coherence can be more than compensated by the enhancement of the tunneling probability resulting from the phonon absorption. The effect depends strongly on the ratio qsb{TF}a of the junction width a to the screening length in the barrier region. For a S-I-S junction, a monotonic decrease in the critical current with temperature is found for qsb{TF}a ≫ 1 whereas for qsb{TF}a ≪ 1, the appearance of a peak in jsb{c}(T) near Tsb{c} is predicted. This new interesting effect is the consequence of the competition between the decrease of the superconducting gap function and the increase in the number of phonons with temperature. A wide range of parameter values has been explored and contact with relevant experimental results has been made. For an S-N-S junction, there is a large increase in the coherence length in the non-superconducting region leading to a substantial enhancement of the critical current over a wide range of temperature. It turns out that the entire temperature range can be divided broadly into two regimes. At low temperatures, the electron predominantly exchanges energy with just one phonon and it is this process that mainly determines the critical current. At higher temperatures the critical current is determined by processes in which the electrons exchange energy with many phonons during their under barrier motion.

  17. Superconducting tunnel-junction refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Robert G.; Paterson, James L.; Kaplan, S. B.

    1980-03-01

    The dc current through an S1-S2 tunnel junction, with Δ2 greater than Δ1, when biased with eV<Δ1+Δ2, will lower the energy in S1. This energy reduction will be shared by the phonons and electrons. This device is shown to be analogous to a thermoelectric refrigerator with an effective Peltier coefficient π*~Δ1e. Tunneling calculations yield the cooling power Pc, the electrical power Pe supplied by the bias supply, and the cooling efficiency η=PcPe. The maximum cooling power is obtained for eV=+/-(Δ2-Δ1) and t1=T1Tc1~0.9. Estimates are made of the temperature difference T2-T1 achievable in Al-Pb and Sn-Pb junctions with an Al2O3 tunneling barrier. The performance of this device is shown to yield a maximum cooling efficiency η~=Δ1(Δ2-Δ1) which can be compared with that available in an ideal Carnot refrigerator of η=T1(T2-T1). The development of a useful tunnel-junction refrigerator requires a tunneling barrier with an effective thermal conductance per unit area several orders of magnitude less than that provided by the Al2O3 barrier in the Al-Pb and Sn-Pb systems.

  18. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  19. Squeezed States in Josephson Junctions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have studied quantum fluctuation properties of Josephson junctions in the limit of large Josephson coupling energy and small charging energy, when the eigenstates of the system can be treated as being nearly localized. We have considered(X. Hu and F. Nori, preprints.) a Josephson junction in a variety of situations, e.g., coupled to one or several of the following elements: a capacitor, an inductor (in a superconducting ring), and an applied current source. By solving an effective Shrödinger equation, we have obtained squeezed vacuum (coherent) states as the ground states of a ``free-oscillating'' (linearly-driven) Josephson junction, and calculated the uncertainties of its canonical momentum, charge, and coordinate, phase. We have also shown that the excited states of the various systems we consider are similar to the number states of a simple harmonic oscillator but with different fluctuation properties. Furthermore, we have obtained the time-evolution operators for these systems. These operators can make it easier to calculate the time-dependence of the expectation values and fluctuations of various quantities starting from an arbitrary initial state.

  20. Synchronization in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, S. T. M.; Trees, B. R.

    2001-10-01

    There is considerable scientific and technological interest in the time-dependent behavior of arrays of non-identical Josephson junctions, whose voltages oscillate with individual bare frequencies that can be made, through interactions, to renormalize their frequencies to a common value. We have studied the degree of synchronization of a subset of overdamped junctions in a ladder geometry, in which the voltages across the ``rung'' junctions of the ladder oscillate with the same, renormalized frequency and a fixed phase difference. We measure the degree of synchronization of the junctions with an order parameter, r (0<= r<= 1), as a function of the nearest-neighbor junction coupling strength. We also determined that a time-averaged version of the resistively-shunted junction (RSJ) equations could be used as an accurate description of the dynamics of the junctions. The solutions to the averaged equations exhibit phase slips between pairs of junctions for certain ranges of the junction coupling strength and also demonstrated that the relationship between the array size N and the critical coupling strength for all junctions to oscillate with the same frequency scales as N^2. This research was partially funded by a grant to Ohio Wesleyan University from the McGregor Foundation to support student research.

  1. Gene targeting of CK2 catalytic subunits

    PubMed Central

    Lou, David Y.; Toselli, Paul; Landesman-Bollag, Esther; Dominguez, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a highly conserved and ubiquitous serine–threonine kinase. It is a tetrameric enzyme that is made up of two regulatory CK2β subunits and two catalytic subunits, either CK2α/CK2α, CK2α/ CK2α′, or CK2α′/CK2α′. Although the two catalytic subunits diverge in their C termini, their enzymatic activities are similar. To identify the specific function of the two catalytic subunits in development, we have deleted them individually from the mouse genome by homologous recombination. We have previously reported that CK2α′is essential for male germ cell development, and we now demonstrate that CK2α has an essential role in embryogenesis, as mice lacking CK2α die in mid-embryogenesis, with cardiac and neural tube defects. PMID:18594950

  2. Activity and in vivo dynamics of Bacillus subtilis DisA are affected by RadA/Sms and by Holliday junction-processing proteins.

    PubMed

    Gándara, Carolina; de Lucena, Daniella K C; Torres, Rubén; Serrano, Ester; Altenburger, Stephan; Graumann, Peter L; Alonso, Juan C

    2017-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis c-di-AMP synthase DisA and RecA-related RadA/Sms are involved in the repair of DNA damage in exponentially growing cells. We provide genetic evidence that DisA or RadA/Sms is epistatic to the branch migration translocase (BMT) RecG and the Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase RecU in response to DNA damage. We provide genetic evidence damage. Functional DisA-YFP formed dynamic foci in exponentially growing cells, which moved through the nucleoids at a speed compatible with a DNA-scanning mode. DisA formed more static structures in the absence of RecU or RecG than in wild type cells, while dynamic foci were still observed in cells lacking the BMT RuvAB. Purified DisA synthesizes c-di-AMP, but interaction with RadA/Sms or with HJ DNA decreases DisA-mediated c-di-AMP synthesis. RadA/Sms-YFP also formed dynamic foci in growing cells, but the foci moved throughout the cells rather than just on the nucleoids, and co-localized rarely with DisA-YFP foci, suggesting that RadA/Sms and DisA interact only transiently in unperturbed conditions. Our data suggest a model in which DisA moving along dsDNA indicates absence of DNA damage/replication stress via normal c-di-AMP levels, while interaction with HJ DNA/halted forks leads to reduced c-di-AMP levels and an ensuing block in cell proliferation. RadA/Sms may be involved in modulating DisA activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Anthranilate synthase subunit organization in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Carminatti, C A; Oliveira, I L; Recouvreux, D O S; Antônio, R V; Porto, L M

    2008-09-16

    Tryptophan is an aromatic amino acid used for protein synthesis and cellular growth. Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 uses two tryptophan molecules to synthesize violacein, a secondary metabolite of pharmacological interest. The genome analysis of this bacterium revealed that the genes trpA-F and pabA-B encode the enzymes of the tryptophan pathway in which the first reaction is the conversion of chorismate to anthranilate by anthranilate synthase (AS), an enzyme complex. In the present study, the organization and structure of AS protein subunits from C. violaceum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools available on the Web. We showed by calculating molecular masses that AS in C. violaceum is composed of alpha (TrpE) and beta (PabA) subunits. This is in agreement with values determined experimentally. Catalytic and regulatory sites of the AS subunits were identified. The TrpE and PabA subunits contribute to the catalytic site while the TrpE subunit is involved in the allosteric site. Protein models for the TrpE and PabA subunits were built by restraint-based homology modeling using AS enzyme, chains A and B, from Salmonella typhimurium (PDB ID 1I1Q).

  4. Physics and Applications of NIS Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ullom, J N

    2001-08-24

    This paper reviews the physics and applications of Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. The current-voltage properties of NIS junctions are diode-like with a strong temperature dependence. Hence, these structures can be used as sensitive thermometers at temperatures well below the energy gap, {Delta}, of the superconducting electrode. For junction voltages comparable to {Delta}/q, current flow removes energy from the normal electrode. This property has been exploited to build refrigerators capable of cooling thin-film circuits from 0.3 K to 0.1 K. Calorimeters and bolometers for the detection of X-rays and millimeter-wave radiation, respectively, have successfully been built from NIS junctions. NIS junctions have also been used to probe the superconducting state. Finally, recent ideas for the use of NIS junctions as simple circuit elements are described.

  5. Molecular mechanics of 30S subunit head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Srividya; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2014-01-01

    During ribosomal translocation, a process central to the elongation phase of protein synthesis, movement of mRNA and tRNAs requires large-scale rotation of the head domain of the small (30S) subunit of the ribosome. It has generally been accepted that the head rotates by pivoting around the neck helix (h28) of 16S rRNA, its sole covalent connection to the body domain. Surprisingly, we observe that the calculated axis of rotation does not coincide with the neck. Instead, comparative structure analysis across 55 ribosome structures shows that 30S head movement results from flexing at two hinge points lying within conserved elements of 16S rRNA. Hinge 1, although located within the neck, moves by straightening of the kinked helix h28 at the point of contact with the mRNA. Hinge 2 lies within a three-way helix junction that extends to the body through a second, noncovalent connection; its movement results from flexing between helices h34 and h35 in a plane orthogonal to the movement of hinge 1. Concerted movement at these two hinges accounts for the observed magnitudes of head rotation. Our findings also explain the mode of action of spectinomycin, an antibiotic that blocks translocation by binding to hinge 2. PMID:25187561

  6. The bacteriophage T4 gene for the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase contains an intron.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, B M; Hahne, S; Mathews, C Z; Mathews, C K; Rand, K N; Gait, M J

    1986-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 gene nrdB codes for the small subunit of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase. The T4 nrdB gene was localized between 136.1 kb and 137.8 kb in the T4 genetic map according to the deduced structural homology of the protein to the amino acid sequence of its bacterial counterpart, the B2 subunit of Escherichia coli. This positions the C-terminal end of the T4 nrdB gene approximately 2 kb closer to the T4 gene 63 than earlier anticipated from genetic recombinational analyses. The most surprising feature of the T4 nrdB gene is the presence of an approximately 625 bp intron which divides the structural gene into two parts. This is the second example of a prokaryotic structural gene with an intron. The first prokaryotic intron was reported in the nearby td gene, coding for the bacteriophage T4-specific thymidylate synthase enzyme. The nucleotide sequence at the exon-intron junctions of the T4 nrdB gene is similar to that of the junctions of the T4 td gene: the anticipated exon-intron boundary at the donor site ends with a TAA stop codon and there is an ATG start codon at the putative downstream intron-exon boundary of the acceptor site. In the course of this work the denA gene of T4 (endonuclease II) was also located. PMID:3530746

  7. [Gap junctions and cancer: implications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mesnil, Marc

    2004-02-01

    Gap junctions are made of intercellular channels which permit the diffusion from cytoplasm to cytoplasm of small hydrophilic molecules (<1,200 Da) such as ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers (calcium, inositol triphosphate, etc.). Since their discovery in the early sixties, several groups have described the loss of their function in cancer cells. The accumulation of such data led to the hypothesis that gap junctions are involved in the carcinogenesis process. This assumption has been confirmed by data establishing that gap junctional intercellular communication is inhibited by most of the tumor promoters and that the restoration of such a communication, by transfection of cDNAs encoding gap junction proteins (connexins), inhibits the aberrant growth rates of tumorigenic cells. Despite these important informations, several fundamental questions remain still open. First, we do not know how gap junctions mediate such a tumor suppressor effect and whether it may depend either on the cell type or on the connexin type. Moreover, most of the data concerning a possible involvement of gap junctions in carcinogenesis have been obtained from in vitro and animal models. The very few results which have been currently collected from human tumors are not sufficient to have a clear idea concerning the real involvement of gap junctions in sporadic human cancers. These points as well as other unresolved questions about the role of gap junctional intercellular communication in carcinogenesis are mentioned. To bring some answers, some prospects are proposed with the objective to use gap junctions for increasing the effect of anticancer therapies.

  8. Ventral surgical approaches to craniovertebral junction chordomas.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder; Harrop, James; Schiffmacher, Paul; Rosen, Marc; Evans, James

    2010-03-01

    Chordomas are primarily malignant tumors encountered at either end of the neural axis; the craniovertebral junction and the sacrococcygeal junction. In this article, we discuss the surgical management of craniovertebral junction chordomas. In this paper, we discuss the surgical management of craniovertebral junction chordomas. The following approaches are illustrated: transoral-transpalatopharyngeal approach, high anterior cervical retropharyngeal approach, endoscopic transoral approach, and endoscopic transnasal approach. No single operative approach can be used for all craniovertebral chordomas. Therefore, the location of the tumor dictates which approach or approaches should be used.

  9. Gap Junctions Couple Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Orthmann-Murphy, Jennifer L.; Abrams, Charles K.; Scherer, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    In vertebrates, a family of related proteins called connexins form gap junctions (GJs), which are intercellular channels. In the central nervous system (CNS), GJs couple oligodendrocytes and astrocytes (O/A junctions) and adjacent astrocytes (A/A junctions), but not adjacent oligodendrocytes, forming a “glial syncytium.” Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes each express different connexins. Mutations of these connexin genes demonstrate that the proper functioning of myelin and oligodendrocytes requires the expression of these connexins. The physiological function of O/A and A/A junctions, however, remains to be illuminated. PMID:18236012

  10. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions.

  11. Magnetic tunnel junction pattern technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eugene; Schwarz, Benjamin; Choi, Chang Ju; Kula, Witold; Wolfman, Jerome; Ounadjela, Kamel; Geha, Sam

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) pattern technique that involves transforming the magnetic layer above the tunnel barrier in unwanted areas into an insulator, thus providing insulation between different MTJ devices without suffering common tunnel barrier shorting problems. With this technique, 90%-100% yielding MTJ devices have been observed. MTJ results using this process are superior to an etching based process. Switching distribution of patterned magnetic bits is also narrower using this novel technique. Process control and the ability to stop on the tunnel barrier have been demonstrated.

  12. Operation Junction City, Vietnam, 1967

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-03

    a standard infantry rifle , the Soviet-made AK-47. They possessed some 7.62 machine guns in each battalion and very few .51 caliber machine guns, if... rifles , and Chinese-manufactured antitank mines. Fire support was provided by 6 0-mm, 82-mm, and for the first time in the war, 120-mm mortars. The...MINIHTHAN) ’ ~ 9j~ REPLACED BY ON I APRIL OL DAli TIENG AP’ GAU BANG’ OPERATION JUNCTION CITY TASK ORGANIZATION PHASE I II FIELD FORCE 1st Inf Div 25th

  13. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  14. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  15. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-06

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  16. An electrostatic mechanism for Ca2+-mediated regulation of gap junction channels

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brad C.; Purdy, Michael D.; Baker, Kent A.; Acharya, Chayan; McIntire, William E.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhang, Qinghai; Harris, Andrew L.; Abagyan, Ruben; Yeager, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Gap junction channels mediate intercellular signalling that is crucial in tissue development, homeostasis and pathologic states such as cardiac arrhythmias, cancer and trauma. To explore the mechanism by which Ca2+ blocks intercellular communication during tissue injury, we determined the X-ray crystal structures of the human Cx26 gap junction channel with and without bound Ca2+. The two structures were nearly identical, ruling out both a large-scale structural change and a local steric constriction of the pore. Ca2+ coordination sites reside at the interfaces between adjacent subunits, near the entrance to the extracellular gap, where local, side chain conformational rearrangements enable Ca2+chelation. Computational analysis revealed that Ca2+-binding generates a positive electrostatic barrier that substantially inhibits permeation of cations such as K+ into the pore. Our results provide structural evidence for a unique mechanism of channel regulation: ionic conduction block via an electrostatic barrier rather than steric occlusion of the channel pore. PMID:26753910

  17. Electrodeposited, Transverse Nanowire Electroluminescent Junctions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaopeng; Xu, Qiang; Dutta, Rajen K; Le Thai, Mya; Li, Xiaowei; Penner, Reginald M

    2016-09-27

    The preparation by electrodeposition of transverse nanowire electroluminescent junctions (tn-ELJs) is described, and the electroluminescence (EL) properties of these devices are characterized. The lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition process is first used to prepare long (millimeters), linear, nanocrystalline CdSe nanowires on glass. The thickness of these nanowires along the emission axis is 60 nm, and the width, wCdSe, along the electrical axis is adjustable from 100 to 450 nm. Ten pairs of nickel-gold electrical contacts are then positioned along the axis of this nanowire using lithographically directed electrodeposition. The resulting linear array of nickel-CdSe-gold junctions produces EL with an external quantum efficiency, EQE, and threshold voltage, Vth, that depend sensitively on wCdSe. EQE increases with increasing electric field and also with increasing wCdSe, and Vth also increases with wCdSe and, therefore, the electrical resistance of the tn-ELJs. Vth down to 1.8(±0.2) V (for wCdSe ≈ 100 nm) and EQE of 5.5(±0.5) × 10(-5) (for wCdSe ≈ 450 nm) are obtained. tn-ELJs produce a broad EL emission envelope, spanning the wavelength range from 600 to 960 nm.

  18. θ0 thermal Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaev, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    We predict the thermal counterpart of the anomalous Josephson effect in superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor junctions with noncoplanar magnetic texture. The heat current through the junction is shown to have the phase-sensitive interference component proportional to cos(θ -θ0) , where θ is the Josephson phase difference and θ0 is the texture-dependent phase shift. In the generic trilayer magnetic structure with the spin-filtering tunnel barrier θ0 is determined by the spin chirality of magnetic configuration and can be considered as the direct manifestation of the energy transport with participation of spin-triplet Cooper pairs. In case of the ideal spin filter the phase shift is shown to be robust against spin relaxation caused by the spin-orbital scattering. Possible applications of the coupling between heat flow and magnetic precession are discussed. For the nonideal spin filters with practically relevant parameters we show that θ0 is much larger than the phase shift of the equilibrium Josephson current.

  19. Atomic structure of the innexin-6 gap junction channel determined by cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Atsunori; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Innexins, a large protein family comprising invertebrate gap junction channels, play an essential role in nervous system development and electrical synapse formation. Here we report the cryo-electron microscopy structures of Caenorhabditis elegans innexin-6 (INX-6) gap junction channels at atomic resolution. We find that the arrangements of the transmembrane helices and extracellular loops of the INX-6 monomeric structure are highly similar to those of connexin-26 (Cx26), despite the lack of significant sequence similarity. The INX-6 gap junction channel comprises hexadecameric subunits but reveals the N-terminal pore funnel, consistent with Cx26. The helix-rich cytoplasmic loop and C-terminus are intercalated one-by-one through an octameric hemichannel, forming a dome-like entrance that interacts with N-terminal loops in the pore. These observations suggest that the INX-6 cytoplasmic domains are cooperatively associated with the N-terminal funnel conformation, and an essential linkage of the N-terminal with channel activity is presumably preserved across gap junction families. PMID:27905396

  20. Targeting neuronal gap junctions in mouse retina offers neuroprotection in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Akopian, Abram; Kumar, Sandeep; Ramakrishnan, Hariharasubramanian; Roy, Kaushambi; Viswanathan, Suresh; Bloomfield, Stewart A

    2017-06-30

    The progressive death of retinal ganglion cells and resulting visual deficits are hallmarks of glaucoma, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In many neurodegenerative diseases, cell death induced by primary insult is followed by a wave of secondary loss. Gap junctions (GJs), intercellular channels composed of subunit connexins, can play a major role in secondary cell death by forming conduits through which toxic molecules from dying cells pass to and injure coupled neighbors. Here we have shown that pharmacological blockade of GJs or genetic ablation of connexin 36 (Cx36) subunits, which are highly expressed by retinal neurons, markedly reduced loss of neurons and optic nerve axons in a mouse model of glaucoma. Further, functional parameters that are negatively affected in glaucoma, including the electroretinogram, visual evoked potential, visual spatial acuity, and contrast sensitivity, were maintained at control levels when Cx36 was ablated. Neuronal GJs may thus represent potential therapeutic targets to prevent the progressive neurodegeneration and visual impairment associated with glaucoma.

  1. Drosophila laminin: sequence of B2 subunit and expression of all three subunits during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In a previous study, we described the cloning of the genes encoding the three subunits of Drosophila laminin, a substrate adhesion molecule, and the cDNA sequence of the B1 subunit (Montell and Goodman, 1988). This analysis revealed the similarity of Drosophila laminin with the mouse and human complexes in subunit composition, domain structure, and amino acid sequence. In this paper, we report the deduced amino acid sequence of the B2 subunit. We then describe the expression and tissue distribution of the three subunits of laminin during Drosophila embryogenesis using both in situ hybridization and immunolocalization techniques, with particular emphasis on its expression in and around the developing nervous system. PMID:2808533

  2. Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions from the Short to the Long Junction Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzenets, I. V.; Amet, F.; Ke, C. T.; Draelos, A. W.; Wei, M. T.; Seredinski, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Bomze, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Tarucha, S.; Finkelstein, G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the critical current IC of ballistic Josephson junctions made of encapsulated graphene-boron-nitride heterostructures. We observe a crossover from the short to the long junction regimes as the length of the device increases. In long ballistic junctions, IC is found to scale as ∝exp (-kBT /δ E ). The extracted energies δ E are independent of the carrier density and proportional to the level spacing of the ballistic cavity. As T →0 the critical current of a long (or short) junction saturates at a level determined by the product of δ E (or Δ ) and the number of the junction's transversal modes.

  3. Some properties of Cosmic String Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouby, Johanna

    2011-07-01

    Cosmic strings are linear concentrations of energy of macroscopic size. Since cosmic superstrings can form junctions, observing them would give some support to string theory. In the following, we study the lensing cosmic string junctions create, the shift in photons' wavelength passing through (leading to the Kaiser-Stebbins effect), and the gravitational radiation they emit.

  4. Dressed fluxon in a Josephson window junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Jean Guy; Flytzanis, Nikos; Devoret, Michel

    1994-09-01

    The static fluxon solutions of a Josephson window junction have been studied numerically. We show that the effect of the idle region surrounding the junction is to ``dress'' the fluxon causing its energy to increase. This effect can be predicted accurately by a simple model.

  5. Slit Diaphragms Contain Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Hirotaka; Bornheimer, Scott; Kudlicka, Krystyna; Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2009-01-01

    Slit diaphragms are essential components of the glomerular filtration apparatus, as changes in these junctions are the hallmark of proteinuric diseases. Slit diaphragms, considered specialized adherens junctions, contain both unique membrane proteins (e.g., nephrin, podocin, and Neph1) and typical adherens junction proteins (e.g., P-cadherin, FAT, and catenins). Whether slit diaphragms also contain tight junction proteins is unknown. Here, immunofluorescence, immunogold labeling, and cell fractionation demonstrated that rat slit diaphragms contain the tight junction proteins JAM-A (junctional adhesion molecule A), occludin, and cingulin. We found these proteins in the same protein complexes as nephrin, podocin, CD2AP, ZO-1, and Neph1 by cosedimentation, coimmunoprecipitation, and pull-down assays. PAN nephrosis increased the protein levels of JAM-A, occludin, cingulin, and ZO-1 several-fold in glomeruli and loosened their attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. These data extend current information about the molecular composition of slit diaphragms by demonstrating the presence of tight junction proteins, although slit diaphragms lack the characteristic morphologic features of tight junctions. The contribution of these proteins to the assembly of slit diaphragms and potential signaling cascades requires further investigation. PMID:19478094

  6. The tight junction: a multifunctional complex.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Eveline E; Lynch, Robert D

    2004-06-01

    Multicellular organisms are separated from the external environment by a layer of epithelial cells whose integrity is maintained by intercellular junctional complexes composed of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, whereas gap junctions provide for intercellular communication. The aim of this review is to present an updated overview of recent developments in the area of tight junction biology. In a relatively short time, our knowledge of the tight junction has evolved from a relatively simple view of it being a permeability barrier in the paracellular space and a fence in the plane of the plasma membrane to one of it acting as a multicomponent, multifunctional complex that is involved in regulating numerous and diverse cell functions. A group of integral membrane proteins-occludin, claudins, and junction adhesion molecules-interact with an increasingly complex array of tight junction plaque proteins not only to regulate paracellular solute and water flux but also to integrate such diverse processes as gene transcription, tumor suppression, cell proliferation, and cell polarity.

  7. Analysis of Tight Junction Formation and Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Kerekes, Ryan A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Foster, Carmen M; Retterer, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study segmentation of tight junctions and analyze the formation and integrity of tight junctions in large-scale confocal image stacks, a challenging biological problem because of the low spatial resolution images and the presence of breaks in tight junction structure. We present an automated, three-step processing approach for tight junction analysis. In our approach, we first localize each individual nucleus in the image by using thresholding, morphological filters and active contours. By using each nucleus position as a seed point, we automatically segment the cell body based on the active contour. We then use an intensity-based skeletonization algorithm to generate the boundary regions for each cell, and features are extracted from tight junctions associated with each cell to assess tight junction continuity. Based on qualitative results and quantitative comparisons, we show that we are able to automatically segment tight junctions and compute relevant features that provide a quantitative measure of tight junction formation to which the permeability of the cell monolayer can ultimately be correlated.

  8. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  9. The Integrin β1 Subunit Regulates Paracellular Permeability of Kidney Proximal Tubule Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Bertha C.; Mathew, Sijo; Srichai, Manakan B.; Palamuttam, Riya; Bulus, Nada; Mernaugh, Glenda; Singh, Amar B.; Sanders, Charles R.; Harris, Raymond C.; Pozzi, Ambra; Zent, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract and kidney have different abilities to facilitate paracellular and transcellular transport of water and solutes. In the kidney, the proximal tubule allows both transcellular and paracellular transport, while the collecting duct primarily facilitates transcellular transport. The claudins and E-cadherin are major structural and functional components regulating paracellular transport. In this study we present the novel finding that the transmembrane matrix receptors, integrins, play a role in regulating paracellular transport of renal proximal tubule cells. Deleting the integrin β1 subunit in these cells converts them from a “loose” epithelium, characterized by low expression of E-cadherin and claudin-7 and high expression of claudin-2, to a “tight” epithelium with increased E-cadherin and claudin-7 expression and decreased claudin-2 expression. This effect is mediated by the integrin β1 cytoplasmic tail and does not entail β1 heterodimerization with an α-subunit or its localization to the cell surface. In addition, we demonstrate that deleting the β1 subunit in the proximal tubule of the kidney results in a major urine-concentrating defect. Thus, the integrin β1 tail plays a key role in regulating the composition and function of tight and adherens junctions that define paracellular transport properties of terminally differentiated renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. PMID:24509849

  10. Overlap junctions for high coherence superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Long, J. L.; Ku, H. S.; Lake, R. E.; Bal, M.; Pappas, D. P.

    2017-07-01

    Fabrication of sub-micron Josephson junctions is demonstrated using standard processing techniques for high-coherence, superconducting qubits. These junctions are made in two separate lithography steps with normal-angle evaporation. Most significantly, this work demonstrates that it is possible to achieve high coherence with junctions formed on aluminum surfaces cleaned in situ by Ar plasma before junction oxidation. This method eliminates the angle-dependent shadow masks typically used for small junctions. Therefore, this is conducive to the implementation of typical methods for improving margins and yield using conventional CMOS processing. The current method uses electron-beam lithography and an additive process to define the top and bottom electrodes. Extension of this work to optical lithography and subtractive processes is discussed.

  11. Diversity of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew K; Sattelle, David B

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast synaptic transmission in the insect nervous system and are targets of a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. They consist of five subunits arranged around a central ion channeL Since the subunit composition determines the functional and pharmacological properties of the receptor the presence of nAChR families comprising several subunit-encodinggenes provides a molecular basis for broad functional diversity. Analyses of genome sequences have shown that nAChR gene families remain compact in diverse insect species, when compared to their nematode andvertebrate counterparts. Thus, the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), malaria mosquito (Anopheles gambiae), honey bee (Apis mellifera), silk worm (Bombyx mon) and the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) possess 10-12 nAChR genes while human and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have 16 and 29 respectively. Although insect nAChRgene families are amongst the smallest known, receptor diversity can be considerably increased by the posttranscriptional processes alternative splicing and mRNA A-to-I editingwhich can potentially generate protein products which far outnumber the nAChR genes. These two processes can also generate species-specific subunit isoforms. In addition, each insect possesses at least one highly divergent nAChR subunit which may perform species-specific functions. Species-specific subunit diversification may offer promising targets for future rational design of insecticides that target specific pest insects while sparing beneficial species.

  12. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  13. Optimized subunit vaccine protects against experimental leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Goto, Yasuyuki; Carter, Lauren; Bhatia, Ajay; Howard, Randall F.; Carter, Darrick; Coler, Rhea N.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Reed, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    Development of a protective subunit vaccine against Leishmania spp. depends on antigens and adjuvants that induce appropriate immune responses. We evaluated a second generation polyprotein antigen (Leish-110f) in different adjuvant formulations for immunogenicity and protective efficacy against Leishmania spp. challenges. Vaccine-induced protection was associated with antibody and T cell responses to Leish-110f. CD4 T cells were the source of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2 double and triple positive populations. This study establishes the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the improved Leish-110f subunit vaccine antigen adjuvanted with natural (MPL-SE) or synthetic (EM005) Toll-like receptor 4 agonists. PMID:19786136

  14. Optimized subunit vaccine protects against experimental leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Goto, Yasuyuki; Carter, Lauren; Bhatia, Ajay; Howard, Randall F; Carter, Darrick; Coler, Rhea N; Vedvick, Thomas S; Reed, Steven G

    2009-11-23

    Development of a protective subunit vaccine against Leishmania spp. depends on antigens and adjuvants that induce appropriate immune responses. We evaluated a second generation polyprotein antigen (Leish-110f) in different adjuvant formulations for immunogenicity and protective efficacy against Leishmania spp. challenges. Vaccine-induced protection was associated with antibody and T cell responses to Leish-110f. CD4 T cells were the source of IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-2 double- and triple-positive populations. This study establishes the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the improved Leish-110f subunit vaccine antigen adjuvanted with natural (MPL-SE) or synthetic (EM005) Toll-like receptor 4 agonists.

  15. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  16. Subunits of phycoerythrin from Fremyella diplosiphon: chemical and immunochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, J; Bogorad, L

    1975-03-25

    The alpha and beta subunits of the phycobiliprotein, phycoerythrin, isolated from the filamentous blue-green alga, Fremyella diplosiphon, have been separated by chromatography on Bio-Rex 70 ion exchange resin. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows no detectable cross-contamination of these subunit preparations. The molar extinction coefficients at 552 nm of the alpha and beta subunits in 8 M urea are 25,549 and 48,456, respectively. The amino acid compositions of the subunits are very similar. Molecular weights of the alpha and beta subunits are 19,500 and 21,700, respectively, based on the amino acid composition analyses. Antisera prepared against the alpha subunit reacts with the beta subunit, and vice versa. Tryptic peptide maps reveal that the subunits share share at least eight common tryptic peptides. These results indicate that the phycoerythrin subunits are chemically very similar.

  17. The gamma subunit of transducin is farnesylated.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, R K; Perez-Sala, D; Cañada, F J; Rando, R R

    1990-01-01

    Protein prenylation with farnesyl or geranylgeranyl moieties is an important posttranslational modification that affects the activity of such diverse proteins as the nuclear lamins, the yeast mating factor mata, and the ras oncogene products. In this article, we show that whole retinal cultures incorporate radioactive mevalonic acid into proteins of 23-26 kDa and one of 8 kDa. The former proteins are probably the "small" guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) and the 8-kDa protein is the gamma subunit of the well-studied retinal heterotrimeric G protein (transducin). After deprenylating purified transducin and its subunits with Raney nickel or methyl iodide/base, the adducted prenyl group can be identified as an all-trans-farnesyl moiety covalently linked to a cysteine residue. Thus far, prenylation reactions have been found to occur at cysteine in a carboxyl-terminal consensus CAAX sequence, where C is the cysteine, A is an aliphatic amino acid, and X is undefined. Both the alpha and gamma subunits of transducin have this consensus sequence, but only the gamma subunit is prenylated. Therefore, the CAAX motif is not necessary and sufficient to direct prenylation. Finally, since transducin is the best understood G protein, both structurally and mechanistically, the discovery that it is farnesylated should allow for a quantitative understanding of this post-translational modification. Images PMID:2217200

  18. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions.

  19. Microtubules regulate disassembly of epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; McCall, Ingrid C; Babbin, Brian; Samarin, Stanislav N; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background Epithelial tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) form the apical junctional complex (AJC) which regulates cell-cell adhesion, paracellular permeability and cell polarity. The AJC is anchored on cytoskeletal structures including actin microfilaments and microtubules. Such cytoskeletal interactions are thought to be important for the assembly and remodeling of apical junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of microtubules in disassembly of the AJC in intestinal epithelial cells using a model of extracellular calcium depletion. Results Calcium depletion resulted in disruption and internalization of epithelial TJs and AJs along with reorganization of perijunctional F-actin into contractile rings. Microtubules reorganized into dense plaques positioned inside such F-actin rings. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole prevented junctional disassembly and F-actin ring formation. Stabilization of microtubules with either docetaxel or pacitaxel blocked contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated internalization of junctional proteins into a subapical cytosolic compartment. Likewise, pharmacological inhibition of microtubule motors, kinesins, prevented contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated disassembly of apical junctions. Kinesin-1 was enriched at the AJC in cultured epithelial cells and it also accumulated at epithelial cell-cell contacts in normal human colonic mucosa. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated association of kinesin-1 with the E-cadherin-catenin complex. Conclusion Our data suggest that microtubules play a role in disassembly of the AJC during calcium depletion by regulating formation of contractile F-actin rings and internalization of AJ/TJ proteins. PMID:16509970

  20. Atomically Abrupt Topological p-n Junction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Kho, Byung Woo; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Liu, Feng; Kim, Jun Sung; Yeom, Han Woong

    2017-08-24

    Topological insulators (TI's) are a new class of quantum matter with extraordinary surface electronic states, which bear great potential for spintronics and error-tolerant quantum computing. In order to put a TI into any practical use, these materials need to be fabricated into devices whose basic units are often p-n junctions. Interesting electronic properties of a 'topological' p-n junction were proposed theoretically such as the junction electronic state and the spin rectification. However, the fabrication of a lateral topological p-n junction has been challenging because of materials, process, and fundamental reasons. Here, we demonstrate an innovative approach to realize a p-n junction of topological surface states (TSS's) of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) with an atomically abrupt interface. When a ultrathin Sb film is grown on a 3D TI of Bi2Se3 with a typical n-type TSS, the surface develops a strongly p-type TSS through the substantial hybridization between the 2D Sb film and the Bi2Se3 surface. Thus, the Bi2Se3 surface covered partially with Sb films bifurcates into areas of n- and p-type TSS's as separated by atomic step edges with a lateral electronic junction of as short as 2 nm. This approach opens a different avenue toward various electronic and spintronic devices based on well-defined topological p-n junctions with the scalability down to atomic dimensions.

  1. Electron microscopic single particle analysis of a tetrameric RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mayanagi, Kouta Fujiwara, Yoshie; Miyata, Tomoko; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2008-01-11

    During the late stage of homologous recombination in prokaryotes, RuvA binds to the Holliday junction intermediate and executes branch migration in association with RuvB. The RuvA subunits form two distinct complexes with the Holliday junction: complex I with the single RuvA tetramer on one side of the four way junction DNA, and complex II with two tetramers on both sides. To investigate the functional roles of complexes I and II, we mutated two residues of RuvA (L125D and E126K) to prevent octamer formation. An electron microscopic analysis indicated that the mutant RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex formed the characteristic tripartite structure, with only one RuvA tetramer bound to one side of the Holliday junction, demonstrating the unexpected stability of this complex. The novel bent images of the complex revealed an intriguing morphological similarity to the structure of SV40 large T antigen, which belongs to the same AAA+ family as RuvB.

  2. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-15

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/{radical}(2), the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  3. Temperature dependence of thermopower in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsang; Lenert, Andrej; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2016-07-01

    The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions are of considerable interest due to their promise for efficient energy conversion. While the dependence of thermoelectric properties of junctions on molecular structure has been recently studied, their temperature dependence remains unexplored. Using a custom built variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope, we measured the thermopower and electrical conductance of individual benzenedithiol junctions over a range of temperatures (100 K-300 K). We find that while the electrical conductance is independent of temperature, the thermopower increases linearly with temperature, confirming the predictions of the Landauer theory.

  4. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  5. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  6. Circuit Theory of Unconventional Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Kashiwaya, S.

    2003-04-01

    We extend the circuit theory of superconductivity to cover transport and proximity effect in mesoscopic systems that contain unconventional superconductor junctions. The approach fully accounts for zero-energy Andreev bound states forming at the surface of unconventional superconductors. As a simple application, we investigate the transport properties of a diffusive normal metal in series with a d-wave superconductor junction. We reveal the competition between the formation of Andreev bound states and proximity effect that depends on the crystal orientation of the junction interface.

  7. Efficient photonic crystal Y-junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rab; Karle, Tim J.; Moerman, I.; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2003-07-01

    A highly efficient Y-junction based on a planar photonic crystal (PhC) platform is presented. The PhC consists of a triangular array of holes etched into a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, with a typical period of 322 nm and ~35% fill factor. The Y-junction has smaller holes positioned at the centre of the junction, giving rise to very uniform splitting and high transmission. The performance is very encouraging, with experimental transmission of approximately 40% for each arm of the Y-splitter relative to a comparable single-defect PhC waveguide.

  8. Molecular mechanism of double Holliday junction dissolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Processing of homologous recombination intermediates is tightly coordinated to ensure that chromosomal integrity is maintained and tumorigenesis avoided. Decatenation of double Holliday junctions, for example, is catalysed by two enzymes that work in tight coordination and belong to the same ‘dissolvasome’ complex. Within the dissolvasome, the RecQ-like BLM helicase provides the translocase function for Holliday junction migration, while the topoisomerase III alpha-RMI1 subcomplex works as a proficient DNA decatenase, together resulting in double-Holliday-junction unlinking. Here, we review the available architectural and biochemical knowledge on the dissolvasome machinery, with a focus on the structural interplay between its components. PMID:25061510

  9. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  10. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  11. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  12. Enhancement at the junction of silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gu, Geun Hoi; Suh, Jung Sang

    2008-08-19

    The enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) at the junction of linearly joined silver nanorods (31 nm in diameter) deposited in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide templates was studied systematically by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The single and joined silver nanorod arrays showed a similar extinction spectrum when their length was the same. Maximum enhancement was observed from the junction system of two nanorods of the same size with a total length of 62 nm. This length also corresponded to the optimum length of single nanorods for SERS by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The enhancement at the junction was approximately 40 times higher than that of the 31 nm single nanorod, while it was 4 times higher than that of the 62 nm single nanorod. The enhancement factor at the junction after oxide removal was approximately 3.9 x 10 (9).

  13. Presynaptic spike broadening reduces junctional potential amplitude.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A N; Przysiezniak, J; Acosta-Urquidi, J; Basarsky, T A

    1989-08-24

    Presynaptic modulation of action potential duration may regulate synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such synaptic plasticity is brought about by modifications to membrane currents at presynaptic release sites, which, in turn, lead to changes in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for mediating transmitter release. The 'primitive' neuromuscular junction of the jellyfish Polyorchis penicillatus is a useful model of presynaptic modulation. In this study, we show that the durations of action potentials in the motor neurons of this jellyfish are negatively correlated with the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials. We present data from in vitro voltage-clamp experiments showing that short duration voltage spikes, which elicit large excitatory junctional potentials in vivo, produce larger and briefer calcium currents than do long duration action potentials, which elicit small excitatory junctional potentials.

  14. UTE MRI of the Osteochondral Junction

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Reni; Chen, Karen; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    The osteochondral junction is composed of numerous tissue components and serves important functions relating to structural stability and proper nutrition in joints such as the knee and spine. Conventional MR techniques have been inadequate at imaging the tissues of the osteochondral junction primarily because of the intrinsically short T2 nature of these tissues, rendering them “invisible” with the standard acquisitions. Ultrashort time to echo (UTE) MR techniques acquire sufficient MR signal of osteochondral tissues, thereby allowing direct evaluation. This article reviews the anatomy of the osteochondral junction of the knee and the spine, technical aspects of UTE MRI, and the application of UTE MRI for evaluation of the osteochondral junction. PMID:25061547

  15. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  16. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  17. Tight junctions in skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bäsler, Katja; Brandner, Johanna M

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation of the skin is found after various external stimuli, e.g., UV radiation, allergen uptake, microbial challenge, or contact with irritants, as well as due to intrinsic, not always well-defined, stimuli, e.g., in autoimmune responses. Often, it is also triggered by a combination of both. The specific processes, which mean the kind of cytokines and immune cells involved and the extent of the reaction, depend not only on the trigger but also on the predisposition of the individual. Tight junctions (TJs) in the skin have been shown to form a barrier in the granular cell layer of the epidermis. Furthermore, TJ proteins were found in several additional epidermal layers. Besides barrier function, TJ proteins have been shown to be involved in proliferation, differentiation, cell-cell adhesion, and apoptosis in keratinocytes. In inflamed skin, TJ proteins are often affected. We summarize here the impact of skin inflammation on TJs, e.g., in various forms of dermatitis including atopic dermatitis, in skin infection, and in UV-irradiated skin, and discuss the role of TJs in these inflammatory processes.

  18. Tunnel junctions with multiferroic barriers.

    PubMed

    Gajek, Martin; Bibes, Manuel; Fusil, Stéphane; Bouzehouane, Karim; Fontcuberta, Josep; Barthélémy, Agnès; Fert, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Multiferroics are singular materials that can exhibit simultaneously electric and magnetic orders. Some are ferroelectric and ferromagnetic and provide the opportunity to encode information in electric polarization and magnetization to obtain four logic states. However, such materials are rare and schemes allowing a simple electrical readout of these states have not been demonstrated in the same device. Here, we show that films of La(0.1)Bi(0.9)MnO(3) (LBMO) are ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, and retain both ferroic properties down to a thickness of 2 nm. We have integrated such ultrathin multiferroic films as barriers in spin-filter-type tunnel junctions that exploit the magnetic and ferroelectric degrees of freedom of LBMO. Whereas ferromagnetism permits read operations reminiscent of magnetic random access memories (MRAM), the electrical switching evokes a ferroelectric RAM write operation. Significantly, our device does not require the destructive ferroelectric readout, and therefore represents an advance over the original four-state memory concept based on multiferroics.

  19. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  20. [Clinical anatomy of the esophagogastric junction].

    PubMed

    Tănase, M; Aldea, A S

    2012-01-01

    The esophagogastric junction is a controversial anatomical area, due to its sphincteric mechanism which does not show an obvious anatomical basis. The aim of this study is to investigate the anatomical components that endoscopically indicate the mucosal esophagogastric junction in hiatal hernia patients. The esophagogastric junction was investigated in 27 hiatal hernia patients undergoing surgery. Hiatal hernia is an extension of the stomach situated between the esophagogastric junction and the diaphragmatic indentation. The following types of hiatal hernia were found: sliding hiatal hernia (type I) in 4 patients (14.81%), rolling hiatal hernia (type II) in 2 (7.4%), mixed hiatal hernia (type III) in 12 (44.44%), type IV hiatal hernia in 4 (14.81%) and recurrent hiatal hernia in 5 (18.51%). Of the 27 hiatal hernia patients, 8 (29.6%) were operated using classical procedures: laparotomy--6 (75%) and laparoscopic surgery--2 (25%). The angle of His cannot be used for marking the mucosal esophagogastric junction due to the severe damage of the lower esophageal sphincter in hiatal hernia patients. The squamocolumnar junction is displaced in hiatal hernia patients and was not an option for the study group. The distal end of the esophageal longitudinal palisading vessels needs medication (proton pump inhibitors that reduce the gastric acid production), in order to enhance the visibility of these vessels. The proximal end of gastric longitudinal mucosal folds proved to be the most reliable site to identify endoscopically the mucosal esophagogastric junction. The anatomical structure of the esophagogastric junction differs in hiatal hernia patients and these peculiarities are very important in surgery.

  1. Noise and Chaos in Driven Josephson Junctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    induced step ( n = integer), the corresponding Fokker - Planck equation is essentially the same as that for a purely dc biased junction in the zero... Planck equation which governs the two-dimensional distribution function P((j), d(t)/dt, t) will reduce to the one-dimensional Smoluchowski equation ...Junction). Its equation of motion turns out exacdy the same as a damped driven pendulum, except its characteristic frequency is about 10^-10^^ times

  2. Degradation of connexins and gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Matthias M.; Kells, Rachael M.; Berthoud, Viviana M.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin proteins are short-lived within the cell, whether present in the secretory pathway or in gap junction plaques. Their levels can be modulated by their rate of degradation. Connexins, at different stages of assembly, are degraded through the proteasomal, endo-/lysosomal, and phago-/lysosomal pathways. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about connexin and gap junction degradation including the signals and protein-protein interactions that participate in their targeting for degradation. PMID:24486527

  3. Anaesthesia management in craniovertebral junctional anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Craniovertebral Junctional (CVJ) anomalies are developmental disorders that affect the skeleton and enclosed neuraxis at the junction of cranium and cervical spine. The high prevalence of airway obstruction and restrictive pulmonary disease in combination with cardiovascular manifestations poses a high anaesthetic risk to these patients. This article provides a discussion of management of anaesthesia in patients with craniovertebral anomalies, the evaluation of risk factors in these patients and their management, including emergency airway issues. PMID:27891026

  4. Heat dissipation in atomic-scale junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woochul; Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Zotti, Linda Angela; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Reddy, Pramod

    2013-06-13

    Atomic and single-molecule junctions represent the ultimate limit to the miniaturization of electrical circuits. They are also ideal platforms for testing quantum transport theories that are required to describe charge and energy transfer in novel functional nanometre-scale devices. Recent work has successfully probed electric and thermoelectric phenomena in atomic-scale junctions. However, heat dissipation and transport in atomic-scale devices remain poorly characterized owing to experimental challenges. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with integrated nanoscale thermocouples to investigate heat dissipation in the electrodes of single-molecule ('molecular') junctions. We find that if the junctions have transmission characteristics that are strongly energy dependent, this heat dissipation is asymmetric--that is, unequal between the electrodes--and also dependent on both the bias polarity and the identity of the majority charge carriers (electrons versus holes). In contrast, junctions consisting of only a few gold atoms ('atomic junctions') whose transmission characteristics show weak energy dependence do not exhibit appreciable asymmetry. Our results unambiguously relate the electronic transmission characteristics of atomic-scale junctions to their heat dissipation properties, establishing a framework for understanding heat dissipation in a range of mesoscopic systems where transport is elastic--that is, without exchange of energy in the contact region. We anticipate that the techniques established here will enable the study of Peltier effects at the atomic scale, a field that has been barely explored experimentally despite interesting theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the experimental advances described here are also expected to enable the study of heat transport in atomic and molecular junctions--an important and challenging scientific and technological goal that has remained elusive.

  5. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  6. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  7. Ocular myasthenia gravis induced by human acetylcholine receptor ϵ subunit immunization in HLA DR3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaorong; Tuzun, Erdem; Saini, Shamsher S; Wang, Jun; Li, Jing; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Huda, Ruksana; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-12-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOM) are preferentially involved in myasthenia gravis (MG) and acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody positive MG patients may occasionally present with isolated ocular symptoms. Although experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by whole AChR immunization closely mimics clinical and immunopathological aspects of MG, EOM are usually not affected. We have previously developed an EAMG model, which imitates EOM symptoms of MG by immunization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic mice with α or γ-subunits of human AChR (H-AChR). To investigate the significance of the ϵ-subunit in ocular MG, we immunized HLA-DR3 and HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice with recombinant H-AChR ϵ-subunit expressed in Escherichia coli. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice showed significantly higher clinical ocular and generalized MG severity scores and lower grip strength values than HLA-DQ8 mice. H-AChR ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 transgenic mice had higher serum anti-AChR antibody (IgG, IgG1, IgG2b, IgG2c and IgM) levels, neuromuscular junction IgG and complement deposit percentages than ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice. Control mice immunized with E. coli extract or complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) did not show clinical and immunopathological features of ocular and generalized EAMG. Lymph node cells of ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 mice showed significantly higher proliferative responses than those of ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 mice, crude E. coli extract-immunized and CFA-immunized transgenic mice. Our results indicate that the human AChR ϵ-subunit is capable of inducing myasthenic muscle weakness. Diversity of the autoimmune responses displayed by mice expressing different HLA class II molecules suggests that the interplay between HLA class II alleles and AChR subunits might have a profound impact on the clinical course of MG.

  8. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  9. Cell junctions in the gut of Protura.

    PubMed

    Xué, L; Romano, D

    1992-01-01

    The main cell junctions in the intestinal tract of a small group of apterygotan insects, Protura, were examined in conventional thin sections, tracer-infiltrated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The smooth septate junctions in the midgut of collembolan Tomocerus minor were also studied for comparison. Pleated septate junctions are found in foregut, hindgut and Malpighian papillae. They exhibit regular septa crossing the intercellular clefts in thin sections; and the septa with a pronounced zig-zag appearance run parallel to form a honeycomb structure in tracer-impregnated sections. After freeze-fracture undulating rows of intramembranous particles (IMPs) are visible on the P face. Smooth septate junctions are observed in the midgut. The intercellular septa often run in pairs for long tracts and exhibit a wavy course in lanthanum impregnated sections. The IMPs exhibited on the E face are usually separated one from another. Twin arrangement of particle rows is also apparent on the replicas. Gap junctions are frequent in both the midgut and hindgut and possess the conventional characteristics of 'inverted gap junction' with E face connexons. These results provide further evidence relating Protura closely to Collembola as well as to primitive arthropods.

  10. Epidermal tight junctions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Brandner, J M; Zorn-Kruppa, M; Yoshida, T; Moll, I; Beck, L A; De Benedetto, A

    2015-01-01

    The skin, the largest organ of the body, is an essential barrier that under homeostatic conditions efficiently protects and/or minimizes damage from both environmental (e.g. microorganisms, physical trauma, ultraviolet radiation) and endogenous (e.g., cancers, inflammation) factors. This formidable barrier function resides mainly in the epidermis, a dynamic, highly-stratified epithelium. The epidermis has 2 major barrier structures: stratum corneum, the outmost layer and tight junctions, intercellular junctions that seal adjacent keratinocytes in the stratum granulosum, found below the stratum corneum. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of tight junction function, composition and regulation. Herein we review what is known about tight junctions in healthy skin and keratinocyte culture systems and highlight the dynamic crosstalk observed between tight junctions and the cutaneous immune system. Finally we discuss the preliminary observations suggesting that tight junction function or protein expression may be relevant for the pathogenesis of a number of common cutaneous inflammatory and neoplastic conditions.

  11. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  12. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  13. Gap junctions: structure and function (Review).

    PubMed

    Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2002-01-01

    Gap junctions are plasma membrane spatial microdomains constructed of assemblies of channel proteins called connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates. The channels provide direct intercellular communication pathways allowing rapid exchange of ions and metabolites up to approximately 1 kD in size. Approximately 20 connexins are identified in the human or mouse genome, and orthologues are increasingly characterized in other vertebrates. Most cell types express multiple connexin isoforms, making likely the construction of a spectrum of heteromeric hemichannels and heterotypic gap junctions that could provide a structural basis for the charge and size selectivity of these intercellular channels. The precise nature of the potential signalling information traversing junctions in physiologically defined situations remains elusive, but extensive progress has been made in elucidating how connexins are assembled into gap junctions. Also, participation of gap junction hemichannels in the propagation of calcium waves via an extracellular purinergic pathway is emerging. Connexin mutations have been identified in a number of genetically inherited channel communication-opathies. These are detected in connexin 32 in Charcot Marie Tooth-X linked disease, in connexins 26 and 30 in deafness and skin diseases, and in connexins 46 and 50 in hereditary cataracts. Biochemical approaches indicate that many of the mutated connexins are mistargeted to gap junctions and/or fail to oligomerize correctly into hemichannels. Genetic ablation approaches are helping to map out a connexin code and point to specific connexins being required for cell growth and differentiation as well as underwriting basic intercellular communication.

  14. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise.

  15. Gap junctions and blood-tissue barriers.

    PubMed

    Li, Michelle W M; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2012-01-01

    Gap junction is a cell-cell communication junction type found in virtually all mammalian epithelia and endothelia and provides the necessary "signals" to coordinate physiological events to maintain the homeostasis of an epithelium and/or endothelium under normal physiological condition and following changes in the cellular environment (e.g., stimuli from stress, growth, development, inflammation, infection). Recent studies have illustrated the significance of this junction type in the maintenance of different blood-tissue barriers, most notably the blood-brain barrier and blood-testis barrier, which are dynamic ultrastructures, undergoing restructuring in response to stimuli from the environment. In this chapter, we highlight and summarize the latest findings in the field regarding how changes at the gap junction, such as the result of a knock-out, knock-down, knock-in, or gap junction inhibition and/or its activation via the use of inhibitors and/or activators, would affect the integrity or permeability of the blood-tissue barriers. These findings illustrate that much research is needed to delineate the role of gap junction in the blood-tissue barriers, most notably its likely physiological role in mediating or regulating the transport of therapeutic drugs across the blood-tissue barriers.

  16. GAP JUNCTIONS AND BLOOD-TISSUE BARRIERS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Michelle W.M.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction is a cell-cell communication junction type found in virtually all mammalian epithelia and endothelia and provides the necessary “signals” to coordinate physiological events to maintain the homeostasis of an epithelium and/or endothelium under normal physiological condition and following changes in the cellular environment (e.g., stimuli from stress, growth, development, inflammation, infection). Recent studies have illustrated the significance of this junction type in the maintenance of different blood-tissue barriers, most notably the blood-brain barrier and blood-testis barrier, which are dynamic ultrastructures, undergoing restructuring in response to stimuli from the environment. In this chapter, we highlight and summarize the latest findings in the field regarding how changes at the gap junction, such as the result of a knock-out, knock-down, knock-in, or gap junction inhibition and/or its activation via the use of inhibitors and/or activators, would affect the integrity or permeability of the blood-tissue barriers. These findings illustrate that much research is needed to delineate the role of gap junction in the blood-tissue barriers, most notably its likely physiological role in mediating or regulating the transport of therapeutic drugs across the blood-tissue barriers. PMID:23397629

  17. Graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying; Trainer, Daniel J.; Chen, Ke

    2016-10-01

    We report a development of graphene tunnel junctions made by chemical vapor deposition grown graphene and sputtered aluminum insulating by an in-situ grown aluminum oxide. The thin oxide layer formed in between the metal layer and the two-dimensional material is a crucial part of a tunnel junction. We characterized surface morphology of oxide layers and studied tunneling spectra of lead and silver tunnel junctions to estimate the quality of the aluminum oxide. The Brinkman-Rowell-Dynes model was applied to fit the conductance-voltage plots to calculate the thickness of oxide layers. Junctions with graphene both on bottom and on top were fabricated and their tunneling properties were characterized after exposure to air for weeks to test time stability. Furthermore, the resistances of graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide formed naturally and in an oxygen atmosphere were studied. Our results demonstrate that in-situ aluminum oxide is an effective barrier for graphene tunnel junctions. The methods of barrier formation enable the realization of more tunnel devices and circuits based on graphene.

  18. Synchronization in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trees, B. R.; Dissanayake, S. T. M.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of a ladder array of overdamped Josephson junctions with periodic boundary conditions. The junctions have critical current and resistive disorder, are current biased above the critical current, and their voltages oscillate with nonidentical bare frequencies. We have been interested in the onset of synchronization in the rung junctions of the ladder, in which nearest neighbor interactions of strength α renormalize the bare frequencies to a common value. The degree of synchronization of the array is measured by an order parameter, r (0<= r<= 1), as a function of α and the spread of bare frequencies. For a given frequency spread, a synchronization phase transition is clearly visible with an increase in α. We have also determined that a time-averaged version of the resistively-shunted junction equations can be used as an accurate description of the dynamics of the junctions. The solutions to the averaged equations exhibit phase slips between pairs of junctions for certain ranges of values of α and also demonstrate that the relationship between the array size, N, and the critical coupling strength for the onset of synchronization scales as N^2. This research was partially funded by a grant to Ohio Wesleyan University from the McGregor Foundation to support student research.

  19. Epidermal tight junctions in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandner, JM; Zorn-Kruppa, M; Yoshida, T; Moll, I; Beck, LA; De Benedetto, A

    2014-01-01

    The skin, the largest organ of the body, is an essential barrier that under homeostatic conditions efficiently protects and/or minimizes damage from both environmental (e.g. microorganisms, physical trauma, ultraviolet radiation) and endogenous (e.g., cancers, inflammation) factors. This formidable barrier function resides mainly in the epidermis, a dynamic, highly-stratified epithelium. The epidermis has 2 major barrier structures: stratum corneum, the outmost layer and tight junctions, intercellular junctions that seal adjacent keratinocytes in the stratum granulosum, found below the stratum corneum. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of tight junction function, composition and regulation. Herein we review what is known about tight junctions in healthy skin and keratinocyte culture systems and highlight the dynamic crosstalk observed between tight junctions and the cutaneous immune system. Finally we discuss the preliminary observations suggesting that tight junction function or protein expression may be relevant for the pathogenesis of a number of common cutaneous inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. PMID:25838981

  20. Recent Advances in Subunit Vaccine Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Abhishek; Sucheck, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    The lower immunogenicity of synthetic subunit antigens, compared to live attenuated vaccines, is being addressed with improved vaccine carriers. Recent reports indicate that the physio-chemical properties of these carriers can be altered to achieve optimal antigen presentation, endosomal escape, particle bio-distribution, and cellular trafficking. The carriers can be modified with various antigens and ligands for dendritic cells targeting. They can also be modified with adjuvants, either covalently or entrapped in the matrix, to improve cellular and humoral immune responses against the antigen. As a result, these multi-functional carrier systems are being explored for use in active immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. Advancing technology, improved analytical methods, and use of computational methodology have also contributed to the development of subunit vaccine carriers. This review details recent breakthroughs in the design of nano-particulate vaccine carriers, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, and inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27104575

  1. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Subunit organization in cytoplasmic dynein subcomplexes

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Bonilla, Myriam; Rodgers, Michael E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    2002-01-01

    Because cytoplasmic dynein plays numerous critical roles in eukaryotic cells, determining the subunit composition and the organization and functions of the subunits within dynein are important goals. This has been difficult partly because of accessory polypeptide heterogeneity of dynein populations. The motor domain containing heavy chains of cytoplasmic dynein are associated with multiple intermediate, light intermediate, and light chain accessory polypeptides. We examined the organization of these subunits within cytoplasmic dynein by separating the molecule into two distinct subcomplexes. These subcomplexes were competent to reassemble into a molecule with dynein-like properties. One subcomplex was composed of the dynein heavy and light intermediate chains whereas the other subcomplex was composed of the intermediate and light chains. The intermediate and light chain subcomplex could be further separated into two pools, only one of which contained dynein light chains. The two pools had distinct intermediate chain compositions, suggesting that intermediate chain isoforms have different light chain–binding properties. When the two intermediate chain pools were characterized by analytical velocity sedimentation, at least four molecular components were seen: intermediate chain monomers, intermediate chain dimers, intermediate chain monomers with bound light chains, and a mixture of intermediate chain dimers with assorted bound light chains. These data provide new insights into the compositional heterogeneity and assembly of the cytoplasmic dynein complex and suggest that individual dynein molecules have distinct molecular compositions in vivo. PMID:11967380

  3. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support.

  4. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes for producing the A and B subunits of cholera toxin and preparations containing so-obtained subunit or subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Harford, N.; De Wilde, M.

    1987-05-19

    A recombinant DNA molecule is described comprising at least a portion coding for subunits A and B of cholera toxin, or a fragment or derivative of the portion wherein the fragment or derivative codes for a polypeptide have an activity which can induce an immune response to subunit A; can induce an immune response to subunit A and cause epithelial cell penetration and the enzymatic effect leading to net loss of fluid into the gut lumen; can bind to the membrane receptor for the B subunit of cholera toxin; can induce an immune response to subunit B; can induce an immune response to subunit B and bind to the membrane receptor; or has a combination of the activities.

  5. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  6. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  7. Neto-Mediated Intracellular Interactions Shape Postsynaptic Composition at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Cathy I.; Igiesuorobo, Oghomwen; Wang, Qi; Serpe, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the subunit composition of glutamate receptors are crucial for the formation of neural circuits and for the long-term plasticity underlying learning and memory. Here we use the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) to examine how specific receptor subtypes are recruited and stabilized at synaptic locations. In flies, clustering of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) requires Neto (Neuropillin and Tolloid-like), a highly conserved auxiliary subunit that is essential for NMJ assembly and development. Drosophila neto encodes two isoforms, Neto-α and Neto-β, with common extracellular parts and distinct cytoplasmic domains. Mutations that specifically eliminate Neto-β or its intracellular domain were generated. When Neto-β is missing or is truncated, the larval NMJs show profound changes in the subtype composition of iGluRs due to reduced synaptic accumulation of the GluRIIA subunit. Furthermore, neto-β mutant NMJs fail to accumulate p21-activated kinase (PAK), a critical postsynaptic component implicated in the synaptic stabilization of GluRIIA. Muscle expression of either Neto-α or Neto-β rescued the synaptic transmission at neto null NMJs, indicating that Neto conserved domains mediate iGluRs clustering. However, only Neto-β restored PAK synaptic accumulation at neto null NMJs. Thus, Neto engages in intracellular interactions that regulate the iGluR subtype composition by preferentially recruiting and/or stabilizing selective receptor subtypes. PMID:25905467

  8. Differential accumulation of ribonucleotide reductase subunits in clam oocytes: the large subunit is stored as a polypeptide, the small subunit as untranslated mRNA

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Within minutes of fertilization of clam oocytes, translation of a set of maternal mRNAs is activated. One of the most abundant of these stored mRNAs encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (Standart, N. M., S. J. Bray, E. L. George, T. Hunt, and J. V. Ruderman, 1985, J. Cell Biol., 100:1968-1976). Unfertilized oocytes do not contain any ribonucleotide reductase activity; such activity begins to appear shortly after fertilization. In virtually all organisms, this enzyme is composed of two dissimilar subunits with molecular masses of approximately 44 and 88 kD, both of which are required for activity. This paper reports the identification of the large subunit of clam ribonucleotide reductase isolated by dATP-Sepharose chromatography as a relatively abundant 86-kD polypeptide which is already present in oocytes, and whose level remains constant during early development. The enzyme activity of this large subunit was established in reconstitution assays using the small subunit isolated from embryos by virtue of its binding to the anti-tubulin antibody YL 1/2. Thus the two components of clam ribonucleotide reductase are differentially stored in the oocyte: the small subunit in the form of untranslated mRNA and the large subunit as protein. When fertilization triggers the activation of translation of the maternal mRNA, the newly synthesized small subunit combines with the preformed large subunit to generate active ribonucleotide reductase. PMID:3536960

  9. Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions from the Short to the Long Junction Regimes.

    PubMed

    Borzenets, I V; Amet, F; Ke, C T; Draelos, A W; Wei, M T; Seredinski, A; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Bomze, Y; Yamamoto, M; Tarucha, S; Finkelstein, G

    2016-12-02

    We investigate the critical current I_{C} of ballistic Josephson junctions made of encapsulated graphene-boron-nitride heterostructures. We observe a crossover from the short to the long junction regimes as the length of the device increases. In long ballistic junctions, I_{C} is found to scale as ∝exp(-k_{B}T/δE). The extracted energies δE are independent of the carrier density and proportional to the level spacing of the ballistic cavity. As T→0 the critical current of a long (or short) junction saturates at a level determined by the product of δE (or Δ) and the number of the junction's transversal modes.

  10. Prefoldin Subunits Are Protected from Ubiquitin-Proteasome System-mediated Degradation by Forming Complex with Other Constituent Subunits*

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation. PMID:21478150

  11. Prefoldin subunits are protected from ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation by forming complex with other constituent subunits.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-06-03

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation.

  12. A single-gradient junction technique to replace multiple-junction shifts for craniospinal irradiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Austin; Ding, George X.

    2014-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) requires abutting fields at the cervical spine. Junction shifts are conventionally used to prevent setup error–induced overdosage/underdosage from occurring at the same location. This study compared the dosimetric differences at the cranial-spinal junction between a single-gradient junction technique and conventional multiple-junction shifts and evaluated the effect of setup errors on the dose distributions between both techniques for a treatment course and single fraction. Conventionally, 2 lateral brain fields and a posterior spine field(s) are used for CSI with weekly 1-cm junction shifts. We retrospectively replanned 4 CSI patients using a single-gradient junction between the lateral brain fields and the posterior spine field. The fields were extended to allow a minimum 3-cm field overlap. The dose gradient at the junction was achieved using dose painting and intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The effect of positioning setup errors on the dose distributions for both techniques was simulated by applying shifts of ± 3 and 5 mm. The resulting cervical spine doses across the field junction for both techniques were calculated and compared. Dose profiles were obtained for both a single fraction and entire treatment course to include the effects of the conventional weekly junction shifts. Compared with the conventional technique, the gradient-dose technique resulted in higher dose uniformity and conformity to the target volumes, lower organ at risk (OAR) mean and maximum doses, and diminished hot spots from systematic positioning errors over the course of treatment. Single-fraction hot and cold spots were improved for the gradient-dose technique. The single-gradient junction technique provides improved conformity, dose uniformity, diminished hot spots, lower OAR mean and maximum dose, and one plan for the entire treatment course, which reduces the potential human error associated with conventional 4-shifted plans.

  13. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  14. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  15. YBCO step-edge junctions with high IcRn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. E.; Foley, C. P.

    2010-06-01

    Step-edge junctions represent one type of grain boundary Josephson junction employed in high-temperature superconducting junction technology. To date, the majority of results published in the literature focus on [001]-tilt grain boundary junctions (GBJs) produced using bicrystal substrates. We investigate the step morphology and YBCO (yttrium barium copper oxide) film structure of YBCO-based step-edge junctions on MgO [001] substrates which structurally resemble [100]-tilt junctions. High-resolution electron microscopy reveals a clean GBJ interface of width ~ 1 nm and a single junction at the top edge. The dependence of the transport properties on the MgO step-edge and junction morphology is examined at 4.2 K, to enable direct comparison with results for other junction studies such as [001]-tilt and [100]-tilt junctions and building on previously published 77 K data. MgO step-edge junctions show a slower reduction in critical current density with step angle compared with [001]-tilt junctions. For optimized step parameters, transport measurements revealed large critical current and normal resistance (IcRN) products (~3-5 mV), comparable with the best results obtained in other kinds of [100]-tilt GBJs in YBCO at 4.2 K. Junction-based devices such as SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) and THz imagers show excellent performance when MgO-based step-edge junctions are used.

  16. Inherent conformational flexibility of F1-ATPase α-subunit.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Herrera, Otto; Salcedo, Guillermo; Barril, Xavier; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The core of F1-ATPase consists of three catalytic (β) and three noncatalytic (α) subunits, forming a hexameric ring in alternating positions. A wealth of experimental and theoretical data has provided a detailed picture of the complex role played by catalytic subunits. Although major conformational changes have only been seen in β-subunits, it is clear that α-subunits have to respond to these changes in order to be able to transmit information during the rotary mechanism. However, the conformational behavior of α-subunits has not been explored in detail. Here, we have combined unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calorimetrically measured thermodynamic signatures to investigate the conformational flexibility of isolated α-subunits, as a step toward deepening our understanding of its function inside the α3β3 ring. The simulations indicate that the open-to-closed conformational transition of the α-subunit is essentially barrierless, which is ideal to accompany and transmit the movement of the catalytic subunits. Calorimetric measurements of the recombinant α-subunit from Geobacillus kaustophilus indicate that the isolated subunit undergoes no significant conformational changes upon nucleotide binding. Simulations confirm that the nucleotide-free and nucleotide-bound subunits show average conformations similar to that observed in the F1 crystal structure, but they reveal an increased conformational flexibility of the isolated α-subunit upon MgATP binding, which might explain the evolutionary conserved capacity of α-subunits to recognize nucleotides with considerable strength. Furthermore, we elucidate the different dependencies that α- and β-subunits show on Mg(II) for recognizing ATP.

  17. The discovery of epidermal tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Sugawara, Koji; Tsuruta, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    It was previously thought that the skin barrier is composed singly by the stratum corneum. However, this concept was overturned by the report of Tsukita's group in 2002. They convinced us that tight junctions exist in the stratum granulosum of the epidermis, with the constituent proteins being occludin, claudin-1 and claudin-4. However, more than 30 years before this, Hashimoto et al. described the possible existence of tight junctions in the epidermis in 'Intercellular spaces of the human epidermis as demonstrated with lanthanum' in 1971. Dr. Hashimoto observed lanthanum nitrate-injected human skin by electron microscopy. He discovered that the injected lanthanum penetrated the intercellular spaces of the basal and spinous layers of the epidermis and then moved towards the skin surface until penetration was halted in the granular cell layer near the stratum corneum. He described the cell-to-cell adhesion structures that blocked the movement of lanthanum as 'truly tight junctions'. Thus, this was the first description of the existence of tight junctions in the epidermis. However, the presence of these structures was denied by others and was forgotten. Thanks to the discovery of claudin, the existence of tight junctions between epidermal keratinocytes was finally confirmed. It is interesting that Hashimoto's finding was eventually proved to be correct three decades later as a result of progress in molecular biology. This article encourages us to recognize the importance of careful observation in the molecular biology era. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Dislocation Multi-junctions and Strain Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V; Hsiung, L; Tang, M; Arsenlis, A; Bartelt, M; Cai, W; Florando, J; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Hommes, G; Pierce, T; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2006-06-20

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects--dislocations. First theorized in 1934 to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed only two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening: a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions tying dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed hereafter multi-junctions. The existence of multi-junctions is first predicted by Dislocation Dynamics (DD) and atomistic simulations and then confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments in single crystal molybdenum. In large-scale Dislocation Dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in BCC crystals.

  19. Dislocation multi-junctions and strain hardening.

    PubMed

    Bulatov, Vasily V; Hsiung, Luke L; Tang, Meijie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; Bartelt, Maria C; Cai, Wei; Florando, Jeff N; Hiratani, Masato; Rhee, Moon; Hommes, Gregg; Pierce, Tim G; de la Rubia, Tomas Diaz

    2006-04-27

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects called dislocations. First proposed theoretically in 1934 (refs 1-3) to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening, a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions that tie the dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed 'multi-junctions'. We first predict the existence of multi-junctions using dislocation dynamics and atomistic simulations and then confirm their existence by transmission electron microscopy experiments in single-crystal molybdenum. In large-scale dislocation dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication, thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in body-centred cubic crystals.

  20. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  1. Acetaldehyde disrupts tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a protein phosphatase 2A-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dunagan, Mitzi; Chaudhry, Kamaljit; Samak, Geetha; Rao, R K

    2012-12-15

    Acetaldehyde is accumulated at high concentrations in the colonic lumen following ethanol administration. Previous studies demonstrated that acetaldehyde disrupts intestinal epithelial tight junctions and increases paracellular permeability. In the present study, we investigated the role of PP2A in the acetaldehyde-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions. Caco-2 cell monolayers were exposed to 200-600 μM acetaldehyde for varying times, and the epithelial barrier function was evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and inulin permeability. Acetaldehyde treatment resulted in a time-dependent increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions. Treatment of cells with fostriecin (a PP2A-selective inhibitor) or knockdown of PP2A by siRNA blocked acetaldehyde-induced increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1. The effects of fostriecin and acetaldehyde were confirmed in mouse intestine ex vivo. Acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction were also attenuated by a PP2A-specific inhibitory peptide, TPDYFL. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that acetaldehyde increased the interaction of PP2A with occludin and induced dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. Fostriecin and TPDYFL significantly reduced acetaldehyde-induced threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. Acetaldehyde failed to change the level of the methylated form of PP2A-C subunit. However, genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blocked acetaldehyde-induced association of PP2A with occludin and threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. These results demonstrate that acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions is mediated by PP2A translocation to tight junctions and dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues.

  2. Acetaldehyde disrupts tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a protein phosphatase 2A-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dunagan, Mitzi; Chaudhry, Kamaljit; Samak, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is accumulated at high concentrations in the colonic lumen following ethanol administration. Previous studies demonstrated that acetaldehyde disrupts intestinal epithelial tight junctions and increases paracellular permeability. In the present study, we investigated the role of PP2A in the acetaldehyde-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions. Caco-2 cell monolayers were exposed to 200–600 μM acetaldehyde for varying times, and the epithelial barrier function was evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and inulin permeability. Acetaldehyde treatment resulted in a time-dependent increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions. Treatment of cells with fostriecin (a PP2A-selective inhibitor) or knockdown of PP2A by siRNA blocked acetaldehyde-induced increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1. The effects of fostriecin and acetaldehyde were confirmed in mouse intestine ex vivo. Acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction were also attenuated by a PP2A-specific inhibitory peptide, TPDYFL. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that acetaldehyde increased the interaction of PP2A with occludin and induced dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. Fostriecin and TPDYFL significantly reduced acetaldehyde-induced threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. Acetaldehyde failed to change the level of the methylated form of PP2A-C subunit. However, genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blocked acetaldehyde-induced association of PP2A with occludin and threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. These results demonstrate that acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions is mediated by PP2A translocation to tight junctions and dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. PMID:23064762

  3. RNA tertiary interactions in the large ribosomal subunit: The A-minor motif

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Poul; Ippolito, Joseph A.; Ban, Nenad; Moore, Peter B.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2009-10-07

    Analysis of the 2.4-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Haloarcula marismortui reveals the existence of an abundant and ubiquitous structural motif that stabilizes RNA tertiary and quaternary structures. This motif is termed the A-minor motif, because it involves the insertion of the smooth, minor groove edges of adenines into the minor groove of neighboring helices, preferentially at C-G base pairs, where they form hydrogen bonds with one or both of the 2' OHs of those pairs. A-minor motifs stabilize contacts between RNA helices, interactions between loops and helices, and the conformations of junctions and tight turns. The interactions between the 3' terminal adenine of tRNAs bound in either the A site or the P site with 23S rRNA are examples of functionally significant A-minor interactions. The A-minor motif is by far the most abundant tertiary structure interaction in the large ribosomal subunit; 186 adenines in 23S and 5S rRNA participate, 68 of which are conserved. It may prove to be the universally most important long-range interaction in large RNA structures.

  4. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  5. [Nose surgical anatomy in six aesthetic subunits].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Lauwers, F; Lopez, R; Saboye, J; André, A; Grolleau, J-L; Chavoin, J-P

    2013-04-01

    The nose is a complex entity, combining aesthetic and functional roles. Descriptive anatomy is a fundamental science that it can be difficult to relate directly to our daily surgical activity. Reasoning in terms of aesthetic subunits to decide on his actions appeared to us so obvious. The aim of this paper is to resume the anatomical bases relevant to our daily practice in order to fully apprehend the restorative or cosmetic procedures. We discuss the limits of the systematization of these principles in nasal oncology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase gene therapy upregulates tight junctions to rescue lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Barravecchia, M; Kothari, P; Young, J L; Dean, D A

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with diverse disorders and characterized by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leakage of edema fluid into the lung, and substantial inflammation leading to acute respiratory failure. Gene therapy is a potentially powerful approach to treat ALI/ARDS through repair of alveolar epithelial function. Herein, we show that delivery of a plasmid expressing β1-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) alone or in combination with epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) α1-subunit using electroporation not only protected from subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated lung injury, but also treated injured lungs. However, transfer of α1-subunit of ENaC (α1-ENaC) alone only provided protection benefit rather than treatment benefit although alveolar fluid clearance had been remarkably enhanced. Gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, but not α1-ENaC, not only enhanced expression of tight junction protein zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) and occludin both in cultured cells and in mouse lungs, but also reduced pre-existing increase of lung permeability in vivo. These results demonstrate that gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase upregulates tight junction formation and therefore treats lungs with existing injury, whereas delivery of α1-ENaC only maintains pre-existing tight junction but not for generation. This indicates that the restoration of epithelial/endothelial barrier function may provide better treatment of ALI/ARDS.

  7. Crystal structure of the Holliday junction migration motor protein RuvB from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Kunishima, Naoki; Mayanagi, Kouta; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Nishino, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Shinagawa, Hideo; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2001-01-01

    We report here the crystal structure of the RuvB motor protein from Thermus thermophilus HB8, which drives branch migration of the Holliday junction during homologous recombination. RuvB has a crescent-like architecture consisting of three consecutive domains, the first two of which are involved in ATP binding and hydrolysis. DNA is likely to interact with a large basic cleft, which encompasses the ATP-binding pocket and domain boundaries, whereas the junction-recognition protein RuvA may bind a flexible β-hairpin protruding from the N-terminal domain. The structures of two subunits, related by a noncrystallographic pseudo-2-fold axis, imply that conformational changes of motor protein coupled with ATP hydrolysis may reflect motility essential for its translocation around double-stranded DNA. PMID:11171970

  8. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A.; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  9. Molecular organization of tricellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mikio; Izumi, Yasushi; Oda, Yukako; Higashi, Tomohito; Iwamoto, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    When the apicolateral border of epithelial cells is compared with a polygon, its sides correspond to the apical junctional complex, where cell adhesion molecules assemble from the plasma membranes of two adjacent cells. On the other hand, its vertices correspond to tricellular contacts, where the corners of three cells meet. Vertebrate tricellular contacts have specialized structures of tight junctions, termed tricellular tight junctions (tTJs). tTJs were identified by electron microscopic observations more than 40 years ago, but have been largely forgotten in epithelial cell biology since then. The identification of tricellulin and angulin family proteins as tTJ-associated membrane proteins has enabled us to study tTJs in terms of not only the paracellular barrier function but also unknown characteristics of epithelial cell corners via molecular biological approaches.

  10. Brownian refrigeration by hybrid tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltonen, J. T.; Helle, M.; Timofeev, A. V.; Solinas, P.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Pekola, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    Voltage fluctuations generated in a hot resistor can cause extraction of heat from a colder normal metal electrode of a hybrid tunnel junction between a normal metal and a superconductor. We extend the analysis presented in Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.210604 98, 210604 (2007) of this heat rectifying system, bearing resemblance to a Maxwell’s demon. Explicit analytic calculations show that the entropy of the total system is always increasing. We then consider a single-electron transistor configuration with two hybrid junctions in series, and show how the cooling is influenced by charging effects. We analyze also the cooling effect from nonequilibrium fluctuations instead of thermal noise, focusing on the shot noise generated in another tunnel junction. We conclude by discussing limitations for an experimental observation of the effect.

  11. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Javedani, J B

    2006-10-25

    Triple junctions are often initiation points for insulator flashover in pulsed power devices. The two-dimensional finite-element TriComp [1] modeling software suite was utilized for its electrostatic field modeling package to investigate electric field behavior in the anode and cathode triple junctions of a high voltage vacuum-insulator interface. TriComp enables simple extraction of values from a macroscopic solution for use as boundary conditions in a subset solution. Electric fields computed with this zoom capability correlate with theoretical analysis of the anode and cathode triple junctions within submicron distances for nominal electrode spacing of 1.0 cm. This paper will discuss the iterative zoom process with TriComp finite-element software and the corresponding theoretical verification of the results.

  12. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms. PMID:26217173

  13. Photocurrent Measurements of Carbon Nanotube PN Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Nathaniel; Zhong, Zhaohui; Bosnick, Ken; Park, Jiwoong; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Gated p-n junctions in semiconducting nanotubes have recently drawn much attention for their electronic and optoelectronic characteristics [1,2,3]. We investigate the photocurrent response at a nanotube gated p-n junction using a focused laser illumination source. We find that the photocurrent at zero source-drain bias increases linearly with optical power for the component of light along the length of the nanotube. Scanned photocurrent imaging demonstrates that carrier generation occurs primarily between the p- and n- type segments of the device. Measurements in an optical cryostat down to 4K reveal large photoresponse and step-like structure in the reverse bias photocurrent. These results show that nanotube p-n junctions are highly sensitive, nanoscale photodetectors. [1] J.U. Lee et al, App. Phys. Lett. 85, 145 (2004). [2] J.U. Lee, App. Phys. Lett. 87, 073101 (2005). [3] K. Bosnick et al, App. Phys. Lett. 89, 163121 (2006).

  14. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  15. Ferromagnetic resonance with long Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Abramov, N. N.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Golubov, A. A.; Ustinov, A. V.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we propose a hybrid device based on a long Josephson junction (JJ) coupled inductively to an external ferromagnetic (FM) layer. The long JJ in a zero-field operation mode induces a localized AC magnetic field in the FM layer and enables a synchronized magnetostatic standing wave. The magnetostatic wave induces additional dissipation for soliton propagation in the junction and also enables a phase locking (resonant soliton synchronization) at a frequency of natural ferromagnetic resonance. The later manifests itself as an additional constant voltage step on the current-voltage characteristics at the corresponding voltage. The proposed device allows to study magnetization dynamics of individual micro-scaled FM samples using just DC technique, and also it provides additional phase locking frequency in the junction, determined exclusively by characteristics of the ferromagnet.

  16. Thermionic refrigeration at CNT-CNT junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to study carrier energy relaxation following thermionic emission at the junction of two van der Waals bonded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). An energy-dependent transmission probability gives rise to energy filtering at the junction, which is predicted to increase the average electron transport energy by as much as 0.115 eV, leading to an effective Seebeck coefficient of 386 μV/K. MC results predict a long energy relaxation length (˜8 μm) for hot electrons crossing the junction into the barrier SWCNT. For SWCNTs of optimal length, an analytical transport model is used to show that thermionic cooling can outweigh parasitic heat conduction due to high SWCNT thermal conductivity, leading to a significant cooling capacity (2.4 × 106 W/cm2).

  17. Numerical Investigation of Josephson Junction Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, I.; Dimova, S.; Boyadjiev, T.

    2009-10-29

    Multilayered long Josephson Junction Structures form an interesting physical system where both nonlinearity and interaction between subsystems play an important role. Such systems allow to study physical effects that do not occur in single Josephson junction.The Sakai-Bodin-Pedersen model--a system of perturbed sine-Gordon equations--is used to study the dynamic states of stacks of inductively coupled long Josephson Junctions (LJJs). The corresponding static problem is numerically investigated as well. In order to study the stability of possible static solutions a Sturm-Liouville problem is generated and solved.The transitions from static to dynamic state and the scenario of these transitions are analyzed depending on the model parameters. Different physical characteristics--current-voltage characteristics, individual instant voltages and internal magnetic fields, are calculated and interpreted.

  18. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  19. Holographic Josephson junction from massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Li, Huai-Fan; Zeng, Hua-Bi; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2016-05-01

    We study the holographic superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity. If the boundary theory is independent of spatial directions, i.e., if the chemical potential is homogeneous in spatial directions, we find that the graviton mass parameter will make it more difficult for the normal metal-superconductor phase transition to take place. In the holographic model of the Josephson junction, it is found that the maximal tunneling current will decrease according to the graviton mass parameter. Besides, the coherence length of the junction decreases as well with respect to the graviton mass parameter. If one interprets the graviton mass parameter as the effect of momentum dissipation in the boundary field theory, this indicates that the stronger the momentum dissipation is, the smaller the coherence length is.

  20. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  1. Modulation of Brain Hemichannels and Gap Junction Channels by Pro-Inflammatory Agents and Their Possible Role in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Pablo J.; Shoji, Kenji F.; Schalper, Kurt A.; Palacios–Prado, Nicolás; Velarde, Victoria; Giaume, Christian; Bennett, Michael V.L.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In normal brain, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, the most abundant and active cells express pannexins and connexins, protein subunits of two families forming membrane channels. Most available evidence indicates that in mammals endogenously expressed pannexins form only hemichannels and connexins form both gap junction channels and hemichannels. Whereas gap junction channels connect the cytoplasm of contacting cells and coordinate electric and metabolic activity, hemichannels communicate the intra- and extracellular compartments and serve as a diffusional pathway for ions and small molecules. A subthreshold stimulation by acute pathological threatening conditions (e.g., global ischemia subthreshold for cell death) enhances neuronal Cx36 and glial Cx43 hemichannel activity, favoring ATP release and generation of preconditioning. If the stimulus is sufficiently deleterious, microglia become overactivated and release bioactive molecules that increase the activity of hemichannels and reduce gap junctional communication in astroglial networks, depriving neurons of astrocytic protective functions, and further reducing neuronal viability. Continuous glial activation triggered by low levels of anomalous proteins expressed in several neurodegenerative diseases induce glial hemichannel and gap junction channel disorders similar to those of acute inflammatory responses triggered by ischemia or infectious diseases. These changes are likely to occur in diverse cell types of the CNS and contribute to neurodegeneration during inflammatory process. Antiox. Redox Signal. 11, 369–399. PMID:18816186

  2. Amino-terminal truncations of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit influence catalysis and subunit interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, K; Morell, M K; Andrews, T J

    1993-01-01

    The first 20 residues at the amino terminus of the small subunit of spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase form an irregular arm that makes extensive contacts with the large subunit and also with another small subunit (S. Knight, I. Andersson, and C.-I. Brändén [1990] J Mol Biol 215: 113-160). The influence of these contacts on subunit binding and, indirectly, on catalysis was investigated by constructing truncations from the amino terminus of the small subunit of the highly homologous enzyme from Synechococcus PCC 6301 expressed in Escherichia coli. Removal of the first six residues (and thus the region of contact with a neighboring small subunit) affected neither the affinity with which the small subunits bound to the large subunits nor the catalytic properties of the assembled holoenzyme. Extending the truncation to include the first 12 residues (which encroaches into a highly conserved region that interacts with the large subunit) also did not weaken intersubunit binding appreciably, but it reduced the catalytic activity of the holoenzyme nearly 5-fold. Removal of an additional single residue (i.e. removal of a total of 13 residues) weakened intersubunit binding approximately 80-fold. Paradoxically, this partially restored catalytic activity to approximately 40% of that of the wild-type holoenzyme. None of these truncations materially affected the Km values for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate or CO2. Removal of all 20 residues of the irregular arm (thereby deleting the conserved region of contact with large subunits) totally abolished the small subunit's ability to bind to large subunits to form a stable holoenzyme. However, this truncated small subunit was still synthesized by the E. coli cells. These data are interpreted in terms of the role of the amino-terminal arm of the small subunit in maintaining the structure of the holoenzyme. PMID:8278544

  3. Non-invasive microfluidic gap junction assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sisi; Lee, Luke P

    2010-03-01

    Gap junctions are protein channels between cells that allow direct electrical and metabolic coupling via the exchange of biomolecules and ions. Their expression, though ubiquitous in most mammalian cell types, is especially important for the proper functioning of cardiac and neuronal systems. Many existing methods for studying gap junction communication suffer from either unquantifiable data or difficulty of use. Here, we measure the extent of dye spread and effective diffusivities through gap junction connected cells using a quantitative microfluidic cell biology platform. After loading dye by hydrodynamic focusing of calcein/AM, dye transfer dynamics into neighboring, unexposed cells can be monitored via timelapse fluorescent microscopy. By using a selective microfluidic dye loading over a confluent layer of cells, we found that high expression of gap junctions in C6 cells transmits calcein across the monolayer with an effective diffusivity of 3.4 x 10(-13) m(2)/s, which are highly coupled by Cx43. We also found that the gap junction blocker 18alpha-GA works poorly in the presence of serum even at high concentrations (50 microM); however, it is highly effective down to 2.5 microM in the absence of serum. Furthermore, when the drug is washed out, dye spread resumes rapidly within 1 min for all doses, indicating the drug does not affect transcriptional regulation of connexins in these Cx43+ cells, in contrast to previous studies. This integrated microfluidic platform enables the in situ monitoring of gap junction communication, yielding dynamic information about intercellular molecular transfer and pharmacological inhibition and recovery.

  4. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  5. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  6. Glycine receptor subunits expression in the developing rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Salceda, Rocío

    2017-09-01

    Glycine receptor (GlyR) consists of two α (1-4) and three β subunits. Considerable evidence indicates that the adult retina expresses the four types of α subunits; however, the proportion of these subunits in adult and immature retina is almost unknown. In this report we have studied mRNA and the protein expression of GlyR subunits in the retina during postnatal rat development by Real-Time qRT-PCR and western blot. mRNA and protein expression indicated a gradual increase of the α1, α3, α4 and β GlyR subunits during postnatal ages tested. The mRNA β subunit showed higher expression levels (∼3 fold) than those observed for the α1 and α3 subunits. Very interestingly, the α2 GlyR subunit had the highest expression in the retina, even in the adult. These results revealed the expression of GlyR at early postnatal ages, supporting its role in retina development. In addition, our results indicated that the adult retina expressed a high proportion of the α2 subunit, suggesting the expression of monomeric and/or heteromeric receptors. A variety of studies are needed to further characterize the role of the specific subunits in both adult and immature retina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  8. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-02-01

    Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9' serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose-response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9'S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Conductance Spectra in Graphene-Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Shi-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The conductance spectra of a graphene ribbon and graphene-superconductor (G-S) junctions are investigated, using the tight-binding model and non-equilibrium Green' function formalism. It is found that the quantized conductance related to graphene' edge-states is robust against perturbations in the model parameters for a graphene monolayer ribbon with the zigzag boundary. With appropriate model parameter of the spin-orbit interaction strength, a new bound state with odd-frequency symmetry is found in the G-S junction. An enhancement in the zero-energy conductance amplitude is followed.

  10. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  11. Resolving Atomic Connectivity in Graphene Nanostructure Junctions.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Thomas; Kawai, Shigeki; Söde, Hajo; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Ruffieux, Pascal; Fasel, Roman; Gröning, Oliver

    2015-08-12

    We report on the structural characterization of junctions between atomically well-defined graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by means of low-temperature, noncontact scanning probe microscopy. We show that the combination of simultaneously acquired frequency shift and tunneling current maps with tight binding (TB) simulations allows a comprehensive characterization of the atomic connectivity in the GNR junctions. The proposed approach can be generally applied to the investigation of graphene nanomaterials and their interconnections and is thus expected to become an important tool in the development of graphene-based circuitry.

  12. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  14. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  15. A proposed route to independent measurements of tight junction conductance at discrete cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lushan; Zeng, Yuhan; Baker, Lane A; Hou, Jianghui

    2015-01-01

    Direct recording of tight junction permeability is of pivotal importance to many biologic fields. Previous approaches bear an intrinsic disadvantage due to the difficulty of separating tight junction conductance from nearby membrane conductance. Here, we propose the design of Double whole-cell Voltage Clamp - Ion Conductance Microscopy (DVC-ICM) based on previously demonstrated potentiometric scanning of local conductive pathways. As proposed, DVC-ICM utilizes two coordinated whole-cell patch-clamps to neutralize the apical membrane current during potentiometric scanning, which in models described here will profoundly enhance the specificity of tight junction recording. Several potential pitfalls are considered, evaluated and addressed with alternative countermeasures. PMID:26716077

  16. Complementation of subunits from different bacterial luciferases. Evidence for the role of the. beta. subunit in the bioluminescent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meighen, E.A.; Bartlet, I.

    1980-12-10

    Complementation of the nonidentical subunits (..cap alpha.. and ..beta..) of luciferases isolated from two different bioluminescent strains, Beneckea harveyi and Photobacterium phosphoreum, has resulted in the formation of a functional hybrid luciferase (..cap alpha../sub h/..beta../sub p/) containing the ..cap alpha.. subunit from B. harveyi luciferase (..cap alpha../sub h/) and the ..beta.. subunit from P. phosphoreum luciferase (..beta../sub p/). The complementation was unidirectional; activity could not be restored by complementing the ..cap alpha.. subunit of P. phosphoreum luciferase with the ..beta.. subunit of B. harveyi luciferase, showing that the subunits from these luciferases were not identical. Kinetic parameters of the hybrid luciferase reflecting the intermediate and later steps of the bioluminescent reaction as well as the overall activity and specificity were essentially identical to the same kinetic parameters for B. harveyi luciferase, the source of the ..cap alpha.. subunit, and quite distinct from those of P. phosphoreum luciferase. However, kinetic parameters that reflected the initial step in the reaction involving interaction of FMNH/sub 2/ and luciferase were altered in the hybrid luciferase compared to both the parental luciferases, the K/sub d/ for FMNH/sub 2/ actually being closer to that observed for the P. phosphoreum luciferase (the source of the ..beta.. subunit). These results provide direct evidence that modification or alteration of the ..beta.. subunit in a dimeric luciferase molecule can affect the kinetic properties and indicates that the ..beta.. subunit plays a functional role in the bioluminescent mechanism. It is proposed that both the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits are involved with the initial interaction with FMNH/sub 2/, whereas subsequent steps in the mechanism are dictated exclusively by the ..cap alpha.. subunit and are unaffected by alterations in the ..beta.. subunit.

  17. 6. View northeast, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View northeast, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, western estate wall and tree lines to right - A. I. Du Pont Estate, Junction of State Route 141 & Rockland Road, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  18. 8. Vidw southwest, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Vidw southwest, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, northern estate wall and tree lines to left - A. I. Du Pont Estate, Junction of State Route 141 & Rockland Road, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  19. Ballistic bipolar junctions in chemically gated graphene ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Baringhaus, Jens; Stöhr, Alexander; Forti, Stiven; Starke, Ulrich; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The realization of ballistic graphene pn-junctions is an essential task in order to study Klein tunneling phenomena. Here we show that intercalation of Ge under the buffer layer of pre-structured SiC-samples succeeds to make truly nano-scaled pn-junctions. By means of local tunneling spectroscopy the junction width is found to be as narrow as 5 nm which is a hundred times smaller compared to electrically gated structures. The ballistic transmission across the junction is directly proven by systematic transport measurements with a 4-tip STM. Various npn- and pnp-junctions are studied with respect to the barrier length. The pn-junctions are shown to act as polarizer and analyzer with the second junction becoming transparent in case of a fully ballistic barrier. This can be attributed to the almost full suppression of electron transmission through the junction away from normal incidence. PMID:25898259

  20. 3. View of junction from the west, looking east along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of junction from the west, looking east along Trunk Highway 55 toward the western side of bridge no. 5820. - Cloverleaf Interchange, Junction of Trunk Highways 52, 3, & 55, Inver Grove Heights, Dakota County, MN

  1. Formation of active bacterial luciferase between interspecific subunits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Almashanu, S; Tuby, A; Hadar, R; Einy, R; Kuhn, J

    1995-01-01

    Interspecific complementation between luxAs and luxBs from Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium leiognathi and Xenorhabdus luminescens was examined in vivo. The individual genes from these species were cloned on different compatible plasmids or amplified by PCR and brought together to yield cis combinations without extraneous DNA. The beta subunits from V. harveyi and X. luminescens form active enzyme only with alpha subunits from one of these species. All other combinations yield active enzymes. The lack of activity of the V. harveyi and X. luminescens beta subunits with the alpha subunits from V. fischeri and P. leiognathi results from a lack of association. This was shown by in vivo competition in which these beta subunits were overproduced in comparison with the beta and alpha of V. fischeri. No reduction in light was found. Overall, the in vivo results parallel those found in vitro using isolated denatured subunits and renaturation by removal of the denaturant.

  2. Sodium channel β subunits: emerging targets in channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Heather A.; Isom, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are responsible for initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. VGSCs in mammalian brain are heterotrimeric complexes of α and β subunits. Originally called “auxiliary,” we now know that β subunit proteins are multifunctional signaling molecules that play roles in both excitable and non-excitable cell types, and with or without the pore-forming α subunit present. β subunits function in VGSC and potassium channel modulation, cell adhesion, and gene regulation, with particularly important roles in brain development. Mutations in the genes encoding β subunits are linked to a number of diseases, including epilepsy, sudden death syndromes like SUDEP and SIDS, and cardiac arrhythmia. While VGSC β subunit-specific drugs have not yet been developed, this protein family is an emerging therapeutic target. PMID:25668026

  3. Diversity of heterotrimeric G-protein γ subunits in plants.

    PubMed

    Trusov, Yuri; Chakravorty, David; Botella, José Ramón

    2012-10-31

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, consisting of three subunits Gα, Gβ and Gγ are present in most eukaryotes and mediate signaling in numerous biological processes. In plants, Gγ subunits were shown to provide functional selectivity to G-proteins. Three unconventional Gγ subunits were recently reported in Arabidopsis, rice and soybean but no structural analysis has been reported so far. Their relationship with conventional Gγ subunits and taxonomical distribution has not been yet demonstrated. After an extensive similarity search through plant genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes we assembled over 200 non-redundant proteins related to the known Gγ subunits. Structural analysis of these sequences revealed that most of them lack the obligatory C-terminal prenylation motif (CaaX). According to their C-terminal structures we classified the plant Gγ subunits into three distinct types. Type A consists of Gγ subunits with a putative prenylation motif. Type B subunits lack a prenylation motif and do not have any cysteine residues in the C-terminal region, while type C subunits contain an extended C-terminal domain highly enriched with cysteines. Comparative analysis of C-terminal domains of the proteins, intron-exon arrangement of the corresponding genes and phylogenetic studies suggested a common origin of all plant Gγ subunits. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that types C and B most probably originated independently from type A ancestors. We speculate on a potential mechanism used by those Gγ subunits lacking isoprenylation motifs to anchor the Gβγ dimer to the plasma membrane and propose a new flexible nomenclature for plant Gγ subunits. Finally, in the light of our new classification, we give a word of caution about the interpretation of Gγ research in Arabidopsis and its generalization to other plant species.

  4. Quantifying the cooperative subunit action in a multimeric membrane receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wongsamitkul, Nisa; Nache, Vasilica; Eick, Thomas; Hummert, Sabine; Schulz, Eckhard; Schmauder, Ralf; Schirmeyer, Jana; Zimmer, Thomas; Benndorf, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In multimeric membrane receptors the cooperative action of the subunits prevents exact knowledge about the operation and the interaction of the individual subunits. We propose a method that permits quantification of ligand binding to and activation effects of the individual binding sites in a multimeric membrane receptor. The power of this method is demonstrated by gaining detailed insight into the subunit action in olfactory cyclic nucleotide-gated CNGA2 ion channels. PMID:26858151

  5. Ballistic transport in InSb Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasco, John Jeffrey; Gill, Stephen; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Mason, Nadya

    We present transport measurements on Josephson junctions consisting of InSb nanowires contacted by Al at various junction lengths. Junction behavior as a function of gate voltage, electric field, and magnetic field is discussed. We show that short junctions behave as 1D quantum wires, exhibiting quantized conductance steps. In addition, we show how Josephson behavior changes as transport evolves from ballistic to diffusive as a function of contact spacing.

  6. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  7. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  8. Intrinsically shunted Josephson junctions for electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogolovskii, M.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Lacquaniti, V.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.

    2017-07-01

    Conventional Josephson metal-insulator-metal devices are inherently underdamped and exhibit hysteretic current-voltage response due to a very high subgap resistance compared to that in the normal state. At the same time, overdamped junctions with single-valued characteristics are needed for most superconducting digital applications. The usual way to overcome the hysteretic behavior is to place an external low-resistance normal-metal shunt in parallel with each junction. Unfortunately, such solution results in a considerable complication of the circuitry design and introduces parasitic inductance through the junction. This paper provides a concise overview of some generic approaches that have been proposed in order to realize internal shunting in Josephson heterostructures with a barrier that itself contains the desired resistive component. The main attention is paid to self-shunted devices with local weak-link transmission probabilities that are so strongly disordered in the interface plane that transmission probabilities are tiny for the main part of the transition region between two super-conducting electrodes, while a small part of the interface is well transparent. We discuss the possibility of realizing a universal bimodal distribution function and emphasize advantages of such junctions that can be considered as a new class of self-shunted Josephson devices promising for practical applications in superconducting electronics operating at 4.2 K.

  9. Gap junctional communication during limb cartilage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Kosher, R A

    1991-03-01

    The onset of cartilage differentiation in the developing limb bud is characterized by a transient cellular condensation process in which prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells become closely apposed to one another prior to initiating cartilage matrix deposition. During this condensation process intimate cell-cell interactions occur which are necessary to trigger chondrogenic differentiation. In the present study, we demonstrate that extensive cell-cell communication via gap junctions as assayed by the intercellular transfer of lucifer yellow dye occurs during condensation and the onset of overt chondrogenesis in high density micromass cultures prepared from the homogeneous population of chondrogenic precursor cells comprising the distal subridge region of stage 25 embryonic chick wing buds. Furthermore, in heterogeneous micromass cultures prepared from the mesodermal cells of whole stage 23/24 limb buds, extensive gap junctional communication is limited to differentiating cartilage cells, while the nonchondrogenic cells of the cultures that are differentiating into the connective tissue lineage exhibit little or no intercellular communication via gap junctions. These results provide a strong incentive for considering and further investigating the possible involvement of cell-cell communication via gap junctions in the regulation of limb cartilage differentiation.

  10. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction presenting after antireflux surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Farshid; Izadpanahi, Mohammad Hossein; Khorrami, Mohammad Hatef; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kia

    2012-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) are two of the most common urologic problems in children that sometimes coexist simultaneously in a patient. However, presentation of UPJO after VUR treatment is rare. We will present two cases and discuss diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the condition. PMID:23210079

  11. Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Recently it has been proposed that dark matter axions from the galactic halo can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass (Beck, 2013). Here we show that the axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson junction environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electrical current manifests itself as an oscillating supercurrent. The linear change of phase associated with this nontrivial solution implies the formal existence of a large magnetic field in a tiny surface area of the weak link region of the junction which makes incoming axions decay into microwave photons. We derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of (110±2) μeV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation.

  12. Limiting process in shallow junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.; Rittner, E.

    1979-01-01

    In extending the violet and nonreflective cell technology to lower resistivities, several processes limiting output power were encountered. The most important was the dark diffusion current due to recombination at the front grid contacts. After removal of this problem by reduction of the silicon metal contact area (to 0.14 percent of the total area), the electric field enhanced junction recombination current J sub r was the main limitation. Alteration of the diffusion profile to reduce the junction field is shown to be an effective means of influencing J sub r. The remaining problems are the bulk recombination in the n+ layer and the surface recombination at the oxide-silicon interface; both of these problems are aggravated by band-narrowing resulting from heavy doping in the diffused layer. Experimental evidence for the main limitations is shown, where increased diffusion temperature is seen to reduce both the influence of the front grid contacts and the junction electric field by increasing the junction depth. The potential for further significant improvement in efficiency appears to be high.

  13. Tight junction, selective permeability, and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Krug, Susanne M; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The tight junction forms a barrier against unlimited paracellular passage but some of the tight junction proteins just do the opposite, they form extracellular channels zigzagging between lateral membranes of neighboring cells. All of these channel-forming proteins and even some of the barrier formers exhibit selectivity, which means that they prefer certain substances over others. All channel formers exhibit at least one of the three types of selectivity: for cations (claudin-2, -10b, -15), for anions (claudin-10a, -17) or for water (claudin-2). Also some, but not all, barrier-forming claudins are charge-selective (claudin-4, -8, -14). Moreover, occludin and tricellulin turned out to be relevant for barrier formation against macromolecule passage. Tight junction proteins are dysregulated or can be genetically defective in numerous diseases, which may lead to three effects: (i) impaired paracellular transport e.g. causing magnesium loss in the kidney, (ii) increased paracellular transport of solutes and water e.g. causing leak-flux diarrhea in the intestine, and (iii) increased permeability to large molecules e.g. unwanted intestinal pathogen uptake fueling inflammatory processes. This review gives an overview on the properties of tight junction proteins featuring selective permeability, and in this context explains how these proteins induce or aggravate diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices.

  15. Two-dimensional bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharekhanlou, Behnaz; Khorasani, Sina; Sarvari, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Recent development in fabrication technology of planar two-dimensional (2D) materials has introduced the possibility of numerous novel applications. Our recent analysis has revealed that by definition of p-n junctions through appropriate patterned doping of 2D semiconductors, ideal exponential I-V characteristics may be expected. However, the theory of 2D junctions turns out to be very different to that of standard bulk junctions. Based on this theory of 2D diodes, we construct for the first time a model to describe 2D bipolar junction transistors (2D-BJTs). We derive the small-signal equivalent model, and estimate the performance of a 2D-BJT device based on graphone as the example material. A current gain of about 138 and maximum threshold frequency of 77 GHz, together with a power-delay product of only 4 fJ per 1 μm lateral width is expected at an operating voltage of 5 V. In addition, we derive the necessary formulae and a new approximate solution for the continuity equation in the 2D configuration, which have been verified against numerical solutions.

  16. All-carbon molecular tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haijun; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard L

    2011-11-30

    This Article explores the idea of using nonmetallic contacts for molecular electronics. Metal-free, all-carbon molecular electronic junctions were fabricated by orienting a layer of organic molecules between two carbon conductors with high yield (>90%) and good reproducibility (rsd of current density at 0.5 V <30%). These all-carbon devices exhibit current density-voltage (J-V) behavior similar to those with metallic Cu top contacts. However, the all-carbon devices display enhanced stability to bias extremes and greatly improved thermal stability. Completed carbon/nitroazobenzene(NAB)/carbon junctions can sustain temperatures up to 300 °C in vacuum for 30 min and can be scanned at ±1 V for at least 1.2 × 10(9) cycles in air at 100 °C without a significant change in J-V characteristics. Furthermore, these all-carbon devices can withstand much higher voltages and current densities than can Cu-containing junctions, which fail upon oxidation and/or electromigration of the copper. The advantages of carbon contacts stem mainly from the strong covalent bonding in the disordered carbon materials, which resists electromigration or penetration into the molecular layer, and provides enhanced stability. These results highlight the significance of nonmetallic contacts for molecular electronics and the potential for integration of all-carbon molecular junctions with conventional microelectronics.

  17. Radiation comb generation with extended Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-09-21

    We propose the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on an extended Josephson junction subject to a time dependent magnetic field. The junction critical current shows known diffraction patterns and determines the position of the critical nodes when it vanishes. When the magnetic flux passes through one of such critical nodes, the superconducting phase must undergo a π-jump to minimize the Josephson energy. Correspondingly, a voltage pulse is generated at the extremes of the junction. Under periodic driving, this allows us to produce a comb-like voltage pulses sequence. In the frequency domain, it is possible to generate up to hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental driving frequency, thus mimicking the frequency comb used in optics and metrology. We discuss several implementations through a rectangular, cylindrical, and annular junction geometries, allowing us to generate different radiation spectra and to produce an output power up to 10 pW at 50 GHz for a driving frequency of 100 MHz.

  18. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  19. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Erik O.; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices. PMID:25553192

  20. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  1. Tuberculous Spondylitis of the Craniovertebral Junction.

    PubMed

    Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Antoniadou, Thekla; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Soultanis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction tuberculosis is rare, accounting for 0.3 to 1% of all tuberculous spondylitis cases. MR imaging is the modality of choice to detect bone involvement, abscess formation and subligamentous spreading of the pus, to differentiate from other lesions affecting the craniovertebral junction, and to determine the efficacy of treatment. Given the fact that surgical treatment of patients with craniovertebral junction tuberculosis has been associated with a high mortality rate ranging up to 10% and recurrence rate ranging up to 20%, conservative is the standard of treatment for most patients. This article presents a patient with craniovertebral junction Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection diagnosed with CT-guided biopsy. A halo vest was applied and antituberculous treatment with rifampicin, isoniazid and ethambutol was initiated. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic; CT of the cervical spine showed healing of the bony lesions. The halo vest was removed and physical therapy was recommended. Antituberculous treatment was continued for a total of 18 months, without any evidence of infection recurrence.

  2. Identification of Junctionally-Transmitted Growth Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    Fig 2b. Fig 2a.. Note junctional plaques (arrows). Fig 2b Western blott of induced (left) and non- induced (right) MDA cells. Arrow indicates 43KD MW...plaques in regions of cell/cell contact (Fig 2a ) and is of the correct molecular size as shown by Western blotting (Fig 2b). We had demonstrated that

  3. The dynamic organic p-n junction.

    PubMed

    Matyba, Piotr; Maturova, Klara; Kemerink, Martijn; Robinson, Nathaniel D; Edman, Ludvig

    2009-08-01

    Static p-n junctions in inorganic semiconductors are exploited in a wide range of today's electronic appliances. Here, we demonstrate the in situ formation of a dynamic p-n junction structure within an organic semiconductor through electrochemistry. Specifically, we use scanning kelvin probe microscopy and optical probing on planar light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) with a mixture of a conjugated polymer and an electrolyte connecting two electrodes separated by 120 microm. We find that a significant portion of the potential drop between the electrodes coincides with the location of a thin and distinct light-emission zone positioned >30 microm away from the negative electrode. These results are relevant in the context of a long-standing scientific debate, as they prove that electrochemical doping can take place in LECs. Moreover, a study on the doping formation and dissipation kinetics provides interesting detail regarding the electronic structure and stability of the dynamic organic p-n junction, which may be useful in future dynamic p-n junction-based devices.

  4. Regulation of Traffic Lights at Road Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutolo, Alfredo; Manzo, Rosanna; Rarità, Luigi

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we aim to investigate the effects of traffic lights regulation at road junctions, modelled by a fluid dynamic approach. Numerical simulations prove that it is possible to plan some optimization strategies for green and red phases for networks consisting of more nodes.

  5. Tricellular junctions: how to build junctions at the TRICkiest points of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Tomohito; Miller, Ann L.

    2017-01-01

    Tricellular contacts are the places where three cells meet. In vertebrate epithelial cells, specialized structures called tricellular tight junctions (tTJs) and tricellular adherens junctions (tAJs) have been identified. tTJs are important for the maintenance of barrier function, and disruption of tTJ proteins contributes to familial deafness. tAJs have recently been attracting the attention of mechanobiologists because these sites are hot spots of epithelial tension. Although the molecular components, regulation, and function of tTJs and tAJs, as well as of invertebrate tricellular junctions, are beginning to be characterized, many questions remain. Here we broadly cover what is known about tricellular junctions, propose a new model for tension transmission at tAJs, and discuss key open questions. PMID:28705832

  6. A study of the oligomeric state of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-preferring glutamate receptors in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T Y; Liu, C I; Chang, Y C

    1996-01-01

    The number of the subunits in an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-preferring L-glutamate receptor in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain was investigated in this study. Upon incubation of the synaptic junctions with three cross-linking regents, dimethyl adipimidate (DMA), dimethyl suberimidate (DMS) and N-succinimidyl-(4-azidophenyl)-1,3'-dithiopropionate (SADP), AMPA receptor subunits in higher-molecular-mass aggregates were detected by immunoblotting. These aggregates migrated as proteins of approx. 200, 300 and 400 kDa. The number and identity of the subunits in a solubilized AMPA receptor were also investigated here. Two samples, W1 and W2, enriched in AMPA receptors were prepared from synaptic junctions by a combination of detergent-solubilization, anion-exchange chromatography and wheatgerm agglutinin affinity chromatography. Hydrodynamic behaviour analyses revealed that the majority of the AMPA receptors in either one of these samples were asymmetrical detergent-surrounded particles with a protein mass around 350 kDa. SDS/PAGE analysis revealed that the majority of AMPA receptors in the W1 sample were comprised of dimers of 106 kDa subunits which were covalently linked by disulphide bonds. Cross-linking these receptors with SADP yielded a new band of approx. 400 kDa. The results obtained here, either from the studies of AMPA receptors embedding in synaptic junctions or from those of detergent-solubilized and partially purified receptors, suggest that AMPA receptors contain a basic core structure comprising of four 106 kDa subunits. PMID:8920974

  7. Genetic analysis of neuronal ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Granger, Adam J; Gray, John A; Lu, Wei; Nicoll, Roger A

    2011-09-01

    In the brain, fast, excitatory synaptic transmission occurs primarily through AMPA- and NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors are composed of subunit proteins that determine their biophysical properties and trafficking behaviour. Therefore, determining the function of these subunits and receptor subunit composition is essential for understanding the physiological properties of synaptic transmission. Here, we discuss and evaluate various genetic approaches that have been used to study AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits. These approaches have demonstrated that the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is required for activity-dependent trafficking and contributes to basal synaptic transmission, while the GluA2 subunit regulates Ca(2+) permeability, homeostasis and trafficking to the synapse under basal conditions. In contrast, the GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits regulate synaptic AMPA receptor content, both during synaptic development and plasticity. Ongoing research in this field is focusing on the molecular interactions and mechanisms that control these functions. To accomplish this, molecular replacement techniques are being used, where native subunits are replaced with receptors containing targeted mutations. In this review, we discuss a single-cell molecular replacement approach which should arguably advance our physiological understanding of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, but is generally applicable to study of any neuronal protein.

  8. Expression of GABA receptor rho subunits in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Boue-Grabot, E; Roudbaraki, M; Bascles, L; Tramu, G; Bloch, B; Garret, M

    1998-03-01

    The GABA receptor rho1, rho2, and rho3 subunits are expressed in the retina where they form bicuculline-insensitive GABA(C) receptors. We used northern blot, in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR analysis to study the expression of rho subunits in rat brains. In situ hybridization allowed us to detect rho-subunit expression in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the cerebellar Purkinje cells. RT-PCR experiments indicated that (a) in retina and in domains that may contain functional GABA(C) receptors, rho2 and rho1 subunits are expressed at similar levels; and (b) in domains and in tissues that are unlikely to contain GABA(C) receptors, rho2 mRNA is enriched relative to rho1 mRNA. These results suggest that both rho1 and rho2 subunits are necessary to form a functional GABA(C) receptor. The use of RT-PCR also showed that, except in the superior colliculus, rho3 is expressed along with rho1 and rho2 subunits. We also raised an antibody against a peptide sequence unique to the rho1 subunit. The use of this antibody on cerebellum revealed the rat rho1 subunit in the soma and dendrites of Purkinje neurons. The allocation of GABA(C) receptor subunits to identified neurons paves the way for future electrophysiological studies.

  9. Single molecule junction conductance and binding geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetska, Maria

    This Thesis addresses the fundamental problem of controlling transport through a metal-organic interface by studying electronic and mechanical properties of single organic molecule-metal junctions. Using a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) we image, probe energy-level alignment and perform STM-based break junction (BJ) measurements on molecules bound to a gold surface. Using Scanning Tunneling Microscope-based break-junction (STM-BJ) techniques, we explore the effect of binding geometry on single-molecule conductance by varying the structure of the molecules, metal-molecule binding chemistry and by applying sub-nanometer manipulation control to the junction. These experiments are performed both in ambient conditions and in ultra high vacuum (UHV) at cryogenic temperatures. First, using STM imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements we explore binding configurations and electronic properties of an amine-terminated benzene derivative on gold. We find that details of metal-molecule binding affect energy-level alignment at the interface. Next, using the STM-BJ technique, we form and rupture metal-molecule-metal junctions ˜104 times to obtain conductance-vs-extension curves and extract most likely conductance values for each molecule. With these measurements, we demonstrated that the control of junction conductance is possible through a choice of metal-molecule binding chemistry and sub-nanometer positioning. First, we show that molecules terminated with amines, sulfides and phosphines bind selectively on gold and therefore demonstrate constant conductance levels even as the junction is elongated and the metal-molecule attachment point is modified. Such well-defined conductance is also obtained with paracyclophane molecules which bind to gold directly through the pi system. Next, we are able to create metal-molecule-metal junctions with more than one reproducible conductance signatures that can be accessed by changing junction geometry. In the

  10. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  11. Variety of horizontal cell gap junctions in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jiook; Kim, Hong-Lim; Pan, Feng; Chun, Myung-Hoon; Massey, Stephen C; Kim, In-Beom

    2012-02-29

    In the rabbit retina, there are two types of horizontal cell (HC). The axonless A-type HCs form a coupled network via connexin 50 (Cx50) gap junctions in the outer plexiform layer (OPL). The axon-bearing B-type HCs form two independently coupled networks; the dendritic network via gap junctions consisted of unknown Cx and the axon terminal network via Cx57. The present study was conducted to examine the localization and morphological features of Cx50 and Cx57 gap junctions in rabbit HCs at cellular and subcellular levels. The results showed that each gap junction composed of Cx50 or Cx57 showed distinct features. The larger Cx50 gap junctions were located more proximally than the smaller Cx50 gap junctions. Both Cx50 plaques formed symmetrical homotypic gap junctions, but some small ones had an asymmetrical appearance, suggesting the presence of heterotypic gap junctions or hemichannels. In contrast, Cx57 gap junctions were found in the more distal part of the OPL but never on the axon terminal endings entering the rod spherules, and they were exclusively homotypic. Interestingly, about half of the Cx57 gap junctions appeared to be invaginated. These distinct features of Cx50 and Cx57 gap junctions show the variety of HC gap junctions and may provide insights into the function of different types of HCs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  13. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  14. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  15. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  16. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  18. COEXISTENCE OF GAP AND SEPTATE JUNCTIONS IN AN INVERTEBRATE EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Hudspeth, A. J.; Revel, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The intercellular junctions of the epithelium lining the hepatic caecum of Daphnia were examined. Electron microscope investigations involved both conventionally fixed material and tissue exposed to a lanthanum tracer of the extracellular space. Both septate junctions and gap junctions occur between the cells studied. The septate junctions lie apically and resemble those commonly discerned between cells of other invertebrates. They are atypical in that the high electron opacity of the extracellular space obscures septa in routine preparations. The gap junctions are characterized by a uniform 30 A space between apposed cell membranes. Lanthanum treatment of gap junctions reveals an array of particles of 95 A diameter and 120 A separation lying in the plane of the junction. As this pattern closely resembles that described previously in vertebrates, it appears that the gap junction is phylogenetically widespread. In view of evidence that the gap junction mediates intercellular electrotonic coupling, the assignment of a coupling role to other junctions, notably the septate junction, must be questioned wherever these junctions coexist. PMID:5563454

  19. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  20. Inverted Three-Junction Tandem Thermophotovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An InGaAs-based three-junction (3J) tandem thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell has been investigated to utilize more of the blackbody spectrum (from a 1,100 C general purpose heat source GPHS) efficiently. The tandem consists of three vertically stacked subcells, a 0.74-eV InGaAs cell, a 0.6- eV InGaAs cell, and a 0.55-eV InGaAs cell, as well as two interconnecting tunnel junctions. A greater than 20% TPV system efficiency was achieved by another group with a 1,040 C blackbody using a single-bandgap 0.6- eV InGaAs cell MIM (monolithic interconnected module) (30 lateral junctions) that delivered about 12 V/30 or 0.4 V/junction. It is expected that a three-bandgap tandem MIM will eventually have about 3 this voltage (1.15 V) and about half the current. A 4 A/cm2 would be generated by a single-bandgap 0.6-V InGaAs MIM, as opposed to the 2 A/cm2 available from the same spectrum when split among the three series-connected junctions in the tandem stack. This would then be about a 50% increase (3xVoc, 0.5xIsc) in output power if the proposed tandem replaced the single- bandgap MIM. The advantage of the innovation, if successful, would be a 50% increase in power conversion efficiency from radioisotope heat sources using existing thermophotovoltaics. Up to 50% more power would be generated for radioisotope GPHS deep space missions. This type of InGaAs multijunction stack could be used with terrestrial concentrator solar cells to increase efficiency from 41 to 45% or more.

  1. Graphene junction field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Tzu-Min; Borsa, Tomoko; van Zeghbroeck, Bart

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time a novel graphene transistor gated by a graphene/semiconductor junction rather than an insulating gate. The transistor operates much like a semiconductor junction Field Effect Transistor (jFET) where the depletion layer charge in the semiconductor modulates the mobile charge in the channel. The channel in our case is the graphene rather than another semiconductor layer. An increased reverse bias of the graphene/n-silicon junction increases the positive charge in the depletion region and thereby reduces the total charge in the graphene. We fabricated individual graphene/silicon junctions as well as graphene jFETs (GjFETs) on n-type (4.5x1015 cm-3) silicon with Cr/Au electrodes and 3 μm gate length. As a control device, we also fabricated back-gated graphene MOSFETs using a 90nm SiO2 on a p-type silicon substrate (1019 cm-3) . The graphene was grown by APCVD on copper foil and transferred with PMMA onto the silicon substrate. The GjFET exhibited an on-off ratio of 3.75, an intrinsic graphene doping of 1.75x1012 cm-2, compared to 1.17x1013 cm-2 in the MOSFET, and reached the Dirac point at 13.5V. Characteristics of the junctions and transistors were measured as a function of temperature and in response to light. Experimental data and a comparison with simulations will be presented.

  2. Model building to facilitate understanding of holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-07-08

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and computer-animated video, we included a model building activity using pipe cleaners. Biotechnology undergraduates (n = 108) used the model to simulate Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. Based on student perception, an average of 12.85 and 78.35% students claimed that they completely and partially understood the two concepts, respectively. A test conducted to ascertain their understanding about the two concepts showed that 66.1% of the students provided the correct response to the three multiple choice questions. A majority of the 108 students attributed the inclusion of model building to their better understanding of Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. This underlines the importance of incorporating model building, particularly in concepts that require spatial visualization. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):381-390, 2016.

  3. Simulations of chaos generation from Josephson junctions with various junction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiwatashi, R.; Tamura, Y.; Shimakage, H.

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that voltage waveforms between electrodes of Josephson junctions under irradiation of a microwave behave chaos characteristics under appropriate conditions. In order to apply the chaos to a random number generator, we have been studying Josephson chaos by simulations. In the simulation, the Josephson junction is assumed to fabricate with YBCO materials. We used a RCSJ model in order to present an equivalent circuit of the Josephson junction, and derived a derivative equation. Lyapunov exponents, which determined if the state of the Josephson junction was chaotic or not, were calculated from time evolutions of voltages obtained from the equation. In the simulation, junction parameters were assigned feasible values for an actual YBCO Josephson junctions. As a result, we found that chaos can be generated by adjusting element parameters. Moreover, we found that there were lower limits in the resistance values for generation of chaos. In addition, we found that frequency margins, at which the chaos was obtained, were broadened by decrease of the resistance and increase of capacitance.

  4. Myosin-dependent remodeling of adherens junctions protects junctions from Snail-dependent disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Although Snail is essential for disassembly of adherens junctions during epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), loss of adherens junctions in Drosophila melanogaster gastrula is delayed until mesoderm is internalized, despite the early expression of Snail in that primordium. By combining live imaging and quantitative image analysis, we track the behavior of E-cadherin–rich junction clusters, demonstrating that in the early stages of gastrulation most subapical clusters in mesoderm not only persist, but move apically and enhance in density and total intensity. All three phenomena depend on myosin II and are temporally correlated with the pulses of actomyosin accumulation that drive initial cell shape changes during gastrulation. When contractile myosin is absent, the normal Snail expression in mesoderm, or ectopic Snail expression in ectoderm, is sufficient to drive early disassembly of junctions. In both cases, junctional disassembly can be blocked by simultaneous induction of myosin contractility. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for mechanosensitivity of cell–cell junctions and imply that myosin-mediated tension can prevent Snail-driven EMT. PMID:26754645

  5. Rubisco small subunit gene family in cassava.

    PubMed

    Yeo, T W; Mak, Y M; Ho, K K

    1999-01-01

    Cassava leaves of two different cultivars, Brazil and Buloh, were used to isolate mRNA. The mRNA isolated was successfully used in the construction of cDNA libraries for each of the cultivars. The cDNA libraries were screened for members of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit gene family and positive clones were sequenced. A total of seven different SSU genes, of which five were from cultivar Brazil and two were from cultivar Buloh, were isolated. Comparison results show that even though all the sequences are highly similar, they can be classified into three subfamilies. Homology between members of the same subfamily is higher than homology between members from the same cultivar.

  6. Alkaline-extracted influenza subunit vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, E A

    1976-01-01

    Treatment of influenza virus concentrates with alkaline solvents releases a major fraction of the viral structural protein content. As determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the surface glycoprotein substructures, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, are the primary solubilized products. Two forms of hemagglutinin antigen are recovered, a 39S active hemagglutinin and a 23S blocking antigen. Dose-response assays in mice demonstrate that hemagglutination-inhibiting and neuraminidase antibodies are induced. Antibody responses are comparable to those resulting from immunization with inactivated whole virus. On the basis of demonstrated purity, high yields of protective antigens, immunogenic potency, and absence of deleterious reagents, alkaline-extracted influenza protein preparations merit consideration as subunit vaccines for human use. PMID:826484

  7. Compilation of small ribosomal subunit RNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Neefs, J M; Van de Peer, Y; De Rijk, P; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1993-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contained 1804 nucleotide sequences on April 23, 1993. This number comprises 365 eukaryotic, 65 archaeal, 1260 bacterial, 30 plastidial, and 84 mitochondrial sequences. These are stored in the form of an alignment in order to facilitate the use of the database as input for comparative studies on higher-order structure and for reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. The elements of the postulated secondary structure for each molecule are indicated by special symbols. The database is available on-line directly from the authors by ftp and can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library by electronic mail, ftp, and on CD ROM disk. PMID:8332525

  8. Subunit vaccine efficacy against Botulinum neurotoxin subtypes.

    PubMed

    Henkel, James S; Tepp, William H; Przedpelski, Amanda; Fritz, Robert B; Johnson, Eric A; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2011-10-13

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are classified into 7 serotypes (A-G) based upon neutralization by serotype-specific anti-sera. Several recombinant serotype-specific subunit BoNT vaccines have been developed, including a subunit vaccine comprising the receptor binding domain (HCR) of the BoNTs. Sequencing of the genes encoding BoNTs has identified variants (subtypes) that possess up to 32% primary amino acid variation among different BoNT serotypes. Studies were conducted to characterize the ability of the HCR of BoNT/A to protect against challenge by heterologous BoNT/A subtypes (A1-A3). High dose vaccination with HCR/A subtypes A1-A4 protected mice from challenge by heterologous BoNT/A subtype A1-A3, while low dose HCR vaccination yielded partial protection to heterologous BoNT/A subtype challenge. Absolute IgG titers to HCRs correlated to the dose of HCR used for vaccination, where HCR/A1 elicited an A1 subtype-specific IgG response, which was not observed with HCR/A2 vaccination. Survival of mice challenged to heterologous BoNT/A2 following low dose HCR/A1 vaccination correlated with elevated IgG titers directed to the denatured C-terminal sub-domain of HCR/A2, while survival of mice to heterologous BoNT/A1 following low dose HCR/A2 vaccination correlated to elevated IgG titers directed to native HCRc/A1. This implies that low dose vaccinations with HCR/A subtypes elicit unique IgG responses, and provides a basis to define how the host develops a neutralizing immune response to BoNT intoxication. These results may provide a reference for the development of pan-BoNT vaccines.

  9. Loss of β2-laminin alters calcium sensitivity and voltage-gated calcium channel maturation of neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Chand, Kirat K; Lee, Kah Meng; Schenning, Mitja P; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Noakes, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular junctions from β2-laminin-deficient mice exhibit lower levels of calcium sensitivity. Loss of β2-laminin leads to a failure in switching from N- to P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC)-mediated transmitter release that normally occurs with neuromuscular junction maturation. The motor nerve terminals from β2-laminin-deficient mice fail to up-regulate the expression of P/Q-type VGCCs clusters and down-regulate N-type VGCCs clusters, as they mature. There is decreased co-localisation of presynaptic specialisations in β2-laminin-deficient neuromuscular junctions as a consequence of lesser P/Q-type VGCC expression. These findings support the idea that β2-laminin is critical in the organisation and maintenance of active zones at the neuromuscular junction via its interaction with P/Q-type VGCCs, which aid in stabilisation of the synapse. β2-laminin is a key mediator in the differentiation and formation of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. Loss of β2-laminin results in significant structural and functional aberrations such as decreased number of active zones and reduced spontaneous release of transmitter. In vitro β2-laminin has been shown to bind directly to the pore forming subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Neurotransmission is initially mediated by N-type VGCCs, but by postnatal day 18 switches to P/Q-type VGCC dominance. The present study investigated the changes in neurotransmission during the switch from N- to P/Q-type VGCC-mediated transmitter release at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Analysis of the relationship between quantal content and extracellular calcium concentrations demonstrated a decrease in the calcium sensitivity, but no change in calcium dependence at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Electrophysiological studies on VGCC sub-types involved in transmitter release indicate N-type VGCCs remain the primary mediator of transmitter release at matured β2-laminin-deficient junctions

  10. Dynamic regulation of β1 subunit trafficking controls vascular contractility.

    PubMed

    Leo, M Dennis; Bannister, John P; Narayanan, Damodaran; Nair, Anitha; Grubbs, Jordan E; Gabrick, Kyle S; Boop, Frederick A; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-02-11

    Ion channels composed of pore-forming and auxiliary subunits control physiological functions in virtually all cell types. A conventional view is that channels assemble with their auxiliary subunits before anterograde plasma membrane trafficking of the protein complex. Whether the multisubunit composition of surface channels is fixed following protein synthesis or flexible and open to acute and, potentially, rapid modulation to control activity and cellular excitability is unclear. Arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes) express large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channel α and auxiliary β1 subunits that are functionally significant modulators of arterial contractility. Here, we show that native BKα subunits are primarily (∼95%) plasma membrane-localized in human and rat arterial myocytes. In contrast, only a small fraction (∼10%) of total β1 subunits are located at the cell surface. Immunofluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy demonstrated that intracellular β1 subunits are stored within Rab11A-postive recycling endosomes. Nitric oxide (NO), acting via cGMP-dependent protein kinase, and cAMP-dependent pathways stimulated rapid (≤1 min) anterograde trafficking of β1 subunit-containing recycling endosomes, which increased surface β1 almost threefold. These β1 subunits associated with surface-resident BKα proteins, elevating channel Ca(2+) sensitivity and activity. Our data also show that rapid β1 subunit anterograde trafficking is the primary mechanism by which NO activates myocyte BK channels and induces vasodilation. In summary, we show that rapid β1 subunit surface trafficking controls functional BK channel activity in arterial myocytes and vascular contractility. Conceivably, regulated auxiliary subunit trafficking may control ion channel activity in a wide variety of cell types.

  11. Structure of a Holliday junction complex reveals mechanisms governing a highly regulated DNA transaction

    PubMed Central

    Laxmikanthan, Gurunathan; Xu, Chen; Brilot, Axel F; Warren, David; Steele, Lindsay; Seah, Nicole; Tong, Wenjun; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Landy, Arthur; Van Duyne, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The molecular machinery responsible for DNA expression, recombination, and compaction has been difficult to visualize as functionally complete entities due to their combinatorial and structural complexity. We report here the structure of the intact functional assembly responsible for regulating and executing a site-specific DNA recombination reaction. The assembly is a 240-bp Holliday junction (HJ) bound specifically by 11 protein subunits. This higher-order complex is a key intermediate in the tightly regulated pathway for the excision of bacteriophage λ viral DNA out of the E. coli host chromosome, an extensively studied paradigmatic model system for the regulated rearrangement of DNA. Our results provide a structural basis for pre-existing data describing the excisive and integrative recombination pathways, and they help explain their regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14313.001 PMID:27223329

  12. Alpha v integrin subunit is predominantly located in nervous tissue and skeletal muscle during mouse development.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, E; Gullberg, D; Balzac, F; Altruda, F; Silengo, L; Tarone, G

    1994-10-01

    Alpha v integrin subunit can dimerize with different beta subunits to form receptors for several matrix proteins. The function of these receptors in vivo is still largely unknown. We examined the localization of alpha v integrin during mouse development and showed that its distribution is dynamically regulated in the glia of the central nervous system and in skeletal muscle. Immunoreactivity in the neural tube was firstly localized at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) around cell bodies lining the lumen and along tiny fibres extending towards the outer margin. At E12.5 alpha v distribution follows the highly defined pattern of the radial glia: fascicles of immunoreactive fibres form parallel palisades, in particular along the hindbrain and the spinal cord. At E15.5, although with weaker intensity, alpha v was still detectable in radial glia fibres, and it codistributed with glial fibrillary acidic protein positive fascicles. After birth (P8) alpha v immunoreactivity in the brain and spinal cord decreased dramatically, but remained high in the radial glia of the cerebellum. In adult mice alpha v reactivity in the central nervous system disappeared. During myogenesis alpha v appears at E10.5 in myotomal cells and from E12.5 alpha v was evident in myoblasts and in myotubes. In the developing skeletal muscle of E15.5 embryos, immunoreactivity became more concentrated in the apical portion of the myotubes. In adult striated muscle the amount of alpha v subunit dramatically declined and immunostaining was no longer detectable. During development, alpha v was weakly evident in other sites including heart and endothelia of blood vessels, mesonephric tubula, smooth muscle of the digestive tract, and bronchia. Comparative analysis of the localization of alpha v, alpha 3, and alpha 5 integrin subunits indicated that alpha v has a unique and highly regulated distribution pattern. The distribution in the nervous system is consistent with a role of alpha v in neuron-glia interaction

  13. Differential pathways of claudin oligomerization and integration into tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Koval, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Tight junctions are the critical intercellular structure required to establish an epithelial barrier. Among the several classes of proteins required to form tight junctions are the tetraspan transmembrane proteins known as claudins that directly determine paracellular permeability. Considerable progress has been made in understanding how incorporation of different claudins into tight junctions increase or decrease paracellular permeability and ion selectivity. However, it has proven difficult to identify discrete steps in claudin assembly and whether claudins exist in distinct oligomerization states prior to tight junction assembly. Studies of homomeric and heteromeric claudin-claudin interactions using complementary techniques suggest a diversity of pathways used by different claudins to oligomerize and integrate into tight junctions.

  14. Delayed pulses from high-transparency Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Songtao; Mancini, C. A.; Feldman, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    Calculations of the shape and the timing of single-magnetic-flux quanta (SFQs) generated by high-current-density "self-shunted" Josephson junctions are presented. The junction current is assumed to be due in part to multiple Andreev reflections within the high-transparency barrier. The SFQ pulses from these junctions show several differences when compared to those from lower-current-density resistively shunted Josephson junctions, the most important being that the pulses are significantly delayed in the self-shunted junctions, by as much as many times the pulse width.

  15. Structure of the archaeal Cascade subunit Csa5: relating the small subunits of CRISPR effector complexes.

    PubMed

    Reeks, Judith; Graham, Shirley; Anderson, Linzi; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F; Naismith, James H

    2013-05-01

    The Cascade complex for CRISPR-mediated antiviral immunity uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target invading DNA species from mobile elements such as viruses, leading to their destruction. The core of the Cascade effector complex consists of the Cas5 and Cas7 subunits, which are widely conserved in prokaryotes. Cas7 binds crRNA and forms the helical backbone of Cascade. Many archaea encode a version of the Cascade complex (denoted Type I-A) that includes a Csa5 (or small) subunit, which interacts weakly with the core proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Csa5 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Csa5 comprises a conserved α-helical domain with a small insertion consisting of a weakly conserved β-strand domain. In the crystal, the Csa5 monomers have multimerized into infinite helical threads. At each interface is a strictly conserved intersubunit salt bridge, deletion of which disrupts multimerization. Structural analysis indicates a shared evolutionary history among the small subunits of the CRISPR effector complexes. The same α-helical domain is found in the C-terminal domain of Cse2 (from Type I-E Cascade), while the N-terminal domain of Cse2 is found in Cmr5 of the CMR (Type III-B) effector complex. As Cmr5 shares no match with Csa5, two possibilities present themselves: selective domain loss from an ancestral Cse2 to create two new subfamilies or domain fusion of two separate families to create a new Cse2 family. A definitive answer awaits structural studies of further small subunits from other CRISPR effector complexes.

  16. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    PubMed Central

    Tandrup Schmidt, Signe; Foged, Camilla; Smith Korsholm, Karen; Rades, Thomas; Christensen, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR

  17. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators.

    PubMed

    Tandrup Schmidt, Signe; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Rades, Thomas; Christensen, Dennis

    2016-03-10

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR

  18. Role of heteromeric gap junctions in the cytotoxicity of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xuhui; Dong, Shuying; Yu, Meiling; Wang, Qin; Tao, Liang

    2013-08-09

    In several systems, the presence of gap junctions made of a single connexin has been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. However, most gap junction channels in vivo appear to be heteromeric (composed of more than one connexin isoform). Here we explore in HeLa cells the cytotoxicity to cisplatin that is enhanced by heteromeric gap junctions composed of Cx26 and Cx32, which have been shown to be more selective among biological permeants than the corresponding homomeric channels. We found that survival and subsequent proliferation of cells exposed to cisplatin were substantially reduced when gap junctions were present than when there were no gap junctions. Functional inhibition of gap junctions by oleamide enhanced survival/proliferation, and enhancement of gap junctions by retinoic acid decreased survival/proliferation. These effects occurred only in high density cultures, and the treatments were without effect when there was no opportunity for gap junction formation. The presence of functional gap junctions enhanced apoptosis as reflected in markers of both early-stage and late-stage apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of caspases 3, 8 and 9 showed that functional gap junctions specifically induced apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway. These results demonstrate that heteromeric Cx26/Cx32 gap junctions increase the cytotoxicity of cisplatin by induction of apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gap junctional conductance and permeability are linearly related.

    PubMed

    Verselis, V; White, R L; Spray, D C; Bennett, M V

    1986-10-24

    The permeability of gap junctions to tetraethylammonium ions was measured in isolated pairs of blastomeres from Rana pipiens L. and compared to the junctional conductance. In this system, the junctional conductance is voltage-dependent and decreases with moderate transjunctional voltage of either sign. The permeability to tetraethylammonium ions was determined by injecting one cell of a pair with tetraethylammonium and monitoring its changing concentration in the prejunctional and postjunctional cells with ion-selective electrodes. Junctional conductance was determined by current-clamp and voltage-clamp techniques. For different cell pairs in which the transjunctional voltage was small and the junctional conductance at its maximum value, the permeability to tetraethylammonium ions was proportional to the junctional conductance. In individual cell pairs, a reduction in the junctional conductance induced by voltage was accompanied by a proportional reduction in the permeability of the gap junction over a wide range. The diameter of the tetraethylammonium ion (8.0 to 8.5 A, unhydrated) is larger than that of the potassium ion (4.6 A, hydrated), the predominant current-carrying species. The proportionality between the permeability to tetraethylammonium ions and the junctional conductance, measured here with exceptionally fine time resolution, indicates that a common gap junctional pathway mediates both electrical and chemical fluxes between cells, and that closure of single gap junction channels by voltage is all or none.

  20. Epitopes from two soybean glycinin subunits antigenic in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Glycinin is a seed storage protein in soybean (Glycine max) that is allergenic in pigs. Glycinin is a hexamer composed of subunits consisting of a basic and acidic portion joined by disulfide bridges. There are 5 glycinin subunits designated Gy1-Gy5. Results: Twenty seven out of 30 pi...

  1. Proteopedia Entry: The Large Ribosomal Subunit of "Haloarcula Marismortui"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decatur, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a "Proteopedia" page that shows the refined version of the structure of the "Haloarcula" large ribosomal subunit as solved by the laboratories of Thomas Steitz and Peter Moore. The landmark structure is of great impact as it is the first atomic-resolution structure of the highly conserved ribosomal subunit which harbors…

  2. Proteopedia Entry: The Large Ribosomal Subunit of "Haloarcula Marismortui"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decatur, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a "Proteopedia" page that shows the refined version of the structure of the "Haloarcula" large ribosomal subunit as solved by the laboratories of Thomas Steitz and Peter Moore. The landmark structure is of great impact as it is the first atomic-resolution structure of the highly conserved ribosomal subunit which harbors…

  3. Specific Roles of NMDA Receptor Subunits in Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, H.; Hagino, Y.; Kasai, S.; Ikeda, K.

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays important roles in learning and memory. NMDA receptors are a tetramer that consists of two glycine-binding subunits GluN1, two glutamate-binding subunits (i.e., GluN2A, GluN2B, GluN2C, and GluN2D), a combination of a GluN2 subunit and glycine-binding GluN3 subunit (i.e., GluN3A or GluN3B), or two GluN3 subunits. Recent studies revealed that the specific expression and distribution of each subunit are deeply involved in neural excitability, plasticity, and synaptic deficits. The present article summarizes reports on the dysfunction of NMDA receptors and responsible subunits in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, autoimmune-induced glutamatergic receptor dysfunction, mood disorders, and autism. A key role for the GluN2D subunit in NMDA receptor antagonist-induced psychosis has been recently revealed. PMID:25817860

  4. The Development and Institutionalization of Subunit Power in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeker, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Examines the effects of founding events on the evolution of subunit importance in the semiconductor industry from 1958 to 1985. Distributions of power and subunit importance represent not only influences of current conditions, but also vestiges of earlier events, including the institution's founding. Includes 55 references. (MLH)

  5. Junction conditions for F (T ) gravity from a variational principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velay-Vitow, Jesse; DeBenedictis, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    We derive a general set of acceptable junction conditions for F (T ) gravity via the variational principle. The analysis is valid for both the traditional form of F (T ) gravity theory as well as the more recently introduced Lorentz covariant theory of Krššák and Saridakis. We find that the general junction conditions derived, when applied to simple cases such as highly symmetric static or time dependent geometries (such as spherical symmetry), imply both the Synge junction conditions as well as the Israel-Sen-Lanczos-Darmois junction conditions of general relativity. In more complicated scenarios the junction conditions derived do not generally imply the well-known junction conditions of general relativity. However, the junction conditions of de la Cruz-Dombriz et al. make up an interesting subset of this more general case.

  6. Cell Junctions in the Specialized Conduction System of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Mezzano, Valeria; Pellman, Jason; Sheikh, Farah

    2015-01-01

    Anchoring cell junctions are integral in maintaining electro-mechanical coupling of ventricular ‘working’ cardiomyocytes; however, their role in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system (CCS) remains less clear. Recent studies in genetic mouse models and humans highlight the appearance of these cell junctions alongside gap junctions in the CCS and also show that defects in these structures and their components are associated with conduction impairments in the CCS. Here we outline current evidence supporting an integral relationship between anchoring and gap junctions in the CCS. Specifically we focus on (1) molecular and ultrastructural evidence for cell-cell junctions in specialized cardiomyocytes of the CCS, (2) genetic mouse models specifically targeting cell-cell junction components in the heart which exhibit CCS conduction defects and (3) human clinical studies from patients with cell-cell junction-based diseases that exhibit CCS electrophysiological defects. PMID:24738884

  7. Loss of β2-laminin alters calcium sensitivity and voltage-gated calcium channel maturation of neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Kirat K; Lee, Kah Meng; Schenning, Mitja P; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Noakes, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    β2-laminin is a key mediator in the differentiation and formation of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. Loss of β2-laminin results in significant structural and functional aberrations such as decreased number of active zones and reduced spontaneous release of transmitter. In vitro β2-laminin has been shown to bind directly to the pore forming subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Neurotransmission is initially mediated by N-type VGCCs, but by postnatal day 18 switches to P/Q-type VGCC dominance. The present study investigated the changes in neurotransmission during the switch from N- to P/Q-type VGCC-mediated transmitter release at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Analysis of the relationship between quantal content and extracellular calcium concentrations demonstrated a decrease in the calcium sensitivity, but no change in calcium dependence at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Electrophysiological studies on VGCC sub-types involved in transmitter release indicate N-type VGCCs remain the primary mediator of transmitter release at matured β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Immunohistochemical analyses displayed irregularly shaped and immature β2-laminin-deficient neuromuscular junctions when compared to matured wild-type junctions. β2-laminin-deficient junctions also maintained the presence of N-type VGCC clustering within the presynaptic membrane, which supported the functional findings of the present study. We conclude that β2-laminin is a key regulator in development of the NMJ, with its loss resulting in reduced transmitter release due to decreased calcium sensitivity stemming from a failure to switch from N- to P/Q-type VGCC-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:25556799

  8. Mutational analysis of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The structural elements required for normal maturation and assembly of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were investigated by expression of mutated subunits in transfected fibroblasts. Normally, the wild-type alpha subunit acquires high affinity alpha bungarotoxin binding in a time-dependent manner; however, mutation of the 128 and/or 142 cysteines to either serine or alanine, as well as deletion of the entire 14 amino acids in this region abolished all detectable high affinity binding. Nonglycosylated subunits that had a serine to glycine mutation in the consensus sequence also did not efficiently attain high affinity binding to toxin. In contrast, mutation of the proline at position 136 to glycine or alanine, or a double mutation of the cysteines at position 192 and 193 to serines had no effect on the acquisition of high affinity toxin binding. These data suggest that a disulfide bridge between cysteines 128 and 142 and oligosaccharide addition at asparagine 141 are required for the normal maturation of alpha subunit as assayed by high affinity toxin binding. The unassembled wild-type alpha subunit expressed in fibroblasts is normally degraded with a t1/2 of 2 h; upon assembly with the delta subunit, the degradation rate slows significantly (t1/2 greater than 13 h). All mutated alpha subunits retained the capacity to assemble with a delta subunit coexpressed in fibroblasts; however, mutated alpha subunits that were not glycosylated or did not acquire high affinity toxin binding were rapidly degraded (t1/2 = 20 min to 2 h) regardless of whether or not they assembled with the delta subunit. Assembly and rapid degradation of nonglycosylated acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits and subunit complexes were also observed in tunicamycin- treated BC3H-1 cells, a mouse musclelike cell line that normally expresses functional AChR. Hence, rapid degradation may be one form of regulation assuring that only correctly processed and assembled subunits

  9. INTRINSIC REGULATION OF HEMOGLOBIN EXPRESSION BY VARIABLE SUBUNIT INTERFACE STRENGTHS

    PubMed Central

    Manning, James M.; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Padovan, Julio C.; Chait, Brian T.; Manning, Lois R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The expression of the six types of human hemoglobin subunits over time is currently considered to be regulated mainly by transcription factors that bind to upstream control regions of the gene (the “extrinsic” component of regulation). Here we describe how subunit pairing and further assembly to tetramers in the liganded state is influenced by the affinity of subunits for one another (the “intrinsic” component of regulation). The adult hemoglobin dimers have the strongest subunit interfaces and the embryonic hemoglobins are the weakest with fetal hemoglobins of intermediate strength, corresponding to the temporal order of their expression. These variable subunit binding strengths and the attenuating effects of acetylation contribute to the differences with which these hemoglobin types form functional O2-binding tetramers consistent with gene switching. PMID:22129306

  10. [Penicillin acylase from Escherichia coli: catalytically active subunits].

    PubMed

    Kabakov, V E; Kliachko, N L; Levashov, A V

    1995-05-01

    Gel filtration under denaturing conditions was used to isolate the alpha- and beta-subunits of penicillin acylase (PA). Refolded subunits were obtained through removing urea by dialysis. Both renatured subunits were catalytically active during hydrolysis of phenylacetic acid p-nitroanilide; this activity decreased after addition of a serine-specific inhibitor--phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. The subunits were also active in reversed micelles of Aerosol OT (AOT) in octane, the optimum hydration degree being 11.9 and 17.5 for the light (alpha) and heavy (beta) subunits, respectively. The positions of the maxima were consistent with both theoretically calculated optimum hydration degrees and the earlier reported profile of enzymatic activity for native PA in reversed micelles.

  11. Geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Burke, Charles C.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2001-10-16

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit). In another aspect, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit. In yet another aspect, the present invention provides isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase protein comprising an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit protein and an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit protein. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase.

  12. Physiology and Function of the Tight Junction

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James M.; Van Itallie, Christina M.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of tight junctions has evolved from their historical perception as inert solute barriers to recognition of their physiological and biochemical complexity. Many proteins are specifically localized to tight junctions, including cytoplasmic actin-binding proteins and adhesive transmembrane proteins. Among the latter are claudins, which are critical barrier proteins. Current information suggests that the paracellular barrier is most usefully modeled as having two physiologic components: a system of charge-selective small pores, 4 Å in radius, and a second pathway created by larger discontinuities in the barrier, lacking charge or size discrimination. The first pathway is influenced by claudin expression patterns and the second is likely controlled by different proteins and signals. Recent information on claudin function and disease-causing mutations have led to a more complete understanding of their role in barrier formation, but progress is impeded by lack of high resolution structural information. PMID:20066090

  13. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  14. Spontaneous supercurrent induced by ferromagnetic pi junctions.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A; Bentner, J; Aprili, M; Della Rocca, M L; Reinwald, M; Wegscheider, W; Strunk, C

    2004-05-28

    We present magnetization measurements of mesoscopic superconducting niobium loops containing a ferromagnetic (PdNi) pi junction. The loops are prepared on top of the active area of a micro-Hall sensor based on high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. We observe asymmetric switching of the loop between different magnetization states when reversing the sweep direction of the magnetic field. This provides evidence for a spontaneous current induced by the intrinsic phase shift of the pi junction. In addition, the presence of the spontaneous current near zero applied field is directly revealed by an increase of the magnetic moment with decreasing temperature, which results in half integer flux quantization in the loop at low temperatures.

  15. [Paroxysmal junctional reciprocal tachycardia and fetoplacental anasarca].

    PubMed

    Maurier, F; Delisle, G; Guay, M

    1985-02-01

    Foeto-placental anasarca was diagnosed at 34 weeks gestation in a patient with acute hydramnios. Foetal tachycardia at 300 bpm was recorded. This obstetrical problem led to the birth of a premature baby with generalised oedema, for which the only apparent cause was the tachycardia. This was identified as a paroxysmal junctional reciprocating tachycardia, initiating on atrial extrasystolic echos, terminating on R waves, with lengthening of the PR interval at the onset of tachycardia, without acceleration of the sinus rate and P'R = RP'. Paroxysmal junctional reciprocating tachycardia in utero was responsible for congestive cardiac failure and foeto-placental anasarca. The cardiac failure was treated by foetal delivery, artificial respiration and digoxin. The association of digoxin-disopyramide reduces the frequency of attacks of tachycardia and treatment may be stopped after one year's follow-up.

  16. Demonstration of an ac Josephson junction laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, M. C.; Bruno, A.; Rubbert, S.; Irfan, M.; Kammhuber, J.; Schouten, R. N.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting electronic devices have reemerged as contenders for both classical and quantum computing due to their fast operation speeds, low dissipation, and long coherence times. An ultimate demonstration of coherence is lasing. We use one of the fundamental aspects of superconductivity, the ac Josephson effect, to demonstrate a laser made from a Josephson junction strongly coupled to a multimode superconducting cavity. A dc voltage bias applied across the junction provides a source of microwave photons, and the circuit’s nonlinearity allows for efficient down-conversion of higher-order Josephson frequencies to the cavity’s fundamental mode. The simple fabrication and operation allows for easy integration with a range of quantum devices, allowing for efficient on-chip generation of coherent microwave photons at low temperatures.

  17. Novel tunnelling barriers for spin tunnelling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish

    A tunnel junction consists of two metal electrodes separated by an insulating barrier thin enough for electrons to tunnel across. With ferromagnetic electrodes, a spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) effect, electrons of one spin tunnelling preferentially over those of the other, is observed. When the electrodes are switched from a parallel to an anti-parallel alignment, the tunnelling current changes and gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR). Since 1995, interest in SDT junctions has increased as TMR in excess of 15% has been achieved, making viable their use in non-volatile memory and magnetic sensors applications. In this work, two key issues of SDT junctions are addressed: spin polarization of the electrode and the tunnel barrier. Spin polarization, a measure of electron states of up and down spins, is widely believed to be an intrinsic property of the electrode. In junctions with barriers formed by plasma oxidation of composite Ta/Al films, the surprising effect of the resistance being lower with the electrodes aligned antiparallel was observed. Junctions with Ta/Al barriers and those with Al/Ta barriers behave opposite to each other and exhibit an inversion only when the Ta side of the barrier is biased positive. This demonstrates the spin polarization is also influenced by the barrier material. Half-metallic materials such as magnetite (Fe3O4) have a gap in one of the spins' states at the fermi level, thus having a theoretical spin polarization of 100%. In this work, an ultrathin Fe3O 4 layer was added between the Al2O3 barrier and the NiFe electrode. The TMR increased sharply from 4% to 16% for thicknesses less than 0.5nm. As the tunnel barrier must be thinner than 2nm, choice of the barrier material becomes critical. Presently, Al2O3 is the best known barrier. In looking for alternative materials, AlN and AlON were formed by plasma nitridation and oxy-nitridation of deposited Al films. TMR results of up to 18% and resistance-area products down to 3

  18. Laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; Has, Cristina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Laminin 332 is an essential component of the dermal-epidermal junction, a highly specialized basement membrane zone that attaches the epidermis to the dermis and thereby provides skin integrity and resistance to external mechanical forces. Mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes that encode the three constituent polypeptide chains, α3, β3 and γ2, abrogate or perturb the functions of laminin 332. The phenotypic consequences are diminished dermal-epidermal adhesion and, as clinical symptoms, skin fragility and mechanically induced blistering. The disorder is designated as junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). This article delineates the signs and symptoms of the different forms of JEB, the mutational spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlations as well as perspectives for future molecular therapies. PMID:23076207

  19. Magnetoamplification in a bipolar magnetic junction transistor.

    PubMed

    Rangaraju, N; Peters, J A; Wessels, B W

    2010-09-10

    We have demonstrated the first bipolar magnetic junction transistor using a dilute magnetic semiconductor. For an InMnAs p-n-p transistor magnetoamplification is observed at room temperature. The observed magnetoamplification is attributed to the magnetoresistance of the magnetic semiconductor InMnAs heterojunction. The magnetic field dependence of the transistor characteristics confirm that the magnetoamplification results from the junction magnetoresistance. To describe the experimentally observed transistor characteristics, we propose a modified Ebers-Moll model that includes a series magnetoresistance attributed to spin-selective conduction. The capability of magnetic field control of the amplification in an all-semiconductor transistor at room temperature potentially enables the creation of new computer logic architecture where the spin of the carriers is utilized.

  20. Modeling Bloch oscillations in nanoscale Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Heli; Kautz, R. L.; Nam, S. W.; Aumentado, J.

    2017-08-01

    Bloch oscillations in nanoscale Josephson junctions with a Coulomb charging energy comparable to the Josephson coupling energy are explored within the context of a model previously considered by Geigenmüller and Schön that includes Zener tunneling and treats quasiparticle tunneling as an explicit shot-noise process. The dynamics of the junction quasicharge are investigated numerically using both Monte Carlo and ensemble approaches to calculate voltage-current characteristics in the presence of microwaves. We examine in detail the origin of harmonic and subharmonic Bloch steps at dc biases I =(n /m )2 e f induced by microwaves of frequency f and consider the optimum parameters for the observation of harmonic (m =1 ) steps. We also demonstrate that the GS model allows a detailed semiquantitative fit to experimental voltage-current characteristics previously obtained at the Chalmers University of Technology, confirming and strengthening the interpretation of the observed microwave-induced steps in terms of Bloch oscillations.

  1. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  2. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  3. String networks with junctions in competition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.; Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Menezes, J.; de Oliveira, B. F.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we give specific examples of competition models, with six and eight species, whose three-dimensional dynamics naturally leads to the formation of string networks with junctions, associated with regions that have a high concentration of enemy species. We study the two- and three-dimensional evolution of such networks, both using stochastic network and mean field theory simulations. If the predation, reproduction and mobility probabilities do not vary in space and time, we find that the networks attain scaling regimes with a characteristic length roughly proportional to t 1 / 2, where t is the physical time, thus showing that the presence of junctions, on its own, does not have a significant impact on their scaling properties.

  4. Excess junction current of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, E. Y.; Legge, R. N.; Christidis, N.

    1973-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of n(plus)-p silicon solar cells with 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, and 10 ohm-cm p-type base materials have been examined in detail. In addition to the usual I-V measurements, we have studied the temperature dependence of the slope of the I-V curve at the origin by the lock-in technique. The excess junction current coefficient (Iq) deduced from the slope at the origin depends on the square root of the intrinsic carrier concentration. The Iq obtained from the I-V curve fitting over the entire forward bias region at various temperatures shows the same temperature dependence. This result, in addition to the presence of an aging effect, suggest that the surface channel effect is the dominant cause of the excess junction current.

  5. Junction between surfaces of two topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Diptiman; Deb, Oindrila

    2012-02-01

    We study scattering from a line junction which separates the surfaces of two three-dimensional topological insulators; some aspects of this problem were recently studied in Takahashi and Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 166805 (2011). The velocities of the Dirac electrons on the two surfaces may be unequal and may even have opposite signs; in the latter case, we find that the electrons must, in general, go into the two-dimensional interface separating the two topological insulators. We also study what happens if the two surfaces are at an angle φ with respect to each other. We find in this case that there are bound states which propagate along the line junction with a velocity and direction of spin which depend on the bending angle φ.

  6. Tunneling in Organic Conductor/superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Lee, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Sato, K.; Friedman, B.

    2003-03-01

    We report the nonequilibrium effect of polaronic quasiparticle (QP) injection using an organic injector in a high Tc three terminal device. The organic, copper (II) phthalocyanine (Cu-Pc), used as the injector, is a photoconductor and a p-type semiconductor. The transport properties of Au/Cu-Pc/Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d (BSCCO) tunnel junctions were investigated in the dark and under ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We observed that the injection of polaronic QP from the organic Cu-Pc film into the BSCCO film generated a substantially larger nonequilibrium effect as compared to the normal QP injection current. We could increase the current gain by UV excitation of the organic photoconductor injector. The tunneling spectroscopy of a Cu-Pc/BSCCO junction exhibited a small enhancement of the zero bias conductance peak under the UV excitation. The above phenomena are of importance in developing optically controlled three terminal superconducting devices.

  7. Current distributions in stripe Majorana junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osca, Javier; Llorenç, Serra

    2017-02-01

    We calculate current and density distributions in stripe (2D planar) junctions between normal and Majorana nanowires having a finite ( y) transverse length. In presence of a magnetic field with vertical and in-plane components, the y-symmetry of the charge current distribution in the normal lead changes strongly across the Majorana phase transition: from center-symmetric if a Majorana mode is present to laterally-shifted (as expected by the Hall effect) if the field is tilted such as to destroy the Majorana mode due to the projection rule. We compare quasi-particle and charge distributions of current and density, as well as spin magnetizations. The Majorana mode causes opposite spin accumulations on the transverse sides of the junction and the emergence of a spin current.

  8. Excess junction current of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, E. Y.; Legge, R. N.; Christidis, N.

    1973-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of n(plus)-p silicon solar cells with 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, and 10 ohm-cm p-type base materials have been examined in detail. In addition to the usual I-V measurements, we have studied the temperature dependence of the slope of the I-V curve at the origin by the lock-in technique. The excess junction current coefficient (Iq) deduced from the slope at the origin depends on the square root of the intrinsic carrier concentration. The Iq obtained from the I-V curve fitting over the entire forward bias region at various temperatures shows the same temperature dependence. This result, in addition to the presence of an aging effect, suggest that the surface channel effect is the dominant cause of the excess junction current.

  9. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  10. Quantum computing with Josephson junction circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huizhong

    This work concerns the study of Josephson junction circuits in the context of their usability for quantum computing. The zero-voltage state of a current-biased Josephson junction has a set of metastable quantum energy levels. If a junction is well isolated from its environment, it will be possible to use the two lowest states as a qubit in a quantum computer. I first examine the meaning of isolation theoretically. Using a master equation, I analyzed the effect of dissipation on escape rates and suggested a simple method, population depletion technique, to measure the relaxation time (T1). Using a stochastic Bloch equation to analyze the dependence of microwave resonance peak width on current noise, I found decoherence due to current noise depends on the noise spectrum. For high frequency noise with a cutoff frequency fc much larger than 1/T1, I found decoherence due to noise can be described by a dephasing rate that is proportional to the noise spectral density. However, for low frequency noise such that its cutoff frequency fc is much smaller than 1/T 1, decoherence due to noise depends on the total rms current noise. I then analyze and test a few qubit isolation schemes, including resistive isolation, inductor-capacitor (LC) isolation, half-wavelength resonant isolation and inductor-junction (LJ) isolation. I found the resistive isolation scheme has a severe heating problem. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and energy level quantization were observed in the LC isolated Nb/AlOx/Nb and AL/ALOx/Al junction qubits at 25 mK. Relaxation times of 4--12 ns and spectroscopic coherence times of 1--3 ns were obtained for these LC isolated qubits. I found the half-wavelength isolated junction qubit has a relaxation time of about 20 ns measured by the population-depletion techniques, but no energy levels were observed in this qubit. Experimental results suggest the LJ isolated qubit has a longer relaxation and coherence times than all my previously examined samples. Using a

  11. Cusps on cosmic superstrings with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Rajamanoharan, Senthooran; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: william.nelson@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The existence of cusps on non-periodic strings ending on D-branes is demonstrated and the conditions for which such cusps are generic are derived. The dynamics of F-strings, D-strings and FD-string junctions are investigated. It is shown that pairs of FD-string junctions, such as would form after intercommutations of F-strings and D-strings, generically contain cusps. This new feature of cosmic superstrings opens up the possibility of extra channels of energy loss from a string network. The phenomenology of cusps on such cosmic superstring networks is compared to that of cusps formed on networks of their field theory analogues, the standard cosmic strings.

  12. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  13. The subunit composition and function of mammalian cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kadenbach, Bernhard; Hüttemann, Maik

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) from mammals and birds is composed of 13 subunits. The three catalytic subunits I-III are encoded by mitochondrial DNA, the ten nuclear-coded subunits (IV, Va, Vb, VIa, VIb, VIc, VIIa, VIIb, VIIc, VIII) by nuclear DNA. The nuclear-coded subunits are essentially involved in the regulation of oxygen consumption and proton translocation by COX, since their removal or modification changes the activity and their mutation causes mitochondrial diseases. Respiration, the basis for ATP synthesis in mitochondria, is differently regulated in organs and species by expression of tissue-, developmental-, and species-specific isoforms for COX subunits IV, VIa, VIb, VIIa, VIIb, and VIII, but the holoenzyme in mammals is always composed of 13 subunits. Various proteins and enzymes were shown, e.g., by co-immunoprecipitation, to bind to specific COX subunits and modify its activity, but these interactions are reversible, in contrast to the tightly bound 13 subunits. In addition, the formation of supercomplexes with other oxidative phosphorylation complexes has been shown to be largely variable. The regulatory complexity of COX is increased by protein phosphorylation. Up to now 18 phosphorylation sites have been identified under in vivo conditions in mammals. However, only for a few phosphorylation sites and four nuclear-coded subunits could a specific function be identified. Research on the signaling pathways leading to specific COX phosphorylations remains a great challenge for understanding the regulation of respiration and ATP synthesis in mammalian organisms. This article reviews the function of the individual COX subunits and their isoforms, as well as proteins and small molecules interacting and regulating the enzyme.

  14. Subunit structure of the follitropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, J.

    1985-01-01

    Both of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of intact human follitropin (FSH) were radioiodinated with /sup 125/I-FSH-sodium iodide and chloramine-T, and could be resolved on polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE). The electrophoretic mobility of radioiodinated FSH ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits as well as the ..cap alpha beta.. dimer changed markedly depending on the concentration of reducing agents. /sup 125/I-FSH (Ka = 1.4 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/), complexes to the receptor on procine granulosa cells or in Triton X-100 extracts, was affinity-crosslinked with a cleavable (nondisulfide) homobifunctional reagent, bis(2-(succinimidooxycarbonyloxy)ethyl)sulfone, solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate with or without reducing agents, and electrophoresed. Crosslinked samples revealed three additional bands of slower electrophoretic mobility, corresponding to 65 (unreduced 62), 83 (unreduced 76) and 117 (unreduced 110)kDa, in addition to hormone bands. Formation of the three bands requires the /sup 125/I-FSH hormone to bind specifically to the receptor with subsequent cross-linking. The rate of formation and cleavage of the cross-linked complexes indicated a sequential and incremental addition of 22, 18, and 34 kDa components to the FSH ..cap alpha beta.. dimer. The results of reduction of cross-linked complexes demonstrated the existence of disulfide linkage between the three components. FSH was photoactively derivatized with N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 4-azidobenzolyl-glycine and radioiodinated for photoaffinity labeling. When derivatized /sup 125/I-FSH (Ka = 1.12 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/) bound to the cell was photolyzed for cross-linking and resolved on the SDS-PAGE, two new bands (106 and 61 kDa) under reducing condition appeared in addition to the hormone bands. Upon reduction with dithiotheitol and second-dimensional electrophoresis, the unreduced 104 kDa (reduced 106 kDa) band released two small components 31 and 14 kDa.

  15. Semiconductor junction formation by directed heat

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Robert B.

    1988-03-24

    The process of the invention includes applying precursors 6 with N- and P-type dopants therein to a silicon web 2, with the web 2 then being baked in an oven 10 to drive off excessive solvents, and the web 2 is then heated using a pulsed high intensity light in a mechanism 12 at 1100.degree.-1150.degree. C. for about 10 seconds to simultaneously form semiconductor junctions in both faces of the web.

  16. Solar-Cell-Junction Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, S. N.; Armini, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    System under development reduces equipment costs. Processing system will produce solar-cell junctions on 4 in. (10.2 cm) round silicon wafers at rate of 10 to seventh power per year. System includes non-mass-analyzed ion implanter, microcomputer-controlled, pulsed-electron-beam annealer, and wafertransport system with vacuum interlock. These features eliminate large, expensive magnet and plates, circuitry, and power source otherwise needed for scanning.

  17. Quantum dynamics in the bosonic Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Chuchem, Maya; Cohen, Doron; Smith-Mannschott, Katrina; Hiller, Moritz; Kottos, Tsampikos; Vardi, Amichay

    2010-11-15

    We employ a semiclassical picture to study dynamics in a bosonic Josephson junction with various initial conditions. Phase diffusion of coherent preparations in the Josephson regime is shown to depend on the initial relative phase between the two condensates. For initially incoherent condensates, we find a universal value for the buildup of coherence in the Josephson regime. In addition, we contrast two seemingly similar on-separatrix coherent preparations, finding striking differences in their convergence to classicality as the number of particles increases.

  18. Josephson junction microwave modulators for qubit control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, O.; Strong, J. A.; Ferguson, D. G.; Egan, J.; Bailey, N.; Hinkey, R. T.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate Josephson junction based double-balanced mixer and phase shifter circuits operating at 6-10 GHz and integrate these components to implement both a monolithic amplitude/phase vector modulator and an I/Q quadrature mixer. The devices are actuated by flux signals, dissipate no power on chip, exhibit input saturation powers in excess of 1 nW, and provide cryogenic microwave modulation solutions for integrated control of superconducting qubits.

  19. Defect formation in long Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Gordeeva, Anna V.; Pankratov, Andrey L.

    2010-06-01

    We study numerically a mechanism of vortex formation in a long Josephson junction within the framework of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon model. This mechanism is switched on below the critical temperature. It is shown that the number of fluxons versus velocity of cooling roughly scales according to the power law with the exponent of either 0.25 or 0.5 depending on the temperature variation in the critical current density.

  20. Electronic and optical spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiner, Michael J.

    Electronic transport through molecules has been intensively studied in recent years, due to scientific interest in fundamental questions about charge transport and the technological promise of nanoscale circuitry. A wide range of range of experimental platforms have been developed to electronically probe both single molecules and molecular monolayers. However, it remains challenging to fabricate reliable electronic contacts to molecules, and the vast majority of molecular electronic architectures are not amenable to standard characterization techniques, such as optical spectroscopy. Thus the field of molecular electronics has been hampered with problems of reproducibility, and many fundamental questions about electronic transport remain unanswered. This thesis describes four significant contributions towards the fabrication and characterization of molecular electronic devices: (1) The development of a new method for creating robust, large area junctions where the electronic transport is through a single monolayer of molecules. This method utilizes atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow an ultrathin oxide layer on top of a molecular monolayer, which protects the molecules against subsequent processing. (2) A new method for rapid imaging and analysis of single defects in molecular monolayers. This method also electrically passivates defects as it labels them. (3) Hot carrier spectroscopy of molecular junctions. Using optically excited hot carriers, we demonstrate the ability to probe the energy level lineup inside buried molecular junctions. (4) Efficient coupling of optical fields to metal-insulator-metal (MIM) surface plasmon modes. We show both theoretical and experimental work illustrating the ability to create very intense optical fields inside MIM systems. The intense fields generated in this manner have natural extensions to a variety of applications, such as photon assisted tunneling in molecular junctions, optical modulators, and ultrafast optoelectronic

  1. Neuro-muscular junction block stimulator simulator.

    PubMed

    Sprick, Cyle

    2006-03-01

    Improved technology and higher fidelity are making medical simulations increasingly popular. A simulated peripheral nerve stimulator and thumb actuator has been developed for use with the SimMan Universal Patient Simulator. This device incorporates a handheld control box, a McKibben pneumatic muscle and articulated thumb, and a remote software interface for the simulation facilitator. The system simulates the action of a peripheral nerve stimulator on the ulnar nerve, and the effects of neuromuscular junction blocking agents on the thumb motion.

  2. Anillin regulates cell-cell junction integrity by organizing junctional accumulation of Rho-GTP and actomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Ciara C.; Jin, Meiyan; Breznau, Elaina B.; Espino, Rhogelyn; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Goryachev, Andrew B.; Miller, Ann L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Anillin is a scaffolding protein that organizes and stabilizes actomyosin contractile rings and was previously thought to function primarily in cytokinesis [1–10]. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model system to examine Anillin’s role in the intact vertebrate epithelium, we find that a population of Anillin surprisingly localizes to epithelial cell-cell junctions throughout the cell cycle, whereas it was previously thought to be nuclear during interphase [5, 11]. Further, we show that Anillin plays a critical role in regulating cell-cell junction integrity. Both tight junctions and adherens junctions are disrupted when Anillin is knocked down, leading to altered cell shape and increased intercellular spaces. Anillin interacts with Rho, F-actin, and Myosin II [3, 8, 9], all of which regulate cell-cell junction structure and function. When Anillin is knocked down, active Rho (Rho-GTP), F-actin, and Myosin II are misregulated at junctions. Indeed, increased dynamic “flares” of Rho-GTP are observed at cell-cell junctions, while overall junctional F-actin and Myosin II accumulation is reduced when Anillin is depleted. We propose that Anillin is required for proper Rho-GTP distribution at cell-cell junctions and for maintenance of a robust apical actomyosin belt, which is required for cell-cell junction integrity. These results reveal a novel role for Anillin in regulating epithelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:24835458

  3. A Computational Approach to Detect Gap Junction Plaques and Associate Them with Cells in Fluorescent Images

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua S.; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular signaling is a fundamental requirement for complex biological system function and survival. Communication between adjoining cells is largely achieved via gap junction channels made up of multiple subunits of connexin proteins, each with unique selectivity and regulatory properties. Intercellular communication via gap junction channels facilitates transmission of an array of cellular signals, including ions, macromolecules, and metabolites that coordinate physiological processes throughout tissues and entire organisms. Although current methods used to quantify connexin expression rely on number or area density measurements in a field of view, they lack cellular assignment, distance measurement capabilities (both within the cell and to extracellular structures), and complete automation. We devised an automated computational approach built on a contour expansion algorithm platform that allows connexin protein detection and assignment to specific cells within complex tissues. In addition, parallel implementation of the contour expansion algorithm allows for high-throughput analysis as the complexity of the biological sample increases. This method does not depend specifically on connexin identification and can be applied more widely to the analysis of numerous immunocytochemical markers as well as to identify particles within tissues such as nanoparticles, gene delivery vehicles, or even cellular fragments such as exosomes or microparticles. PMID:23324867

  4. Connexin43 gap junction protein plays an essential role in morphogenesis of the embryonic chick face.

    PubMed

    McGonnell, I M; Green, C R; Tickle, C; Becker, D L

    2001-11-01

    Normal outgrowth and fusion of facial primordia during vertebrate development require interaction of diverse tissues and co-ordination of many different signalling pathways. Gap junction channels, made up of subunits consisting of connexin proteins, facilitate communication between cells and are implicated in embryonic development. Here we describe the distribution of connexin43 and connexin32 gap junction proteins in the developing chick face. To test the function of connexin43 protein, we applied antisense oligodeoxynucleotides that specifically reduced levels of connexin43 protein in cells of early chick facial primordia. This resulted in stunting of primordia outgrowth and led to facial defects. Furthermore, cell proliferation in regions of facial primordia that normally express high levels of connexin43 protein was reduced and this was associated with lower levels of Msx-1 expression. Facial defects arise when retinoic acid is applied to the face of chick embryos at later stages. This treatment also resulted in significant reduction in connexin43 protein, while connexin32 protein expression was unaffected. Taken together, these results indicate that connexin43 plays an essential role during early morphogenesis and subsequent outgrowth of the developing chick face.

  5. Inflammatory conditions induce gap junctional communication between rat Kupffer cells both in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Eugenín, Eliseo A.; González, Hernán E.; Sánchez, Helmuth A.; Brañes, María C.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2007-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit, has been previously detected in Kupffer cells (KCs) during liver inflammation, however, KCs phagocytose cell debris that may include Cx43 protein, which could explain the detection of Cx43 in KCs. We determined that KCs express Cx43 and form gap junctions both in vivo and in vitro. In liver sections of animals treated with LPS, Cx43 was detected at ED2+ cells interfaces, indicating formation of GJ between KCs in vivo. In vitro, unstimulated KCs cultures did not form functional GJs, and expressed low levels of Cx43 that showed a diffuse intracellular distribution. In contrast, KCs treated with LPS plus IFN-γ, expressed a greater amount of Cx43 at both the, protein and mRNA levels, and showed Cx43 at cell-cell contacts associated with higher dye coupling. In conclusion, activation of KCs in vivo or in vitro resulted in enhanced Cx43 expression levels and formation of GJ that might play relevant roles during liver inflammation. PMID:17900549

  6. MuSK is required for anchoring acetylcholinesterase at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Cartaud, Annie; Strochlic, Laure; Guerra, Manuel; Blanchard, Benoît; Lambergeon, Monique; Krejci, Eric; Cartaud, Jean; Legay, Claire

    2004-01-01

    At the neuromuscular junction, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is mainly present as asymmetric forms in which tetramers of catalytic subunits are associated to a specific collagen, collagen Q (ColQ). The accumulation of the enzyme in the synaptic basal lamina strictly relies on ColQ. This has been shown to be mediated by interaction between ColQ and perlecan, which itself binds dystroglycan. Here, using transfected mutants of ColQ in a ColQ-deficient muscle cell line or COS-7 cells, we report that ColQ clusterizes through a more complex mechanism. This process requires two heparin-binding sites contained in the collagen domain as well as the COOH terminus of ColQ. Cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments in Torpedo postsynaptic membranes together with transfection experiments with muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) constructs in MuSK-deficient myotubes or COS-7 cells provide the first evidence that ColQ binds MuSK. Together, our data suggest that a ternary complex containing ColQ, perlecan, and MuSK is required for AChE clustering and support the notion that MuSK dictates AChE synaptic localization at the neuromuscular junction. PMID:15159418

  7. The gap junctional protein INX-14 functions in oocyte precursors to promote C. elegans sperm guidance

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Johnathan W.; McKinney, Shauna L.; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Miller, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Innexins are the subunits of invertebrate gap junctions. Here we show that the innexin INX-14 promotes sperm guidance to the fertilization site in the C. elegans hermaphrodite reproductive tract. inx-14 loss causes cell nonautonomous defects in sperm migration velocity and directional velocity. Results from genetic and immunocytochemical analyses provide strong evidence that INX-14 acts in transcriptionally active oocyte precursors in the distal gonad, not in transcriptionally inactive oocytes that synthesize prostaglandin sperm-attracting cues. Somatic gonadal sheath cell interaction is necessary for INX-14 function, likely via INX-8 and INX-9 expressed in sheath cells. However, electron microscopy has not identified gap junctions in oocyte precursors, suggesting that INX-14 acts in a channel-independent manner or INX-14 channels are difficult to document. INX-14 promotes prostaglandin signaling to sperm at a step after F-series prostaglandin synthesis in oocytes. Taken together, our results support the model that INX-14 functions in a somatic gonad/germ cell signaling mechanism essential for sperm function. We propose that this mechanism regulates the transcription of a factor(s) that modulates prostaglandin metabolism, transport, or activity in the reproductive tract. PMID:21889935

  8. The exon junction complex controls transposable element activity by ensuring faithful splicing of the piwi transcript

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Colin D.; Mestdagh, Claire; Akhtar, Junaid; Kreim, Nastasja; Deinhard, Pia; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Treisman, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is a highly conserved ribonucleoprotein complex that binds RNAs during splicing and remains associated with them following export to the cytoplasm. While the role of this complex in mRNA localization, translation, and degradation has been well characterized, its mechanism of action in splicing a subset of Drosophila and human transcripts remains to be elucidated. Here, we describe a novel function for the EJC and its splicing subunit, RnpS1, in preventing transposon accumulation in both Drosophila germline and surrounding somatic follicle cells. This function is mediated specifically through the control of piwi transcript splicing, where, in the absence of RnpS1, the fourth intron of piwi is retained. This intron contains a weak polypyrimidine tract that is sufficient to confer dependence on RnpS1. Finally, we demonstrate that RnpS1-dependent removal of this intron requires splicing of the flanking introns, suggesting a model in which the EJC facilitates the splicing of weak introns following its initial deposition at adjacent exon junctions. These data demonstrate a novel role for the EJC in regulating piwi intron excision and provide a mechanism for its function during splicing. PMID:25104425

  9. A computational approach to detect gap junction plaques and associate them with cells in fluorescent images.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joshua S; Vadakkan, Tegy J; Hirschi, Karen K; Dickinson, Mary E

    2013-04-01

    Intercellular signaling is a fundamental requirement for complex biological system function and survival. Communication between adjoining cells is largely achieved via gap junction channels made up of multiple subunits of connexin proteins, each with unique selectivity and regulatory properties. Intercellular communication via gap junction channels facilitates transmission of an array of cellular signals, including ions, macromolecules, and metabolites that coordinate physiological processes throughout tissues and entire organisms. Although current methods used to quantify connexin expression rely on number or area density measurements in a field of view, they lack cellular assignment, distance measurement capabilities (both within the cell and to extracellular structures), and complete automation. We devised an automated computational approach built on a contour expansion algorithm platform that allows connexin protein detection and assignment to specific cells within complex tissues. In addition, parallel implementation of the contour expansion algorithm allows for high-throughput analysis as the complexity of the biological sample increases. This method does not depend specifically on connexin identification and can be applied more widely to the analysis of numerous immunocytochemical markers as well as to identify particles within tissues such as nanoparticles, gene delivery vehicles, or even cellular fragments such as exosomes or microparticles.

  10. Comparative analysis of the gap junction protein from rat heart and liver: is there a tissue specificity of gap junctions?

    PubMed

    Gros, D B; Nicholson, B J; Revel, J P

    1983-12-01

    Gap junctions have been isolated from both rat heart and liver, tissues where junctions are typical in appearance and physiology. The purity of the fractions obtained was monitored by electron microscopy (thin-sectioning and negative staining) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The myocardial gap junctions are comprised of a single polypeptide of Mr 28,000, apparently derived from a protein of Mr 30,000. Hepatic gap junctions are also comprised of a single native protein of Mr 28,000 as previously reported. Exhaustive trypsin digestion of the isolated junctions cleaves both of these proteins similarly, while leaving their characteristic junctional lattice structures intact. However, comparison of heart and liver junctional proteins by two-dimensional peptide mapping of tryptic and alpha-chymotryptic fragments, followed by high pressure liquid chromatography, reveals no homology between these proteins.

  11. Na, K ATPase beta3 subunit (CD298): association with alpha subunit and expression on peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed

    Chiampanichayakul, S; Khunkaewla, P; Pata, S; Kasinrerk, W

    2006-12-01

    Beta3 subunit is described as one of the Na, K ATPase subunits. Recently, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb), termed P-3E10. This mAb was shown to react with the Na, K ATPase beta3 subunit or CD298. By immunofluorescence analysis using mAb P-3E10, it was found that all peripheral blood leukocytes express Na, K ATPase beta3. The presence of beta3 subunit on leukocytes is not in a quantitative polymorphic manner. Upon phytohemagglutinin or phorbol myristate acetate activation, the expression level of the Na, K ATPase beta3 subunit on activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not altered in comparison with those of unstimulated cells. Red blood cells (RBCs) of healthy donors showed negative reactivity with mAb P-3E10. However, more than 80% of thalassemic RBCs showed positive reactivity. By immunoprecipitation, moreover, a protein band of 55-65 kDa was precipitated from normal RBC membrane using mAb P-3E10. These results evidenced that the beta3 subunit of Na, K ATPase is expressed on RBC membrane but the epitope recognized by mAb P-3E10 is hidden in normal RBCs. Furthermore, we showed the association of beta3 subunit and alpha subunit of Na, K ATPase. This information is important for further understanding of the functional roles of this molecule.

  12. Primary thermometry with nanoscale tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvi, K.P.; Kauppinen, J.P.; Paalanen, M.A.; Pekola, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    We have found current-voltage (I-V) and conductance (dI/dV) characteristics of arrays of nanoscale tunnel junctions between normal metal electrodes to exhibit suitable features for primary thermometry. The current through a uniform array depends on the ratio of the thermal energy k{sub B}T and the electrostatic charging energy E{sub c} of the islands between the junctions and is completely blocked by Coulomb repulsion at T=0 and at small voltages eV/2 {<=} Ec. In the opposite limit, k{sub B}T {much_gt} E{sub c}, the width of the conductance minimum scales linearly and universally with T and N, the number of tunnel junctions, and qualifies as a primary thermometer. The zero bias drop in the conductance is proportional to T{sup -1} and can be used as a secondary thermometer. We will show with Monte Carlo simulations how background charge and nonuniformities of the array will affect the thermometer.

  13. Molecular Diffusion through Cyanobacterial Septal Junctions.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Morión, Mercedes; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Flores, Enrique

    2017-01-03

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as filaments in which intercellular molecular exchange takes place. During the differentiation of N2-fixing heterocysts, regulators are transferred between cells. In the diazotrophic filament, vegetative cells that fix CO2 through oxygenic photosynthesis provide the heterocysts with reduced carbon and heterocysts provide the vegetative cells with fixed nitrogen. Intercellular molecular transfer has been traced with fluorescent markers, including calcein, 5-carboxyfluorescein, and the sucrose analogue esculin, which are observed to move down their concentration gradient. In this work, we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assays in the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to measure the temperature dependence of intercellular transfer of fluorescent markers. We find that the transfer rate constants are directly proportional to the absolute temperature. This indicates that the "septal junctions" (formerly known as "microplasmodesmata") linking the cells in the filament allow molecular exchange by simple diffusion, without any activated intermediate state. This constitutes a novel mechanism for molecular transfer across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, in addition to previously characterized mechanisms for active transport and facilitated diffusion. Cyanobacterial septal junctions are functionally analogous to the gap junctions of metazoans.

  14. Very large thermophase in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Giazotto, F; Heikkilä, T T; Bergeret, F S

    2015-02-13

    The concept of thermophase refers to the appearance of a phase gradient inside a superconductor originating from the presence of an applied temperature bias across it. The resulting supercurrent flow may, in suitable conditions, fully counterbalance the temperature-bias-induced quasiparticle current therefore preventing the formation of any voltage drop, i.e., a thermovoltage, across the superconductor. Yet, the appearance of a thermophase is expected to occur in Josephson-coupled superconductors as well. Here, we theoretically investigate the thermoelectric response of a thermally biased Josephson junction based on a ferromagnetic insulator. In particular, we predict the occurrence of a very large thermophase that can reach π/2 across the contact for suitable temperatures and structure parameters; i.e., the quasiparticle thermal current can reach the critical current. Such a thermophase can be several orders of magnitude larger than that predicted to occur in conventional Josephson tunnel junctions. In order to assess experimentally the predicted very large thermophase, we propose a realistic setup realizable with state-of-the-art nanofabrication techniques and well-established materials, based on a superconducting quantum interference device. This effect could be of strong relevance in several low-temperature applications, for example, for revealing tiny temperature differences generated by coupling the electromagnetic radiation to one of the superconductors forming the junction.

  15. Josephson effect in a Weyl SNS junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Kevin A.; Bergholtz, Emil J.; Brouwer, Piet W.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the Josephson current density j (ϕ ) for a Weyl superconductor-normal-metal-superconductor junction for which the outer terminals are superconducting Weyl metals and the normal layer is a Weyl (semi)metal. We describe the Weyl (semi)metal using a simple model with two Weyl points. The model has broken time-reversal symmetry, but inversion symmetry is present. We calculate the Josephson current for both zero and finite temperature for the two pairing mechanisms inside the superconductors that have been proposed in the literature, zero-momentum BCS-like pairing and finite-momentum FFLO-like pairing, and assuming the short-junction limit. For both pairing types we find that the current is proportional to the normal-state junction conductivity, with a proportionality coefficient that shows quantitative differences between the two pairing mechanisms. The current for the BCS-like pairing is found to be independent of the chemical potential, whereas the current for the FFLO-like pairing is not.

  16. Hemichannel and junctional properties of connexin 50.

    PubMed Central

    Beahm, Derek L; Hall, James E

    2002-01-01

    Lens fiber connexins, cx50 and cx46 (alpha3 and alpha8), belong to a small subset of connexins that can form functional hemichannels in nonjunctional membranes. Knockout of either cx50 or cx46 results in a cataract, so the properties of both connexins are likely essential for proper physiological functioning of the lens. Although portions of the sequences of these two connexins are nearly identical, their hemichannel properties are quite different. Cx50 hemichannels are much more sensitive to extracellular acidification than cx46 hemichannels and differ from cx46 hemichannels both in steady-state and kinetic properties. Comparison of the two branches of the cx50 hemichannel G-V curve with the junctional G-V curve suggests that cx50 gap junctions gate with positive relative polarity. The histidine-modifying reagent, diethyl pyrocarbonate, reversibly blocks cx50 hemichannel currents but not cx46 hemichannel currents. Because cx46 and cx50 have very similar amino acid sequences, one might expect that replacing the two histidines unique to the third transmembrane region of cx50 with the corresponding cx46 residues would produce mutants more closely resembling cx46. In fact this does not happen. Instead the mutant cx50H161N does not form detectable hemichannels but forms gap junctions indistinguishable from wild type. Cx50H176Q is oocyte lethal, and the double mutant, cx50H61N/H176Q, neither forms hemichannels nor kills oocytes. PMID:11916859

  17. Josephson junction in a thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V. G.; Dobrovitski, V. V.; Clem, J. R.; Mawatari, Yasunori; Mints, R. G.

    2001-04-01

    The phase difference {phi}(y) for a vortex at a line Josephson junction in a thin film attenuates at large distances as a power law, unlike the case of a bulk junction where it approaches exponentially the constant values at infinities. The field of a Josephson vortex is a superposition of fields of standard Pearl vortices distributed along the junction with the line density {phi}'(y)/2{pi}. We study the integral equation for {phi}(y) and show that the phase is sensitive to the ratio l/{Lambda}, where l={lambda}{sub J}{sup 2}/{lambda}{sub L}, {Lambda}=2{lambda}{sub L}{sup 2}/d, {lambda}{sub L}, and {lambda}{sub J} are the London and Josephson penetration depths, and d is the film thickness. For l<<{Lambda}, the vortex ''core'' of the size l is nearly temperature independent, while the phase ''tail'' scales as l{Lambda}/y{sup 2}={lambda}{sub J}2{lambda}{sub L}/d/y{sup 2}; i.e., it diverges as T{yields}T{sub c}. For l>>{Lambda}, both the core and the tail have nearly the same characteristic length l{Lambda}.

  18. Junction point on partially singular trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odia, Ameze; Bell, David J.

    2012-12-01

    In recent times, several works have been performed on the design of fuel optimal trajectories for space navigation. These works show the possibility of the existence of partially singular trajectories for systems that are linear analytic (Park et al. 2010). Linear analytic systems may show the existence of partially singular subarcs, and the point where these subarcs meet is called a junction point. Thus, knowledge about junction conditions became necessary when solving the optimal control problem for such systems. This led to the development of two 'theorems' on junction conditions, given by McDanell and Powers (McDanell, J.P. and Powers W.F. (1971), 'Necessary Conditions for Joining Optimal Singular and Nonsingular Sub Arcs', SIAM Journal of Control, 9, 161-173). However, the second 'theorem', which is now known as a conjecture, could not satisfy all classes of linear analytic system. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect and correct the errors in the derivation of the McDanell and Powers conjecture. The error in their derivations was corrected and then tested on two newly mathematically constructed systems. The results of these tests were found to be satisfactory. This implies that by making the necessary corrections, the conjecture can still be useful in generating a general theorem for all classes of systems.

  19. STUDIES ON AN EPITHELIAL (GLAND) CELL JUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Loewenstein, Werner R.; Kanno, Yoshinobu

    1964-01-01

    Membrane permeability of an epithelial cell junction (Drosophila salivary gland) was examined with intracellular microelectrodes and with fluorescent tracers. In contrast to the non-junctional cell membrane surface, which has a low permeability to ions (10-4 mho/cm2), the junctional membrane surface is highly permeable. In fact, it introduces no substantial restriction to ion flow beyond that in the cytoplasm; the resistance through a chain of cells (150 Ω cm) is only slightly greater than in extruded cytoplasm (100 Ω cm). The diffusion resistance along the intercellular space to the exterior, on the other hand, is very high. Here, there exists an ion barrier of, at least, 104Ω cm2. As a result, small ions and fluorescein move rather freely from one cell to the next, but do not leak appreciably through the intercellular space to the exterior. The organ here, rather than the single cell, appears to be the unit of ion environment. The possible underlying structural aspects are discussed. PMID:14206423

  20. Expression of voltage sensitive calcium channel (VSCC) L-type Cav1.2 (alpha1C) and T-type Cav3.2 (alpha1H) subunits during mouse bone development.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ying; Alicknavitch, Michael; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2005-09-01

    Voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) are key regulators of osteoblast plasma membrane Ca(2+) permeability and are under control of calcitropic hormones. Subtype specific antibodies were used to probe L-type Ca(v)1.2 (alpha(1C)) and T-type Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)) subunit expression during mouse skeletal development. Commencing from E14.5 and continuing through skeletal maturity, immunoreactivity of Ca(v)1.2 (alpha(1C)) subunits was evident in regions of rapid long bone growth, including the perichondrium, periosteum, chondro-osseous junction and trabecular bones. Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)) subunits appeared simultaneously and followed a similar distribution pattern. Both subunits were observed in osteoblasts and chondrocytes under high magnification. Interestingly, Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)) subunits were present, but Ca(v)1.2 (alpha(1C)) subunits were absent from osteocytes. Western Blot and immunohistochemical assessment of in vitro cell culture models of osteogenesis and chondrogenesis confirmed the in vivo observations. We conclude that both L-type Ca(v)1.2 (alpha(1C)) and T-type Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)) VSCCs are dynamically regulated in bones and cartilages during endochondral bone development. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of germanium junctions for multi-junction solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, T.; Faucher, J.; Lee, M. L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth and device characteristics of Ge solar cells. Integrating a Ge bottom cell beneath a lattice-matched triple junction stack grown by MBE could enable ultra-high efficiencies without metamorphic growth or wafer bonding. However, a diffused junction cannot be readily formed in Ge by MBE due to the low sticking coefficient of group-V molecules on Ge surfaces. We therefore realized Ge junctions by growth of homo-epitaxial n-Ge on p-Ge wafers within a standard III-V MBE system. We then fabricated Ge solar cells, finding growth temperature and post-growth annealing to be key factors for achieving high efficiency. Open-circuit voltage and fill factor values of ~0.175 V and ~0.59 without a window layer were obtained, both of which are comparable to diffused Ge junctions formed by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. We also demonstrate growth of high-quality, single-domain GaAs on the Ge junction, as needed for subsequent growth of III-V subcells, and that the surface passivation afforded by the GaAs layer slightly improves the Ge cell performance.

  2. Gap junctions in several tissues share antigenic determinants with liver gap junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Dermietzel, R; Leibstein, A; Frixen, U; Janssen-Timmen, U; Traub, O; Willecke, K

    1984-01-01

    Using affinity-purified antibodies against mouse liver gap junction protein (26 K), discrete fluorescent spots were seen by indirect immunofluorescence labelling on apposed membranes of contiguous cells in several mouse and rat tissues: pancreas (exocrine part), kidney, small intestine (epithelium and circular smooth muscle), Fallopian tube, endometrium, and myometrium of delivering rats. No reaction was seen on sections of myocardium, ovaries and lens. Specific labelling of gap junction plaques was demonstrated by immunoelectron microscopy on ultrathin frozen sections through liver and the exocrine part of pancreas after treatment with gold protein A. Weak immunoreactivity was found on the endocrine part of the pancreas (i.e., Langerhans islets) after glibenclamide treatment of mice and rats, which causes an increase of insulin secretion and of the size as well as the number of gap junction plaques in cells of Langerhans islets. Furthermore, the affinity purified anti-liver 26 K antibodies were shown by immunoblot to react with proteins of similar mol. wt. in pancreas and kidney membranes. Taken together these results suggest that gap junctions from several, morphogenetically different tissues have specific antigenic sites in common. The different extent of specific immunoreactivity of anti-liver 26 K antibodies with different tissues is likely due to differences in size and number of gap junctions although structural differences cannot be excluded. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6209130

  3. Tellurium doping of InGaP for tunnel junction applications in triple junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, C.; Pulwin, Z.; Byrnes, D.; Paranjpe, A.; Zhang, W.

    2011-01-01

    Tellurium doped InGaP is an ideal material for the n side of a tunnel junction for triple junction solar cell structures grown by MOCVD. In this paper, we discuss the growth process for abrupt turn-on and turn-off of tellurium in InGaP when InGaP must be highly doped and uniformly doped with tellurium to provide for epitaxial films suitable for tunnel junctions. Results show that tellurium pre-doping of the layer before InGaP growth provides for a sharp turn-on and that using a growth pause at elevated growth temperatures after InGaP provides for a sharp turn-off in the doping profile. Results from a series of experiments in which partial pressure of phosphine and growth temperature were varied show that doping levels of >1×10 19 cm -3 can be achieved uniformly over 4 in. diameter germanium wafers by lowering growth temperature and V/III ratio. Results also showed that high tellurium doping levels strain InGaP and adjustment of indium mole fraction in InGaP is required to produce smooth epitaxial layers. These MOCVD growth processes can be incorporated in the growth of tunnel junction layers used in the production of triple junction solar cells.

  4. [A promoter responsible for over-expression of cholera toxin B subunit in cholera toxin A subunit structure gene].

    PubMed

    Cao, C; Shi, C; Li, P; Ma, Q

    1997-01-01

    A promoter sequence, which promotes the transcription of cholera toxin B subunit gene, was found in cholera toxin A subunit structure gene. The transcription starts at the adenine Located at +833, that is 456bp upstream to the A of the initiation codon ATG of cholera toxin B gene. Under the control of the promoter, cholera toxin B subunit was over-expressed as high as 200 mg/L at an optimized culture condition. The chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene and beta-galactosidase could also be efficiently expressed under the direction of the promoter. This promoter may be responsible for the 6 fold and 7 fold higher expression level of cholera toxin B subunit than cholera toxin A subunit in V. cholerae and Escheria coli respectively. The over-expression of CTB may be useful in preparing vaccine against cholera and facilitating the construction of peptide-bearing immunogenic hybrid proteins.

  5. Subunit recombinant vaccine protects against monkeypox.

    PubMed

    Heraud, Jean-Michel; Edghill-Smith, Yvette; Ayala, Victor; Kalisz, Irene; Parrino, Janie; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Hryniewicz, Anna; Trindade, Christopher J; Hassett, Meredith; Tsai, Wen-Po; Venzon, David; Nalca, Aysegul; Vaccari, Monica; Silvera, Peter; Bray, Mike; Graham, Barney S; Golding, Hana; Hooper, Jay W; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2006-08-15

    The smallpox vaccine Dryvax, a live vaccinia virus (VACV), protects against smallpox and monkeypox, but is contraindicated in immunocompromised individuals. Because Abs to VACV mediate protection, a live virus vaccine could be substituted by a safe subunit protein-based vaccine able to induce a protective Ab response. We immunized rhesus macaques with plasmid DNA encoding the monkeypox orthologs of the VACV L1R, A27L, A33R, and B5R proteins by the intradermal and i.m. routes, either alone or in combination with the equivalent recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli. Animals that received only DNA failed to produce high titer Abs, developed innumerable skin lesions after challenge, and died in a manner similar to placebo controls. By contrast, the animals vaccinated with proteins developed moderate to severe disease (20-155 skin lesions) but survived. Importantly, those immunized with DNA and boosted with proteins had mild disease with 15 or fewer lesions that resolved within days. DNA/protein immunization elicited Th responses and binding Ab titers to all four proteins that correlated negatively with the total lesion number. The sera of the immunized macaques recognized a limited number of linear B cell epitopes that are highly conserved among orthopoxviruses. Their identification may guide future efforts to develop simpler, safer, and more effective vaccines for monkeypox and smallpox.

  6. Gel-based chemical cross-linking analysis of 20S proteasome subunit-subunit interactions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai; Xiong, Hua; Che, Jing; Xi, Qing-Song; Huang, Liu; Xiong, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a pivotal role in breast tumorigenesis by controlling transcription factors, thus promoting cell cycle growth, and degradation of tumor suppressor proteins. However, breast cancer patients have failed to benefit from proteasome inhibitor treatment partially due to proteasome heterogeneity, which is poorly understood in malignant breast neoplasm. Chemical crosslinking is an increasingly important tool for mapping protein three-dimensional structures and proteinprotein interactions. In the present study, two cross-linkers, bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS(3)) and its water-insoluble analog disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), were used to map the subunit-subunit interactions in 20S proteasome core particle (CP) from MDA-MB-231 cells. Different types of gel electrophoresis technologies were used. In combination with chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry, we applied these gel electrophoresis technologies to the study of the noncovalent interactions among 20S proteasome subunits. Firstly, the CP subunit isoforms were profiled. Subsequently, using native/SDSPAGE, it was observed that 0.5 mmol/L BS(3) was a relatively optimal cross-linking concentration for CP subunit-subunit interaction study. 2-DE analysis of the cross-linked CP revealed that α1 might preinteract with α2, and α3 might pre-interact with α4. Moreover, there were different subtypes of α1α2 and α3α4 due to proteasome heterogeneity. There was no significant difference in cross-linking pattern for CP subunits between BS(3) and DSS. Taken together, the gel-based characterization in combination with chemical cross-linking could serve as a tool for the study of subunit interactions within a multi-subunit protein complex. The heterogeneity of 20S proteasome subunit observed in breast cancer cells may provide some key information for proteasome inhibition strategy.

  7. Altered 40 S ribosomal subunits in omnipotent suppressors of yeast.

    PubMed

    Eustice, D C; Wakem, L P; Wilhelm, J M; Sherman, F

    1986-03-20

    The five suppressors SUP35, SUP43, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46, each mapping at a different chromosomal locus in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suppress a wide range of mutations, including representatives of all three types of nonsense mutations, UAA, UAG and UGA. We have demonstrated that ribosomes from the four suppressors SUP35, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46 translate polyuridylate templates in vitro with higher errors than ribosomes from the normal stain, and that this misreading is substantially enhanced by the antibiotic paromomycin. Furthermore, ribosomal subunit mixing experiments established that the 40 S ribosomal subunit, and this subunit only, is responsible for the higher levels of misreading. Thus, the gene products of SUP35, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46 are components of the 40 S subunit or are enzymes that modify the subunit. In addition, a protein from the 40 S subunit of the SUP35 suppressor has an altered electrophoretic mobility; this protein is distinct from the altered protein previously uncovered in the 40 S subunit of the SUP46 suppressor. In contrast to the ribosomes from the four suppressors SUP35, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46, the ribosomes from the SUP43 suppressor do not significantly misread polyuridylate templates in vitro, suggesting that this locus may not encode a ribosomal component or that the misreading is highly specific.

  8. Interactions between the human RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed

    Acker, J; de Graaff, M; Cheynel, I; Khazak, V; Kedinger, C; Vigneron, M

    1997-07-04

    As an initial approach to characterizing the molecular structure of the human RNA polymerase II (hRPB), we systematically investigated the protein-protein contacts that the subunits of this enzyme may establish with each other. To this end, we applied a glutathione S-transferase-pulldown assay to extracts from Sf9 insect cells, which were coinfected with all possible combinations of recombinant baculoviruses expressing hRPB subunits, either as untagged polypeptides or as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. This is the first comprehensive study of interactions between eukaryotic RNA polymerase subunits; among the 116 combinations of hRPB subunits tested, 56 showed significant to strong interactions, whereas 60 were negative. Within the intricate network of interactions, subunits hRPB3 and hRPB5 play a central role in polymerase organization. These subunits, which are able to homodimerize and to interact, may constitute the nucleation center for polymerase assembly, by providing a large interface to most of the other subunits.

  9. Androgen-Dependent Sertoli Cell Tight Junction Remodeling Is Mediated by Multiple Tight Junction Components

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Papia; William Buaas, F.; Sharma, Manju; Smith, Benjamin E.; Greenlee, Anne R.; Eacker, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Sertoli cell tight junctions (SCTJs) of the seminiferous epithelium create a specialized microenvironment in the testis to aid differentiation of spermatocytes and spermatids from spermatogonial stem cells. SCTJs must be chronically broken and rebuilt with high fidelity to allow the transmigration of preleptotene spermatocytes from the basal to adluminal epithelial compartment. Impairment of androgen signaling in Sertoli cells perturbs SCTJ remodeling. Claudin (CLDN) 3, a tight junction component under androgen regulation, localizes to newly forming SCTJs and is absent in Sertoli cell androgen receptor knockout (SCARKO) mice. We show here that Cldn3-null mice do not phenocopy SCARKO mice: Cldn3−/− mice are fertile, show uninterrupted spermatogenesis, and exhibit fully functional SCTJs based on imaging and small molecule tracer analyses, suggesting that other androgen-regulated genes must contribute to the SCARKO phenotype. To further investigate the SCTJ phenotype observed in SCARKO mutants, we generated a new SCARKO model and extensively analyzed the expression of other tight junction components. In addition to Cldn3, we identified altered expression of several other SCTJ molecules, including down-regulation of Cldn13 and a noncanonical tight junction protein 2 isoform (Tjp2iso3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to demonstrate direct androgen receptor binding to regions of these target genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CLDN13 is a constituent of SCTJs and that TJP2iso3 colocalizes with tricellulin, a constituent of tricellular junctions, underscoring the importance of androgen signaling in the regulation of both bicellular and tricellular Sertoli cell tight junctions. PMID:24825397

  10. Gap junctions composed of connexins 41.8 and 39.4 are essential for colour pattern formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Irion, Uwe; Frohnhöfer, Hans Georg; Krauss, Jana; Çolak Champollion, Tuǧba; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Geiger-Rudolph, Silke; Weiler, Christian; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2014-12-23

    Interactions between all three pigment cell types are required to form the stripe pattern of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio), but their molecular nature is poorly understood. Mutations in leopard (leo), encoding Connexin 41.8 (Cx41.8), a gap junction subunit, cause a phenotypic series of spotted patterns. A new dominant allele, leo(tK3), leads to a complete loss of the pattern, suggesting a dominant negative impact on another component of gap junctions. In a genetic screen, we identified this component as Cx39.4 (luchs). Loss-of-function alleles demonstrate that luchs is required for stripe formation in zebrafish; however, the fins are almost not affected. Double mutants and chimeras, which show that leo and luchs are only required in xanthophores and melanophores, but not in iridophores, suggest that both connexins form heteromeric gap junctions. The phenotypes indicate that these promote homotypic interactions between melanophores and xanthophores, respectively, and those cells instruct the patterning of the iridophores.

  11. Deficiency of subunits of Complex I and mitochondrial encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, T; Tanaka, M; Nishikimi, M; Suzuki, H; Ozawa, T; Kobayashi, M; Wada, Y

    1988-03-01

    Enzymic activities of the respiratory chain and content of immunochemically detectable subunits in NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) were measured in mitochondria from the skeletal muscles of 4 patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS). The rotenone-sensitive NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity was extremely decreased, ranging from 0% to 27% of the control value. In all patients, the content of subunits of Complex I was also reduced in parallel with the rotenone-sensitive NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity. It is suggested that the variation in the degree of deficiency of Complex I subunits could explain the clinical heterogeneity of patients with MELAS.

  12. Echinococcus granulosus Antigen B Structure: Subunit Composition and Oligomeric States

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Karina M.; Cardoso, Mateus B.; Follmer, Cristian; da Silveira, Nádya P.; Vargas, Daiani M.; Kitajima, Elliot W.; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antigen B (AgB) is the major protein secreted by the Echinococcus granulosus metacestode and is involved in key host-parasite interactions during infection. The full comprehension of AgB functions depends on the elucidation of several structural aspects that remain unknown, such as its subunit composition and oligomeric states. Methodology/Principal Findings The subunit composition of E. granulosus AgB oligomers from individual bovine and human cysts was assessed by mass spectrometry associated with electrophoretic analysis. AgB8/1, AgB8/2, AgB8/3 and AgB8/4 subunits were identified in all samples analyzed, and an AgB8/2 variant (AgB8/2v8) was found in one bovine sample. The exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI) was used to estimate the relative abundance of the AgB subunits, revealing that AgB8/1 subunit was relatively overrepresented in all samples. The abundance of AgB8/3 subunit varied between bovine and human cysts. The oligomeric states formed by E. granulosus AgB and recombinant subunits available, rAgB8/1, rAgB8/2 and rAgB8/3, were characterized by native PAGE, light scattering and microscopy. Recombinant subunits showed markedly distinct oligomerization behaviors, forming oligomers with a maximum size relation of rAgB8/3>rAgB8/2>rAgB8/1. Moreover, the oligomeric states formed by rAgB8/3 subunit were more similar to those observed for AgB purified from hydatid fluid. Pressure-induced dissociation experiments demonstrated that the molecular assemblies formed by the more aggregative subunits, rAgB8/2 and rAgB8/3, also display higher structural stability. Conclusions/Significance For the first time, AgB subunit composition was analyzed in samples from single hydatid cysts, revealing qualitative and quantitative differences between samples. We showed that AgB oligomers are formed by different subunits, which have distinct abundances and oligomerization properties. Overall, our findings have significantly contributed to increase the

  13. The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions isolated from adult bovine and calf lenses were studied using combined electron microscopy, immunolocalization with monoclonal and polyclonal anti-MIP and anti-MP70 (two putative gap junction-forming proteins), and freeze-fracture and label-fracture methods. The major intrinsic protein of lens plasma membranes (MIP) was localized in single membranes and in an extensive network of junctions having flat and undulating surface topologies. In wavy junctions, polyclonal and monoclonal anti-MIPs labeled only the cytoplasmic surface of the convex membrane of the junction. Label-fracture experiments demonstrated that the convex membrane contained MIP arranged in tetragonal arrays 6-7 nm in unit cell dimension. The apposing concave membrane of the junction displayed fracture faces without intramembrane particles or pits. Therefore, wavy junctions are asymmetric structures composed of MIP crystals abutted against particle-free membranes. In thin junctions, anti-MIP labeled the cytoplasmic surfaces of both apposing membranes with varying degrees of asymmetry. In thin junctions, MIP was found organized in both small clusters and single membranes. These small clusters also abut against particle-free apposing membranes, probably in a staggered or checkerboard pattern. Thus, the structure of thin and wavy junctions differed only in the extent of crystallization of MIP, a property that can explain why this protein can produce two different antibody-labeling patterns. A conclusion of this study is that wavy and thin junctions do not contain coaxially aligned channels, and, in these junctions, MIP is unlikely to form gap junction-like channels. We suggest MIP may behave as an intercellular adhesion protein which can also act as a volume-regulating channel to collapse the lens extracellular space. Junctions constructed of MP70 have a wider overall thickness (18-20 nm) and are abundant in the cortical regions

  14. Electron Transport through Porphyrin Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi

    The goal of this work is to study the properties that would affect the electron transport through a porphyrin molecular junction. This work contributes to the field of electron transport in molecular junctions in the following 3 aspects. First of all, by carrying out experiments comparing the conductance of the iron (III) porphyrin (protected) and the free base porphyrin (protected), it is confirmed that the molecular energy level broadening and shifting occurs for porphyrin molecules when coupled with the metal electrodes, and this level broadening and shifting plays an important role in the electron transport through molecular junctions. Secondly, by carrying out an in-situ deprotection of the acetyl-protected free base porphyrin molecules, it is found out that the presence of acetyl groups reduces the conductance. Thirdly, by incorporating the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectrum and the in-situ deprotection prior to formation of molecular junctions, it allows a more precise understanding of the molecules involved in the formation of molecular junctions, and therefore allows an accurate analysis of the conductance histogram. The molecules are prepared by self-assembly and the junctions are formed using a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) molecular break junction technique. The porphyrin molecules are characterized by MALDI in solution before self-assembly to a gold/mica substrate. The self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of porphyrins on gold are characterized by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) reflection spectroscopy to confirm that the molecules are attached to the substrate. The SAMs are then characterized by Angle-Resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) to determine the thickness and the average molecular orientation of the molecular layer. The electron transport is measured by conductance-displacement (G-S) experiments under a given bias (-0.4V). The conductance value of a single molecule is identified by a statistical analysis

  15. Mutations of the G sup s. alpha. -subunit gene in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy detected by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, L.S.; Friedman, E.; Collins, R.M.; Spiegel, A.M.; Gejman, P.V.; Kadowaki, Takashi; Gershon, E.S. )

    1990-11-01

    Affected members of most kindreds with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy have a partial deficiency of functional G{sub s}, the guanine nucleotide-binding protein that stimulates adenylyl cyclase. By use of the polymerase chain reaction to amplify genomic fragments with the attachment of a high-melting G+C-rich region (GC clamp) and analysis of these fragments by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, heterozygous mutations in the G{sub s} {alpha}-subunit at the donor splice junction of intron 10 and a coding frameshift created by a single base deletion within exon 10. The findings illustrate the heterogeneity of genetic defects in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy and the usefulness of the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis method to search rapidly for mutations in a large candidate gene.

  16. Mutations of the Gs alpha-subunit gene in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy detected by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, L S; Gejman, P V; Friedman, E; Kadowaki, T; Collins, R M; Gershon, E S; Spiegel, A M

    1990-01-01

    Affected members of most kindreds with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy have a partial deficiency of functional Gs, the guanine nucleotide-binding protein that stimulates adenylyl cyclase. By use of the polymerase chain reaction to amplify genomic fragments with the attachment of a high-melting G + C-rich region (GC clamp) and analysis of these fragments by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, heterozygous mutations in the Gs alpha-subunit gene were found in two kindreds. These included a G----C substitution at the donor splice junction of intron 10 and a coding frameshift created by a single base deletion within exon 10. The findings illustrate the heterogeneity of genetic defects in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy and the usefulness of the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis method to search rapidly for mutations in a large candidate gene. Images PMID:2122458

  17. The critical power to maintain thermally stable molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-09

    With the rise of atomic-scale devices such as molecular electronics and scanning probe microscopies, energy transport processes through molecular junctions have attracted notable research interest recently. In this work, heat dissipation and transport across diamond/benzene/diamond molecular junctions are explored by performing atomistic simulations. We identify the critical power Pcr to maintain thermal stability of the junction through efficient dissipation of local heat. We also find that the molecule-probe contact features a power-dependent interfacial thermal resistance RK in the order of 10(9) kW(-1). Moreover, both Pcr and RK display explicit dependence on atomic structures of the junction, force and temperature. For instance, Pcr can be elevated in multiple-molecule junctions, and streching the junction enhances RK by a factor of 2. The applications of these findings in molecular electronics and scanning probing measurements are discussed, providing practical guidelines in their rational design.

  18. The critical power to maintain thermally stable molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-01

    With the rise of atomic-scale devices such as molecular electronics and scanning probe microscopies, energy transport processes through molecular junctions have attracted notable research interest recently. In this work, heat dissipation and transport across diamond/benzene/diamond molecular junctions are explored by performing atomistic simulations. We identify the critical power Pcr to maintain thermal stability of the junction through efficient dissipation of local heat. We also find that the molecule-probe contact features a power-dependent interfacial thermal resistance RK in the order of 109 kW-1. Moreover, both Pcr and RK display explicit dependence on atomic structures of the junction, force and temperature. For instance, Pcr can be elevated in multiple-molecule junctions, and streching the junction enhances RK by a factor of 2. The applications of these findings in molecular electronics and scanning probing measurements are discussed, providing practical guidelines in their rational design.

  19. Coherent diffraction of thermal currents in long Josephson tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Giazotto, Francesco; Solinas, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We discuss heat transport in thermally-biased long Josephson tunnel junctions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. In full analogy with the Josephson critical current, the phase-dependent component of the heat current through the junction displays coherent diffraction. Thermal transport is analyzed as a function of both the length and the damping of the junction, highlighting deviations from the standard "Fraunhofer" pattern characteristic of short junctions. The heat current diffraction patterns show features strongly related to the formation and penetration of Josephson vortices, i.e., solitons. We show that a dynamical treatment of the system is crucial for the realistic description of the Josephson junction, and it leads to peculiar results. In fact, hysteretic behaviors in the diffraction patterns when the field is swept up and down are observed, corresponding to the trapping of vortices in the junction.

  20. Structure, regulation and function of gap junctions in liver

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are a specialized group of cell-to-cell junctions that mediate direct intercellular communication between cells. They arise from the interaction of 2 hemichannels of adjacent cells, which in turn are composed of 6 connexin proteins. In liver, gap junctions are predominantly found in hepatocytes and play critical roles in virtually all phases of the hepatic life cycle, including cell growth, differentiation, liver-specific functionality and cell death. Liver gap junctions are directed through a broad variety of mechanisms ranging from epigenetic control of connexin expression to posttranslational regulation of gap junction activity. This paper reviews established and novel aspects regarding the architecture, control and functional relevance of liver gap junctions. PMID:27001459

  1. Structure, Regulation and Function of Gap Junctions in Liver.

    PubMed

    Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    Gap junctions are a specialized group of cell-to-cell junctions that mediate direct intercellular communication between cells. They arise from the interaction of two hemichannels of adjacent cells, which in turn are composed of six connexin proteins. In liver, gap junctions are predominantly found in hepatocytes and play critical roles in virtually all phases of the hepatic life cycle, including cell growth, differentiation, liver-specific functionality and cell death. Liver gap junctions are directed through a broad variety of mechanisms ranging from epigenetic control of connexin expression to post-translational regulation of gap junction activity. This paper reviews established and novel aspects regarding the architecture, control and functional relevance of liver gap junctions.

  2. Germ cell migration across Sertoli cell tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin E; Braun, Robert E

    2012-11-09

    The blood-testis barrier includes strands of tight junctions between somatic Sertoli cells that restricts solutes from crossing the paracellular space, creating a microenvironment within seminiferous tubules and providing immune privilege to meiotic and postmeiotic cells. Large cysts of germ cells transit the Sertoli cell tight junctions (SCTJs) without compromising their integrity. We used confocal microscopy to visualize SCTJ components during germ cell cyst migration across the SCTJs. Cysts become enclosed within a network of transient compartments fully bounded by old and new tight junctions. Dissolution of the old tight junctions releases the germ cells into the adluminal compartment, thus completing transit across the blood-testis barrier. Claudin 3, a tight junction protein, is transiently incorporated into new tight junctions and then replaced by claudin 11.

  3. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw [Kensington, CA; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man [Lafayette, CA

    2012-03-06

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  4. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw [Kensington, CA; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man [Lafayette, CA

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  5. Electron optics with p-n junctions in ballistic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaowen; Han, Zheng; Elahi, Mirza M.; Habib, K. M. Masum; Wang, Lei; Wen, Bo; Gao, Yuanda; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Ghosh, Avik W.; Dean, Cory R.

    2016-09-01

    Electrons transmitted across a ballistic semiconductor junction are expected to undergo refraction, analogous to light rays across an optical boundary. In graphene, the linear dispersion and zero-gap band structure admit highly transparent p-n junctions by simple electrostatic gating. Here, we employ transverse magnetic focusing to probe the propagation of carriers across an electrostatically defined graphene junction. We find agreement with the predicted Snell’s law for electrons, including the observation of both positive and negative refraction. Resonant transmission across the p-n junction provides a direct measurement of the angle-dependent transmission coefficient. Comparing experimental data with simulations reveals the crucial role played by the effective junction width, providing guidance for future device design. Our results pave the way for realizing electron optics based on graphene p-n junctions.

  6. NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I sequences compared for members of the genus Taenia (Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Zhu, X; McManus, D P

    1999-12-01

    Nine members of the genus Taenia (Taenia taeniaeformis, Taenia hydatigena, Taenia pisiformis, Taenia ovis, Taenia multiceps, Taenia serialis, Taenia saginata, Taenia solium and the Asian Taenia) were characterised by their mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 gene sequences and their genetic relationships were compared with those derived from the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 sequence data. The extent of inter-taxon sequence difference in NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (approximately 5.9-30.8%) was usually greater than in cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (approximately 2.5-18%). Although topology of the phenograms derived from NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 sequence data differed, there was concordance in that T. multiceps, T. serialis (of canids), T. saginata and the Asian Taenia (of humans) were genetically most similar, and those four members were genetically more similar to T. ovis and T. solium than they were to T. hydatigena and T. pisiformis (of canids) or T. taeniaeformis (of cats). The NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 sequence data may prove useful in studies of the systematics and population genetic structure of the Taeniidae.

  7. Performance of Junctional Tourniquets in Normal Human Volunteers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    PERFORMANCE OF JUNCTIONAL TOURNIQUETS IN NORMAL HUMAN VOLUNTEERS John F. Kragh, Jr., MD, Russ S. Kotwal, MD, MPH, Andrew P. Cap, MD, PhD, James K...Cancio, MD ABSTRACT Background. Inguinal bleeding is a common and pre- ventable cause of death on the battlefield. Four FDA-cleared junctional ...tourniquets (Combat Ready Clamp [CRoC], Ab- dominal Aortic and Junctional Tourniquet [AAJT], Junc- tional Emergency Treatment Tool [JETT], and SAM Junc- tional

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions: structure, function and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Emmanuel; Dingsdale, Hayley; Parker, Tony; Voronina, Svetlana; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions are contact sites between the ER and the PM; the distance between the two organelles in the junctions is below 40 nm and the membranes are connected by protein tethers. A number of molecular tools and technical approaches have been recently developed to visualise, modify and characterise properties of ER-PM junctions. The junctions serve as the platforms for lipid exchange between the organelles and for cell signalling, notably Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling. Vice versa, signalling events regulate the development and properties of the junctions. Two Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms of de novo formation of ER-PM junctions have been recently described and characterised. The junction-forming proteins and lipids are currently the focus of vigorous investigation. Junctions can be relatively short-lived and simple structures, forming and dissolving on the time scale of a few minutes. However, complex, sophisticated and multifunctional ER-PM junctions, capable of attracting numerous protein residents and other cellular organelles, have been described in some cell types. The road from simplicity to complexity, i.e. the transformation from simple 'nascent' ER-PM junctions to advanced stable multiorganellar complexes, is likely to become an attractive research avenue for current and future junctologists. Another area of considerable research interest is the downstream cellular processes that can be activated by specific local signalling events in the ER-PM junctions. Studies of the cell physiology and indeed pathophysiology of ER-PM junctions have already produced some surprising discoveries, likely to expand with advances in our understanding of these remarkable organellar contact sites. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  9. Geometrical theory of triple junctions of CSL boundaries.

    PubMed

    Gertsman, V Y

    2001-07-01

    When three grain boundaries having misorientations generating coincidence site lattices (CSLs) meet at a triple junction, a common (triple-junction) CSL is formed. A theory is developed as a set of theorems establishing the relationships between the geometrical parameters of the grain-boundary and triple-junction CSLs. Application of the theory is demonstrated in detail for the case of the cubic crystal system. It is also shown how the theory can be extended to an arbitrary crystal lattice.

  10. Superconductive tunnel junction device and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.

    1983-12-20

    A Josephson tunnel junction device having niobium nitride superconductive electrodes includes a polycrystalline semiconductor tunneling barrier therebetween comprised of silicon, germanium, or an alloy thereof preferably deposited on the lower superconductive electrodes by vapor deposition. The barrier thickness of the junction is controlled by precision doping of the semiconductor material. The active junction is defined after the interfaces between the barrier material and the two superconductor lines are formed, retaining those active interfaces in fully unpolluted character.

  11. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1994-01-01

    A database on large ribosomal subunit RNA is made available. It contains 258 sequences. It provides sequence, alignment and secondary structure information in computer-readable formats. Files can be obtained using ftp. PMID:7524023

  12. Genetic Analysis of the Cytoplasmic Dynein Subunit Families

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, K. Kevin; Shah, Paresh R; Hummerich, Holger; Russ, Andreas; Cotton, James; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; King, Stephen M; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles. PMID:16440056

  13. The eukaryotic RNA exosome: same scaffold but variable catalytic subunits.

    PubMed

    Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Tomecki, Rafal; Jensen, Torben Heick; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The RNA exosome is a versatile ribonucleolytic protein complex that participates in a multitude of cellular RNA processing and degradation events. It consists of an invariable nine-subunit core that associates with a variety of enzymatically active subunits and co-factors. These contribute to or even provide the catalytic activity and substrate specificity of the complex. The S. cerevisiae exosome has been intensively studied since its discovery in 1997 and thus serves as the archetype of eukaryotic exosomes. Notably, its catalytic potential, derived exclusively from associated subunits, differs between the nuclear and cytoplasmic versions of the complex. The same holds true for other eukaryotes, however, recent discoveries from various laboratories including our own have revealed that there are variations on this theme. Here, we review the latest findings concerning catalytic subunits of eukaryotic exosomes, and we discuss the apparent need for differential composition and subcellular distribution of exosome variants.

  14. A process yields large quantities of pure ribosome subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, M.; Lu, P.; Rich, A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of process for in-vitro protein synthesis from living cells followed by dissociation of ribosomes into subunits is discussed. Process depends on dialysis or use of chelating agents. Operation of process and advantages over previous methods are outlined.

  15. ‘Gap Junctions and Cancer: Communicating for 50 Years’

    PubMed Central

    Aasen, Trond; Mesnil, Marc; Naus, Christian C.; Lampe, Paul D.; Laird, Dale W.

    2017-01-01

    Fifty years ago, tumour cells were found to lack electrical coupling, leading to the hypothesis that loss of direct intercellular communication is commonly associated with cancer onset and progression. Subsequent studies linked this phenomenon to gap junctions composed of connexin proteins. While many studies support the notion that connexins are tumour suppressors, recent evidence suggests that, in some tumour types, they may facilitate specific stages of tumour progression through both junctional and non-junctional signalling pathways. This Timeline article highlights the milestones connecting gap junctions to cancer, and underscores important unanswered questions, controversies and therapeutic opportunities in the field. PMID:27782134

  16. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  17. PKCζ PHOSPHORYLATES OCCLUDIN AND PROMOTES ASSEMBLY OF EPITHELIAL TIGHT JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Suneet; Suzuki, Takuya; Seth, Ankur; Samak, Geetha; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Evidence indicates that protein kinases play an important role in the regulation of epithelial tight junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of PKCζ in tight junction regulation in Caco-2 and MDCK cell monolayers. Inhibition of PKCζ by a specific PKCζ-pseudosubstrate peptide results in redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions and disruption of barrier function without affecting cell viability. Reduced expression of PKCζ by antisense oligonucleotide or shRNA also results in compromised tight junction integrity. Inhibition or knock down of PKCζ delays calcium-induced assembly of tight junctions. Tight junction disruption by PKCζ-pseudosubstrate is associated with the dephosphorylation of occludin and ZO-1 on Ser and Thr residues. PKCζ directly binds to the C-terminal domain of occludin and phosphorylates it on Thr residues. T403, T404, T424 and T438 in occludin C-terminal domain are the predominant sites of PKCζ-dependent phosphorylation. T424A or T438A mutation in full length occludin delays its assembly into the tight junctions. Inhibition of PKCζ also induces redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the tight junctions and dissociates these proteins from the detergent-insoluble fractions in mouse ileum. This study demonstrates that PKCζ phosphorylates occludin on specific Thr residues and promotes assembly of epithelial tight junctions. PMID:21545357

  18. Tight junctions: from simple barriers to multifunctional molecular gates.

    PubMed

    Zihni, Ceniz; Mills, Clare; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S

    2016-09-01

    Epithelia and endothelia separate different tissue compartments and protect multicellular organisms from the outside world. This requires the formation of tight junctions, selective gates that control paracellular diffusion of ions and solutes. Tight junctions also form the border between the apical and basolateral plasma-membrane domains and are linked to the machinery that controls apicobasal polarization. Additionally, signalling networks that guide diverse cell behaviours and functions are connected to tight junctions, transmitting information to and from the cytoskeleton, nucleus and different cell adhesion complexes. Recent advances have broadened our understanding of the molecular architecture and cellular functions of tight junctions.

  19. Anomalous Josephson effect in p-wave dirty junctions.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Yukio; Kashiwaya, Satoshi

    2006-03-10

    The Josephson effect in p-wave superconductor/diffusive normal metal/p-wave superconductor junctions is studied theoretically. Amplitudes of Josephson currents are several orders of magnitude larger than those in s-wave junctions. Current-phase (J-phi) relations in low temperatures are close to those in ballistic junctions such as J proportional to sin(phi/2) and J proportional to phi even in the presence of random impurity potentials. A cooperative effect between the midgap Andreev resonant states and the proximity effect causes such anomalous properties and is a character of the spin-triplet superconductor junctions.

  20. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  1. Observing Holliday junction branch migration one step at a time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Taekjip

    2004-03-01

    During genetic recombination, two homologous DNA molecules undergo strand exchange to form a four-way DNA (Holliday) junction and the recognition and processing of this species by branch migration and junction resolving enzymes determine the outcome. We have used single molecule fluorescence techniques to study two intrinsic structural dynamics of the Holliday junction, stacking conformer transitions and spontaneous branch migration. Our studies show that the dynamics of branch migration, resolved with one base pair resolution, is determined by the stability of conformers which in turn depends on the local DNA sequences. Therefore, the energy landscape of Holliday junction branch migation is not uniform, but is rugged.

  2. Craniovertebral Junction Instability: A Review of Facts about Facets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction surgery involves an appropriate philosophical, biomechanical and anatomical understanding apart from high degree of technical skill and ability of controlling venous and arterial bleeding. The author presents his 30-year experience with treating complex craniovertebral junction instability related surgical issues. The facets of atlas and axis form the primary site of movements at the craniovertebral junction. All craniovertebral junction instability is essentially localized to the atlantoaxial facet joint. Direct manipulation and fixation of the facets forms the basis of treatment for instability. PMID:26240728

  3. Towards field theory in spaces with multivolume junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, P. I.; Shtanov, Yu V.

    2002-06-01

    We consider a spacetime formed by several pieces with common timelike boundary which plays the role of a junction between them. We establish junction conditions for fields of various spins and derive the resulting laws of wave propagation through the junction, which turn out to be quite similar for fields of all spins. As an application, we consider the case of multivolume junctions in four-dimensional spacetime that may arise in the context of the theory of quantum creation of a closed universe on the background of a big mother universe. The theory developed can also be applied to braneworld models and to the superstring theory.

  4. 14. View showing junction of arrowhead breakwater with West Breakwater ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View showing junction of arrowhead breakwater with West Breakwater at Harbor entrance At left is automatically controlled lighthouse. - Cleveland Breakwater at Cleveland Harbor, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. Electric flow through an ideal ferromagnet-superconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrescu, Oana Ancuta; Cune, L. C.; Apostol, M.

    2009-04-01

    It is investigated the possibility of controlling the electric flow through a ferromagnet-superconductor junction by spin polarization, within a simple, ideal model of a perfect ferromagnetic-superconductor junction. The ferromagnetic and superconducting properties as well as the Andreev reflection are briefly reviewed and the electrical resistance of the junction is computed both in the diffusive and ballistic regime for the ferromagnetic sample. It is shown that the resistance of the junction increases with increasing magnetization, including both positive or negative jumps on passing from the ballistic to the diffusive regime.

  6. Imaging snake orbits at graphene n -p junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasiński, K.; Mreńca-Kolasińska, A.; Szafran, B.

    2017-01-01

    We consider conductance mapping of the snake orbits confined along the n -p junction defined in graphene by the electrostatic doping in the quantum Hall regime. We explain the periodicity of conductance oscillations at the magnetic field and the Fermi energy scales by the properties of the n -p junction as a conducting channel. We evaluate the conductance maps for a floating gate scanning the surface of the device. In the quantum Hall conditions the currents flow near the edges of the sample and along the n -p junction. The conductance mapping resolves only the n -p junction and not the edges. The conductance oscillations along the junction are found in the maps with periodicity related to the cyclotron orbits of the scattering current. Stronger probe potentials provide support to localized resonances at one of the sides of the junction with current loops that interfere with the n -p junction currents. The interference results in a series of narrow lines parallel to the junction with positions that strongly depend on the magnetic field through the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The consequences of a limited transparency of finite-width n -p junctions are also discussed.

  7. Photoresponse in arrays of thermoelectric nanowire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, T. E.; Scott, R.; Johnson, S.; Brower, T.; Belk, J. H.; Hunt, J. H.

    2013-07-01

    We report the first demonstration of optical detection by thermoelectric nanowire junctions. We employed devices composed of bismuth nanowire arrays which are capped with a transparent indium tin oxide electrode. The incident surface features very low optical reflectivity and enhanced light trapping. The unique attributes of the thermoelectric arrays are the combination of strong temporal and optical wavelength dependences of the photocurrent. Under infrared illumination, the signal can be completely described by thermoelectric effects considering cooling rates given by heat diffusion through the array. In addition, under visible illumination, we observe a photovoltaic response.

  8. Plasmon Enhanced Hetero-Junction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Ching, Levine; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Xu, Huizhong

    2015-03-01

    Here we report a systematic study of plasmon-enhanced hetero-junction solar cells made of colloidal quantum dots (PbS) and nanowires (ZnO), with/without metal nanoparticles (Au). The structure of solar cell devices was characterized by AFM, SEM and profilometer, etc. The power conversion efficiencies of solar cell devices were characterized by solar simulator (OAI TriSOL, AM1.5G Class AAA). The enhancement in the photocurrent due to introduction of metal nanoparticles was obvious. We believe this is due to the plasmonic effect from the metal nanoparticles. The correlation between surface roughness, film uniformity and device performance was also studied.

  9. Charge Transport Processes in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christopher Eugene

    Molecular electronics (ME) has evolved into a rich area of exploration that combines the fields of chemistry, materials, electronic engineering and computational modeling to explore the physics behind electronic conduction at the molecular level. Through studying charge transport properties of single molecules and nanoscale molecular materials the field has gained the potential to bring about new avenues for the miniaturization of electrical components where quantum phenomena are utilized to achieve solid state molecular device functionality. Molecular junctions are platforms that enable these studies and consist of a single molecule or a small group of molecules directly connected to electrodes. The work presented in this thesis has built upon the current understanding of the mechanisms of charge transport in ordered junctions using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecular thin films. Donor and acceptor compounds were synthesized and incorporated into SAMs grown on metal substrates then the transport properties were measured with conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). In addition to experimentally measured current-voltage (I-V) curves, the transport properties were addressed computationally and modeled theoretically. The key objectives of this project were to 1) investigate the impact of molecular structure on hole and electron charge transport, 2) understand the nature of the charge carriers and their structure-transport properties through long (<4 nm) conjugated molecular wires, and 3) quantitatively extract interfacial properties characteristic to macroscopic junctions, such as energy level alignment and molecule-contact electronic coupling from experimental I-V curves. Here, we lay ground work for creating a more complete picture of charge transport in macroscopically ordered molecular junctions of controlled architecture, length and charge carrier. The polaronic nature of hopping transport has been predicted in long, conjugated molecular wires

  10. Collisions of Strings with Y Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2006-07-14

    We study the dynamics of Nambu-Goto strings with junctions at which three strings meet. In particular, we exhibit one simple exact solution and examine the process of intercommuting of two straight strings in which they exchange partners but become joined by a third string. We show that there are important kinematical constraints on this process. The exchange cannot occur if the strings meet with very large relative velocity. This may have important implications for the evolution of cosmic superstring networks and non-Abelian string networks.

  11. Nonintrusive Measurement Of Temperature Of LED Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Powers, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Temperature inferred from spectrum of emitted light. Method of determining temperature of junction based on two relevant characteristics of LED. Gap between valence and conduction electron-energy bands in LED material decreases with increasing temperature, causing wavelength of emitted photon to increase with temperature. Other, as temperature increases, non-radiative processes dissipate more of input electrical energy as heat and less as photons in band-gap wavelenth region; optical and quantum efficiencies decrease with increasing temperature. In principal, either characteristic alone used to determine temperature. However, desirable to use both to obtain indication of uncertainty.

  12. Nonintrusive Measurement Of Temperature Of LED Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Powers, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Temperature inferred from spectrum of emitted light. Method of determining temperature of junction based on two relevant characteristics of LED. Gap between valence and conduction electron-energy bands in LED material decreases with increasing temperature, causing wavelength of emitted photon to increase with temperature. Other, as temperature increases, non-radiative processes dissipate more of input electrical energy as heat and less as photons in band-gap wavelenth region; optical and quantum efficiencies decrease with increasing temperature. In principal, either characteristic alone used to determine temperature. However, desirable to use both to obtain indication of uncertainty.

  13. Anatomy and biomechanics of the craniovertebral junction.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alejandro J; Scheer, Justin K; Leibl, Kayla E; Smith, Zachary A; Dlouhy, Brian J; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2015-04-01

    The craniovertebral junction (CVJ) has unique anatomical structures that separate it from the subaxial cervical spine. In addition to housing vital neural and vascular structures, the majority of cranial flexion, extension, and axial rotation is accomplished at the CVJ. A complex combination of osseous and ligamentous supports allow for stability despite a large degree of motion. An understanding of anatomy and biomechanics is essential to effectively evaluate and address the various pathological processes that may affect this region. Therefore, the authors present an up-to-date narrative review of CVJ anatomy, normal and pathological biomechanics, and fixation techniques.

  14. Magic-T Junction using Microstrip/Slotline Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.; Doiron, Terence

    2008-01-01

    An improved broadband planar magic-T junction that incorporates microstrip/slotline transitions has been developed. In comparison with a prior broadband magic-T junction incorporating microstrip/slotline transitions, this junction offers superior broadband performance. In addition, because this junction is geometrically simpler and its performance is less affected by fabrication tolerances, the benefits of the improved design can be realized at lower fabrication cost. There are potential uses for junctions like this one in commercial microwave communication receivers, radar and polarimeter systems, and industrial microwave instrumentation. A magic-T junction is a four-port waveguide junction consisting of a combination of an H-type and an E-type junction. An E-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm that extends from a main waveguide in the same direction as that of the electric (E) field in the waveguide. An H-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm parallel to the magnetic (H) field in a main waveguide. A magic-T junction includes two input ports (here labeled 1 and 2, respectively) and two output ports (here labeled E and H, respectively). In an ideal case, (1) a magic-T junction is lossless, (2) the input signals add (that is, they combine in phase with each other) at port H, and (3) the input signals subtract (that is, they combine in opposite phase) at port E. The prior junction over which the present junction is an improvement affords in-phase-combining characterized by a broadband frequency response, and features a small slotline area to minimize in-band loss. However, with respect to isolation between ports 1 and 2 and return loss at port E, it exhibits narrowband frequency responses. In addition, its performance is sensitive to misalignment of microstrip and slotline components: this sensitivity is attributable to a limited number of quarter-wavelength (lambda/4) transmission-line sections for matching impedances

  15. Large-area silicon nanowire Schottky junction photodetector with tunable absorption and low junction capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, L. P.; Seyedi, M. A.; Fiorentino, M.; Beausoleil, R. G.

    2017-06-01

    Silicon photodetectors for operation in the near-infrared with a sufficient responsivity and high-speed operation are currently needed as scalable, CMOS compatible components for photonic and communication applications. Photodetectors based on semiconductor nanowire structures with dielectric planarization enable larger active optical areas and higher operating speeds than planar devices due to reduced junction capacitance and enhanced absorption. Here, we report on the fabrication and characterization of a silicon nanowire photodetector with dielectric infilling and a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) Schottky contact. Optical simulations show that the absorbed power can be confined at the top of the nanowire array, enabling efficient operation in the near-infrared. This is despite the relatively low absorption coefficient for silicon in this wavelength range in addition to the design of the nanowire array to have a low fill factor compared to the bulk material in order to minimize the junction capacitance. The responsivity of this device is  >0.3 A W-1 at a reverse bias of 2 V and the junction capacitance is 8  ±  2 nF cm-2, which are respectively comparable and lower than the values expected for a planar silicon Schottky junction photodetector with a similar active area.

  16. Full potential of radial junction Si thin film solar cells with advanced junction materials and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shengyi; Misra, Soumyadeep; Lu, Jiawen; Yu, Zhongwei; Yu, Linwei; Xu, Jun; Wang, Junzhuan; Xu, Ling; Shi, Yi; Chen, Kunji; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2015-07-01

    Combining advanced materials and junction design in nanowire-based thin film solar cells requires a different thinking of the optimization strategy, which is critical to fulfill the potential of nano-structured photovoltaics. Based on a comprehensive knowledge of the junction materials involved in the multilayer stack, we demonstrate here, in both experimental and theoretical manners, the potential of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) thin film solar cells in a radial junction (RJ) configuration. Resting upon a solid experimental basis, we also assess a more advanced tandem RJ structure with radially stacking a-Si:H/nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si:H) PIN junctions, and show that a balanced photo-current generation with a short circuit current density of Jsc = 14.2 mA/cm2 can be achieved in a tandem RJ cell, while reducing the expensive nc-Si:H absorber thickness from 1-3 μ m (in planar tandem cells) to only 120 nm. These results provide a clearly charted route towards a high performance Si thin film photovoltaics.

  17. Subunit-Specific Trafficking of GABAA Receptors during Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Goodkin, Howard P.; Joshi, Suchitra; Mtchedlishvili, Zakaria; Brar, Jasmit; Kapur, Jaideep

    2010-01-01

    It is proposed that a reduced surface expression of GABAA receptors (GABARs) contributes to the pathogenesis of status epilepticus (SE), a condition characterized by prolonged seizures. This hypothesis was based on the finding that prolonged epileptiform bursting (repetitive bursts of prolonged depolarizations with superimposed action potentials) in cultures of dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neurons (dissociated cultures) results in the increased intracellular accumulation of GABARs. However, it is not known whether this rapid modification in the surface-expressed GABAR pool results from selective, subunit-dependent or nonselective, subunit-independent internalization of GABARs. In hippocampal slices obtained from animals undergoing prolonged SE (SE-treated slices), we found that the surface expression of the GABARβ2/3 and γ2 subunits was reduced, whereas that of the δ subunit was not. Complementary electrophysiological recordings from dentate granule cells in SE-treated slices demonstrated a reduction in GABAR-mediated synaptic inhibition, but not tonic inhibition. A reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit, but not the δ subunit was also observed in dissociated cultures and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures when incubated in an elevated KCl external medium or an elevated KCl external medium supplemented with NMDA, respectively. Additional studies demonstrated that the reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit was independent of direct ligand binding of the GABAR. These findings demonstrate that the regulation of surface-expressed GABAR pool during SE is subunit-specific and occurs independent of ligand binding. The differential modulation of the surface expression of GABARs during SE has potential implications for the treatment of this neurological emergency. PMID:18322097

  18. F-subunit reinforces torque generation in V-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Jun-ichi; Seino, Akihiko; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Tirtom, Naciye Esma; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Ken; Hayashi, Kumiko

    2014-09-01

    Vacuolar-type H(+)-pumping ATPases (V-ATPases) perform remarkably diverse functions in eukaryotic organisms. They are present in the membranes of many organelles and regulate the pH of several intracellular compartments. A family of V-ATPases is also present in the plasma membranes of some bacteria. Such V-ATPases function as ATP-synthases. Each V-ATPase is composed of a water-soluble domain (V1) and a membrane-embedded domain (Vo). The ATP-driven rotary unit, V[Formula: see text], is composed of A, B, D, and F subunits. The rotary shaft (the DF subcomplex) rotates in the central cavity of the A3B3-ring (the catalytic hexamer ring). The D-subunit, which has a coiled-coil domain, penetrates into the ring, while the F-subunit is a globular-shaped domain protruding from the ring. The minimal ATP-driven rotary unit of V[Formula: see text] is comprised of the A3B3D subunits, and we therefore investigated how the absence of the globular-shaped F-subunit affects the rotary torque generation of V[Formula: see text]. Using a single-molecule technique, we observed the motion of the rotary motors. To obtain the torque values, we then analyzed the measured motion trajectories based on the fluctuation theorem, which states that the law of entropy production in non-equilibrium conditions and has been suggested as a novel and effective method for measuring torque. The measured torque of A3B3D was half that of the wild-type V1, and full torque was recovered in the mutant V1, in which the F-subunit was genetically fused with the D-subunit, indicating that the globular-shaped F-subunit reinforces torque generation in V1.

  19. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua Joshua

    2008-11-11

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  20. Behavior of tight-junction, adherens-junction and cell polarity proteins during HNF-4{alpha}-induced epithelial polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Satohisa, Seiro; Chiba, Hideki . E-mail: hidchiba@sapmed.ac.jp; Osanai, Makoto; Ohno, Shigeo; Kojima, Takashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2005-10-15

    We previously reported that expression of tight-junction molecules occludin, claudin-6 and claudin-7, as well as establishment of epithelial polarity, was triggered in mouse F9 cells expressing hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} [H. Chiba, T. Gotoh, T. Kojima, S. Satohisa, K. Kikuchi, M. Osanai, N. Sawada. Hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} triggers formation of functional tight junctions and establishment of polarized epithelial morphology in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, Exp. Cell Res. 286 (2003) 288-297]. Using these cells, we examined in the present study behavior of tight-junction, adherens-junction and cell polarity proteins and elucidated the molecular mechanism behind HNF-4{alpha}-initiated junction formation and epithelial polarization. We herein show that not only ZO-1 and ZO-2, but also ZO-3, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B, JAM-C and cell polarity proteins PAR-3, PAR-6 and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) accumulate at primordial adherens junctions in undifferentiated F9 cells. In contrast, CRB3, Pals1 and PATJ appeared to exhibit distinct subcellular localization in immature cells. Induced expression of HNF-4{alpha} led to translocation of these tight-junction and cell polarity proteins to beltlike tight junctions, where occludin, claudin-6 and claudin-7 were assembled, in differentiated cells. Interestingly, PAR-6, aPKC, CRB3 and Pals1, but not PAR-3 or PATJ, were also concentrated on the apical membranes in differentiated cells. These findings indicate that HNF-4{alpha} provokes not only expression of tight-junction adhesion molecules, but also modulation of subcellular distribution of junction and cell polarity proteins, resulting in junction formation and epithelial polarization.