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Sample records for junctional adhesion molecule-a

  1. Expression of claudins, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 in canine organs

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Changhwan; Shin, Da-Hye; Lee, Dongoh; Kang, Su-Myung; Seok, Ju-Hyung; Kang, Hee Young; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions are the outermost structures of intercellular junctions and are classified as transmembrane proteins. These factors form selective permeability barriers between cells, act as paracellular transporters and regulate structural and functional polarity of cells. Although tight junctions have been previously studied, comparison of the transcriptional-translational levels of these molecules in canine organs remains to be investigated. In the present study, organ-specific expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 was examined in the canine duodenum, lung, liver and kidney. Results of immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that the tight junctions were localized in intestinal villi and glands of the duodenum, bronchiolar epithelia and alveolar walls of the lung, endometrium and myometrium of the hepatocytes, and the distal tubules and glomeruli of the kidney. These results suggest that tight junctions are differently expressed in organs, and therefore may be involved in organ-specific functions to maintain physiological homeostasis. PMID:27600198

  2. Distribution of the feline calicivirus receptor junctional adhesion molecule a in feline tissues.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, P A; Stokol, T; Liu, H; van der List, D A; Gaffney, P M; Parker, J S

    2011-03-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that plays an important role in the assembly and maintenance of tight junctions and the establishment of epithelial cell polarity. The feline JAM-A (fJAM-A) is a functional receptor for feline calicivirus (FCV). Among natural diseases associated with FCV infection, isolates that cause oral vesicular disease are detected in epithelial cells; however, isolates that cause systemic disease are detected in multiple cell types. The distribution of an FCV receptor or receptors in feline tissues is relevant to viral pathogenesis in that it should reflect the wide latitude of clinical sequelae associated with FCV infection. The authors examined the expression of feline JAM-A in the cat by using confocal immunofluorescence localization on normal tissues, with special regard to tissue targets of naturally occurring FCV. As described in the human and the mouse, fJAM-A was widely distributed in feline tissues, where it localized at cell-cell junctions of epithelial and endothelial cells. fJAM-A was highly expressed on feline platelets, with lower levels of expression on feline peripheral blood leukocytes. Additionally, FCV infection of a feline epithelial cell monolayer causes redistribution of fJAM-A to the cytosol of infected cells. It is reasonable to propose that the spectrum of lesions caused by FCV reflects disruption of intercellular junctions that rely on fJAM-A function and tight junctional integrity.

  3. Overexpression of junctional adhesion molecule-A and EphB2 predicts poor survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Wang, Aili; Lu, Funian; Chen, Hongxia; Fu, Pin; Zhao, Xianda; Chen, Honglei

    2017-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecules are important components of tight junctions, and Eph/ephrin proteins constitute the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Both junctional adhesion molecules and Eph/ephrin are involved in normal tissue development and cancer progression. However, the expression levels and clinical significances of junctional adhesion molecule-A, a member of junctional adhesion molecules, and EphB2, a member of Eph/ephrin family, in lung adenocarcinoma patients are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to identify the expression and prognostic values of junctional adhesion molecule-A and EphB2 in lung adenocarcinoma patients' cohort. In our study, 70 (55.6%) showed high expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A protein and 51 (40.5%) showed high expression of EphB2 protein in 126 lung adenocarcinoma tissues. Junctional adhesion molecule-A and EphB2 expressions were both significantly increased in tumor tissues compared with noncancerous lung tissues. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test indicated that low expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A and EphB2 proteins can predict better survival and low mortality rate of lung adenocarcinomas. In univariate analysis, high expression levels of junctional adhesion molecule-A and EphB2 were both found to be significantly correlated with poor overall survival of lung adenocarcinoma patients (hazard ratio = 1.791, 95% confidence interval = 1.041-3.084, p = 0.035; hazard ratio = 1.762, 95% confidence interval = 1.038-2.992, p = 0.036, respectively). The multivariate Cox proportional hazard model demonstrated that EphB2 expression is an independent prognosis parameter in lung adenocarcinoma patients (hazard ratio = 1.738, 95% confidence interval = 1.023-2.952, p = 0.016). Taken together, high expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A and EphB2 can predict poor overall survival and high mortality rate, and EphB2 is an independent prognostic biomarker in

  4. Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A Is Required for Hematogenous Dissemination of Reovirus

    PubMed Central

    Antar, Annukka A. R.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Campbell, Jacquelyn A.; Henry, Rachel A.; Perdigoto, Ana L.; Carter, Bruce D.; Pozzi, Ambra; Abel, Ty W.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Diverse families of viruses bind immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) proteins located in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions of epithelium and endothelium. However, little is known about the roles of these receptors in the pathogenesis of viral disease. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an IgSF protein that localizes to TJs and serves as a receptor for mammalian reovirus. We inoculated wild-type (wt) and isogenic JAM-A−/− mice perorally with reovirus and found that JAM-A is dispensable for viral replication in the intestine but required for systemic dissemination. Reovirus replication in the brain and tropism for discrete neural regions are equivalent in wt and JAM-A−/− mice following intracranial inoculation, suggesting a function for JAM-A in reovirus spread to extra-intestinal sites. JAM-A promotes reovirus infection of endothelial cells, providing a conduit for the virus into the bloodstream. These findings indicate that a broadly expressed IgSF viral receptor specifically mediates hematogenous dissemination in the host. PMID:19154988

  5. Dysregulation of junctional adhesion molecule-A via p63/GATA-3 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kakuki, Takuya; Kurose, Makoto; Takano, Ken-ichi; Kondoh, Atsushi; Obata, Kazufumi; Nomura, Kazuaki; Miyata, Ryo; Kaneko, Yakuto; Konno, Takumi; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Kohno, Takayuki; Himi, Tetsuo; Kojima, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A), which belongs to the IgG superfamily, is a tight junction molecule associated with epithelial and endothelial barrier function. Overexpression of JAM-A is also closely associated with invasion and metastasis of cancers such as breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancer. However, little is known about the mechanism in overexpression of JAM-A in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In the present study, we found high expression of JAM-A at the protein and mRNA levels in HNSCC tissues, including those of the oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx, together with high protein expression of β-catenin, p63, ΔNp63 and GATA-3. Furthermore, in ELISA, a significant increase of soluble JAM-A in the sera of HNSCC patients was observed compared to healthy subjects. Knockdown of JAM-A by siRNA inhibited cell proliferation, invasion and migration in the HNSCC cell line Detroit562 in vitro. JAM-A expression in Detroit562 was increased via a distinct signal transduction pathway including NF-κB. Expression of JAM-A, β-catenin, p63 and ΔNp63 in Detroit562 was decreased under hypoxia. Knockdown of p63, ΔNp63 or GATA-3 by siRNAs reduced JAM-A expression in Detroit562. In primary cultured HNSCC cells in which CK7, p63, ΔNp63 and GATA-3 were detected, JAM-A expression was decreased by knockdown of p63 or ΔNp63. These results indicate that JAM-A is a biomarker of malignancy in HNSCC and that plasma soluble JAM-A may contribute to serum-based diagnosis of HNSCC. The mechanism of dysregulation of JAM-A via p63/GATA-3 is important in possible molecular targeted therapy for HNSCC. PMID:27036044

  6. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  7. Junctional adhesion molecule A of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus): a possible immunomodulator and a target for bacterial immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Min; Sun, Li

    2014-09-15

    Junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) are a family of type I cell surface receptors with two immunoglobulin (Ig) domains in the extracellular region. The family contains three classical members, i.e., JAM-A, -B, and -C. To date very little is known about the function of JAMs in teleost. In this work, we identified a JAM-A homologue (named SoJAMa) from red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and examined its expression and biological property. SoJAMa is composed of 347 amino acid residues and was predicted to be a transmembrane protein with a large extracellular region that contains two Ig domains. SoJAMa expression occurred in multiple tissues, in particular immune relevant organs. SoJAMa expression was downregulated by experimental challenge with an extracellular pathogen but upregulated by challenge with an intracellular pathogen that is known to be capable of immune evasion. Likewise, cellular study showed that infection of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) with intracellular pathogen induced significantly higher expression of SoJAMa. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that SoJAMa was localized on the surface of PBL and recognized by antibodies against recombinant SoJAMa. Blockage of the SoJAMa on PBL with antibodies resulted in augmented respiratory burst activity. Consistently, antibody-treated PBL exhibited enhanced resistance against bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that a teleost JAM-A likely possesses immunoregulatory property in a negative manner, and that this property may be taken advantage of by intracellular pathogens as an invasion strategy.

  8. Junctional adhesion molecule-A, JAM-A, is a novel cell-surface marker for long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yasuyoshi; Takeuchi, Masaki; Hirata, Ayami; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Kitamura, Toshio; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A/JAM-1/F11R) is a cell adhesion molecule expressed in epithelial and endothelial cells, and also hematopoietic cells, such as leukocytes, platelets, and erythrocytes. Here, we show that JAM-A is expressed at a high level in the enriched hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) fraction; that is, CD34(+)c-Kit(+) cells in embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) aorta-gonod-mesonephros (AGM) and E11.5 fetal liver (FL), as well as c-Kit(+)Sca-1(+)Lineage(-) (KSL) cells in E14.5 FL, E18.5FL, and adult bone marrow (BM). Although the percentage of JAM-A(+) cells in those tissues decreases during development, the expression in the HSC fraction is maintained throughout life. Colony-forming assays reveal that multilineage colony-forming activity in JAM-A(+) cells is higher than that in JAM-A(-) cells in the enriched HSC fraction in all of those tissues. Transplantation assays show that long-term reconstituting HSC (LTR-HSC) activity is exclusively in the JAM-A(+) population and is highly enriched in the JAM-A(+) cells sorted directly from whole BM cells by anti-JAM-A antibody alone. Together, these results indicate that JAM-A is expressed on hematopoietic precursors in various hematopoietic tissues and is an excellent marker to isolate LTR-HSCs.

  9. miR156a Mimic Represses the Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition of Human Nasopharyngeal Cancer Cells by Targeting Junctional Adhesion Molecule A

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yinuo; Qiu, Huizhi; Xie, Guofeng; Huang, Donglan; Zheng, Ronghui; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been documented as having an important role in the development of cancer. Broccoli is very popular in large groups of the population and has anticancer properties. Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAMA) is preferentially concentrated at tight junctions and influences cell morphology and migration. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental program associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miRNAs from broccoli in human nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). We demonstrated that a total of 84 conserved miRNAs and 184 putative novel miRNAs were found in broccoli by sequencing technology. Among these, miR156a was expressed the most. In addition, synthetic miR156a mimic inhibited the EMT of NPC cells in vitro. Furthermore, it was confirmed that JAMA was the target of miR156a mimic as validated by 3’ UTR luciferase reporter assays and western blotting. Knockdown of JAMA was consistent with the effects of miR156a mimic on the EMT of NPC, and the up-regulation of JAMA could partially restore EMT repressed by miR156a mimic. In conclusion, these results indicate that the miR156a mimic inhibits the EMT of NPC cells by targeting the 3’ UTR of JAMA. These miRNA profiles of broccoli provide a fundamental basis for further research. Moreover, the discovery of miR156a may have clinical implications for the treatment of patients with NPC. PMID:27341697

  10. A novel role for junctional adhesion molecule-A in tumor proliferation: modulation by an anti-JAM-A monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, Liliane; Haeuw, Jean-François; Beau-Larvor, Charlotte; Gonzalez, Alexandra; Zanna, Laurence; Malissard, Martine; Lepecquet, Anne-Marie; Robert, Alain; Bailly, Christian; Broussas, Matthieu; Corvaia, Nathalie

    2013-03-15

    To identify new potential targets in oncology, functional approaches were developed using tumor cells as immunogens to select monoclonal antibodies targeting membrane receptors involved in cell proliferation. For that purpose cancer cells were injected into mice and resulting hybridomas were screened for their ability to inhibit cell proliferation in vitro. Based on this functional approach coupled to proteomic analysis, a monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing the human junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) was defined. Interestingly, compared to both normal and tumor tissues, we observed that JAM-A was mainly overexpressed on breast, lung and kidney tumor tissues. In vivo experiments demonstrated that injections of anti-JAM-A antibody resulted in a significant tumor growth inhibition of xenograft human tumors. Treatment with monoclonal antibody induced a decrease of the Ki67 expression and downregulated JAM-A levels. All together, our results show for the first time that JAM-A can interfere with tumor proliferation and suggest that JAM-A is a potential novel target in oncology. The results also demonstrate that a functional approach coupled to a robust proteomic analysis can be successful to identify new antibody target molecules that lead to promising new antibody-based therapies against cancers.

  11. Oestradiol decreases colonic permeability through oestrogen receptor β-mediated up-regulation of occludin and junctional adhesion molecule-A in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Braniste, Viorica; Leveque, Mathilde; Buisson-Brenac, Claire; Bueno, Lionel; Fioramonti, Jean; Houdeau, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Oestradiol modulates paracellular permeability and tight junction (TJ) function in endothelia and reproductive tissues, but whether the ovarian hormones and cycle affect the paracellular pathway in the intestinal epithelium remains unclear. Oestrogen receptors (ERs) are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, and oestradiol regulates epithelium formation. We examined the effects of oestrous cycle stage, oestradiol benzoate (EB), and progesterone (P) on colonic paracellular permeability (CPP) in the female rat, and whether EB affects expression of the TJ proteins in the rat colon and the human colon cell line Caco-2. In cyclic rats, CPP was determined through lumen-to-blood 51Cr-labelled EDTA clearance, and in Ussing chambers for dextran permeability. CPP was also examined in ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated with P or EB, with and without the ER antagonist ICI 182,780, or with the selective agonists for ERα (propyl pyrazole triol; PPT) or ERβ (diarylpropionitrile; DPN). In oestrus rats, CPP was reduced (P < 0.01) relative to dioestrus. In OVX rats, EB dose-dependently decreased CPP, an effect mimicked by DPN and blocked by ICI 182,780, whereas P had no effect. Oestradiol increased occludin mRNA and protein in the colon (P < 0.05), but not zona occludens (ZO)-1. Further, EB and DPN enhanced occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A expression in Caco-2 cells without change in ZO-1, an effect blocked by ICI 182,780. These data show that oestrogen reinforces intestinal epithelial barrier through ERβ-mediated up-regulation of the transmembrane proteins occludin and JAM-A determining paracellular spaces. These findings highlight the importance of the ERβ pathway in the control of colonic paracellular transport and mucosal homeostasis. PMID:19433574

  12. Influence of hypothermia and subsequent rewarming upon leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of Junctional-Adhesion-Molecules A and B

    PubMed Central

    Bogert, Nicolai V.; Werner, Isabella; Kornberger, Angela; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Keller, Till; Stock, Ulrich A.; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Patients with risks of ischemic injury, e.g. during circulatory arrest in cardiac surgery, or after resuscitation are subjected to therapeutic hypothermia. For aortic surgery, the body is traditionally cooled down to 18 °C and then rewarmed to body temperature. The role of hypothermia and the subsequent rewarming process on leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of junctional-adhesion-molecules is not clarified yet. Thus, we investigated in an in-vitro model the influence of temperature modulation during activation and transendothelial migration of leukocytes through human endothelial cells. Additionally, we investigated the expression of JAMs in the rewarming phase. Exposure to low temperatures alone during transmigration scarcely affects leukocyte extravasation, whereas hypothermia during treatment and transendothelial migration improves leukocyte-endothelial interactions. Rewarming causes a significant up-regulation of transmigration with falling temperatures. JAM-A is significantly modulated during rewarming. Our data suggest that transendothelial migration of leukocytes is not only modulated by cell-activation itself. Activation temperatures and the rewarming process are essential. Continued hypothermia significantly inhibits transendothelial migration, whereas the rewarming process enhances transmigration strongly. The expression of JAMs, especially JAM-A, is strongly modulated during the rewarming process. Endothelial protection prior to warm reperfusion and mild hypothermic conditions reducing the difference between hypothermia and rewarming temperatures should be considered. PMID:26912257

  13. A novel junctional adhesion molecule A (CgJAM-A-L) from oyster (Crassostrea gigas) functions as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Conghui; Wang, Mengqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Hao; Liu, Zhaoqun; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM), a subfamily of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) with a couple of immunoglobulin domains, can act as regulator in homeostasis and inflammation of vertebrates. In the present study, a structural homolog of JAM-A (designated CgJAM-A-L) was screened out from oyster, Crassostrea gigas, through a search of JAM-A D1 domain (N-terminal Ig domain in JAM-A). The cDNA of CgJAM-A-L was of 1188 bp encoding a predicted polypeptide of 395 amino acids. The immunoreactive area of CgJAM-A-L mainly distributed over the plasma membrane of hemocytes. After Vibro splendidus or tumor necrosis factor (CgTNF-1) stimulation, the mRNA transcripts of CgJAM-A-L in hemocytes increased significantly by 4.46-fold and 9.00-fold (p < 0.01) of those in control group, respectively. The recombinant CgJAM-A-L protein (rCgJAM-A-L) could bind multiple PAMPs including lipopolysaccharides (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), mannose (MAN), β-glucan (GLU) and poly(I:C), and various microorganisms including Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Vibro anguillarum, V. splendidus, Pastoris pastoris and Yarrowia lipolytica. The phagocytic rates of oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and yeast P. pastoris were significantly enhanced after the incubation of rCgJAM-A-L, and even increased more significantly after the pre-incubation of rCgJAM-A-L with microbes (p < 0.01). The results collectively indicated that CgJAM-A-L functioned as an important pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and opsonin in the immune defense against invading pathogen in oyster. Moreover, as the most primitive specie with homolog of JAMs, the information of CgJAM-A-L in oyster would provide useful clues for the evolutionary study of JAMs and immunoglobulins.

  14. Targeting endothelial junctional adhesion molecule-A/ EPAC/ Rap-1 axis as a novel strategy to increase stem cell engraftment in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Giannotta, Monica; Benedetti, Sara; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Corada, Monica; Trani, Marianna; D'Antuono, Rocco; Millet, Queensta; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Gálvez, Beatriz G; Cossu, Giulio; Dejana, Elisabetta

    2014-02-01

    Muscular dystrophies are severe genetic diseases for which no efficacious therapies exist. Experimental clinical treatments include intra-arterial administration of vessel-associated stem cells, called mesoangioblasts (MABs). However, one of the limitations of this approach is the relatively low number of cells that engraft the diseased tissue, due, at least in part, to the sub-optimal efficiency of extravasation, whose mechanisms for MAB are unknown. Leukocytes emigrate into the inflamed tissues by crossing endothelial cell-to-cell junctions and junctional proteins direct and control leukocyte diapedesis. Here, we identify the endothelial junctional protein JAM-A as a key regulator of MAB extravasation. We show that JAM-A gene inactivation and JAM-A blocking antibodies strongly enhance MAB engraftment in dystrophic muscle. In the absence of JAM-A, the exchange factors EPAC-1 and 2 are down-regulated, which prevents the activation of the small GTPase Rap-1. As a consequence, junction tightening is reduced, allowing MAB diapedesis. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of Rap-1 increases MAB engraftment in dystrophic muscle, which results into a significant improvement of muscle function offering a novel strategy for stem cell-based therapies.

  15. The cryo-electron microscopy structure of feline calicivirus bound to junctional adhesion molecule A at 9-angstrom resolution reveals receptor-induced flexibility and two distinct conformational changes in the capsid protein VP1.

    PubMed

    Bhella, David; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2011-11-01

    Caliciviridae are small icosahedral positive-sense RNA-containing viruses and include the human noroviruses, a leading cause of infectious acute gastroenteritis and feline calicivirus (FCV), which causes respiratory illness and stomatitis in cats. FCV attachment and entry is mediated by feline junctional adhesion molecule A (fJAM-A), which binds to the outer face of the capsomere, inducing a conformational change in the capsid that may be important for viral uncoating. Here we present the results of our structural investigation of the virus-receptor interaction and ensuing conformational changes. Cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction were used to solve the structure of the virus decorated with a soluble fragment of the receptor at subnanometer resolution. In initial reconstructions, the P domains of the capsid protein VP1 and fJAM-A were poorly resolved. Sorting experiments led to improved reconstructions of the FCV-fJAM-A complex both before and after the induced conformational change, as well as in three transition states. These data showed that the P domain becomes flexible following fJAM-A binding, leading to a loss of icosahedral symmetry. Furthermore, two distinct conformational changes were seen; an anticlockwise rotation of up to 15° of the P domain was observed in the AB dimers, while tilting of the P domain away from the icosahedral 2-fold axis was seen in the CC dimers. A list of putative contact residues was calculated by fitting high-resolution coordinates for fJAM-A and VP1 to the reconstructed density maps, highlighting regions in both virus and receptor important for virus attachment and entry.

  16. Junction adhesion molecule is a receptor for reovirus.

    PubMed

    Barton, E S; Forrest, J C; Connolly, J L; Chappell, J D; Liu, Y; Schnell, F J; Nusrat, A; Parkos, C A; Dermody, T S

    2001-02-09

    Virus attachment to cells plays an essential role in viral tropism and disease. Reovirus serotypes 1 and 3 differ in the capacity to target distinct cell types in the murine nervous system and in the efficiency to induce apoptosis. The binding of viral attachment protein sigma1 to unidentified receptors controls these phenotypes. We used expression cloning to identify junction adhesion molecule (JAM), an integral tight junction protein, as a reovirus receptor. JAM binds directly to sigma1 and permits reovirus infection of nonpermissive cells. Ligation of JAM is required for reovirus-induced activation of NF-kappaB and apoptosis. Thus, reovirus interaction with cell-surface receptors is a critical determinant of both cell-type specific tropism and virus-induced intracellular signaling events that culminate in cell death.

  17. Nectin and junctional adhesion molecule are critical cell adhesion molecules for the apico-basal alignment of adherens and tight junctions in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomohiro; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Rikitsu, Etsuko; Kurita, Souichi; Ikeda, Wataru; Takai, Yoshimi

    2013-11-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) form an apical junctional complex at the apical side of the lateral membranes of epithelial cells, in which TJs are aligned at the apical side of AJs. Many cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and cell polarity molecules (CPMs) cooperatively regulate the formation of the apical junctional complex, but the mechanism for the alignment of TJs at the apical side of AJs is not fully understood. We developed a cellular system with which epithelial-like TJs and AJs were reconstituted in fibroblasts and analyzed the cooperative roles of CAMs and CPMs. We exogenously expressed various combinations of CAMs and CPMs in fibroblasts that express negligible amounts of these molecules endogenously. In these cells, the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion was formed at the apical side of the junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-based cell-cell adhesion, and cadherin and claudin were recruited to the nectin-3- and JAM-based cell-cell adhesion sites to form AJ-like and TJ-like domains, respectively. This inversed alignment of the AJ-like and TJ-like domains was reversed by complementary expression of CPMs Par-3, atypical protein kinase C, Par-6, Crb3, Pals1 and Patj. We describe the cooperative roles of these CAMs and CPMs in the apico-basal alignment of TJs and AJs in epithelial cells.

  18. Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B supports lymphocyte rolling and adhesion through interaction with alpha4beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ralf J; Hardt, Katja; Hatting, Max; Bistrian, Roxana; Diehl, Sandra; Radeke, Heinfried H; Podda, Maurizio; Schön, Michael P; Kaufmann, Roland; Henschler, Reinhard; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Santoso, Sentot; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2009-10-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A), JAM-B and JAM-C have been implicated in leucocyte transmigration. As JAM-B binds to very late activation antigen (VLA)-4, a leucocyte integrin that contributes to rolling and firm adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells through binding to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, we hypothesized that JAM-B is also involved in leucocyte rolling and firm adhesion. To test this hypothesis, intravital microscopy of murine skin microvasculature was performed. Rolling interactions of murine leucocytes were significantly affected by blockade of JAM-B [which reduced rolling interactions from 9.1 +/- 2.6% to 3.2 +/- 1.2% (mean +/- standard deviation)]. To identify putative ligands, T lymphocytes were perfused over JAM-B-coated slides in a dynamic flow chamber system. JAM-B-dependent rolling and sticking interactions were observed at low shear stress [0.3 dyn/cm(2): 220 +/- 71 (mean +/- standard deviation) versus 165 +/- 88 rolling (P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney rank sum test) and 2.6 +/- 1.3 versus 1.0 +/- 0.7 sticking cells/mm(2)/min (P = 0.026; Mann-Whitney rank sum test) on JAM-B- compared with baseline], but not at higher shear forces (1.0 dyn/cm(2)). As demonstrated by antibody blocking experiments, JAM-B-mediated rolling and sticking of T lymphocytes was dependent on alpha4 and beta1 integrin, but not JAM-C expression. To investigate whether JAM-B-mediated leucocyte-endothelium interactions are involved in a disease-relevant in vivo model, adoptive transfer experiments in 2,4,-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced contact hypersensitivity reactions were performed in mice in the absence or in the presence of a function-blocking JAM-B antibody. In this model, JAM-B blockade during the sensitization phase impaired the generation of the immune response to DNFB, which was assessed as the increase in ear swelling in untreated, DNFB-challenged mice, by close to 40% [P = 0.037; analysis of variance (anova)]. Overall, JAM-B appears to

  19. Junctional Adhesion Molecule C Mediates Leukocyte Adhesion to Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovium

    PubMed Central

    Rabquer, Bradley J.; Pakozdi, Angela; Michel, James E.; Gujar, Bansari S.; Haines, G. Kenneth; Imhof, Beat A.; Koch, Alisa E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Leukocyte infiltration into the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovium is a multistep process in which leukocytes leave the bloodstream and invade the synovial tissue (ST). Leukocyte transendothelial migration and adhesion to RA ST requires adhesion molecules on the surface of endothelial cells and RA ST fibroblasts. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) in mediating leukocyte recruitment and retention in the RA joint. Methods Immunohistologic analysis was performed on RA, osteoarthritis (OA), and normal ST samples to quantify JAM-C expression. Fibroblast JAM-C expression was also analyzed using Western blotting, cell surface enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunofluorescence. To determine the role of JAM-C in leukocyte retention in the RA synovium, in vitro and in situ adhesion assays and RA ST fibroblast transmigration assays were performed. Results JAM-C was highly expressed by RA ST lining cells, and its expression was increased in OA ST and RA ST endothelial cells compared with normal ST endothelial cells. JAM-C was also expressed on the surface of OA ST and RA ST fibroblasts. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myeloid U937 cell adhesion to both OA ST and RA ST fibroblasts and to RA ST was dependent on JAM-C. U937 cell migration through an RA ST fibroblast monolayer was enhanced in the presence of neutralizing antibodies against JAM-C. Conclusion Our results highlight the novel role of JAM-C in recruiting and retaining leukocytes in the RA synovium and suggest that targeting JAM-C may be important in combating inflammatory diseases such as RA. PMID:18821692

  20. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  1. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis. PMID:26507779

  2. ADAMTS-10 and -6 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Stuart A.; Mularczyk, Ewa J.; Singh, Mukti; Massam-Wu, Teresa; Kielty, Cay M.

    2016-01-01

    ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 are homologous metalloproteinases with ill-defined roles. ADAMTS10 mutations cause Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS), implicating it in fibrillin microfibril biology since some fibrillin-1 mutations also cause WMS. However little is known about ADAMTS6 function. ADAMTS10 is resistant to furin cleavage, however we show that ADAMTS6 is effectively processed and active. Using siRNA, over-expression and mutagenesis, it was found ADAMTS6 inhibits and ADAMTS10 is required for focal adhesions, epithelial cell-cell junction formation, and microfibril deposition. Either knockdown of ADAMTS6, or disruption of its furin processing or catalytic sites restores focal adhesions, implicating its enzyme activity acts on targets in the focal adhesion complex. In ADAMTS10-depleted cultures, expression of syndecan-4 rescues focal adhesions and cell-cell junctions. Recombinant C-termini of ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6, both of which induce focal adhesions, bind heparin and syndecan-4. However, cells overexpressing full-length ADAMTS6 lack heparan sulphate and focal adhesions, whilst depletion of ADAMTS6 induces a prominent glycocalyx. Thus ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 oppositely affect heparan sulphate-rich interfaces including focal adhesions. We previously showed that microfibril deposition requires fibronectin-induced focal adhesions, and cell-cell junctions in epithelial cultures. Here we reveal that ADAMTS6 causes a reduction in heparan sulphate-rich interfaces, and its expression is regulated by ADAMTS10. PMID:27779234

  3. Increased DC trafficking to lymph nodes and contact hypersensitivity in junctional adhesion molecule-A–deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Cera, Maria Rosaria; Del Prete, Annalisa; Vecchi, Annunciata; Corada, Monica; Martin-Padura, Ines; Motoike, Toshiyuki; Tonetti, Paolo; Bazzoni, Gianfranco; Vermi, William; Gentili, Francesca; Bernasconi, Sergio; Sato, Thomas N.; Mantovani, Alberto; Dejana, Elisabetta

    2004-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a transmembrane adhesive protein expressed at endothelial junctions and in leukocytes. In the present work, we found that DCs also express JAM-A. To evaluate the biological relevance of this observation, Jam-A–/– mice were generated and the functional behavior of DCs in vitro and in vivo was studied. In vitro, Jam-A–/– DCs showed a selective increase in random motility and in the capacity to transmigrate across lymphatic endothelial cells. In vivo, Jam-A–/– mice showed enhanced DC migration to lymph nodes, which was not observed in mice with endothelium-restricted deficiency of the protein. Furthermore, increased DC migration to lymph nodes was associated with enhanced contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Adoptive transfer experiments showed that JAM-A–deficient DCs elicited increased CHS in Jam-A+/+ mice, further supporting the concept of a DC-specific effect. Thus, we identified here a novel, non-redundant role of JAM-A in controlling DC motility, trafficking to lymph nodes, and activation of specific immunity. PMID:15343392

  4. Relative resistance of long junctional epithelial adhesions and connective tissue attachments to plaque-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, R H; O'Leary, T J; Kafrawy, A H

    1984-04-01

    This study compared the resistance to periodontal disease of the long junctional epithelial adhesion and the naturally occurring dentogingival junction. Two groups were used, each containing three young male beagle dogs with all permanent teeth erupted. Periodontitis was induced around maxillary and mandibular premolars in the experimental dogs over a 42-day period, using subgingival ligatures and a soft diet. Fourteen days after ligature removal, flaps were reflected, granulation tissue was removed and the roots were planed to the alveolar crest. Reference grooves were placed in the root surfaces at the level of the alveolar bone, the flaps were positioned over the alveolar crests, and sutures were placed. A 60-day period permitted healing with formation of long junctional epithelial adhesions. During this 116-day period control dogs were maintained in gingival health by daily brushing and by prophylaxis every 14 days. Both groups had a high level of health (GI scores of 0) at the beginning of the 20-day combined disease phase. Inflammation was induced in both groups by subgingival ligature placement and a plaque-promoting diet. Right and left sides of both groups represented separate time intervals within the 20-day period. Block sections were secured at time of killing and the tissues were prepared for light and fluorescent microscopic evaluation. Mean GI scores and mean probing depths increased similarly in both groups. Tagge index scores of gingival inflammation were higher at the longer time periods in the experimental animals. However, they displayed an intact long junctional epithelial adhesion throughout the study, while control animals frequently showed ulceration of the sulcular epithelium. Neither group showed significant changes in location of the apical cells of the attachment epithelium. Crestal osteoblastic activity, confirmed with Procion labeling, predominated in the experimental animals, while osteoclastic activity predominated in the control

  5. Organization of pp60src and selected cytoskeletal proteins within adhesion plaques and junctions of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed rat cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The localization of pp60src within adhesion structures of epithelioid rat kidney cells transformed by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus was compared to the organization of actin, alpha-actinin, vinculin (a 130,000-dalton protein), tubulin, and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein. The adhesion structures included both adhesion plaques and previously uncharacterized adhesive regions formed at cell-cell junctions. We have termed these latter structures "adhesion junctions." Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were identified by interference-reflection microscopy and compared to the location of pp60src and the various cytoskeletal proteins by double fluorescence. The results demonstrated that the src gene product was found within both adhesion plaques and the adhesion junctions. In addition, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were also localized within the same pp60src-containing adhesion structures. In contrast, tubulin and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein were not associated with either adhesion plaques or adhesion junctions. Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were isolated as substratum-bound structures and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence revealed that pp60src, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were organized within specific regions of the adhesion junctions. Heavy accumulations of actin and alpha-actinin were found on both sides of the junctions with a narrow gap of unstained material at the midline, whereas pp60src stain was more intense in this central region. Antibody to vinculin stained double narrow lines defining the periphery of the junctional complexes but was excluded from the intervening region. In addition, the distribution of vinculin relative to pp60src within adhesion plaques suggested an inverse relationship between the presence of these two proteins. Overall, these results establish a close link between the src gene product and components of the

  6. The Junctional Adhesion Molecule-B regulates JAM-C-dependent melanoma cell metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Frontera, Vincent; Bardin, Florence; Thomassin, Jeanne; Chetaille, Bruno; Adams, Susanne; Adams, Ralf H; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2012-11-16

    Metastasis is a major clinical issue and results in poor prognosis for most cancers. The Junctional Adhesion Molecule-C (JAM-C) expressed by B16 melanoma and endothelial cells has been involved in metastasis of tumor cells through homophilic JAM-C/JAM-C trans-interactions. Here, we show that JAM-B expressed by endothelial cells contributes to murine B16 melanoma cells metastasis through its interaction with JAM-C on tumor cells. We further show that this adhesion molecular pair mediates melanoma cell adhesion to primary Lung Microvascular Endothelial Cells and that it is functional in vivo as demonstrated by the reduced metastasis of B16 cells in Jam-b deficient mice.

  7. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  8. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  9. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhesion triggers the disorganization of endothelial cell-to-cell adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) infiltration into tissues is frequently accompanied by increase in vascular permeability. This suggests that PMN adhesion and transmigration could trigger modifications in the architecture of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions. In the present paper, using indirect immunofluorescence, we found that PMN adhesion to tumor necrosis factor-activated endothelial cells (EC) induced the disappearance from endothelial cell-to-cell contacts of adherens junction (AJ) components: vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and plakoglobin. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of the VE- cadherin/catenin complex showed that the amount of beta-catenin and plakoglobin was markedly reduced from the complex and from total cell extracts. In contrast, VE-cadherin and alpha-catenin were only partially affected. Disorganization of endothelial AJ by PMN was not accompanied by EC retraction or injury and was specific for VE- cadherin/catenin complex, since platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) distribution at cellular contacts was unchanged. PMN adhesion to EC seems to be a prerequisite for VE-cadherin/catenin complex disorganization. This phenomenon could be fully inhibited by blocking PMN adhesion with an anti-integrin beta 2 mAb, while it could be reproduced by any condition that induced increase of PMN adhesion, such as addition of PMA or an anti-beta 2-activating mAb. The effect on endothelial AJ was specific for PMN since adherent activated lymphocytes did not induce similar changes. High concentrations of protease inhibitors and oxygen metabolite scavengers were unable to prevent AJ disorganization mediated by PMN. PMN adhesion to EC was accompanied by increase in EC permeability in vitro. This effect was dependent on PMN adhesion, was not mediated by proteases and oxygen- reactive metabolites, and could be reproduced by EC treatment with EGTA. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis showed that VE

  10. The junctional adhesion molecule JAM-C regulates polarized transendothelial migration of neutrophils in vivo.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Colom, Bartomeu; Caille, Dorothée; Diapouli, Frantzeska-Maria; Nash, Gerard B; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Albelda, Steven M; Rainger, G Ed; Meda, Paolo; Imhof, Beat A; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2011-06-26

    The migration of neutrophils into inflamed tissues is a fundamental component of innate immunity. A decisive step in this process is the polarized migration of blood neutrophils through endothelial cells (ECs) lining the venular lumen (transendothelial migration (TEM)) in a luminal-to-abluminal direction. By real-time confocal imaging, we found that neutrophils had disrupted polarized TEM ('hesitant' and 'reverse') in vivo. We noted these events in inflammation after ischemia-reperfusion injury, characterized by lower expression of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) at EC junctions, and they were enhanced by blockade or genetic deletion of JAM-C in ECs. Our results identify JAM-C as a key regulator of polarized neutrophil TEM in vivo and suggest that reverse TEM of neutrophils can contribute to the dissemination of systemic inflammation.

  11. TNF-α and IFN-γ promote lymphocyte adhesion to endothelial junctional regions facilitating transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Jaczewska, Justyna; Abdulreda, Midhat H; Yau, Chi Y; Schmitt, Martin M; Schubert, Irene; Berggren, Per-Olof; Weber, Christian; Koenen, Rory R; Moy, Vincent T; Wojcikiewicz, Ewa P

    2014-02-01

    Inflammatory conditions induce redistribution of junctional adhesion receptors toward the apical regions of endothelial cells promoting lymphocyte TEM. Much of the molecular structures of TEM have been revealed; however, the biophysical mechanisms underlying this process remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and AFM to study endothelial distribution of adhesion molecules upon lymphocyte activation and transmigration. Our immunofluorescence results revealed redistribution of JAM-A and PECAM-1 but not ICAM-1 or VCAM-1 toward the apical junctional regions of HUVECs following a 6-h stimulation with TNF-α and IFN-γ. Consistently, our SCFS studies revealed that Jurkat cell adhesion to stimulated HUVEC monolayers was significantly greater in junctional regions. Enhanced adhesion was mediated mostly by JAM-A receptors. Further AFM adhesion mapping of the homophilic JAM-A/JAM-A interaction on the surfaces of HUVECs revealed a greater number of JAM-A receptors available for binding along junctional regions after TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulation. Our data reveal for the first time that adhesion "hot spots" of JAM-A receptors are involved in initiating lymphocyte TEM under inflammatory conditions.

  12. Neural differentiation, NCAM-mediated adhesion, and gap junctional communication in neuroectoderm. A study in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We studied the development of NCAM and gap junctional communication, and their mutual relationship in chick neuroectoderm in vitro. Expression of NCAM, as detected by monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and development of junctional communication, as detected by extensive cell-to-cell transfer of 400-500-D fluorescent tracers, occurred in cultures from stage-2 embryos onward. Both expressions presumably required primary induction. The differentiating cells formed discrete fields of expression on the second to third day in culture, with the NCAM fields coinciding with the junctional communication fields delineated by the tracers. Other neural differentiations developed in the following order: tetanus toxin receptors, neurofilament protein, and neurite outgrowth. Chronic treatment with antibody Fab fragments against NCAM interfered with the development of communication, suggesting that NCAM-mediated adhesion promotes formation of cell-to-cell channels. Temperature-sensitive mutant Rous sarcoma virus blocked (reversibly) communication and the subsequent development of neurofilament protein and neurites, but expression of NCAM continued. PMID:2834404

  13. Internalization of adhesion junction proteins and their association with recycling endosome marker proteins in rat seminiferous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Young, J'Nelle S; Takai, Yoshimi; Kojic, Katarina L; Vogl, A Wayne

    2012-03-01

    Tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs) are elaborate cytoskeleton-related structures that are formed in association with intercellular junctions in the seminiferous epithelium. They consist of a cylindrical double-membrane core composed of the plasma membranes of the two attached cells, cuffed by a dendritic network of actin filaments. TBCs are proposed to be subcellular machines that internalize intercellular junctions during the extensive junction remodeling that occurs during spermatogenesis. At the apical sites of attachment between Sertoli cells and spermatids, junction disassembly is part of the sperm release mechanism. In this study, we used immunological probes to explore junction internalization and recycling at apical TBCs in the rat seminiferous epithelium. We demonstrate that β1-integrin and nectin 2 were concentrated at the ends of TBCs and for the first time show that the early endosome marker RAB5A was also distinctly localized at the ends of TBCs that appear to be the 'bulbar' regions of the complexes. Significantly, we also demonstrate that the 'long-loop' recycling endosome marker RAB11A was co-distributed with nectin 2 at junctions with early spermatids deeper in the epithelium. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that TBCs associated with late spermatids internalize adhesion junctions and also indicate that some of the internalized junction proteins may be recycled to form junctions with the next generation of spermatids.

  14. Bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cell adhesion assay for studying Escherichia coli O157 adherence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An adherence assay, using recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells (RSEC), was developed for Escherichia coli O157 and related organisms. The assay was standardized in comparison with the routinely used HEp-2 cell adherence assay, in this “proof of concept” study. The novel RSEC adhesion assay ...

  15. Differential mouse-strain specific expression of Junctional Adhesion Molecule (JAM)-B in placental structures.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Ina Annelies; Mori, Mayumi; DeMayo, Francesco; Lydon, John; Arck, Petra Clara; Solano, Maria Emilia

    2016-03-03

    The junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in stabilization of interendothelial cell-cell contacts, formation of vascular tubes, homeostasis of stem cell niches and promotion of leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. In the human placenta, JAM-B protein is abundant and mRNA transcripts are enriched in first-trimester extravillous trophoblast in comparison to the villous trophoblast. We here aimed to elucidate the yet unexplored spatio-temporal expression of JAM-B in the mouse placenta. We investigated and semi-quantified JAM-B protein expression by immunohistochemistry in early post-implantation si tes and in mid- to late gestation placentae of various murine mating combinations. Surprisingly, the endothelium of the placental labyrinth was devoid of JAM-B expression. JAM-B was mainly present in spongiotrophoblast cells of the junctional zone, as well as in the fetal vessels of the chorionic plate, the umbilical cord and in maternal myometrial smooth muscle. We observed a strain-specific placental increase of JAM-B protein expression from mid- to late gestation in Balb/c-mated C57BL/6 females, which was absent in DBA/2J-mated Balb/c females. Due to the essential role of progesterone during gestation, we further assessed a possible modulation of JAM-B in mid-gestational placentae deficient in the progesterone receptor (Pgr(-/-)) and observed an increased expression of JAM-B in Pgr(-/-) placentae, compared to Pgr(+/+) tissue samples. We propose that JAM-B is an as yet underappreciated trophoblast lineage-specific protein, which is modulated via the progesterone receptor and shows unique strain-specific kinetics. Future work is needed to elucidate its possible contribution to placental processes necessary to ensuring its integrity, ultimately facilitating placental development and fetal growth.

  16. Claudin-11 Tight Junctions in Myelin Are a Barrier to Diffusion and Lack Strong Adhesive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Denninger, Andrew R.; Breglio, Andrew; Maheras, Kathleen J.; LeDuc, Geraldine; Cristiglio, Viviana; Demé, Bruno; Gow, Alexander; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The radial component is a network of interlamellar tight junctions (TJs) unique to central nervous system myelin. Ablation of claudin-11, a TJ protein, results in the absence of the radial component and compromises the passive electrical properties of myelin. Although TJs are known to regulate paracellular diffusion, this barrier function has not been directly demonstrated for the radial component, and some evidence suggests that the radial component may also mediate adhesion between myelin membranes. To investigate the physical properties of claudin-11 TJs, we compared fresh, unfixed Claudin 11-null and control nerves using x-ray and neutron diffraction. In Claudin 11-null tissue, we detected no changes in myelin structure, stability, or membrane interactions, which argues against the notion that myelin TJs exhibit significant adhesive properties. Moreover, our osmotic stressing and D2O-H2O exchange experiments demonstrate that myelin lacking claudin-11 is more permeable to water and small osmolytes. Thus, our data indicate that the radial component serves primarily as a diffusion barrier and elucidate the mechanism by which TJs govern myelin function. PMID:26445439

  17. Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-C deficient C57BL/6 mice develop a severe hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Lena; Schäfer, Julia; Liebner, Stefan; Mittelbronn, Michel; Deutsch, Urban; Enzmann, Gaby; Adams, Ralf H; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Plate, Karl H; Imhof, Beat A; Engelhardt, Britta

    2012-01-01

    The junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-C is a widely expressed adhesion molecule regulating cell adhesion, cell polarity and inflammation. JAM-C expression and function in the central nervous system (CNS) has been poorly characterized to date. Here we show that JAM-C(-/-) mice backcrossed onto the C57BL/6 genetic background developed a severe hydrocephalus. An in depth immunohistochemical study revealed specific immunostaining for JAM-C in vascular endothelial cells in the CNS parenchyma, the meninges and in the choroid plexus of healthy C57BL/6 mice. Additional JAM-C immunostaining was detected on ependymal cells lining the ventricles and on choroid plexus epithelial cells. Despite the presence of hemorrhages in the brains of JAM-C(-/-) mice, our study demonstrates that development of the hydrocephalus was not due to a vascular function of JAM-C as endothelial re-expression of JAM-C failed to rescue the hydrocephalus phenotype of JAM-C(-/-) C57BL/6 mice. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation within the ventricular system of JAM-C(-/-) mice excluded occlusion of the cerebral aqueduct as the cause of hydrocephalus development but showed the acquisition of a block or reduction of CSF drainage from the lateral to the 3(rd) ventricle in JAM-C(-/-) C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, our study suggests that JAM-C(-/-) C57BL/6 mice model the important role for JAM-C in brain development and CSF homeostasis as recently observed in humans with a loss-of-function mutation in JAM-C.

  18. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) Regulates Claudin Dynamics and Tight Junctions* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuan-Jin; Mannan, Poonam; Lu, Michael; Udey, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) (CD326) is a surface glycoprotein expressed by invasive carcinomas and some epithelia. Herein, we report that EpCAM regulates the composition and function of tight junctions (TJ). EpCAM accumulated on the lateral interfaces of human colon carcinoma and normal intestinal epithelial cells but did not co-localize with TJ. Knockdown of EpCAM in T84 and Caco-2 cells using shRNAs led to changes in morphology and adhesiveness. TJ formed readily after EpCAM knockdown; the acquisition of trans-epithelial electroresistance was enhanced, and TJ showed increased resistance to disruption by calcium chelation. Preparative immunoprecipitation demonstrated that EpCAM bound tightly to claudin-7. Co-immunoprecipitation documented associations of EpCAM with claudin-7 and claudin-1 but not claudin-2 or claudin-4. Claudin-1 associated with claudin-7 in co-transfection experiments, and claudin-7 was required for association of claudin-1 with EpCAM. EpCAM knockdown resulted in decreases in claudin-7 and claudin-1 proteins that were reversed with lysosome inhibitors. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that claudin-7 and claudin-1 continually trafficked into lysosomes. Although EpCAM knockdown decreased claudin-1 and claudin-7 protein levels overall, accumulations of claudin-1 and claudin-7 in TJ increased. Physical interactions between EpCAM and claudins were required for claudin stabilization. These findings suggest that EpCAM modulates adhesion and TJ function by regulating intracellular localization and degradation of selected claudins. PMID:23486470

  19. Functional role of gap junctions in cytokine-induced leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Véliz, Loreto P.; González, Francisco G.; Duling, Brian R.; Sáez, Juan C.; Boric, Mauricio P.

    2008-01-01

    To assess the hypothesis that gap junctions (GJs) participate on leukocyte-endothelium interactions in the inflammatory response, we compared leukocyte adhesion and transmigration elicited by cytokine stimulation in the presence or absence of GJ blockers in the hamster cheek pouch and also in the cremaster muscle of wild-type (WT) and endothelium-specific connexin 43 (Cx43) null mice (Cx43e−/−). In the cheek pouch, topical tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; 150 ng/ml, 15 min) caused a sustained increment in the number of leukocytes adhered to venular endothelium (LAV) and located at perivenular regions (LPV). Superfusion with the GJ blockers 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA; 75 μM) or 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (50 μM) abolished the TNF-α-induced increase in LAV and LPV; carbenoxolone (75 μM) or oleamide (100 μM) reduced LAV by 50 and 75%, respectively, and LPV to a lesser extent. None of these GJ blockers modified venular diameter, blood flow, or leukocyte rolling. In contrast, glycyrrhizin (75 μM), a non-GJ blocker analog of AGA, was devoid of effect. Interestingly, when AGA was removed 90 min after TNF-α stimulation, LAV started to rise at a similar rate as in control. Conversely, application of AGA 90 min after TNF-α reduced the number of previously adhered cells. In WT mice, intrascrotal injection of TNF-α (0.5 μg/0.3 ml) increased LAV (fourfold) and LPV (threefold) compared with saline-injected controls. In contrast to the observations in WT animals, TNF-α stimulation did not increase LAV or LPV in Cx43e−/− mice. These results demonstrate an important role for GJ communication in leukocyte adhesion and transmigration during acute inflammation in vivo and further suggest that endothelial Cx43 is key in these processes. PMID:18599597

  20. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  1. Interleukin-8 Regulates Endothelial Permeability by Down-regulation of Tight Junction but not Dependent on Integrins Induced Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongchi; Huang, Xianliang; Ma, Yunlong; Gao, Min; Wang, Ou; Gao, Ting; Shen, Yang; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a common inflammatory factor, which involves in various non-specific pathological processes of inflammation. It has been found that increased endothelial permeability accompanied with high expression of IL-8 at site of injured endothelium and atherosclerotic plaque at early stages, suggesting that IL-8 participated in regulating endothelial permeability in the developing processes of vascular disease. The purpose of this study is to investigate the regulation effects of IL-8 on the vascular endothelial permeability, and the mRNA and protein expression of tight junction components (i.e., ZO-1, Claudin-5 and Occludin). Endothelial cells were stimulated by IL-8 with the dose of 50, 100 and 200 ng/mL, and duration of 2, 4, 6, 8h, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression level of tight junction components with IL-8 under different concentration and duration was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Meanwhile, the integrins induced focal adhesions event with IL-8 stimulation was also investigated. The results showed that IL-8 regulated the permeability of endothelium by down-regulation of tight junction in a dose- and time-dependence manner, but was not by integrins induced focal adhesions. This finding reveals the molecular mechanism in the increase of endothelial cell permeability induced by IL-8, which is expected to provide a new idea as a therapeutic target in vascular diseases. PMID:24155670

  2. Murine junctional adhesion molecules JAM-B and JAM-C mediate endothelial and stellate cell interactions during hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hintermann, Edith; Bayer, Monika; Ehser, Janine; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Imhof, Beat A; Christen, Urs

    2016-07-03

    Classical junctional adhesion molecules JAM-A, JAM-B and JAM-C influence vascular permeability, cell polarity as well as leukocyte recruitment and immigration into inflamed tissue. As the vasculature becomes remodelled in chronically injured, fibrotic livers we aimed to determine distribution and role of junctional adhesion molecules during this pathological process. Therefore, livers of naïve or carbon tetrachloride-treated mice were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to localize all 3 classical junctional adhesion molecules. Hepatic stellate cells and endothelial cells were isolated and subjected to immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry to determine localization and functionality of JAM-B and JAM-C. Cells were further used to perform contractility and migration assays and to study endothelial tubulogenesis and pericytic coverage by hepatic stellate cells. We found that in healthy tissue, JAM-A was ubiquitously expressed whereas JAM-B and JAM-C were restricted to the vasculature. During fibrosis, JAM-B and JAM-C levels increased in endothelial cells and JAM-C was de novo generated in myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells. Soluble JAM-C blocked contractility but increased motility in hepatic stellate cells. Furthermore, soluble JAM-C reduced endothelial tubulogenesis and endothelial cell/stellate cell interaction. Thus, during liver fibrogenesis, JAM-B and JAM-C expression increase on the vascular endothelium. More importantly, JAM-C appears on myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells linking them as pericytes to JAM-B positive endothelial cells. This JAM-B/JAM-C mediated interaction between endothelial cells and stellate cells stabilizes vessel walls and may control the sinusoidal diameter. Increased hepatic stellate cell contraction mediated by JAM-C/JAM-C interaction may cause intrahepatic vasoconstriction, which is a major complication in liver cirrhosis.

  3. RacGAP1-driven focal adhesion formation promotes melanoma transendothelial migration through mediating adherens junction disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Bai, Huiyuan; Fu, Changliang; Chen, Feng; Zeng, Panying; Wu, Chengxiang; Ye, Qichao; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-03-27

    Melanoma cell migration across vascular endothelial cells is an essential step of tumor metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that RacGAP1, a cytokinesis-related Rho GTPase-activating protein, contributed to this process. Depletion of RacGAP1 with RacGAP1-targeting siRNA or overexpression of RacGAP1 mutant (T249A) attenuated melanoma cell transendothelial migration and concomitant changes of adherens junctions. In addition, RacGAP1 promoted the activations of RhoA, FAK, paxillin and triggered focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal rearrangement. By overexpressing FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK) in endothelium, we showed that RacGAP1 mediated endothelial barrier function loss and melanoma transmigration in a focal adhesion-dependent manner. These results suggest that endothelial RacGAP1 may play critical roles in pathogenic processes of cancer by regulating endothelial permeability.

  4. Calcium Dobesilate Inhibits the Alterations in Tight Junction Proteins and Leukocyte Adhesion to Retinal Endothelial Cells Induced by Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Ermelindo C.; Martins, João; Voabil, Paula; Liberal, Joana; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Bauer, Jacques; Cunha-Vaz, José; Ambrósio, António F.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Calcium dobesilate (CaD) has been used in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy in the last decades, but its mechanisms of action are not elucidated. CaD is able to correct the excessive vascular permeability in the retina of diabetic patients and in experimental diabetes. We investigated the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of CaD against the increase in blood–retinal barrier (BRB) permeability induced by diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Wistar rats were divided into three groups: controls, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and diabetic rats treated with CaD. The BRB breakdown was evaluated using Evans blue. The content or distribution of tight junction proteins (occludin, claudin-5, and zonula occluden-1 [ZO-1]), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) was evaluated by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Leukocyte adhesion was evaluated in retinal vessels and in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by the detection of oxidized carbonyls and tyrosine nitration. NF-κB activation was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS Diabetes increased the BRB permeability and retinal thickness. Diabetes also decreased occludin and claudin-5 levels and altered the distribution of ZO-1 and occludin in retinal vessels. These changes were inhibited by CaD treatment. CaD also inhibited the increase in leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels or endothelial cells and in ICAM-1 levels, induced by diabetes or elevated glucose. Moreover, CaD decreased oxidative stress and p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation caused by diabetes. CONCLUSIONS CaD prevents the BRB breakdown induced by diabetes, by restoring tight junction protein levels and organization and decreasing leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels. The protective effects of CaD are likely to involve the inhibition of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation, possibly through the inhibition of oxidative

  5. Kon-tiki enhances PS2 integrin adhesion and localizes its ligand, Thrombospondin, in the myotendinous junction.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, Juan J; Espina-Zambrano, Agueda G; García-Calderón, Clara B; Estrada, Beatriz

    2017-03-01

    Cell-extracellular-matrix adhesion is mediated by cell receptors, mainly integrins and transmembrane proteoglycans, which can functionally interact. How these receptors are regulated and coordinated is largely unknown. We show that the conserved transmembrane Drosophila proteoglycan Kon-tiki (Kon, also known as Perdido) interacts with the αPS2βPS integrin (αPS2 is encoded by inflated and βPS by myospheroid) to mediate muscle-tendon adhesion. kon and inflated double mutant embryos show a synergistic increase in muscle detachment. Furthermore, Kon modulates αPS2βPS signaling at the muscle attachment, since phosphorylated Fak is reduced in kon mutants. This reduction in integrin signaling can be rescued by the expression of a truncated Kon protein containing its transmembrane and extracellular domains, suggesting that these domains are sufficient to mediate this signaling. We show that these domains are sufficient to properly localize the αPS2βPS ligand, Thrombospondin, to the muscle attachment, and to partially rescue Kon-dependent muscle-tendon adhesion. We propose that Kon can engage in a protein complex with αPS2βPS and enhance integrin-mediated signaling and adhesion by recruiting its ligand, which would increase integrin-binding affinity to the extracellular matrix, resulting in the consolidation of the myotendinous junction.

  6. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  7. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  8. Blocking Junctional Adhesion Molecule C Enhances Dendritic Cell Migration and Boosts the Immune Responses against Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Ballet, Romain; Emre, Yalin; Jemelin, Stéphane; Charmoy, Mélanie; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Imhof, Beat A.

    2014-01-01

    The recruitment of dendritic cells to sites of infections and their migration to lymph nodes is fundamental for antigen processing and presentation to T cells. In the present study, we showed that antibody blockade of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) on endothelial cells removed JAM-C away from junctions and increased vascular permeability after L. major infection. This has multiple consequences on the output of the immune response. In resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, we found higher numbers of innate immune cells migrating from blood to the site of infection. The subsequent migration of dendritic cells (DCs) from the skin to the draining lymph node was also improved, thereby boosting the induction of the adaptive immune response. In C57BL/6 mice, JAM-C blockade after L. major injection led to an enhanced IFN-γ dominated T helper 1 (Th1) response with reduced skin lesions and parasite burden. Conversely, anti JAM-C treatment increased the IL-4-driven T helper 2 (Th2) response in BALB/c mice with disease exacerbation. Overall, our results show that JAM-C blockade can finely-tune the innate cell migration and accelerate the consequent immune response to L. major without changing the type of the T helper cell response. PMID:25474593

  9. Identification of Human Junctional Adhesion Molecule 1 as a Functional Receptor for the Hom-1 Calicivirus on Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Parra, Gabriel I; Tin, Christine M; Jones, Ronald W; Soden, Jo; Barnes, Donna; Freeth, Jim; Smith, Alvin W; Green, Kim Y

    2017-02-14

    The Hom-1 vesivirus was reported in 1998 following the inadvertent transmission of the animal calicivirus San Miguel sea lion virus to a human host in a laboratory. We characterized the Hom-1 strain and investigated the mechanism by which human cells could be infected. An expression library of 3,559 human plasma membrane proteins was screened for reactivity with Hom-1 virus-like particles, and a single interacting protein, human junctional adhesion molecule 1 (hJAM1), was identified. Transient expression of hJAM1 conferred susceptibility to Hom-1 infection on nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Virus infection was markedly inhibited when CHO cells stably expressing hJAM were pretreated with anti-hJAM1 monoclonal antibodies. Cell lines of human origin were tested for growth of Hom-1, and efficient replication was observed in HepG2, HuH7, and SK-CO15 cells. The three cell lines (of hepatic or intestinal origin) were confirmed to express hJAM1 on their surface, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9-mediated knockout of the hJAM1 gene in each line abolished Hom-1 propagation. Taken together, our data indicate that entry of the Hom-1 vesivirus into these permissive human cell lines is mediated by the plasma membrane protein hJAM1 as a functional receptor.IMPORTANCE Vesiviruses, such as San Miguel sea lion virus and feline calicivirus, are typically associated with infection in animal hosts. Following the accidental infection of a laboratory worker with San Miguel sea lion virus, a related virus was isolated in cell culture and named Hom-1. In this study, we found that Hom-1 could be propagated in a number of human cell lines, making it the first calicivirus to replicate efficiently in cultured human cells. Screening of a library of human cell surface membrane proteins showed that the virus could utilize human junctional adhesion molecule 1 as a receptor to enter cells and initiate replication. The Hom-1 virus presents a new

  10. Targeting Fyn in Ras-transformed cells induces F-actin to promote adherens junction-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Sarah E; Hutchens, Kelli A; Denning, Mitchell F

    2015-10-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases (SFK), is an oncogene in murine epidermis and is associated with cell-cell adhesion turnover and induction of cell migration. Additionally, Fyn upregulation has been reported in multiple tumor types, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Introduction of active H-Ras(G12V) into the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line resulted in upregulation of Fyn mRNA (200-fold) and protein, while expression of other SFKs remained unaltered. Transduction of active Ras or Fyn was sufficient to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in HaCaT cells. Inhibition of Fyn activity, using siRNA or the clinical SFK inhibitor Dasatinib, increased cell-cell adhesion and rapidly (5-60 min) increased levels of cortical F-actin. Fyn inhibition with siRNA or Dasatinib also induced F-actin in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which have elevated Fyn. F-actin co-localized with adherens junction proteins, and Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion could be blocked by Cytochalasin D, indicating that F-actin polymerization was a key initiator of cell-cell adhesion through the adherens junction. Conversely, inhibiting cell-cell adhesion with low Ca(2+) media did not block Dasatinib-induced F-actin polymerization. Inhibition of the Rho effector kinase ROCK blocked Dasatinib-induced F-actin and cell-cell adhesion, implicating relief of Rho GTPase inhibition as a mechanism of Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion. Finally, topical Dasatinib treatment significantly reduced total tumor burden in the SKH1 mouse model of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Together these results identify the promotion of actin-based cell-cell adhesion as a newly described mechanism of action for Dasatinib and suggest that Fyn inhibition may be an effective therapeutic approach in treating cSCC.

  11. Mutations in contactin-1, a neural adhesion and neuromuscular junction protein, cause a familial form of lethal congenital myopathy.

    PubMed

    Compton, Alison G; Albrecht, Douglas E; Seto, Jane T; Cooper, Sandra T; Ilkovski, Biljana; Jones, Kristi J; Challis, Daniel; Mowat, David; Ranscht, Barbara; Bahlo, Melanie; Froehner, Stanley C; North, Kathryn N

    2008-12-01

    We have previously reported a group of patients with congenital onset weakness associated with a deficiency of members of the syntrophin-alpha-dystrobrevin subcomplex and have demonstrated that loss of syntrophin and dystrobrevin from the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle can also be associated with denervation. Here, we have further studied four individuals from a consanguineous Egyptian family with a lethal congenital myopathy inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion and characterized by a secondary loss of beta2-syntrophin and alpha-dystrobrevin from the muscle sarcolemma, central nervous system involvement, and fetal akinesia. We performed homozygosity mapping and candidate gene analysis and identified a mutation that segregates with disease within CNTN1, the gene encoding for the neural immunoglobulin family adhesion molecule, contactin-1. Contactin-1 transcripts were markedly decreased on gene-expression arrays of muscle from affected family members compared to controls. We demonstrate that contactin-1 is expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in mice and man in addition to the previously documented expression in the central and peripheral nervous system. In patients with secondary dystroglycanopathies, we show that contactin-1 is abnormally localized to the sarcolemma instead of exclusively at the NMJ. The cntn1 null mouse presents with ataxia, progressive muscle weakness, and postnatal lethality, similar to the affected members in this family. We propose that loss of contactin-1 from the NMJ impairs communication or adhesion between nerve and muscle resulting in the severe myopathic phenotype. This disorder is part of the continuum in the clinical spectrum of congenital myopathies and congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  12. Early Detection of Junctional Adhesion Molecule-1 (JAM-1) in the Circulation after Experimental and Clinical Polytrauma.

    PubMed

    Denk, Stephanie; Wiegner, Rebecca; Hönes, Felix M; Messerer, David A C; Radermacher, Peter; Weiss, Manfred; Kalbitz, Miriam; Ehrnthaller, Christian; Braumüller, Sonja; McCook, Oscar; Gebhard, Florian; Weckbach, Sebastian; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Severe tissue trauma-induced systemic inflammation is often accompanied by evident or occult blood-organ barrier dysfunctions, frequently leading to multiple organ dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether specific barrier molecules are shed into the circulation early after trauma as potential indicators of an initial barrier dysfunction. The release of the barrier molecule junctional adhesion molecule-1 (JAM-1) was investigated in plasma of C57BL/6 mice 2 h after experimental mono- and polytrauma as well as in polytrauma patients (ISS ≥ 18) during a 10-day period. Correlation analyses were performed to indicate a linkage between JAM-1 plasma concentrations and organ failure. JAM-1 was systemically detected after experimental trauma in mice with blunt chest trauma as a driving force. Accordingly, JAM-1 was reduced in lung tissue after pulmonary contusion and JAM-1 plasma levels significantly correlated with increased protein levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage as a sign for alveolocapillary barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, JAM-1 was markedly released into the plasma of polytrauma patients as early as 4 h after the trauma insult and significantly correlated with severity of disease and organ dysfunction (APACHE II and SOFA score). The data support an early injury- and time-dependent appearance of the barrier molecule JAM-1 in the circulation indicative of a commencing trauma-induced barrier dysfunction.

  13. Junctional adhesion molecule overexpression in Kaposi varicelliform eruption skin lesions - as a possible herpes virus entry site

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Velez, Ana Maria; Klein, A. Deo; Howard, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection of the skin represents a common challenge in dermatology; however, currently the port of viral entry remains obscure. HSV is known to induce an immunoglobulin-binding cell surface receptor in infected cells that utilizes a non-immune mechanism. The replication of HSV in cultured cells is accompanied by the appearance of surface receptors with an affinity for the Fc region of immunoglobulin G. Case Report: We describe a 43 year old African American male who presented with a generalized rash, including intense pruritus and umbilicated vesiculopustules. The patient had been previously diagnosed and treated for psoriasis with methotrexate and prednisone. Hematoxylin and eosin demonstrated keratinocytes with ballooning degeneration within the epidermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) results resembled the pattern of paraneoplastic pemphigus, with negative indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) results on rat bladder. Immunohistochemistry revealed deposits of the complement membrane attack complex within dermal sweat glands, as well as the presence of herpes simplex virus 1 on the skin. We report a case of Kaposi varicelliform eruption, a cutaneous eruption caused by a virus infecting patients with pre-existing dermatoses. Conclusion: HSV virus infection with over-expression of the junctional adhesion molecule close to herpetic infection sites may preferentially increase viral entry through the skin, possibly triggering a Kaposi varicelliform eruption. PMID:22558593

  14. Identification of Human Junctional Adhesion Molecule 1 as a Functional Receptor for the Hom-1 Calicivirus on Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Parra, Gabriel I.; Tin, Christine M.; Jones, Ronald W.; Soden, Jo; Barnes, Donna; Freeth, Jim; Smith, Alvin W.; Green, Kim Y.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Hom-1 vesivirus was reported in 1998 following the inadvertent transmission of the animal calicivirus San Miguel sea lion virus to a human host in a laboratory. We characterized the Hom-1 strain and investigated the mechanism by which human cells could be infected. An expression library of 3,559 human plasma membrane proteins was screened for reactivity with Hom-1 virus-like particles, and a single interacting protein, human junctional adhesion molecule 1 (hJAM1), was identified. Transient expression of hJAM1 conferred susceptibility to Hom-1 infection on nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Virus infection was markedly inhibited when CHO cells stably expressing hJAM were pretreated with anti-hJAM1 monoclonal antibodies. Cell lines of human origin were tested for growth of Hom-1, and efficient replication was observed in HepG2, HuH7, and SK-CO15 cells. The three cell lines (of hepatic or intestinal origin) were confirmed to express hJAM1 on their surface, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9-mediated knockout of the hJAM1 gene in each line abolished Hom-1 propagation. Taken together, our data indicate that entry of the Hom-1 vesivirus into these permissive human cell lines is mediated by the plasma membrane protein hJAM1 as a functional receptor. PMID:28196955

  15. Paired octamer rings of retinoschisin suggest a junctional model for cell-cell adhesion in the retina.

    PubMed

    Tolun, Gökhan; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Huang, Rick; Zeng, Yong; Li, Yan; Steven, Alasdair C; Sieving, Paul A; Heymann, J Bernard

    2016-05-10

    Retinoschisin (RS1) is involved in cell-cell junctions in the retina, but is unique among known cell-adhesion proteins in that it is a soluble secreted protein. Loss-of-function mutations in RS1 lead to early vision impairment in young males, called X-linked retinoschisis. The disease is characterized by separation of inner retinal layers and disruption of synaptic signaling. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we report the structure at 4.1 Å, revealing double octamer rings not observed before. Each subunit is composed of a discoidin domain and a small N-terminal (RS1) domain. The RS1 domains occupy the centers of the rings, but are not required for ring formation and are less clearly defined, suggesting mobility. We determined the structure of the discoidin rings, consistent with known intramolecular and intermolecular disulfides. The interfaces internal to and between rings feature residues implicated in X-linked retinoschisis, indicating the importance of correct assembly. Based on this structure, we propose that RS1 couples neighboring membranes together through octamer-octamer contacts, perhaps modulated by interactions with other membrane components.

  16. Dual interaction of JAM-C with JAM-B and alpha(M)beta2 integrin: function in junctional complexes and leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lamagna, Chrystelle; Meda, Paolo; Mandicourt, Guillaume; Brown, James; Gilbert, Robert J C; Jones, E Yvonne; Kiefer, Friedemann; Ruga, Pilar; Imhof, Beat A; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2005-10-01

    The junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) have been recently described as interendothelial junctional molecules and as integrin ligands. Here we show that JAM-B and JAM-C undergo heterophilic interaction in cell-cell contacts and that JAM-C is recruited and stabilized in junctional complexes by JAM-B. In addition, soluble JAM-B dissociates soluble JAM-C homodimers to form JAM-B/JAM-C heterodimers. This suggests that the affinity of JAM-C monomers to form dimers is higher for JAM-B than for JAM-C. Using antibodies against JAM-C, the formation of JAM-B/JAM-C heterodimers can be abolished. This liberates JAM-C from its vascular binding partner JAM-B and makes it available on the apical side of vessels for interaction with its leukocyte counter-receptor alpha(M)beta2 integrin. We demonstrate that the modulation of JAM-C localization in junctional complexes is a new regulatory mechanism for alpha(M)beta2-dependent adhesion of leukocytes.

  17. Ablation of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells exacerbates Japanese encephalitis by regulating blood-brain barrier permeability and altering tight junction/adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Hossain, Ferdaus Mohd Altaf; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John-Hwa; Kim, Bumseok; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2016-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), characterized by extensive neuroinflammation following infection with neurotropic JE virus (JEV), is becoming a leading cause of viral encephalitis due to rapid changes in climate and demography. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in restricting neuroinvasion of peripheral leukocytes and virus, thereby regulating the progression of viral encephalitis. In this study, we explored the role of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating BBB integrity and JE progression using a conditional depletion model of CD11c(hi) DCs. Transient ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs resulted in markedly increased susceptibility to JE progression along with highly increased neuro-invasion of JEV. In addition, exacerbated JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was closely associated with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and CC chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2) in the brain. Moreover, our results revealed that the exacerbation of JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was correlated with enhanced BBB permeability and reduced expression of tight junction and adhesion molecules (claudin-5, ZO-1, occluding, JAMs). Ultimately, our data conclude that the ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs provided a subsidiary impact on BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules, thereby leading to exacerbated JE progression. These findings provide insight into the secondary role of CD11c(hi) DCs in JE progression through regulation of BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules.

  18. Slit Diaphragms Contain Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Hirotaka; Bornheimer, Scott; Kudlicka, Krystyna; Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2009-01-01

    Slit diaphragms are essential components of the glomerular filtration apparatus, as changes in these junctions are the hallmark of proteinuric diseases. Slit diaphragms, considered specialized adherens junctions, contain both unique membrane proteins (e.g., nephrin, podocin, and Neph1) and typical adherens junction proteins (e.g., P-cadherin, FAT, and catenins). Whether slit diaphragms also contain tight junction proteins is unknown. Here, immunofluorescence, immunogold labeling, and cell fractionation demonstrated that rat slit diaphragms contain the tight junction proteins JAM-A (junctional adhesion molecule A), occludin, and cingulin. We found these proteins in the same protein complexes as nephrin, podocin, CD2AP, ZO-1, and Neph1 by cosedimentation, coimmunoprecipitation, and pull-down assays. PAN nephrosis increased the protein levels of JAM-A, occludin, cingulin, and ZO-1 several-fold in glomeruli and loosened their attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. These data extend current information about the molecular composition of slit diaphragms by demonstrating the presence of tight junction proteins, although slit diaphragms lack the characteristic morphologic features of tight junctions. The contribution of these proteins to the assembly of slit diaphragms and potential signaling cascades requires further investigation. PMID:19478094

  19. Contact inhibition of locomotion and mechanical cross-talk between cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion determine the pattern of junctional tension in epithelial cell aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Luke; Lopez, Hender; Caldwell, Benjamin J.; Moussa, Elliott; Yap, Chloe; Priya, Rashmi; Noppe, Adrian; Roberts, Anthony P.; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Yap, Alpha S.; Neufeld, Zoltan; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational approach to analyze the biomechanics of epithelial cell aggregates—islands, stripes, or entire monolayers—that combines both vertex and contact-inhibition-of-locomotion models to include cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion. Examination of the distribution of cell protrusions (adhesion to the substrate) in the model predicted high-order profiles of cell organization that agree with those previously seen experimentally. Cells acquired an asymmetric distribution of basal protrusions, traction forces, and apical aspect ratios that decreased when moving from the edge to the island center. Our in silico analysis also showed that tension on cell–cell junctions and apical stress is not homogeneous across the island. Instead, these parameters are higher at the island center and scale up with island size, which we confirmed experimentally using laser ablation assays and immunofluorescence. Without formally being a three-dimensional model, our approach has the minimal elements necessary to reproduce the distribution of cellular forces and mechanical cross-talk, as well as the distribution of principal stress in cells within epithelial cell aggregates. By making experimentally testable predictions, our approach can aid in mechanical analysis of epithelial tissues, especially when local changes in cell–cell and/or cell–substrate adhesion drive collective cell behavior. PMID:27605701

  20. Nectin/PRR: an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule recruited to cadherin-based adherens junctions through interaction with Afadin, a PDZ domain-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Nakanishi, H; Miyahara, M; Mandai, K; Satoh, K; Satoh, A; Nishioka, H; Aoki, J; Nomoto, A; Mizoguchi, A; Takai, Y

    1999-05-03

    We have isolated a novel actin filament-binding protein, named afadin, localized at cadherin-based cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs) in various tissues and cell lines. Afadin has one PDZ domain, three proline-rich regions, and one actin filament-binding domain. We found here that afadin directly interacted with a family of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which was isolated originally as the poliovirus receptor-related protein (PRR) family consisting of PRR1 and -2, and has been identified recently to be the alphaherpes virus receptor. PRR has a COOH-terminal consensus motif to which the PDZ domain of afadin binds. PRR and afadin were colocalized at cadherin-based cell-cell AJs in various tissues and cell lines. In E-cadherin-expressing EL cells, PRR was recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. PRR showed Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion activity. These results indicate that PRR is a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which is recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. We rename PRR as nectin (taken from the Latin word "necto" meaning "to connect").

  1. West Nile virus infection modulates human brain microvascular endothelial cells tight junction proteins and cell adhesion molecules: Transmigration across the in vitro blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saguna; Lo, Yeung; Chapagain, Moti; Lum, Stephanie; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Luo, Haiyan; Nakatsuka, Austin; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2009-01-01

    Neurological complications such as inflammation, failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and neuronal death contribute to the mortality and morbidity associated with WNV-induced meningitis. Compromised BBB indicates the ability of the virus to gain entry into the CNS via the BBB, however, the underlying mechanisms, and the specific cell types associated with WNV-CNS trafficking are not well understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells, main component of the BBB, represent a barrier to virus dissemination into the CNS and could play key role in WNV spread via hematogenous route. To investigate WNV entry into the CNS, we infected primary human brain microvascular endothelial (HBMVE) cells with the neurovirulent strain of WNV (NY99) and examined WNV replication kinetics together with the changes in the expressions of key tight junction proteins (TJP) and cell adhesion molecules (CAM). WNV infection of HBMVE cells was productive as analyzed by plaque assay and qRT-PCR, and did not induce cytopathic effect. Increased mRNA and protein expressions of TJP (claudin-1) and CAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule and E-selectin) were observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, respectively, which coincided with the peak in WNV replication. Further, using an in vitro BBB model comprised of HBMVE cells, we demonstrate that cell-free WNV can cross the BBB, without compromising the BBB integrity. These data suggest that infection of HBMVE cells can facilitate entry of cell-free virus into the CNS without disturbing the BBB, and increased CAM may assist in the trafficking of WNV-infected immune cells into the CNS, via ‘Trojan horse’ mechanism, thereby contributing to WNV dissemination in the CNS and associated pathology. PMID:19135695

  2. Transforming growth factor-β3 regulates cell junction restructuring via MAPK-mediated mRNA destabilization and Smad-dependent protein degradation of junctional adhesion molecule B (JAM-B).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lui, Wing-Yee

    2015-06-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-B (JAM-B) is found between Sertoli cells at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) as well as between Sertoli and germ cells at the apical ectoplasmic specializations (ES) in the testis. The expression of JAM-B is tightly regulated to modulate the passage of spermatocytes across the BTB as well as the release of mature spermatozoa from the seminiferous epithelium. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) family is implicated in the regulation of testicular cell junction dynamics during spermatogenesis. This study aims to investigate the effects of TGF-β3 on the expression of JAM-B as well as the underlying mechanisms on how TGF-β3 regulates JAM-B expression to facilitate the disassembly of the BTB and apical ES. Our results revealed that TGF-β3 suppresses JAM-B at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. Inhibitor, siRNA knockdown and co-immunoprecipitation have shown that TGF-β3 induces JAM-B protein degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Immunofluorescence staining further confirmed that blockage of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway could abrogate TGF-β3-induced loss of JAM-B at the cell-cell interface. siRNA knockdown and immunofluorescence staining also demonstrated that activation of Smad signaling is required for TGF-β3-induced JAM-B protein degradation. In addition, TGF-β3 reduces JAM-B mRNA levels, at least in part, via post-transcriptional regulation. mRNA stability assay has confirmed that TGF-β3 promotes the degradation of JAM-B transcript and TGF-β3-mediated mRNA destabilization requires the activation of ERK1/2 and p54 JNK signal cascades. Taken together, TGF-β3 significantly downregulates JAM-B expression via post-transcriptional and post-translational modulation and results in the disruption of BTB and apical ES.

  3. Desmosomal adhesion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berika, Mohamed; Garrod, David

    2014-02-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that provide strong adhesion or hyper-adhesion in tissues. Here, we discuss the molecular and structural basis of this with particular reference to the desmosomal cadherins (DCs), their isoforms and evolution. We also assess the role of DCs as regulators of epithelial differentiation. New data on the role of desmosomes in development and human disease, especially wound healing and pemphigus, are briefly discussed, and the importance of regulation of the adhesiveness of desmosomes in tissue dynamics is considered.

  4. HIV-1 gp120 Glycoprotein Interacting with Dendritic Cell-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 3-grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN) Down-Regulates Tight Junction Proteins to Disrupt the Blood Retinal Barrier and Increase Its Permeability.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi-Wen; Li, Chuan; Jiang, Ai-Ping; Ge, Shengfang; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Tai-Sheng; Jin, Xia; Wang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2016-10-28

    Approximately 70% of HIV-1 infected patients acquire ocular opportunistic infections and manifest eye disorders during the course of their illness. The mechanisms by which pathogens invade the ocular site, however, are unclear. Under normal circumstances, vascular endothelium and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which possess a well developed tight junction complex, form the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) to prevent pathogen invasion. We hypothesize that disruption of the BRB allows pathogen entry into ocular sites. The hypothesis was tested using in vitro models. We discovered that human RPE cells could bind to either HIV-1 gp120 glycoproteins or HIV-1 viral particles. Furthermore, the binding was mediated by dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) expressed on RPE cells. Upon gp120 binding to DC-SIGN, cellular NF-κB signaling was triggered, leading to the induction of matrix metalloproteinases, which subsequently degraded tight junction proteins and disrupted the BRB integrity. DC-SIGN knockdown or prior blocking with a specific antibody abolished gp120-induced matrix metalloproteinase expression and reduced the degradation of tight junction proteins. This study elucidates a novel mechanism by which HIV, type 1 invades ocular tissues and provides additional insights into the translocation or invasion process of ocular complication-associated pathogens.

  5. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  6. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  7. Junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) distinguishes CD27+ germinal center B lymphocytes from non-germinal center cells and constitutes a new diagnostic tool for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ody, C; Jungblut-Ruault, S; Cossali, D; Barnet, M; Aurrand-Lions, M; Imhof, B A; Matthes, T

    2007-06-01

    Differentiation of naïve B cells into plasma cells or memory cells occurs in the germinal centers (GCs) of lymph follicles or alternatively via a GC- and T-cell-independent pathway. It is currently assumed that B-cell lymphomas correlate to normal B-cell differentiation stages, but the precise correlation of several B-cell lymphomas to these two pathways remains controversial. In the present report, we describe the junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C), currently identified at the cell-cell border of endothelial cells, as a new B-cell marker with a tightly regulated expression during B-cell differentiation. Expression of JAM-C in tonsils allows distinction between two CD27+ B-cell subpopulations: JAM-C- GC B cells and JAM-C+ non-germinal B cells. The expression of JAM-C in different B-cell lymphomas reveals a disease-specific pattern and allows a clear distinction between JAM-C- lymphoproliferative syndromes (chronic lymphocytic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma) and JAM-C+ ones (hairy cell leukemia, marginal zone B-cell lymphoma). Therefore, we propose JAM-C as a new identification tool in B-cell lymphoma diagnosis.

  8. An unusual cause of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass: Case report of a penetrating fish bone causing adhesions at the biliary-digestive junction resulting in partial obstruction and chronic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Vincent; Hendrickx, Leo; Valk, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGP) is complex and challenging. Foreign body intestinal perforation including that caused by fish bones has previously been reported in the literature and if clinically unrecognized, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Fish bone perforation as a cause of chronic abdominal pain after LRYGP has rarely been reported. Summary The unusual case of a 54 year old female presenting with recurrent episodes of postprandial pain 2 years after LRYGP is reported. Previous radiological and endoscopic investigations did not reveal any abnormality and after the most recent clinical presentation, a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A protruding fish bone at the biliary-digestive junction was discovered intra-operatively and successfully extracted. Dense adhesions between the involved intestinal loops were lysed in an attempt to improve intestinal transit and subsequently relieve post-prandial pain. Conclusion This case highlights the possibility of a missed fish bone perforation causing chronic postprandial abdominal pain and discomfort in a patient with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy. Foreign body perforation is a rare cause of abdominal pain after gastric bypass that should be considered when evaluating chronic abdominal pain symptoms after LRYGP. PMID:27107305

  9. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  10. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  11. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  12. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  13. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  14. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  15. Cell Adhesion in Epidermal Development and Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Lechler, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell adhesions are necessary for structural integrity and barrier formation of the epidermis. Here, we discuss insights from genetic and cell biological studies into the roles of individual cell–cell junctions and their composite proteins in regulating epidermal development and function. In addition to individual adhesive functions, we will discuss emerging ideas on mechanosensation/transduction of junctions in the epidermis, noncanonical roles for adhesion proteins, and crosstalk/interdependencies between the junctional systems. These studies have revealed that cell adhesion proteins are connected to many aspects of tissue physiology including growth control, differentiation, and inflammation. PMID:25733147

  16. Intrauterine Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion formation are infections of the uterine lining (endometritis), removal of fibroids in the cavity of the ... to prevent adhesions from reforming. Hormonal treatment with estrogen and NSAIDs are frequently prescribed after surgery to ...

  17. aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at Ser285 to promote cell contact maturation and tight junction formation.

    PubMed

    Iden, Sandra; Misselwitz, Steve; Peddibhotla, Swetha S D; Tuncay, Hüseyin; Rehder, Daniela; Gerke, Volker; Robenek, Horst; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ebnet, Klaus

    2012-03-05

    The PAR-3-atypical protein kinase C (aPKC)-PAR-6 complex has been implicated in the development of apicobasal polarity and the formation of tight junctions (TJs) in vertebrate epithelial cells. It is recruited by junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to primordial junctions where aPKC is activated by Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases. In this paper, we show that aPKC can interact directly with JAM-A in a PAR-3-independent manner. Upon recruitment to primordial junctions, aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to promote the maturation of immature cell-cell contacts. In fully polarized cells, S285-phosphorylated JAM-A is localized exclusively at the TJs, and S285 phosphorylation of JAM-A is required for the development of a functional epithelial barrier. Protein phosphatase 2A dephosphorylates JAM-A at S285, suggesting that it antagonizes the activity of aPKC. Expression of nonphosphorylatable JAM-A/S285A interferes with single lumen specification during cyst development in three-dimensional culture. Our data suggest that aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to regulate cell-cell contact maturation, TJ formation, and single lumen specification.

  18. Novel Effects of Azithromycin on Tight Junction Proteins in Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Asgrimsson, Valthor; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur Hrafn; Baldursson, Olafur

    2006-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin improves lung function and prognosis among patients with cystic fibrosis or diffuse panbronchiolitis, independently of bacterial eradication. Anti-inflammatory effects have been implicated, but data from in vivo studies are scarce, and the link between abnormal electrolyte content in airway surface liquid and bronchial infections remains uncertain. In the present study, we treated human airway epithelia on filter supports with azithromycin and monitored transepithelial electrical resistance. We found that azithromycin increased transepithelial electrical resistance of airway epithelia in a dose-dependent manner. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting showed that addition of azithromycin changed the locations of proteins in cell cultures and induced processing of the tight junction proteins claudin-1 and claudin-4, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecule-A. These effects were reversible, and no effect was seen when cells were treated with penicillin or erythromycin. The data indicate that azithromycin increases the transepithelial electrical resistance of human airway epithelia by changing the processing of tight junction proteins. The results are novel and may help explain the beneficial effects of azithromycin in patients with cystic fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, and community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:16641453

  19. PPARα and PPARγ attenuate HIV-induced dysregulation of tight junction proteins by modulations of matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Eum, Sung Yong; András, Ibolya E; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in HIV trafficking into the brain and the development of the central nervous system complications in HIV infection. Tight junctions are the main structural and functional elements that regulate the BBB integrity. Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3 cell line) to HIV-infected monocytes resulted in decreased expression of tight junction proteins, such as junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM)-A, occludin, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1. Control experiments involved exposure to uninfected monocytes. Alterations of tight junction protein expression were associated with increased endothelial permeability and elevated transendothelial migration of HIV-infected monocytes across an in vitro model of the BBB. Notably, overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α or PPARγ attenuated HIV-mediated dysregulation of tight junction proteins. With the use of exogenous PPARγ agonists and silencing of PPARα or PPARγ, these protective effects were connected to down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and proteasome activities. Indeed, the HIV-induced decrease in the expression of JAM-A and occludin was restored by inhibition of MMP activity. Moreover, both MMP and proteasome inhibitors attenuated HIV-mediated altered expression of ZO-1. The present data indicate that down-regulation of MMP and proteasome activities constitutes a novel mechanism of PPAR-induced protections against HIV-induced disruption of brain endothelial cells.—Huang, W., Eum, S. Y., András, I. E., Hennig, B., Toborek, M. PPARα and PPARγ attenuate HIV-induced dysregulation of tight junction proteins by modulations of matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities. PMID:19141539

  20. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  1. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  2. Microtubules regulate disassembly of epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; McCall, Ingrid C; Babbin, Brian; Samarin, Stanislav N; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background Epithelial tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) form the apical junctional complex (AJC) which regulates cell-cell adhesion, paracellular permeability and cell polarity. The AJC is anchored on cytoskeletal structures including actin microfilaments and microtubules. Such cytoskeletal interactions are thought to be important for the assembly and remodeling of apical junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of microtubules in disassembly of the AJC in intestinal epithelial cells using a model of extracellular calcium depletion. Results Calcium depletion resulted in disruption and internalization of epithelial TJs and AJs along with reorganization of perijunctional F-actin into contractile rings. Microtubules reorganized into dense plaques positioned inside such F-actin rings. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole prevented junctional disassembly and F-actin ring formation. Stabilization of microtubules with either docetaxel or pacitaxel blocked contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated internalization of junctional proteins into a subapical cytosolic compartment. Likewise, pharmacological inhibition of microtubule motors, kinesins, prevented contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated disassembly of apical junctions. Kinesin-1 was enriched at the AJC in cultured epithelial cells and it also accumulated at epithelial cell-cell contacts in normal human colonic mucosa. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated association of kinesin-1 with the E-cadherin-catenin complex. Conclusion Our data suggest that microtubules play a role in disassembly of the AJC during calcium depletion by regulating formation of contractile F-actin rings and internalization of AJ/TJ proteins. PMID:16509970

  3. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  4. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  5. The Extracellular Architecture of Adherens Junctions Revealed by Crystal Structures of Type I Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    O Harrison; X Jin; S Hong; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; J Brasch; Y Wu; J Vendome; K Felsovalyi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Adherens junctions, which play a central role in intercellular adhesion, comprise clusters of type I classical cadherins that bind via extracellular domains extended from opposing cell surfaces. We show that a molecular layer seen in crystal structures of E- and N-cadherin ectodomains reported here and in a previous C-cadherin structure corresponds to the extracellular architecture of adherens junctions. In all three ectodomain crystals, cadherins dimerize through a trans adhesive interface and are connected by a second, cis, interface. Assemblies formed by E-cadherin ectodomains coated on liposomes also appear to adopt this structure. Fluorescent imaging of junctions formed from wild-type and mutant E-cadherins in cultured cells confirm conclusions derived from structural evidence. Mutations that interfere with the trans interface ablate adhesion, whereas cis interface mutations disrupt stable junction formation. Our observations are consistent with a model for junction assembly involving strong trans and weak cis interactions localized in the ectodomain.

  6. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  7. Alteration of Tight Junction Proteins Is an Early Event in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Nina; Poetzl, Claudia; von den Driesch, Peter; Wladykowski, Ewa; Moll, Ingrid; Behne, Martin J.; Brandner, Johanna M.

    2009-01-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, impaired barrier function, and pronounced infiltration of inflammatory cells. Tight junctions (TJs) are cell-cell junctions that form paracellular barriers for solutes and inflammatory cells. Altered localization of TJ proteins in the epidermis was described in plaque-type psoriasis. Here we show that localization of TJ proteins is already altered in early-stage psoriasis. Occludin, ZO-1, and claudin-4 are found in more layers than in normal epidermis, and claudin-1 and -7 are down-regulated in the basal and in the uppermost layers. In plaque-type psoriasis, the staining patterns of occludin and ZO-1 do not change, whereas the claudins are further down-regulated. Near transmigrating granulocytes, all TJ proteins except for junctional adhesion molecule-A are down-regulated. Treatment of cultured keratinocytes with interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, which are present at elevated levels in psoriatic skin, results in an increase of transepithelial resistance at early time points and a decrease at later time points. Injection of interleukin-1β into an ex vivo skin model leads to an up-regulation of occludin and ZO-1, resembling TJ protein alteration in early psoriasis. Our results show for the first time that alteration of TJ proteins is an early event in psoriasis and is not the consequence of the more profound changes found in plaque-type psoriasis. Our data indicate that cytokines are involved in alterations of TJ proteins observed in psoriasis. PMID:19661441

  8. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  9. Synaptopodin couples epithelial contractility to α-actinin-4–dependent junction maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Nivetha

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial junction experiences mechanical force exerted by endogenous actomyosin activities and from interactions with neighboring cells. We hypothesize that tension generated at cell–cell adhesive contacts contributes to the maturation and assembly of the junctional complex. To test our hypothesis, we used a hydraulic apparatus that can apply mechanical force to intercellular junction in a confluent monolayer of cells. We found that mechanical force induces α-actinin-4 and actin accumulation at the cell junction in a time- and tension-dependent manner during junction development. Intercellular tension also induces α-actinin-4–dependent recruitment of vinculin to the cell junction. In addition, we have identified a tension-sensitive upstream regulator of α-actinin-4 as synaptopodin. Synaptopodin forms a complex containing α-actinin-4 and β-catenin and interacts with myosin II, indicating that it can physically link adhesion molecules to the cellular contractile apparatus. Synaptopodin depletion prevents junctional accumulation of α-actinin-4, vinculin, and actin. Knockdown of synaptopodin and α-actinin-4 decreases the strength of cell–cell adhesion, reduces the monolayer permeability barrier, and compromises cellular contractility. Our findings underscore the complexity of junction development and implicate a control process via tension-induced sequential incorporation of junctional components. PMID:26504173

  10. The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions isolated from adult bovine and calf lenses were studied using combined electron microscopy, immunolocalization with monoclonal and polyclonal anti-MIP and anti-MP70 (two putative gap junction-forming proteins), and freeze-fracture and label-fracture methods. The major intrinsic protein of lens plasma membranes (MIP) was localized in single membranes and in an extensive network of junctions having flat and undulating surface topologies. In wavy junctions, polyclonal and monoclonal anti-MIPs labeled only the cytoplasmic surface of the convex membrane of the junction. Label-fracture experiments demonstrated that the convex membrane contained MIP arranged in tetragonal arrays 6-7 nm in unit cell dimension. The apposing concave membrane of the junction displayed fracture faces without intramembrane particles or pits. Therefore, wavy junctions are asymmetric structures composed of MIP crystals abutted against particle-free membranes. In thin junctions, anti-MIP labeled the cytoplasmic surfaces of both apposing membranes with varying degrees of asymmetry. In thin junctions, MIP was found organized in both small clusters and single membranes. These small clusters also abut against particle-free apposing membranes, probably in a staggered or checkerboard pattern. Thus, the structure of thin and wavy junctions differed only in the extent of crystallization of MIP, a property that can explain why this protein can produce two different antibody-labeling patterns. A conclusion of this study is that wavy and thin junctions do not contain coaxially aligned channels, and, in these junctions, MIP is unlikely to form gap junction-like channels. We suggest MIP may behave as an intercellular adhesion protein which can also act as a volume-regulating channel to collapse the lens extracellular space. Junctions constructed of MP70 have a wider overall thickness (18-20 nm) and are abundant in the cortical regions

  11. The organization of adherens junctions and desmosomes at the cardiac intercalated disc is independent of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Gutstein, David E; Liu, Fang-Yu; Meyers, Marian B; Choo, Andrew; Fishman, Glenn I

    2003-03-01

    Adherens junctions and desmosomes are responsible for mechanically coupling myocytes in the heart and are found closely apposed to gap junction plaques at the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes. It is not known whether loss of cardiac gap junctions, such as described in cardiac disease states, may influence the expression patterns of other intercalated disc-associated proteins. We investigated whether the major cardiac gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) may be responsible for regulating adherens junctions, desmosomes and their associated catenins, in terms of abundance and localization at the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes. In order to study the effect of loss of cardiac gap junctions on the intercalated disc-associated proteins, we used a combination of immunoblotting, immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy and electron microscopy to evaluate heart tissue from mice with cardiac-specific conditional knockout of Cx43. We found that the cardiac adherens junctions, desmosomes and their associated catenins, as well as vinculin and ZO-1, maintain their normal abundance, structural appearance and localization in the absence of Cx43. We conclude from these data that Cx43 is not required for the organization of the cell adhesion junctions and their associated catenins at the intercalated disc in the adult cardiac myocyte.

  12. Desmoplakin controls microvilli length but not cell adhesion or keratin organization in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Lechler, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining proper cell–cell adhesion in the intestine is essential for tissue homeostasis and barrier function. This adhesion is thought to be mediated by cell adhesion structures, including tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, which concentrate in the apical junctional region. While clear roles for adherens and tight junctions have been established in simple epithelia, the function of desmosomes has not been addressed. In stratified epithelia, desmosomes impart mechanical strength to tissues by organizing and anchoring the keratin filament network. In this paper, we report that the desmosomal protein desmoplakin (DP) is not essential for cell adhesion in the intestinal epithelium. Surprisingly, when DP is lacking, keratin filament localization is also unperturbed, although keratin filaments no longer anchor at desmosomes. Unexpectedly, DP is important for proper microvillus structure. Our study highlights the tissue-specific functions of desmosomes and reveals that the canonical functions for these structures are not conserved in simple epithelium. PMID:22238362

  13. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  14. Indian Ocean Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.

    1980-09-10

    The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the Indian Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central Indian Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast Indian Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest Indian Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest Indian Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.

  15. Physiology and Function of the Tight Junction

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James M.; Van Itallie, Christina M.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of tight junctions has evolved from their historical perception as inert solute barriers to recognition of their physiological and biochemical complexity. Many proteins are specifically localized to tight junctions, including cytoplasmic actin-binding proteins and adhesive transmembrane proteins. Among the latter are claudins, which are critical barrier proteins. Current information suggests that the paracellular barrier is most usefully modeled as having two physiologic components: a system of charge-selective small pores, 4 Å in radius, and a second pathway created by larger discontinuities in the barrier, lacking charge or size discrimination. The first pathway is influenced by claudin expression patterns and the second is likely controlled by different proteins and signals. Recent information on claudin function and disease-causing mutations have led to a more complete understanding of their role in barrier formation, but progress is impeded by lack of high resolution structural information. PMID:20066090

  16. Epithelial junctions and Rho family GTPases: the zonular signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Citi, Sandra; Guerrera, Diego; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell-cell junctions is crucially important to regulate adhesion, apico-basal polarity and motility of epithelial cells, and ultimately controls the architecture and physiology of epithelial organs. Junctions are supported, shaped and regulated by cytoskeletal filaments, whose dynamic organization and contractility are finely tuned by GTPases of the Rho family, primarily RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. Recent research has identified new molecular mechanisms underlying the cross-talk between these GTPases and epithelial junctions. Here we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the organization, molecular evolution and cytoskeletal anchoring of cell-cell junctions, and we comment on the most recent advances in the characterization of the interactions between Rho GTPases and junctional proteins, and their consequences with regards to junction assembly and regulation of cell behavior in vertebrate model systems. The concept of “zonular signalosome” is proposed, which highlights the close functional relationship between proteins of zonular junctions (zonulae occludentes and adhaerentes) and the control of cytoskeletal organization and signaling through Rho GTPases, transcription factors, and their effectors. PMID:25483301

  17. Analysis of Adhesion Molecules and Basement Membrane Contributions to Synaptic Adhesion at the Drosophila Embryonic NMJ

    PubMed Central

    Koper, Andre; Schenck, Annette; Prokop, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Synapse formation and maintenance crucially underlie brain function in health and disease. Both processes are believed to depend on cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Many different classes of CAMs localise to synapses, including cadherins, protocadherins, neuroligins, neurexins, integrins, and immunoglobulin adhesion proteins, and further contributions come from the extracellular matrix and its receptors. Most of these factors have been scrutinised by loss-of-function analyses in animal models. However, which adhesion factors establish the essential physical links across synaptic clefts and allow the assembly of synaptic machineries at the contact site in vivo is still unclear. To investigate these key questions, we have used the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of Drosophila embryos as a genetically amenable model synapse. Our ultrastructural analyses of NMJs lacking different classes of CAMs revealed that loss of all neurexins, all classical cadherins or all glutamate receptors, as well as combinations between these or with a Laminin deficiency, failed to reveal structural phenotypes. These results are compatible with a view that these CAMs might have no structural role at this model synapse. However, we consider it far more likely that they operate in a redundant or well buffered context. We propose a model based on a multi-adaptor principle to explain this phenomenon. Furthermore, we report a new CAM-independent adhesion mechanism that involves the basement membranes (BM) covering neuromuscular terminals. Thus, motorneuronal terminals show strong partial detachment of the junction when BM-to-cell surface attachment is impaired by removing Laminin A, or when BMs lose their structural integrity upon loss of type IV collagens. We conclude that BMs are essential to tie embryonic motorneuronal terminals to the muscle surface, lending CAM-independent structural support to their adhesion. Therefore, future developmental studies of these synaptic junctions in Drosophila need

  18. AB223. Expression of tight junction proteins in rat vagina

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyung Jin; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Chung, Ho Suck; Ahn, Kyu Youn; Park, Kwangsung

    2014-01-01

    Aim Tight junction plays a role in apical cell-to-cell adhesion and epithelial polarity. In this study, we investigated the expression of tight junction proteins, such as Claudin-1, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, junction adhesion molecule (JAM)-A, and occludin in rat vagina. Methods Female Sprague-dawley rats (230-240 g, n=20) were divided into two groups: control (n=10) and bilateral ovariectomy (n=10). The expression and cellular localization of claudin-1, ZO-1, JAM-A, and occludin were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results Immunolabeling of ZO-1 was mainly expressed in the capillaries and venules of the vagina. Claudin-1, JAM-A, and occludin were expressed in the epithelium of the vagina. The immunoreactivity and protein expression of claudin-1 was significantly decreased in the ovariectomy group compared with the control group. Conclusions Our results suggest that tight junction proteins may have an important role in the vagina. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of each tight junction protein on vaginal lubrication.

  19. Regulation of Endothelial Adherens Junctions by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Alejandro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells form a semipermeable, regulated barrier that limits the passage of fluid, small molecules, and leukocytes between the bloodstream and the surrounding tissues. The adherens junction, a major mechanism of intercellular adhesion, is comprised of transmembrane cadherins forming homotypic interactions between adjacent cells and associated cytoplasmic catenins linking the cadherins to the cytoskeleton. Inflammatory conditions promote the disassembly of the adherens junction and a loss of intercellular adhesion, creating openings or gaps in the endothelium through which small molecules diffuse and leukocytes transmigrate. Tyrosine kinase signaling has emerged as a central regulator of the inflammatory response, partly through direct phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the adherens junction components. This review discusses the findings that support and those that argue against a direct effect of cadherin and catenin phosphorylation in the disassembly of the adherens junction. Recent findings indicate a complex interaction between kinases, phosphatases, and the adherens junction components that allow a fine regulation of the endothelial permeability to small molecules, leukocyte migration, and barrier resealing. PMID:26556953

  20. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics.

  1. [Relationship between tight junction proteins and Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Mi-Zu

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is an important cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer, but their pathogenesis is unclear. The role of gastric mucosal barrier dysfunction induced by impaired structure and function of tight junction in the pathogenesis of Hp-associated gastric diseases has received considerable attention in recent years. Tight junction is composed of a variety of proteins and molecules, including 3 integral membrane proteins (occludin, claudins, and junctional adhesion molecules) and a cytoplasmic protein (zonula occludens). This paper mainly describes the composition and function of various tight junction proteins, changes in tight junction protein function induced by Hp infection and their relationship with the incidence of gastric diseases, and the significance of enhancing the tight junction protein function in the prevention and treatment of Hp-associated gastric diseases.

  2. Breaking into the epithelial apical-junctional complex--news from pathogen hackers.

    PubMed

    Vogelmann, Roger; Amieva, Manuel R; Falkow, Stanley; Nelson, W James

    2004-02-01

    The epithelial apical-junctional complex is a key regulator of cellular functions. In addition, it is an important target for microbial pathogens that manipulate the cell to survive, proliferate and sometimes persist within a host. Out of a myriad of potential molecular targets, some bacterial and viral pathogens have selected a subset of protein targets at the apical-junctional complex of epithelial cells. Studying how microbes use these targets also teaches us about the inherent physiological properties of host molecules in the context of normal junctional structure and function. Thus, we have learned that three recently uncovered components of the apical-junctional complex of the Ig superfamily--junctional adhesion molecule, Nectin and the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor--are important regulators of junction structure and function and represent critical targets of microbial virulence gene products.

  3. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  4. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  5. Dot junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1986-01-01

    A design of solar cells with reduced junction area on the cell surface is investigated for reduction of saturation current and increase in open-circuit voltage. Equidiameter dot junctions distributed across the surface of the cell offer an efficient alternative, with variations in dot diameter and in the spacing between dots giving the required variations in the ratio of junction area to total surface area. A simplified analysis for short-circuit current and other cell parameters, which enables cell design optimization, is presented. Experimental solar-cell performance results, as functions of different area ratios, are presented and compared with the model. It is shown that saturation current reduction is possible for achieving efficiencies as high as 18 percent in flat-plate terrestrial applications.

  6. Intraepithelial lymphocytes express junctional molecules in murine small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko . E-mail: INAGAKI@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Sawaguchi, Akira; Suganuma, Tatsuo; Matsuzaki, Goro; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2005-06-17

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) that reside at basolateral site regulate the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells (EC) for providing a first line of host defense in intestine. However, it remains unknown how IEL interact and communicate with EC. Here, we show that IEL express junctional molecules like EC. We identified mRNA expression of the junctional molecules in IEL such as zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) (tight junction), {beta}-catenin and E-cadherin (adherens junction), and connexin26 (gap junction). IEL constitutively expressed occludin and E-cadherin at protein level, while other T cells in the thymus, spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph node, and Peyer's patches did not. {gamma}{delta} IEL showed higher level of these expressions than {alpha}{beta} IEL. The expression of occludin was augmented by anti-CD3 Ab stimulation. These results suggest the possibility of a novel role of IEL concerning epithelial barrier and communication between IEL and EC.

  7. Defining functional interactions during biogenesis of epithelial junctions

    PubMed Central

    Erasmus, J. C.; Bruche, S.; Pizarro, L.; Maimari, N.; Pogglioli, T.; Tomlinson, C.; Lees, J.; Zalivina, I.; Wheeler, A.; Alberts, A.; Russo, A.; Braga, V. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of extensive recent progress, a comprehensive understanding of how actin cytoskeleton remodelling supports stable junctions remains to be established. Here we design a platform that integrates actin functions with optimized phenotypic clustering and identify new cytoskeletal proteins, their functional hierarchy and pathways that modulate E-cadherin adhesion. Depletion of EEF1A, an actin bundling protein, increases E-cadherin levels at junctions without a corresponding reinforcement of cell–cell contacts. This unexpected result reflects a more dynamic and mobile junctional actin in EEF1A-depleted cells. A partner for EEF1A in cadherin contact maintenance is the formin DIAPH2, which interacts with EEF1A. In contrast, depletion of either the endocytic regulator TRIP10 or the Rho GTPase activator VAV2 reduces E-cadherin levels at junctions. TRIP10 binds to and requires VAV2 function for its junctional localization. Overall, we present new conceptual insights on junction stabilization, which integrate known and novel pathways with impact for epithelial morphogenesis, homeostasis and diseases. PMID:27922008

  8. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  9. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  10. Role of Rho GTPases in desmosomal adhesion and pemphigus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2011-05-01

    Desmosomes are distinct intercellular contacts essential to the integrity of epithelial tissues and the heart muscle. This function is impaired in the disease pemphigus, in which patients develop autoantibodies against the cadherin-type desmosomal core proteins desmogleins. Autoantibody binding induces loss of cell-cell adhesion leading to blisters within the epidermis and mucous membranes. Despite the relevance of desmosomes for integrity of such essential organs as the skin, data on the regulation of desmosome assembly and maintenance and desmosome-mediated adhesion are only slowly emerging. Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) of the Rho family have long been established as regulators of other cell junctions such as adherens junctions, but also have been implicated in participating in the formation of desmosomes. In this short review we summarize two papers from our group dealing with the role of Rho family GTPases for desmosomal adhesion and pemphigus and discuss these data integrating novel work recently published.

  11. Thinking outside the cell: how cadherins drive adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Brasch, Julia; Harrison, Oliver J.; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Cadherins embody a superfamily of cell-surface glycoproteins whose ectodomains contain multiple repeats of β-sandwich EC (extracellular cadherin) domains that adopt a similar fold to immunoglobulin domains. The best characterized cadherins are the vertebrate “classical” cadherins, which mediate adhesion via trans homodimerization between their membrane-distal EC1 domains that extend from apposed cells, and assemble intercellular adherens junctions through cis clustering. To form mature trans adhesive dimers, cadherin domains from apposed cells dimerize in a “strand-swapped” conformation. This occurs in a two-step binding process involving a fast-binding intermediate called the “X-dimer”. Trans dimers are less flexible than cadherin monomers, a factor which drives junction assembly following cell-cell contact by reducing the entropic cost associated with the formation of lateral cis oligomers. Cadherins outside of the classical subfamily appear to have evolved distinct adhesive mechanisms which are just now beginning to be understood. PMID:22555008

  12. Thinking outside the cell: how cadherins drive adhesion.

    PubMed

    Brasch, Julia; Harrison, Oliver J; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Cadherins are a superfamily of cell surface glycoproteins whose ectodomains contain multiple repeats of β-sandwich extracellular cadherin (EC) domains that adopt a similar fold to immunoglobulin domains. The best characterized cadherins are the vertebrate 'classical' cadherins, which mediate adhesion via trans homodimerization between their membrane-distal EC1 domains that extend from apposed cells, and assemble intercellular adherens junctions through cis clustering. To form mature trans adhesive dimers, cadherin domains from apposed cells dimerize in a 'strand-swapped' conformation. This occurs in a two-step binding process involving a fast-binding intermediate called the 'X-dimer'. Trans dimers are less flexible than cadherin monomers, a factor that drives junction assembly following cell-cell contact by reducing the entropic cost associated with the formation of lateral cis oligomers. Cadherins outside the classical subfamily appear to have evolved distinct adhesive mechanisms that are only now beginning to be understood.

  13. Physical understanding of cryogenic implant benefits for electrical junction stability

    SciTech Connect

    Adeni Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd

    2012-03-12

    We investigate the effect of cryogenic temperature implants on electrical junction stability for ultra shallow junction applications for sub-32 nm technology nodes and beyond. A comprehensive study was conducted to gain physical understanding of the impact of cryogenic temperature implants on dopant-defect interactions. Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) molecule, a potential alternative to monomer boron was implanted in carbon preamorphized silicon substrates at cryogenic implant temperatures. Results indicate implants at cryogenic temperatures increase dopant activation with reduced diffusion, resulting in lower sheet resistance for a lower junction depth. Further, this study emphasizes the benefits of co-implants performed at cryogenic temperatures as alternative to traditional preamorphizing implants.

  14. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  15. Intercellular junctions in myriapods.

    PubMed

    Dallai, R; Bigliardi, E; Lane, N J

    1990-01-01

    Tissue from the intestinal tract of myriapods, including millipedes, centipedes and pauropods were examined in tracer-impregnated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The foregut and hindgut of all three classes exhibit pleated septate junctions; these display undulating intercellular ribbons in thin sections. In replicas they show discrete intramembranous particle (IMP) arrays aligned in rows in parallel; with one another. The tissues of the hindgut also possess scalariform junctions, characterized by cross-striated intercellular clefts in sections and IMP-enriched membranes in replicas. Gap junctions occur in all groups, but they are atypical in replicas in that their component IMPs do not always fracture onto the E face, as is characteristic of other arthropods; some IMPs cleave to the P face and others to the E face. The midgut of these organisms exhibits smooth septate junctions with conventional straight septal ribbons and occasional interseptal columns. However the intramembranous appearance in replicas is variable, particularly in centipedes, in that the rows of IMPs in chemically-unfixed propanecryofixed tissues, are prominent and adhere preferentially to the E face, with complementary P face grooves, while in fixed tissues the IMPs are much less distinct and fracture to either P face or E face. They tend not to protrude far beyond the mid-plane of the membrane bilayer and lie in rows which commonly take on the form of a network. Individual rows of the network sometimes curve to run beside a second row, over a short distance, before bending away into another part of the network. The aligned particle rows, which are much more prominent in millipedes, where they frequently lie in close parallel appositions, do not fuse into ridges as often occurs in insect tissues. The myriapod junctions, therefore, are of the same general kind as are found in the gut tract of other arthropod groups, but differ with respect to the subtleties of their intramembranous

  16. Do cell junction protein mutations cause an airway phenotype in mice or humans?

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene H; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Zabner, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Cell junction proteins connect epithelial cells to each other and to the basement membrane. Genetic mutations of these proteins can cause alterations in some epithelia leading to varied phenotypes such as deafness, renal disease, skin disorders, and cancer. This review examines if genetic mutations in these proteins affect the function of lung airway epithelia. We review cell junction proteins with examples of disease mutation phenotypes in humans and in mouse knockout models. We also review which of these genes are expressed in airway epithelium by microarray expression profiling and immunocytochemistry. Last, we present a comprehensive literature review to find the lung phenotype when cell junction and adhesion genes are mutated or subject to targeted deletion. We found that in murine models, targeted deletion of cell junction and adhesion genes rarely result in a lung phenotype. Moreover, mutations in these genes in humans have no obvious lung phenotype. Our research suggests that simply because a cell junction or adhesion protein is expressed in an organ does not imply that it will exhibit a drastic phenotype when mutated. One explanation is that because a functioning lung is critical to survival, redundancy in the system is expected. Therefore mutations in a single gene might be compensated by a related function of a similar gene product. Further studies in human and animal models will help us understand the overlap in the function of cell junction gene products. Finally, it is possible that the human lung phenotype is subtle and has not yet been described.

  17. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    ASTM 907-05. Standard Terminology of Adhesives. West Conshohocken, PA, May 2005. 4. 3M Scotch-Grip Nitrile High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to increase rubber to metal adhesion in Army materials using...1 Figure 2. Steel and rubber

  18. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  19. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  20. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions.

    PubMed

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the 'apical junctional complex-AJC' with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the 'Junctional Adhesion Molecules' (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers.

  1. The adherens junction is lost during normal pregnancy but not during ovarian hyperstimulated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dowland, Samson N; Madawala, Romanthi J; Lindsay, Laura A; Murphy, Christopher R

    2016-03-01

    During early pregnancy in the rat, the luminal uterine epithelial cells (UECs) must transform to a receptive state to permit blastocyst attachment and implantation. The implantation process involves penetration of the epithelial barrier, so it is expected that the transformation of UECs includes alterations in the lateral junctional complex. Previous studies have demonstrated a deepening of the tight junction (zonula occludens) and a reduction in the number of desmosomes (macula adherens) in UECs at the time of implantation. However, the adherens junction (zonula adherens), which is primarily responsible for cell-cell adhesion, has been little studied during early pregnancy. This study investigated the adherens junction in rat UECs during the early stages of normal pregnancy and ovarian hyperstimulated (OH) pregnancy using transmission electron microscopy. The adherens junction is present in UECs at the time of fertilisation, but is lost at the time of blastocyst implantation during normal pregnancy. Interestingly, at the time of implantation after OH, adherens junctions are retained and may impede blastocyst penetration of the epithelium. The adherens junction anchors the actin-based terminal web, which is known to be disrupted in UECs during early pregnancy. However, artificial disruption of the terminal web, using cytochalasin D, did not cause removal of the adherens junction in UECs. This study revealed that adherens junction disassembly occurs during early pregnancy, but that this process does not occur during OH pregnancy. Such disassembly does not appear to depend on the disruption of the terminal web.

  2. Garlic (Allium sativum) feeding impairs Sertoli cell junctional proteins in male Wistar rat testis: microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Hammami, I; Nahdi, A; Atig, F; El May, A; El May, M V

    2016-12-01

    Sertoli cell junctions, such as adhesion junction (AJ), gap junction (GJ) and tight junction (TJ), are important for maintaining spermatogenesis. In previous studies, we showed the inhibitory effect of crude garlic (Allium sativum, As) on spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. The aim of this work was to complete our investigation on the impact of this plant, especially on Sertoli cell junctional proteins (SCJPs). During 1 month, 24 male rats were divided into groups: group control (0% of As) and treated groups fed 5%, 10% and 15% of As. Light and electron microscopy observations were performed to localise junctional proteins: connexin-43, Zona Occluding-1 and N-cadherin (immunohistochemistry) and to describe junctions. We showed that the specific cells involved in the localisation of the SCJP were similar in both control and treated groups, but with different immunoreactivity intensity between them. The electron microscopy observation focused on TJs between Sertoli cells, constituting the blood-testis barrier, showed ultrastructural changes such as fragmentation of TJs between adjacent Sertoli cell membranes and dilatation of rough endoplasmic reticulum saccules giving an aspect of scale to these junctions. We concluded that crude garlic consumption during 1 month induces perturbations on Sertoli cell junctions. These alterations can explain apoptosis in testicular germ cells previously showed.

  3. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  4. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion.

  5. Magnetic tunnel junctions utilizing diamond-like carbon tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieu, F. J.; Chen, Li; Li, Biao

    2002-05-01

    We have devised a method whereby thin particulate-free diamond-like carbon films can be made with good adhesion onto even room-temperature substrates. The method employs a filtered ionized carbon beam created by the vacuum impact of a high-energy, approximately 1 J per pulse, 248 nm excimer laser onto a carbon target. The resultant deposition beam can be steered and deflected by magnetic and electric fields to paint a specific substrate area. An important aspect of this deposition method is that the resultant films are particulate free and formed only as the result of atomic species impact. The vast majority of magnetic tunnel junctions utilizing thin metallic magnetic films have employed a thin oxidized layer of aluminum to form the tunnel barrier. This has presented reproducibility problems because the indicated optimal barrier thickness is only approximately 13 Å thick. Magnetic tunnel junctions utilizing Co and permalloy films made by evaporation and sputtering have been fabricated with an intervening diamond-like carbon tunnel barrier. The diamond-like carbon thickness profile has been tapered so that seven junctions with different barrier thickness can be formed at once. Magnetoresistive (MR) measurements made between successive permalloy strip ends include contributions from two junctions and from the permalloy and Co strips that act as current leads to the junctions. Magnetic tunnel junctions with thicker carbon barriers exhibit MR effects that are dominated by that of the permalloy strips. Since these tunnel barriers are formed without the need for oxygen, complete tunnel junctions can be formed with all high-vacuum processing.

  6. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  7. Investigation of the adhesive bonding technology for the insulator structure of EAST neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jiang-Long Li, Jun; Hu, Chun-Dong; Xie, Ya-Hong; Jing, Hao

    2014-07-15

    A key issue on the development of EAST ion source was the junction design of insulator structure, which consists of three insulators and four supporting flanges of electrode grid. Because the ion source is installed on the vertical plane, the insulator structure has to withstand large bending and shear stress due to the gravity of whole ion source. Through a mechanical analysis, it was calculated that the maximum bending normal stress was 0.34 MPa and shear stress was 0.23 MPa on the insulator structure. Due to the advantages of simplicity and high strength, the adhesive bonding technology was applied to the junction of insulator structure. A tensile testing campaign of different junction designs between insulator and supporting flange was performed, and a junction design of stainless steel and fiber enhanced epoxy resin with epoxy adhesive was determined. The insulator structure based on the determined design can satisfy both the requirements of high-voltage holding and mechanical strength.

  8. Desmosomes: adhesive strength and signalling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Helen A; Scothern, Anthea; McHarg, Selina; Garrod, David R

    2010-08-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions whose primary function is strong intercellular adhesion, known as hyperadhesion. In the present review, we discuss how their structure appears to support this function as well as how they are assembled and down-regulated. Desmosomal components also have signalling functions that are important in tissue development and remodelling. Their adhesive and signalling functions are both compromised in genetic and autoimmune diseases that affect the heart, skin and mucous membranes. We conclude that much work is required on structure-function relationships within desmosomes in vivo and on how they participate in signalling processes to enhance our knowledge of tissue homoeostasis and human disease.

  9. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  10. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  11. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    Also, CaRuO 3 is chemically compatible with YBa2Cu30 7 and its conductivity does not appear to be strongly dependent on doping or oxygen concentration...barrier conductivity is quite high. The first YBa2Cu30 7 layer and the SrTiO3 layer are deposited first and then patterned with ion milling (to help form...the edge junction will dominate any leakage through the SrTiO3 , thus the integrity of that dielectric will not be a concern here. The integrity of the

  12. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  13. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  14. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  15. MicroRNA Regulation of Endothelial Junction Proteins and Clinical Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yugang; Peng, Hu; Mastej, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Cellular junctions play a critical role in structural connection and signal communication between cells in various tissues. Although there are structural and functional varieties, cellular junctions include tight junctions, adherens junctions, focal adhesion junctions, and tissue specific junctions such as PECAM-1 junctions in endothelial cells (EC), desmosomes in epithelial cells, and hemidesmosomes in EC. Cellular junction dysfunction and deterioration are indicative of clinical diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are ~20 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs that play an important role in posttranscriptional regulation for almost all genes. Unsurprisingly, miRNAs regulate junction protein gene expression and control junction structure integrity. In contrast, abnormal miRNA regulation of junction protein gene expression results in abnormal junction structure, causing related diseases. The major components of tight junctions include zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), claudin-1, claudin-5, and occludin. The miRNA regulation of ZO-1 has been intensively investigated. ZO-1 and other tight junction proteins such as claudin-5 and occludin were positively regulated by miR-126, miR-107, and miR21 in different models. In contrast, ZO-1, claudin-5, and occludin were negatively regulated by miR-181a, miR-98, and miR150. Abnormal tight junction miRNA regulation accompanies cerebral middle artery ischemia, brain trauma, glioma metastasis, and so forth. The major components of adherens junctions include VE-cadherin, β-catenin, plakoglobin, P120, and vinculin. VE-cadherin and β-catenin were regulated by miR-9, miR-99b, miR-181a, and so forth. These regulations directly affect VE-cadherin-β-catenin complex stability and further affect embryo and tumor angiogenesis, vascular development, and so forth. miR-155 and miR-126 have been shown to regulate PECAM-1 and affect neutrophil rolling and EC junction integrity. In focal adhesion junctions, the major components are integrin β4, paxillin, and focal

  16. Instant acting adhesive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  17. LARC-13 adhesive development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Sheppard, C. H.; Johnson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A LARC-13 type adhesive system was developed and property data obtained that demonstrated improved thermomechanical properties superior to base LARC-13 adhesive. An improved adhesive for 589 K (600 F) use was developed by physical or chemical modification of LARC-13. The adhesive was optimized for titanium and composite bonding, and a compatible surface preparation for titanium and composite substrates was identified. The data obtained with the improved adhesive system indicated it would meet the 589 K (600 F) properties desired for application on space shuttle components. Average titanium lap shear data were: (1) 21.1 MPa (3355 psi) at RT, (2) 13.0 MPa (1881 psi) at 600 F, and (3) 16.4 MPa (2335) after aging 125 hours at 600 F and tested at 600 F.

  18. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  19. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated.

  20. Cyanoacrylate Adhesives in Eye Wounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EYE, *WOUNDS AND INJURIES), (*ADHESIVES, EYE), (*ACRYLIC RESINS, ADHESIVES), CORNEA , HEALING, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), NECROSIS, SURGICAL SUPPLIES, STRENGTH(PHYSIOLOGY), SURGERY, THERAPY

  1. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  2. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  3. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  4. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  5. Adhesion of Polymer Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, John J.; Bates, Frank S.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Silas, James A.

    2005-07-01

    The adhesion and bending modulus of polybutadiene-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer vesicles made from a bidisperse mixture of polymers is measured using micropipette aspiration. The adhesion energy between biotinylated vesicles and avidin beads is modeled by incorporating the extension of the adhesive ligands above the surface brush of the vesicle according to the blob model of bidisperse polymer mixtures of Komura and Safran assuming the polymer brush at the surface of the vesicle is compact. The same model accurately reproduces the scaling of the bending modulus with polymer composition.

  6. Adhesive Bonding for Shelters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    weru uvaluated, the type of etch bath " sweetener " and the type of rinse\\water used. The type of etch bath " sweetener " was found to have a dramatic effect...EA9601NW Adhesives on 50521134 Bare Adherenas 39 13 Stress-Durability Behavior Sun-mary 40 14 Effect of Ltch Bath Sweetening Alloy on Interracial Durability...34"’ -,,• , •’• •"• " ,,,,, 9 Adhesive/Primer/Adherend Alloy/Surface Preparation Combinations Adherend OFPL Sweetening Rinse Adhesive:Primer Alloy Alloy

  7. Metal-ceramic junctions - Mechanical and physicochemical interactive joining techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascar, Guy

    Reactive brazing and thermocompression are discussed in terms of their use as joining techniques for metal-ceramic structures. Theoretical consideration is given to brazing under vacuum conditions to examine the relationships between contact surface and volume, interfacial energy, surface energy, and adhesion energy. Brazing is shown to permit metal-ceramic junctions without metallization of the ceramic substrate, although several reactions and metallic materials can affect joint strength. Thermocompression is distinguished from brazing and shown to limit the alteration of the ceramic material. The protection of the mechanical properties of the ceramic and metal components of the materials is a critical aspect of industrial applications of brazing and thermocompression.

  8. Measurement of Mechanical Tension at Cell-cell Junctions Using Two-photon Laser Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xuan; Michael, Magdalene; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    The cortical actomyosin cytoskeleton is found in all non-muscle cells where a key function is to control mechanical force (Salbreux et al., 2012). When coupled to E-cadherin cell-cell adhesion, cortical actomyosin generates junctional tension that influences many aspects of tissue function, organization and morphogenesis (Lecuit and Yap, 2015). Uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of junctional tension requires tools for measuring it in live cells with a high spatio-temporal resolution. For this, we have set up a technique of laser ablation, in which we use the high power output of a two-photon laser to physically cut the actin cortex at the sites of cell-cell adhesion labeled with E-cadherin-GFP. Tension, thus is visualized as the outwards recoil of the vertices that define a junction after this was ablated/cut. Analysis of recoil versus time allows extracting parameters related to the amount of contractile force that is applied to the junction before ablation (initial recoil) and the ratio between elasticity of the junction and viscosity of the media (cytoplasm) in which the junctional cortex is immersed. Using this approach we have discovered how Src protein-tyrosine kinase (Gomez et al., 2015); actin-binding proteins such as tropomyosins (Caldwell et al., 2014) and N-WASP (Wu et al., 2014); Myosin II (Priya et al., 2015) and coronin-1B (Michael et al., 2016) contribute to the molecular apparatus responsible for generating tension at the cell-cell junctions. This protocol describes the experimental procedure for setting up laser ablation experiments and how to optimize ablation and acquisition conditions for optimal measurements of junctional tension. It also provides a full description, step by step, of the post-acquisition analysis required to evaluate changes in contractile force as well as cell elasticity and/or cytoplasm viscosity. PMID:28191488

  9. A novel synaptic junction preparation for the identification and characterization of cleft proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Dosemeci, Ayse

    2017-01-01

    Identification of synaptic cleft components has been hampered by the lack of a suitable preparation enriched in synaptic junctions devoid of adjoining peripheral membranes. Prior strategies for the isolation of synaptic junctions, relying on detergents for the removal of peripheral membranes, resulted in substantial loss of membranes lining the cleft. Here, a novel, detergent-free method is described for the preparation of a synaptic junction (SJ) fraction, using phospholipase A2. Limited digestion of synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fraction with phospholipase A2 followed by centrifugation over a sucrose cushion results in selective removal of membranes peripheral to the cleft while junctional membranes remain relatively intact as observed by electron microscopy. Enrichment in synaptic junctional structures and loss of membranes peripheral to the junctional area are further verified by demonstrating enrichment in PSD-95 and loss in mGluR5, respectively. The SJ fraction is enriched in neuroligins and neurexins, in agreement with immuno-electron microscopy data showing their selective localization to the junctional area. Among additional cell adhesion molecules tested, N-cadherin and specific isoforms of the SynCAM and SALM families also show marked enrichment in the SJ fraction, suggesting preferential localization at the synaptic cleft while others show little enrichment or decrease, suggesting that they are not restricted to or concentrated at the synaptic cleft. Treatment of the SJ fraction with glycosidases results in electrophoretic mobility shifts of all cell adhesion molecules tested, indicating glycosylation at the synaptic cleft. Biochemical and ultrastructural data presented indicate that the novel synaptic junction preparation can be used as a predictive tool for the identification and characterization of the components of the synaptic cleft. PMID:28362857

  10. Thermopower measurements in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Rincón-García, Laura; Evangeli, Charalambos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2016-08-07

    The measurement of thermopower in molecular junctions offers complementary information to conductance measurements and is becoming essential for the understanding of transport processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the study of the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. After presenting the theoretical background for thermoelectricity at the nanoscale, we review the experimental techniques for measuring the thermopower in these systems and discuss the main results. Finally, we consider the challenges in the application of molecular junctions in viable thermoelectric devices.

  11. Structural basis of adhesive binding by desmocollins and desmogleins

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Brasch, Julia; Lasso, Gorka; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsen, Goran; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular adhesive junctions that impart strength to vertebrate tissues. Their dense, ordered intercellular attachments are formed by desmogleins (Dsgs) and desmocollins (Dscs), but the nature of trans-cellular interactions between these specialized cadherins is unclear. Here, using solution biophysics and coated-bead aggregation experiments, we demonstrate family-wise heterophilic specificity: All Dsgs form adhesive dimers with all Dscs, with affinities characteristic of each Dsg:Dsc pair. Crystal structures of ectodomains from Dsg2 and Dsg3 and from Dsc1 and Dsc2 show binding through a strand-swap mechanism similar to that of homophilic classical cadherins. However, conserved charged amino acids inhibit Dsg:Dsg and Dsc:Dsc interactions by same-charge repulsion and promote heterophilic Dsg:Dsc interactions through opposite-charge attraction. These findings show that Dsg:Dsc heterodimers represent the fundamental adhesive unit of desmosomes and provide a structural framework for understanding desmosome assembly. PMID:27298358

  12. Desmosomes and extradesmosomal adhesive signaling contacts in pemphigus.

    PubMed

    Waschke, Jens; Spindler, Volker

    2014-11-01

    Desmosomes are adhering junctions present in all cells of simple and complex epithelia. They are most abundant in cells of tissues subjected to extensive mechanical stress such as keratinocytes and cardiomyocytes. The core of desmosomes is built up of desmosomal cadherins, cadherin-type adhesion molecules that are tethered to intermediate filaments via adaptor proteins of the armadillo and the plakin family. In addition, desmosomal cadherins are present outside of desmosomes. Recent investigations indicate that these molecules are involved in adhesion-dependent and adhesion-independent signaling and thus have functions different from the adhesive properties of their counterparts within desmosomes. Impaired adhesion of desmosomal cadherins both within and outside of desmosomes is the cause of the blistering skin disease pemphigus. Autoantibodies interfere with the binding of desmosomal cadherins and alter intracellular signaling pathways, the latter of which is necessary for loss of cell adhesion. Among the plethora of signaling molecules reported, altered activities of p38MAPK, protein kinase C, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are most relevant. This review highlights the recent data on signaling by desmosomal cadherins and the mechanisms involved in pemphigus skin blistering.

  13. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  14. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  15. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  16. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  17. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  18. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  19. Desmosomes: Regulators of Cellular Signaling and Adhesion in Epidermal Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jodi L.; Najor, Nicole A.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that mediate cell–cell adhesion and anchor the intermediate filament network to the plasma membrane, providing mechanical resilience to tissues such as the epidermis and heart. In addition to their critical roles in adhesion, desmosomal proteins are emerging as mediators of cell signaling important for proper cell and tissue functions. In this review we highlight what is known about desmosomal proteins regulating adhesion and signaling in healthy skin—in morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis, wound healing, and protection against environmental damage. We also discuss how human diseases that target desmosome molecules directly or interfere indirectly with these mechanical and signaling functions to contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25368015

  20. Desmosomes: regulators of cellular signaling and adhesion in epidermal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jodi L; Najor, Nicole A; Green, Kathleen J

    2014-11-03

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that mediate cell-cell adhesion and anchor the intermediate filament network to the plasma membrane, providing mechanical resilience to tissues such as the epidermis and heart. In addition to their critical roles in adhesion, desmosomal proteins are emerging as mediators of cell signaling important for proper cell and tissue functions. In this review we highlight what is known about desmosomal proteins regulating adhesion and signaling in healthy skin-in morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis, wound healing, and protection against environmental damage. We also discuss how human diseases that target desmosome molecules directly or interfere indirectly with these mechanical and signaling functions to contribute to pathogenesis.

  1. Control of Junction Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, T.-C.; Bingham, C.; Kellier, L.

    2001-11-01

    Control for horseshoe vortices resulting from boundary layer separation in front of a structure has long been sought without satisfactory results. Tests were carried out in a water channel with the objective of seeking such a control. The water channel has a test section of .6m wide, .4m deep and 8m long, with an adjustable mean flow speed of up to .5m/s. Flow visualization technique was used to elucidate the flow process. To control the horseshoe vortex a long airfoil of 1cm chord was placed horizontally near the ground upstream of a 10cm thin square plate. It was found that the original horseshoe vortex moved toward and circulated around the airfoil. The junction flow immediately upstream of the obstacle was noticeably steady and free of disturbance. The process was insensitive to the streamwise location of the airfoil, horseshoe's vortical structure, stream speed and acceleration, upstream vortical influx, and magnitude/sign of airfoil's angle of attack. Experimental results with obliquely mounted square cylinder were similar, which demonstrated that controls were effective for all angles of attack.

  2. Calcium-dependent dynamics of cadherin interactions at cell–cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sally A.; Tai, Chin-Yin; Mok, Lee-Peng; Mosser, Eric A.; Schuman, Erin M.

    2011-01-01

    Cadherins play a key role in the dynamics of cell–cell contact formation and remodeling of junctions and tissues. Cadherin–cadherin interactions are gated by extracellular Ca2+, which serves to rigidify the cadherin extracellular domains and promote trans junctional interactions. Here we describe the direct visualization and quantification of spatiotemporal dynamics of N-cadherin interactions across intercellular junctions in living cells using a genetically encodable FRET reporter system. Direct measurements of transjunctional cadherin interactions revealed a sudden, but partial, loss of homophilic interactions (τ = 1.17 ± 0.06 s−1) upon chelation of extracellular Ca2+. A cadherin mutant with reduced adhesive activity (W2A) exhibited a faster, more substantial loss of homophilic interactions (τ = 0.86 ± 0.02 s−1), suggesting two types of native cadherin interactions—one that is rapidly modulated by changes in extracellular Ca2+ and another with relatively stable adhesive activity that is Ca2+ independent. The Ca2+-sensitive dynamics of cadherin interactions were transmitted to the cell interior where β-catenin translocated to N-cadherin at the junction in both cells. These data indicate that cadherins can rapidly convey dynamic information about the extracellular environment to both cells that comprise a junction. PMID:21613566

  3. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  4. Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Wu, Yi; Hahn, Klaus; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structural adaptation and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high resolution live cell imaging approaches to measure forces, assembly and interaction of adhesion components, and the activation of adhesion-mediated signals. We conclude by outlining computational multiplexing as a framework for the integration of these data into comprehensive models of adhesion signaling pathways. PMID:18586481

  5. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  6. Adhesion systems in normal breast and in invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Glukhova, M.; Koteliansky, V.; Sastre, X.; Thiery, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    To analyze the role of various elements of the adhesion system in the organization of the normal mammary gland and in breast carcinoma, we have studied simultaneously the expression of integrins, E- and P-cadherins, and cytoplasmic constituents of adherens junctions. In the normal gland, E-cadherin and alpha-catenin are present in luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells, whereas integrins are more abundant in acinar epithelial and in myoepithelial cells. We demonstrate here that, in addition, myoepithelial cells express much more vinculin and alpha-actinin than luminal epithelial cells, whereas talin and focal adhesion kinase (pp125FAK) are restricted to the basal cell layer. In invasive carcinoma, E-cadherin is usually present although often in reduced amount; different integrin subunits are expressed either by a fraction or by all of the cells or are absent. However, the cytoplasmic components of adherens junctions, such as alpha-catenin, vinculin, alpha-actinin, talin, and pp125FAK, are expressed at low levels or cannot be detected in the carcinoma cells. Our data suggest that 1), in the normal mammary gland, the myoepithelial cells, being particularly rich in integrins and cytoplasmic components of the adherens junctions, play an important role in the maintenance of tissue integrity; 2), in invasive carcinoma, cell aggregates may be maintained due to varying levels of expression of E-cadherin and/or integrins; and 3), interaction of the transmembrane adhesion molecules with the cytoskeleton in carcinoma may be impaired as revealed by reduced levels of expression of alpha-catenin, vinculin, alpha-actinin, talin, and pp125FAK. Importantly, carcinoma cells, when exposed to stroma during invasion, do not acquire the adhesion apparatus characteristic of normal cells in contact with the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7887451

  7. Shoichiro Tsukita: a life exploring the molecular architecture of the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    On December 11, 2005, Shoichiro Tsukita died at the young age of 52, after 14 months of treatment for cancer. Early in his career, Tsukita succeeded in isolating and purifying the adherens junction with his wife Sachiko, an accomplishment that he followed up with an impressive series of discoveries of cell adhesion and cytoskeletal molecules, including what may have been his greatest contribution to the field, the identification of occludin and the claudin family of molecules, which were watershed discoveries in the study of the molecular nature of tight junctions. PMID:16449186

  8. Formin-mediated actin polymerization at cell–cell junctions stabilizes E-cadherin and maintains monolayer integrity during wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Megha Vaman; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion is required for epithelial tissue integrity in homeostasis, during development, and in tissue repair. E-cadherin stability depends on F-actin, but the mechanisms regulating actin polymerization at cell–cell junctions remain poorly understood. Here we investigated a role for formin-mediated actin polymerization at cell–cell junctions. We identify mDia1 and Fmnl3 as major factors enhancing actin polymerization and stabilizing E-cadherin at epithelial junctions. Fmnl3 localizes to adherens junctions downstream of Src and Cdc42 and its depletion leads to a reduction in F-actin and E-cadherin at junctions and a weakening of cell–cell adhesion. Of importance, Fmnl3 expression is up-regulated and junctional localization increases during collective cell migration. Depletion of Fmnl3 or mDia1 in migrating monolayers results in dissociation of leader cells and impaired wound repair. In summary, our results show that formin activity at epithelial cell–cell junctions is important for adhesion and the maintenance of epithelial cohesion during dynamic processes, such as wound repair. PMID:27440924

  9. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  10. Proposed Junction-Box Stress Test (Using an Added Weight) for Use During the Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-02-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. Furthermore, there are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the j-box adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to the preliminary results conducted using representative materials and components.

  11. Structure of artificial and natural VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Dubois, Mathilde; Le Bihan, Olivier; Trépout, Sylvain; Almagro, Sébastien; Hewat, Elizabeth; Durmort, Claire; Heyraud, Stéphanie; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle; Lambert, Olivier

    2008-04-01

    In vascular endothelium, adherens junctions between endothelial cells are composed of VE-cadherin (vascular endothelial cadherin), an adhesive receptor that is crucial for the proper assembly of vascular structures and the maintenance of vascular integrity. As a classical cadherin, VE-cadherin links endothelial cells together by homophilic interactions mediated by its extracellular part and associates intracellularly with the actin cytoskeleton via catenins. Although, from structural crystallographic data, a dimeric structure arranged in a trans orientation has emerged as a potential mechanism of cell-cell adhesion, the cadherin organization within adherens junctions remains controversial. Concerning VE-cadherin, its extracellular part possesses the capacity to self-associate in solution as hexamers consisting of three antiparallel cadherin dimers. VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions were reconstituted in vitro by assembly of a VE-cadherin EC (extracellular repeat) 1-EC4 hexamer at the surfaces of liposomes. The artificial adherens junctions revealed by cryoelectron microscopy appear as a two-dimensional self-assembly of hexameric structures. This cadherin organization is reminiscent of that found in native desmosomal junctions. Further structural studies performed on native VE-cadherin junctions would provide a better understanding of the cadherin organization within adherens junctions. Homophilic interactions between cadherins are strengthened intracellularly by connection to the actin cytoskeleton. Recently, we have discovered that annexin 2, an actin-binding protein connects the VE-cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton. This novel link is labile and promotes the endothelial cell switch from a quiescent to an angiogenic state.

  12. Distribution of gap junctions and square array junctions in the mammalian lens.

    PubMed

    Costello, M J; McIntosh, T J; Robertson, J D

    1989-05-01

    The morphology of membrane specializations of the cortex and nucleus of bovine lenses has been analyzed for both isolated membrane fractions and intact tissue fragments. Fractions of fiber cell membranes isolated from the outer cortex and the inner nucleus of lenses have been compared using x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, SDS polyacrylamide gels and Western blots. Each fraction has distinctive structural characteristics. In x-ray experiments, the cortical fraction gives no sharp equatorial reflections (from the plane of the membrane), whereas the nuclear fraction gives sharp equatorial reflections which index on a square lattice of 6.6 nm. In thin-section electron micrographs, the cortical fraction is composed primarily of closed vesicles and flat membrane sheets, some of which contain pentalamellar structures similar in appearance to the 16-18 nm thick gap junctions found in other tissues. The nuclear fraction contains mostly undulating membrane pairs which often show 11-14 nm pentalamellar profiles and occasionally thicker junctions. In freeze-fracture images the cortical membranes display irregular clusters of intramembrane particles which resemble gap junctions, whereas the nuclear membranes contain numerous large square arrays with a 6.6 nm repeat and few irregular clusters or individual intramembrane particles. Images of fragments of intact lenses used in the membrane isolations give similar results; in the cortex the area covered by gap junctions is over 50 times the area covered by square lattices, whereas nuclear fiber cell membranes contain large square arrays. Thus, cortical and nuclear fiber cell membranes have quite different morphologies. In particular, the size of the square arrays of protein increases as the fiber cells mature. SDS polyacrylamide gels from cortical and nuclear fractions are similar in that they both contain MP26 as the major band. However, Western blot analysis shows increasing quantities of lower molecular weight, 25 kD and

  13. Reduction of postoperative adhesion development.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Despite use of meticulous surgical techniques, and regardless of surgical access via laparotomy or laparoscopy, postoperative adhesions develop in the vast majority of women undergoing abdominopelvic surgery. Such adhesions represent not only adhesion reformation at sites of adhesiolysis, but also de novo adhesion formation at sites of surgical procedures. Application of antiadhesion adjuvants compliment the benefits of meticulous surgical techniques, providing an opportunity to further reduce postoperative adhesion development. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of adhesion development and distinguishing variations in the molecular biologic mechanisms from adhesion-free peritoneal repair represent future opportunities to improve the reduction of postoperative adhesions. Optimization of the reduction of postoperative adhesions will likely require identification of unique, personalized approaches in each individual, representing interindividual variation in peritoneal repair processes.

  14. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-04

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  15. Adhesion and wetting: Similarities and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, M.E.R. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines what is understood about adhesion and wetting both from the historical and scientific perspectives. Topics covered include mechanical adhesion, specific adhesion, chemical adhesion, adhesion by diffusion, the adsorption or wetting theory, bulk adhesion, the rheological theory, hysteresis effects in rubber adhesion, and hysteresis of wetting.

  16. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  17. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  18. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  19. Kinetic Measurements Reveal Enhanced Protein-Protein Interactions at Intercellular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Shashikanth, Nitesh; Kisting, Meridith A.; Leckband, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    The binding properties of adhesion proteins are typically quantified from measurements with soluble fragments, under conditions that differ radically from the confined microenvironment of membrane bound proteins in adhesion zones. Using classical cadherin as a model adhesion protein, we tested the postulate that confinement within quasi two-dimensional intercellular gaps exposes weak protein interactions that are not detected in solution binding assays. Micropipette-based measurements of cadherin-mediated, cell-cell binding kinetics identified a unique kinetic signature that reflects both adhesive (trans) bonds between cadherins on opposing cells and lateral (cis) interactions between cadherins on the same cell. In solution, proposed lateral interactions were not detected, even at high cadherin concentrations. Mutations postulated to disrupt lateral cadherin association altered the kinetic signatures, but did not affect the adhesive (trans) binding affinity. Perturbed kinetics further coincided with altered cadherin distributions at junctions, wound healing dynamics, and paracellular permeability. Intercellular binding kinetics thus revealed cadherin interactions that occur within confined, intermembrane gaps but not in solution. Findings further demonstrate the impact of these revealed interactions on the organization and function of intercellular junctions. PMID:27009566

  20. Natural Underwater Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Russell J; Ransom, Todd C; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)(3) coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  1. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  2. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  3. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts.

    PubMed

    Torres, J R; Jay, G D; Kim, K-S; Bothun, G D

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  4. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  5. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  6. p120-catenin and β-catenin differentially regulate cadherin adhesive function.

    PubMed

    Oas, Rebecca G; Nanes, Benjamin A; Esimai, Chimdimnma C; Vincent, Peter A; García, Andrés J; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2013-03-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, the major adherens junction adhesion molecule in endothelial cells, interacts with p120-catenin and β-catenin through its cytoplasmic tail. However, the specific functional contributions of the catenins to the establishment of strong adhesion are not fully understood. Here we use bioengineering approaches to identify the roles of cadherin-catenin interactions in promoting strong cellular adhesion and the ability of the cells to spread on an adhesive surface. Our results demonstrate that the domain of VE-cadherin that binds to β-catenin is required for the establishment of strong steady-state adhesion strength. Surprisingly, p120 binding to the cadherin tail had no effect on the strength of adhesion when the available adhesive area was limited. Instead, the binding of VE-cadherin to p120 regulates adhesive contact area in a Rac1-dependent manner. These findings reveal that p120 and β-catenin have distinct but complementary roles in strengthening cadherin-mediated adhesion.

  7. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  8. F-actin binding protein, anillin, regulates integrity of intercellular junctions in human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Feygin, Alex; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ) are key morphological features of differentiated epithelial cells that regulate the integrity and permeability of tissue barriers. Structure and remodeling of epithelial junctions depends on their association with the underlying actomyosin cytoskeleton. Anillin is a unique scaffolding protein interacting with different cytoskeletal components, including actin filaments and myosin motors. Its role in the regulation of mammalian epithelial junctions remains unexplored. Downregulation of anillin expression in human prostate, colonic, and lung epithelial cells triggered AJ and TJ disassembly without altering the expression of junctional proteins. This junctional disassembly was accompanied by dramatic disorganization of the perijunctional actomyosin belt; while the general architecture of the actin cytoskeleton, and activation status of non-muscle myosin II, remained unchanged. Furthermore, loss of anillin disrupted the adducin-spectrin membrane skeleton at the areas of cell-cell contact, selectively decreased γ-adducin expression, and induced cytoplasmic aggregation of αII-spectrin. Anillin knockdown activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and JNK inhibition restored AJ and TJ integrity and cytoskeletal organization in anillin-depleted cells. These findings suggest a novel role for anillin in regulating intercellular adhesion in model human epithelia by mechanisms involving the suppression of JNK activity and controlling the assembly of the perijunctional cytoskeleton. PMID:25809162

  9. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  10. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  11. Syringomyelia associated with adhesive spinal arachnoiditis: MRI.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Y; Nemoto, Y; Ohata, K; Daikokuya, H; Hakuba, A; Tashiro, T; Shakudo, M; Nagai, K; Nakayama, K; Yamada, R

    2001-04-01

    We reviewed the MRI of seven patients with syringomyelia associated with surgically proven adhesive spinal arachnoiditis to describe clinical and MRI findings in this condition. Using 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 tesla units, we obtained sagittal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo and axial T1-weighted images. Additional sagittal T2-weighted images were obtained without using motion-artefact suppression. Contrast medium was given intravenously to five patients. The syrinx cavities were thoracic in five cases, cervicothoracic in one, and extended from C4 to L1 in one. No Chiari malformation or craniovertebral junction anomaly was demonstrated. Meningeal thickening was seen on T2-weighted sagittal images only in one case. Cord deformity due to adhesion or displacement due to an associated arachnoid cyst was seen in all cases best demonstrated on axial images. Focal blurring of the syrinx wall on axial images was seen in six patients. Flow voids were seen in the syrinx fluid in all cases on T2-weighted images obtained without motion-artefact suppression. No abnormal contrast enhancement was demonstrated.

  12. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  13. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  14. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  15. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  16. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  17. Ceramic Adhesive for High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Everett G.

    1987-01-01

    Fused-silica/magnesium-phosphate adhesive resists high temperatures and vibrations. New adhesive unaffected by extreme temperatures and vibrations. Assuring direct bonding of gap filters to tile sidewalls, adhesive obviates expensive and time-consuming task of removal, treatment, and replacement of tiles.

  18. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  19. Gordon Conference on Microbial Adhesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    immunity against certain pathogens, the role of exopolysaccharides in adhesion and the role of lectin-glycolipid interactions in adhesion. Have...pathogenesis? What governs the specificity of p; exopolysaccharides in adhesion to surfaces? This session emphasized the molecular aspects of

  20. Rapid Adhesive Bonding of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Fox, R. L.; Sterling, S. Elmo, Jr.; Buckley, J. D.; Inge, Spencer V., Jr.; Burcher, L. G.; Wright, Robert E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Strong bonds created in less time and with less power than use of conventional bonding methods. Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) technique for composites uses high-frequency induction heating toroids to quickly heat metallic susceptor impregnated with thermoplastic adhesive or sandwiched between thermoset or thermoplastic adhesive cloths or films. Susceptor steel screen or perforated steel foil.

  1. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  2. Proteomic and bioinformatic analysis of epithelial tight junction reveals an unexpected cluster of synaptic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vivian W

    2006-01-01

    Background Zonula occludens, also known as the tight junction, is a specialized cell-cell interaction characterized by membrane "kisses" between epithelial cells. A cytoplasmic plaque of ~100 nm corresponding to a meshwork of densely packed proteins underlies the tight junction membrane domain. Due to its enormous size and difficulties in obtaining a biochemically pure fraction, the molecular composition of the tight junction remains largely unknown. Results A novel biochemical purification protocol has been developed to isolate tight junction protein complexes from cultured human epithelial cells. After identification of proteins by mass spectroscopy and fingerprint analysis, candidate proteins are scored and assessed individually. A simple algorithm has been devised to incorporate transmembrane domains and protein modification sites for scoring membrane proteins. Using this new scoring system, a total of 912 proteins have been identified. These 912 hits are analyzed using a bioinformatics approach to bin the hits in 4 categories: configuration, molecular function, cellular function, and specialized process. Prominent clusters of proteins related to the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and vesicular traffic have been identified. Weaker clusters of proteins associated with cell growth, cell migration, translation, and transcription are also found. However, the strongest clusters belong to synaptic proteins and signaling molecules. Localization studies of key components of synaptic transmission have confirmed the presence of both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins at the tight junction domain. To correlate proteomics data with structure, the tight junction has been examined using electron microscopy. This has revealed many novel structures including end-on cytoskeletal attachments, vesicles fusing/budding at the tight junction membrane domain, secreted substances encased between the tight junction kisses, endocytosis of tight junction double membranes, satellite

  3. The Yolla Bolly junction revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, M.C.; Jayko, A.S. ); Jones, D.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Engebretson, D.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    West of Red Bluff, California, rocks of the northern Coast Ranges, Klamath-Sierra Nevada, and Great Valley provinces come together at what has been called the Yolla Bolly junction. Mapping of the Red Bluff and Willows 1:100,000 quadrangles has greatly clarified the enigmatic features of this complex area. Terranes of the Klamath Mountains and their Cretaceous sedimentary cover have been thrust northwestward over the Elder Creek terrane and Franciscan rocks, north of the left-lateral Cold Fork fault zone. The Condrey Mountain window (Franciscan Pickett Peak terrane) provides a measure of the magnitude of this thrusting (ca 90 km). South of the Cold Fork fault zone, the Franciscan and Elder Creek terranes were driven southeastward as tectonic wedges onto Sierran-Klamath basement. Timing of this scissor-tectonics is not constrained near the junction, but further north in southwest Oregon, Lower Eocene strata were deformed by overthrusting of the Klamath block whereas Upper Eocene strata overlap the thrust, indicating that thrusting occurred between about 52 and 60 Ma. Plate reconstructions for this time interval indicate the close proximity of the Kula-Farallon-North America triple junction and that old (ca 100 m.y.) Farallon lithosphere was being subducted north of the junction whereas to the south, very young (ca 10 m.y.) Kula plate was presumably obducted onto North America.

  4. Spatial organization of the extracellular matrix regulates cell–cell junction positioning

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Qingzong; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Deshiere, Alexandre; Balland, Martial; Guillou, Hervé; Filhol, Odile; Théry, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The organization of cells into epithelium depends on cell interaction with both the extracellular matrix (ECM) and adjacent cells. The role of cell–cell adhesion in the regulation of epithelial topology is well-described. ECM is better known to promote cell migration and provide a structural scaffold for cell anchoring, but its contribution to multicellular morphogenesis is less well-understood. We developed a minimal model system to investigate how ECM affects the spatial organization of intercellular junctions. Fibronectin micropatterns were used to constrain the location of cell–ECM adhesion. We found that ECM affects the degree of stability of intercellular junction positioning and the magnitude of intra- and intercellular forces. Intercellular junctions were permanently displaced, and experienced large perpendicular tensional forces as long as they were positioned close to ECM. They remained stable solely in regions deprived of ECM, where they were submitted to lower tensional forces. The heterogeneity of the spatial organization of ECM induced anisotropic distribution of mechanical constraints in cells, which seemed to adapt their position to minimize both intra- and intercellular forces. These results uncover a morphogenetic role for ECM in the mechanical regulation of cells and intercellular junction positioning. PMID:22307605

  5. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  6. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  7. Environmentally compliant adhesive joining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Adhesive joining offers one method of assembling products. Advantages of adhesive joining/assembly include distribution of applied forces, lighter weight, appealing appearance, etc. Selecting environmentally safe adhesive materials and accompanying processes is paramount in today`s business climate if a company wants to be environmentally conscious and stay in business. Four areas of adhesive joining (adhesive formulation and selection, surface preparation, adhesive bonding process, waste and pollution generation/cleanup/management) all need to be carefully evaluated before adhesive joining is selected for commercial as well as military products. Designing for six sigma quality must also be addressed in today`s global economy. This requires material suppliers and product manufacturers to work even closer together.

  8. Endothelial paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) play a critical role in neutrophil transmigration.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sean A; Sharma, Ritu; Roccamatisi, Dawn L; Zhang, Hong; Petri, Björn; Kubes, Paul; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D

    2012-02-01

    During an inflammatory response, endothelial cells undergo morphological changes to allow for the passage of neutrophils from the blood vessel to the site of injury or infection. Although endothelial cell junctions and the cytoskeleton undergo reorganization during inflammation, little is known about another class of cellular structures, the focal adhesions. In this study, we examined several focal adhesion proteins during an inflammatory response. We found that there was selective loss of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) from focal adhesions in proximity to transmigrating neutrophils; in contrast the levels of the focal adhesion proteins β1-integrin and vinculin were unaffected. Paxillin was lost from focal adhesions during neutrophil transmigration both under static and flow conditions. Down-regulating endothelial paxillin with siRNA blocked neutrophil transmigration while having no effect on rolling or adhesion. As paxillin dynamics are regulated partly by FAK, the role of FAK in neutrophil transmigration was examined using two complementary methods. siRNA was used to down-regulate total FAK protein while dominant-negative, kinase-deficient FAK was expressed to block FAK signaling. Disruption of the FAK protein or FAK signaling decreased neutrophil transmigration. Collectively, these findings reveal a novel role for endothelial focal adhesion proteins paxillin and FAK in regulating neutrophil transmigration.

  9. Influence of surface roughness on the adhesion of elastic films.

    PubMed

    Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, J Th M

    2003-02-01

    It is shown that a self-affine roughness at the junction of an elastic film and a hard solid substrate influences considerably the adhesion of the elastic film, especially for small roughness exponents H (H<0.5) and/or large long wavelength roughness ratios w/xi with w being the rms roughness amplitude and xi being the in-plane roughness correlation length. Analytical calculations of the local surface slope allows an estimate of the roughness effects on the adhesion energy more precisely than those presented in earlier works (especially for roughness exponents H<0.5). For weak surface roughness the elastic energy contribution is significant on the film effective surface energy deltagamma(eff) and on pull-off force for elastic modulus E in the range of GPa. Moreover, in the case of partial contact an estimation of the pull-off force shows that it strongly decreases with reducing contact area due to surface.

  10. [Fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek; Sadowska, Marta; Bogusławska-Walecka, Romana

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a rare disease with insidious course. It causes damage of the spinal cord and nerve roots. The causes of adhesive arachnoiditis include earlier traumatic injury of the spinal cord, surgery, intrathecal administration of therapeutic substances (e.g. anaesthetics, chemotherapy) or contrast media, bleeding, and inflammation. It can also be idiopathic or iatrogenic. We present the case of a 42-year-old patient with fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis which was provoked by spinal surgery and caused severe neurological disability with profound, progressive, flaccid paraparesis and bladder dysfunction. The electromyography (EMG) showed serious damage of nerves of both lower limbs at the level of motor roots L2-S2 and damage of the motor neuron at the level of Th11-Th12 on the right side. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral and thoracic part of the spinal cord demonstrated cystic liquid spaces in the lumen of the dural sac in the bottom part of the cervical spine and at the Th2-Th10 level, modelling the lateral and anterior surface of the cord. Because of the vast lesions, surgery could not be performed. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation brought only a small clinical improvement.

  11. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  12. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  13. Adhesion barrier reduces postoperative adhesions after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Hirata, Yasutaka; Achiwa, Ikuya; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Soto, Hajime; Kobayahsi, Jotaro

    2012-06-01

    Reoperation in cardiac surgery is associated with increased risk due to surgical adhesions. Application of a bioresorbable material could theoretically reduce adhesions and allow later development of a free dissection plane for cardiac reoperation. Twenty-one patients in whom a bioresorbable hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose adhesion barrier had been applied in a preceding surgery underwent reoperations, while 23 patients underwent reoperations during the same period without a prior adhesion barrier. Blinded observers graded the tenacity of the adhesions from surgical video recordings of the reoperations. No excessive bleeding requiring wound reexploration, mediastinal infection, or other complication attributable to the adhesion barrier occurred. Multiple regression analysis showed that shorter duration of the preceding surgery, non-use of cardiopulmonary bypass in the preceding surgery, and use of the adhesion barrier were significantly associated with less tenacious surgical adhesions. The use of a bioresorbable material in cardiac surgery reduced postoperative adhesions, facilitated reoperation, and did not promote complications. The use of adhesion barrier is recommended in planned staged procedures and those in which future reoperation is likely.

  14. Tight junction proteins: from barrier to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Runkle, E Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-08-28

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis.

  15. Tight Junction Proteins: From Barrier to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, E. Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-01-01

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis. PMID:23743355

  16. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  17. An introduction to adherens junctions: from molecular mechanisms to tissue development and disease.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tony J C

    2012-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) are fundamental for the development of animal tissues and organs. The core complex is formed from transmembrane cell-cell adhesion molecules, cadherins, and adaptor molecules, the catenins, that link to cytoskeletal and regulatory networks within the cell. This complex can be considered over a wide range of biological organization, from atoms to molecules, protein complexes, molecular networks, cells, tissues, and overall animal development. AJs have also been an integral part of animal evolution, and play central roles in cancer development and pathogen infection. This book addresses major questions encompassing these aspects of AJ biology. How did AJs evolve? How do the cadherins and catenins interact to assemble AJs and mediate adhesion? How do AJs interface with other cellular machinery to couple adhesion with the whole cell? How do AJs affect cell behaviour and multicellular development? How can abnormal AJ activity lead to disease?

  18. Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Pamela

    2014-06-01

    Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease.

  19. Focal Adhesion Kinase Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening via Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Kristin E.; Dumbauld, David W.; Burns, Kellie L.; Hanks, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an essential nonreceptor tyrosine kinase regulating cell migration, adhesive signaling, and mechanosensing. Using FAK-null cells expressing FAK under an inducible promoter, we demonstrate that FAK regulates the time-dependent generation of adhesive forces. During the early stages of adhesion, FAK expression in FAK-null cells enhances integrin activation to promote integrin binding and, hence, the adhesion strengthening rate. Importantly, FAK expression regulated integrin activation, and talin was required for the FAK-dependent effects. A role for FAK in integrin activation was confirmed in human fibroblasts with knocked-down FAK expression. The FAK autophosphorylation Y397 site was required for the enhancements in adhesion strengthening and integrin-binding responses. This work demonstrates a novel role for FAK in integrin activation and the time-dependent generation of cell–ECM forces. PMID:19297531

  20. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  1. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  2. Thermocouple, multiple junction reference oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved oven for maintaining the junctions of a plurality of reference thermocouples at a common and constant temperature is described. The oven is characterized by a cylindrical body defining a heat sink with axially extended-cylindrical cavity a singularized heating element which comprises a unitary cylindrical heating element consisting of a resistance heating coil wound about the surface of metallic spool with an axial bore defined and seated in the cavity. Other features of the oven include an annular array of radially extended bores defined in the cylindrical body and a plurality of reference thermocouple junctions seated in the bores in uniformly spaced relation with the heating element, and a temperature sensing device seated in the axial bore for detecting temperature changes as they occur in the spool and circuit to apply a voltage across the coil in response to detected drops in temperatures of the spool.

  3. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.

  4. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions

    PubMed Central

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the ‘apical junctional complex—AJC’ with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the ‘Junctional Adhesion Molecules’ (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers. PMID:25610754

  5. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; ...

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest thatmore » the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.« less

  6. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  7. Squeezed States in Josephson Junctions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have studied quantum fluctuation properties of Josephson junctions in the limit of large Josephson coupling energy and small charging energy, when the eigenstates of the system can be treated as being nearly localized. We have considered(X. Hu and F. Nori, preprints.) a Josephson junction in a variety of situations, e.g., coupled to one or several of the following elements: a capacitor, an inductor (in a superconducting ring), and an applied current source. By solving an effective Shrödinger equation, we have obtained squeezed vacuum (coherent) states as the ground states of a ``free-oscillating'' (linearly-driven) Josephson junction, and calculated the uncertainties of its canonical momentum, charge, and coordinate, phase. We have also shown that the excited states of the various systems we consider are similar to the number states of a simple harmonic oscillator but with different fluctuation properties. Furthermore, we have obtained the time-evolution operators for these systems. These operators can make it easier to calculate the time-dependence of the expectation values and fluctuations of various quantities starting from an arbitrary initial state.

  8. FSGS3/CD2AP is a barbed-end capping protein that stabilizes actin and strengthens adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vivian W; Brieher, William M

    2013-12-09

    By combining in vitro reconstitution biochemistry with a cross-linking approach, we have identified focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3/CD2-associated protein (FSGS3/CD2AP) as a novel actin barbed-end capping protein responsible for actin stability at the adherens junction. FSGS3/CD2AP colocalizes with E-cadherin and α-actinin-4 at the apical junction in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised actin stability and decreased actin accumulation at the adherens junction. Using a novel apparatus to apply mechanical stress to cell-cell junctions, we showed that knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised adhesive strength, resulting in tearing between cells and disruption of barrier function. Our results reveal a novel function of FSGS3/CD2AP and a previously unrecognized role of barbed-end capping in junctional actin dynamics. Our study underscores the complexity of actin regulation at cell-cell contacts that involves actin activators, inhibitors, and stabilizers to control adhesive strength, epithelial behavior, and permeability barrier integrity.

  9. Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Dolan, R A

    1993-06-01

    Forty-one cases of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis are presented. The key points are, first, that lumbar disc lesions, their investigations and surgical treatment and the use of nonabsorbable contrast materials are the most common etiological factors and, secondly, that operation is the best treatment. It is our contention that the majority of patients so treated do experience some improvement in what otherwise can be an unbearable amount of pain and disability. The use of adsorbable, nonirritative contrast materials such as Iohexol Parenteral will result in a marked reduction in the frequency of occurrence of arachnoiditis.

  10. A protein interaction map for cell-cell adhesion regulators identifies DUSP23 as a novel phosphatase for β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon; Ng, Mei Rosa; Sowa, Mathew E.; Selfors, Laura M.; White, Anne; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Singh, Pragya; Dhakal, Sabin; Harper, J. Wade; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is central to morphogenesis and maintenance of epithelial cell state. We previously identified 27 candidate cell-cell adhesion regulatory proteins (CCARPs) whose down-regulation disrupts epithelial cell-cell adhesion during collective migration. Using a protein interaction mapping strategy, we found that 18 CCARPs link to core components of adherens junctions or desmosomes. We further mapped linkages between the CCARPs and other known cell-cell adhesion proteins, including hits from recent screens uncovering novel components of E-cadherin adhesions. Mechanistic studies of one novel CCARP which links to multiple cell-cell adhesion proteins, the phosphatase DUSP23, revealed that it promotes dephosphorylation of β-catenin at Tyr 142 and enhances the interaction between α- and β-catenin. DUSP23 knockdown specifically diminished adhesion to E-cadherin without altering adhesion to fibronectin matrix proteins. Furthermore, DUSP23 knockdown produced “zipper-like” cell-cell adhesions, caused defects in transmission of polarization cues, and reduced coordination during collective migration. Thus, this study identifies multiple novel connections between proteins that regulate cell-cell interactions and provides evidence for a previously unrecognized role for DUSP23 in regulating E-cadherin adherens junctions through promoting the dephosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:27255161

  11. CYANOACRYLATE ADHESIVES IN EYE WOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    adhesives. The following adhesives were tested: methyl, isobutyl, n-butyl, n-hexyl, n-heptyl, n-octyl, n-decyl, -trifluoroisopropyl 2- cyanoacrylate , and...Biobond. Of these, methyl and -trifluoroisopropyl cyanoacrylates are not well tolerated by eye tissues. Biobond sets too slowly, and does not seem... cyanoacrylate is the best adhesive found so far when tissue tolerance, tensile strength, and ability to seal eye perforations (alone and with silicone rubber patches) are the criteria. (Author)

  12. Durability of Adhesively Bonded Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-11

    frequently. Significant technology improvements have occurred In surface treatment, primers, joint analyses, adhesives and process controls. These have...clearly established the Initial cost savings potential for adhesive bonding. While this approach addresses the adequacy of joints early in service, there...processes with those changes which occur as a result of residual stress or cyclic loading in the adhesive joint 074-2R-bh 1 To fill a small part of this

  13. Hot melt adhesive attachment pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. L.; Frizzill, A. W.; Little, B. D.; Progar, D. J.; Coultrip, R. H.; Couch, R. H.; Gleason, J. R.; Stein, B. A.; Buckley, J. D.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hot melt adhesive attachment pad for releasably securing distinct elements together is described which is particularly useful in the construction industry or a spatial vacuum environment. The attachment pad consists primarily of a cloth selectively impregnated with a charge of hot melt adhesive, a thermo-foil heater, and a thermo-cooler. These components are securely mounted in a mounting assembly. In operation, the operator activates the heating cycle transforming the hot melt adhesive to a substantially liquid state, positions the pad against the attachment surface, and activates the cooling cycle solidifying the adhesive and forming a strong, releasable bond.

  14. Distribution of Tight Junction Proteins in Adult Human Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Ola M.; Kim, Jung-Wan Martin; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A.; Baum, Bruce J.; Tran, Simon D.

    2008-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are an essential structure of fluid-secreting cells, such as those in salivary glands. Three major families of integral membrane proteins have been identified as components of the TJ: claudins, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs), plus the cytosolic protein zonula occludens (ZO). We have been working to develop an orally implantable artificial salivary gland that would be suitable for treating patients lacking salivary parenchymal tissue. To date, little is known about the distribution of TJ proteins in adult human salivary cells and thus what key molecular components might be desirable for the cellular component of an artificial salivary gland device. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TJ proteins in human salivary glands. Salivary gland samples were obtained from 10 patients. Frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained using IHC methods. Claudin-1 was expressed in ductal, endothelial, and ∼25% of serous cells. Claudins-2, -3, and -4 and JAM-A were expressed in both ductal and acinar cells, whereas claudin-5 was expressed only in endothelial cells. Occludin and ZO-1 were expressed in acinar, ductal, and endothelial cells. These results provide new information on TJ proteins in two major human salivary glands and should serve as a reference for future studies to assess the presence of appropriate TJ proteins in a tissue-engineered human salivary gland. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:1093–1098, 2008) PMID:18765838

  15. Canonical Wnt Signaling Regulates Atrioventricular Junction Programming and Electrophysiological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Gillers, Benjamin S; Chiplunkar, Aditi; Aly, Haytham; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Rentschler, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proper patterning of the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is essential for delay of electrical impulses between atria and ventricles, and defects in AVC maturation can result in congenital heart disease. Objective To determine the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium during AVC development. Methods and Results We utilized a novel allele of β-catenin that preserves β-catenin’s cell adhesive functions but disrupts canonical Wnt signaling, allowing us to probe the effects of Wnt loss of function independently. We show that loss of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium results in tricuspid atresia with hypoplastic right ventricle associated with loss of AVC myocardium. In contrast, ectopic activation of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce formation of ectopic AV junction-like tissue as assessed by morphology, gene expression, and electrophysiologic criteria. Aberrant AVC development can lead to ventricular preexcitation, a characteristic feature of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We demonstrate that postnatal activation of Notch signaling downregulates canonical Wnt targets within the AV junction. Stabilization of β-catenin protein levels can rescue Notch-mediated ventricular preexcitation and dysregulated ion channel gene expression. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that myocardial canonical Wnt signaling is an important regulator of AVC maturation and electrical programming upstream of Tbx3. Our data further suggests that ventricular preexcitation may require both morphologic patterning defects, as well as myocardial lineage reprogramming, to allow robust conduction across accessory pathway tissue. PMID:25599332

  16. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2. PMID:27588115

  17. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2.

  18. Adhesion in Mammary Development: Novel Roles for E-Cadherin in Individual and Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Eliah R.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are essential for barrier function, secretion, and regulation of fluid transport. Their function requires cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion, mediated through intercellular junctions. Conversely, disruption of adhesion and polarity is thought to drive cancer progression. The mammary gland is an important model for cell adhesion due to its postnatal hormonally regulated development; ducts undergo branching morphogenesis in response to steroid hormones during puberty. These hormonal signals induce a transition from simple to stratified architecture, initiated by asymmetric luminal cell divisions. Ductal elongation is accomplished by this multilayered, low-polarity epithelium, and polarity is reestablished as elongation ceases. The requirement for cell adhesion has been tested in 3D culture and in vivo, using gene deletion, knockdown, and misexpression in both developmental and homeostatic contexts. Attention has focused on E-cadherin, the major classical cadherin in luminal epithelial cells. Classic studies revealed a requirement for E-cadherin during lactation, and E-cadherin loss is widely posited to promote metastasis. However, recent findings demonstrated a broader requirement for E-cadherin during branching morphogenesis and homeostasis and also, surprisingly, in epithelial dissemination. These studies suggest that longstanding models of the role of adhesion in epithelial biology need to be revisited. Advances in inducible gene expression and knockdown, CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and fluorescent labeling of genetically modified cells offer the opportunity to test the roles of diverse adhesion systems and to develop a mechanistic understanding of how cell adhesion regulates development and cancer. PMID:25733146

  19. The Dissolution of Double Holliday Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Bizard, Anna H.; Hickson, Ian D.

    2014-01-01

    Double Holliday junctions (dHJS) are important intermediates of homologous recombination. The separate junctions can each be cleaved by DNA structure-selective endonucleases known as Holliday junction resolvases. Alternatively, double Holliday junctions can be processed by a reaction known as “double Holliday junction dissolution.” This reaction requires the cooperative action of a so-called “dissolvasome” comprising a Holliday junction branch migration enzyme (Sgs1/BLM RecQ helicase) and a type IA topoisomerase (Top3/TopoIIIα) in complex with its OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold containing accessory factor (Rmi1). This review details our current knowledge of the dissolution process and the players involved in catalyzing this mechanistically complex means of completing homologous recombination reactions. PMID:24984776

  20. Physics and Applications of NIS Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ullom, J N

    2001-08-24

    This paper reviews the physics and applications of Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. The current-voltage properties of NIS junctions are diode-like with a strong temperature dependence. Hence, these structures can be used as sensitive thermometers at temperatures well below the energy gap, {Delta}, of the superconducting electrode. For junction voltages comparable to {Delta}/q, current flow removes energy from the normal electrode. This property has been exploited to build refrigerators capable of cooling thin-film circuits from 0.3 K to 0.1 K. Calorimeters and bolometers for the detection of X-rays and millimeter-wave radiation, respectively, have successfully been built from NIS junctions. NIS junctions have also been used to probe the superconducting state. Finally, recent ideas for the use of NIS junctions as simple circuit elements are described.

  1. In vitro formation of gap junction vesicles.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A

    1976-02-01

    A method is described that uses trypsin digestion combined with collagenase-hyaluronidase which produces a population of gap junction vesicles. The hexagonal lattice of subunits ("connexons") comprising the gapjunctions appears unaltered by various structural criteria and by buoyant density measurements. The gap junction vesciles are closed by either a single or a double profile of nonjunctional "membrane," which presents a smooth, particle-free fracture face. Horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c studies have revealed that about 20% of the gap junction vesicles are impermeable to proteins 12,000 daltons or larger. The increased purity of the trypsinized junction preparation suggests that one of the disulfide reduction products of the gap-junction principal protein may be a nonjunctional contaminating peptide. The gap junction appears to be composed of a single 18,000-dalton protein, connexin, which may be reduced to a single 9,000-dalton peak. The number of peptides in this reduced peak are still unknown.

  2. cAMP Promotes Cell Migration Through Cell Junctional Complex Dynamics and Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling: Implications in Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ok; Ryu, Jung Min; Suh, Han Na; Park, Soo Hyun; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Hun; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells have attracted great interest for their therapeutic capacity in tissue regeneration. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), existing in high concentration at wound sites, mediated various signaling pathways such as cytoskeleton dynamics, cell adhesion, and cell migration in stem cells, which suggest the critical roles of cAMP in the wound healing process through functional regulation of stem cells. However, the mechanisms behind the effect of cAMP on mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) motility and its roles on skin wound healing remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, 8-Bromo cAMP-treated mESCs showed significant wound closure and improved neovascularization. Moreover, 8-Bromo cAMP stimulated mESC migration into the wound bed. 8-Bromo cAMP also increased ESC motility in in vitro migration assay. 8-Bromo cAMP induced myosin light chain phosphorylation through Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling, which were involved in 8-Bromo cAMP-induced decrease in expression of junction proteins (connexin 43, E-cadherin, and occludin) at the plasma membrane. Subsequently, 8-Bromo cAMP induced the disruption of cell junctions (including gap junctions, adherens junctions, and tight junctions), which reduced the function of the gap junctions and cell adhesion. In addition, 8-Bromo cAMP-induced Rac1 and Cdc42 activation increased Arp3, TOCA, PAK, and N-WASP expression, but decreased cofilin phosphorylation level, which elicited actin cytoskeleton remodeling. In contrast to the control, 8-Bromo cAMP evoked a substantial migration of cells into the denuded area, which was blocked by the small interfering RNAs of the signaling pathway-related molecules or by inhibitors. In conclusion, cAMP enhanced the migration of mESCs through effective coordination of junctional disruption and actin cytoskeleton remodeling, which increased the wound healing capacity of ESCs.

  3. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-05

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  4. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  5. Effect of a plant-based hemostatic agent on microleakage of self-etching adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Soley; Ertaş, Hüseyin; Zorba, Yahya O.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study evaluated the effect of Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) contamination on the microleakage of one-step and two-step self-etching adhesives. Study design: Class V cavities were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction on both buccal and lingual surfaces of 60 freshly extracted human molars. Teeth were randomly assigned into three groups according to contamination material applied (Group I, no contamination; Group II, blood contamination; Group III, ABS contamination). In contaminated groups, one drop of blood and ABS solution was applied directly to the dentin surface and air-dried. Each group was further divided into two subgroups according to bonding agent used [Group A, Clearfil SE Bond (two-step self-etching adhesive); Group B, Adper Easy One (one-step self-etching adhesive)]. Adhesive materials were applied according to the manufacturers’ recommendations. The specimens were restored using a universal microhybrid composite (Arabesk). After thermocycling (5000x, 5°C – 55°C) and immersion in a 0.5% basic fuchsin, dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was performed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at p < 0.05. Results: Significantly higher microleakage scores were observed when one-step self-etching adhesive was applied to blood- and ABS-contaminated dentin. However, when a two-step self etching adhesive was used, microleakage was observed only following blood contamination, not following ABS contamination. Conclusions: Although, blood contamination before adhesive application resulted in increased microleakage with both one-step and two-step self-etching adhesive systems, ABS contamination did not affect microleakage when a two-step self-ething adhesive system was used. Key words:Ankaferd Blood Stopper, blood, microleakage, self-etching adhesive. PMID:23229238

  6. JAM-A and aPKC: A close pair during cell-cell contact maturation and tight junction formation in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ebnet, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion plays a critical role in the formation of barrier-forming epithelia. The molecules which mediate cell-cell adhesion frequently act as signaling molecules by recruiting and/or assembling cytoplasmic protein complexes. Junctional Adhesion Molecule (JAM)-A interacts with the cell polarity protein PAR-3, a member of the PAR-3-aPKC-PAR-6 complex, which regulates the formation of cell-cell contacts and the development of tight junctions (TJs). In our recent study we found that JAM-A is localized at primordial, spot-like cell-cell junctions (pAJs) in a non-phosphorylated form. After the recruitment of the PAR-aPKC complex and its activation at pAJs, aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at Ser285 to promote the maturation of immature junctions. In polarized epithelial cells, aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A selectively at the TJs to maintain the barrier function of TJs. Thus, through mutual regulation, JAM-A and aPKC form a functional unit that regulates the establishment of barrier-forming junctions in vertebrate epithelial cells.

  7. [Gap junctions and cancer: implications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mesnil, Marc

    2004-02-01

    Gap junctions are made of intercellular channels which permit the diffusion from cytoplasm to cytoplasm of small hydrophilic molecules (<1,200 Da) such as ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers (calcium, inositol triphosphate, etc.). Since their discovery in the early sixties, several groups have described the loss of their function in cancer cells. The accumulation of such data led to the hypothesis that gap junctions are involved in the carcinogenesis process. This assumption has been confirmed by data establishing that gap junctional intercellular communication is inhibited by most of the tumor promoters and that the restoration of such a communication, by transfection of cDNAs encoding gap junction proteins (connexins), inhibits the aberrant growth rates of tumorigenic cells. Despite these important informations, several fundamental questions remain still open. First, we do not know how gap junctions mediate such a tumor suppressor effect and whether it may depend either on the cell type or on the connexin type. Moreover, most of the data concerning a possible involvement of gap junctions in carcinogenesis have been obtained from in vitro and animal models. The very few results which have been currently collected from human tumors are not sufficient to have a clear idea concerning the real involvement of gap junctions in sporadic human cancers. These points as well as other unresolved questions about the role of gap junctional intercellular communication in carcinogenesis are mentioned. To bring some answers, some prospects are proposed with the objective to use gap junctions for increasing the effect of anticancer therapies.

  8. Magnetic tunnel junction pattern technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eugene; Schwarz, Benjamin; Choi, Chang Ju; Kula, Witold; Wolfman, Jerome; Ounadjela, Kamel; Geha, Sam

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) pattern technique that involves transforming the magnetic layer above the tunnel barrier in unwanted areas into an insulator, thus providing insulation between different MTJ devices without suffering common tunnel barrier shorting problems. With this technique, 90%-100% yielding MTJ devices have been observed. MTJ results using this process are superior to an etching based process. Switching distribution of patterned magnetic bits is also narrower using this novel technique. Process control and the ability to stop on the tunnel barrier have been demonstrated.

  9. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions.

  10. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  11. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  12. Fire-Retardant Epoxy Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    Phosphorus-containing epoxy is fire-retardant and translucent. Intended as adhesive for laminated plastic sheets, new material bonds well to titanium dioxide-filled plastic film, which ordinarily shows little surface interaction with adhesives. Fire retardancy has been demonstrated, and smoke density is low enough to avoid smoke obscuration.

  13. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  14. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-23

    pressure-activated adhesive is nearly complete. A 2:1 ratio of microcapsules:gorilla glue and a 1.5% dibutyltin diacetate concentration produced adhesion...Table I below. The best performers generally had between 1% and 1.5% dibutyltin diacetate (DBTDA). They also had a 2:1 ratio (vol/wt) of microcapsules

  15. Severe adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Catena, Fausto; Kelly, Michael D; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction is a frequent cause of hospital admission. Water soluble contrast studies may have diagnostic and therapeutic value and avoid challenging demanding surgical operations, but if bowel ischemia is suspected, prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. A 58-year-old patient was operated for extensive adhesive small bowel obstruction after having had two previous laparotomies for colorectal surgery, and had a complex clinical course with multiple operations and several complications. Different strategies of management have been adopted, including non-operative management with the use of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast medium, multiple surgical procedures, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, and finally use of antiadherences icodextrin solution. After 2 years follow-up the patient was doing well without presenting recurrent episodes of adhesive small bowel obstruction. For patients admitted several times for adhesive small bowel obstruction, the relative risk of recurring obstruction increases in relation to the number of prior episodes. Several strategies for non-operative conservative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction have already addressed diagnostic and therapeutic value of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast. According to the most recent evidence-based guidelines, open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating adhesive small bowel obstruction as well as after failed conservative management. Research interest and clinical evidence are increasing in adhesions prevention. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin may reduce incidence of adhesions.

  16. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Neviaser, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is characterized by painful, gradual loss of active and passive shoulder motion resulting from fibrosis and contracture of the joint capsule. Other shoulder pathology can produce a similar clinical picture, however, and must be considered. Management is based on the underlying cause of pain and stiffness, and determination of the etiology is essential. Subtle clues in the history and physical examination can help differentiate adhesive capsulitis from other conditions that cause a stiff, painful shoulder. The natural history of adhesive capsulitis is a matter of controversy. Management of true capsular restriction of motion (ie, true adhesive capsulitis) begins with gentle, progressive stretching exercises. Most patients improve with nonsurgical treatment. Indications for surgery should be individualized. Failure to obtain symptomatic improvement and continued functional disability following ≥6 months of physical therapy is a general guideline for surgical intervention. Diligent postoperative therapy to maintain motion is required to minimize recurrence of adhesive capsulitis.

  17. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  18. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, R.A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

  19. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, Ray A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

  20. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  1. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  2. Propulsion by directional adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John; Prakash, Manu

    2008-03-01

    The rough, hairy integument of water-walking arthropods is well known to be responsible for their water-repellency; we here consider its additional propulsive role. We demonstrate that the tilted flexible leg hairs of water-walking arthropods render the leg cuticle directionally anisotropic: contact lines advance most readily towards the leg tips. The dynamical role of the resulting unidirectional adhesion is explored, and yields new insight into the manner in which water-walking arthropods generate thrust, glide and leap from the free surface. We thus provide new rationale for the fundamental topological difference in the roughness on plants and insects, and suggest novel directions for biomimetic design of smart, hydrophobic surfaces.

  3. Multicomponent Analysis of Junctional Movements Regulated by Myosin II Isoforms at the Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Smutny, Michael; Wu, Selwin K.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Mangold, Sabine; Yap, Alpha S.; Hamilton, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    The zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelial cells is a site of cell-cell adhesion where cellular forces are exerted and resisted. Increasing evidence indicates that E-cadherin adhesion molecules at the ZA serve to sense force applied on the junctions and coordinate cytoskeletal responses to those forces. Efforts to understand the role that cadherins play in mechanotransduction have been limited by the lack of assays to measure the impact of forces on the ZA. In this study we used 4D imaging of GFP-tagged E-cadherin to analyse the movement of the ZA. Junctions in confluent epithelial monolayers displayed prominent movements oriented orthogonal (perpendicular) to the ZA itself. Two components were identified in these movements: a relatively slow unidirectional (translational) component that could be readily fitted by least-squares regression analysis, upon which were superimposed more rapid oscillatory movements. Myosin IIB was a dominant factor responsible for driving the unilateral translational movements. In contrast, frequency spectrum analysis revealed that depletion of Myosin IIA increased the power of the oscillatory movements. This implies that Myosin IIA may serve to dampen oscillatory movements of the ZA. This extends our recent analysis of Myosin II at the ZA to demonstrate that Myosin IIA and Myosin IIB make distinct contributions to junctional movement at the ZA. PMID:21799860

  4. The adhesive properties of coacervated recombinant hybrid mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonghye; Choi, Yoo Seong; Kang, Dong Gyun; Song, Young Hoon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2010-05-01

    Marine mussels attach to substrates using adhesive proteins. It has been suggested that complex coacervation (liquid-liquid phase separation via concentration) might be involved in the highly condensed and non-water dispersed adhesion process of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). However, as purified natural MAPs are difficult to obtain, it has not been possible to experimentally validate the coacervation model. In the present work, we demonstrate complex coacervation in a system including recombinant MAPs and hyaluronic acid (HA). Our recombinant hybrid MAPs, fp-151 and fp-131, can be produced in large quantities, and are readily purified. We observed successful complex coacervation using cationic fp-151 or fp-131, and an anionic HA partner. Importantly, we found that highly condensed complex coacervates significantly increased the bulk adhesive strength of MAPs in both dry and wet environments. In addition, oil droplets were successfully engulfed using a MAP-based interfacial coacervation process, to form microencapsulated particles. Collectively, our results indicate that a complex coacervation system based on MAPs shows superior adhesive properties, combined with additional valuable features including liquid/liquid phase separation and appropriate viscoelasticity. Our microencapsulation system could be useful in the development of new adhesive biomaterials, including self-adhesive microencapsulated drug carriers, for use in biotechnological and biomedical applications.

  5. Tunicate-mimetic nanofibrous hydrogel adhesive with improved wet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Lee, Dohoon; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-07-01

    The main impediment to medical application of biomaterial-based adhesives is their poor wet adhesion strength due to hydration-induced softening and dissolution. To solve this problem, we mimicked the wound healing process found in tunicates, which use a nanofiber structure and pyrogallol group to heal any damage on its tunic under sea water. We fabricated a tunicate-mimetic hydrogel adhesive based on a chitin nanofiber/gallic acid (a pyrogallol acid) composite. The pyrogallol group-mediated cross-linking and the nanofibrous structures improved the dissolution resistance and cohesion strength of the hydrogel compared to the amorphous polymeric hydrogels in wet condition. The tunicate-mimetic adhesives showed higher adhesion strength between fully hydrated skin tissues than did fibrin glue and mussel-mimetic adhesives. The tunicate mimetic hydrogels were produced at low cost from recyclable and abundant raw materials. This tunicate-mimetic adhesive system is an example of how natural materials can be engineered for biomedical applications.

  6. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    PubMed

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  7. KIF17 regulates RhoA-dependent actin remodeling at epithelial cell–cell adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Bipul R.; Espenel, Cedric; Libanje, Fotine; Raingeaud, Joel; Morgan, Jessica; Jaulin, Fanny; Kreitzer, Geri

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The kinesin KIF17 localizes at microtubule plus-ends where it contributes to regulation of microtubule stabilization and epithelial polarization. We now show that KIF17 localizes at cell–cell adhesions and that KIF17 depletion inhibits accumulation of actin at the apical pole of cells grown in 3D organotypic cultures and alters the distribution of actin and E-cadherin in cells cultured in 2D on solid supports. Overexpression of full-length KIF17 constructs or truncation mutants containing the N-terminal motor domain resulted in accumulation of newly incorporated GFP–actin into junctional actin foci, cleared E-cadherin from cytoplasmic vesicles and stabilized cell–cell adhesions to challenge with calcium depletion. Expression of these KIF17 constructs also increased cellular levels of active RhoA, whereas active RhoA was diminished in KIF17-depleted cells. Inhibition of RhoA or its effector ROCK, or expression of LIMK1 kinase-dead or activated cofilinS3A inhibited KIF17-induced junctional actin accumulation. Interestingly, KIF17 activity toward actin depends on the motor domain but is independent of microtubule binding. Together, these data show that KIF17 can modify RhoA–GTPase signaling to influence junctional actin and the stability of the apical junctional complex of epithelial cells. PMID:26759174

  8. The receptor tyrosine phosphatase Lar regulates adhesion between Drosophila male germline stem cells and the niche.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Shrividhya; Mahowald, Anthony P; Fuller, Margaret T

    2012-04-01

    The stem cell niche provides a supportive microenvironment to maintain adult stem cells in their undifferentiated state. Adhesion between adult stem cells and niche cells or the local basement membrane ensures retention of stem cells in the niche environment. Drosophila male germline stem cells (GSCs) attach to somatic hub cells, a component of their niche, through E-cadherin-mediated adherens junctions, and orient their centrosomes toward these localized junctional complexes to carry out asymmetric divisions. Here we show that the transmembrane receptor tyrosine phosphatase Leukocyte-antigen-related-like (Lar), which is best known for its function in axonal migration and synapse morphogenesis in the nervous system, helps maintain GSCs at the hub by promoting E-cadherin-based adhesion between hub cells and GSCs. Lar is expressed in GSCs and early spermatogonial cells and localizes to the hub-GSC interface. Loss of Lar function resulted in a reduced number of GSCs at the hub. Lar function was required cell-autonomously in germ cells for proper localization of Adenomatous polyposis coli 2 and E-cadherin at the hub-GSC interface and for the proper orientation of centrosomes in GSCs. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that in Lar mutants the adherens junctions between hub cells and GSCs lack the characteristic dense staining seen in wild-type controls. Thus, the Lar receptor tyrosine phosphatase appears to polarize and retain GSCs through maintenance of localized E-cadherin-based adherens junctions.

  9. Cell-Cell Adhesions and Cell Contractility Are Upregulated upon Desmosome Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Sumigray, Kaelyn; Zhou, Kang; Lechler, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Desmosomes are perturbed in a number of disease states – including genetic disorders, autoimmune and bacterial diseases. Here, we report unexpected changes in other cell-cell adhesion structures upon loss of desmosome function. We found that perturbation of desmosomes by either loss of the core desmosomal protein desmoplakin or treatment with pathogenic anti-desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) antibodies resulted in changes in adherens junctions consistent with increased tension. The total amount of myosin IIA was increased in desmoplakin-null epidermis, and myosin IIA became highly localized to cell contacts in both desmoplakin-null and anti-Dsg3-treated mouse keratinocytes. Inhibition of myosin II activity reversed the changes to adherens junctions seen upon desmosome disruption. The increased cortical myosin IIA promoted epithelial sheet fragility, as myosin IIA-null cells were less susceptible to disruption by anti-Dsg3 antibodies. In addition to the changes in adherens junctions, we found a significant increase in the expression of a number of claudin genes, which encode for transmembrane components of the tight junction that provide barrier function. These data demonstrate that desmosome disruption results in extensive transcriptional and posttranslational changes that alter the activity of other cell adhesion structures. PMID:25006807

  10. Cell-cell adhesions and cell contractility are upregulated upon desmosome disruption.

    PubMed

    Sumigray, Kaelyn; Zhou, Kang; Lechler, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Desmosomes are perturbed in a number of disease states - including genetic disorders, autoimmune and bacterial diseases. Here, we report unexpected changes in other cell-cell adhesion structures upon loss of desmosome function. We found that perturbation of desmosomes by either loss of the core desmosomal protein desmoplakin or treatment with pathogenic anti-desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) antibodies resulted in changes in adherens junctions consistent with increased tension. The total amount of myosin IIA was increased in desmoplakin-null epidermis, and myosin IIA became highly localized to cell contacts in both desmoplakin-null and anti-Dsg3-treated mouse keratinocytes. Inhibition of myosin II activity reversed the changes to adherens junctions seen upon desmosome disruption. The increased cortical myosin IIA promoted epithelial sheet fragility, as myosin IIA-null cells were less susceptible to disruption by anti-Dsg3 antibodies. In addition to the changes in adherens junctions, we found a significant increase in the expression of a number of claudin genes, which encode for transmembrane components of the tight junction that provide barrier function. These data demonstrate that desmosome disruption results in extensive transcriptional and posttranslational changes that alter the activity of other cell adhesion structures.

  11. Electrodeposited, Transverse Nanowire Electroluminescent Junctions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaopeng; Xu, Qiang; Dutta, Rajen K; Le Thai, Mya; Li, Xiaowei; Penner, Reginald M

    2016-09-27

    The preparation by electrodeposition of transverse nanowire electroluminescent junctions (tn-ELJs) is described, and the electroluminescence (EL) properties of these devices are characterized. The lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition process is first used to prepare long (millimeters), linear, nanocrystalline CdSe nanowires on glass. The thickness of these nanowires along the emission axis is 60 nm, and the width, wCdSe, along the electrical axis is adjustable from 100 to 450 nm. Ten pairs of nickel-gold electrical contacts are then positioned along the axis of this nanowire using lithographically directed electrodeposition. The resulting linear array of nickel-CdSe-gold junctions produces EL with an external quantum efficiency, EQE, and threshold voltage, Vth, that depend sensitively on wCdSe. EQE increases with increasing electric field and also with increasing wCdSe, and Vth also increases with wCdSe and, therefore, the electrical resistance of the tn-ELJs. Vth down to 1.8(±0.2) V (for wCdSe ≈ 100 nm) and EQE of 5.5(±0.5) × 10(-5) (for wCdSe ≈ 450 nm) are obtained. tn-ELJs produce a broad EL emission envelope, spanning the wavelength range from 600 to 960 nm.

  12. Rapid remodeling of tight junctions during paracellular diapedesis in a human model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Winger, Ryan C; Koblinski, Jennifer E; Kanda, Takashi; Ransohoff, Richard M; Muller, William A

    2014-09-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM; diapedesis) is a critical event in immune surveillance and inflammation. Most TEM occurs at endothelial cell borders (paracellular). However, there is indirect evidence to suggest that, at the tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), leukocytes migrate directly through the endothelial cell body (transcellular). Why leukocytes migrate through the endothelial cell body rather than the cell borders is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the tightness of endothelial cell junctions influences the pathway of diapedesis, we developed an in vitro model of the BBB that possessed 10-fold higher electrical resistance than standard culture conditions and strongly expressed the BBB tight junction proteins claudin-5 and claudin-3. We found that paracellular TEM was still the predominant pathway (≥98%) and TEM was dependent on PECAM-1 and CD99. We show that endothelial tight junctions expressing claudin-5 are dynamic and undergo rapid remodeling during TEM. Membrane from the endothelial lateral border recycling compartment is mobilized to the exact site of tight junction remodeling. This preserves the endothelial barrier by sealing the intercellular gaps with membrane and engaging the migrating leukocyte with unligated adhesion molecules (PECAM-1 and CD99) as it crosses the cell border. These findings provide new insights into leukocyte-endothelial interactions at the BBB and suggest that tight junctions are more dynamic than previously appreciated.

  13. Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael P; Kim, Seok; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    The complex structures that allow geckos to repeatably adhere to surfaces consist of multilevel branching fibers with specialized tips. We present a novel technique for fabricating similar multilevel structures from polymer materials and demonstrate the fabrication of arrays of two- and three-level structures, wherein each level terminates in flat mushroom-type tips. Adhesion experiments are conducted on two-level fiber arrays on a 12-mm-diameter glass hemisphere, which exhibit both increased adhesion and interface toughness over one-level fiber samples and unstructured control samples. These adhesion enhancements are the result of increased surface conformation as well as increased extension during detachment.

  14. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  15. Contractility Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening Through Focal Adhesion Kinase and Assembly of Vinculin-Containing Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Dumbauld, David W.; Shin, Heungsoo; Gallant, Nathan D.; Michael, Kristin E.; Radhakrishna, Harish; García, Andrés J.

    2010-01-01

    Actin-myosin contractility modulates focal adhesion assembly, stress fiber formation, and cell migration. We analyzed the contributions of contractility to fibroblast adhesion strengthening using a hydrodynamic adhesion assay and micropatterned substrates to control cell shape and adhesive area. Serum addition resulted in adhesion strengthening to levels 30–40% higher than serum-free cultures. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase or Rho-kinase blocked phosphorylation of myosin light chain to similar extents and eliminated the serum-induced enhancements in strengthening. Blebbistatin-induced inhibition of myosin II reduced serum-induced adhesion strength to similar levels as those obtained by blocking myosin light chain phosphorylation. Reductions in adhesion strengthening by inhibitors of contractility correlated with loss of vinculin and talin from focal adhesions without changes in integrin binding. In vinculin-null cells, inhibition of contractility did not alter adhesive force, whereas controls displayed a 20% reduction in adhesion strength, indicating that the effects of contractility on adhesive force are vinculin-dependent. Furthermore, in cells expressing FAK, inhibitors of contractility reduced serum-induced adhesion strengthening as well as eliminated focal adhesion assembly. In contrast, in the absence of FAK, these inhibitors did not alter adhesion strength or focal adhesion assembly. These results indicate that contractility modulates adhesion strengthening via FAK-dependent, vinculin-containing focal adhesion assembly. PMID:20205236

  16. Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions from the Short to the Long Junction Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzenets, I. V.; Amet, F.; Ke, C. T.; Draelos, A. W.; Wei, M. T.; Seredinski, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Bomze, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Tarucha, S.; Finkelstein, G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the critical current IC of ballistic Josephson junctions made of encapsulated graphene-boron-nitride heterostructures. We observe a crossover from the short to the long junction regimes as the length of the device increases. In long ballistic junctions, IC is found to scale as ∝exp (-kBT /δ E ). The extracted energies δ E are independent of the carrier density and proportional to the level spacing of the ballistic cavity. As T →0 the critical current of a long (or short) junction saturates at a level determined by the product of δ E (or Δ ) and the number of the junction's transversal modes.

  17. Epithelial Microvilli Establish an Electrostatic Barrier to Microbial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kaila M.; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Microvilli are membrane extensions on the apical surface of polarized epithelia, such as intestinal enterocytes and tubule and duct epithelia. One notable exception in mucosal epithelia is M cells, which are specialized for capturing luminal microbial particles; M cells display a unique apical membrane lacking microvilli. Based on studies of M cell uptake under different ionic conditions, we hypothesized that microvilli may augment the mucosal barrier by providing an increased surface charge density from the increased membrane surface and associated glycoproteins. Thus, electrostatic charges may repel microbes from epithelial cells bearing microvilli, while M cells are more susceptible to microbial adhesion. To test the role of microvilli in bacterial adhesion and uptake, we developed polarized intestinal epithelial cells with reduced microvilli (“microvillus-minus,” or MVM) but retaining normal tight junctions. When tested for interactions with microbial particles in suspension, MVM cells showed greatly enhanced adhesion and uptake of particles compared to microvillus-positive cells. This preference showed a linear relationship to bacterial surface charge, suggesting that microvilli resist binding of microbes by using electrostatic repulsion. Moreover, this predicts that pathogen modification of electrostatic forces may contribute directly to virulence. Accordingly, the effacement effector protein Tir from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 expressed in epithelial cells induced a loss of microvilli with consequent enhanced microbial binding. These results provide a new context for microvillus function in the host-pathogen relationship, based on electrostatic interactions. PMID:24778113

  18. Dressed fluxon in a Josephson window junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Jean Guy; Flytzanis, Nikos; Devoret, Michel

    1994-09-01

    The static fluxon solutions of a Josephson window junction have been studied numerically. We show that the effect of the idle region surrounding the junction is to ``dress'' the fluxon causing its energy to increase. This effect can be predicted accurately by a simple model.

  19. Analysis of Tight Junction Formation and Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Kerekes, Ryan A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Foster, Carmen M; Retterer, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study segmentation of tight junctions and analyze the formation and integrity of tight junctions in large-scale confocal image stacks, a challenging biological problem because of the low spatial resolution images and the presence of breaks in tight junction structure. We present an automated, three-step processing approach for tight junction analysis. In our approach, we first localize each individual nucleus in the image by using thresholding, morphological filters and active contours. By using each nucleus position as a seed point, we automatically segment the cell body based on the active contour. We then use an intensity-based skeletonization algorithm to generate the boundary regions for each cell, and features are extracted from tight junctions associated with each cell to assess tight junction continuity. Based on qualitative results and quantitative comparisons, we show that we are able to automatically segment tight junctions and compute relevant features that provide a quantitative measure of tight junction formation to which the permeability of the cell monolayer can ultimately be correlated.

  20. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-09

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications.

  1. Adhesion molecules in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Asrar, A.; Geboes, K.; Al-Kharashi, S.; Tabbara, K.; Missotten, L.; Desmet, V.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Adhesion molecules play a key role in the selective recruitment of different leucocyte population to inflammatory sites. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of adhesion molecules in the conjunctiva of patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC).
METHODS—The presence and distribution of adhesion molecules were studied in 14 conjunctival biopsy specimens from seven patients with active VKC and in four normal conjunctival biopsy specimens. We used a panel of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3), lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), very late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1). In addition, a panel of mAbs were used to characterise the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate.
RESULTS—In the normal conjunctiva, ICAM-1 was expressed on the vascular endothelium only, LFA-1 and ICAM-3 on epithelial and stromal mononuclear cells , and VLA-4 on stromal mononuclear cells. The expression of VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 was absent. The number of cells expressing adhesion molecules was found to be markedly increased in all VKC specimens. This was concurrent with a heavy inflammatory infiltrate. Strong ICAM-1 expression was induced on the basal epithelial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, ICAM-1 was expressed on stromal mononuclear cells. LFA-1 and ICAM-3 were expressed on the majority of epithelial and stromal infiltrating mononuclear cells. VLA-4 expression was noted on stromal mononuclear cells. Compared with controls, VKC specimens showed significantly more ICAM-3+, LFA-1+, and VLA-4+ cells. VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 were induced on the vascular endothelial cells.
CONCLUSIONS—Increased expression of adhesion molecules may play an important role in the pathogenesis of VKC.

 PMID

  2. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  3. Adhesive Performance of Biomimetic Adhesive-Coated Biologic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John L.; Vollenweider, Laura; Xu, Fangmin; Lee, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical repair of a discontinuity in traumatized or degenerated soft tissues is traditionally accomplished using sutures. A current trend is to reinforce this primary repair with surgical grafts, meshes, or patches secured with perforating mechanical devices (i.e., sutures, staples, or tacks). These fixation methods frequently lead to chronic pain and mesh detachment. We developed a series of biodegradable adhesive polymers that are synthetic mimics of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), composed of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-derivatives, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polycaprolactone (PCL). These polymers can be cast into films, and their mechanical properties, extent of swelling, and degradation rate can be tailored through the composition of the polymers as well as blending with additives. When coated onto a biologic mesh used for hernia repair, these adhesive constructs demonstrated adhesive strengths significantly higher than fibrin glue. With further development, a pre-coated bioadhesive mesh may represent a new surgical option for soft tissue repair. PMID:20919699

  4. Green waxes, adhesives and lubricants.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Kong, X H; Ruan, M; Ma, F M; Jiang, Y F; Liu, M Z; Chen, Y; Zuo, X H

    2010-10-28

    General characteristics of waxes, adhesives and lubricants as well as the recent fundamental investigations on their physical and mechanical behaviour are introduced. The current R&D status for new type/generation of waxes, adhesives and lubricants from natural products is reviewed, with an emphasis on their tribological applications. In particular, some crucial issues and challenges relating to technological improvement and materials development are discussed. Based on the current predicted shortage of energy resources and environmental concerns, prospective research on the development of green waxes, adhesives and lubricants is suggested.

  5. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  6. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  7. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  8. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  9. The Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction as a model for scaffold complexes at glutamatergic synapses: benefits and limitations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ulrich; Kobler, Oliver; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2010-09-01

    Based on unbeatable genetic accessibility and relative simplicity, the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction has become a widely used model system for studying functional and structural aspects of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like proteins (MAGUKs) are first-order scaffolding molecules enriched at many cellular junctions, including synapses, where they coordinate multiple binding partners, including cell adhesion molecules and ion channels. The enrichment of the prototypic MAGUK Discs-Large at larval NMJs apparently parallels the high abundance of its homologs at excitatory synapses in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, the authors review selected aspects of the long-standing work on Dlg at fly neuromuscular junctions, thereby scrutinizing its subcellular localization, function, and regulation with regard to corresponding aspects of MAGUKs in vertebrate neurons.

  10. Structural Basis for Human PECAM-1-Mediated Trans-homophilic Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Menglong; Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Qun; Hao, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion involved in signal transduction, tissue integrity and pathogen infection is mainly mediated by cell adhesion molecules (CAM). One CAM member, platelet–endothelial-cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), plays an important role in tight junction among endothelia cells, leukocyte trafficking, and immune response through its homophilic and heterophilic binding patterns. Both kinds of interactions, which lead to endogenous and exogenous signal transmission, are derived from extracellular immunoglobulin-like (IgL) domains and cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) of PECAM-1. To date, the mechanism of trans-homophilic interaction of PECAM-1 remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of PECAM-1 IgL1-2 trans-homo dimer. Both IgL 1 and 2 adopt the classical Ig domain conformation comprised of two layers of β-sheets possessing antiparallel β-strands with each being anchored by a pair of cysteines forming a disulfide bond. The dimer interface includes hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. The Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) envelope of PECAM-1 IgL1-6 supported such a dimer formation in solution. Cell adhesion assays on wildtype and mutant PECAM-1 further characterized the structural determinants in cell junction and communication. PMID:27958302

  11. Structural basis for human PECAM-1-mediated trans-homophilic cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Menglong; Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Qun; Hao, Quan

    2016-12-13

    Cell adhesion involved in signal transduction, tissue integrity and pathogen infection is mainly mediated by cell adhesion molecules (CAM). One CAM member, platelet–endothelial-cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), plays an important role in tight junction among endothelia cells, leukocyte trafficking, and immune response through its homophilic and heterophilic binding patterns. Both kinds of interactions, which lead to endogenous and exogenous signal transmission, are derived from extracellular immunoglobulin-like (IgL) domains and cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) of PECAM-1. To date, the mechanism of trans-homophilic interaction of PECAM-1 remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of PECAM-1 IgL1-2 trans-homo dimer. Both IgL 1 and 2 adopt the classical Ig domain conformation comprised of two layers of β-sheets possessing antiparallel β-strands with each being anchored by a pair of cysteines forming a disulfide bond. The dimer interface includes hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. The Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) envelope of PECAM-1 IgL1-6 supported such a dimer formation in solution. As a result, cell adhesion assays on wildtype and mutant PECAM-1 further characterized the structural determinants in cell junction and communication.

  12. Structural basis for human PECAM-1-mediated trans-homophilic cell adhesion

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Menglong; Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Qun; ...

    2016-12-13

    Cell adhesion involved in signal transduction, tissue integrity and pathogen infection is mainly mediated by cell adhesion molecules (CAM). One CAM member, platelet–endothelial-cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), plays an important role in tight junction among endothelia cells, leukocyte trafficking, and immune response through its homophilic and heterophilic binding patterns. Both kinds of interactions, which lead to endogenous and exogenous signal transmission, are derived from extracellular immunoglobulin-like (IgL) domains and cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) of PECAM-1. To date, the mechanism of trans-homophilic interaction of PECAM-1 remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of PECAM-1 IgL1-2 trans-homo dimer. Both IgLmore » 1 and 2 adopt the classical Ig domain conformation comprised of two layers of β-sheets possessing antiparallel β-strands with each being anchored by a pair of cysteines forming a disulfide bond. The dimer interface includes hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. The Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) envelope of PECAM-1 IgL1-6 supported such a dimer formation in solution. As a result, cell adhesion assays on wildtype and mutant PECAM-1 further characterized the structural determinants in cell junction and communication.« less

  13. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  14. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  15. Lateral assembly of N-cadherin drives tissue integrity by stabilizing adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Garg, S.; Fischer, S. C.; Schuman, E. M.; Stelzer, E. H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin interactions ensure the correct registry and anchorage of cells during tissue formation. Along the plasma membrane, cadherins form inter-junctional lattices via cis- and trans-dimerization. While structural studies have provided models for cadherin interactions, the molecular nature of cadherin binding in vivo remains unexplored. We undertook a multi-disciplinary approach combining live cell imaging of three-dimensional cell assemblies (spheroids) with a computational model to study the dynamics of N-cadherin interactions. Using a loss-of-function strategy, we demonstrate that each N-cadherin interface plays a distinct role in spheroid formation. We found that cis-dimerization is not a prerequisite for trans-interactions, but rather modulates trans-interfaces to ensure tissue stability. Using a model of N-cadherin junction dynamics, we show that the absence of cis-interactions results in low junction stability and loss of tissue integrity. By quantifying the binding and unbinding dynamics of the N-cadherin binding interfaces, we determined that mutating either interface results in a 10-fold increase in the dissociation constant. These findings provide new quantitative information on the steps driving cadherin intercellular adhesion and demonstrate the role of cis-interactions in junction stability. PMID:25589573

  16. Mechanical Control of Myotendinous Junction Formation and Tendon Differentiation during Development

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, Mauricio; Vega-Macaya, Franco; Olguín, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    The development of the musculoskeletal system is a great model to study the interplay between chemical and mechanical inter-tissue signaling in cell adhesion, tissue morphogenesis and differentiation. In both vertebrates and invertebrates (e.g., Drosophila melanogaster) the formation of muscle-tendon interaction generates mechanical forces which are required for myotendinous junction maturation and tissue differentiation. In addition, these forces must be withstood by muscles and tendons in order to prevent detachment from each other, deformation or even losing their integrity. Extracellular matrix remodeling at the myotendinous junction is key to resist mechanical load generated by muscle contraction. Recent evidences in vertebrates indicate that mechanical forces generated during junction formation regulate chemical signaling leading to extracellular matrix remodeling, however, the mechanotransduction mechanisms associated to this response remains elusive. In addition to extracellular matrix remodeling, the ability of Drosophila tendon-cells to bear mechanical load depends on rearrangement of tendon cell cytoskeleton, thus studying the molecular mechanisms involved in this process is critical to understand the contribution of mechanical forces to the development of the musculoskeletal system. Here, we review recent findings regarding the role of chemical and mechanical signaling in myotendinous junction formation and tendon differentiation, and discuss molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction that may allow tendon cells to withstand mechanical load during development of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:28386542

  17. Grainy head promotes expression of septate junction proteins and influences epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Maithreyi; Uv, Anne; Krejci, Alena; Brown, Nicholas H; Bray, Sarah J

    2008-03-15

    Transcription factors of the Grainy head (Grh) family are required in epithelia to generate the impermeable apical layer that protects against the external environment. This function is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates, despite the differing molecular composition of the protective barrier. Epithelial cells also have junctions that create a paracellular diffusion barrier (tight or septate junctions). To examine whether Grh has a role in regulating such characteristics, we used an epidermal layer in the Drosophila embryo that has no endogenous Grh and lacks septate junctions, the amnioserosa. Expression of Grh in the amnioserosa caused severe defects in dorsal closure, a process similar to wound closure, and induced robust expression of the septate junction proteins Coracle, Fasciclin 3 and Sinuous. Grh-binding sites are present within the genes encoding these proteins, consistent with them being direct targets. Removal of Grh from imaginal disc cells caused a reduction in Fasciclin 3 and Coracle levels, suggesting that Grh normally fine tunes their epithelial expression and hence contributes to barrier properties. The fact that ectopic Grh arrests dorsal closure also suggests that this dynamic process relies on epithelia having distinct adhesive properties conferred by differential deployment of Grh.

  18. Density-enhanced Phosphatase 1 Regulates Phosphorylation of Tight Junction Proteins and Enhances Barrier Function of Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sallee, Jennifer L.; Burridge, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is a dynamic process that can activate multiple signaling pathways. These signaling pathways can be regulated through reversible tyrosine phosphorylation events. The level of tyrosine phosphorylation of junctional proteins reflects the balance between protein-tyrosine kinase and protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. The receptor-tyrosine phosphatase DEP-1 (CD148/PTP-η) has been implicated in cell growth and differentiation as well as in regulating phosphorylation of junctional proteins. However, the role of DEP-1 in regulating tight junction phosphorylation and the integrity of cell-cell junctions is still under investigation. In this study, we used a catalytically dead substrate-trapping mutant of DEP-1 to identify potential substrates at cell-cell junctions. We have shown that in epithelial cells the trapping mutant of DEP-1 interacts with the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. In contrast, PTP-PEST, Shp2, and PTPμ did not interact with these proteins, suggesting that the interaction of DEP-1 with occludin and ZO-1 is specific. In addition, occludin and ZO-1 were dephosphorylated by DEP-1 but not these other phosphatases in vitro. Overexpression of DEP-1 increased barrier function as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance and also reduced paracellular flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran following a calcium switch. Reduced DEP-1 expression by small interfering RNA had a small but significant increase in junction permeability. These data suggest that DEP-1 can modify the phosphorylation state of tight junction proteins and play a role in regulating permeability. PMID:19332538

  19. Exceptionally Small Statistical Variations in the Transport Properties of Metal-Molecule-Metal Junctions Composed of 80 Oligophenylene Dithiol Molecules.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zuoti; Bâldea, Ioan; Demissie, Abel T; Smith, Christopher E; Wu, Yanfei; Haugstad, Greg; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2017-04-14

    Strong stochastic fluctuations witnessed as very broad resistance (R) histograms with widths comparable to or even larger than the most probable values characterize many measurements in the field of molecular electronics, particularly those measurements based on single molecule junctions at room temperature. Here we show that molecular junctions containing 80 oligophenylene dithiol molecules (OPDn, 1 ≤ n ≤ 4) connected in parallel display small relative statistical deviations-δR/R ≈ 25% after only ∼200 independent measurements-and we analyze the sources of these deviations quantitatively. The junctions are made by conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) in which an Au-coated tip contacts a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of OPDs on Au. Using contact mechanics and direct measurements of the molecular surface coverage, the tip radius, tip-SAM adhesion force (F), and sample elastic modulus (E), we find that the tip-SAM contact area is approximately 25 nm(2), corresponding to about 80 molecules in the junction. Supplementing this information with I-V data and an analytic transport model, we are able to quantitatively describe the sources of deviations δR in R: namely, δN (deviations in the number of molecules in the junction), δε (deviations in energetic position of the dominant molecular orbital), and δΓ (deviations in molecule-electrode coupling). Our main results are (1) direct determination of N; (2) demonstration that δN/N for CP-AFM junctions is remarkably small (≤2%) and that the largest contributions to δR are δε and δΓ; (3) demonstration that δR/R after only ∼200 measurements is substantially smaller than most reports based on >1000 measurements for single molecule break junctions. Overall, these results highlight the excellent reproducibility of junctions composed of tens of parallel molecules, which may be important for continued efforts to build robust molecular devices.

  20. Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) regulates spermatid adhesion in the testis via dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and the nectin-3 adhesion protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elissa W. P.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    Development of spermatozoa in adult mammalian testis during spermatogenesis involves extensive cell migration and differentiation. Spermatogonia that reside at the basal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium differentiate into more advanced germ cell types that migrate toward the apical compartment until elongated spermatids are released into the tubule lumen during spermiation. Apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES; a testis-specific anchoring junction) is the only cell junction that anchors and maintains the polarity of elongating/elongated spermatids (step 8–19 spermatids) in the epithelium. Little is known regarding the signaling pathways that trigger the disassembly of the apical ES at spermiation. Here, we show that secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1), a putative tumor suppressor gene that is frequently down-regulated in multiple carcinomas, is a crucial regulatory protein for spermiation. The expression of sFRP1 is tightly regulated in adult rat testis to control spermatid adhesion and sperm release at spermiation. Down-regulation of sFRP1 during testicular development was found to coincide with the onset of the first wave of spermiation at approximately age 45 d postpartum, implying that sFRP1 might be correlated with elongated spermatid adhesion conferred by the apical ES before spermiation. Indeed, administration of sFRP1 recombinant protein to the testis in vivo delayed spermiation, which was accompanied by down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tyr397 and retention of nectin-3 adhesion protein at the apical ES. To further investigate the functional relationship between p-FAK-Tyr397 and localization of nectin-3, we overexpressed sFRP1 using lentiviral vectors in the Sertoli-germ cell coculture system. Consistent with the in vivo findings, overexpression of sFRP1 induced down-regulation of p-FAK-Tyr397, leading to a decline in phosphorylation of nectin-3. In summary, this report highlights the critical role of s

  1. Testing Adhesive Bonds to Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Nondestructive tool simple and inexpensive. Easy-to-use tool nondestructively tests strength of adhesive bond between cloth and straight rigid edge. Developed for testing advanced flexible reusable surface insulation.

  2. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2016-07-12

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  3. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2008-03-26

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  4. Epidermal cell junctions and their regulation by p63 in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ferone, Giustina; Mollo, Maria Rosaria; Missero, Caterina

    2015-06-01

    As the outermost tissue of the body, the epidermis is the first physical barrier for any pressure, stress or trauma. Several specialized cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion structures, together with an intracellular network of dedicated intermediate filaments, are required to confer critical resilience to mechanical stress. The transcription factor p63 is a master regulator of gene expression in the epidermis and in other stratified epithelia. It has been extensively demonstrated that p63 positively controls a large number of tissue-specific genes, including those encoding a large fraction of tissue-restricted cell adhesion molecules. Consistent with p63 functions in cell adhesion and in epidermal differentiation, heterozygous mutations clustered mainly in the p63 C-terminus are causative of AEC syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by cleft palate, ankyloblepharon and ectodermal dysplasia associated with severe skin erosions, bleeding and infections. The molecular basis of skin erosions in AEC patients is not fully understood, although defects in desmosomes and in other cell junctions are likely to be involved. Here, we provide an extensive review of the different epidermal cell junctions that cooperate to withstand mechanical stress and on the mechanisms by which p63 regulates gene expression of their components in healthy skin and in AEC syndrome. Collectively, advancement in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which epidermal cell junctions precisely exert their functions and how p63 orchestrates their coordinated expression, will ultimately lead to insight into developing future strategies for the treatment of AEC syndrome and more in generally for diseases that share an overlapping phenotype.

  5. Adhesive interactions between vesicles in the strong adhesion limit

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Arun; Anderson, Travers H.; Leal, L. Gary; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the adhesive interaction energy between a pair of vesicles in the strong adhesion limit, in which bending forces play a negligible role in determining vesicle shape compared to forces due to membrane stretching. Although force-distance or energy distance relationships characterizing adhesive interactions between fluid bilayers are routinely measured using the surface forces apparatus, the atomic force microscope and the biomembrane force probe, the interacting bilayers in these methods are supported on surfaces (e.g. mica sheet) and cannot be deformed. However, it is known that in a suspension, vesicles composed of the same bilayer can deform by stretching or bending, and can also undergo changes in volume. Adhesively interacting vesicles can thus form flat regions in the contact zone, which will result in an enhanced interaction energy as compared to rigid vesicles. The focus of this paper is to examine the magnitude of the interaction energy between adhesively interacting, deformed vesicles relative to free, undeformed vesicles as a function of the intervesicle separation. The modification of the intervesicle interaction energy due to vesicle deformability can be calculated knowing the undeformed radius of the vesicles, R0, the bending modulus kb, the area expansion modulus Ka, and the adhesive minimum WP(0) and separation DP(0) in the energy of interaction between two flat bilayers, which can be obtained from the force-distance measurements made using the above supported-bilayer methods. For vesicles with constant volumes, we show that adhesive potentials between non-deforming bilayers such as ∣WP(0)∣∼5×10−4mJ/m2, which are ordinarily considered weak in colloidal physics literature, can result in significantly deep (>10×) energy minima due to increase in vesicle area and flattening in the contact region. If the osmotic expulsion of water across the vesicles driven by the tense, stretched membrane in the presence of an osmotically active

  6. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-27

    technology is the use of pressure sensitive microcapsules , which release reactive amine crosslinkers into an adhesive putty when pressed against the surface...CLEANING AGENT RHEOLOGY 3 3.3 PRESSURE-ACTIVATED ADHESIVE 5 3.3.1 PROCESSING IMPROVEMENTS 5 3.3.2 MICROCAPSULE DIAMETER 5 3.3.3 MICROCAPSULE /RESIN...to attain a reasonable shelf life (- l wk.). The microcapsule diameter has been halved in order to improve mixing in the pressure-activated

  7. Multi-Scale Biomimetic Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-10

    Objectives: Same as originally stated 3. Status of Effort: Over the life of this grant, significant technical contributions have been made. When this...department of Defense as well, broadening our goals. 4. Accomplishments/New Findings (over the life of the grant): The mechanism of adhesion in the gecko...enabling microrobotics to explore extraterrestrial surfaces or harsh climates otherwise not accessible to man. In contrast to the adhesion seen in a rest

  8. Silorane adhesive system: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro Júnior, Sylvio; Andrada, Mauro Amaral Caldeira de

    2014-01-01

    Silorane-based composite resin requires a specific adhesive system: a 2-step self-etching adhesive. Clinical protocols are well established and are based on the principles of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. In this paper, we present a clinical application of the silorane adhesive system in a class-II restoration using silorane-based composite resin.

  9. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  10. Integrin-mediated adhesion complex

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau

    2010-01-01

    The integrin-mediated adhesion machinery is the primary cell-matrix adhesion mechanism in Metazoa. The integrin adhesion complex, which modulates important aspects of the cell physiology, is composed of integrins (alpha and beta subunits) and several scaffolding and signaling proteins. Integrins appeared to be absent in all non-metazoan eukaryotes so-far analyzed, including fungi, plants and choanoflagellates, the sister-group to Metazoa. Thus, integrins and, therefore, the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling mechanism was considered a metazoan innovation. Recently, a broad comparative genomic analysis including new genome data from several unicellular organisms closely related to fungi and metazoans shattered previous views. The integrin adhesion and signaling complex is not specific to Metazoa, but rather it is present in apusozoans and holozoan protists. Thus, this important signaling and adhesion system predated the origin of Fungi and Metazoa, and was subsequently lost in fungi and choanoflagellates. This finding suggests that cooption played a more important role in the origin of Metazoa than previously believed. Here, we hypothesize that the integrin adhesome was ancestrally involved in signaling. PMID:21057645

  11. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  12. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions.

  13. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  14. [Adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, C; Reis, F C

    1998-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis, an inflammatory process involving all three meningeal layers as well as the nerve roots, is a cause of persistent symptoms in 6% to 16% of postoperative patients. Although spinal surgery is the most common antecedent associated with arachnoiditis, multiple causes have been reported, including infection, intrathecal steroids or anesthetic agents, trauma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and ionic myelographic contrast material--both oil soluble and water soluble. In the past, oil-based intrathecal contrast agents (Pantopaque) were associated with arachnoiditis especially when this material was introduced into the thecal sac and mixed with blood. Arachnoiditis is apparently rarely idiopathic. The pathogenesis of spinal arachnoiditis is similar to the repair process of serous membranes, such as the peritoneum, with a negligible inflammatory cellular exudate and a prominent fibrinous exudate. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis of the lower spine is a myelographic diagnosis. The myelographic findings of arachnoiditis were divided into two types by Jorgensen et al. In type 1, "the empty thecal sac" appearance, there is homogeneous filling of the thecal sac with either absence of or defects involving nerve root sleeve filling. In type 2 arachnoiditis, there are localized or diffuse filling defects within the contrast column. MRI has demonstrated a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 100% in the diagnosis of arachnoiditis. The appearance of arachnoiditis on MRI can be assigned to three main groups. The MRI findings in group I are a conglomeration of adherent roots positioned centrally in the thecal sac. Patients in group II show roots peripherally adherent to the meninges--the so called empty sac. MRI findings in group III are a soft tissue mass within the subarachnoid space. It corresponds to the type 2 categorization defined by Jorgensen et al, where as the MRI imaging types I and II correspond to the myelographic type 1.

  15. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  16. Molecular mechanism of double Holliday junction dissolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Processing of homologous recombination intermediates is tightly coordinated to ensure that chromosomal integrity is maintained and tumorigenesis avoided. Decatenation of double Holliday junctions, for example, is catalysed by two enzymes that work in tight coordination and belong to the same ‘dissolvasome’ complex. Within the dissolvasome, the RecQ-like BLM helicase provides the translocase function for Holliday junction migration, while the topoisomerase III alpha-RMI1 subcomplex works as a proficient DNA decatenase, together resulting in double-Holliday-junction unlinking. Here, we review the available architectural and biochemical knowledge on the dissolvasome machinery, with a focus on the structural interplay between its components. PMID:25061510

  17. Circuit Theory of Unconventional Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Kashiwaya, S.

    2003-04-01

    We extend the circuit theory of superconductivity to cover transport and proximity effect in mesoscopic systems that contain unconventional superconductor junctions. The approach fully accounts for zero-energy Andreev bound states forming at the surface of unconventional superconductors. As a simple application, we investigate the transport properties of a diffusive normal metal in series with a d-wave superconductor junction. We reveal the competition between the formation of Andreev bound states and proximity effect that depends on the crystal orientation of the junction interface.

  18. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  19. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  20. Transcriptional changes in adhesion-related genes are site-specific during noise-induced cochlear pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qunfeng; Patel, Minal; Coling, Donald; Hu, Bo Hua

    2012-02-01

    Cell-cell junctions and junctions between cells and extracellular matrix are essential for maintenance of the structural and functional integrity of the cochlea, and are also a major target of acoustic trauma. While morphological assessments have revealed adhesion dysfunction in noise-traumatized cochleae, the molecular mechanisms responsible for adhesion disruption are not clear. Here, we screened the transcriptional expression of 49 adhesion-related genes in normal rat cochleae and measured the expression changes in the early phases of cochlear pathogenesis after acoustic trauma. We found that genes from four adhesion families, including the immunoglobulin superfamily and the integrin, cadherin, and selectin families, are expressed in the normal cochlea. Exposure to an intense noise at 120dB sound pressure level (SPL) for 2h caused site-specific changes in expression levels in the apical and the basal sections of the sensory epithelium. Expression changes that occurred in the cochlear sensory epithelium were biphasic, with early upregulation at 2h post-noise exposure and subsequent downregulation at 1day post-exposure. Importantly, the altered expression level of seven genes (Sgce, Sell, Itga5, Itgal, Selp, Cntn1 and Col5a1) is related to the level of threshold shift of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), an index reflecting functional change in the cochlea. Notably, the genes showing expression changes exhibited diverse constitutive expression levels and belong to multiple adhesion gene families. The finding of expression changes in multiple families of adhesion genes in a temporal fashion (2h vs. 1day) and a spatial fashion (the apical and the basal sensory epithelia as well as the lateral wall tissue) suggests that acoustic overstimulation provokes a complex response in adhesion genes, which likely involves multiple adhesion-related signaling pathways.

  1. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  2. Iron ion irradiation increases promotes adhesion of monocytic cells to arterial vascular endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Yu, Tao; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz

    Radiation causes inflammation, and chronic, low-level vascular inflammation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Consistent with this, exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Part of the inflammatory response to radiation is a change in the adhesiveness of the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, triggering inappropriate accumulation of leukocytes, leading to later, damaging effects of inflammation. Although some studies have been done on the effects of gamma irradiation on vascular endothelium, the response of endothelium to heavy ion radiation likely to be encountered in prolonged space flight has not been determined. We investigated how irradiation of aortic endothelial cells with iron ions affects adhesiveness of cultured aortic endothelial cells for monocytic cells and the consequences of this for development of atherosclerosis. Aortic endothelial cells were irradiated with 600 MeV iron ions at Brookhaven National Laboratory and adhesion-related changes were measured. Cells remained viable for at least 72 hours, and were even able to repair acute damage to cell junctions. We found that iron ion irradiation altered expression levels of specific endothelial cell adhesion molecules. Further, these changes had functional consequences. Using a flow chamber adhesion assay to measure adhesion of monocytic cells to endothelial cells under physiological shear stress, we found that adhesivity of vascular endothelium was enhanced in as little as 24 hours after irradiation. Further, the radiation dose dependence was not monotonic, suggesting that it was not simply the result of endothelial cell damage. We also irradiated aortic arches and carotid arteries of Apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice. Histologic analysis of these mice will be conducted to determine whether effects of radiation on endothelial adhesiveness result in consequences for development of atherosclerosis. (Supported by NSBRI

  3. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  4. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  5. Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  6. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  7. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  8. Presynaptic spike broadening reduces junctional potential amplitude.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A N; Przysiezniak, J; Acosta-Urquidi, J; Basarsky, T A

    1989-08-24

    Presynaptic modulation of action potential duration may regulate synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such synaptic plasticity is brought about by modifications to membrane currents at presynaptic release sites, which, in turn, lead to changes in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for mediating transmitter release. The 'primitive' neuromuscular junction of the jellyfish Polyorchis penicillatus is a useful model of presynaptic modulation. In this study, we show that the durations of action potentials in the motor neurons of this jellyfish are negatively correlated with the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials. We present data from in vitro voltage-clamp experiments showing that short duration voltage spikes, which elicit large excitatory junctional potentials in vivo, produce larger and briefer calcium currents than do long duration action potentials, which elicit small excitatory junctional potentials.

  9. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  10. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  11. Enhancement at the junction of silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gu, Geun Hoi; Suh, Jung Sang

    2008-08-19

    The enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) at the junction of linearly joined silver nanorods (31 nm in diameter) deposited in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide templates was studied systematically by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The single and joined silver nanorod arrays showed a similar extinction spectrum when their length was the same. Maximum enhancement was observed from the junction system of two nanorods of the same size with a total length of 62 nm. This length also corresponded to the optimum length of single nanorods for SERS by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The enhancement at the junction was approximately 40 times higher than that of the 31 nm single nanorod, while it was 4 times higher than that of the 62 nm single nanorod. The enhancement factor at the junction after oxide removal was approximately 3.9 x 10 (9).

  12. UTE MRI of the Osteochondral Junction

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Reni; Chen, Karen; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    The osteochondral junction is composed of numerous tissue components and serves important functions relating to structural stability and proper nutrition in joints such as the knee and spine. Conventional MR techniques have been inadequate at imaging the tissues of the osteochondral junction primarily because of the intrinsically short T2 nature of these tissues, rendering them “invisible” with the standard acquisitions. Ultrashort time to echo (UTE) MR techniques acquire sufficient MR signal of osteochondral tissues, thereby allowing direct evaluation. This article reviews the anatomy of the osteochondral junction of the knee and the spine, technical aspects of UTE MRI, and the application of UTE MRI for evaluation of the osteochondral junction. PMID:25061547

  13. Epithelial junction formation requires confinement of Cdc42 activity by a novel SH3BP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Zihni, Ceniz; Terry, Stephen J.; Clark, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cell–cell adhesion and morphogenesis require dynamic control of actin-driven membrane remodeling. The Rho guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Cdc42 regulates sequential molecular processes during cell–cell junction formation; hence, mechanisms must exist that inactivate Cdc42 in a temporally and spatially controlled manner. In this paper, we identify SH3BP1, a GTPase-activating protein for Cdc42 and Rac, as a regulator of junction assembly and epithelial morphogenesis using a functional small interfering ribonucleic acid screen. Depletion of SH3BP1 resulted in loss of spatial control of Cdc42 activity, stalled membrane remodeling, and enhanced growth of filopodia. SH3BP1 formed a complex with JACOP/paracingulin, a junctional adaptor, and CD2AP, a scaffolding protein; both were required for normal Cdc42 signaling and junction formation. The filamentous actin–capping protein CapZ also associated with the SH3BP1 complex and was required for control of actin remodeling. Epithelial junction formation and morphogenesis thus require a dual activity complex, containing SH3BP1 and CapZ, that is recruited to sites of active membrane remodeling to guide Cdc42 signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics. PMID:22891260

  14. Anaesthesia management in craniovertebral junctional anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Craniovertebral Junctional (CVJ) anomalies are developmental disorders that affect the skeleton and enclosed neuraxis at the junction of cranium and cervical spine. The high prevalence of airway obstruction and restrictive pulmonary disease in combination with cardiovascular manifestations poses a high anaesthetic risk to these patients. This article provides a discussion of management of anaesthesia in patients with craniovertebral anomalies, the evaluation of risk factors in these patients and their management, including emergency airway issues. PMID:27891026

  15. Heat dissipation in atomic-scale junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woochul; Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Zotti, Linda Angela; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Reddy, Pramod

    2013-06-13

    Atomic and single-molecule junctions represent the ultimate limit to the miniaturization of electrical circuits. They are also ideal platforms for testing quantum transport theories that are required to describe charge and energy transfer in novel functional nanometre-scale devices. Recent work has successfully probed electric and thermoelectric phenomena in atomic-scale junctions. However, heat dissipation and transport in atomic-scale devices remain poorly characterized owing to experimental challenges. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with integrated nanoscale thermocouples to investigate heat dissipation in the electrodes of single-molecule ('molecular') junctions. We find that if the junctions have transmission characteristics that are strongly energy dependent, this heat dissipation is asymmetric--that is, unequal between the electrodes--and also dependent on both the bias polarity and the identity of the majority charge carriers (electrons versus holes). In contrast, junctions consisting of only a few gold atoms ('atomic junctions') whose transmission characteristics show weak energy dependence do not exhibit appreciable asymmetry. Our results unambiguously relate the electronic transmission characteristics of atomic-scale junctions to their heat dissipation properties, establishing a framework for understanding heat dissipation in a range of mesoscopic systems where transport is elastic--that is, without exchange of energy in the contact region. We anticipate that the techniques established here will enable the study of Peltier effects at the atomic scale, a field that has been barely explored experimentally despite interesting theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the experimental advances described here are also expected to enable the study of heat transport in atomic and molecular junctions--an important and challenging scientific and technological goal that has remained elusive.

  16. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  17. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  18. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  19. Spatial distribution of cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions regulates force balance while main-taining E-cadherin molecular tension in cell pairs.

    PubMed

    Sim, Joo Yong; Moeller, Jens; Hart, Kevin C; Ramallo, Diego; Vogel, Viola; Dunn, Alex R; Nelson, W James; Pruitt, Beth L

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical linkage between cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions regulates cell shape changes during embryonic development and tissue homoeostasis. We examined how the force balance between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions changes with cell spread area and aspect ratio in pairs of MDCK cells. We used ECM micropatterning to drive different cytoskeleton strain energy states and cell-generated traction forces and used a Förster resonance energy transfer tension biosensor to ask whether changes in forces across cell-cell junctions correlated with E-cadherin molecular tension. We found that continuous peripheral ECM adhesions resulted in increased cell-cell and cell-ECM forces with increasing spread area. In contrast, confining ECM adhesions to the distal ends of cell-cell pairs resulted in shorter junction lengths and constant cell-cell forces. Of interest, each cell within a cell pair generated higher strain energies than isolated single cells of the same spread area. Surprisingly, E-cadherin molecular tension remained constant regardless of changes in cell-cell forces and was evenly distributed along cell-cell junctions independent of cell spread area and total traction forces. Taken together, our results showed that cell pairs maintained constant E-cadherin molecular tension and regulated total forces relative to cell spread area and shape but independently of total focal adhesion area.

  20. Capillarity-based switchable adhesion.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Michael J; Steen, Paul H

    2010-02-23

    Drawing inspiration from the adhesion abilities of a leaf beetle found in nature, we have engineered a switchable adhesion device. The device combines two concepts: The surface tension force from a large number of small liquid bridges can be significant (capillarity-based adhesion) and these contacts can be quickly made or broken with electronic control (switchable). The device grabs or releases a substrate in a fraction of a second via a low-voltage pulse that drives electroosmotic flow. Energy consumption is minimal because both the grabbed and released states are stable equilibria that persist with no energy added to the system. Notably, the device maintains the integrity of an array of hundreds to thousands of distinct interfaces during active reconfiguration from droplets to bridges and back, despite the natural tendency of the liquid toward coalescence. We demonstrate the scaling of adhesion strength with the inverse of liquid contact size. This suggests that strengths approaching those of permanent bonding adhesives are possible as feature size is scaled down. In addition, controllability is fast and efficient because the attachment time and required voltage also scale down favorably. The device features compact size, no solid moving parts, and is made of common materials.

  1. [Adhesion molecules and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Hopps, E; Caimi, G

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a significant role in leukocyte migration across the endothelium and are also involved in regulating immune system. It is shown that diabetic patients have an increase of soluble adhesion molecules (sICAM-1, sICAM-2, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, sL-selectin, sP-selectin) considered an integral part of inflammatory state. This inflammation is responsible for the increased cardiovascular risk of these patients. There is a close link between hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, coagulopathy and inflammation and between these factors and the vascular damage. Various studies have showed the potential role of adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of diabetic vasculopathy. They promote leukocyte recruitment, which is one of the initial steps in the genesis of atherosclerotic plaque. Adhesion molecules are also involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 1; sICAM-1 would have a particular immunomodulatory role in the process of destroying beta-cells and could be used as a subclinical marker of insulitis. Plasma levels of soluble adhesion molecules correlate with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity; they are associated with the development of nephropathy, retinopathy, myocardial infarction, stroke and obliterant peripheral arterial disease in diabetic type 1 and 2. Given the role of these molecules in endothelial dysfunction genesis and tissue damage associated with diabetes, they could constitute a therapeutic target for the prevention of genesis and progression of chronic complications of diabetic disease.

  2. High performance Cu adhesion coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.W.; Viehbeck, A.; Chen, W.R.; Ree, M.

    1996-12-31

    Poly(arylene ether benzimidazole) (PAEBI) is a high performance thermoplastic polymer with imidazole functional groups forming the polymer backbone structure. It is proposed that upon coating PAEBI onto a copper surface the imidazole groups of PAEBI form a bond with or chelate to the copper surface resulting in strong adhesion between the copper and polymer. Adhesion of PAEBI to other polymers such as poly(biphenyl dianhydride-p-phenylene diamine) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide is also quite good and stable. The resulting locus of failure as studied by XPS and IR indicates that PAEBI gives strong cohesive adhesion to copper. Due to its good adhesion and mechanical properties, PAEBI can be used in fabricating thin film semiconductor packages such as multichip module dielectric (MCM-D) structures. In these applications, a thin PAEBI coating is applied directly to a wiring layer for enhancing adhesion to both the copper wiring and the polymer dielectric surface. In addition, a thin layer of PAEBI can also function as a protection layer for the copper wiring, eliminating the need for Cr or Ni barrier metallurgies and thus significantly reducing the number of process steps.

  3. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  4. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  5. VASP, zyxin and TES are tension-dependent members of Focal Adherens Junctions independent of the α-catenin-vinculin module

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Joppe; van der Krogt, Gerard; Twiss, Floor; Bongaarts, Annika; Habani, Yasmin; Slotman, Johan A.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan; Huveneers, Stephan; de Rooij, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces are integrated at cadherin-based adhesion complexes to regulate morphology and strength of cell-cell junctions and organization of associated F-actin. A central mechanosensor at the cadherin complex is α-catenin, whose stretching recruits vinculin to regulate adhesion strength. The identity of the F-actin regulating signals that are also activated by mechanical forces at cadherin-based junctions has remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-regulators VASP, zyxin and TES as members of punctate, tensile cadherin-based junctions called Focal Adherens Junctions (FAJ) and show that they display mechanosensitive recruitment similar to that of vinculin. However, this recruitment is not altered by destroying or over-activating the α-catenin/vinculin module. Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) indicates that these tension sensitive proteins concentrate at locations within FAJs that are distinct from the core cadherin complex proteins. Furthermore, localization studies using mutated versions of VASP and zyxin indicate that these two proteins require binding to each other in order to localize to the FAJs. We conclude that there are multiple force sensitive modules present at the FAJ that are activated at distinct locations along the cadherin-F-actin axis and regulate specific aspects of junction dynamics. PMID:26611125

  6. Alpha-catenin-Dependent Recruitment of the Centrosomal Protein CAP350 to Adherens Junctions Allows Epithelial Cells to Acquire a Columnar Shape

    PubMed Central

    Zurbano, Angel; Formstecher, Etienne; Martinez-Morales, Juan R.; Bornens, Michel; Rios, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. How this complex process is controlled at the molecular level is still largely unknown. Here, we report that the centrosomal microtubule (MT)-binding protein CAP350 localises at adherens junctions in epithelial cells. By two-hybrid screening, we identified a direct interaction of CAP350 with the adhesion protein α-catenin that was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Block of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)-mediated cell-cell adhesion or α-catenin depletion prevented CAP350 localisation at cell-cell junctions. Knocking down junction-located CAP350 inhibited the establishment of an apico-basal array of microtubules and impaired the acquisition of columnar shape in Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells grown as polarised epithelia. Furthermore, MDCKII cystogenesis was also defective in junctional CAP350-depleted cells. CAP350-depleted MDCKII cysts were smaller and contained either multiple lumens or no lumen. Membrane polarity was not affected, but cortical microtubule bundles did not properly form. Our results indicate that CAP350 may act as an adaptor between adherens junctions and microtubules, thus regulating epithelial differentiation and contributing to the definition of cell architecture. We also uncover a central role of α-catenin in global cytoskeleton remodelling, in which it acts not only on actin but also on MT reorganisation during epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25764135

  7. VASP, zyxin and TES are tension-dependent members of Focal Adherens Junctions independent of the α-catenin-vinculin module.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Joppe; van der Krogt, Gerard; Twiss, Floor; Bongaarts, Annika; Habani, Yasmin; Slotman, Johan A; Houtsmuller, Adriaan; Huveneers, Stephan; de Rooij, Johan

    2015-11-27

    Mechanical forces are integrated at cadherin-based adhesion complexes to regulate morphology and strength of cell-cell junctions and organization of associated F-actin. A central mechanosensor at the cadherin complex is α-catenin, whose stretching recruits vinculin to regulate adhesion strength. The identity of the F-actin regulating signals that are also activated by mechanical forces at cadherin-based junctions has remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-regulators VASP, zyxin and TES as members of punctate, tensile cadherin-based junctions called Focal Adherens Junctions (FAJ) and show that they display mechanosensitive recruitment similar to that of vinculin. However, this recruitment is not altered by destroying or over-activating the α-catenin/vinculin module. Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) indicates that these tension sensitive proteins concentrate at locations within FAJs that are distinct from the core cadherin complex proteins. Furthermore, localization studies using mutated versions of VASP and zyxin indicate that these two proteins require binding to each other in order to localize to the FAJs. We conclude that there are multiple force sensitive modules present at the FAJ that are activated at distinct locations along the cadherin-F-actin axis and regulate specific aspects of junction dynamics.

  8. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  9. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise.

  10. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  11. Graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying; Trainer, Daniel J.; Chen, Ke

    2016-10-01

    We report a development of graphene tunnel junctions made by chemical vapor deposition grown graphene and sputtered aluminum insulating by an in-situ grown aluminum oxide. The thin oxide layer formed in between the metal layer and the two-dimensional material is a crucial part of a tunnel junction. We characterized surface morphology of oxide layers and studied tunneling spectra of lead and silver tunnel junctions to estimate the quality of the aluminum oxide. The Brinkman-Rowell-Dynes model was applied to fit the conductance-voltage plots to calculate the thickness of oxide layers. Junctions with graphene both on bottom and on top were fabricated and their tunneling properties were characterized after exposure to air for weeks to test time stability. Furthermore, the resistances of graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide formed naturally and in an oxygen atmosphere were studied. Our results demonstrate that in-situ aluminum oxide is an effective barrier for graphene tunnel junctions. The methods of barrier formation enable the realization of more tunnel devices and circuits based on graphene.

  12. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    PubMed

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  13. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  14. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  15. Adhesive arachnoiditis following lumbar myelography.

    PubMed

    Skalpe, I O

    1978-03-01

    Late sequelae (adhesive arachnoiditis) have been reported following myelography with the oily contrast medium (Pantopaque) and with the ionic water-soluble contrast media methiodal sodium (Abrodil, Conturex, Kontrast U) meglumine iothalamate (Conray Meglumine) and meglumine iocarmate (Bis-Conray, Dimer-X). Adhesive arachnoiditis has not yet been reported after the use of the nonionic water-soluble contrast medium metrizamide (Amipaque). Thus, this is considered the contrast medium of choice for lumbar myelography. Using the recommended dose of 10 ml with an iodine concentration of 170 mg/ml for this examination, adhesive arachnoiditis is unlikely to occur. Increased osmolality of spinal fluid after injection of contrast medium is related to increased frequency of arachnoiditis.

  16. Mechanics of Nascent Cell Adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejean, Cecile O.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2009-03-01

    Cells have the ability to sense and respond to mechanical and biochemical cues from their environment. In neurons, the binding and restraint of transmembrane cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) can trigger acute periods of axon growth. Preceding growth, the cell must create a stiff mechanical linkage between the CAM and the cytoskeleton. Using holographic optical tweezers, we manipulate CAM-coated beads on the membrane of the cell. We investigate the dynamics of the mechanical properties of this linkage as a function of time, applied force, and CAM density. We find that CAM-coated beads exhibit stochastic intermittent binding to the cytoskeleton. In time, we observed that the adhesions stiffen and their mechanical properties depend on the applied force. Treatment of cells with small molecules that alter cytoskeletal dynamics are used to probe the roles of actin filament assembly and myosin motor activity in adhesion formation.

  17. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  18. Dual-Mode Adhesive Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Tool helps worker grip and move along large, smooth structure with no handgrips or footholds. Adheres to surface but easily released by actuating simple mechanism. Includes handle and segmented contact-adhesive pad. Bulk of pad made of soft plastic foam conforming to surface of structure. Each segment reinforced with rib. In sticking mode, ribs braced by side catches. In peeling mode, side catches retracted, and segmented adhesive pad loses its stiffness. Modified versions useful in inspecting hulls of ships and scaling walls in rescue operations.

  19. Sealing of adhesive systems in ferric sulfate-contaminated dentinal margins in class V composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Shadman, Niloofar; Farzin Ebrahimi, Shahram; Mollaie, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hemostatic agents are applied to prepare an isolated bleeding-free condition during dental treatments and can influence adhesive restorations. This study evaluated the effect of a hemostatic agent (ViscoStat) on microleakage of contaminated dentinal margin of class V composite resin restorations with three adhesives. Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human molars were selected and class V cavities (3×3×1.5 mm) were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed below the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were divided into six groups randomly. The adhesives were Excite, AdheSE and AdheSE One. In three groups, the gingival walls of the cavities were contaminated with ViscoStat and then rinsed. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light-cured. After storage in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours and polishing, the samples were thermocycled and sealed with nail varnish. Then they were stored in 1% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, rinsed and mounted in self-cured acryl resin, followed by sectioning buccolingually. Dye penetration was observed under a stereomicroscope and scored. Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. P<0.05 was set as the level of significance. Results. Only in the Excite group, contamination did not have adverse effects on dentin microleakage (P > 0.05). In the contaminated groups, Excite had significantly less microleakage than the others (P = 0.003). AdheSE and AdheSE One did not exhibit significant difference in microleakage (P > 0.05). Conclusion. ViscoStat hemostatic agent increased dentinal microleakage in AdheSE and AdheSE One adhesives with no effect on Excite.

  20. Sealing of adhesive systems in ferric sulfate-contaminated dentinal margins in class V composite resin restorations

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Niloofar; Farzin Ebrahimi, Shahram; Mollaie, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hemostatic agents are applied to prepare an isolated bleeding-free condition during dental treatments and can influence adhesive restorations. This study evaluated the effect of a hemostatic agent (ViscoStat) on microleakage of contaminated dentinal margin of class V composite resin restorations with three adhesives. Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human molars were selected and class V cavities (3×3×1.5 mm) were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed below the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were divided into six groups randomly. The adhesives were Excite, AdheSE and AdheSE One. In three groups, the gingival walls of the cavities were contaminated with ViscoStat and then rinsed. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light-cured. After storage in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours and polishing, the samples were thermocycled and sealed with nail varnish. Then they were stored in 1% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, rinsed and mounted in self-cured acryl resin, followed by sectioning buccolingually. Dye penetration was observed under a stereomicroscope and scored. Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. P<0.05 was set as the level of significance. Results. Only in the Excite group, contamination did not have adverse effects on dentin microleakage (P > 0.05). In the contaminated groups, Excite had significantly less microleakage than the others (P = 0.003). AdheSE and AdheSE One did not exhibit significant difference in microleakage (P > 0.05). Conclusion. ViscoStat hemostatic agent increased dentinal microleakage in AdheSE and AdheSE One adhesives with no effect on Excite. PMID:27092210

  1. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support.

  2. Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is critical for the closing of the mouse optic fissure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyi; Lewis, Brandy; Moran, Andrea; Xie, Ting

    2012-01-01

    Coloboma is a congenital disease that contributes significantly to childhood blindness. It results from the failure in closing the optic fissure, a transient opening on the ventral side of the developing eye. Although human and mouse genetic studies have identified a number of genes associated with coloboma, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying the optic fissure closure and coloboma formation remain largely undefined. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion has been shown to be important for the optic fissure closure in zebrafish, but it remains to be determined experimentally how cell-cell adhesions are involved in the mammalian optic fissure closing process. α-Catenin is required for cell adhesion mediated by all of the classic cadherin molecules, including N-cadherin. In this study, we used the Cre-mediated conditional knockout technique to specifically delete α-catenin from the developing mouse eye to show that it is required for the successful closing of the optic fissure. In α-catenin conditional mutant optic cups, the major cell fates, including the optic fissure margin, neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium, are specified normally, and the retinal progenitor cells proliferate normally. However, adherens junctions components, including N-cadherin, β-catenin and filamentous actin, fail to accumulate on the apical side of α-catenin mutant retinal progenitor cells, where adherens junctions are normally abundant, and the organization of the neural retina and the optic fissure margin is disrupted. Finally, the α-catenin mutant retina gradually degenerates in the adult mouse eye. Therefore, our results show that α-catenin-mediated cell adhesion and cell organization are important for the fissure closure in mice, and further suggest that genes that regulate cell adhesion may underlie certain coloboma cases in humans.

  3. Auto-Adhesion Potential of Extraocular Aqp0 during Teleost Development

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2016-01-01

    AQP0 water channels are the most abundant proteins expressed in the mammalian lens fiber membranes where they are essential for lens development and transparency. Unlike other aquaporin paralogs, mammalian AQP0 has a low intrinsic water permeability, but can form cell-to-cell junctions between the lens fibers. It is not known whether the adhesive properties of AQP0 is a derived feature found only in mammals, or exists as a conserved ancestral trait in non-mammalian vertebrates. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, expresses four Aqp0 paralogs in the developing lens, but also expresses significant levels of aqp0 mRNAs and proteins in the epithelia of the pronephros, presumptive enterocytes, gill filament and epidermis. Quantitative PCR reveals that aqp0 mRNA titres increase by three orders of magnitude between the onset of somitogenesis and pigmentation of the eye. Using in situ hybridization and specific antisera, we show that at least two of the channels (Aqp0a1, -0b1 and/or -0b2) are localized in the extraocular basolateral and apical membranes, while Aqp0a2 is lens-specific. Heterologous expression of the Aqp0 paralogs in adhesion-deficient mouse fibolast L-cells reveals that, as for human AQP0, each intact salmon channel retains cell-to-cell adhesive properties. The strongest Aqp0 interactions are auto-adhesion, suggesting that homo-octamers likely form the intercellular junctions of the developing lens and epithelial tissues. The present data are thus the first to show the adhesion potential of Aqp0 channels in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and further uncover a novel extraocular role of the channels during vertebrate development. PMID:27153052

  4. Giardia disrupts the arrangement of tight, adherens and desmosomal junction proteins of intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Maia-Brigagão, C; Morgado-Díaz, J A; De Souza, W

    2012-06-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a parasitic protozoan that causes diarrhea and other symptoms which together constitute a disease known as giardiasis. Although the disease has been well defined, the mechanisms involving the establishment of the infection have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we show that after 24h of interaction between parasites and intestinal Caco-2 cells, there was an alteration of the paracellular permeability, as observed by an approximate 42% of reduction in the transepithelial electrical resistance and permeation to ruthenium red, which was concomitant with ultrastructural changes. Nevertheless, epithelium viability was not affected. We also demonstrate that there was no change in expression of junctional proteins (tight and adherens) but that the distribution of these proteins in Caco-2 cells after parasite adhesion was significantly altered, as observed via laser scanning confocal microscopy 3D reconstruction. The present work shows that adhesion of Giardia duodenalis trophozoites to intestinal cells in vitro induces disturbances of the tight, adherens and desmosomal junctions.

  5. CLASP2 interacts with p120-catenin and governs microtubule dynamics at adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Marta N.; Megias, Diego; Epifano, Carolina; Akhmanova, Anna; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Classical cadherins and their connections with microtubules (MTs) are emerging as important determinants of cell adhesion. However, the functional relevance of such interactions and the molecular players that contribute to tissue architecture are still emerging. In this paper, we report that the MT plus end–binding protein CLASP2 localizes to adherens junctions (AJs) via direct interaction with p120-catenin (p120) in primary basal mouse keratinocytes. Reductions in the levels of p120 or CLASP2 decreased the localization of the other protein to cell–cell contacts and altered AJ dynamics and stability. These features were accompanied by decreased MT density and altered MT dynamics at intercellular junction sites. Interestingly, CLASP2 was enriched at the cortex of basal progenitor keratinocytes, in close localization to p120. Our findings suggest the existence of a new mechanism of MT targeting to AJs with potential functional implications in the maintenance of proper cell–cell adhesion in epidermal stem cells. PMID:24368809

  6. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  7. Lateral adhesion drives reintegration of misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers

    PubMed Central

    St Johnston, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Cells in simple epithelia orient their mitotic spindles in the plane of the epithelium so that both daughter cells are born within the epithelial sheet. This is assumed to be important to maintain epithelial integrity and prevent hyperplasia, because misaligned divisions give rise to cells outside the epithelium1,2. Here we test this assumption in three types of Drosophila epithelia; the cuboidal follicle epithelium, the columnar early embryonic ectoderm, and the pseudostratified neuroepithelium. Ectopic expression of Inscuteable in these tissues reorients mitotic spindles, resulting in one daughter cell being born outside of the epithelial layer. Live imaging reveals that these misplaced cells reintegrate into the tissue. Reducing the levels of the lateral homophilic adhesion molecules Neuroglian or Fasciclin 2 disrupts reintegration, giving rise to extra-epithelial cells, whereas disruption of adherens junctions has no effect. Thus, the reinsertion of misplaced cells appears to be driven by lateral adhesion, which pulls cells born outside the epithelia layer back into it. Our findings reveal a robust mechanism that protects epithelia against the consequences of misoriented divisions. PMID:26414404

  8. Photoresist substrate having robust adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.

    2005-07-26

    A substrate material for LIGA applications w hose general composition is Ti/Cu/Ti/SiO.sub.2. The SiO.sub.2 is preferably applied to the Ti/Cu/Ti wafer as a sputtered coating, typically about 100 nm thick. This substrate composition provides improved adhesion for epoxy-based photoresist materials, and particularly the photoresist material SU-8.

  9. Fluorescence Reveals Contamination From Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolia, William

    1992-01-01

    Contamination of nearby surfaces from ingredients in some adhesive materials detected by ultraviolet illumination and observation of resulting fluorescence. Identification of contaminants via telltale fluorescence not new; rather, significance lies in method of implementation and potential extension to wider variety of materials and applications.

  10. Shelf Stable Epoxy Repair Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Epoxy Resin Adhesive WP-1763 viii FINAL REPORT List of Acronyms ACN Acetonitrile ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials BPA Bisphenol...the oven and immediately cooled to room temperature. Approximately 1.0 mL of acetonitrile ( ACN ) was added to each vial using a glass syringe. The

  11. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  12. Development of thin wraparound junction silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F.; Iles, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art technologies was applied to fabricate 50 micro thick 2x4 cm, coplanar back contact (CBC) solar cells with AMO efficiency above 12%. A requirement was that the cells have low solar absorptance. A wraparound junction (WAJ) with wraparound metallization was chosen. This WAJ approach avoided the need for very complex fixturing, especially during rotation of the cells for providing adequate contacts over dielectric edge layers. The contact adhesion to silicon was considered better than to an insulator. It is indicated that shunt resistance caused by poor WAJ diode quality, and series resistance from the WAJ contact, give good cell performance. The cells developed reached 14 percent AMO efficiency (at 25 C), with solar absorptance values of 0.73. Space/cell environmental tests were performed on these cells and the thin CSC cells performed well. The optimized design configuration and process sequence were used to make 50 deliverable CBC cells. These cells were all above 12 percent efficiency and had an average efficiency of -13 percent. Results of environmental tests (humidity-temperature, thermal shock, and contact adherence) are also given.

  13. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  14. Nucleation and Growth of Integrin Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Atilgan, Erdinç; Ovryn, Ben

    2009-01-01

    We present a model that provides a mechanistic understanding of the processes that govern the formation of the earliest integrin adhesions ex novo from an approximately planar plasma membrane. Using an analytic analysis of the free energy of a dynamically deformable membrane containing freely diffusing receptors molecules and long repeller molecules that inhibit integrins from binding with ligands on the extracellular matrix, we predict that a coalescence of polymerizing actin filaments can deform the membrane toward the extracellular matrix and facilitate integrin binding. Monte Carlo simulations of this system show that thermally induced membrane fluctuations can either zip-up and increase the radius of a nucleated adhesion or unzip and shrink an adhesion, but the fluctuations cannot bend the ventral membrane to nucleate an adhesion. To distinguish this integrin adhesion from more mature adhesions, we refer to this early adhesion as a nouveau adhesion. PMID:19413961

  15. Tape-Smoothing Tool For Adhesion Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1992-01-01

    Small tool smoothes adhesive tape uniformly to ensure consistency and repeatability of tape-peel tests of adhesion of paint to substrate. Includes resilient pad covered with tough, smooth fabric. Internal spring regulates force applied to tape.

  16. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  17. Microfluidic adhesion induced by subsurface microstructures.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Ghatak, Animangsu; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2007-10-12

    Natural adhesives in the feet of different arthropods and vertebrates show strong adhesion as well as excellent reusability. Whereas the hierarchical structures on the surface are known to have a substantial effect on adhesion, the role of subsurface structures such as the network of microchannels has not been studied. Inspired by these bioadhesives, we generated elastomeric layers with embedded air- or oil-filled microchannels. These adhesives showed remarkable enhancement of adhesion ( approximately 30 times), which results from the crack-arresting properties of the microchannels, together with the surface stresses caused by the capillary force. The importance of the thickness of the adhesive layer, channel diameter, interchannel spacing, and vertical position within the adhesive has been examined for developing an optimal design of this microfluidic adhesive.

  18. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Ryan; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  19. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-07

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  20. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  1. YBCO step-edge junctions with high IcRn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. E.; Foley, C. P.

    2010-06-01

    Step-edge junctions represent one type of grain boundary Josephson junction employed in high-temperature superconducting junction technology. To date, the majority of results published in the literature focus on [001]-tilt grain boundary junctions (GBJs) produced using bicrystal substrates. We investigate the step morphology and YBCO (yttrium barium copper oxide) film structure of YBCO-based step-edge junctions on MgO [001] substrates which structurally resemble [100]-tilt junctions. High-resolution electron microscopy reveals a clean GBJ interface of width ~ 1 nm and a single junction at the top edge. The dependence of the transport properties on the MgO step-edge and junction morphology is examined at 4.2 K, to enable direct comparison with results for other junction studies such as [001]-tilt and [100]-tilt junctions and building on previously published 77 K data. MgO step-edge junctions show a slower reduction in critical current density with step angle compared with [001]-tilt junctions. For optimized step parameters, transport measurements revealed large critical current and normal resistance (IcRN) products (~3-5 mV), comparable with the best results obtained in other kinds of [100]-tilt GBJs in YBCO at 4.2 K. Junction-based devices such as SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) and THz imagers show excellent performance when MgO-based step-edge junctions are used.

  2. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  3. Dislocation Multi-junctions and Strain Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V; Hsiung, L; Tang, M; Arsenlis, A; Bartelt, M; Cai, W; Florando, J; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Hommes, G; Pierce, T; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2006-06-20

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects--dislocations. First theorized in 1934 to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed only two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening: a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions tying dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed hereafter multi-junctions. The existence of multi-junctions is first predicted by Dislocation Dynamics (DD) and atomistic simulations and then confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments in single crystal molybdenum. In large-scale Dislocation Dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in BCC crystals.

  4. Dislocation multi-junctions and strain hardening.

    PubMed

    Bulatov, Vasily V; Hsiung, Luke L; Tang, Meijie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; Bartelt, Maria C; Cai, Wei; Florando, Jeff N; Hiratani, Masato; Rhee, Moon; Hommes, Gregg; Pierce, Tim G; de la Rubia, Tomas Diaz

    2006-04-27

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects called dislocations. First proposed theoretically in 1934 (refs 1-3) to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening, a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions that tie the dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed 'multi-junctions'. We first predict the existence of multi-junctions using dislocation dynamics and atomistic simulations and then confirm their existence by transmission electron microscopy experiments in single-crystal molybdenum. In large-scale dislocation dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication, thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in body-centred cubic crystals.

  5. Digestion of epithelial tight junction proteins by the commensal Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Pruteanu, Mihaela; Shanahan, Fergus

    2013-11-15

    The enteric microbiota contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, but the pathways involved and bacterial participants may vary in different hosts. We previously reported that some components of the human commensal microbiota, particularly Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens), have the proteolytic capacity for host matrix degradation and reduce transepithelial resistance. Here, we examined the C. perfringens-derived proteolytic activity against epithelial tight junction proteins using human intestinal epithelial cell lines. We showed that the protein levels of E-cadherin, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecule 1 decrease in colonic cells treated with C. perfringens culture supernatant. E-cadherin ectodomain shedding in C. perfringens-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells was detected with antibodies against the extracellular domain of E-cadherin, and we demonstrate that this process occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, we showed that the filtered sterile culture supernatant of C. perfringens has no cytotoxic activity on the human intestinal cells at the concentrations used in this study. The direct cleavage of E-cadherin by the proteases from the C. perfringens culture supernatant was confirmed by C. perfringens supernatant-induced in vitro degradation of the human recombinant E-cadherin. We conclude that C. perfringens culture supernatant mediates digestion of epithelial cell junctional proteins, which is likely to enable access to the extracellular matrix components by the paracellular pathway.

  6. Self-Organizing Actomyosin Patterns on the Cell Cortex at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Thomas; Wu, Selwin K.; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Neufeld, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of actomyosin critically determines morphologically distinct patterns of contractility found at the interface between adherent cells. One such pattern is found at the apical region (zonula adherens) of cell-cell junctions in epithelia, where clusters of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin concentrate in a static pattern. Meanwhile, E-cadherin clusters throughout lateral cell-cell contacts display dynamic movements in the plane of the junctions. To gain insight into the principles that determine the nature and organization of these dynamic structures, we analyze this behavior by modeling the 2D actomyosin cell cortex as an active fluid medium. The numerical simulations show that the stability of the actin filaments influences the spatial structure and dynamics of the system. We find that in addition to static Turing-type patterns, persistent dynamic behavior occurs in a wide range of parameters. In the 2D model, mechanical stress-dependent actin breakdown is shown to produce a continuously changing network of actin bridges, whereas with a constant breakdown rate, more isolated clusters of actomyosin tend to form. The model qualitatively reproduces the dynamic and stable patterns experimentally observed at the junctions between epithelial cells. PMID:25468344

  7. Transverse Reinforcement of Adhesive Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, S.; Shakirov, A.

    2015-05-01

    The shear of single-lap adhesive joints causes significant peel stresses in the adhesive layer, which is a particularly urgent problem for low-modulus polyurethane compositions. An experimental and computational analysis of various methods for increasing the load-bearing capacity of the joints by their strengthening with metallic z-elements was carried out. This strengthening hinders their delamination by the action of peel stresses, which allows one to reduce the overall dimensions and weight of adhesive joints. Two main strengthening methods were considered: with steel tapping screws (of diameter 2.5 mm) and blind aluminum rivets (of diameter 4.0 mm). The peculiarity of the strengthening lies in the fact that z-elements of minimum available diameter were used for reducing the effect of stress concentrations on the strength of the joints. The test of specimens for each type of strengthening showed an average increase in the ultimate load by 40% for the threaded reinforcements and by 10% for the rivets. During an analysis of stress state of the joints by the FEM, the nonlinear behavior of constituent materials and stress concentration in the region of reinforcing elements were taken into account. The mechanical properties of the adhesive layer and the GFRP covering were determined in separate experiments. The analysis showed that the weight of the reinforced adhesive joints could be lowered by 20-25% relative to that of unreinforced ones without reducing their load-bearing capacity. An additional effect caused by using the threaded reinforcing elements was a more than threefold increase in their rigidity as compared with that of analogous nonreinforced ones.

  8. Mispolarization of desmosomal proteins and altered intercellular adhesion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Melina; Charron, Audra J; Bacallao, Robert; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2005-06-01

    Polycystin-1, the product of the major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), has been shown to associate with multiple epithelial cell junctions. Our hypothesis is that polycystin-1 is an important protein for the initial establishment of cell-cell junctions and maturation of the cell and that polycystin-1 localization is dependent on the degree of cell polarization. Using laser-scanning confocal microscopy and two models of cell polarization, polycystin-1 and desmosomes were found to colocalize during the initial establishment of cell-cell contact when junctions were forming. However, colocalization was lost in confluent monolayers. Parallel morphological and biochemical evaluations revealed a profound mispolarization of desmosomal components to both the apical and basolateral domains in primary ADPKD cells and tissue. Studies of the intermediate filament network associated with desmosomes showed that there is a decrease in cytokeratin levels and an abnormal expression of the mesenchymal protein vimentin in the disease. Moreover, we show for the first time that the structural alterations seen in adherens and desmosomal junctions have a functional impact, leaving the ADPKD cells with weakened cell-cell adhesion. In conclusion, in this paper we show that polycystin-1 transiently colocalizes with desmosomes and that desmosomal proteins are mislocalized as a consequence of polycystin-1 mutation.

  9. Epithelial self-healing is recapitulated by a 3D biomimetic E-cadherin junction

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Daniel J.; Gloerich, Martijn; Nelson, W. James

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial monolayers undergo self-healing when wounded. During healing, cells collectively migrate into the wound site, and the converging tissue fronts collide and form a stable interface. To heal, migrating tissues must form cell–cell adhesions and reorganize from the front-rear polarity characteristic of cell migration to the apical-basal polarity of an epithelium. However, identifying the "stop signal" that induces colliding tissues to cease migrating and heal remains an open question. Epithelial cells form integrin-based adhesions to the basal extracellular matrix (ECM) and E-cadherin–mediated cell–cell adhesions on the orthogonal, lateral surfaces between cells. Current biological tools have been unable to probe this multicellular 3D interface to determine the stop signal. We addressed this problem by developing a unique biointerface that mimicked the 3D organization of epithelial cell adhesions. This "minimal tissue mimic" (MTM) comprised a basal ECM substrate and a vertical surface coated with purified extracellular domain of E-cadherin, and was designed for collision with the healing edge of an epithelial monolayer. Three-dimensional imaging showed that adhesions formed between cells, and the E-cadherin-coated MTM resembled the morphology and dynamics of native epithelial cell–cell junctions and induced the same polarity transition that occurs during epithelial self-healing. These results indicate that E-cadherin presented in the proper 3D context constitutes a minimum essential stop signal to induce self-healing. That the Ecad:Fc MTM stably integrated into an epithelial tissue and reduced migration at the interface suggests that this biointerface is a complimentary approach to existing tissue–material interfaces. PMID:27930308

  10. Self-Adjustable Adhesion of Polyampholyte Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Roy, Chanchal Kumar; Guo, Hong Lei; Sun, Tao Lin; Ihsan, Abu Bin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Takahata, Masakazu; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2015-12-02

    Developing nonspecific, fast, and strong adhesives that can glue hydrogels and biotissues substantially promotes the application of hydrogels as biomaterials. Inspired by the ubiquitous adhesiveness of bacteria, it is reported that neutral polyampholyte hydrogels, through their self-adjustable surface, can show rapid, strong, and reversible adhesion to charged hydrogels and biological tissues through the Coulombic interaction.

  11. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  12. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin is a device intended for topical closure of surgical incisions, including laparoscopic incisions, and simple traumatic lacerations that have easily approximated skin edges. Tissue adhesives...

  13. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  14. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics). PMID:28287647

  15. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  16. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  17. Thermionic refrigeration at CNT-CNT junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to study carrier energy relaxation following thermionic emission at the junction of two van der Waals bonded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). An energy-dependent transmission probability gives rise to energy filtering at the junction, which is predicted to increase the average electron transport energy by as much as 0.115 eV, leading to an effective Seebeck coefficient of 386 μV/K. MC results predict a long energy relaxation length (˜8 μm) for hot electrons crossing the junction into the barrier SWCNT. For SWCNTs of optimal length, an analytical transport model is used to show that thermionic cooling can outweigh parasitic heat conduction due to high SWCNT thermal conductivity, leading to a significant cooling capacity (2.4 × 106 W/cm2).

  18. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  19. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  20. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Javedani, J B

    2006-10-25

    Triple junctions are often initiation points for insulator flashover in pulsed power devices. The two-dimensional finite-element TriComp [1] modeling software suite was utilized for its electrostatic field modeling package to investigate electric field behavior in the anode and cathode triple junctions of a high voltage vacuum-insulator interface. TriComp enables simple extraction of values from a macroscopic solution for use as boundary conditions in a subset solution. Electric fields computed with this zoom capability correlate with theoretical analysis of the anode and cathode triple junctions within submicron distances for nominal electrode spacing of 1.0 cm. This paper will discuss the iterative zoom process with TriComp finite-element software and the corresponding theoretical verification of the results.

  1. Photocurrent Measurements of Carbon Nanotube PN Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Nathaniel; Zhong, Zhaohui; Bosnick, Ken; Park, Jiwoong; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Gated p-n junctions in semiconducting nanotubes have recently drawn much attention for their electronic and optoelectronic characteristics [1,2,3]. We investigate the photocurrent response at a nanotube gated p-n junction using a focused laser illumination source. We find that the photocurrent at zero source-drain bias increases linearly with optical power for the component of light along the length of the nanotube. Scanned photocurrent imaging demonstrates that carrier generation occurs primarily between the p- and n- type segments of the device. Measurements in an optical cryostat down to 4K reveal large photoresponse and step-like structure in the reverse bias photocurrent. These results show that nanotube p-n junctions are highly sensitive, nanoscale photodetectors. [1] J.U. Lee et al, App. Phys. Lett. 85, 145 (2004). [2] J.U. Lee, App. Phys. Lett. 87, 073101 (2005). [3] K. Bosnick et al, App. Phys. Lett. 89, 163121 (2006).

  2. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms. PMID:26217173

  3. Numerical Investigation of Josephson Junction Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, I.; Dimova, S.; Boyadjiev, T.

    2009-10-29

    Multilayered long Josephson Junction Structures form an interesting physical system where both nonlinearity and interaction between subsystems play an important role. Such systems allow to study physical effects that do not occur in single Josephson junction.The Sakai-Bodin-Pedersen model--a system of perturbed sine-Gordon equations--is used to study the dynamic states of stacks of inductively coupled long Josephson Junctions (LJJs). The corresponding static problem is numerically investigated as well. In order to study the stability of possible static solutions a Sturm-Liouville problem is generated and solved.The transitions from static to dynamic state and the scenario of these transitions are analyzed depending on the model parameters. Different physical characteristics--current-voltage characteristics, individual instant voltages and internal magnetic fields, are calculated and interpreted.

  4. Brownian refrigeration by hybrid tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltonen, J. T.; Helle, M.; Timofeev, A. V.; Solinas, P.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Pekola, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    Voltage fluctuations generated in a hot resistor can cause extraction of heat from a colder normal metal electrode of a hybrid tunnel junction between a normal metal and a superconductor. We extend the analysis presented in Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.210604 98, 210604 (2007) of this heat rectifying system, bearing resemblance to a Maxwell’s demon. Explicit analytic calculations show that the entropy of the total system is always increasing. We then consider a single-electron transistor configuration with two hybrid junctions in series, and show how the cooling is influenced by charging effects. We analyze also the cooling effect from nonequilibrium fluctuations instead of thermal noise, focusing on the shot noise generated in another tunnel junction. We conclude by discussing limitations for an experimental observation of the effect.

  5. Mesenchymal-epithelial transitions: spontaneous and cumulative syntheses of epithelial marker molecules and their assemblies to novel cell junctions connecting human hematopoietic tumor cells to carcinomatoid tissue structures.

    PubMed

    Franke, Werner W; Rickelt, Steffen

    2011-12-01

    Using biochemical as well as light- and electron-microscopic immunolocalization methods, in cultures of unicellular human blood tumor cells, we have studied the phenomenon of spontaneous and cumulative syntheses of certain epithelial proteins and glycoproteins and their assemblies to two major kinds of novel cell-cell junctions, adhering junctions (AJs) and junctions based on the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). More than two decades, we have selected and characterized clonal sublines of multipotential hematopoietic K562 cells, which are enriched in newly formed AJs based on cis-clusters of desmoglein Dsg2, in some sublines accompanied by desmocollin Dsc2. Both desmosomal cadherins can be anchored in a submembranous plaque containing plakoglobin and plakophilins Pkp2 and Pkp3, with or without other armadillo proteins and desmoplakin. Also, these cells are often connected by an additional, extended junction system, in which the transmembrane epithelial glycoprotein EpCAM is associated with a cytoplasmic plaque rich in several actin-binding proteins such as afadin, α-actinin, ezrin and vinculin. Both kinds of junctions contribute to connections of K562 cells into epithelioid monolayers or even three-dimensional, tissue-like structures, thus markedly changing the cell biological nature and behavior of the resulting tumor subforms (mesenchymal-epithelial transitions). We discuss molecular mechanisms involved in the formation and function of these junctions, also with respect to tumor spread and metastasis, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic consequences.

  6. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  7. Non-invasive microfluidic gap junction assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sisi; Lee, Luke P

    2010-03-01

    Gap junctions are protein channels between cells that allow direct electrical and metabolic coupling via the exchange of biomolecules and ions. Their expression, though ubiquitous in most mammalian cell types, is especially important for the proper functioning of cardiac and neuronal systems. Many existing methods for studying gap junction communication suffer from either unquantifiable data or difficulty of use. Here, we measure the extent of dye spread and effective diffusivities through gap junction connected cells using a quantitative microfluidic cell biology platform. After loading dye by hydrodynamic focusing of calcein/AM, dye transfer dynamics into neighboring, unexposed cells can be monitored via timelapse fluorescent microscopy. By using a selective microfluidic dye loading over a confluent layer of cells, we found that high expression of gap junctions in C6 cells transmits calcein across the monolayer with an effective diffusivity of 3.4 x 10(-13) m(2)/s, which are highly coupled by Cx43. We also found that the gap junction blocker 18alpha-GA works poorly in the presence of serum even at high concentrations (50 microM); however, it is highly effective down to 2.5 microM in the absence of serum. Furthermore, when the drug is washed out, dye spread resumes rapidly within 1 min for all doses, indicating the drug does not affect transcriptional regulation of connexins in these Cx43+ cells, in contrast to previous studies. This integrated microfluidic platform enables the in situ monitoring of gap junction communication, yielding dynamic information about intercellular molecular transfer and pharmacological inhibition and recovery.

  8. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  9. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  10. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  11. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  13. Resolving Atomic Connectivity in Graphene Nanostructure Junctions.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Thomas; Kawai, Shigeki; Söde, Hajo; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Ruffieux, Pascal; Fasel, Roman; Gröning, Oliver

    2015-08-12

    We report on the structural characterization of junctions between atomically well-defined graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by means of low-temperature, noncontact scanning probe microscopy. We show that the combination of simultaneously acquired frequency shift and tunneling current maps with tight binding (TB) simulations allows a comprehensive characterization of the atomic connectivity in the GNR junctions. The proposed approach can be generally applied to the investigation of graphene nanomaterials and their interconnections and is thus expected to become an important tool in the development of graphene-based circuitry.

  14. Bio-inspired adhesion: local chemical environments impact adhesive stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Rapp, Michael V.; Yu, Jing; Wei, Wei; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2014-03-01

    3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) is an amino acid that is naturally synthesized by marine mussels and exhibits the unique ability to strongly bind to surfaces in aqueous environments. However, the Dopa functional group undergoes auto-oxidation to a non-adhesive quinone form in neutral to basic pH conditions, limiting the utilization of Dopa in biomedical applications. In this work, we performed direct surface force measurements with in situ electrochemical control across a Dopa-rich native mussel foot protein (mfp-5), as well as three simplified model peptide sequences. We find that the neighboring peptide residues can significantly impact the redox stability of Dopa functional groups, with lysine residues imparting a substantial degree of Dopa redox stabilization. Surprisingly, the local chemical environments only minimally impact the magnitude of the adhesion forces measured between molecularly-smooth mica and gold surfaces. Our results provide molecular level insight into approaches that can be used to mitigate the detrimental impact of Dopa auto-oxidation, thus suggesting new molecular design strategies for improving the performance of Dopa-based underwater adhesives.

  15. A review of high-temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of high temperature adhesives and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ) is reported. Thermoplastic polyimides and linear PPQ adhesive are shown to have potential for bonding both metals and composite structures. A nadic terminated addition polyimide adhesive, LARC-13, and an acetylene terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) were developed. Both of the addition type adhesives are shown to be more readily processable than linear materials but less thermooxidatively stable and more brittle. It is found that the addition type adhesives are able to perform, at elevated temperatures up to 595 C where linear systems fail thermoplastically.

  16. A proposed route to independent measurements of tight junction conductance at discrete cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lushan; Zeng, Yuhan; Baker, Lane A; Hou, Jianghui

    2015-01-01

    Direct recording of tight junction permeability is of pivotal importance to many biologic fields. Previous approaches bear an intrinsic disadvantage due to the difficulty of separating tight junction conductance from nearby membrane conductance. Here, we propose the design of Double whole-cell Voltage Clamp - Ion Conductance Microscopy (DVC-ICM) based on previously demonstrated potentiometric scanning of local conductive pathways. As proposed, DVC-ICM utilizes two coordinated whole-cell patch-clamps to neutralize the apical membrane current during potentiometric scanning, which in models described here will profoundly enhance the specificity of tight junction recording. Several potential pitfalls are considered, evaluated and addressed with alternative countermeasures. PMID:26716077

  17. Knock-down of ZBED6 in insulin-producing cells promotes N-cadherin junctions between beta-cells and neural crest stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Xie, Beichen; Qi, Yu; Wallerman, Ola; Vasylovska, Svitlana; Andersson, Leif; Kozlova, Elena Nickolaevna; Welsh, Nils

    2016-01-01

    The role of the novel transcription factor ZBED6 for the adhesion/clustering of insulin-producing mouse MIN6 and βTC6 cells was investigated. Zbed6-silencing in the insulin producing cells resulted in increased three-dimensional cell-cell clustering and decreased adhesion to mouse laminin and human laminin 511. This was paralleled by a weaker focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation at laminin binding sites. Zbed6-silenced cells expressed less E-cadherin and more N-cadherin at cell-to-cell junctions. A strong ZBED6-binding site close to the N-cadherin gene transcription start site was observed. Three-dimensional clustering in Zbed6-silenced cells was prevented by an N-cadherin neutralizing antibody and by N-cadherin knockdown. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) with Zbed6-silenced cells, but not with control cells, stimulated the outgrowth of NCSC processes. The cell-to-cell junctions between NCSCs and βTC6 cells stained more intensely for N-cadherin when Zbed6-silenced cells were co-cultured with NCSCs. We conclude that ZBED6 decreases the ratio between N- and E-cadherin. A lower N- to E-cadherin ratio may hamper the formation of three-dimensional beta-cell clusters and cell-to-cell junctions with NCSC, and instead promote efficient attachment to a laminin support and monolayer growth. Thus, by controlling beta-cell adhesion and cell-to-cell junctions, ZBED6 might play an important role in beta-cell differentiation, proliferation and survival. PMID:26750727

  18. Ocular surface sealants and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Subir Singh

    2006-07-01

    Tissue adhesives, both synthetic and biologic, have a long history of use in ophthalmology. Cyanoacrylate-based glues have traditionally been the most widely used glues for various purposes. They have been specially useful for treating corneal perforations and have had significantly improved long-term outcomes. More recently, fibrin-based glues have gained a major role as a suture substitute for attaching biologic tissues and as surface sealants. The literature supports expanded use of fibrin glue in this fashion. Other new agents, such as polyethyelene glycols, have been underutilized and hold promise, especially as surface protectants. Numerous other glues are being developed and show promise as ocular surface sealants and protective membranes. Advances in knowledge about tissue adhesives are leading to more effective and efficient ophthalmic care.

  19. Particle adhesion in powder coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Wankum, D.L.; Knutson, M.; Williams, S.; Banerjee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Electrostatic powder coating is a widely used industrial painting process. It has three major advantages: (1) it provides high quality durable finish, (2) the process is environmentally friendly and does not require the use of organic solvents, and (3) it is economically competitive. The adhesion of electrostatically deposited polymer paint particles on the grounded conducting substrate depends upon many parameters: (a) particle size and shape distributions, (b) electrostatic charge distributions, (c) electrical resistivity, (d) dielectric strength of the particles, (e) thickness of the powder film, (f) presence and severity of the back corona, and (g) the conductivity and surface properties of the substrate. The authors present a model on the forces of deposition and adhesion of corona charged particles on conducting substrates.

  20. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-13 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples.

  1. Dental adhesion: mechanism, techniques and durability.

    PubMed

    Manuja, N; Nagpal, R; Pandit, I K

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary dental adhesives show favorable immediate results in terms of bonding effectiveness. However, the durability of resin-dentin bonds is their major problem. It appears that simplification of adhesive techniques is rather detrimental to the long-term stability of resin-tooth interface. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure, the dentinal fluid flow and the increased dentinal wetness in vital dentin can affect the intimate interaction of certain dentin adhesives with dentinal tissue. Bond degradation occurs via water sorption, hydrolysis of ester linkages of methacrylate resins, and activation of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases. The three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives still remain the gold standard in terms of durability. This review discusses the fundamental process of adhesion to enamel and dentin with different adhesive techniques, factors affecting the long-term bonding performance of modern adhesives and addresses the current perspectives for improving bond durability.

  2. High-Frequency Mechanostimulation of Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Suana, K Grace; Holz, Michelle; Wang, Wei; Westerhaus, Hannes; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2017-01-02

    Cell adhesion is regulated by molecularly defined protein interactions and by mechanical forces, which can activate a dynamic restructuring of adhesion sites. Previous attempts to explore the response of cell adhesion to forces have been limited to applying mechanical stimuli that involve the cytoskeleton. In contrast, we here apply a new, oscillatory type of stimulus through push-pull azobenzenes. Push-pull azobenzenes perform a high-frequency, molecular oscillation upon irradiation with visible light that has frequently been applied in polymer surface relief grating. We here use these oscillations to address single adhesion receptors. The effect of molecular oscillatory forces on cell adhesion has been analyzed using single-cell force spectroscopy and gene expression studies. Our experiments demonstrate a reinforcement of cell adhesion as well as upregulated expression levels of adhesion-associated genes as a result of the nanoscale "tickling" of integrins. This novel type of mechanical stimulus provides a previously unprecedented molecular control of cellular mechanosensing.

  3. Theory of adhesion: role of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Persson, B N J; Scaraggi, M

    2014-09-28

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ∼ u(-n), n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  4. Theory of adhesion: Role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Scaraggi, M.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ˜ u-n, n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  5. Adhesive mechanisms in cephalopods: a review.

    PubMed

    von Byern, Janek; Klepal, Waltraud

    2006-01-01

    Several genera of cephalopods (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions, which are used for attachment to the substratum, for mating and to capture prey. These adhesive structures are located in different parts of the body, viz. in the digital tentacles (Nautilus), in the ventral surface of the mantle and fourth arm pair (Sepia), in the dorsal epidermis (Euprymna), or in the dorsal mantle side and partly on the fins (Idiosepius). Adhesion in Sepia is induced by suction of dermal structures on the mantle, while for Nautilus, Euprymna and Idiosepius adhesion is probably achieved by chemical substances. Histochemical studies indicate that in Nautilus and Idiosepius secretory cells that appear to be involved in adhesion stain for carbohydrates and protein, whilst in Euprymna only carbohydrates are detectable. De-adhesion is either achieved by muscle contraction of the tentacles and mantle (Nautilus and Sepia) or by secretion of substances (Euprymna). The de-adhesive mechanism used by Idiosepius remains unknown.

  6. Adhesion effects in contact interaction of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryacheva, Irina; Makhovskaya, Yulya

    2008-01-01

    An approach to solving problems of the interaction of axisymmetric elastic bodies in the presence of adhesion is developed. The different natures of adhesion, i.e. capillary adhesion, or molecular adhesion described by the Lennard-Jones potential are examined. The effect of additional loading of the interacting bodies outside the contact zone is also investigated. The approach is based on the representation of the pressure outside the contact zone arising from adhesion by a step function. The analytical solution is obtained and is used to analyze the influence of the form of the adhesion interaction potential, of the surface energy of interacting bodies or the films covering the bodies, their shapes (parabolic, higher power exponential function), volume of liquid in the meniscus, density of contact spots, of elastic modulus and the Poisson ratio on the characteristics of the interaction of the bodies in the presence of adhesion. To cite this article: I. Goryacheva, Y. Makhovskaya, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  7. Mapping the dynamics of force transduction at cell–cell junctions of epithelial clusters

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Mei Rosa; Besser, Achim; Brugge, Joan S; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2014-01-01

    Force transduction at cell-cell adhesions regulates tissue development, maintenance and adaptation. We developed computational and experimental approaches to quantify, with both sub-cellular and multi-cellular resolution, the dynamics of force transmission in cell clusters. Applying this technology to spontaneously-forming adherent epithelial cell clusters, we found that basal force fluctuations were coupled to E-cadherin localization at the level of individual cell-cell junctions. At the multi-cellular scale, cell-cell force exchange depended on the cell position within a cluster, and was adaptive to reconfigurations due to cell divisions or positional rearrangements. Importantly, force transmission through a cell required coordinated modulation of cell-matrix adhesion and actomyosin contractility in the cell and its neighbors. These data provide insights into mechanisms that could control mechanical stress homeostasis in dynamic epithelial tissues, and highlight our methods as a resource for the study of mechanotransduction in cell-cell adhesions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03282.001 PMID:25479385

  8. Corrective transduction of human epidermal stem cells in laminin-5-dependent junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Dellambra, E; Vailly, J; Pellegrini, G; Bondanza, S; Golisano, O; Macchia, C; Zambruno, G; Meneguzzi, G; De Luca, M

    1998-06-10

    Laminin-5 is composed of three distinct polypeptides, alpha3, beta3, and gamma2, which are encoded by three different genes, LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, respectively. We have isolated epidermal keratinocytes from a patient presenting with a lethal form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa characterized by a homozygous mutation of the LAMB3 gene, which led to complete absence of the beta3 polypeptide. In vitro, beta3-null keratinocytes were unable to synthesize laminin-5 and to assemble hemidesmosomes, maintained the impairment of their adhesive properties, and displayed a decrease of their colony-forming ability. A retroviral construct expressing a human beta3 cDNA was used to transduce primary beta3-null keratinocytes. Clonogenic beta3-null keratinocytes were transduced with an efficiency of 100%. Beta3-transduced keratinocytes were able to synthesize and secrete mature heterotrimeric laminin-5. Gene correction fully restored the keratinocyte adhesion machinery, including the capacity of proper hemidesmosomal assembly, and prevented the loss of the colony-forming ability, suggesting a direct link between adhesion to laminin-5 and keratinocyte proliferative capacity. Clonal analysis demonstrated that holoclones expressed the transgene permanently, suggesting stable correction of epidermal stem cells. Because cultured keratinocytes are used routinely to make autologous grafts for patients suffering from large skin or mucosal defects, the full phenotypic reversion of primary human epidermal stem cells defective for a structural protein opens new perspectives in the long-term treatment of genodermatoses.

  9. Tight Junctions: A Barrier to the Initiation and Progression of Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Kieran; Offiah, Gozie; McSherry, Elaine A.; Hopkins, Ann M.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that arises from epithelial cells lining the breast ducts and lobules. Correct adhesion between adjacent epithelial cells is important in determining the normal structure and function of epithelial tissues, and there is accumulating evidence that dysregulated cell-cell adhesion is associated with many cancers. This review will focus on one cell-cell adhesion complex, the tight junction (TJ), and summarize recent evidence that TJs may participate in breast cancer development or progression. We will first outline the protein composition of TJs and discuss the functions of the TJ complex. Secondly we will examine how alterations in these functions might facilitate breast cancer initiation or progression; by focussing on the regulatory influence of TJs on cell polarity, cell fate and cell migration. Finally we will outline how pharmacological targeting of TJ proteins may be useful in limiting breast cancer progression. Overall we hope to illustrate that the relationship between TJ alterations and breast cancer is a complex one; but that this area offers promise in uncovering fundamental mechanisms linked to breast cancer progression. PMID:19920867

  10. Synemin isoforms differentially organize cell junctions and desmin filaments in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Linda M.; Kerr, Jaclyn P.; Lupinetti, Jenna; Zhang, Yinghua; Russell, Mary A.; Bloch, Robert J.; Bond, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) in cardiomyocytes consist primarily of desmin, surround myofibrils at Z disks, and transmit forces from the contracting myofilaments to the cell surface through costameres at the sarcolemma and desmosomes at intercalated disks. Synemin is a type IV IF protein that forms filaments with desmin and also binds α-actinin and vinculin. Here we examine the roles and expression of the α and β forms of synemin in developing rat cardiomyocytes. Quantitative PCR showed low levels of expression for both synemin mRNAs, which peaked at postnatal day 7. Synemin was concentrated at sites of cell–cell adhesion and at Z disks in neonatal cardiomyocytes. Overexpression of the individual isoforms showed that α-synemin preferentially localized to cell-cell junctions, whereas β-synemin was primarily at the level of Z disks. An siRNA targeted to both synemin isoforms reduced protein expression in cardiomyocytes by 70% and resulted in a failure of desmin to align with Z disks and disrupted cell–cell junctions, with no effect on sarcomeric organization. Solubility assays showed that β-synemin was soluble and interacted with sarcomeric α-actinin by coimmunoprecipitation, while α-synemin and desmin were insoluble. We conclude that β-synemin mediates the association of desmin IFs with Z disks, whereas α-synemin stabilizes junctional complexes between cardiomyocytes.—Lund, L. M., Kerr, J. P., Lupinetti, J., Zhang, Y., Russell, M. A., Bloch, R. J., Bond, M. Synemin isoforms differentially organize cell junctions and desmin filaments in neonatal cardiomyocytes. PMID:21982947

  11. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-23

    technology is the use of pressure sensitive microcapsules , which release reactive amine crosslinkers into an adhesive putty when pressed against the...PROIECT GOALS AND OBIECTIVES 2 2 KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 3.1 KICKOFF MEETING 3 3.2 AMINE MICROENCAPSULATION 3 3.3 CAUSTIC CLEANING AGENT 5 3.4...caustic, and the abrasive brush. We successfully synthesized amine-filled microcapsules and a dry mixture of caustic ingredients that only activate when

  12. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days’ immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  13. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  14. Ballistic bipolar junctions in chemically gated graphene ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Baringhaus, Jens; Stöhr, Alexander; Forti, Stiven; Starke, Ulrich; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The realization of ballistic graphene pn-junctions is an essential task in order to study Klein tunneling phenomena. Here we show that intercalation of Ge under the buffer layer of pre-structured SiC-samples succeeds to make truly nano-scaled pn-junctions. By means of local tunneling spectroscopy the junction width is found to be as narrow as 5 nm which is a hundred times smaller compared to electrically gated structures. The ballistic transmission across the junction is directly proven by systematic transport measurements with a 4-tip STM. Various npn- and pnp-junctions are studied with respect to the barrier length. The pn-junctions are shown to act as polarizer and analyzer with the second junction becoming transparent in case of a fully ballistic barrier. This can be attributed to the almost full suppression of electron transmission through the junction away from normal incidence. PMID:25898259

  15. Gap junction- and hemichannel-independent actions of connexins

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jean X.; Gu, Sumin

    2007-01-01

    Connexins have been known to be the protein building blocks of gap junctions and mediate cell–cell communication. In contrast to the conventional dogma, recent evidence suggests that in addition to forming gap junction channels, connexins possess gap junction-independent functions. One important gap junction-independent function for connexins is to serve as the major functional component for hemichannels, the un-apposed halves of gap junctions. Hemichannels, as independent functional units, play roles that are different from that of gap junctions in the cell. The other functions of connexins appear to be gap junction- and hemichannel-independent. Published studies implicate the latter functions of connexins in cell growth, differentiation, tumorigenicity, injury, and apoptosis, although the mechanistic aspects of these actions remain largely unknown. In this review, gap junction- and hemichannel-independent functions of connexins are summarized, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these connexin functions are speculated and discussed. PMID:15955305

  16. Bistable front dynamics in a contractile medium: Travelling wave fronts and cortical advection define stable zones of RhoA signaling at epithelial adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Budnar, Srikanth; Yap, Alpha S.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical coherence of cell layers is essential for epithelia to function as tissue barriers and to control active tissue dynamics during morphogenesis. RhoA signaling at adherens junctions plays a key role in this process by coupling cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion together with actomyosin contractility. Here we propose and analyze a mathematical model representing core interactions involved in the spatial localization of junctional RhoA signaling. We demonstrate how the interplay between biochemical signaling through positive feedback, combined with diffusion on the cell membrane and mechanical forces generated in the cortex, can determine the spatial distribution of RhoA signaling at cell-cell junctions. This dynamical mechanism relies on the balance between a propagating bistable signal that is opposed by an advective flow generated by an actomyosin stress gradient. Experimental observations on the behavior of the system when contractility is inhibited are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the model. PMID:28273072

  17. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Ralph Robert

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  18. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.'

  19. Modulation of Brain Hemichannels and Gap Junction Channels by Pro-Inflammatory Agents and Their Possible Role in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Pablo J.; Shoji, Kenji F.; Schalper, Kurt A.; Palacios–Prado, Nicolás; Velarde, Victoria; Giaume, Christian; Bennett, Michael V.L.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In normal brain, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, the most abundant and active cells express pannexins and connexins, protein subunits of two families forming membrane channels. Most available evidence indicates that in mammals endogenously expressed pannexins form only hemichannels and connexins form both gap junction channels and hemichannels. Whereas gap junction channels connect the cytoplasm of contacting cells and coordinate electric and metabolic activity, hemichannels communicate the intra- and extracellular compartments and serve as a diffusional pathway for ions and small molecules. A subthreshold stimulation by acute pathological threatening conditions (e.g., global ischemia subthreshold for cell death) enhances neuronal Cx36 and glial Cx43 hemichannel activity, favoring ATP release and generation of preconditioning. If the stimulus is sufficiently deleterious, microglia become overactivated and release bioactive molecules that increase the activity of hemichannels and reduce gap junctional communication in astroglial networks, depriving neurons of astrocytic protective functions, and further reducing neuronal viability. Continuous glial activation triggered by low levels of anomalous proteins expressed in several neurodegenerative diseases induce glial hemichannel and gap junction channel disorders similar to those of acute inflammatory responses triggered by ischemia or infectious diseases. These changes are likely to occur in diverse cell types of the CNS and contribute to neurodegeneration during inflammatory process. Antiox. Redox Signal. 11, 369–399. PMID:18816186

  20. The F-BAR protein pacsin2 inhibits asymmetric VE-cadherin internalization from tensile adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Dorland, Yvonne L.; Malinova, Tsveta S.; van Stalborch, Anne-Marieke D.; Grieve, Adam G.; van Geemen, Daphne; Jansen, Nicolette S.; de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Nawaz, Kalim; Kole, Jeroen; Geerts, Dirk; Musters, René J. P.; de Rooij, Johan; Hordijk, Peter L.; Huveneers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular homoeostasis, development and disease critically depend on the regulation of endothelial cell–cell junctions. Here we uncover a new role for the F-BAR protein pacsin2 in the control of VE-cadherin-based endothelial adhesion. Pacsin2 concentrates at focal adherens junctions (FAJs) that are experiencing unbalanced actomyosin-based pulling. FAJs move in response to differences in local cytoskeletal geometry and pacsin2 is recruited consistently to the trailing end of fast-moving FAJs via a mechanism that requires an intact F-BAR domain. Photoconversion, photobleaching, immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy reveal polarized dynamics, and organization of junctional proteins between the front of FAJs and their trailing ends. Interestingly, pacsin2 recruitment inhibits internalization of the VE-cadherin complex from FAJ trailing ends and is important for endothelial monolayer integrity. Together, these findings reveal a novel junction protective mechanism during polarized trafficking of VE-cadherin, which supports barrier maintenance within dynamic endothelial tissue. PMID:27417273

  1. Overexpression of CD97 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells of Transgenic Mice Attenuates Colitis by Strengthening Adherens Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Wobus, Manja; Schneider, Rick; Amasheh, Salah; Sittig, Doreen; Kerner, Christiane; Naumann, Ronald; Hamann, Joerg; Aust, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    The adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor CD97 is present in normal colonic enterocytes but overexpressed in colorectal carcinoma. To investigate the function of CD97 in colorectal carcinogenesis, transgenic Tg(villin-CD97) mice overexpressing CD97 in enterocytes were generated and subjected to azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Unexpectedly, we found a CD97 cDNA copy number-dependent reduction of DSS-induced colitis in Tg compared to wild-type (WT) mice that was confirmed by applying a simple DSS protocol. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that overexpression of CD97 strengthened lateral cell-cell contacts between enterocytes, which, in contrast, were weakened in CD97 knockout (Ko) mice. Transepithelial resistance was not altered in Tg and Ko mice, indicating that tight junctions were not affected. In Tg murine and normal human colonic enterocytes as well as in colorectal cell lines CD97 was localized preferentially in E-cadherin-based adherens junctions. CD97 overexpression upregulated membrane-bound but not cytoplasmic or nuclear β-catenin and reduced phospho-β-catenin, labeled for degradation. This was associated with inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and activation of Akt. In summary, CD97 increases the structural integrity of enterocytic adherens junctions by increasing and stabilizing junctional β-catenin, thereby regulating intestinal epithelial strength and attenuating experimental colitis. PMID:20084281

  2. Interlocked positive and negative feedback network motifs regulate β-catenin activity in the adherens junction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Horvath, Nicholas; Cuppett, Vanessa; Wu, Yueting; Deng, Wentao; Kanj, Rania

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial tissue architecture is maintained through adherens junctions that are created through extracellular homotypic protein–protein interactions between cadherin molecules. Cadherins also provide an intracellular scaffold for the formation of a multiprotein complex that contains signaling proteins, including β-catenin. Environmental factors and controlled tissue reorganization disrupt adherens junctions by cleaving the extracellular binding domain and initiating a series of transcriptional events that aim to restore tissue homeostasis. However, it remains unclear how alterations in cell adhesion coordinate transcriptional events, including those mediated by β-catenin in this pathway. Here were used quantitative single-cell and population-level in vitro assays to quantify the endogenous pathway dynamics after the proteolytic disruption of the adherens junctions. Using prior knowledge of isolated elements of the overall network, we interpreted these data using in silico model-based inference to identify the topology of the regulatory network. Collectively the data suggest that the regulatory network contains interlocked network motifs consisting of a positive feedback loop, which is used to restore the integrity of adherens junctions, and a negative feedback loop, which is used to limit β-catenin–induced gene expression. PMID:26224311

  3. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  4. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  5. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Erik O.; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices. PMID:25553192

  6. Radiation comb generation with extended Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-09-21

    We propose the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on an extended Josephson junction subject to a time dependent magnetic field. The junction critical current shows known diffraction patterns and determines the position of the critical nodes when it vanishes. When the magnetic flux passes through one of such critical nodes, the superconducting phase must undergo a π-jump to minimize the Josephson energy. Correspondingly, a voltage pulse is generated at the extremes of the junction. Under periodic driving, this allows us to produce a comb-like voltage pulses sequence. In the frequency domain, it is possible to generate up to hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental driving frequency, thus mimicking the frequency comb used in optics and metrology. We discuss several implementations through a rectangular, cylindrical, and annular junction geometries, allowing us to generate different radiation spectra and to produce an output power up to 10 pW at 50 GHz for a driving frequency of 100 MHz.

  7. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  8. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  9. Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Recently it has been proposed that dark matter axions from the galactic halo can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass (Beck, 2013). Here we show that the axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson junction environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electrical current manifests itself as an oscillating supercurrent. The linear change of phase associated with this nontrivial solution implies the formal existence of a large magnetic field in a tiny surface area of the weak link region of the junction which makes incoming axions decay into microwave photons. We derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of (110±2) μeV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation.

  10. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices.

  11. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  12. Gap junctional communication during limb cartilage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Kosher, R A

    1991-03-01

    The onset of cartilage differentiation in the developing limb bud is characterized by a transient cellular condensation process in which prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells become closely apposed to one another prior to initiating cartilage matrix deposition. During this condensation process intimate cell-cell interactions occur which are necessary to trigger chondrogenic differentiation. In the present study, we demonstrate that extensive cell-cell communication via gap junctions as assayed by the intercellular transfer of lucifer yellow dye occurs during condensation and the onset of overt chondrogenesis in high density micromass cultures prepared from the homogeneous population of chondrogenic precursor cells comprising the distal subridge region of stage 25 embryonic chick wing buds. Furthermore, in heterogeneous micromass cultures prepared from the mesodermal cells of whole stage 23/24 limb buds, extensive gap junctional communication is limited to differentiating cartilage cells, while the nonchondrogenic cells of the cultures that are differentiating into the connective tissue lineage exhibit little or no intercellular communication via gap junctions. These results provide a strong incentive for considering and further investigating the possible involvement of cell-cell communication via gap junctions in the regulation of limb cartilage differentiation.

  13. All-carbon molecular tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haijun; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard L

    2011-11-30

    This Article explores the idea of using nonmetallic contacts for molecular electronics. Metal-free, all-carbon molecular electronic junctions were fabricated by orienting a layer of organic molecules between two carbon conductors with high yield (>90%) and good reproducibility (rsd of current density at 0.5 V <30%). These all-carbon devices exhibit current density-voltage (J-V) behavior similar to those with metallic Cu top contacts. However, the all-carbon devices display enhanced stability to bias extremes and greatly improved thermal stability. Completed carbon/nitroazobenzene(NAB)/carbon junctions can sustain temperatures up to 300 °C in vacuum for 30 min and can be scanned at ±1 V for at least 1.2 × 10(9) cycles in air at 100 °C without a significant change in J-V characteristics. Furthermore, these all-carbon devices can withstand much higher voltages and current densities than can Cu-containing junctions, which fail upon oxidation and/or electromigration of the copper. The advantages of carbon contacts stem mainly from the strong covalent bonding in the disordered carbon materials, which resists electromigration or penetration into the molecular layer, and provides enhanced stability. These results highlight the significance of nonmetallic contacts for molecular electronics and the potential for integration of all-carbon molecular junctions with conventional microelectronics.

  14. Regulation of Traffic Lights at Road Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutolo, Alfredo; Manzo, Rosanna; Rarità, Luigi

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we aim to investigate the effects of traffic lights regulation at road junctions, modelled by a fluid dynamic approach. Numerical simulations prove that it is possible to plan some optimization strategies for green and red phases for networks consisting of more nodes.

  15. The dynamic organic p-n junction.

    PubMed

    Matyba, Piotr; Maturova, Klara; Kemerink, Martijn; Robinson, Nathaniel D; Edman, Ludvig

    2009-08-01

    Static p-n junctions in inorganic semiconductors are exploited in a wide range of today's electronic appliances. Here, we demonstrate the in situ formation of a dynamic p-n junction structure within an organic semiconductor through electrochemistry. Specifically, we use scanning kelvin probe microscopy and optical probing on planar light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) with a mixture of a conjugated polymer and an electrolyte connecting two electrodes separated by 120 microm. We find that a significant portion of the potential drop between the electrodes coincides with the location of a thin and distinct light-emission zone positioned >30 microm away from the negative electrode. These results are relevant in the context of a long-standing scientific debate, as they prove that electrochemical doping can take place in LECs. Moreover, a study on the doping formation and dissipation kinetics provides interesting detail regarding the electronic structure and stability of the dynamic organic p-n junction, which may be useful in future dynamic p-n junction-based devices.

  16. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition, IP3 receptors and ER–PM junctions: translocation of Ca2+ signalling complexes and regulation of migration

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, Emmanuel; Parker, Tony; Dingsdale, Hayley; Concannon, Matthew; Awais, Muhammad; Voronina, Svetlana; Molgó, Jordi; Begg, Malcolm; Metcalf, Daniel; Knight, Alex E.; Sutton, Robert; Haynes, Lee; Tepikin, Alexei V.

    2016-01-01

    Disconnection of a cell from its epithelial neighbours and the formation of a mesenchymal phenotype are associated with profound changes in the distribution of cellular components and the formation of new cellular polarity. We observed a dramatic redistribution of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-competent endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane junctions (ER–PM junctions) when pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells disconnect from their neighbours and undergo individual migration. In cellular monolayers IP3Rs are juxtaposed with tight junctions. When individual cells migrate away from their neighbours IP3Rs preferentially accumulate at the leading edge where they surround focal adhesions. Uncaging of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) resulted in prominent accumulation of paxillin in focal adhesions, highlighting important functional implications of the observed novel structural relationships. ER–PM junctions and STIM1 proteins also migrate to the leading edge and position closely behind the IP3Rs, creating a stratified distribution of Ca2+ signalling complexes in this region. Importantly, migration of PDAC cells was strongly suppressed by selective inhibition of IP3Rs and store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), indicating that these mechanisms are functionally required for migration. PMID:26759379

  17. ZEB2-transgene expression in the epidermis compromises the integrity of the epidermal barrier through the repression of different tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Tatari, Marianthi N; De Craene, Bram; Soen, Bieke; Taminau, Joachim; Vermassen, Petra; Goossens, Steven; Haigh, Katharina; Cazzola, Silvia; Lambert, Jo; Huylebroeck, Danny; Haigh, Jody J; Berx, Geert

    2014-09-01

    Epithelial homeostasis within the epidermis is maintained by means of multiple cell-cell adhesion complexes such as adherens junctions, tight junctions, gap junctions, and desmosomes. These complexes co-operate in the formation and the regulation of the epidermal barrier. Disruption of the epidermal barrier through the deregulation of the above complexes is the cause behind a number of skin disorders such as psoriasis, dermatitis, keratosis, and others. During epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), epithelial cells lose their adhesive capacities and gain mesenchymal properties. ZEB transcription factors are key inducers of EMT. In order to gain a better understanding of the functional role of ZEB2 in epidermal homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with conditional overexpression of Zeb2 in the epidermis. Our analysis revealed that Zeb2 expression in the epidermis leads to hyperproliferation due to the combined downregulation of different tight junction proteins compromising the epidermal barrier. Using two epidermis-specific in vivo models and in vitro promoter assays, we identified occludin as a new Zeb2 target gene. Immunohistological analysis performed on human skin biopsies covering various pathogeneses revealed ZEB2 expression in the epidermis of pemphigus vulgaris. Collectively, our data support the notion for a potential role of ZEB2 in intracellular signaling of this disease.

  18. Protocadherin-1 Localization and Cell-Adhesion Function in Airway Epithelial Cells in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Faura Tellez, Grissel; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Brouwer, Uilke; Nijboer-Brinksma, Susan; Vandepoele, Karl; Noordhoek, Jacobien A.; Heijink, Irene; de Vries, Maaike; Smithers, Natalie P.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Timens, Wim; Wiffen, Laura; van Roy, Frans; Holloway, John W.; Lackie, Peter M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The asthma gene PCDH1 encodes Protocadherin-1, a putative adhesion molecule of unknown function expressed in the airway epithelium. Here, we characterize the localization, differential expression, homotypic adhesion specificity and function of PCDH1 in airway epithelial cells in asthma. Methods We performed confocal fluorescence microscopy to determine subcellular localization of PCDH1 in 16HBE cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) grown at air-liquid interface. Next, to compare PCDH1 expression and localization in asthma and controls we performed qRT-PCR and fluorescence microscopy in PBECs and immunohistochemistry on airway wall biopsies. We examined homotypic adhesion specificity of HEK293T clones overexpressing fluorescently tagged-PCDH1 isoforms. Finally, to evaluate the role for PCDH1 in epithelial barrier formation and repair, we performed siRNA knockdown-studies and measured epithelial resistance. Results PCDH1 localized to the cell membrane at cell-cell contact sites, baso-lateral to adherens junctions, with increasing expression during epithelial differentiation. No differences in gene expression or localization of PCDH1 isoforms expressing the extracellular domain were observed in either PBECs or airway wall biopsies between asthma patients and controls. Overexpression of PCDH1 mediated homotypic interaction, whereas downregulation of PCDH1 reduced epithelial barrier formation, and impaired repair after wounding. Conclusions In conclusion, PCDH1 is localized to the cell membrane of bronchial epithelial cells baso-lateral to the adherens junction. Expression of PCDH1 is not reduced nor delocalized in asthma even though PCDH1 contributes to homotypic adhesion, epithelial barrier formation and repair. PMID:27701444

  19. Single molecule junction conductance and binding geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetska, Maria

    This Thesis addresses the fundamental problem of controlling transport through a metal-organic interface by studying electronic and mechanical properties of single organic molecule-metal junctions. Using a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) we image, probe energy-level alignment and perform STM-based break junction (BJ) measurements on molecules bound to a gold surface. Using Scanning Tunneling Microscope-based break-junction (STM-BJ) techniques, we explore the effect of binding geometry on single-molecule conductance by varying the structure of the molecules, metal-molecule binding chemistry and by applying sub-nanometer manipulation control to the junction. These experiments are performed both in ambient conditions and in ultra high vacuum (UHV) at cryogenic temperatures. First, using STM imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements we explore binding configurations and electronic properties of an amine-terminated benzene derivative on gold. We find that details of metal-molecule binding affect energy-level alignment at the interface. Next, using the STM-BJ technique, we form and rupture metal-molecule-metal junctions ˜104 times to obtain conductance-vs-extension curves and extract most likely conductance values for each molecule. With these measurements, we demonstrated that the control of junction conductance is possible through a choice of metal-molecule binding chemistry and sub-nanometer positioning. First, we show that molecules terminated with amines, sulfides and phosphines bind selectively on gold and therefore demonstrate constant conductance levels even as the junction is elongated and the metal-molecule attachment point is modified. Such well-defined conductance is also obtained with paracyclophane molecules which bind to gold directly through the pi system. Next, we are able to create metal-molecule-metal junctions with more than one reproducible conductance signatures that can be accessed by changing junction geometry. In the

  20. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  1. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  2. Graphene junction field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Tzu-Min; Borsa, Tomoko; van Zeghbroeck, Bart

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time a novel graphene transistor gated by a graphene/semiconductor junction rather than an insulating gate. The transistor operates much like a semiconductor junction Field Effect Transistor (jFET) where the depletion layer charge in the semiconductor modulates the mobile charge in the channel. The channel in our case is the graphene rather than another semiconductor layer. An increased reverse bias of the graphene/n-silicon junction increases the positive charge in the depletion region and thereby reduces the total charge in the graphene. We fabricated individual graphene/silicon junctions as well as graphene jFETs (GjFETs) on n-type (4.5x1015 cm-3) silicon with Cr/Au electrodes and 3 μm gate length. As a control device, we also fabricated back-gated graphene MOSFETs using a 90nm SiO2 on a p-type silicon substrate (1019 cm-3) . The graphene was grown by APCVD on copper foil and transferred with PMMA onto the silicon substrate. The GjFET exhibited an on-off ratio of 3.75, an intrinsic graphene doping of 1.75x1012 cm-2, compared to 1.17x1013 cm-2 in the MOSFET, and reached the Dirac point at 13.5V. Characteristics of the junctions and transistors were measured as a function of temperature and in response to light. Experimental data and a comparison with simulations will be presented.

  3. Multiphase Flow in Micro-fracture Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basagaoglu, H.; Meakin, P.; Succi, S.; Wildenschild, D.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional two-phase lattice-Boltzmann model was used to simulate immiscible fluid flow in four micro-fracture geometries closely related to geological fractured systems: (1) a fracture junction with fractal surfaces embedded in a non-porous matrix; (2) a fracture junction embedded in a heterogeneous porous matrix; (3) a heterogeneous porous medium overlying a fracture with fractal surfaces; and (4) a fracture network with fractal surfaces enclosed by a non-porous medium. The spatio-temporal distributions of fluids in fracture junctions were controlled by interplays between velocity-dependent contact angle dynamics, mediated by surface roughness, and pore-scale gravitational, viscous, and capillary forces. All simulations were conducted with actual physical units. Sensitivities of lateral and vertical spreads of fluids in the fracture junctions to the orientation of fracture junctions (tilted vs. vertical) and the wetting strength of fluids were analyzed via temporal moment analyses for the first two geometries. The simulation results revealed that the receding and advancing contact angles varied strongly with the transient fluid velocity. The patterns and distributions of thin films (continuous vs. discontinuous) on rough fracture walls were largely controlled by the wetting strength of the fluids. The spatio-temporal distributions of fluids were highly sensitive to the domain size and boundary conditions (periodic, no-flow, constant density, and flux-type). Single- and two-sided wetting of fracture aperture walls and long-term entrapment of a nonwetting less-dense fluid by a wetting dense fluid were observed in the simulations. These numerical results are useful for the design of experiments and for analyzing the relative strengths of pore-scale processes in more complex and realistic fracture systems such as those encountered at the Yucca Mountain and Idaho National Laboratory sites.

  4. Skin fragility and impaired desmosomal adhesion in mice lacking all keratins.

    PubMed

    Bär, Janina; Kumar, Vinod; Roth, Wera; Schwarz, Nicole; Richter, Miriam; Leube, Rudolf E; Magin, Thomas M

    2014-04-01

    Keratins perform major structural and regulatory functions in epithelia. Owing to redundancy, their respective contribution to epidermal integrity, adhesion, and cell junction formation has not been addressed in full. Unexpectedly, the constitutive deletion of type II keratins in mice was embryonic lethal ∼ E9.5 without extensive tissue damage. This prompted us to analyze keratin functions in skin where keratins are best characterized. Here, we compare the mosaic and complete deletion of all type II keratins in mouse skin, with distinct consequences on epidermal integrity, adhesion, and organismal survival. Mosaic knockout (KO) mice survived ∼ 12 days while global KO mice died perinatally because of extensive epidermal damage. Coinciding with absence of keratins, epidermal fragility, inflammation, increased epidermal thickness, and increased proliferation were noted in both strains of mice, accompanied by significantly smaller desmosomes. Decreased desmosome size was due to accumulation of desmosomal proteins in the cytoplasm, causing intercellular adhesion defects resulting in intercellular splits. Mixing different ratios of wild-type and KO keratinocytes revealed that ∼ 60% of keratin-expressing cells were sufficient to maintain epithelial sheets under stress. Our data reveal a major contribution of keratins to the maintenance of desmosomal adhesion and epidermal integrity with relevance for the treatment of epidermolysis bullosa simplex and other keratinopathies.

  5. Myosin-dependent remodeling of adherens junctions protects junctions from Snail-dependent disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Although Snail is essential for disassembly of adherens junctions during epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), loss of adherens junctions in Drosophila melanogaster gastrula is delayed until mesoderm is internalized, despite the early expression of Snail in that primordium. By combining live imaging and quantitative image analysis, we track the behavior of E-cadherin–rich junction clusters, demonstrating that in the early stages of gastrulation most subapical clusters in mesoderm not only persist, but move apically and enhance in density and total intensity. All three phenomena depend on myosin II and are temporally correlated with the pulses of actomyosin accumulation that drive initial cell shape changes during gastrulation. When contractile myosin is absent, the normal Snail expression in mesoderm, or ectopic Snail expression in ectoderm, is sufficient to drive early disassembly of junctions. In both cases, junctional disassembly can be blocked by simultaneous induction of myosin contractility. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for mechanosensitivity of cell–cell junctions and imply that myosin-mediated tension can prevent Snail-driven EMT. PMID:26754645

  6. Model building to facilitate understanding of holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-07-08

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and computer-animated video, we included a model building activity using pipe cleaners. Biotechnology undergraduates (n = 108) used the model to simulate Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. Based on student perception, an average of 12.85 and 78.35% students claimed that they completely and partially understood the two concepts, respectively. A test conducted to ascertain their understanding about the two concepts showed that 66.1% of the students provided the correct response to the three multiple choice questions. A majority of the 108 students attributed the inclusion of model building to their better understanding of Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. This underlines the importance of incorporating model building, particularly in concepts that require spatial visualization. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):381-390, 2016.

  7. Chitosan Adhesive Films for Photochemical Tissue Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Piller, Sabine C.; Longo, Leonardo

    2011-08-01

    Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Materials and Methods. Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ˜0.1wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (wavelength = 532 nm, Fluence ˜110 J/cm2, spot size ˜5 mm). A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T) at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results and Conclusion. The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine (15±2 kPa, n = 31). The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5±0.1 kPa (n = 8) when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26 °C to 32 °C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  8. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  9. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved.

  10. BMP4-induced differentiation of a rat spermatogonial stem cell line causes changes in its cell adhesion properties.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Gianfranco; van Bragt, Maaike P A; Korver, Cindy M; Repping, Sjoerd; de Rooij, Dirk G; van Pelt, Ans M M

    2010-11-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are at the basis of the spermatogenic process and are essential for the continuous lifelong production of spermatozoa. Although several factors that govern SSC self-renewal and differentiation have been investigated, the direct effect of such factors on SSCs has not yet been studied, mainly because of the absence of markers to identify SSCs and the lack of effective methods to obtain and culture a pure population of SSCs. We now have used a previously established rat SSC cell line (GC-6spg) to elucidate the role of BMP4 in SSC differentiation. We found that GC-6spg cells cultured in the presence of BMP4 upregulate KIT expression, which is an early marker for differentiating spermatogonia. GC-6spg cells were found to express three BMP4 receptors and the downstream SMAD1/5/8 proteins were phosphorylated during BMP4-induced differentiation. A time-course DNA micro-array analysis revealed a total of 529 differentially regulated transcripts (≥2-fold), including several known downstream targets of BMP4 such as Id2 and Gata2. Pathway analysis revealed that the most affected pathways were those involved in adherens junctions, focal junctions, gap junctions, cell adhesion molecules, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, among the genes belonging to the most strongly affected adhesion pathways was Cdh1 (known as E-cadherin), an adhesion molecule known to be expressed by a subpopulation of spermatogonia including SSCs. Overall, our results suggest that BMP4 induces early differentiation of SSCs in a direct manner by affecting cell adhesion pathways.

  11. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G.; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J.R.; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  12. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  13. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  14. Mussel-Inspired Adhesives and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bruce P.; Messersmith, P. B.; Israelachvili, J. N.; Waite, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    Mussels attach to solid surfaces in the sea. Their adhesion must be rapid, strong, and tough, or else they will be dislodged and dashed to pieces by the next incoming wave. Given the dearth of synthetic adhesives for wet polar surfaces, much effort has been directed to characterizing and mimicking essential features of the adhesive chemistry practiced by mussels. Studies of these organisms have uncovered important adaptive strategies that help to circumvent the high dielectric and solvation properties of water that typically frustrate adhesion. In a chemical vein, the adhesive proteins of mussels are heavily decorated with Dopa, a catecholic functionality. Various synthetic polymers have been functionalized with catechols to provide diverse adhesive, sealant, coating, and anchoring properties, particularly for critical biomedical applications.

  15. Mussel-Inspired Adhesives and Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce P.; Messersmith, P.B.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Waite, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Mussels attach to solid surfaces in the sea. Their adhesion must be rapid, strong, and tough, or else they will be dislodged and dashed to pieces by the next incoming wave. Given the dearth of synthetic adhesives for wet polar surfaces, much effort has been directed to characterizing and mimicking essential features of the adhesive chemistry practiced by mussels. Studies of these organisms have uncovered important adaptive strategies that help to circumvent the high dielectric and solvation properties of water that typically frustrate adhesion. In a chemical vein, the adhesive proteins of mussels are heavily decorated with Dopa, a catecholic functionality. Various synthetic polymers have been functionalized with catechols to provide diverse adhesive, sealant, coating, and anchoring properties, particularly for critical biomedical applications. PMID:22058660

  16. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  17. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  18. Improved Cure-in-Place Silicone Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, C. E.; Sweet, J.; Gonzalez, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two improved cure-in-place silicone-elastomer-based adhesives have low thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity. Adhesives are flexible at low temperature and withstand high temperatures without disintegrating. New ablative compounds were initially developed for in-flight repair of insulating tile on Space Shuttle orbiter. Could find use in other applications requiring high-performance adhesives, such as sealants for solar collectors.

  19. Microscopic and infrared spectroscopic comparison of the underwater adhesives produced by germlings of the brown seaweed species Durvillaea antarctica and Hormosira banksii.

    PubMed

    Dimartino, Simone; Savory, David M; Fraser-Miller, Sara J; Gordon, Keith C; McQuillan, A James

    2016-04-01

    Adhesives from marine organisms are often the source of inspiration for the development of glues able to create durable bonds in wet environments. In this work, we investigated the adhesive secretions produced by germlings of two large seaweed species from the South Pacific, Durvillaea antarctica, also named 'the strongest kelp in the word', and its close relative Hormosira banksii The comparative analysis was based on optical and scanning electron microscopy imaging as well as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA). For both species, the egg surface presents peripheral vesicles which are released soon after fertilization to discharge a primary adhesive. This is characterized by peaks representative of carbohydrate molecules. A secondary protein-based adhesive is then secreted in the early developmental stages of the germlings. Energy dispersive X-ray, FTIR and PCA indicate that D. antarctica secretions also contain sulfated moieties, and become cross-linked with time, both conferring strong adhesive and cohesive properties. On the other hand, H. banksii secretions are complemented by the putative adhesive phlorotannins, and are characterized by a simple mechanism in which all constituents are released with the same rate and with no apparent cross-linking. It is also noted that the release of adhesive materials appears to be faster and more copious in D. antarctica than in H. banksii Overall, this study highlights that both quantity and quality of the adhesives matter in explaining the superior attachment ability of D. antarctica.

  20. Microscopic and infrared spectroscopic comparison of the underwater adhesives produced by germlings of the brown seaweed species Durvillaea antarctica and Hormosira banksii

    PubMed Central

    Savory, David M.; McQuillan, A. James

    2016-01-01

    Adhesives from marine organisms are often the source of inspiration for the development of glues able to create durable bonds in wet environments. In this work, we investigated the adhesive secretions produced by germlings of two large seaweed species from the South Pacific, Durvillaea antarctica, also named ‘the strongest kelp in the word’, and its close relative Hormosira banksii. The comparative analysis was based on optical and scanning electron microscopy imaging as well as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA). For both species, the egg surface presents peripheral vesicles which are released soon after fertilization to discharge a primary adhesive. This is characterized by peaks representative of carbohydrate molecules. A secondary protein-based adhesive is then secreted in the early developmental stages of the germlings. Energy dispersive X-ray, FTIR and PCA indicate that D. antarctica secretions also contain sulfated moieties, and become cross-linked with time, both conferring strong adhesive and cohesive properties. On the other hand, H. banksii secretions are complemented by the putative adhesive phlorotannins, and are characterized by a simple mechanism in which all constituents are released with the same rate and with no apparent cross-linking. It is also noted that the release of adhesive materials appears to be faster and more copious in D. antarctica than in H. banksii. Overall, this study highlights that both quantity and quality of the adhesives matter in explaining the superior attachment ability of D. antarctica. PMID:27122179

  1. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  2. The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

  3. The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

  4. Comparison of three work of adhesion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, J.A.; O`Toole, E.; Zamora, D.; Poon, B.

    1998-02-01

    Practical work of adhesion measurements are being studied for several types of polymer/metal combinations in order to obtain a better understanding of the adhesive failure mechanisms for systems containing encapsulated and bonded components. The primary question is whether studies of model systems can be extended to systems of technological interest. The authors report on their first attempts to obtain the work of adhesion between a PDMS polymer and stainless steel. The work of adhesion measurements were made using three techniques -- contact angle, adhesive fracture energy at low deformation rates and JKR. Previous work by Whitesides` group show a good correlation between JKR and contact angle measurements for PDMS. Their initial work focused on duplicating the PDMS measurements of Chaudury. In addition, in this paper the authors extend the work of adhesion measurement to third technique -- interfacial failure energy. The ability to determine the reversible work of adhesion for practical adhesive joints allows understanding of several issues that control adhesion: surface preparation, nature of the interphase region, and bond durability.

  5. Investigation of package sealing using organic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic study was performed to evaluate the suitability of adhesives for sealing hybrid packages. Selected adhesives were screened on the basis of their ability to seal gold-plated Kovar butterfly-type packages that retain their seal integrity after individual exposures to increasingly severe temperature-humidity environments. Tests were also run using thermal shock, temperature cycling, mechanical shock and temperature aging. The four best adhesives were determined and further tested in a 60 C/98% RH environment and continuously monitored in regard to moisture content. Results are given, however, none of the tested adhesives passed all the tests.

  6. Adhesive strength of autologous fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Hirozane, K; Kamiya, A

    2000-03-01

    To establish an easy and rapid method for measuring the adhesive strength of fibrin glue and to clarify the factor(s) most affecting the strength, a study was made on the effect of the concentration of plasma components on the strength of cryoprecipitate (Cryo) prepared from a subject's own autologous plasma to be used as fibrin glue. The adhesive strength of the Cryo was measured with various supporting materials instead of animal skin using a tester of tension and compression. The results were as follows: (1) the strength of Cryo applied to ground flat glass (4 cm2) was significantly greater than that applied to clear glass, clear plastic, or smooth and flat wood chips; (2) the adhesive strength of Cryo depended on the concentration of thrombin with the optimal concentration being 50 units/ml; (3) the concentration of CaCl2 did not affect the adhesive strength of Cryo; (4) the adhesive reaction was dependent on the temperature and the adhesive strength more quickly reached a steady state at 37 degrees C than at lower temperature; (5) the adhesive strength was correlated well with the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin. These results indicate that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be easily and quickly evaluated using a tester and ground glass with thrombin at 50 units/ml, and that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be predicted from the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin.

  7. Acceptance Criteria for Aerospace Structural Adhesives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ADHESIVES, *AIRFRAMES, PRIMERS, STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION , DATA ACQUISITION , PARTICLE SIZE, ACCEPTANCE TESTS, ELASTOMERS, BONDING, QUALITY CONTROL, .

  8. Effect of water absorption on pollen adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Carson Meredith, J

    2015-03-15

    Pollens possess a thin liquid coating, pollenkitt, which plays a major role in adhesion by forming capillary menisci at interfaces. Unfortunately, the influence of humidity on pollenkitt properties and capillary adhesion is unknown. Because humidity varies widely in the environment, the answers have important implications for better understanding plant reproduction, allergy and asthma, and pollen as atmospheric condensation nuclei. Here, pollenkitt-mediated adhesion of sunflower pollen to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was measured as a function of humidity. The results quantify for the first time the significant water absorption of pollenkitt and the resulting complex dependence of adhesion on humidity. On hydrophilic Si, adhesion increased with increasing RH for pollens with or without pollenkitt, up to 200nN at 70% RH. In contrast, on hydrophobic PS, adhesion of pollenkitt-free pollen is independent of RH. Surprisingly, when pollenkitt was present adhesion forces on hydrophobic PS first increased with RH up to a maximum value at 35% RH (∼160nN), and then decreased with further increases in RH. Independent measurement of pollenkitt properties is used with models of capillary adhesion to show that humidity-dependent changes in pollenkitt wetting and viscosity are responsible for this complex adhesion behavior.

  9. Demonstration of an ac Josephson junction laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, M. C.; Bruno, A.; Rubbert, S.; Irfan, M.; Kammhuber, J.; Schouten, R. N.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting electronic devices have reemerged as contenders for both classical and quantum computing due to their fast operation speeds, low dissipation, and long coherence times. An ultimate demonstration of coherence is lasing. We use one of the fundamental aspects of superconductivity, the ac Josephson effect, to demonstrate a laser made from a Josephson junction strongly coupled to a multimode superconducting cavity. A dc voltage bias applied across the junction provides a source of microwave photons, and the circuit’s nonlinearity allows for efficient down-conversion of higher-order Josephson frequencies to the cavity’s fundamental mode. The simple fabrication and operation allows for easy integration with a range of quantum devices, allowing for efficient on-chip generation of coherent microwave photons at low temperatures.

  10. String networks with junctions in competition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.; Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Menezes, J.; de Oliveira, B. F.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we give specific examples of competition models, with six and eight species, whose three-dimensional dynamics naturally leads to the formation of string networks with junctions, associated with regions that have a high concentration of enemy species. We study the two- and three-dimensional evolution of such networks, both using stochastic network and mean field theory simulations. If the predation, reproduction and mobility probabilities do not vary in space and time, we find that the networks attain scaling regimes with a characteristic length roughly proportional to t 1 / 2, where t is the physical time, thus showing that the presence of junctions, on its own, does not have a significant impact on their scaling properties.

  11. Junction between surfaces of two topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Diptiman; Deb, Oindrila

    2012-02-01

    We study scattering from a line junction which separates the surfaces of two three-dimensional topological insulators; some aspects of this problem were recently studied in Takahashi and Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 166805 (2011). The velocities of the Dirac electrons on the two surfaces may be unequal and may even have opposite signs; in the latter case, we find that the electrons must, in general, go into the two-dimensional interface separating the two topological insulators. We also study what happens if the two surfaces are at an angle φ with respect to each other. We find in this case that there are bound states which propagate along the line junction with a velocity and direction of spin which depend on the bending angle φ.

  12. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  13. Current distributions in stripe Majorana junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osca, Javier; Llorenç, Serra

    2017-02-01

    We calculate current and density distributions in stripe (2D planar) junctions between normal and Majorana nanowires having a finite ( y) transverse length. In presence of a magnetic field with vertical and in-plane components, the y-symmetry of the charge current distribution in the normal lead changes strongly across the Majorana phase transition: from center-symmetric if a Majorana mode is present to laterally-shifted (as expected by the Hall effect) if the field is tilted such as to destroy the Majorana mode due to the projection rule. We compare quasi-particle and charge distributions of current and density, as well as spin magnetizations. The Majorana mode causes opposite spin accumulations on the transverse sides of the junction and the emergence of a spin current.

  14. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  15. Magnetoamplification in a bipolar magnetic junction transistor.

    PubMed

    Rangaraju, N; Peters, J A; Wessels, B W

    2010-09-10

    We have demonstrated the first bipolar magnetic junction transistor using a dilute magnetic semiconductor. For an InMnAs p-n-p transistor magnetoamplification is observed at room temperature. The observed magnetoamplification is attributed to the magnetoresistance of the magnetic semiconductor InMnAs heterojunction. The magnetic field dependence of the transistor characteristics confirm that the magnetoamplification results from the junction magnetoresistance. To describe the experimentally observed transistor characteristics, we propose a modified Ebers-Moll model that includes a series magnetoresistance attributed to spin-selective conduction. The capability of magnetic field control of the amplification in an all-semiconductor transistor at room temperature potentially enables the creation of new computer logic architecture where the spin of the carriers is utilized.

  16. Excess junction current of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, E. Y.; Legge, R. N.; Christidis, N.

    1973-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of n(plus)-p silicon solar cells with 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, and 10 ohm-cm p-type base materials have been examined in detail. In addition to the usual I-V measurements, we have studied the temperature dependence of the slope of the I-V curve at the origin by the lock-in technique. The excess junction current coefficient (Iq) deduced from the slope at the origin depends on the square root of the intrinsic carrier concentration. The Iq obtained from the I-V curve fitting over the entire forward bias region at various temperatures shows the same temperature dependence. This result, in addition to the presence of an aging effect, suggest that the surface channel effect is the dominant cause of the excess junction current.

  17. Cusps on cosmic superstrings with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Rajamanoharan, Senthooran; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: william.nelson@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The existence of cusps on non-periodic strings ending on D-branes is demonstrated and the conditions for which such cusps are generic are derived. The dynamics of F-strings, D-strings and FD-string junctions are investigated. It is shown that pairs of FD-string junctions, such as would form after intercommutations of F-strings and D-strings, generically contain cusps. This new feature of cosmic superstrings opens up the possibility of extra channels of energy loss from a string network. The phenomenology of cusps on such cosmic superstring networks is compared to that of cusps formed on networks of their field theory analogues, the standard cosmic strings.

  18. [Paroxysmal junctional reciprocal tachycardia and fetoplacental anasarca].

    PubMed

    Maurier, F; Delisle, G; Guay, M

    1985-02-01

    Foeto-placental anasarca was diagnosed at 34 weeks gestation in a patient with acute hydramnios. Foetal tachycardia at 300 bpm was recorded. This obstetrical problem led to the birth of a premature baby with generalised oedema, for which the only apparent cause was the tachycardia. This was identified as a paroxysmal junctional reciprocating tachycardia, initiating on atrial extrasystolic echos, terminating on R waves, with lengthening of the PR interval at the onset of tachycardia, without acceleration of the sinus rate and P'R = RP'. Paroxysmal junctional reciprocating tachycardia in utero was responsible for congestive cardiac failure and foeto-placental anasarca. The cardiac failure was treated by foetal delivery, artificial respiration and digoxin. The association of digoxin-disopyramide reduces the frequency of attacks of tachycardia and treatment may be stopped after one year's follow-up.

  19. Novel tunnelling barriers for spin tunnelling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish

    A tunnel junction consists of two metal electrodes separated by an insulating barrier thin enough for electrons to tunnel across. With ferromagnetic electrodes, a spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) effect, electrons of one spin tunnelling preferentially over those of the other, is observed. When the electrodes are switched from a parallel to an anti-parallel alignment, the tunnelling current changes and gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR). Since 1995, interest in SDT junctions has increased as TMR in excess of 15% has been achieved, making viable their use in non-volatile memory and magnetic sensors applications. In this work, two key issues of SDT junctions are addressed: spin polarization of the electrode and the tunnel barrier. Spin polarization, a measure of electron states of up and down spins, is widely believed to be an intrinsic property of the electrode. In junctions with barriers formed by plasma oxidation of composite Ta/Al films, the surprising effect of the resistance being lower with the electrodes aligned antiparallel was observed. Junctions with Ta/Al barriers and those with Al/Ta barriers behave opposite to each other and exhibit an inversion only when the Ta side of the barrier is biased positive. This demonstrates the spin polarization is also influenced by the barrier material. Half-metallic materials such as magnetite (Fe3O4) have a gap in one of the spins' states at the fermi level, thus having a theoretical spin polarization of 100%. In this work, an ultrathin Fe3O 4 layer was added between the Al2O3 barrier and the NiFe electrode. The TMR increased sharply from 4% to 16% for thicknesses less than 0.5nm. As the tunnel barrier must be thinner than 2nm, choice of the barrier material becomes critical. Presently, Al2O3 is the best known barrier. In looking for alternative materials, AlN and AlON were formed by plasma nitridation and oxy-nitridation of deposited Al films. TMR results of up to 18% and resistance-area products down to 3

  20. Spontaneous supercurrent induced by ferromagnetic pi junctions.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A; Bentner, J; Aprili, M; Della Rocca, M L; Reinwald, M; Wegscheider, W; Strunk, C

    2004-05-28

    We present magnetization measurements of mesoscopic superconducting niobium loops containing a ferromagnetic (PdNi) pi junction. The loops are prepared on top of the active area of a micro-Hall sensor based on high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. We observe asymmetric switching of the loop between different magnetization states when reversing the sweep direction of the magnetic field. This provides evidence for a spontaneous current induced by the intrinsic phase shift of the pi junction. In addition, the presence of the spontaneous current near zero applied field is directly revealed by an increase of the magnetic moment with decreasing temperature, which results in half integer flux quantization in the loop at low temperatures.