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Sample records for jurassic morrison formation

  1. Reevaluation of upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Western Interior

    SciTech Connect

    Mantzios, C.

    1989-03-01

    Comparison of the Brushy Basin member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the Colorado Plateau with the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Morrison-Cloverly sequence in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, shows great similarities in their depositional environments and stratigraphy. The lower Brushy Basin member is a fluvial deposit composed of channel sandstones and overbank mudstones which display a great number of pedogenic features. Similar depositional setting has been observed in the Morrison Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, where pedogenic features suggest a distal floodplain setting with low-sinuosity channels cutting through. In both localities the dominant clay mineral is illite. The upper Brushy Basin member in the Colorado Plateau is composed mostly of gray and purpose mudstones rich in montmorillonite. Devitrified tuff beds and bentonite occur in certain levels throughout the unit. Pedogenic features are not conspicuously developed. The Lower Cretaceous Clovery Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, is strikingly similar in terms of lithological aspects. The depositional environment is interpreted in both localities as a playa deposit. A great variety of nodules is present such as silcretes, septaria, and silica-carbonate nodules. Radiometric dating of bentonites in central Utah revealed that the upper Brushy Basin member is Early Cretaceous in age. Field and geochemical data support these conclusions and aid the understanding of the exact nature of the depositional basin, environments, stratigraphy, and paleotectonics of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous interval in the Western Interior.

  2. Jurassic "savannah" - Plant taphonomy and climate of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic, Western USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrish, Judith T.; Peterson, F.; Turner, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Morrison Formation contains six plant taphofacies: Wood, whole-leaf, leaf-mat, root, common carbonaceous debris, and rare carbonaceous debris. None of these taphofacies is common in the Morrison; particularly striking is the paucity of wood, even in more reducing environments. The flora of the Morrison Formation is distinct in the Kimmeridgian and Tithonian parts of the section. The plant taphofacies are consistent with a predominantly herbaceous vegetation. Evidence from the plant taphofacies, floras, and sedimentology of the Morrison is consistent with a warm, seasonal, semi-arid climate throughout, changing from dry semi-arid to humid semi-arid from the Kimmeridgian to the Tithonian parts of the formation. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Jurassic Lake T'oo'dichi': a large alkaline, saline lake, Morrison Formation, eastern Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, C.E.; Fishman, N.S.

    1991-01-01

    Recognition of alkaline, saline-lake deposits in the Morrison Formation significantly alters interpretations of depositional environments of this formation, and it also has important implications for paleoclimatic interpretation. Late Jurassic climate was apparently much more arid than had previously been thought. In fact, sedimentologic evidence suggests that the lake basin was typically dry for extended periods and enjoyed only brief wet intervals. This conclusion has important consequences for environmental interpretation of the habitat that was favorable for large herbivorous dinosaurs, which thrived in the Late Jurassic. -from Authors

  4. Paleoclimatology indicators of the Salt Wash member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation near Jensen, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, D.A. . Dept. of Geology); Bilbey, S.A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation has yielded one of the richest floras of the so-called transitional conifers'' of the Middle Mesozoic. Recently, a silicified axis of one of these conifers was collected from the Salt Wash member in essentially the same horizon as a previously reported partial Stegosaurus skeleton. In addition, two other axes of conifers were collected in the same immediate vicinity. Paleoecological considerations are extrapolated from the coniferous flora, vertebrate fauna and associated lithologies. Techniques of paleodendrology and relationships of extant/extinct environments are compared. The paleoclimatic conditions of the transitional conifers and associated dinosaurian fossils are postulated.

  5. Reconstruction of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation extinct ecosystem - A synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, C.E.; Peterson, F.

    2004-01-01

    A synthesis of recent and previous studies of the Morrison Formation and related beds, in the context of a conceptual climatic/hydrologic framework, permits reconstruction of the Late Jurassic dinosaurian ecosystem throughout the Western Interior of the United States and Canada. Climate models and geologic evidence indicate that a dry climate persisted in the Western Interior during the Late Jurassic. Early and Middle Kimmeridgian eolian deposits and Late Kimmeridgian alkaline, saline wetland/lacustrine deposits demonstrate that dryness persisted throughout the Kimmeridgian. Tithonian-age coal reflects lower evaporation rates associated with a slight cooling trend, but not a significant climate change. With a subtropical high over the Paleo-Pacific Ocean and atmospheric circulation generally toward the east, moisture carried by prevailing winds "rained out" progressively eastward, leaving the continental interior-and the Morrison depositional basin-dry. Within the basin, high evaporation rates associated with the southerly paleolatitude and greenhouse effects added to the dryness. Consequently, the two main sources of water-groundwater and surface water-originated outside the basin, through recharge of regional aquifers and streams that originated in the western uplands. Precipitation that fell west of the basin recharged aquifers that underlay the basin and discharged in wetlands and lakes in the distal, low-lying part of the basin. Precipitation west of the basin also fed intermittent and scarce perennial streams that flowed eastward. The streams were probably "losing" streams in their upstream reaches, and contributed to a locally raised water table. Elsewhere in the basin, where the floodplain intersected the water table, small lakes dotted the landscape. Seasonal storms, perhaps in part from the Paleo-Gulf of Mexico, brought some precipitation directly to the basin, although it was also subjected to "rain out" en route. Thus, meteoric input to the basin was

  6. Reconstruction of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation extinct ecosystem—a synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Christine E.; Peterson, Fred

    2004-05-01

    A synthesis of recent and previous studies of the Morrison Formation and related beds, in the context of a conceptual climatic/hydrologic framework, permits reconstruction of the Late Jurassic dinosaurian ecosystem throughout the Western Interior of the United States and Canada. Climate models and geologic evidence indicate that a dry climate persisted in the Western Interior during the Late Jurassic. Early and Middle Kimmeridgian eolian deposits and Late Kimmeridgian alkaline, saline wetland/lacustrine deposits demonstrate that dryness persisted throughout the Kimmeridgian. Tithonian-age coal reflects lower evaporation rates associated with a slight cooling trend, but not a significant climate change. With a subtropical high over the Paleo-Pacific Ocean and atmospheric circulation generally toward the east, moisture carried by prevailing winds "rained out" progressively eastward, leaving the continental interior—and the Morrison depositional basin—dry. Within the basin, high evaporation rates associated with the southerly paleolatitude and greenhouse effects added to the dryness. Consequently, the two main sources of water—groundwater and surface water—originated outside the basin, through recharge of regional aquifers and streams that originated in the western uplands. Precipitation that fell west of the basin recharged aquifers that underlay the basin and discharged in wetlands and lakes in the distal, low-lying part of the basin. Precipitation west of the basin also fed intermittent and scarce perennial streams that flowed eastward. The streams were probably "losing" streams in their upstream reaches, and contributed to a locally raised water table. Elsewhere in the basin, where the floodplain intersected the water table, small lakes dotted the landscape. Seasonal storms, perhaps in part from the Paleo-Gulf of Mexico, brought some precipitation directly to the basin, although it was also subjected to "rain out" en route. Thus, meteoric input to the

  7. Paleomagnetism of the Front Range (Colorado) Morrison Formation and an alternative model of Late Jurassic North American apparent polar wander

    SciTech Connect

    Fossen, M.C. Van; Kent, D.V. )

    1992-03-01

    A paleomagnetic study of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the Front Range of central Colorado yields high-unblocking-temperature, dual-polarity magnetizations. With respect to known paleohorizontal, the inclinations (absolute mean = 57.3{degree}, 95% confidence interval = 52.3{degree} to 63.1{degree}, N = 8 sites) pass tilt and reversal tests, whereas the dispersion in declinations can be attributed to apparent or real tectonic rotations and sedimentary processes. The site-centered colatitudinal locus of possible Front Range Morrison poles partially overlaps the 'upper' pole, but it excludes the 'lower' pole from the Morrison Formation on the Colorado Plateau as well as the 151 Ma Glance conglomerate pole from the Basin and Range province of southeastern Arizona. The authors offer various explanations for these disparities and suggest an alternative model of Late Jurassic North American apparent polar wander through {approximately}70{degree}N which is supported by Late Jurassic European poles (with positive stability tests) transferred to North American coordinates.

  8. Sequence stratigraphy of the Jurassic-Cretaceous Morrison and Cedar Mountain Formations, NE Utah--NW Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, B.S. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Jurassic-Cretaceous Morrison and Cedar Mountain of NE Utah and NW Colorado record nonmarine deposition during early development of the Cordilleran foreland basin. Contained within these formations are three distinct depositional sequences that represent changes in sedimentary architecture due to fluctuations in development of basin accommodation. The first of these sequences comprises the Oxfordian transition from marine to nonmarine sedimentation. Morrison Formation marginal marine and nonmarine facies prograded across shallow marine facies of the Stump Formation (Redwater Member), during a period of increased accommodation. The base of the second depositional sequences within the Morrison Formation was produced by a decrease in regional accommodation. The Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation unconformably overlies the Morrison Formation and its base marks the lower boundary of the third depositional sequence. The unconformity surface represents a decrease in regional accommodation and is marked by fluvial incision and evidence of subaerial exposure and intense weathering of the upper Brushy Basin Member. Increased basin accommodation during the early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian ) resulted in valley fill deposition of the braided fluvial Buckhorn Conglomerate Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation. This conglomerate is overlain by Cedar Mountain anastomosing fluvial and lacustrine facies which were deposited during continued accommodation development. The Sequence is capped unconformity by the Albian-Cenomanian Dakota Formation.

  9. Paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic significance of freshwater bivalves in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Western Interior, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Steven C.

    2004-05-01

    Freshwater unionid bivalves are spatially and temporally distributed throughout the Morrison depositional basin, and locally dominate the biomass of many aquatic depositional environments. Two bivalve assemblages are identified. Within-channel assemblages are death assemblages that have been transported and may represent mixed assemblages from multiple communities. These assemblages are predominately disarticulated, in current stable orientations, and composed of higher stream velocity ecophenotypes (medium size, lanceolate form, and very thick shells). The floodplain-pond assemblages are disturbed neighborhood assemblages in the mudstones inhabited during life. The bivalves are predominately articulated, variable in size, and composed of low stream velocity ecophenotypes (large maximum sizes, ovate shell shapes, and thinner shells). The glochidial parasitic larval stage of unionid bivalves provides an effective means of dispersing species throughout drainage basins. These larvae attach to fish and are carried through the fluvial drainage where the larvae detach and establish new bivalve communities. Preliminary paleobiogeographic analyses are drawn at the genus level because of the need to reevaluate bivalve species of the Morrison. Unio spp. and Vetulonaia spp. are widespread throughout the Morrison depositional basin, but Hadrodon spp. are restricted to the eastern portion of the Colorado Plateau during Salt Wash Member deposition, suggesting that Salt Wash drainage was isolated from other contemporaneous regions of the basin. Bivalves from five localities in the Morrison Formation were thin-sectioned for growth band analysis. Growth bands of modern unionid bivalves are produced when the valves are forced to close. Closure can produce annual growth bands in response to seasonal variation, such as temperature-induced hibernation, or precipitation-induced aestivation or turbidity. Pseudoannual growth bands form from non-cyclical events such as predation attacks or

  10. Regional paleohydrologic and paleoclimatic settings of wetland/lacustrine depositional systems in the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic), Western Interior, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunagan, S.P.; Turner, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    During deposition of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, water that originated as precipitation in uplands to the west of the Western Interior depositional basin infiltrated regional aquifers that underlay the basin. This regional groundwater system delivered water into the otherwise dry continental interior basin where it discharged to form two major wetland/lacustrine successions. A freshwater carbonate wetland/lacustrine succession formed in the distal reaches of the basin, where regional groundwater discharged into the Denver-Julesburg Basin, which was a smaller structural basin within the more extensive Western Interior depositional basin. An alkaline-saline wetland/lacustrine complex (Lake T'oo'dichi') formed farther upstream, where shallower aquifers discharged into the San Juan/Paradox Basin, which was another small structural basin in the Western Interior depositional basin. These were both wetlands in the sense that groundwater was the major source of water. Input from surface and meteoric water was limited. In both basins, lacustrine conditions developed during episodes of increased input of surface water. Inclusion of wetlands in our interpretation of what had previously been considered largely lacustrine systems has important implications for paleohydrology and paleoclimatology. The distal carbonate wetland/lacustrine deposits are well developed in the Morrison Formation of east-central Colorado, occupying a stratigraphic interval that is equivalent to the "lower" Morrison but extends into the "upper" Morrison Formation. Sedimentologic, paleontologic, and isotopic evidence indicate that regional groundwater discharge maintained shallow, hydrologically open, well oxygenated, perennial carbonate wetlands and lakes despite the semi-arid climate. Wetland deposits include charophyte-rich wackestone and green mudstone. Lacustrine episodes, in which surface water input was significant, were times of carbonate and siliciclastic deposition in scarce deltaic

  11. Variations in fluvial style in the Westwater Canyon Member, Morrison formation (Jurassic), San Juan basin, Colorado plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miall, A.D.; Turner-Peterson, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques of architectural element analysis and lateral profiling have been applied to the fluvial Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic) in southern San Juan Basin. On a large scale, the sandstone-body architecture consists mainly of a series of tabular sandstone sheets 5-15 m thick and hundreds of meters wide, separated by thin fine-grained units. Internally these sheets contain lateral accretion surfaces and are cut by channels 10-20 m deep and at least 250 m wide. On a more detailed scale, interpretations made from large-scale photomosaics show a complex of architectural elements and bounding surfaces. Typical indicators of moderate- to high-sinuosity channels (lateral accretion deposits) coexist in the same outcrop with downstream-accreted macroform deposits that are typical of sand flats of low-sinuosity, multiple-channel rivers. Broad, deep channels with gently to steeply dipping margins were mapped in several of the outcrops by carefully tracing major bounding surfaces. Locally thick accumulations of plane-laminated and low-angle cross-laminated sandstone lithofacies suggest rapid flow, probably transitional to upper flow regime conditions. Such a depositional style is most typical of ephemeral rivers or those periodically undergoing major seasonal (or more erratic) stage fluctuations, an interpretation consistent with independent mineralogical evidence of aridity. Fining-upward sequences are rare in the project area, contrary to the descriptions of Campbell (1976). The humid alluvial fan model of Galloway (1978) cannot be substantiated and, similarly, the architectural model of Campbell (1976) requires major revision. Comparisons with the depositional architecture of the large Indian rivers, such as the Ganges and Brahmaputra, still seem reasonable, as originally proposed by Campbell (1976), although there is now convincing evidence for aridity and for major stage fluctuations, which differs both from those modern rivers and Campbell

  12. Reconnaissance of Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation ichnofossils, Rocky Mountain Region, USA: paleoenvironmental, stratigraphic, and paleoclimatic significance of terrestrial and freshwater ichnocoenoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasiotis, Stephen T.

    2004-05-01

    Seventy-five types of ichnofossils documented during a four-year reconnaissance study in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation demonstrate that highly diverse and abundant plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates occur throughout most of the Morrison or equivalent strata. Invertebrate ichnofossils, preserving the most environmentally and climatically sensitive in situ behavior of Morrison organisms, are in nearly all outcrops. Terrestrial ichnofossils record biotic processes in soil formation, indicating soil moisture and water-table levels. Freshwater ichnofossils preserve evidence of water depth, salinity, and seasonality of water bodies. Ichnofossils, categorized as epiterraphilic, terraphilic, hygrophilic, and hydrophilic (new terms), reflect the moisture regime where they were constructed. The ichnofossils are vertically zoned with respect to physical, chemical, and biological factors in the environment that controlled their distribution and abundance, and are expressed as surficial, shallow, intermediate, and deep. The sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geographic distribution of Morrison ichnofossils reflects the environmental and climatic variations across the basin through time. Marginal-marine, tidal to brackish-water ichnofossils are mainly restricted to the Windy Hill Member. Very large to small termite nests dominate the Salt Wash Member. Similar size ranges of ant nests dominate the Brushy Basin Member. Soil bee nests dominate in the Salt Wash, decreasing in abundance through the Brushy Basin. Deeper and larger insect nests indicate more seasonal distribution of precipitation and rainfall. Shallower and smaller insect nests indicate either dry or wet substrate conditions depending on the nest architecture and paleopedogenic and sedimentologic character of the substrate. Trace-fossil indicators of flowing or standing water conditions are dominant in the Tidwell Member and in fluvial sandstones of the Salt Wash and Brushy Basin Members. Large communities

  13. Regional paleoclimatic and stratigraphic implications of paleosols and fluvial/overbank architecture in the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic), Western Interior, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demko, Timothy M.; Currie, Brian S.; Nicoll, Kathleen A.

    2004-05-01

    Paleosols in the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) from the Western Interior and Colorado Plateau regions occur in fluvial/overbank and marginal-lacustrine depositional facies associated with aggradational settings, and at sequence-bounding unconformities that mark divisions between major aggradational and degradational successions. Pedogenic features within these horizons preserve important contextual information about the local and regional paleoclimate and paleoenvironment in which the soils formed. Floodplain and lake-margin paleosols show evidence that most of the Morrison basin was characterized by a semi-arid to tropical wet-dry paleoclimate with fluctuating groundwater conditions, a low precipitation to evaporation ratio, and weak to moderately seasonal precipitation. Paleosol ichnofauna show evidence of a diverse and opportunistic flora and fauna that exploited changing conditions and existing nutrient and moisture regimes. Changes in paleosol type and degree of development over the basin indicate the overall regional paleoclimate was drier in the western and southern portions of the basin. Vertical trends indicate paleoclimatic conditions over the basin became steadily more humid through time. Laterally continuous, well-developed, deeply weathered paleosols formed during times of little or no deposition and mark regional unconformities. The paleosols at these sequence-bounding unconformities serve as useful regional stratigraphic markers to trace genetic packages across the Morrison depositional basin and to determine regional accommodation trends.

  14. Map showing structure contours on the top of the upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crysdale, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps showing computer-generated structure contours, isopachs, and cross sections of selected formations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana. The map and cross sections were constructed from information stored in a U.S. Geological Survey Evolution of Sedimentary Basins data base. This data base contains picks of geologic formation and (or) unit tops and bases determined from electric resistivity and gamma-ray logs of 8,592 wells penetrating Tertiary and older rocks in the Powder River basin. Well completion cards (scout tickets) were reviewed and compared with copies of all logs, and formation or unit contacts determined by N. M. Denson, D.L. Macke, R. R. Schumann and others. This isopach map is based on information from 2,429 of these wells that penetrate the Minnelusa Formation and equivalents.

  15. The Postcranial Skeleton of an Exceptionally Complete Individual of the Plated Dinosaur Stegosaurus stenops (Dinosauria: Thyreophora) from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Wyoming, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Maidment, Susannah Catherine Rose; Brassey, Charlotte; Barrett, Paul Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although Stegosaurus is one of the most iconic dinosaurs, well-preserved fossils are rare and as a consequence there is still much that remains unknown about the taxon. A new, exceptionally complete individual affords the opportunity to describe the anatomy of Stegosaurus in detail for the first time in over a century, and enables additional comparisons with other stegosaurian dinosaurs. The new specimen is from the Red Canyon Ranch Quarry, near Shell Wyoming, and appears to have been so well preserved because it was buried rapidly in a pond or body of standing water immediately after death. The quarry is probably located in the middle part of the Morrison Formation, which is believed to be Tithonian in age in this area. The specimen is referable to Stegosaurus stenops based on the possession of an edentulous anterior portion of the dentary and elevated postzygapophyses on the cervical vertebrae. New information provided by the specimen concerns the morphology of the vertebrae, the iliosacral block and dermal armor. Several aspects of its morphology indicate the individual was not fully skeletally mature at the time of death, corroborating a previous histological study.

  16. The Postcranial Skeleton of an Exceptionally Complete Individual of the Plated Dinosaur Stegosaurus stenops (Dinosauria: Thyreophora) from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Wyoming, U.S.A.

    PubMed Central

    Maidment, Susannah Catherine Rose; Brassey, Charlotte; Barrett, Paul Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although Stegosaurus is one of the most iconic dinosaurs, well-preserved fossils are rare and as a consequence there is still much that remains unknown about the taxon. A new, exceptionally complete individual affords the opportunity to describe the anatomy of Stegosaurus in detail for the first time in over a century, and enables additional comparisons with other stegosaurian dinosaurs. The new specimen is from the Red Canyon Ranch Quarry, near Shell Wyoming, and appears to have been so well preserved because it was buried rapidly in a pond or body of standing water immediately after death. The quarry is probably located in the middle part of the Morrison Formation, which is believed to be Tithonian in age in this area. The specimen is referable to Stegosaurus stenops based on the possession of an edentulous anterior portion of the dentary and elevated postzygapophyses on the cervical vertebrae. New information provided by the specimen concerns the morphology of the vertebrae, the iliosacral block and dermal armor. Several aspects of its morphology indicate the individual was not fully skeletally mature at the time of death, corroborating a previous histological study. PMID:26466098

  17. Alteration of magnetite and ilmenite in Upper Jurassic Morrison formation, San Juan basin, New Mexico: relationship to facies and primary uranium mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, N.S.; Peterson, C.E.T.; Reynolds; Reynolds, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    Petrographic studies of outcrop and drill core samples in the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation along the southern and western margins of the San Juan basin reveal a close spatial relationship among altered (iron-leached) detrital magnetite and ilmenite (FeTi oxides), depositional facies in the overlying Brushy Basin Member, and distribution of primary uranium deposits. Iron leaching of FeTi oxides resulted from passage of solutions containing soluble organic material; concentrations of this organic material are the sites of the primary uranium ore bodies. Along the southern and western parts of the basin, FeTi oxides typically have been leached in the upper Westwater Member, but are unaltered in the lower Westwater; however, locally, leaching occurred throughout the Westwater. This zone of leaching systematically thins northward to zero, where unleached FeTi oxides occur throughout the Westwater. Regional patterns of alteration of FeTi oxides correspond to regional facies distribution in the overlying Brushy Basin Member. Extensive FeTi oxide leaching characterizes the Westwater beneath the smectite-rich mud-flat facies of the Brushy Basin, whereas negligible leaching characterizes the Westwater beneath the zeolite-rich playa facies of the Brushy Basin. This correspondence between facies and alteration patterns suggests that solutions responsible for solubilization of organic material, which in turn leached FeTi oxides in the Westwater, originated from the mud-flat facies of the Brushy Basin. Organic material that precipitated form these solutions concentrated uranium to form primary uranium ore bodies; therefore, distribution of the Brushy Basin mud-flat facies may define, and restrict, distribution of primary ore bodies in the Westwater.

  18. Iron (Oxyhydr)Oxide Biosignatures in the Brushy Basin Member of the Jurassic Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau, USA: Analog for Martian Diagenetic Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J.

    2012-03-01

    Iron precipitates in modern microbial mats compared with iron cements in Jurassic alkaline saline lake sediments show that morphological and chemical biosignatures are present and preserved in oxidized, evaporative environments analogous to Mars.

  19. Evidence for Sexual Dimorphism in the Plated Dinosaur Stegosaurus mjosi (Ornithischia, Stegosauria) from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Western USA.

    PubMed

    Saitta, Evan Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Conclusive evidence for sexual dimorphism in non-avian dinosaurs has been elusive. Here it is shown that dimorphism in the shape of the dermal plates of Stegosaurus mjosi (Upper Jurassic, western USA) does not result from non-sex-related individual, interspecific, or ontogenetic variation and is most likely a sexually dimorphic feature. One morph possessed wide, oval plates 45% larger in surface area than the tall, narrow plates of the other morph. Intermediate morphologies are lacking as principal component analysis supports marked size- and shape-based dimorphism. In contrast, many non-sex-related individual variations are expected to show intermediate morphologies. Taphonomy of a new quarry in Montana (JRDI 5ES Quarry) shows that at least five individuals were buried in a single horizon and were not brought together by water or scavenger transportation. This new site demonstrates co-existence, and possibly suggests sociality, between two morphs that only show dimorphism in their plates. Without evidence for niche partitioning, it is unlikely that the two morphs represent different species. Histology of the new specimens in combination with studies on previous specimens indicates that both morphs occur in fully-grown individuals. Therefore, the dimorphism is not a result of ontogenetic change. Furthermore, the two morphs of plates do not simply come from different positions on the back of a single individual. Plates from all positions on the body can be classified as one of the two morphs, and previously discovered, isolated specimens possess only one morph of plates. Based on the seemingly display-oriented morphology of plates, female mate choice was likely the driving evolutionary mechanism rather than male-male competition. Dinosaur ornamentation possibly served similar functions to the ornamentation of modern species. Comparisons to ornamentation involved in sexual selection of extant species, such as the horns of bovids, may be appropriate in predicting the

  20. Evidence for Sexual Dimorphism in the Plated Dinosaur Stegosaurus mjosi (Ornithischia, Stegosauria) from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Western USA

    PubMed Central

    Saitta, Evan Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Conclusive evidence for sexual dimorphism in non-avian dinosaurs has been elusive. Here it is shown that dimorphism in the shape of the dermal plates of Stegosaurus mjosi (Upper Jurassic, western USA) does not result from non-sex-related individual, interspecific, or ontogenetic variation and is most likely a sexually dimorphic feature. One morph possessed wide, oval plates 45% larger in surface area than the tall, narrow plates of the other morph. Intermediate morphologies are lacking as principal component analysis supports marked size- and shape-based dimorphism. In contrast, many non-sex-related individual variations are expected to show intermediate morphologies. Taphonomy of a new quarry in Montana (JRDI 5ES Quarry) shows that at least five individuals were buried in a single horizon and were not brought together by water or scavenger transportation. This new site demonstrates co-existence, and possibly suggests sociality, between two morphs that only show dimorphism in their plates. Without evidence for niche partitioning, it is unlikely that the two morphs represent different species. Histology of the new specimens in combination with studies on previous specimens indicates that both morphs occur in fully-grown individuals. Therefore, the dimorphism is not a result of ontogenetic change. Furthermore, the two morphs of plates do not simply come from different positions on the back of a single individual. Plates from all positions on the body can be classified as one of the two morphs, and previously discovered, isolated specimens possess only one morph of plates. Based on the seemingly display-oriented morphology of plates, female mate choice was likely the driving evolutionary mechanism rather than male-male competition. Dinosaur ornamentation possibly served similar functions to the ornamentation of modern species. Comparisons to ornamentation involved in sexual selection of extant species, such as the horns of bovids, may be appropriate in predicting the

  1. Diagenetic Iron Cycling in Ancient Alkaline Saline Lacustrine Sedimentary Rocks: A Case Study on the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J. O. L.

    2014-12-01

    The upper part of the Brushy Basin Member in the Four Corners region of the U.S. was deposited in an ephemeral alkaline saline lake system with copious input of volcanic ash. The variegated shale formation provides a setting for the study of early diagenetic iron cycling that records the action of alkaline saline fluid chemistries reacting with volcaniclastic sediments in the presence of microbes. A bull's-eye pattern of authigenic minerals with increasing alteration towards the basinal center similar to modern alkaline saline lakes provides evidence for an extreme paleoenvironmental interpretation. The purpose of this research is to document specific factors, such as reactive sediments, microbial influences, and grain size that affect concretion formation and iron cycling in an ancient extreme environment. Three broad diagenetic facies are interpreted by color and associated bioturbation features: red, green and intermediate. Diagenetic facies reflect meter-scale paleotopography: red facies represent shallow water to subaerial, oxidizing conditions; green facies reflect saturated conditions and reducing pore water chemistry shortly after deposition, and intermediate facies represent a combination of the previous two conditions. Evidence of biotic influence is abundant and trace fossils exhibit patterns associated with the diagenetic facies. Red diagenetic facies typically contain burrows and root traces and green diagenetic facies exhibit restricted biotic diversity typically limited to algal molds (vugs). Microbial fossils are well-preserved and are in close proximity to specific iron mineral textures suggesting biotic influence on the crystal morphology. Three categories of concretions are characterized based on mineralogy: carbonate, iron (oxyhydr)oxide and phosphate concretions. Concretion mineralogy and size vary within an outcrop and even within a stratigraphic horizon such that more than one main category is typically present in an outcrop. Variation in

  2. Geochemical and mineralogical studies of dinosaur bone from the Morrison Formation at Dinosaur Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    The dinosaur bones first discovered in 1877 in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation at Morrison, Colorado were the first major find of dinosaur skeletons in the western U.S. and led to the recognition of four new dinosaur genera (Apatosaurus, Allosaurus, Diplodocus, and Stegosaurus). Eight articles dealing with these bones which appeared as research reports in the annual reports of the Friends of Dinosaur Ridge from 1990-1999 are condensed and summarized with some additional comments. Two of the articles are about the mineralogy and preservation of the bones; two are about the physical description of the bone occurrence; two are about the history of the site, and two are about use of novel instrumental methods (ground-penetrating radar and a directional scintillometer) to search for new bones.

  3. The nonopaque, detrital heavy mineralogy of the Morrison Formation near Crownpoint, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, Paula L.

    1983-01-01

    Description and quantification of the nonopaque, detrital heavy mineralogy of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the southwestern part of the San Juan Basin have helped to identify stratigraphic trends, source-area lithologies, and zones of post-depositional alteration possibly related to uranium mineralization. A synthesis of stratigraphic variations in mineral species and diversity in Morrison sandstones reveals an increasing upward igneous component, characterized by euhedral zircon and subhedral apatite. Complementing this trend, the predominantly well-rounded assemblage of the Recapture Member changes to a mixed assemblage of rounded and angular grains in the Westwater Canyon Member. Overall, the low diversity in mineral species indicates a sedimentary, low- to medium-grade-metamorphic, and acid igneous parentage for Morrison sediments; however, post-depositional processes have played a significant role in determining the present mineralogy. The roles that diagenesis and weathering have played in determining the present aspect of the assemblage, which is a mature garnet-zircon-apatite-tourmaline suite, cannot be overemphasized. For instance, the presence of authigenically etched to skeletal garnet and staurolite implies that entire grains have been destroyed. Comparison of cores with measured sections indicates that near-surface weathering has caused the destruction of some minerals, notably apatite, sensitive to acidic conditions. Therefore, in order to interpret the sedimentology, stratigraphic intervals in which post-depositional processes have affected the mineralogy were identified. These diagenetic zones may prove to be most useful in delineating the past movements and compositions of interstitial, possibly ore-forming, fluids.

  4. Eolian sandstone unit of Morrison Formation, central Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, D.M.

    1986-08-01

    The fine-grained quartzarenite that overlies the Sundance Formation in the southwestern Powder River basin, Wind River basin, and southern Bighorn basin is interpreted as being primarily the result of eolian deposition. This unit, often more than 20 m (65.6 ft) thick, is the probable correlative of the Unkpapa Sandstone member of the Morrison Formation of the southeastern Black Hills region. An eolian interpretation is based on the presence of large-scale sets of high-angle, planar cross-stratification. Observed considerable variation in the thickness of the unit is likely to be an expression of the depositional (dune-form) topography rather than the result of later erosion. Discrete dunes are exposed near Thermopolis along the northern margin of the unit: the transitional marine deposits of the uppermost Sundance formation are the most likely source of the wind-transported sand. Stratigraphic and facies relationships and lithologic similarity support correlation of the eolian unit with the Unkpapa Sandstone. Together, the units represent regions of significant eolian deposition within the predominantly fluvial Morrison depositional environment. The properties of the eolian sandstone, its thickness, its superposition above the marine Sundance Formation, and the possibility of its persistence in the subsurface of the southern Powder River basin give it potential as a petroleum reservoir. These anomalous eolian deposits may record the positions of gentle structures developed in central Wyoming and western South Dakota at the onset of, and in association with, Sevier compression.

  5. Stratigraphy of the Morrison and related formations, Colorado Plateau region, a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Lawrence C.; ,

    1955-01-01

    Three subdivisions of the Jurassic rocks of the Colorado Plateau region are: the Glen Canyon group, mainly eolian and fluvial sedimentary rocks; the San Rafael group, marine and marginal marine sedimentary rocks; and the Morrison formation, fluvial and lacustrine sedimentary rocks. In central and eastern Colorado the Morrison formation has not been differ- entiated into members. In eastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and in part of western Colorado, the Morrison may be divided into a lower part and an upper part; each part has two members which are di1Ierentiated on a lithologic basis. Where differentiated, the lower part of the Morrison consists either of the Salt Wash member or the Recapture member or both; these are equivalent in age and inter tongue and intergrade over a broad area in the vicinity of the Four Corners area of New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah. The Salt Wash member is present in eastern Utah and parts of western Colorado, north- eastern Arizona, and northwestern New Mexico. It was formed as a large alluvial plain or 'fan' by an aggrading system of braided streams diverging to the north and east from an apex in south-central Utah. The major source area of the Salt Wash was to the southwest of south-central Utah, probably in west-central Arizona and southeastern California. The member was derived mainly from sedimentary rocks. The Salt Wash deposits grade from predomi- nantly coarse texture at the apex of the 'fan' to predominantly flne texture at the margin of the 'fan'. The Salt Wash member has been arbitrarily divided into four facies: a con- glomera tic sandstone facies, a sandstone and mudstone facies, a claystone and lenticular sandstone facies, and a claystone and limestone facies. The Recapture member of the Morrison formation is present in northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and small areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado near the Four Corners. It was formed as a large alluvial plain

  6. Architectural studies of Jurassic-Cretaceous fluvial units, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Miall, A.D.; Bromley, M.H.; Cowan, E.J.; Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    A sixfold hierarchy of architectural elements and bounding surfaces evolved from outcrop studies of three fluvial units: Westwater Canyon member (WCM), Morrison Formation, Upper Jurassic; Torrivio sandstone member (TSM), Gallup Sandstone, Upper Cretaceous, northwestern New Mexico; and Kayenta Formation (KF), Lower Jurassic, southwestern Colorado. This hierarchy is discussed.

  7. Distribution of elements in the Salt Wash member of the Morrison Formation in the Jo Dandy area, Montrose County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, William L.; Elston, Donald P.

    1957-01-01

    A study of the distribution of elements in the Salt Wash member of the Morrison formation of Jurassic age from samples taken in the Jo Dandy area, Montrose County, Colo., was made to determine average chemical composition of mudstone and sandstone and to determine the magnitude of variations in concentrations of elements within similar rock types. Analytical data were obtained by semiquantitative spectrographic and radiometric methods. Results of the study show that variations in concentrations of about 20 elements commonly detected by semiquantititive spectrographic analyses of sedimentary rocks are small for a specific rock type; therefore, considerable confidence may be placed upon the average chemical appears to be no significant relation between chemical composition of mudstone or sandstone and distance from known uranium-vanadium ore or mineralization rock. Mudstone generally contains greater concentrations of the elements studied than sandstone. The chemical composition of red mudstone is similar to the chemical composition of green mudstone except that red mudstone was found to contain almost twice as much calcium as green mudstone in the Jo Dandy area. Samples of the unoxidized sandstone from the Jo Dandy area contain about twice as much calcium, three times as much strontium, but only about one-half as much as zirconium as oxidized sandstone; except for these elements the chemical compositions of both categories of sandstone are similar. Samples of sandstone of the Salt Wash member in the Jo Dandy area contain more potassium, magnesium, vanadium, and nickel than “average sandstone” of the Salt Wash member. The distribution of bismuth in rocks of the Jo Dandy area suggests that bismuth and perhaps part of the potassium and magnesium found in rocks of the Salk Wash member were either derived from solutions which ascended from the underlying salt- and gypsum-bearing Paradox member that was incorporated with rocks of the Salt Wash during sedimentation.

  8. Diagrammatic restored section of the Inyan Kara group, Morrison formation, and Unkpapa sandstone of the western side of the Black Hills, Wyoming and South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mapel, W.J.; Gott, G.B.

    1959-01-01

    The Inyan Kara group of Early Creaceous age and the underlying Morrison formation and Unkapa sandstone of Late Jurassic age comprise about 300 to 850 feet of gently dipping predominantly nonmarine rocks that crop out along the flanks of the Black Hills in northeastern Wyoming and western South Dakota. Terailed mapping and stratigraphic studies of these rocks were made from 1952 to 1957 by the U.S. Geological Survey on behalf of the Division of Raw Materials of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. One of the results of the studies is a correlation of formational and informational units along the western side of the Black Hills for a distance of about 140 miles. The generalized section above, which has a greatly exaggerated vertical scale, shoes the main lithologic units that have been traced and correlated, and  the stratigraphic position of uranium deposits in various parts of the Black Hills in relation to these units. Geologists who have this sheet and the areas for which each is responsible are shown on the accompanying map. The brief text below summarizes some of the broad stratigraphic relations within the Inyan Kara group and underlying formations.

  9. Late Jurassic weather forecast, Four Corners area: Dry, hot, and partly sunny

    SciTech Connect

    Turner-Peterson, C.E.; Fishman, N.S. )

    1989-09-01

    Interfingering between members of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation and inferences based on their various environments of deposition permit interpretation of a persistent paleoclimate during the Late Jurassic in the Colorado Plateau region. Paleoclimate interpretation is based on evaporites in the Tidwell member, at the base of the Morrison; eolian deposits in the Recapture and Bluff Sandstone members; and saline, alkaline-lake deposits (which indicate high evaporation rates) in the Brushy Basin member at the top of the Morrison. Interfingering of these members with all other members of the Morrison Formation implies that a semiarid to arid climate was likely throughout Morrison time. The semiarid to arid interpretation is consistent with the global climatic zone inferred from the paleogeographic/paleotectonic setting. The Four Corners area during the Late Jurassic was in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and thus was affected by prevailing westerly winds. A magmatic arc located several hundred kilometers to the west of the Morrison depositional basin may have caused a broad rain-shadow effect, which contributed to a dry continental climate downwind. A typical Late Jurassic day in the Four Corners area is predicted to have been hot and dry, although seasonally heavy rains probably fed intermittent streams that transported sediments into the region. Explosive eruptions of silicic volcanic ash may have darkened the skies episodically, and thus partly sunny would have been a conservative forecast.

  10. The Lacustrine Upper Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Four Corners Region, Usa: a Lithological and Mineralogical Terrestrial Analog for Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The upper part of the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation is an iron- and clay-rich volcaniclastic shale deposited in an ephemeral alkaline saline lake system. Sedimentary rocks exposed in Gale Crater consist of similar non-acidic clays, possibly of lacustrine origin. Three primary clastic lithofacies are present in both the Brushy Basin Member and at Gale Crater: silt-/claystone, sandstone, and conglomerate. Both the terrestrial and martian silt-/claystone lithofacies are interpreted as lacustrine depositional environments due to features such as parallel laminated and massive sedimentary structures. Vugs are present in the siltstone/claystone facies on both the Colorado Plateau and at Gale Crater. Fluvial features are also observed in both examples such as cross-bedded sandstones and imbricated conglomerates. Concretions are present in both the Colorado Plateau and Gale Crater units. The vugs in the Brushy Basin Member preserve algal forms with cellular elaboration and are interpreted as charophyte molds. Two distinct suites of elements (1. C, Fe, As, P and, 2. C, S, Se, P) are associated with the microbial fossils and may be potential markers for biosignatures. Vugs at Gale Crater are a potential target to investigate the possibility of preserved microbial (algal) life where early analyses show the presence of the elements capable of supporting life. The Brushy Basin Member is composed predominately of quartz, feldspars, zeolites and altered volcanic ash. The abundant clay minerals in both the terrestrial and martian examples are hypothesized to have formed due to partial alteration of volcanic minerals in alkaline fluid. Similarly, concretions present in the terrestrial unit exhibit a diverse range of mineralogies likely due to alkaline fluid chemistries interacting with reactive volcaniclastic sediments. Terrestrial concretion mineralogy is diverse even within an outcrop or stratigraphic horizon which suggests reactants to precipitate

  11. Surface to subsurface cross sections showing correlation of the Dakota Sandstone, Burro Canyon (?) Formation, and upper part of the Morrison Formation in the Chama-El Vado area, Chama Basin, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgley, Jennie L.

    1987-01-01

    This report shows the correlation of the Dakota Sandstone, Burro Canyon(?) Formation, and the upper part of the Morrison Formation in the Chama basin from E1 Cerro dome, just west of Chama, to El Vado Reservoir. Criteria needed to recognize these formations both at the outcrop and in the subsurface is also included. 

  12. The geographic and phylogenetic position of sauropod dinosaurs from the Kota formation (Early Jurassic) of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, David D.

    2003-03-01

    The earliest sauropods are the Late Triassic Isanosaurus from Thailand, the Early Jurassic Barapasaurus and Kotasaurus from the Kota Formation of the Pranhita-Godavari Basin of India and Vulcanodon from Zimbabwe, and a variety of Middle Jurassic genera from many localities in Gondwana and Laurasia except North America. These early sauropod genera are related, but their phylogenetic positions remain unresolved. Sauropods originated in Laurasia (Thailand and vicinity) or Pangea (broadly, Thailand, China, India), with at least three additional steps involving expansion and diversification through the Middle Jurassic.

  13. Adragna Rebuttal to Morrison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adragna, Steven P.

    1985-01-01

    Morrison's critique of the Reagan Administration's Strategic Defense Initiative is representative of the views of those who oppose ballistic missile defense (Georgia Social Science Journal; v16 n2 p12-14 Spr 1985). Morrison's analysis is thoughtful, well structured, and well presented. However, it is quite wrong. Fallacies in his analysis are…

  14. The Jurassic section along McElmo Canyon in southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Sullivan, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    In McElmo Canyon, Jurassic rocks are 1500-1600 ft thick. Lower Jurassic rocks of the Glen Canyon Group include (in ascending order) Wingate Sandstone, Kayenta Formation and Navajo Sandstone. Middle Jurassic rocks are represented by the San Rafael Group, which includes the Entrada Sandstone and overlying Wanakah Formation. Upper Jurassic rocks comprise the Junction Creek Sandstone overlain by the Morrison Formation. The Burro Canyon Formation, generally considered to be Lower Cretaceous, may be Late Jurassic in the McElmo Canyon area and is discussed with the Jurassic. The Upper Triassic Chinle Formation in the subsurface underlies, and the Upper Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone overlies, the Jurassic section. An unconformity is present at the base of the Glen Canyon Group (J-0), at the base of the San Rafael Group (J-2), and at the base of the Junction Creek Sandstone (J-5). Another unconformity of Cretaceous age is at the base of the Dakota Sandstone. Most of the Jurassic rocks consist of fluviatile, lacustrine and eolian deposits. The basal part of the Entrada Sandstone and the Wanakah Formation may be of marginal marine origin.

  15. Palynological age determination for Dorcheat and Hosston Formations - Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary in northern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R.

    1987-09-01

    Forty-four core samples from three wells drilled into the Dorcheat and Hosston formations in northern Louisiana were examined for fossil palynomorphs. These samples were obtained from the four beds of the Dorcheat formation, and from the lower two beds of the Hosston Formation. A diverse terrestrial and marine palynoflora containing stratigraphically significant species indicates that the cored section of strata spans the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary.

  16. Palaeoenvironmental and sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Jurassic Datta Formation, Salt Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Jan, Irfan U.; Akhter, M. Gulraiz; Bibi, Mehwish

    2015-06-01

    The Lower Jurassic Datta Formation, western Salt Range, Pakistan, comprises three facies associations: (1) channel belt facies association (CBFA), (2) channel margin, and overbank facies association (CMOFA), and (3) lagoonal facies association (LFA). A cyclic fining-upward trend in the succession is represented by basal quartzose conglomerate/pebbly sandstone, through coarse to fine quartzose sandstone to siltstone and shales/claystone, which contains some carbonate accumulation. Two prominent depositional sequences are recognized in the Datta Formation with the lower high and upper low magnitude cycles. The Datta Formation thus represents a thick sedimentary succession and in the study area, i.e., western Salt Range, mainly channel belt, flood plain and/or delta top facies are exposed. The palaeocurrent analysis shows that the source area with acidic plutonic rocks laid to S-SE in the Indian shield, aravalies or older sedimentary rocks of the Indus Basin (i.e., Khewra, Tobra and Warchha formations). A tentative stratigraphic correlation of the Datta Formation with the lower Jurassic Lathi Formation, India invites further work in parts of India, which will elaborate the extent of the Datta Formation in the Greater Indian peninsula and develop palaeogeographic setting for this Lower Jurassic deltaic rock unit.

  17. Comparison of abundances of chemical elements in mineralized and unmineralized sandstone of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Smith Lake District, Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, C.T.; Spirakis, C.S.; Robertson, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of analytical data from the Mariano Lake and Ruby uranium deposits in the Smith Lake district, New Mexico, indicates that organic carbon, arsenic, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, gallium, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, strontium, sulfur, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium are concentrated along with uranium in primary ore. Comparison of the Smith Lake data with information from other primary deposits in the Grants uranium region and elsewhere in the Morrison Formation of the Colorado Plateau suggests that these elements, with the possible exceptions of zirconium and gallium and with the probable addition of aluminum and magnesium, are typically associated with primary, tabular uranium deposits. Chemical differences between the Ruby and Mariano Lake deposits are consistent with the interpretation that the Ruby deposit has been more affected by post-mineralization oxidizing solutions than has the Mariano Lake deposit.

  18. Two new species of Trichoceridae from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Inner Mongolia, China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Fei; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Two new species, Eotrichocera (Archaeotrichocera) longensis sp. n. and Eotrichocera (Archaeotrichocera) amabilis sp. n. of Trichoceridae are described based on a combination of the following characters: Sc ending proximad of the forking of R2, shape of d cell and A2 rather short and bending sharply toward posterior margin. These fossil specimens were collected from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Daohugou in Inner Mongolia, China. PMID:24899858

  19. New fossil record of a Jurassic pterosaur from Neuquen Basin, Vaca Muerta Formation, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codorniú, Laura; Garrido, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Discoveries of Jurassic pterosaurs in the Southern Hemisphere are extremely unusual. In Argentina, pterosaurs from the Upper Jurassic (Tithonian) have only been found in the Northwest of Patagonia (Neuquén Basin). These come from marine deposits and three specimens have been discovered up to the present. In this paper, we report a new finding from the Neuquén Basin. This material is identified as a tibiotarsus, which probably belonged to an osteologically adult individual and represents a new species of a pterodactyloid pterosaur of medium size. This discovery provides new evidence that at least two different species of pterodactyloid pterosaurs may have coexisted in Los Catutos Member, Vaca Muerta Formation, from the shallow marine deposits of the Neuquén Basin.

  20. New Fossil Lepidoptera (Insecta: Amphiesmenoptera) from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiting; Shih, Chungkun; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Sohn, Jae-Cheon; Davis, Donald R.; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A.; Flint, Oliver; Ren, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background The early history of the Lepidoptera is poorly known, a feature attributable to an inadequate preservational potential and an exceptionally low occurrence of moth fossils in relevant mid-Mesozoic deposits. In this study, we examine a particularly rich assemblage of morphologically basal moths that contribute significantly toward the understanding of early lepidopteran biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Our documentation of early fossil moths involved light- and scanning electron microscopic examination of specimens, supported by various illumination and specimen contrast techniques. A total of 20 moths were collected from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation in Northeastern China. Our principal results were the recognition and description of seven new genera and seven new species assigned to the Eolepidopterigidae; one new genus with four new species assigned to the Mesokristenseniidae; three new genera with three new species assigned to the Ascololepidopterigidae fam. nov.; and one specimen unassigned to family. Lepidopteran assignment of these taxa is supported by apomorphies of extant lineages, including the M1 vein, after separation from the M2 vein, subtending an angle greater than 60 degrees that is sharply angulate at the junction with the r–m crossvein (variable in Trichoptera); presence of a foretibial epiphysis; the forewing M vein often bearing three branches; and the presence of piliform scales along wing veins. Conclusions/Significance The diversity of these late Middle Jurassic lepidopterans supports a conclusion that the Lepidoptera–Trichoptera divergence occurred by the Early Jurassic. PMID:24278142

  1. Recoverable natural gas reserves from Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Alabama coastal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Hamilton, R.P.

    1987-09-01

    To date, 11 Norphlet gas fields have been established in offshore Alabama. These fields are part of a deep Jurassic gas trend that extends across southern Mississippi and Alabama into the Gulf of Mexico. Recoverable gas reserves of 4.9-8.1 tcf are estimated for the Norphlet Formation in Alabama's coastal waters. Proven gas reserves are estimated to be 3.7-4.6 tcf and potential reserves are estimated to be 1.2-3.5 tcf. The natural gas is trapped in a series of generally east-west-trending salt anticlines. The mechanism of structure formation appears to be salt flowage that has formed broad, low-relief anticlines, most of which are faulted, and many of which are related to small-scale growth faults. Salt movement is the critical factor in the formation of these petroleum traps. The primary Norphlet reservoir lithofacies are eolian dune and interdune sandstones that range in thickness from 140 to over 600 ft in Alabama's coastal waters. Gas pay can exceed 280 ft in thickness. Porosity is principally secondary, developed as a result of decementation and grain dissolution. Jurassic Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were the main source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. The seal for the gas is the nonpermeable upper portion of the Norphlet Formation. The overlying lower Smackover carbonates are also nonpermeable and may serve as part of the seal.

  2. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  3. Geochemical relationships of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Claypool, G.E.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-07-01

    Algal carbonate mudstones of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are the main source rocks for oil and condensate in Mesozoic reservoir rocks in southwestern Alabama. This interpretation is based on geochemical analyses of oils, condensates, and organic matter in selected samples of shale (Norphlet Formation, Haynesville Formation, Trinity Group, Tuscaloosa Group) and carbonate (Smackover Formation) rocks. Potential and probable oil source rocks are present in the Tuscaloosa Group and Smackover Formation, respectively. Extractable organic matter from Smackover carbonates has molecular and isotopic similarities to Jurassic oil. Although the Jurassic oils and condensates in southwestern Alabama have genetic similarities, they show significant compositional variations due to differences in thermal maturity and organic facies/lithofacies. Organic facies reflect different depositional conditions for source rocks in the various basins. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin was characterized by more continuous marine to hypersaline conditions, whereas the Manila and Conecuh embayments periodically had lower salnity and greater input of clastic debris and terrestrial organic matter. Petroleum and organic matter in Jurassic rocks of southwestern Alabama show a range of thermal transformations. The gas content of hydrocarbons in reservoirs increases with increasing depth and temperature. In some reservoirs where the temperature is above 266/degrees/F(130/degrees/C), gas-condensate is enriched in isotopically heavy sulfur, apparently derived from thermochemical reduction of Jurassic evaporite sulfate. This process also resulted in increase H/sub 2/S and CO in the gas, and depletion of saturated hydrocarbons in the condensate liquids.

  4. The Anari and Tapirapua Jurassic formations, western Brazil: Paleomagnetism, geochemistry and geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Lauar, C. R.; Pacca, I. G.; Melfi, A. J.; Piccirillo, E. M.; Bellieni, G.; Petrini, R.; Rizzieri, R.

    1994-12-01

    The Anari and Tapirapua formations are very similar from the point of view of paleomagnetic, geochronological and geochemical results. They date from around 197 Ma and the flows are mainly tholeiitic basalts with a low TiO2 and incompatible element content. The magnetic carriers in rocks from these two formations were highly oxidized titanomagnetites, maghemites and, probably, titanomaghemites. Paleomagnetic analysis has shown that the magnetizations are all normal in polarity and virtual geomagnetic poles obtained for both formations are indistinguishable at the 95% confidence level. The calculated mean for these poles is 250.3 deg E, 65.5 deg S (N = 15; A95 = 3.6 deg; KSC = 1578). This pole is compatible with Jurassic poles which have been determined for South America or transposed from Africa.

  5. Fossils from the Middle Jurassic Wanakah formation near Delta in western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Sullivan, R. B.; Carey, M.A.; Good, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Middle Jurassic Wanakah Formation averages about 30 m in thickness in Colorado. Fossils are sparse and include fish, ostracodes, and trace fossils. A thin (0.03-0.45 m) fossil bed near the middle of the formation extends for some 48 km along the northeast flank of the Uncompahgre Plateau near Delta. The fossil bed at one locality contains one pelecypod identified possibly as Modiolus cf. M. subimbricatus (Meek), as well as other specimens too poorly preserved for identification. Previously, Mytilus was found in the same fossil bed at another locality by C.N. Holmes. The Wanakah Formation is primarily of terrestrial origin, but the fossil bed represents a shallow-marine incursion.

  6. Anomalous Iridium Enrichment at the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary, Blomidon Formation, Fundy Basin, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We present new analyses that confirm Ir enrichment (up to 0.31 ng/g) in close proximity to the palynological Triassic-Jurassic boundary in strata near the top of the Blomidon Formation at Partridge Island, Nova Scotia. High Ir concentrations have been found in at least two samples within the uppermost 70 cm of the formation. Ratios of other PGEs and Au to Ir are generally higher by an order of magnitude than in ordinary chondrites. No impact-related materials have been identified at #is horizon in the Blomidon Formation, therefore we cannot confirm an extraterrestrial source for the anomalous Ir levels. We consider, however, the possibility that regional basaltic volcanism is a potential source for the Ir in these sediments. The elevated Ir concentrations are found in reduced, grey colored mudstones, so redox concentration is a possible explanation for the distribution of Ir in these strata.

  7. Mollusks of the Upper Jurassic (upper Oxfordian-lower Kimmeridgian) shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation, northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, Patrick; Beckmann, Seija; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Götte, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We present the first systematic description of Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) invertebrates from the shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation of northeastern Mexico. The unit was generally considered to be extremely poor in fossils, due to an overall evaporitic character. The collection described here includes three taxa of ammonites, 10 taxa of bivalves and five taxa of gastropods. The fossils were discovered near Galeana and other localities in southern Nuevo León and northeastern San Luis Potosí, in thin-bedded marly limestones intercalated between gypsum units. Due to complex internal deformation of the sediments, fossils used for this study cannot be assigned to precise layers of origin. However, the taxa identified suggest a Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) age for these fossil-bearing layers and allow us, for the first time, to assign a biostratigraphic age to Upper Jurassic strata in the region underlying the La Caja and La Casita formations.

  8. Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic) of southwestern and offshore Alabama: environments of deposition and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Mink, R.M.; Wilkerson, R.P.

    1985-06-01

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern and offshore Alabama accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama to provide a barrier for air and water circulation during the deposition of the Norphlet Formation. These mountains produced topographic conditions that contributed to the arid climate, and they affected sedimentation. Norphlet paleogeography in southwestern Alabama was dominated by a broad desert plain, rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. The desert plain extended westward into eastern and central Mississippi. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent; six oil and gas fields already have been established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist primarily of quartz-rich sandstones that are eolian, wadi, and marine in origin. Porosity is principally secondary (dissolution) with some intergranular porosity. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. Jurassic oil generation and migration probably were initiated in the Early Cretaceous.

  9. Recognition and source correlation of migrated hydrocarbons in Upper Jurassic Hareelv Formation, Jameson Land, east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Requejo, A.G.; Hollywood, J.; Halpern, H.I. )

    1989-09-01

    Organic geochemical analysis of an interbedded shales and sandstone sequence from the Upper Jurassic Hareelv Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland, has revealed oil shows in the sandstones, consistent with petroleum generation and migration. A comparison of the molecular characteristics of extractable material from the sandstones with those of kerogen and bitumen from the shales indicates that the most likely origin of these shows is generation within the shales with expulsion and short-range migration into the sandstones. This conclusion is based on comparisons of biological marker distributions, stable carbon isotopic compositions of extractable material and kerogen, and pyrolysate compositions of kerogen and asphaltenes. Oil from a seep in the Savoia Halvo region south of Jameson Land can be correlated to the Jurassic sandstone oil shows based on similar isotopic compositions and asphaltene pyrolysate distributions. Impregnation of both sandstones and shales throughout the sequence by products generated at higher maturities is considered unlikely, but cannot be ruled out by the existing data. 18 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Palaeoclimatic conditions in the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic of southern Africa: A geochemical assessment of the Elliot Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciscio, Lara; Bordy, Emese M.

    2016-07-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic boundary marks a global faunal turnover event that is generally considered as the third largest of five major biological crises in the Phanerozoic geological record of Earth. Determining the controlling factors of this event and their relative contributions to the biotic turnover associated with it is on-going globally. The Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic rock record of southern Africa presents a unique opportunity for better constraining how and why the biosphere was affected at this time not only because the succession is richly fossiliferous, but also because it contains important palaeoenvironmental clues. Using mainly sedimentary geochemical proxies (i.e., major, trace and rare earth elements), our study is the first quantitative assessment of the palaeoclimatic conditions during the deposition of the Elliot Formation, a continental red bed succession that straddles the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in southern Africa. Employing clay mineralogy as well as the indices of chemical alteration and compositional variability, our results confirm earlier qualitative sedimentological studies and indicate that the deposition of the Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic Elliot Formation occurred under increasingly dry environmental conditions that inhibited chemical weathering in this southern part of Pangea. Moreover, the study questions the universal validity of those studies that suggest a sudden increase in humidity for the Lower Jurassic record and supports predictions of long-term global warming after continental flood basalt emplacement.

  11. Present and past ground-water conditions in the Morrison Formation in southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phoenix, D.A.

    1952-01-01

    Whatever mode of origin is used to explain the deposits, geologists almost without exception, agree that the metals were transported by solutions that have migrated through the sediments for considerable distances. For this reason, a study of the horizontal and vertical transmissibility characteristics of all exposed sedimentary formations on the Colorado Plateau is planned.

  12. Undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the U.S. Gulf Coast Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover Formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Ofori N.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has completed assessments of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and gas resources in the Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations of the onshore coastal plain and State waters of the U.S. Gulf Coast. The Norphlet Formation consists of sandstones and interbedded shales and siltstones deposited during a marine transgression. Along its northeast margin, deposition of the Norphlet was in alluvial fans, fluvial systems, and dune and clastic sabkha environments. Mudstones of the underlying Smackover Formation act as source rocks for Norphlet reservoirs. The Norphlet was divided into the following three assessment units (AUs): the Norphlet Salt Basins and Updip AU, the Norphlet Mobile Bay Deep Gas AU, and the Norphlet South Texas Gas AU. The lower part of the Smackover consists primarily of dark carbonate mudstone and argillaceous limestone deposited in low-energy environments, and is one of the Gulf of Mexico Basin’s major source rocks. The upper part of the Smackover is comprised primarily of grain-supported carbonates deposited in high-energy environments. The Smackover was divided into the following four AUs: the Smackover Updip and Peripheral Fault Zone AU, the Smackover Salt Basin AU, the Smackover South Texas AU, and the Smackover Downdip Continuous Gas AU. Although the Norphlet and Smackover formations have been the focus of extensive exploration and production, they probably still contain significant undiscovered oil and gas resources.

  13. Diagenesis of fluvial sands in Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic), Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Keighin, C.W.; Schenk, C.J.

    1989-03-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important hydrocarbon reservoir in Baldwin and Mobile Counties and offshore in Mobile Bay, Alabama. The formation is not productive in the Little Escambia Creek field, Escambia County, but underlies the productive Smackover Formation at a depth of approximately 15,500 ft (4725 m). The Norphlet sandstones examined in cores from two drill holes are largely fluvial in origin and consist of moderately to well-sorted, very fine to coarse-grained feldspathic sandstones extensively altered by a complex sequence of diagenetic reactions. Visible evidence of chemical and mechanical compaction is relatively minor in the sandstones. Paucity of compaction suggests that extensive early cementation by anhydrite and/or calcite reduced compaction; these cements were subsequently removed by migrating fluids. Porosity, both intergranular and intragranular, is generally well developed. Intergranular pores are due primarily to partial to complete dissolution of cements and mineral grains, especially feldspar. Intragranular pores are largely the result of partial leaching of rock fragments and of microporosity formed by precipitation of clay minerals in earlier dissolution pores.

  14. Philip Morrison--A Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Anne

    1982-01-01

    Highlights the career and accomplishments of Philip Morrison, one of the most thoughtful advocates of arms control, valued for his scientific contributions to the Manhattan Project, theoretical physics, astrophysics, and the public understanding of science. (Author/JN)

  15. David Morrison on Lake Vostok

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. David Morrison discusses the implications of research possibilities at Lake Vostok, one of the largest subglacial lakes located over two miles beneath the ice in Antarctica. The lake has been c...

  16. Fabric analysis of mudstone cycles in the East Berlin Formation, Lower Jurassic, East Berlin, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, P.S.; Jewett, C.H. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    A fabric analysis was performed on cyclic grey and black mudstones of lacustrine or fluvial origin from the Lower Jurassic East Berlin Formation near East Berlin, Connecticut. The analysis was to test the utility of macro and microfabric of mudstones in interpreting processes of deposition. The mudstone fabrics were studied with the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and with petrographic techniques using the criteria of O'Brien (1990). Random orientation of clay fabric and grey color are indicators of bioturbation and relatively oxygen-rich environments. The black mudstones show wavy lamination with no evidence of bioturbation. These features coupled with the black color are indicators of relatively oxygen-poor environments. Minor amounts of quartz are found within the clays and crystals of dolomite occur in the black mudstones. SEM analysis shows random clay fabric in both the grey and black mudstones of the East Berlin Formation. On a macroscopic scale, burrows seen in thin sections of the grey mudstone provide clear evidence of bioturbation. The regularity in thickness ([+-] 1 meter) of the black and grey mudstone cycles and the consistent pattern of features in each facies suggests they were deposited in a lacustrine (perennial lake) environment rather than a fluvial environment.

  17. Geologic framework of the Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation the Alabama coastal waters area

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, B.H.; Mancini, E.A. ); Mink R.M.; Mann, S.D. ); Mancini, E.A.

    1993-09-01

    The Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a prolific hydrocarbon-producing geologic unit in the onshore Gulf of Mexico area, including southwest Alabama. However, no Smackover strata containing commercial accumulations of oil or gas have thus far been discovered in the Alabama state coastal waters area (ACW). This study of the regional geologic framework of the Smackover Formation was done to characterize the unit in the ACW and to compare strata in the ACW with productive Smackover intervals in the onshore area. In the study area, the Smackover Formation was deposited on a highly modified carbonate associated with pre-Smackover topographic features. In the onshore Alabama, north of the Wiggins arch complex, an inner ramp developed in the area of the Mississippi interior salt basin and the Manila and Conecuh embayments. South of the Wiggins arch complex in extreme southern onshore Alabama and in the ACW, an outer ramp formed that was characterized by a much thicker Smackover section. In the outer ramp setting, four lithofacies associations are recognized: lower, middle, and upper outer ramp lithofacies (ORL) and the coastal dolostone lithofacies. The coastal dolostone lithofacies accounts for most of the reservoir-grade porosity in the outer ramp setting. The lower, middle, and upper ORL, for the most part, are nonporous. Volumetrically, intercrystalline porosity is the most important pore type in the coastal dolostone lithofacies. Numerous data in the ACW area indicate that halokinesis has created structural conditions favorable for accumulation and entrapment of oil and gas in the outer ramp lithofacies of the Smackover. Prolific hydrocarbon source rocks are present in the ACW, as evidenced by the significant natural gas accumulations in the Norphlet Formation. To date, however, reservoir quality rocks of the coastal dolostone lithofacies coincident with favorable structural conditions have not been encountered in the ACW.

  18. Clastic Pipes: Proxies of High Water Tables and Strong Ground Motion, Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, David; Chan, Marjorie

    2015-04-01

    Multiple soft sediment deformation features from bed-scale to basin-scale are well preserved within the Jurassic Carmel Formation of Southern Utah. Field mapping reveals thousands of small-scale clastic injectite pipes (10 cm to 10 m diameter, up to 20 m tall) in extremely high densities (up to 500+ pipes per 0.075 square kilometers). The pipes weather out in positive relief from the surrounding host strata of massive sandstone (sabkha) and crossbedded sands with minor conglomerate and shale (fluvial) deposits. The host rock shows both brittle and ductile deformation. Reverse, normal, and antithetical faulting is common with increased frequency, including ring faults, surrounding the pipes. The pipes formed from liquefaction and subsequent fluidization induced by strong ground motion. Down-dropped, graben blocks and ring faults surrounding pipes indicate initial sediment volume increase during pipe emplacement followed by sediment volume decrease during dewatering. Complex crosscutting relationships indicate several injection events where some pipe events reached the surface as sand blows. Multiple ash layers provide excellent stratigraphic and temporal constraints for the pipe system with the host strata deposited between 166 and 164 Ma. Common volcanic fragments and rounded volcanic cobbles occur within sandstone and conglomerate beds, and pipes. Isolated volcanic clasts in massive sandstone indicate explosive volcanic events that could have been the exogenic trigger for earthquakes. The distribution of pipes are roughly parallel to the Middle Jurassic paleoshoreline located in marginal environments between the shallow epicontinental Sundance Sea and continental dryland. At the vertical stratigraphic facies change from dominantly fluvial sediments to dominantly massive sabkha sediments, there is a 1-2 m-thick floodplain mudstone that was a likely seal for underlying, overpressurized sediments. The combination of loose porous sediment at a critical depth of water

  19. Model for isopaching Jurassic-age Norphlet Formation in Mobile Bay, Alabama area

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, L.F.

    1989-03-01

    Deep gas was discovered in the Norphlet Sandstone of Mobile Bay Alabama in 1979. Sixteen wells, of which Exxon Company, U.S.A. has had an interest in eight, have tested gas from depths greater than 20,000 ft and at an average rate of 19 million ft/sub 3/ of gas per day. The dominant structural features in Mobile Bay are large east-west-trending salt-supported anticlines associated with salt pull-apart listric normal faulting. Throws on these faults measure up to 1000 ft. Individual structures have dimensions as large as 15 mi in an east-west strike direction and 8 mi in a north-south dip direction. The Jurassic age (Callovian) Norphlet of Mobile Bay is characterized by eolian dune sand deposits up to 700 ft thick. An important factor affecting future development drilling is the accurate prediction of reservoir thickness. This presentation shows that an integrated study of seismic and well data has facilitated the development of a geological model for isopaching the Norphlet Formation. The isopach exhibits a strong north-northwest-south-southeast orientation of parallel thicks and thins. These trends are believed to be the result of original eolian deposition of complex linear dunes in the Norphlet Sandstone. The major east-west structural grain of faults and anticlines overprints this preserved depositional trend.

  20. A new pterosaur tracksite from the jurassic summerville formation, near Ferron, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mickelson, D.L.; Lockley, M.G.; Bishop, J.; Kirkland, J.

    2003-01-01

    Pterosaur tracks (cf. Pteraichnus) from the Summerville Formation of the Ferron area of central Utah add to the growing record of Pteraichnus tracksites in the Late Jurassic Summerville Formation and time-equivalent, or near time-equivalent, deposits. The site is typical in revealing high pterosaur track densities, but low ichnodiversity suggesting congregations or "flocks" of many individuals. Footprint length varies from 2.0 to 7.0 cms. The ratio of well-preserved pes:manus tracks is about 1:3.4. This reflects a bias in favor of preservation of manus tracks due to the greater weight-bearing role of the front limbs, as noted in other pterosaur track assemblages. The sample also reveals a number of well-preserved trackways including one suggestive of pes-only progression that might be associated with take off or landing, and another that shows pronounced lengthening of stride indicating acceleration. One well-preserved medium-sized theropod trackway (Therangospodus) and other larger theropod track casts (cf. Megalosauripus) are associated with what otherwise appears to be a nearly monospecific pterosaur track assemblage. However, traces of a fifth pes digit suggest some tracks are of rhamphorynchoid rather than pterodactyloid origin, as usually inferred for Pteraichnus. The tracks occur at several horizons in a thin stratigraphic interval of ripple marked sandstones and siltstones. Overall the assemblage is similar to others found in the same time interval in the Western Interior from central and eastern Utah through central and southern Wyoming, Colorado, northeastern Arizona, and western Oklahoma. This vast "Pteraichnus ichnofacies" with associated saurischian tracks, remains the only ichnological evidence of pre-Cretaceous pterosaurs in North America and sheds important light on the vertebrate ecology of the Summerville Formation and contiguous deposits. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

  1. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta formation, Venezuelan Andes

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Max C.; Rincón, Ascanio D.; Ramezani, Jahandar; Solórzano, Andrés; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along the western border of Venezuela, where strata of the La Quinta Formation have yielded the ornithischian Laquintasaura venezuelae and other dinosaur remains. Here, we report isolated bones (ischium and tibia) of a small new theropod, Tachiraptor admirabilis gen. et sp. nov., which differs from all previously known members of the group by an unique suite of features of its tibial articulations. Comparative/phylogenetic studies place the new form as the sister taxon to Averostra, a theropod group that is known primarily from the Middle Jurassic onwards. A new U–Pb zircon date (isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry; ID-TIMS method) from the bone bed matrix suggests an earliest Jurassic maximum age for the La Quinta Formation. A dispersal–vicariance analysis suggests that such a stratigraphic gap is more likely to be filled by new records from north and central Pangaea than from southern areas. Indeed, our data show that the sampled summer-wet equatorial belt, which yielded the new taxon, played a pivotal role in theropod evolution across the Triassic–Jurassic boundary. PMID:26064540

  2. Petrologic and experimental evidence for the etching of garnets by organic acids in the upper Jurassic Morrision Formation, northwestern New Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Etching of garnets and partial to complete dissolution of other aluminosilicate minerals were caused by high concentrations of organic acids generated during the maturation of epigenetic organic matter (predominantly type-III kerogen) in the Morrison Formation. The presence of authigenic phases that form near 100oC indicates that temperatures were high enough during diagenesis to cause the thermal degradation of kerogen.-from Author

  3. New evidence of shared dinosaur across Upper Jurassic Proto-North Atlantic: Stegosaurus from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Escaso, Fernando; Ortega, Francisco; Dantas, Pedro; Malafaia, Elisabete; Pimentel, Nuno L; Pereda-Suberbiola, Xabier; Sanz, José Luis; Kullberg, José Carlos; Kullberg, María Carla; Barriga, Fernando

    2007-05-01

    More than one century after its original description by Marsh in 1877, we report in this paper the first uncontroversial evidence of a member of the genus Stegosaurus out of North America. The specimen consists of a partial skeleton from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal, herein considered as Stegosaurus cf. ungulatus. The presence of this plated dinosaur in the upper Kimmeridgian-lower Tithonian Portuguese record and synchronic levels of the Morrison Formation of North America reinforces previous hypothesis of a close relationship between these two areas during the Late Jurassic. This relationship is also supported by geotectonic evidences indicating high probability of an episodic corridor between the Newfoundland and Iberian landmasses. Together, Portuguese Stegosaurus discovery and geotectonic inferences could provide a scenario with episodical faunal contact among North Atlantic landmasses during the uppermost Kimmeridgian-lowermost Tithonian (ca. 148-153 Ma ago).

  4. New evidence of shared dinosaur across Upper Jurassic Proto-North Atlantic: Stegosaurus from Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escaso, Fernando; Ortega, Francisco; Dantas, Pedro; Malafaia, Elisabete; Pimentel, Nuno L.; Pereda-Suberbiola, Xabier; Sanz, José Luis; Kullberg, José Carlos; Kullberg, María Carla; Barriga, Fernando

    2007-05-01

    More than one century after its original description by Marsh in 1877, we report in this paper the first uncontroversial evidence of a member of the genus Stegosaurus out of North America. The specimen consists of a partial skeleton from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal, herein considered as Stegosaurus cf. ungulatus. The presence of this plated dinosaur in the upper Kimmeridgian-lower Tithonian Portuguese record and synchronic levels of the Morrison Formation of North America reinforces previous hypothesis of a close relationship between these two areas during the Late Jurassic. This relationship is also supported by geotectonic evidences indicating high probability of an episodic corridor between the Newfoundland and Iberian landmasses. Together, Portuguese Stegosaurus discovery and geotectonic inferences could provide a scenario with episodical faunal contact among North Atlantic landmasses during the uppermost Kimmeridgian-lowermost Tithonian (ca. 148-153 Ma ago).

  5. Sedimentary facies and history of Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation in Conecuh embayment of south Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, R.A.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is an important petroleum-bearing unit in the deep subsurface of the gulf rim. The authors studied the sedimentary facies and sedimentary history of the Smackover in Escambia County, Alabama. The wells studied form an east-west strike section across the Conecuh embayment in south Alabama. In the central part of the embayment, the Smackover is 350 ft (107 m) thick and consists of a vertical sequence of the following correlative sedimentary facies. In stratigraphic order, they are: (1) basal, shallow-water facies that rests conformably on the underlying Norphlet and forms a discontinuous interval a few feet thick, consisting of algal-laminated mudstones, sandy packstones and grainstones, and clast horizons; (2) basinal, deep-water facies, 175 ft (53 m) thick, consisting of resedimented debris beds (oolitic-pisolitic-graded beds, 8 in or 24 cm thick) intercalated with laminated, very argillaceous mudstone and wackestone; (3) parallel and wavy-laminated, sparsely fossiliferous packstone and wackestone, 80 ft (24 m) thick, interpreted as a carbonate slope deposit that accumulated below storm wave base; (4) bioturbated oolitic, pelletal, and fossiliferous packstone with faint relict laminations, 45 ft (14 m) thick, containing abundant Thalassinoides and Zoophycus traces and interpreted as below normal wave base deposits; and (5) oolitic and fossiliferous grainstone, 50 ft (15 m) thick, interpreted as deposits formed above wave base (shelf-platform deposits). The above sequence suggests progradation of a carbonate shelf. This progradation probably followed the rapid eustatic sea-level rise of the Oxfordian.

  6. Controls on reservoir development in a shelf carbonate: Upper Jurassic smackover formation of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Mann, S.D.; Schmoker, J.W.

    1994-06-01

    Hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation in Alabama are predominately oolitic and pelletal dolostone. Pore systems are dominated by moldic and secondary intraparticle pores, intercrystalline pores, or mixtures of these pore types. All Smackover reservoirs in Alabama have been strongly affected by early cementation, dissolution of calcium-carbonate allochems, and dolomitization. Dolomitization of the Smackover in Alabama included penecontemporaneous, early burial, and late (deep) burial episodes. Fabric-selective dolomitization yielded reservoirs strongly influenced by both depositional fabric and diagenesis. Nonselective dolomitization yielded reservoirs with intercrystalline pore systems shaped primarily by diagenesis. Thermal exposure is inversely related to porosity, but the relationship is weak (r{sup 2} < 0.5). Fabric-selective dolostone is slightly more porous than nonselective dolostone when averaged over the entire study area (averages of 18.1% and 15.1%, respectively; p = 0.0001), but nonselective dolostone is more porous at a given level of equivalent vitrinite reflectance. Smackover fields on the north flank of the Wiggins arch are unusually porous given their level of thermal maturity, and are unusual in other ways as well. Local porosity variation was controlled by depositional fabric, early cementation, dissolution, and burial compaction and cementation. Regional permeability variation cannot be explained using existing data. Permeability is locally controlled by pore-throat size, the effects of dolomite crystal-size distribution, early cementation, fracturing, and burial compaction and cementation. Pore-throat size exhibits the strongest overall correlation with permeability (r{sup 2} = 0.54). Permeability and porosity are strongly correlated locally, but the regional correlation is weak.

  7. A New Upper Jurassic Ophthalmosaurid Ichthyosaur from the Slottsmøya Member, Agardhfjellet Formation of Central Spitsbergen

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Aubrey Jane; Druckenmiller, Patrick Scott; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Hurum, Jørn Harald

    2014-01-01

    Abundant new ichthyosaur material has recently been documented in the Slottsmøya Member of the Agardhfjellet Formation from the Svalbard archipelago of Norway. Here we describe a partial skeleton of a new taxon, Janusaurus lundi, that includes much of the skull and representative portions of the postcranium. The new taxon is diagnosed by a suite of cranial character states including a very gracile stapedial shaft, the presence of a dorsal process on the prearticular and autapomorphic postcranial features such as the presence of an interclavicular trough and a conspicuous anterodorsal process of the ilium. The peculiar morphology of the ilia indicates a previously unrecognized degree of morphological variation in the pelvic girdle of ophthalmosaurids. We also present a large species level phylogenetic analysis of ophthalmosaurids including new and undescribed ichthyosaur material from the Upper Jurassic of Svalbard. Our results recover all Svalbard taxa in a single unresolved polytomy nested within Ophthalmosaurinae, which considerably increases the taxonomic composition of this clade. The paleobiogeographical implications of this result suggest the presence of a single clade of Boreal ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs that existed during the latest Jurassic, a pattern also reflected in the high degree of endemicity among some Boreal invertebrates, particularly ammonoids. Recent and ongoing descriptions of marine reptiles from the Slottsmøya Member Lagerstätte provide important new data to test hypotheses of marine amniote faunal turnover at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary. PMID:25084533

  8. Obituary: Philip Morrison, 1915-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2005-12-01

    (somehow often as the conference summarizer). He was an early exponent of the idea of convergent evolution, meaning that structures (including intelligence) with similar functions might arise from very different beginnings. Morrison thought and wrote (often with students) about an enormous range of topics in astrophysics. This list, in fairness, includes both some successes and some false starts: (1) predictions of gamma ray emission from active galaxies, supernova remnants, and the general interstellar medium (long before any extra-solar gamma rays had been seen); (2) cooling of stellar remnants by neutrino emission (with Hong Yee Chiu); (3) possible X-ray emission mechanisms for clusters of galaxies (with James Felten); (4) a fluorescent theory of supernova light emission (akin at least to the current Ni-56 decay scenario); (5) the inevitable "Are quasars giant Crab Nebulas?" question; (6) a suggestion (with Ken Brecher) that the emission from gamma-ray bursts must be beamed into a narrow cone (now known to be true); (7) the association of a subset of active galaxies (including M82) with star formation fueled by recent infall of new gas rather than with a central black hole; (8) prediction of X-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and radio galaxies (later seen, though the mechanism is probably different); and (9) a shadowing mechanism to account for the jet found to be sticking out of the edge of the Crab Nebula in the 1980s. Like any charismatic scientist, he was surrounded by a "cloud" of Morrison stories, many included on the web sites, so here are only four "micros:" (a) about the discovery of gamma ray bursters with the Vela (bomb test monitoring) satellites and the evidence for plate tectonics from underground test monitoring seismometers, he said: "Well, it's hard to waste 108 dollars;" (b) explaining why it was okay to pretend to confuse the real and dummy bomb cores en route to the Trinity test site: "The real one was warm;" (c) concerning the enormous extent of

  9. Volcanic Facies of the Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation, Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay, Alaska Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation (Jtk), a >1,000-km-long belt of vol­canic facies within the accreted intra-oceanic Talkeetna Arc has been characterized within the Talkeetna Mountains, but on the Alaska Peninsula Jtk facies have not previously been described in detail. Here we describe facies of the Jtk stretching from the Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay. On the Iniskin Peninsula, a high concentration and great thickness of mafic to intermediate lavas, associated autobreccias and hyaloclastites, fluidal-clast breccias and possible pillows are suggestive of one or more submarine effusive eruption centers. Also volumetrically significant are non-stratified polymictic volcaniclastic breccia facies. Minor facies include thinly bedded volcaniclastic sandstone to pebble breccia-conglomerate facies, some of which are shard- and pumice-bearing pyroclastic deposits preserved in thinly bedded deposits, indicative of episodes of explosive volcanism and the eruption-fed nature of some of the deposits. North of Chinitna Bay, coherent facies tend to be thin and relatively small in volume. Volcaniclastic facies provide evidence of subaerial-fluvial deposition, and pyroclastic activity. Thinly bedded, laterally continuous beds locally exhibit cross-laminations, channel fills, normal grading and lenticular beds, and contain plant fossils. Within this sequence is a 10-m-thick pumice breccia containing fossilized logs, underlain by a thin, weakly laminated, pumice- and lithic-bearing volcaniclastic siltstone to sandstone. The log-bearing pumice breccia and the lithic-bearing laminated basal unit represent pyroclastic density current (PDC) facies deposited in a subaerial or possibly shallow aqueous environment. Underlying the PDC deposit are several 30-cm-thick maroon and olive green volcaniclastic fine-grained sandstone and siltstone beds containing channel fills, cross-beds and lenticular beds. Marbles exposed in the contact zone between the intrusions of Alaska

  10. Microtaphofacies of Lower Jurassic Limestones from the Rotzo Formation, Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Luise; Nebelsick, James; Bassi, Davide; Posenato, Renato

    2015-04-01

    Microtaphofacies investigations allow for the study of taphonomic features of cemented limestones as found in thin sections. It allows for changes in environmental parameters to be assessed especially with respect to abrasion, fragmentation, encrustation and bioerosion of biotic components. Variations of taphonomic features along environmental gradients can thus be examined and can be compared to other facies determining features such as the distribution of specific biotic components as well as carbonate fabrics. The Lower Jurassic Rotzo Formation, occurring in the palaeogeographic unit Trento Platform (Southern Alps, Italy), is characterized by very well preserved components in a shallow water lagoonal setting. Components are dominated by dasycladalean algae, small and large benthic foraminifera, various bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods and echinoderms. Oncoids and trace fossils can also be prevalent. Although bioclastic components are commonly preserved in very fine micritic limestones, various types of mass occurrences are also present especially with respect to the bivalves including the well known Lithiotis fauna. Microfacies are dominated by mudstones. Bioclastic rich microfacies are also present with packstones and rudstones mainly containing foraminifera and bivalves, but also including, and in part dominated by other components. Microtaphofacies were studied along the Monte Toraro section to the east of Tonezza del Cimone (Vicenza Province). Abrasion, fragmentation, bioerosion and encrustation were qualitatively and semi-quantitatively analyzed with features being scored into three categories equivalent to good, fair, and poor preservation. This allowed for changes along the section to be analyzed. Abrasion and fragmentation are common in all facies and affect most components. Encrustation and bioerosion rates, however, are highly variably are only dominate in oncoids rich facies. Components in mass shell accumulations are often very well preserved

  11. A cratonic Middle Jurassic paleopole: Callovian-Oxfordian stillstand (J-2 cusp), rotation of the Colorado Plateau, and Jurassic North American apparent polar wander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Maureen B.

    2003-06-01

    Paleomagnetic results have been obtained from two sequences of the upper Middle Jurassic (upper Callovian) Summerville Formation which are located on the North American craton (north central New Mexico). The thicker of the two sections (Trujillo) exhibits a well-defined dual-polarity remanence, forming a magnetostratigraphy of at least 12 relatively short polarity intervals. The high reversal frequency is consistent with that recorded by the oceanic crust at this time. The second section (Romeroville) is thin, gypsiferous, and poorly indurated; consequently, only a short interval (5 m) was successfully sampled. The characteristic magnetization was wholly normal polarity. In the rapid reversals of the thicker section, that thickness of normal polarity is unique and thus forms the basis of magnetostratigraphic correlation between the two sections. A cratonic late Middle Jurassic paleomagnetic pole at 148.2°E, 57.3°N (k = 30.3, α95 = 6.0°) was obtained from the larger Trujillo sequence. Despite large confidence limits, the small sample population of the Romeroville sequence displayed the same pole. Throughout the western United States, the Summerville Formation is overlain with little or no discordance by the Morrison Formation, although the two stratigraphic units are commonly reported to be separated by an unconformity, designated J-5. The New Mexico paleopoles of the Summerville and overlying lower Morrison Formations are statistically identical at the 95% confidence level; a similar situation exists between Summerville and lower Morrison paleopoles of the Colorado Plateau. The presence of the same geomagnetic field direction in both the Summerville and the lower Morrison Formations suggests that the J-5 unconformity which separates them may encompass little time, perhaps representing only a minor break in deposition. The two newly investigated Summerville sites are located east of the Rio Grande Rift, hence representative of the North American craton; their

  12. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic evidence for a secondary yet early magnetization in large sandstone pipes and host Late Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Summerville Formation and Bluff Sandstone near Mesita, west central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, John W.; Harlan, Stephen S.

    2004-07-01

    significantly to the characteristic remanent magnetization. The similarity in demagnetization properties between pipes and adjacent host strata, the absence of a well-defined high unblocking temperature remanence that is more typical of hematite-cemented detrital strata, and the essentially uniform reverse polarity of the remanence are all interpreted to indicate that pipes and host strata contain secondary, yet early acquired magnetizations and that magnetization acquisition continued after pipe injection. We propose that acquisition of the secondary magnetization took place in the presence of alkaline, high pH brines formed by the dissolution of the underlying gypsum-dominated Lower Jurassic Todilto Formation strata and therefore the remanence is early in age. On the basis of a comparison with Summerville and Morrison (Middle and Late Jurassic) paleomagnetic poles from rocks on the Colorado Plateau, we interpret the secondary remanence in Summerville strata and sandstone pipes near Laguna to be latest Middle to Late Jurassic in age. If realistic, this interpretation further emphasizes the importance of fluid-rock interaction in the acquisition of secondary magnetizations.

  13. Two new ootaxa from the late Jurassic: The oldest record of crocodylomorph eggs, from the Lourinhã Formation, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Mateus, Octávio; Marzola, Marco; Balbino, Ausenda

    2017-01-01

    The Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation is known for its abundant remains of dinosaurs, crocodylomorphs and other vertebrates. Among this record are nine localities that have produced either dinosaur embryos, eggs or eggshell fragments. Herein, we describe and identify the first crocodiloid morphotype eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Formation, from five occurrences. One clutch from Cambelas, composed of 13 eggs, eggshell fragments from Casal da Rola and Peralta, one crushed egg and eggshells from Paimogo North, and four crushed eggs as well as eggshell fragments from Paimogo South. We observed and confirmed diagnostic morphological characters for crocodiloid eggshells and which are consistent with a crocodylomorph affinity, such as the ellipsoidal shape, wedge-shaped shell units, triangular extinction under cross-polarized light, and tabular ultrastructure. This material is distinctive enough to propose two new ootaxa within the oofamily Krokolithidae, Suchoolithus portucalensis, oogen. and oosp. nov., for the material from Cambelas, the most complete clutch known for crocodiloid eggs, and Krokolithes dinophilus, oosp. nov., for the remaining material. These are the oldest crocodylomorph eggs known, extending the fossil record for this group to the Late Jurassic. Furthermore, except for the clutch from Cambelas, the material was found with theropod eggs and nests, in the other four occurrences, which seem to suggest some form of biological relationship, still unclear at this point. PMID:28273086

  14. Sequence architecture and lithofacies assemblages of submarine fan deposits in Los Molles Formation (Jurassic), Neuquen Basin, Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.S.

    1986-05-01

    The Neuquen basin is a remnant of the Mesozoic back-arc basin trend that developed along the western margin of South America. It contains a thick, diverse sequence of Jurassic sedimentary strata, whose facies distribution was strongly influenced by syndepositional tectonism. The predominantly dark, laminated shales and siltstones of the Los Molles Formation range from Pliensbachian to Callovian in age and record the progradation of the outer shelf, slope, and basin-plain sediments deposited during the shoaling phase of the lowermost, or Cuyan, Jurassic cycle. Based on outcrop, well, and seismic data, several thick packages of sandstone and conglomerate within the Los Molles are interpreted to represent submarine fan deposits that developed during periods of relative sea level lowstand. Sea level falls were probably related to local synchronous tectonic pulses rather than true eustatic fluctuations. The distribution of coarse-grained fan deposits was apparently strongly controlled by the location of major Jurassic fault trends that stabilized the position of the shelf-slope break through time. Based on the geometry and sequence architecture, two distinct styles of fan development are recognized in the Los Molles sandstones. The most common style (type A) is characterized by sequences that have poorly defined, sand-poor lobes with well-developed channel-levee complexes. Some channels exhibit large-scale accretion surfaces, probably resulting from lateral migration. Thick-bedded arenite facies are limited to amalgamated channel fills, whereas thin-bedded classical turbidites are present as overbank deposits. Type A fans were built by turbidity and fluxoturbidity currents from submarine canyon point sources. The less common fan sequences (type B) lack channeling; they are dominated by thick, massive beds of internally featureless sandstone that are bounded by chaotic slump deposits.

  15. The Tendaguru formation of southeastern Tanzania, East Africa: An alternating Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous palaeoenvironment of exceptional status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, B.

    2009-04-01

    Dinosaur remains have inspired considerable scientific interest in the Tendaguru formation of southeastern Tanzania during the 20th century; however, this formation is exceptional in many other respects. The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits of the Tendaguru formation in the southwestern Tethys are unique because they represent a marginal marine palaeoenvironment with nonmarine faunal and floral content. It is a threefold succession of marginal marine to terrestrial, carbonate-siliciclastic sediments with cyclic character, consisting of three transgressive-regressive cycles. Revisitation of the type locality (the Tendaguru, a hill approximately 60km northwest of the town of Lindi) by a German-Tanzanian expedition in summer 2000 (Heinrich et al., 2001) resulted in a new standard section (hitherto unpublished, the informal terminology is indicated by the use of lower case in Tendaguru formation), a refined environmental model (Aberhan et al., 2002) and many new insights towards its geology (with evidence of event-sedimentation, Bussert and Aberhan, 2004), biostratigraphy and a better understanding of the Tendaguru palaeo-ecosystems and the palaeoclimate. Within the scope of the designation of a new standard section at the type locality, calcareous microfossils (ostracods, charophytes) have been described to supplement the ongoing discussion about the age and palaeoecology of the Tendaguru formation (Sames, 2008). Although only a few unevenly distributed layers across the section produced calcareous microfossils, the results are very promising. A total of 40 ostracode and 2 charophyte taxa could be distinguished. The non-marine part of the ostracod fauna provides an important contribution to the documentation of Purbeck/Wealden-type nonmarine palaeoenvironments and its microfaunas and -floras previously unknown from East Africa. The marine faunal part belongs to a relatively endemic southern (Gondwana) fauna. Together with other fossil groups, the

  16. Completely preserved cockroaches of the family Mesoblattinidae from the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation (Liaoning Province, NE China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dandan; Ren, Dong

    2013-08-01

    Although cockroaches were the dominant insects in various Paleozoic and Mesozoic insect assemblages, their general morphology was extremely conservative. One of the most common of them, the Jurassic-Cretaceous family Mesoblattinidae, is described here for the first time on the basis of completely preserved specimens. Ninety-two specimens of Perlucipecta aurea gen. et sp. n. reveal details of head, mandible, male tergal glands and terminal hook; cercal, leg and antennal sensilla. Its congener, P. vrsanskyi is described from the same sediments of the Yixian Formation (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous). The forewing venation variability of P. aurea, analysed for the first time in this family is nearly identical (CV = 6.23 %) with variability of two species of family Blattulidae that occur at the same locality (CV = 6.22 %; 5.72 %). The transitional nature of morphological characters represented by asymmetry between left and right wings (simple/branched forewing SC and hind wing M) in P. aurea documents the phylogenetic relation between the families Mesoblattinidae and Ectobiidae

  17. Position of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and timing of the end-Triassic extinctions on land: Data from the Moenave Formation on the southern Colorado Plateau, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, S.G.; Tanner, L.H.; Donohoo-Hurley, L.; Geissman, J.W.; Kozur, H.W.; Heckert, A.B.; Weems, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    Strata of the Moenave Formation on and adjacent to the southern Colorado Plateau in Utah-Arizona, U.S.A., represent one of the best known and most stratigraphically continuous, complete and fossiliferous terrestrial sections across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. We present a synthesis of new biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic data collected from across the Moenave Formation outcrop belt, which extends from the St. George area in southwestern Utah to the Tuba City area in northern Arizona. These data include palynomorphs, conchostracans and vertebrate fossils (including footprints) and a composite polarity record based on four overlapping magnetostratigraphic sections. Placement of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in strata of the Moenave Formation has long been imprecise and debatable, but these new data (especially the conchostracans) allow us to place the Triassic-Jurassic boundary relatively precisely in the middle part of the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation, stratigraphically well above the highest occurrence of crurotarsan body fossils or footprints. Correlation to marine sections based on this placement indicates that major terrestrial vertebrate extinctions preceded marine extinctions across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and therefore were likely unrelated to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) volcanism. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone in the Upper Jurassic Naknek Formation on the south shore of Kamishak Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Richard G.; Herriott, Trystan M.; Helmold, Kenneth P.; Gillis, Robert J.; Lillis, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of an active petroleum system in Kamishak Bay is demonstrated by an outcrop of hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone in the Upper Jurassic Naknek Formation near the south shore of the bay (fig. 1). The outcrop is about 140 km southwest of Homer on a small, unnamed island near the mouth of the Douglas River (fig. 17). The existence of this outcrop was kindly reported to us by Les Magoon (U.S. Geological Survey, emeritus), who also provided a topographic map showing its exact position. The outcrop was mentioned very briefly in publications by Magoon and others (1975, p. 19) and by Lyle and Morehouse (1977, p. E-1), but to our knowledge there are no detailed descriptions of this outcrop or its hydrocarbons in the published scientific literature.

  19. Toni Morrison: Writing above the Ground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacour, Claudia Brodsky

    1996-01-01

    Discusses and appraises the work of Nobel Prize winning black author Toni Morrison. Locates thematic and stylistic antecedents in the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky and Ernest Hemingway. Compares and contrasts Morrison's work with Ralph Ellison's "Invisible Man" and discusses the critical reception of black authors. (MJP)

  20. Facial characteristics and palaeogeographic conditions of accumulation of the Middle Jurassic Coal-Bearing Formation in western Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Chikhradze, G.A.; Chechelashvili, I.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Middle Jurassic Coal-Bearing Formation in western Georgia has been the object of investigation for a long time. The Tkibuli-Shaori and Tkvarcheli coalfields, which are of great national economic importance, are studied particularly intensively. In the available literature, until the end of the 1940s, the problems concerning principally coal-bearing sequences of some coalfields were elucidated. Systematic study of a coal-bearing association as a whole was conducted at the end of the 1940s and during the 1950s. The results of these studies were summarized. This paper deals with the results of the lithological and facial investigations of the coal-bearing association in western Georgia, which were carried out within the International Geological Correlation Program No. 166 of the International Project {open_quotes}Correlation of Coal-Bearing Formations{close_quotes} under the Problem II {open_quotes}Global Correlation of Processes Accumulation and Transformation of Coal-Bearing Formations{close_quotes} under the Supervision of P.P. Timofeev.

  1. Upper Jurassic Norphlet formation: new frontier for hydrocarbon prospecting in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-04-01

    Since the discovery of oil in 1967 from the Smackover Formation at Toxey field, Choctaw County, Alabama, and of condensate in 1968 from the Norphlet Formation at Flomaton field, Escambia County, Alabama, the Upper Jurassic has become the primary exploration target in southwestern Alabama. Norphlet petroleum traps in the region are principally combination traps involving favorable stratigraphy and salt anticlines (Copeland field), extensional fault traps associated with salt movement (Flomaton field), and faulted salt anticlines (Hatter's Pond and Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann fields). Reservoir rocks include marine, dune, and fluvial sandstone lithofacies. Sandstone porosity involves both primary intergranular and secondary dissolution and fracture. Smackover algal carbonate mudstone is probably the source for much of the Norphlet hydrocarbon, but downdip Norphlet marine shales may also be source rocks. The central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions should continue to be excellent areas to explore for hydrocarbons in the years ahead. Successful Norphlet petroleum prospecting in the area has involved the identification of favorable sandstone lithofacies and structural hydrocarbon traps by using geologic and geophysical methods. Future Norphlet discoveries will require the delineation of stratigraphic and structural/stratigraphic combination hydrocarbon traps using seismic-stratigraphic techniques.

  2. Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg: depositional model for northeastern De Soto salt basin, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kemmer, D.A.; Reagan, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    Available well control, seismic reflection geometries, and seismic modeling suggest the interpretation of a Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg in the northeastern De Soto salt basin. Ranging in thickness from less than 100 ft to nearly 1000 ft, the Norphlet erg encompasses an area of approximately 700 mi/sup 2/. Separated from the major gas accumulation in the Norphlet in the Mobile Bay area by the offshore extension of the Pensacola arch, the Norphlet erg appears to be oriented transverse to the axis of the De Soto salt basin. Seismic signatures for the Smackover carbonate, Norphlet sand, and Louann Salt intervals are investigated using synthetic seismograms generated from six wells in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. General characteristics about the reflection coefficients from the major units in the interval are noted. The reflection coefficient information and synthetic seismograms are used to interpret seismic data on a regional basis. Two-dimensional, vertical-incidence, ray-trace modeling of the seismic data is done to aid the interpretation on a detailed basis. Interpreted Norphlet sandstone thicknesses and Louann Salt structures are combined to support the Norphlet Formation sand erg hypothesis.

  3. Upper Jurassic Norphlet formation: new frontier for hydrocarbon prospecting in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-04-01

    Since the discovery of oil in 1967 from the Smackover Formation at Toxey field, Choctaw County, Alabama, and of condensate in 1968 from the Norphlet Formation at Flomaton field, Escambia County, Alabama, the Upper Jurassic has become the primary exploration target in southwestern Alabama. Norphlet petroleum traps in the region are principally combination traps involving favorable stratigraphy and salt anticlines (Copeland field), exensional fault traps associated with salt movement (Flomaton field), and faulted salt anticlines (Hatter's Pond and Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann fields). Reservoir rocks include marine, dune, and fluvial sandstone lithofacies. Sandstone porosity involves both primary intergranular and secondary dissolution and fracture. Smackover algal carbonate mudstone is probably the source for much of the Norphlet hydrocarbon, but downdip Norphlet marine shales may also be source rocks. The central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions should continue to be excellent areas to explore for hydrocarbons in the years ahead. Successful Norphlet petroleum prospecting in the area has involved the identification of favorable sandstone lithofacies and structural hydrocarbon traps by using geologic and geophysical methods. Future Norphlet discoveries will require the delineation of stratigraphic and structural/stratigraphic combination hydrocarbon traps using seismic-stratigraphic techniques.

  4. Talks With Great Teachers: Philip Morrison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dana

    1982-01-01

    Presents excerpts of an interview with Philip Morrison, Institute Professor of Physics at M.I.T., who has made significant contributions to areas ranging from high-energy astrophysics to elementary school science education. (Author/SK)

  5. Taphonomy of Microbial Biosignatures in Spring Deposits: A Comparison of Modern, Quaternary, and Jurassic Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, Sally L.; Williams, Jason; Phillips-Lander, Charity; O'Connell, Laura

    2017-03-01

    On Earth, microorganisms commonly enhance mineral precipitation and mediate mineralogical and chemical compositions of resulting deposits, particularly at spring systems. However, preservation of any type of microbial fossil or chemical or textural biosignature depends on the degree of alteration during diagenesis and factors such as exposure to diagenetic fluids. Little is known about the transformation of biosignatures during diagenesis over geologic time. Ten Mile Graben, Utah, USA, hosts a cold spring system that is an exceptional site for evaluation of diagenetic alteration of biosignatures because of the presence of modern springs with actively precipitating microbial mats and a series of progressively older tufa terraces (<400 ka) preserved in the area from the same spring system. A previously undescribed Jurassic laminated carbonate unit within the upper part of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation is also exposed in Ten Mile Graben. This research characterizes the geology of these modern and Quaternary saline, Fe-undersaturated, circumneutral Ten Mile Graben cold springs and provides the first description in the literature of the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation carbonate deposit. Taphonomy of microbial fossils is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The data highlight two distinct methods of biosignature formation: (1) precipitation of minerals from an undersaturated solution owing to metabolic activity of the cells and (2) mineral precipitation on charged cell surfaces that produce distinctive microbial trace fossils. Although diagenesis can destroy or severely degrade biosignatures, particularly microbial fossils, some fossils and trace fossils are preserved because entombment by Ostwald ripening limits diagenetic alteration. Recognizing spring-fed, biogenic tufas is crucial for astrobiological research and the search for life on Mars.

  6. Regional porosity trends of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity, with comparisons to formations of other basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    Sandstone porosity of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation decreases systematically as depth and thermal maturity increase over a wide range. Median porosity is about 25% where equivalent vitrinite reflectance (Ro) is slightly over 0.7% in the northern part of the study area (Clarke County, Mississippi). Median porosity is reduced to 8% where Ro approaches 2.7% in the southern part of the study area. Based on the comparisons at similar Ro levels, median (50th-percentile) Norphlet porosity exceeds porosities of "typical' sandstones in other basins by more than a factor of two throughout the study area. Even the lower (10th-percentile) Norphlet porosities are higher than median porosities of sandstones in general. -from Authors

  7. Extent and impact of Cretaceous magmatism on the formation and evolution of Jurassic oceanic crust in the western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H.; Lizarralde, D.; Tominaga, M.; Hart, L.; Tivey, M.; Swift, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-channel seismic (MCS) images and wide-angle sonobuoy data acquired during a 2011 cruise on the R/V Thomas G. Thompson (TN272) show widespread emplacement of igneous sills and broadly thickened oceanic Layer 2 through hundreds of kilometers of oceanic crust in one of the oldest ocean basins in the western Pacific, a region known as the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ). Oceanic crust from the JQZ has grown through at least two main magmatic phases: It was formed by mid-ocean ridge processes in the Jurassic (at ~170 Ma), and then it was added to by a substantial Cretaceous magmatic event (at ~75-125 Ma). The scale of Cretaceous magmatism is exemplified by massive seafloor features such as the Ontong Java Plateau, Mid-Pacific Mountains, Marshall-Gilbert Islands, Marcus-Wake Seamount Chain, and numerous guyots, seamounts, and volcaniclastic flows observed throughout the region. We use seismic data to image heavily intruded and modified oceanic crust along an 800-km-long transect through the JQZ in order to examine how processes of secondary crustal growth - including magmatic emplacement, transport, and distribution - are expressed in the structure of modified oceanic crust. We also model gravity anomalies to constrain crustal thickness and depth to the Moho. Our observations suggest that western Pacific crust was modified via the following modes of emplacement: (a) extrusive seafloor flows that may or may not have grown into seamounts, (b) seamounts formed through intrusive diking that pushed older sediments aside during their formation, and (c) igneous sills that intruded sediments at varying depths. Emplacement modes (a) and (b) tend to imply a focused, pipe-like mechanism for melt transport through the lithosphere. Such a mechanism does not explain the observed broadly distributed intrusive emplacement of mode (c) however, which may entail successive sill emplacement between igneous basement and sediments thickening oceanic Layer 2 along ~400 km of our seismic line

  8. Facies analysis, sea level history, and platform evolution of Jurassic Smackover Formation, Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, R.A. Jr.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    The Smackover Formation (Jurassic, Oxfordian) in the Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama, is divided into six carbonate sedimentary facies. In approximate stratigraphic order, they are (1) intertidal algal mudstone, (2) basinal carbonate mudstone and calcareous shale, (3) graded slope packstone and wackestone, (4) Tubiphytes-bearing, slope debris-flow grainstone and packstone, (5) distal-ramp wackestone, and (6) shoal-produced oolitic grainstone. Facies correlation and synthesis, using 11 key drill cores, show that the Smackover platform was profoundly affected by two rapid sea level rises during the Oxfordian transgression, as well as the late Oxfordian regression. The first rapid rise drowned in the inherited Norphlet clastic ramp, including the Smackover intertidal algal mudstone (facies 1). Subsequently, a Tubiphytes-rimmed shelf developed and its bypass-margin slope deposits (facies 3 and 4) and coeval basinal facies (facies 2) prograded in the basin. The second rapid sea level rise drowned the rimmed shelf, creating a distally steepened ramp. Facies developed on the ramp were distal-ramp deposits (facies 5) and higher energy updip oolitic shoals (facies 6). The late Oxfordian rapid regression caused widespread progradation of the oolitic shoals and coeval sabkha facies of the overlying Buckner anhydrite.

  9. On the peritidal cycles and their diagenetic evolution in the Lower Jurassic carbonates of the Calcare Massiccio Formation (Central Apennines)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandano, Marco; Corda, Laura; Tomassetti, Laura; Testa, Davide

    2015-10-01

    This paper shows the environmental changes and high-frequency cyclicity recorded by Lower Jurassic shallow-water carbonates known as the Calcare Massiccio Formation which crop out in the central Apennines of Italy. Three types of sedimentary cycle bounded by subaerial erosion have been recognized: Type I consists of a shallowing upward cycle with oncoidal floatstones to rudstones passing gradationally up into peloidal packstone alternating with cryptoalgal laminites and often bounded by desiccation cracks and pisolitic-peloidal wackestones indicating a period of subaerial exposure. Type II shows a symmetrical trend in terms of facies arrangement with peloidal packstones and cryptoalgal laminites present both at the base and in the upper portion of the cycle, separated by oncoidal floatstones to rudstones. Type III displays a shallowing upward trend with an initial erosion surface overlain by oncoidal floatstones to rudstones that, in turn, are capped by pisolitic-peloidal wackestones and desiccation sheet cracks. Sheet cracks at the top of cycles formed during the initial phase of subaerial exposure were successively enlarged by dissolution during prolonged subaerial exposure. The following sea-level fall produced dissolution cavities in subtidal facies, while the successive sea-level rise resulted in the precipitation of marine cements in dissolution cavities. Spectral analysis revealed six peaks, five of which are consistent with orbital cycles. While a tectonic control cannot be disregarded, the main signal recorded by the sedimentary succession points toward a main control related to orbital forcing. High frequency sea-level fluctuations also controlled diagenetic processes.

  10. Organic matter diagenesis as the key to a unifying theory for the genesis of tabular uranium-vanadium deposits in the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, P.L.; Spirakis, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    Interstitial, epigenetic amorphous organic matter is intimately associated with uranium in the Grants uranium region and is considered essential to genetic models for these deposits. In contrast, uranium minerals are intimately associated with authigenic vanadium chlorite and vanadium oxides in amorphous organic matter-poor ores of the Slick Rock and Henry Mountains mining districts and therefore, in some genetic models amorphous organic matter is not considered crucial to the formation of these deposits. Differences in organic matter content can be explained by recognizing that amorphous organic matter-poor deposits have been subjected to more advanced stages of diagenesis than amorphous organic matter-rich deposits. Evidence that amorphous organic matter was involved in the genesis of organic matter-poor, as well as organic matter-rich, deposits is described. -from Authors

  11. The Kimmeridge Clay Formation (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) of the Norwegian continental shelf and Dorset, UK: a chemostratigraphical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Holly; Gale, Andy; Gradstein, Felix

    2016-04-01

    The type section of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) at Dorset, (UK) stands at the forefront in multidisciplinary research on climatic cyclicity, orbital forcing, sea level change and the productivity vs. preservation controversy. In economic terms, it is a prime source rock of the North Sea hydrocarbon province containing up to 35% total organic carbon. Lateral equivalents of the KCF occur widely in the North, Norwegian and Barents Sea regions of north-western Europe under other names: the Draupne, Mandal, Spekk, Hekkingen and Agardhfjellet (Svalbard) formations. Carbon isotopes and clay mineralogy have been extensively studied from the KCF type section at Dorset. However, between the North Sea and Western Barents Sea, little is known of these records. Correlation using both clay mineral and δ13Corg profiles across these areas would provide insights for our understanding of Late Jurassic climatic developments in north-western Europe. New chemostratigraphical records through the KCF of five Norwegian exploration wells of Lundin Petroleum and one of Statoil, are compared with the Kimmeridgian of Sub-Boreal Dorset, along with a correlation between Svalbard records with the Tithonian cores sampled in this project. Dinoflagellate biostratigraphy accompanies isotope stratigraphy in the placement of each core in time. Initial results show a strong overall correlation. On a smaller timescale, several events are described from Dorset, including a distinct mid-Eudoxus positive isotope peak reflecting a sea level rise, and the Hudlestoni aridity peak as recorded by low kaolinite/illite ratios. Off the Norwegian Continental Shelf, how are these events recorded, if recorded at all, in a δ13Corg and clay mineralogical profile? Such events are useful tools in correlation, and their identification regionally reduces the likelihood of local influence on oceanographical conditions, such as palaeoproductivity response to nutrient influxes, and instead reflects changes in the

  12. Possible secondary apatite fission track age standard from altered volcanic ash beds in the middle Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowallis, B.J.; Christiansen, E.H.; Everett, B.H.; Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Miller, D.S.; Deino, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary age standards are valuable in intra- and interlaboratory calibration. At present very few such standards are available for fission track dating that is older than Tertiary. Several altered volcanic ash beds occur in the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation in southwestern Utah. The formation was deposited in a shallow marine/sabhka environment. Near Gunlock, Utah, eight ash beds have been identified. Sanidines from one of the ash beds (GUN-F) give a single-crystal laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar age of 166.3??0.8 Ma (2??). Apatite and zircon fission track ages range from 152-185 Ma with typically 15-20 Ma errors (2??). Track densities in zircons are high and most grains are not countable. Apatites are fairly common in most of the ash beds and have reasonable track densities ranging between 1.2-1.5 ?? 106 tracks/cm2. Track length distributions in apatites are unimodal, have standard deviations <1??m, and mean track lengths of about 14-14.5 ??m. High Cl apatites (F:Cl:OH ratio of 39:33:28) are particularly abundant and large in ash GUN-F, and are fairly easy to concentrate, but the concentrates contain some siderite, most of which can be removed by sieving. GUN-F shows evidence of some reworking and detriaal contamination based on older single grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses and some rounding of grains, but the apatite population appears to be largely uncontaminated. At present BJK has approximately 12 of apatite separate from GUN-F. ?? 1993.

  13. Petroleum geology of the Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic), S. W. and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-07-16

    Recent successful gas test in the Norphlet formation (up to 26 million CF/day) at depths exceeding 20,500 ft in the Mobile Bay area demonstrate a high potential for hydrocarbon production in the Alabama offshore area. In addition, wells drilled in the upper Mobile Bay area could encounter gas condensate in the Norphlet formation; gas condensate is being produced from wells in Hatter's Pond field about 14 miles north of Mobile Bay and 45 miles north of the Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann field. With continued petroleum exploration, additional Norphlet petroleum fields should be discovered in southwestern and offshore Alabama in the years ahead. In light of the recent discoveries in Escambia County and in the lower Mobile Bay area, Mobile, Baldwin, and Escambia counties and Mobile Bay appear to be the most prospective hydrocarbon areas.

  14. Sedimentation of the Triassic Jurassic Adigrat Sandstone Formation, Blue Nile (Abay) Basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A.

    2008-09-01

    Exploration of oil and gas deposits in the Blue Nile Basin targeted the Adigrat Sandstone Formation as a reservoir objective. Conglomerates, gravely sandstones, coarse to medium-grained sandstones, very fine-grained cross-bedded sandstones, siltstones and mudstones of the Adigrat Sandstone Formation were deposited in semi-arid to arid climates. The North-western highlands are the main source for the sedimentation. The poorly-sorted, crudely-bedded conglomerates and gravely sandstones are interpreted as alluvial fan deposits. The basal polymictic orthoconglomerate passes up vertically into gravely sandstone, possibly indicating proximal to mid-fan sedimentation. The alluvial fan sedimentation passes up vertically into channel, point bars and flood-plain fines. The meandering river sedimentation is characterized by single and amalgamated multi-storey sandstone bodies. In places, the uppermost part of the Adigrat Sandstone Formation is represented by coal-bearing sediments possibly reflect lacustrine depositional environment. The medium-coarse-grained sandstone is a possible oil and gas reservoir, whilst the fine-grained sediments are a possible gas reservoir.

  15. Role of halite in the evolution of sandstone porosity, upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W. )

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of petrographic point-count data, cement paragenesis, and scanning electron microscopy examination of pores has shown that poikilitic halite cement in sandstones of the Norphlet Formation in a core from Wayne County, Mississippi, formed following cementation by quartz, feldspar, dolomite, and anhydrite. Intergranular volume ranges from 26 to 42%, averaging 35%, indicating that an average of 10% of the rock volume was lost to compaction, and a further 10-15%, was lost to cementation prior to halite cementation, assuming a depositional porosity of about 45%. Most halite occurs as intergranular cement, but some halite is present as intragranular cement within framework feldspars and lithic fragments. Halite is easily removed from a sandstone during coring, slabbing, and thin-section preparation techniques that do not use oil-based fluids and muds, so the amount of porosity in these samples that is a product of artificial removal of halite is unknown. Although the present and former distribution of halite is poorly known, natural halite dissolution could have produced about 20% secondary porosity in the Norphlet Formation at depth in this part of the Mississippi Salt basin.

  16. Reservoir characterization of the Upper Jurassic geothermal target formations (Molasse Basin, Germany): role of thermofacies as exploration tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homuth, S.; Götz, A. E.; Sass, I.

    2015-06-01

    The Upper Jurassic carbonates of the southern German Molasse Basin are the target of numerous geothermal combined heat and power production projects since the year 2000. A production-orientated reservoir characterization is therefore of high economic interest. Outcrop analogue studies enable reservoir property prediction by determination and correlation of lithofacies-related thermo- and petrophysical parameters. A thermofacies classification of the carbonate formations serves to identify heterogeneities and production zones. The hydraulic conductivity is mainly controlled by tectonic structures and karstification, whilst the type and grade of karstification is facies related. The rock permeability has only a minor effect on the reservoir's sustainability. Physical parameters determined on oven-dried samples have to be corrected, applying reservoir transfer models to water-saturated reservoir conditions. To validate these calculated parameters, a Thermo-Triaxial-Cell simulating the temperature and pressure conditions of the reservoir is used and calorimetric and thermal conductivity measurements under elevated temperature conditions are performed. Additionally, core and cutting material from a 1600 m deep research drilling and a 4850 m (total vertical depth, measured depth: 6020 m) deep well is used to validate the reservoir property predictions. Under reservoir conditions a decrease in permeability of 2-3 magnitudes is observed due to the thermal expansion of the rock matrix. For tight carbonates the matrix permeability is temperature-controlled; the thermophysical matrix parameters are density-controlled. Density increases typically with depth and especially with higher dolomite content. Therefore, thermal conductivity increases; however the dominant factor temperature also decreases the thermal conductivity. Specific heat capacity typically increases with increasing depth and temperature. The lithofacies-related characterization and prediction of reservoir

  17. Basin Analysis of Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Mancini

    2001-03-01

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE for review. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. The information on the source rocks is being prepared for inclusion in the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern and western parts of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis continues. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Two underdeveloped Smackover reservoirs have been identified. They are the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - This task has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock information will continue to be prepared for the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Study of Smackover underdeveloped reservoirs will continue with focus on the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs.

  18. Paleogeographic and litho-facies formation conditions of MidUpper Jurassic sediments in S-E Western Siberia (Tomsk Oblast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaminova, M.; Rychkova, I.; Sterzhanova, Ju

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the criteria to identify Tumen (lower Bathonian) and Naunak (upper Bathonian-Callovian- Oxfordian) suites within S-E Western Siberia (Tomsk Oblast). The specific paleogeographic and litho-facies formation conditions of sediments and numerous vegetable remains and ichnofossils indicated the fact that this territory was the location of sedimentogenesis transition during Tumen and Naunak suite formation. Based on integrated survey oil-gas potential litho-facies groups were defined in Mid-Upper Jurassic sediments within S-E Western Siberia.

  19. Sedimentology and paleoenvironments of the Las Chacritas carbonate paleolake, Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic), Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaleri, Nora G.; Benavente, Cecilia A.

    2013-02-01

    The Las Chacritas Member is the lower part of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic). The unit is a completely continental limestone succession with volcanic contributions that were deposited during the development of the Cañadón Asfalto Rift Basin (Chubut province, Patagonia, Argentina). A detailed sedimentological analysis was performed in the Fossati depocenter to determine the paleoenvironments that developed in the context of this rift. The Las Chacritas Member represents a carbonate paleolake system with ramp-shaped margins associated with wetlands that were eventually affected by subaerial exposure and pedogenesis. This process is represented by three main subenvironments: a) a lacustrine setting sensu stricto (lacustrine limestone facies association), represented by Mudstones/Wackestones containing porifera spicules (F1), Intraclastic packstones (F6) and Tabular stromatolites (F10) in which deposition and diagenesis were entirely subaqueous; b) a palustrine setting (palustrine limestone facies association) containing Microbial Mudstones (F2), Intraclastic sandy packstone with ostracode remains (F3), Oncolitic packstone (F5), Brecciated limestone (F7) and Nodular-Mottled limestone (F8) representing shallow marginal areas affected by groundwater fluctuations and minor subaerial exposure; and c) a pedogenic paleoenvironment (pedogenic limestone facies association) including Intraclastic limestone (F4) and Packstones containing Microcodium (F9) facies displaying the major features of subaerial exposure, pedogenic diagenesis and the development of paleosols. The fluvial-palustrine-lacustrine succession shows a general shallow upward trend in which contraction-expansion cycles are represented (delimited by exposure and surface erosion). The variations in the successive formations reflect the responses to fluctuations in a combination of two major controls, the tectonic and local climatic variables. The predominance of the palustrine facies associations was

  20. Regional porosity trends of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity, with comparisons to formations of other basins

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Sandstone porosity of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity decreases systematically as depth and thermal maturity increase over a wide range. Median porosity is about 25% where equivalent vitrinite reflectance (R[sub o]) is slightly over 0.7% in the northern part of the study area (Clarke County, Mississippi). Median porosity is reduced to 8% where R[sub o] approaches 2.7% in the southern part of the study area (state waters of Mobile Bay). Porosity of the cemented, tight zone at the top of the Norphlet in downdip locations is roughly 10% lower than porosities of facies underlying the tight zone, but nevertheless is slightly above the norm for other sandstones at similar R[sub o] levels. Porosity of dune facies is consistently 2-5% higher than that of interdune facies, other factors being equal. Our data show 3-6% higher porosity in chlorite-dominated intervals relative to intervals where illite is the dominant clay mineral. Norphlet porosity has little or no correlation with position relative to the present-day hydrocarbon-water contact. Based on comparisons at similar R[sub o] levels, median (50th-percentile) Norphlet porosity exceeds porosities of [open quotes]typical[close quotes] sandstones in other basins by more than a factor of two throughout the study area. Even the lower (10th-percentile) Norphlet porosities are higher than median porosities of sandstones in general. 48 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Chemical mobility during low-grade metamorphism of a Jurassic lava flow: Río Grande Formation, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, L.

    Chemical and mineralogical changes produced by very low-grade metamorphism in a 40 meter thick, K-rich, calc-alkaline andesite flow of the marine Jurassic Río Grande Formation of southern coastal Peru are discussed. This metamorphism (=spilitization) was non-deformational and generated spilitic domains at (and near) both vesicular margins of the flow, whereas the massive central zone remained relatively unaltered. The metadomains are characterized by mineral associations of the zeolite facies. Primary minerals are Ca-plagioclase, augitic pyroxene, iron-titanium oxides, and (pseudomorphs after) olivine. Metamorphic minerals are: albite (three generations), K-feldspar, pumpellyite, chlorite, interlayered chlorite-celadonite, celadonite, various mixed-layer Si- and Fe-rich phyllosilicates, "iddingsite," calcite, analcime, titanite, and white mica. The effect of the metamorphism on the rock chemistry is reflected in changes especially observed at the marginal zones of the flow which affect major, trace, and RE elements: 1) strong increase of the iron oxidation ratio (Fe 2O 3/FeO); 2) enrichment in Na 2O accompanied by a concomitant depletion of CaO in non-amygdaloidal domains; 3) depletion of SiO 2; 4) strong enrichment in H 2O and CO 2; 5) marked depletion of Sr and Rb; 6) enrichment in Cl and S; and 7) slight depletion in RE elements, notably in the top zone of the flow. Conversely, elements such as Ti, P, Nb, and Y were fairly immobile, whereas Zr and K were only slightly mobilized. The effect of the metamorphism on the mineral chemistry is expressed by the predominance of metastable equilibrium evidenced by the existence of wide compositional ranges in the phyllosilicates, the incomplete albitization of the Ca-plagioclase, and the Al-rich character of the pumpellyites. The metamorphism is considered to be of hydrothermal-burial type, which takes place at low temperature and pressure — probably about 125-230°C and less than 3 kb, and is produced mainly through

  2. Trace fossils from Jurassic lacustrine turbidites of the Anyao Formation (central China) and their environmental and evolutionary significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buatois, L.A.; Mangano, M.G.; Wu, X.; Zhang, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Lower Jurassic Anyao Formation crops out near Jiyuan city, western Henan Province, central China. It is part of the infill of the nonmarine early Mesozoic Jiyuan-Yima Basin. In the Jiyuan section, this unit is about 100 m thick and consists of laterally persistent, thin and thick-bedded turbidite sandstones and mudstones displaying complete and base- or top-absent Bouma sequences, and thickbedded massive sandstones. The Anyao Formation records sedimentation within a lacustrine turbidite system developed in a pull-apart basin. Processes involved include high and low density turbidity currents, sometimes affected by liquefaction or fluidization. Facies analysis suggests that this succession is formed by stacked aggradational turbidite lobes. The absence of thick mudstone packages indicates that background sedimentation was subordinate to high frequency turbidite deposition. The Anyao Formation hosts a moderately diverse ichnofauna preserved as hypichnial casts on the soles of thin-bedded turbidite sandstones. The ichnofauna consists of Cochlichnus anguineus, Helminthoidichnites tenuis, Helminthopsis abeli, H. hieroglyphica, Monomorphichnus lineatus, Paracanthorhaphe togwunia, Tuberculichnus vagans, Vagorichnus anyao, tiny grazing trails, and irregularly branching burrows. Vagorichnus anyao occurs not only as a discrete trace, but also as a compound ichnotaxon intergrading with Gordia marina and Tuberculichnus vagans. Both predepositional and post-depositional traces are present on the soles of turbidites. This ichnofauna comprises both feeding and grazing traces produced by a deposit-feeding lacustrine benthic biota. Crawling traces are rare. Although certain ichnofossils (e.g. V. anyao, P. togwunia) show overall similarities with deep-sea agrichnia, they differ in reflecting remarkably less specialized feeding strategies, displaying overcrossing between specimens (and to a lesser extent, self-crossing), and in the case of V. anyao recording post

  3. The Middle Jurassic basinal deposits of the Surmeh Formation in the Central Zagros Mountains, southwest Iran: Facies, sequence stratigraphy, and controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasemi, Y.; Jalilian, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The lower part of the Lower to Upper Jurassic Surmeh Formation consists of a succession of shallow marine carbonates (Toarcian-Aalenian) overlain by a deep marine basinal succession (Aalenian-Bajocian) that grades upward to Middle to Upper Jurassic platform carbonates. The termination of shallow marine carbonate deposition of the lower part of the Surmeh Formation and the establishment of deep marine sedimentation indicate a change in the style of sedimentation in the Neotethys passive margin of southwest Iran during the Middle Jurassic. To evaluate the reasons for this change and to assess the basin configuration during the Middle Jurassic, this study focuses on facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy of the basinal deposits (pelagic and calciturbidite facies) of the Surmeh Formation, referred here as 'lower shaley unit' in the Central Zagros region. The upper Aalenian-Bajocian 'lower shaley unit' overlies, with an abrupt contact, the Toarcian-lower Aalenian platform carbonates. It consists of pelagic (calcareous shale and limestone) and calciturbidite facies grading to upper Bajocian-Bathonian platform carbonates. Calciturbidite deposits in the 'lower shaley unit' consist of various graded grainstone to lime mudstone facies containing mixed deep marine fauna and platform-derived material. These facies include quartz-bearing lithoclast/intraclast grainstone to lime mudstone, bioclast/ooid/peloid intraclast grainstone, ooid grainstone to packstone, and lime wackestone to mudstone. The calciturbidite layers are erosive-based and commonly exhibit graded bedding, incomplete Bouma turbidite sequence, flute casts, and load casts. They consist chiefly of platform-derived materials including ooids, intraclasts/lithoclasts, peloids, echinoderms, brachiopods, bivalves, and open-ocean biota, such as planktonic bivalves, crinoids, coccoliths, foraminifers, and sponge spicules. The 'lower shaley unit' constitutes the late transgressive and the main part of the highstand

  4. Isopach and structure contour maps of the Burro Canyon(?) Formation in the Chama-El Vado Area, Chama Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgley, Jennie L.

    1983-01-01

    In the Chama Basin a wequence of conglomerate, sandstone, and red, gray-green, and pale-purple mudstone occurs stratigraphically between the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation and Upper Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone. This stratigraphic interval has been called the Burro Canyon Formation by several workers (Craig and others, 1959; Smith and others, 1961; Saucier, 1974). Although similarities in lithology and stratigraphic position exist between this unit and the Burro Canyon Formation in Colorado, no direct correlation has been made between the two. For this reason the unit in the Chama Basin is called the Burro Canyon(?) Formation

  5. Isopach and structure contour maps of the Burro Canyon(?) Formation in the Mesa Golondrina and Mesa de los Viejos areas, Chama Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgley, Jennie L.

    1983-01-01

    In the Chama Basin a wequence of conglomerate, sandstone, and red, gray-green, and pale-purple mudstone occurs stratigraphically between the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation and Upper Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone. This stratigraphic interval has been called the Burro Canyon Formation by several workers (Craig and others, 1959; Smith and others, 1961; Saucier, 1974). Although similarities in lithology and stratigraphic position exist between this unit and the Burro Canyon Formation in Colorado, no direct correlation has been made between the two. For this reason the unit in the Chama Basin is called the Burro Canyon(?) Formation

  6. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database), to increase our understanding of geologic heterogeneities that affect the recoveries of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama, and to identify resources that are producible at moderate cost. This objective will be achieved through detailed geological, geostatistical, and engineering characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon, and engineering characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the state of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities in hydrocarbon production. Work to date has focused on completion of Subtasks 1, 2, and 3 of this project. Work on Subtask 4 began in this quarter, and substantial additional work has been accomplished on Subtask 2. Subtask 1 included the survey and tabulation of available reservoir engineering and geological data. Subtask 2 comprises the geologic and engineering characterization of smackover reservoir lithofacies. Subtask 3 includes the geologic modeling of reservoir heterogeneities. Subtask 4 includes the development of reservoir exploitation methodologies for strategic infill drilling. 1 fig.

  7. Field-trip guide to volcanic and volcaniclastic deposits of the lower Jurassic Talkeetna formation, Sheep Mountain, south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Blodgett, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    This guide provides information for a one-day field trip in the vicinity of Sheep Mountain, just north of the Glenn Highway in south-central Alaska. The Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation, consisting of extrusive volcanic and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks of the Talkeetna arc complex, is exposed on and near Sheep Mountain. Field-trip stops within short walking distance of the Glenn Highway (approximately two hours’ drive from Anchorage) are described, which will be visited during the Geological Society of America Penrose meeting entitled Crustal Genesis and Evolution: Focus on Arc Lower Crust and Shallow Mantle, held in Valdez, Alaska, in July 2006. Several additional exposures of the Talkeetna Formation on other parts of Sheep Mountain that would need to be accessed with longer and more strenuous walking or by helicopter are also mentioned.

  8. Paleontology, sedimentology and paleoenvironment of a new fossiliferous locality of the Jurassic Cañadón Asfalto Formation, Chubut Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Oscar F.; Cabaleri, Nora G.; Armella, Claudia; Volkheimer, Wolfgang; Ballent, Sara C.; Martínez, Sergio; Monferran, Mateo D.; Silva Nieto, Diego G.; Páez, Manuel A.

    2011-02-01

    A new Late Jurassic assemblage of “conchostracans”, ostracods, bivalves and caddisfly cases from the locality “Estancia La Sin Rumbo”, Chubut Province (Patagonia, Argentina) is recorded. The fossils occur in the upper part of an outcropping 45 m thick volcaniclastic lacustrine sequence of yellowish tuffs and tuffites of the Puesto Almada Member, which is the upper member of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation with U/Pb age of 161 ± 3 Ma. The sequence represents one sedimentary cycle composed of a (lower) hemicycle of expansion and a (higher) hemicycle of contraction of the water body. The invertebrates lived in small freshwater bodies during the periods of expansion of the lake. The occurrence of a great number of small spinicaudatans, associated with mud-cracks, is evidence of dry climatic conditions and suggests several local mortality events. The spinicaudatan record of the fushunograptid-orthestheriid (component of the Eosestheriopsis dianzhongensis fauna) and the presence of Congestheriella rauhuti Gallego and Shen, suggest a Late Jurassic (Oxfordian to Tithonian) age. Caddisfly cases are recorded for the first time in the Cañadón Asfalto Basin.

  9. A hyper-robust sauropodomorph dinosaur ilium from the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic Elliot Formation of South Africa: Implications for the functional diversity of basal Sauropodomorpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, Blair W.; Choiniere, Jonah N.

    2016-11-01

    It has generally been held that the locomotory habits of sauropodomorph dinosaurs moved in a relatively linear evolutionary progression from bipedal through "semi-bipedal" to the fully quadrupedal gait of Sauropoda. However, there is now a growing appreciation of the range of locomotory strategies practiced amongst contemporaneous taxa of the latest Triassic and earliest Jurassic. Here we present on the anatomy of a hyper-robust basal sauropodomorph ilium from the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic Elliot Formation of South Africa. This element, in addition to highlighting the unexpected range of bauplan diversity throughout basal Sauropodomorpha, also has implications for our understanding of the relevance of "robusticity" to sauropodomorph evolution beyond generalized limb scaling relationships. Possibly representing a unique form of hindlimb stabilization during phases of bipedal locomotion, the autapomorphic morphology of this newly rediscovered ilium provides additional insight into the myriad ways in which basal Sauropodomorpha managed the inherited behavioural and biomechanical challenges of increasing body-size, hyper-herbivory, and a forelimb primarily adapted for use in a bipedal context.

  10. Jurassic exploration trends of East Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Presly, M.W.; Reed, C.H.

    1984-09-01

    This article deals with exploration and production from the Jurassic reservoirs of East Texas. The paper discussed the trapping mechanisms, structural configurations, lithologies and stratigraphic relationships. The major formations presented are the Smackover and the Haynesville (Cotton Valley).

  11. A re-examination of paleomagnetic results from NA Jurassic sedimentary rocks: Additional evidence for proposed Jurassic MUTO?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housen, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Kent and Irving, 2010; and Kent et al, 2015 propose a monster shift in the position of Jurassic (160 to 145 Ma) paleopoles for North America- defined by results from igneous rocks. This monster shift is likely an unrecognized true polar wander occurrence. Although subject to inclination error, results from sedimentary rocks from North America, if corrected for these effects, can be used to supplement the available data for this time period. Steiner (2003) reported results from 48 stratigraphic horizons sampled from the Callovian Summerville Fm, from NE New Mexico. A recalculated mean of these results yields a mean direction of D = 332, I = 39, n=48, k = 15, α95 = 5.4°. These data were analyzed for possible inclination error-although the dataset is small, the E-I results yielded a corrected I = 53. This yields a corrected paleopole for NA at ~165 Ma located at 67° N and 168° E.Paleomagnetic results from the Black Hills- Kilanowski (2002) for the Callovian Hulett Mbr of the Sundance Fm, and Gregiore (2001) the Oxfordian-Tithonian Morrison Fm (Gregiore, 2001) have previously been interpreted to represent Eocene-aged remagnetizations- due to the nearly exact coincidence between the in-situ pole positions of these Jurassic units with the Eocene pole for NA. Both of the tilt-corrected results for these units have high latitude poles (Sundance Fm: 79° N, 146° E; Morrison Fm: 89° N, 165° E). An E-I analysis of these data will be presented- using a provisional inclination error of 10°, corrected paleopoles are: (Sundance Fm: 76° N, 220° E; Morrison Fm: 77° N, 266° E). The Black Hills 165 Ma (Sundance Fm) and 145 Ma (Morrison Fm) poles, provisionally corrected for 10° inclination error- occur fairly close to the NA APWP proposed by Kent et al, 2015- using an updated set of results from kimberlites- the agreement between the Sundance Fm and the Triple-B (158 Ma) pole would be nearly exact with a slightly lesser inclination error. The Summerville Fm- which is

  12. Paleoenvironments and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama and adjacent coastal water area

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-09-01

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern Alabama and the adjacent coastal water area accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama, providing a barrier for air and water circulation during Norphlet deposition. Norphlet paleogeography was dominated by a broad desert plain rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. Initiation of Norphlet sedimentation was a result of erosion of the southern Appalachians. Norphlet conglomerates were deposited in coalescing alluvial fans in proximity to an Appalachian source. The conglomeratic sandstones grade downdip into red-bed lithofacies that accumulated in distal portions of alluvial fan and wadi systems. Quartzose sandstones (Denkman Member) were deposited as dune and interdune sediments on a broad desert plain. The source of the sand was the updip and adjacent alluvial fan, plain, and wadi deposits. A marine transgression was initiated late in Denkman deposition, resulting in the reworking of previously deposited Norphlet sediments. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent with four oil and gas fields already established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist of quartzose sandstones, which are principally eolian in origin. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons.

  13. Chapter 5. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources-Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston formations, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The petroleum assessment of the Travis Peak and Hosston Formations was conducted by using a total petroleum system model. A total petroleum system includes all of the important elements of a hydrocarbon fluid system needed to develop oil and gas accumulations, including source and reservoir rocks, hydrocarbon generation, migration, traps and seals, and undiscovered accumulations. A total petroleum system is mappable and may include one or more assessment units. For each assessment unit, reservoir rocks contain similar geology, exploration characteristics, and risk. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates and calcareous shales and organic-rich shales of the Upper Jurassic Bossier Shale of the Cotton Valley Group and (2) Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston Formations. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes three conventional Travis Peak-Hosston assessment units: Travis Peak-Hosston Gas and Oil (AU 50490205), Travis Peak-Hosston Updip Oil (AU 50490206), and Travis Peak-Hosston Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490207). A fourth assessment unit, the Hosston Hypothetical Slope-Basin Gas Assessment Unit, was named and numbered (AU 50490208) but not geologically defined or quantitatively assessed owing to a lack of data. Together, assessment units 50490205 to 50490207 are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29 million barrels of oil, 1,136 billion cubic feet of gas, and 22 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

  14. Hints of the early Jehol Biota: important dinosaur footprint assemblages from the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary Tuchengzi Formation in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lida; Zhang, Jianping; Lockley, Martin G; McCrea, Richard T; Klein, Hendrik; Alcalá, Luis; Buckley, Lisa G; Burns, Michael E; Kümmell, Susanna B; He, Qing

    2015-01-01

    New reports of dinosaur tracksites in the Tuchengzi Formation in the newly established Yanqing Global Geopark, Beijing, China, support previous inferences that the track assemblages from this formation are saurischian-dominated. More specifically, the assemblages appear theropod-dominated, with the majority of well-preserved tracks conforming to the Grallator type (sensus lato), thus representing relatively small trackmakers. Such ichnofaunas supplement the skeletal record from this unit that lacks theropods thus far, proving a larger diversity of dinosaur faunas in that region. Sauropods are represented by medium to large sized and narrow and wide-gauge groups, respectively. The latter correspond with earlier discoveries of titanosauriform skeletons in the same unit. Previous records of ornithischian tracks cannot be positively confirmed. Purported occurrences are re-evaluated here, the trackways and imprints, except of a single possible specimen, re-assigned to theropods. Palecologically the Tuchengzi ichnofauna is characteristic of semi-arid fluvio-lacustrine inland basins with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous deposits in northern China that all show assemblages with abundant theropod and sauropod tracks and minor components of ornithopod, pterosaur and bird tracks.

  15. Hints of the Early Jehol Biota: Important Dinosaur Footprint Assemblages from the Jurassic-Cretaceous Boundary Tuchengzi Formation in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lida; Zhang, Jianping; Lockley, Martin G.; McCrea, Richard T.; Klein, Hendrik; Alcalá, Luis; Buckley, Lisa G.; Burns, Michael E.; Kümmell, Susanna B.; He, Qing

    2015-01-01

    New reports of dinosaur tracksites in the Tuchengzi Formation in the newly established Yanqing Global Geopark, Beijing, China, support previous inferences that the track assemblages from this formation are saurischian-dominated. More specifically, the assemblages appear theropod-dominated, with the majority of well-preserved tracks conforming to the Grallator type (sensus lato), thus representing relatively small trackmakers. Such ichnofaunas supplement the skeletal record from this unit that lacks theropods thus far, proving a larger diversity of dinosaur faunas in that region. Sauropods are represented by medium to large sized and narrow and wide-gauge groups, respectively. The latter correspond with earlier discoveries of titanosauriform skeletons in the same unit. Previous records of ornithischian tracks cannot be positively confirmed. Purported occurrences are re-evaluated here, the trackways and imprints, except of a single possible specimen, re-assigned to theropods. Palecologically the Tuchengzi ichnofauna is characteristic of semi-arid fluvio-lacustrine inland basins with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous deposits in northern China that all show assemblages with abundant theropod and sauropod tracks and minor components of ornithopod, pterosaur and bird tracks. PMID:25901363

  16. Finding of two new radiolarian associations calibrated with ammonoids in the Vaca Muerta Formation (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous), Neuquén Basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennari, Verónica V.; Pujana, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    An association of ammonoids and radiolarians retrieved from a sedimentary section of the Vaca Muerta Formation at Vega de Escalone, Neuquén Basin, Argentina, was analized under a strict stratigraphic control. Nine ammonoid assemblage biozones were identified, indicating an age span from Early Tithonian to Late Berriasian/earlymost Valanginian for the Vaca Muerta Formation at the studied section. In connection to the ammonoid record, two radiolarian faunas were identified and named J3A1 and J3B1. Fauna J3A1, corresponding to the Virgatosphinctes andesensis Biozone, is dominated by nasellarian genera and represents the first Lower Tithonian radiolarian fauna described from the Neuquén Basin. Fauna J3B1, linked to the interval assigned to the Substeueroceras koeneni Biozone (Late Tithonian-Early Berriasian), yields abundant representatives of the Pantanellid Family. The presence of Complexapora kozuri (Kiessling and Zeiss) and Loopus primitivus (Matsuoka and Yao), two important radiolarian primary markers of the Late Jurassic in North America, supports a Late Tithonian age for at least part of the S. koeneni Biozone in the studied area. Nor certain Berriasian radiolarian faunas nor elements of the Vallupinae Family were identified so far at the Vega de Escalone section.

  17. Paleomagnetic evidence for Post-Jurassic stability of southeastern Mexico: Maya Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Jose C.; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Helsley, Charles E.

    1990-05-01

    The tectonic evolution of southeastern Mexico has been a subject of major controversy, not only in regard to past geometry but also in the timing of proposed geological events as well. For the past 10 years, most, if not all, investigators agree that the Gulf of Mexico Basin was formed by Late Jurassic time and that the Maya Terrane was in its current location prior to the Cretaceous. In order to gain further insight into the drift history of the Maya Terrane we have undertaken a paleomagnetic study of the uppermost Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous (Tithonian-lower Neocomian?) San Ricardo Formation in southeastern Mexico, at 93.7°W, 16.8°N. The sampling site is located east of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, on the southwest side of the Maya block, at the base of the Yucatan Peninsula. A suite of 133 samples was collected in stratigraphic succession from a 114-m-thick sequence of red shales and sandstones near Cintalapa, Chiapas, Mexico. After progressive thermal demagnetization of all samples at six steps from 350°C to 630°C, 89 samples were selected for final paleopole analysis on the basis of their magnetic stability. Four different polarity intervals were observed, the sequence being from bottom to top: N, R, N, R which assists in the assessment of the reliability of the observations. The mean pole position obtained, 160.0°E, 69.8°N, agrees with the mean pole position of the upper part of the Morrison Formation of Colorado, a unit of virtually identical age. These results indicate that no discernible rotation or displacement of the Maya block has occurred since at least early Neocomian times.

  18. Characterization of oil source strata organic matter of Jurassic age and its contribution to the formation of oil and gas deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronin, Nikita; Nosova, Fidania; Plotnikova, Irina

    2013-04-01

    Within the frames of this work we carried out comprehensive geochemical study of high-carbon rocks samples taken from the three segments of the Jurassic system - from the lower (Kotuhtinskaya suite), from the medium (Tyumenskaya suite) and from the upper (Vasyuganskaya, Georgievskaya and the Bazhenovskaya suites), all within the north-eastern part of the Surgut oil and gas region. Altogether we investigated 27 samples. The complex study of the organic matter (OM) of these strata included the following: chloroform extraction of bitumen, the determination of the group and element composition, gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatomass-spectrometry (GC/MS). These methods allow giving high quality assessments of the potential oil and gas source strata and thus identifying the possible oil and gas generating strata among them, ie, those strata that could be involved in the formation of oil and gas within the area. As a result of this work we identified various biomarkers that allow characterizing each oil and gas source strata under the study in the open-cast of the Jurassic system: 1. Kotuhtinskaya Suite. The build-up of this suite took place in the coastal marine weakly reducing conditions. In their composition these deposits contain some highly transformed humus organic matter (gradation of catagenesis MK3). 2. Tyumenskaya Suite. Accumulation of OM in these deposits occured mainly in the coastal marine environment with the influx of a large number of terrestrial vegetation in the basin of deposition. As for the type of agents - it is a humus or sapropel-humus OM with a rich content of continental organics. Source type of this OM is mixed - bacterial and algal. OM of the rocks of Tyumenskaya suite is situated in the area of high maturity (stage of catagenesis at MK3 level). 3. Vasyuganskaya Suite. In this case the accumulation of OM occurred mainly in the laguna (lake-delta) weak-reduction close to oxidative conditions with the influx of bacterial matter and the

  19. Chasing the Late Jurassic APW Monster Shift in Ontario Kimberlites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, D. V.; Muttoni, G.; Gee, J. S.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    A 30° gap was recognized in a composite APW path when global poles from predominantly igneous rocks were assembled in North American coordinates using plate reconstructions (Kent & Irving 2010 JGR). The 'monster shift' occurred between a 160-190 Ma cluster of mean poles at 75-80°N 90-110°E to a 140-145 Ma grouping centered at 60-65°N ~200°E. There are hardly any intermediate igneous poles whereas the rather divergent directions from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation published by Steiner & Helsley (1975 GSA Bulletin) are subject to adjustments for Colorado Plateau rotation and sedimentary inclination error, neither of which are precisely known for this redbed unit sampled in Colorado. On the other hand, similar large rapid swings have been recognized in the Late Jurassic APW path for Adria (Channell et al. 2010 Paleo3), suggesting a global phenomena. In an effort to fill the data gap between ~145 and 160 Ma, we sampled accessible outcrops/subcrops of kimberlites in the Timiskaming area of Ontario, Canada, that are associated with high precision U-Pb perovskite ages (Heamon & Kjarsgaard 2000 EPSL). We report initial results from two of the intrusions: the 153.6±2.4 Ma Peddie kimberlite from outcrop and the Triple B kimberlite that was accessible by trenching and is assumed to be the same age as the nearby 153.7±1.8 Ma Seed kimberlite as delineated by aeromagnetic surveys and borings. Systematic progressive thermal demagnetization indicated in each unit a dominant characteristic component with unblocking temperatures to 575° that presumably reflect a magnetite carrier that will be checked by further rock magnetic experiments. Samples from the Peddie kimberlite had stable downward (normal polarity) magnetizations whose mean direction gives a paleopole at 73°N 184°E. In contrast, samples from the Triple B kimberlite have upward (reverse polarity) magnetizations with a well-grouped direction whose (north) paleopole is 78°N 197°E, proximal to the Peddie

  20. Erosional remnants and adjacent unconformities along an eolian-marine boundary of the Page Sandstone and Carmel Formation, Middle Jurassic, south-central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.S.; Blakey, R.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    Sandstone ridges along the marine-eolian boundary of the Middle Jurassic Page Sandstone (eolian) with the lower Carmel Formation (restricted marine) in south-central Utah have been identified as erosional remnants consisting of strata of siliciclastic sabkha and eolian origin. The ridges lie within two distinct units of the Thousand Pockets Tongue of the Page. Two equally plausible models explain the genesis of these ridges. One model involves (1) early cementation of eolian and sabkha strata, (2) wind erosion leading to development of yardangs and unconformities, (3) yardang tilting due to evaporite dissolution, and (4) renewed deposition and burial. The alternative model explains ridge development through (1) subsidence, with tilting, of eolian and sabkha strata into evaporites due to loading from linear dunes, (2) evaporite dissolution and unconformity development, and (3) renewed deposition and burial. These models provide important clues about the nature of a missing part of the rock record. Reconstruction of units that were deposited but later eroded improves paleogeographic interpretation and here indicates that the Carmel paleo-shoreline was considerably farther to the northwest than previously believed.

  1. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Mancini

    2000-12-31

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the modeling results are being interpreted for report writing (Table 1). Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern part of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis has been initiated. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - The report on basin flow will be completed. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock data will be reviewed in light of the basin flow model results. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis.

  2. Sedimentology and palaeontology of the Upper Jurassic Puesto Almada Member (Cañadón Asfalto Formation, Fossati sub-basin), Patagonia Argentina: Palaeoenvironmental and climatic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaleri, Nora G.; Benavente, Cecilia A.; Monferran, Mateo D.; Narváez, Paula L.; Volkheimer, Wolfgang; Gallego, Oscar F.; Do Campo, Margarita D.

    2013-10-01

    Six facies associations are described for the Puesto Almada Member at the Cerro Bandera locality (Fossati sub-basin). They correspond to lacustrine, palustrine, and pedogenic deposits (limestones); and subordinated alluvial fan, fluvial, aeolian, and pyroclastic deposits. The lacustrine-palustrine depositional setting consisted of carbonate alkaline shallow lakes surrounded by flooded areas in a low-lying topography. The facies associations constitute four shallowing upward successions defined by local exposure surfaces: 1) a Lacustrine-Palustrine-pedogenic facies association with a 'conchostracan'-ostracod association; 2) a Palustrine facies association representing a wetland subenvironment, and yielding 'conchostracans', body remains of insects, fish scales, ichnofossils, and palynomorphs (cheirolepidiacean species and ferns growing around water bodies, and other gymnosperms in more elevated areas); 3) an Alluvial fan facies association indicating the source of sediment supply; and 4) a Lacustrine facies association representing a second wetland episode, and yielding 'conchostracans', insect ichnofossils, and a palynoflora mainly consisting of planktonic green algae associated with hygrophile elements. The invertebrate fossil assemblage found contains the first record of fossil insect bodies (Insecta-Hemiptera and Coleoptera) for the Cañadón Asfalto Formation. The succession reflects a mainly climatic control over sedimentation. The sedimentary features of the Puesto Almada Member are in accordance with an arid climatic scenario across the Upper Jurassic, and they reflect a strong seasonality with periods of higher humidity represented by wetlands and lacustrine sediments.

  3. Depositional and diagenetic history and petroleum geology of the Jurassic Norphlet Formation of the Alabama coastal waters area and adjacent federal waters area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The discovery of deep (>20,000 ft) gas reservoirs in eolian sandstone of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in Mobile Bay and offshore Alabama in the late 1970s represents one of the most significant hydrocarbon discoveries in the nation during the past several decades. Estimated original proved gas from Norphlet reservoirs in the Alabama coastal waters and adjacent federal waters is 7.462 trillion ft3 (Tcf) (75% recovery factor). Fifteen fields have been established in the offshore Alabama area. Norphlet sediment was deposited in an arid environment in alluvial fans, alluvial plains, and wadis in updip areas. In downdip areas, the Norphlet was deposited in a broad desert plain, with erg development in some areas. Marine transgression, near the end of Norphlet deposition, resulted in reworking of the upper part of the Norphlet Formation. Norphlet reservoir sandstone is arkose and subarkose, consisting of a simple assemblage of three minerals, quartz, albite, and K-feldspar. The present framework grain assemblage of the Norphlet is dominantly diagenetic, owing to albitization and dissolution of feldspar. Despite the simple framework composition, the diagenetic character of the Norphlet is complex. Important authigenic minerals include carbonate phases (calcite, dolomite, Fe-dolomite, and breunnerite), feldspar (albite and K-feldspar), evaporite minerals (anhydrite and halite), clay minerals (illite and chlorite), quartz, and pyrobitumen. The abundance and distribution of these minerals varies significantly between onshore and offshore regions of Norphlet production. The lack of sufficient internal sources of components for authigenic minerals, combined with unusual chemical compositions of chloride (Mg-rich), breunnerite, and some minor authigenic minerals, suggests that Louann-derived fluids influenced Norphlet diagenesis. In offshore Alabama reservoirs, porosity is dominantly modified primary porosity. Preservation of porosity in deep Norphlet reservoirs is due

  4. Deposition of a Jurassic ooid sand shoal - Smackover A zone of Buckner Formation, Corney Bayou field, Union Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Tye, E.N.; Moore, C.H.

    1986-09-01

    The Smackover A zone of the Buckner Formation in northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas is lithologically similar to the more thoroughly studied upper Smackover Formation. However, in contrast to the regionally occurring thick, blanket-like ooid sands of the upper Smackover, the Smackover A zone carbonates occur as strike-parallel, individual carbonate sand bodies isolated within the clays, muds, and evaporites of the upper Buckner. This isolation and its potential effects on fluid movement, diagenetic processes, and ultimate porosity evolution in similar sequences across northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas emphasize the importance of a well-constrained core-based field study.

  5. Sedimentary processes in modern and ancient oceanic arc settings: evidence from the Jurassic Talkeetna Formation of Alaska and the Mariana and Tonga Arcs, western Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    Sediment deposited around oceanic volcanic ares potentially provides the most complete record of the tectonic and geochemical evolution of active margins. The use of such tectonic and geochemical records requires an accurate understanding of sedimentary dynamics in an arc setting: processes of deposition and reworking that affect the degree to which sediments represent the contemporaneous volcanism at the time of their deposition. We review evidence from the modern Mariana and Tonga arcs and the ancient arc crustal section in the Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation of south-central Alaska, and introduce new data from the Mariana Arc, to produce a conceptual model of volcaniclastic sedimentation processes in oceanic arc settings. All three arcs are interpreted to have formed in tectonically erosive margin settings, resulting in long-term extension and subsidence. Debris aprons composed of turbidites and debris flow deposits occur in the immediate vicinity of arc volcanoes, forming relatively continuous mass-wasted volcaniclastic records in abundant accommodation space. There is little erosion or reworking of old volcanic materials near the arc volcanic front. Tectonically generated topography in the forearc effectively blocks sediment flow from the volcanic front to the trench; although some canyons deliver sediment to the trench slope, most volcaniclastic sedimentation is limited to the area immediately around volcanic centers. Arc sedimentary sections in erosive plate margins can provide comprehensive records of volcanism and tectonism spanning < 10 My. The chemical evolution of a limited section of an oceanic arc may be best reconstructed from sediments of the debris aprons for intervals up to ~ 20 My but no longer, because subduction erosion causes migration of the forearc basin crust and its sedimentary cover toward the trench, where there is little volcaniclastic sedimentation and where older sediments are dissected and reworked along the trench slope.

  6. A geochemical constraint on the formation process of a manganese carbonate nodule in the siliceous mudstone of the Jurassic accretionary complex in the Mino Belt, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Ryoichi; Shirai, Taka'aki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Noritoshi; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) carbonate nodules, which differ from seafloor Mn nodules mainly composed of MnO2, are occasionally embedded in the form of a lens shape in the Jurassic accretionary complexes, such as the Mino Belt in Japan. The interpretation of the formation process of Mn carbonate is still controversial, particularly concerning whether the Mn carbonate was formed primarily or secondarily. In this study, a fresh Mn carbonate nodule incorporated into the red siliceous mudstone was collected for geochemical and sedimentological analysis. The optical observation of thin sections indicates that the Mn carbonate nodules are composed of abraded grains of rhodochrosite spherule with radiolarians and are sedimentary embedded in siliceous mudstone. Microfossil radiolarians from the Mn carbonate nodules and the host red siliceous mudstone are dated as the Bajocian, but the radiolarians in the nodules are somewhat older than those in the host red siliceous mudstone. Geochemical analysis using the X-ray absorption near-edge structure on Ce indicates the dominance of trivalent Ce at present, despite the observation of a positive Ce anomaly in the PAAS-normalized REE pattern of Mn carbonate. The REE adsorption experiment on synthesized MnCO3 does not show any distinctive positive Ce anomaly, and a thermodynamic calculation suggests the possible coexistence of rhodochrosite and spontaneous oxidation of Ce. A leaching experiment that can selectively decompose the carbonate phase demonstrated no Ce anomaly in the carbonate phase of the Mn carbonate and a poor contribution to the bulk REE concentration. The carbon isotope data of Mn carbonate nodule implied the dominance of inorganic marine carbonate origin with small contribution of organic decomposition. The most plausible account of all of the observational and geochemical results is that the rhodochrosite grains were primarily formed on the depositional site and subsequently transferred to a different site, where siliceous

  7. Petrographic and geochemical constraints on the deposition and diagenesis of the Haynesville Formation (Upper Jurassic), southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Eustice, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The Haynesville Formation in Clarke County, southwestern Alabama, is a 250 m thick, halite-dominated evaporite rock composed of four vertically stacked evaporite facies. The different facies present include a basal chevron-dominated unit, a gray cumulate unit, a unit dominated by brown, organic-rich cumulates, and a unit composed of halite and anhydrite interbedded with sand and mud. The facies are defined by halite textures, the presence of anhydrite laminae and dissolution surfaces, and the relative amount of terrigenous material. These criteria were used because they provide some constraint on the brine depths present during precipitation of the salt. The integration of geochemical data with petrographic observations has been used to formulate a model for the deposition and diagenesis of the deposits. The bromide concentrations within the basal chevron zone systematically rise from 36 ppm to 101 ppm, while the bromide concentrations within the overlying cumulate zone rise more rapidly from 121 ppm to 440 ppm. The strontium isotopic composition of the salt over this interval systematically increases from 0.7068 to 0.7084. Bromide concentrations, strontium isotope ratios, and other chemical parameters, in combination with petrographic observations, constrain the relative importance of depositional and diagenetic processes. Processes that are important in controlling the geochemistry of the deposits include the influx of seawater and meteoric fluid into the basin, synsedimentary dissolution and recycling of solutes, the reflux of brines within the basin, and burial diagenetic processes.

  8. Diagenesis of Eolian and fluvial feldspathic sandstones, Norphlet formation (upper Jurassic), Rankin County, Mississippi, and Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, E.F.; Land, L.S.; Mack, L.E.

    1987-09-01

    Norphlet sandstones in seven cores from Mississippi and Alabama are arkoses and subarkoses deposited in eolian-dune, interdune, and fluvial environments. Similar to the deeply buried (> 5 km) Tertiary feldspathic sandstones of the Gulf basin, all detrital plagioclase that survived dissolution has been albitized. Fluvial red sandstone lost all initial porosity by the introduction of preburial pedogenic calcite and compaction. Initial porosity of eolian sands was reduced by compaction to an average of 29%; and later by cementation by quartz, carbonates, anhydrite, halite, K-feldspar, and illite. Quartz and anhydrite cements precipitated between 90/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/C (approximately 2.3 km deep), carbonates and halite cements formed below 120/sup 0/C (< 3 km), and late-stage illite cement formed between 130/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C (4-5 km deep). Cements are patchy, and some, especially quartz and anhydrite, are texture-selective, being more abundant in coarser laminae. Secondary porosity, which makes up approximately half the porosity in thin sections, formed by dissolution of detrital grains (feldspar, rock fragments) and cements (anhydrite, carbonate, halite). Reservoir bitumen records an early phase of oil entrapment. Reservoir quality is influenced by the abundance of reservoir bitumen and thread-like illite, both of which bridge pores. Isotopic data suggest that during the first 30 to 40 m.y. of burial, subsurface diagenesis of the Norphlet Formation was dominated by deep-circulating, hot, meteoric water. This phenomenon may be characteristic of the early diagenetic history of rifted basins. 10 figures, 5 tables.

  9. Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, M.; Ishihara, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the tectonic evolution of the Jurassic Pacific plate based on magnetic anomly lineations and abyssal hills. The Pacific plate is the largest oceanic plate on Earth. It was born as a microplate aroud the Izanagi-Farallon-Phoenix triple junction about 192 Ma, Early Jurassic [Nakanishi et al., 1992]. The size of the Pacific plate at 190 Ma was nearly half that of the present Easter or Juan Fernandez microplates in the East Pacific Rise [Martinez et at, 1991; Larson et al., 1992]. The plate boundary surrounding the Pacific plate from Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous involved the four triple junctions among Pacific, Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix plates. The major tectonic events as the formation of oceanic plateaus and microplates during the period occurred in the vicinity of the triple junctions [e.g., Nakanishi and Winterer, 1998; Nakanishi et al., 1999], implying that the study of the triple junctions is indispensable for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate. Previous studies indicate instability of the configuration of the triple junctions from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (155-125 Ma). On the other hand, the age of the birth of the Pacific plate was determined assuming that all triple junctions had kept their configurations for about 30 m.y. [Nakanishi et al., 1992] because of insufficient information of the tectonic history of the Pacific plate before Late Jurassic.Increase in the bathymetric and geomagnetic data over the past two decades enables us to reveal the tectonic evolution of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction before Late Jurassic. Our detailed identication of magnetic anomaly lineations exposes magnetic bights before anomaly M25. We found the curved abyssal hills originated near the triple junction, which trend is parallel to magnetic anomaly lineations. These results imply that the configuration of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction had been RRR before Late Jurassic.

  10. The nature of porosity in organic-rich mudstones of the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, North Sea, offshore United Kingdom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Neil S.; Hackley, Paul C.; Lowers, Heather; Hill, Ronald J.; Egenhoff, Sven O.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Blum, Alex E.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of organic-rich mudstones from wells that penetrated the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, offshore United Kingdom, were performed to evaluate the nature of both organic and inorganic rock constituents and their relation to porosity in this world-class source rock. The formation is at varying levels of thermal maturity, ranging from immature in the shallowest core samples to mature in the deepest core samples. The intent of this study was to evaluate porosity as a function of both organic macerals and thermal maturity. At least four distinct types of organic macerals were observed in petrographic and SEM analyses and they all were present across the study area. The macerals include, in decreasing abundance: 1) bituminite admixed with clays; 2) elongate lamellar masses (alginite or bituminite) with small quartz, feldspar, and clay entrained within it; 3) terrestrial (vitrinite, fusinite, semifusinite) grains; and 4) Tasmanites microfossils. Although pores in all maceral types were observed on ion-milled surfaces of all samples, the pores (largely nanopores with some micropores) vary as a function of maceral type. Importantly, pores in the macerals do not vary systematically as a function of thermal maturity, insofar as organic pores are of similar size and shape in both the immature and mature Kimmeridge rocks. If any organic pores developed during the generation of hydrocarbons, they were apparently not preserved, possibly because of the highly ductile nature of much of the rock constituents of Kimmeridge mudstones (clays and organic material). Inorganic pores (largely micropores with some nanopores) have been observed in all Kimmeridge mudstones. These pores, particularly interparticle (i.e., between clay platelets), and intraparticle (i.e., in framboidal pyrite, in partially dissolved detrital K-feldspar, and in both detrital and authigenic dolomite) are noteworthy because they compose much of the observable porosity in the shales in both

  11. Geological model of the Jurassic section in the State of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Yousif, S.; Nouman, G.

    1995-11-01

    Until the end of the seventies, the knowledge of Jurassic Geology in the State of Kuwait was very limited, since only one deep well was drilled and bottomed in the Triassic sediments. Few scattered wells partially penetrated the Jurassic sequence. During the eighties, appreciable number of wells were drilled through the Jurassic, and added a remarkable volume of information. consequently it was necessary to analyze the new data, in order to try to construct a geological model for the Jurassic in the State of Kuwait. This paper includes a number of isopach maps explaining the Jurassic depositional basin which also helps in trying to explain the Jurassic basin in the Arabian Gulf basin. Structural evolution of the Jurassic sequence indicated an inversion of relief when compared with the Cretaceous sequence. In fact, the main Cretaceous arches were sites of sedimentation troughs during the Jurassic period. This fact marks a revolution in the concepts for the Jurassic oil exploration. One of the very effective methods of the definition of the Jurassic structures is the isopaching of the Gotnia Formation. Najmah, Sargelu and Marrat Formations include the main Jurassic reservoirs which were detected as a result of the exploration activities during the eighties. Selective stratigraphic and structural cross sections have been prepared to demonstrate and explain the nature of the Jurassic sediments.

  12. Non-marine carbonate facies, facies models and palaeogeographies of the Purbeck Formation (Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous) of Dorset (Southern England).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallois, Arnaud; Bosence, Dan; Burgess, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Non-marine carbonates are relatively poorly understood compared with their more abundant marine counterparts. Sedimentary facies and basin architecture are controlled by a range of environmental parameters such as climate, hydrology and tectonic setting but facies models are few and limited in their predictive value. Following the discovery of extensive Early Cretaceous, non-marine carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs in the South Atlantic, the interest of understanding such complex deposits has increased during recent years. This study is developing a new depositional model for non-marine carbonates in a semi-arid climate setting in an extensional basin; the Purbeck Formation (Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous) in Dorset (Southern England). Outcrop study coupled with subsurface data analysis and petrographic study (sedimentology and early diagenesis) aims to constrain and improve published models of depositional settings. Facies models for brackish water and hypersaline water conditions of these lacustrine to palustrine carbonates deposited in the syn-rift phase of the Wessex Basin will be presented. Particular attention focusses on the factors that control the accumulation of in-situ microbialite mounds that occur within bedded inter-mound packstones-grainstones in the lower Purbeck. The microbialite mounds are located in three units (locally known as the Skull Cap, the Hard Cap and the Soft Cap) separated by three fossil soils (locally known as the Basal, the Lower and the Great Dirt Beds) respectively within three shallowing upward lacustrine sequences. These complex microbialite mounds (up to 4m high), are composed of tabular small-scale mounds (flat and long, up to 50cm high) divided into four subfacies. Many of these small-scale mounds developed around trees and branches which are preserved as moulds (or silicified wood) which are surrounded by a burrowed mudstone-wackestone collar. Subsequently a thrombolite framework developed on the upper part only within

  13. Late Jurassic salamandroid from western Liaoning, China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ke-Qin; Shubin, Neil H.

    2012-01-01

    A Jurassic salamander, Beiyanerpeton jianpingensis (gen. et sp. nov.), from a recently found site in western Liaoning Province, China is the earliest known record of Salamandroidea. As a Late Jurassic record of the group, it extends the range of the clade by ~40 Ma. The Late Jurassic taxon is neotenic and represented by exceptionally preserved specimens, including fully articulated cranial and postcranial skeletons and bony gill structures close to the cheek region. The fossil beds, consisting of dark-brown volcanic ash shales of the Upper Jurassic Tiaojishan (Lanqi) Formation (Oxfordian), underlie trachyandesite rocks that have yielded a SHRIMP zircon U-Pb date of 157 ± 3 Ma. The fossiliferous beds are substantially older than the Jehol Group, including the Yixian Formation (40Ar/39Ar dates of 122–129 Ma), but slightly younger than the Middle Jurassic Daohugou horizon (40Ar/39Ar date of 164 ± 4 Ma). The early fossil taxon shares with extant salamandroids derived character states, including: separated nasals lacking a midline contact, angular fused to the prearticular in the lower jaw, and double-headed ribs on the presacral vertebrae. In contrast to extant salamandroids, however, the salamander shows a discrete and tooth-bearing palatine, and unequivocally nonpedicellate and monocuspid marginal teeth in large and presumably mature individuals. The finding provides insights into the evolution of key characters of salamanders, and also provides direct evidence supporting the hypothesis that the split between Cryptobranchoidea and Salamandroidea had taken placed before the Late Jurassic Oxfordian time. In this aspect, both paleontological and molecular data now come to agree. PMID:22411790

  14. Jurassic stratigraphy of the Wiggins Arch, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.; Maxwell, G.B. )

    1993-09-01

    Mobil and Shell jointly explored the Wiggins arch area in southern Mississippi from 1985 to 1991. The effort concentrated on the Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations. Two wells were drilled into Paleozoic crystalline rocks and one well into the Pine Hill formation. Two of these wells were located on the southern side of the Wiggins arch and provide significant data for interpreting Jurassic stratigraphy. The Mobil No. 1 U.S.A. well encountered a complete Jurassic section, but with some significantly different facies than those encountered by wells to the north. A granite wash section is the equivalent to the Frisco City formation previously only found 100 mi to the north-northeast. All 300 ft of Smackover is crystalline dolomite. The Norphlet section is entirely granite wash. The Pine Hill anhydrite is unusually thick and interpreted to be equivalent to the Louann Salt. Correlations to other wells on the Wiggins arch, particularly the Conoco No. 1 Higgins, indicate that the Jurassic can be divided into three transgressive events separated by the Norphlet/Pine Hill and Frisco City/Buckner regressive events.

  15. Man: Planetary Disease. The 1971 B. Y. Morrison Memorial Lecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHarg, Ian L.

    The 1971 B.Y. Morrison Memorial Lecture by Ian L. McHarg, noted landscape architect, planner, and lecturer, is presented in this pamphlet. His expose is two-fold. "Man is an epidemic, multiplying at a superexponential rate, destroying the environment upon which he depends, and threatening his own extinction. He treats the world as a storehouse…

  16. Migration, Trauma, PTSD: A Gender Study in Morrison's Jazz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motlagh, Leila Tafreshi; Yahya, Wan Roselezam Wan

    2014-01-01

    Toni Morrison is an acknowledged master of trauma literature, however trauma theory and a gender response to trauma remain largely unaccounted for her migration literature, specifically "Jazz" (1992). In her novel, two migrant women are affected by the same trauma, a crime of passion. But they choose different reactions and coping…

  17. Optimal application of Morrison's iterative noise removal for deconvolution. Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    1987-01-01

    Morrison's iterative method of noise removal, or Morrison's smoothing, is applied in a simulation to noise-added data sets of various noise levels to determine its optimum use. Morrison's smoothing is applied for noise removal alone, and for noise removal prior to deconvolution. For the latter, an accurate method is analyzed to provide confidence in the optimization. The method consists of convolving the data with an inverse filter calculated by taking the inverse discrete Fourier transform of the reciprocal of the transform of the response of the system. Various length filters are calculated for the narrow and wide Gaussian response functions used. Deconvolution of non-noisy data is performed, and the error in each deconvolution calculated. Plots are produced of error versus filter length; and from these plots the most accurate length filters determined. The statistical methodologies employed in the optimizations of Morrison's method are similar. A typical peak-type input is selected and convolved with the two response functions to produce the data sets to be analyzed. Both constant and ordinate-dependent Gaussian distributed noise is added to the data, where the noise levels of the data are characterized by their signal-to-noise ratios. The error measures employed in the optimizations are the L1 and L2 norms. Results of the optimizations for both Gaussians, both noise types, and both norms include figures of optimum iteration number and error improvement versus signal-to-noise ratio, and tables of results. The statistical variation of all quantities considered is also given.

  18. Toni Morrison's Beloved: a journey through the pain of grief.

    PubMed

    Pass, Olivia McNeely

    2006-01-01

    This paper elucidates the structure of Toni Morrison's novel, Beloved, using the framework of human emotions in response to grieving and death as developed by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross. Through her studies of terminally ill patients, Kubler-Ross identified five stages when approaching death: denial and isolation, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. These stages accurately fill the process that the character Sethe experiences in the novel as she learns to accept her daughter's death.

  19. Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hutley, J.K.

    1985-02-01

    Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

  20. A quantitative model of ground-water flow during formation of tabular sandstone uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a quantitative simulation of regional groundwater flow during uranium deposition in the Westwater Canyon Member and Jackpile Sandstone Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the San Juan basin. Topographic slope, shoreline position, and density contrasts in the lake and pore fluids controlled the directions of flow and recharge-discharge areas. The most important results for uranium ore deposit formation are that regional groundwater discharged throughout the basin, regional discharge was concentrated along the shore line or playa margin, flow was dominantly gravity driven, and compaction dewatering was negligible. A strong association is found between the tabular sandstone uranium deposits and major inferred zones of mixed local and regional groundwater discharge. -from Author

  1. Geochemistry evidence for depositional settings and provenance of Jurassic argillaceous rocks of Jiyuan Basin, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yao; Zheng, Deshun; Li, Minglong

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to discuss the depositional settings and provenances for the Jurassic in Jiyuan basin, North China, based on the rare earth element (REE) and trace element features of 16 Jurassic argillaceous rock samples from the Anyao, Yangshuzhuang and Ma'ao Formations, respectively. Generally, geochemical analysis results show that chondrite-normalised REE distribution patterns of all the three formations are characterised by light-REE (LREE) enrichment, moderately negative Eu anomalies, slightly negative Ce anomalies, and strong fractionation between LREE and heavy-REE (HREE). Trace element proxies V/(V + Ni), Ce anom index, Ce/La, Sr/Ba, and Sr/Cu indicate a weak oxidation-reduction environment, progressively decreasing reducibility and water depth from the bottom up during Jurassic in Jiyuan basin. Palaeoclimate varied from humid in the Early Jurassic to arid in the Middle Jurassic, corresponding with the variations of palaeoredox and palaeosalinity. The provenances of Jurassic rocks in Jiyuan basin are mainly from felsic sources related to active continental margin and continental island arc. The Early-Middle Jurassic (Anyao and Yangshuzhuang Formations) provenances are mainly derived from North Qinling and partially from the eroded recycled felsic sedimentary covers of Taihang Mountain. In the late stage of Middle Jurassic (Ma'ao Formation), Taihang Mountain has been the primary source to Jiyuan basin. We conclude that the Jurassic rocks of Jiyuan basin reveal the progressive uplift and denudation processes of the Taihang Mountain.

  2. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2001-09-14

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been reservoir description and characterization. This effort has included four tasks: (1) geoscientific reservoir characterization, (2) the study of rock-fluid interactions, (3) petrophysical and engineering characterization and (4) data integration. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 1. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been initiated. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been

  3. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and

  4. Isotopic composition of a calcite-cemented layer in the Lower Jurassic Bridport Sands, southern England: Implications for formation of laterally extensive calcite-cemented layers

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerkum, P.A. ); Walderhaug, O. )

    1993-07-01

    [delta][sup 18]O[sub PDB] and [delta][sup 13]C[sub PDB] values have been measured on 107 calcite cement samples from a laterally extensive (> 3 km) and continuous calcite-cemented layer 0.5 m thick in the coastal exposures of the Lower Jurassic shallow-marine Bridport Sands in Dorset, southern England. The samples were taken from a two-dimensional grid with 10-cm horizontal and vertical spacing between samples and along individual vertical lines across the calcite-cemented layer, [delta][sup 18]O[sub PDB] values vary between [minus]4.8% and [minus]9.2% and decrease radially outwards from points with lateral spacings on the order of 0.5-1 m in the middle of the calcite-cemented layer. The [delta][sup 18]O[sub PDB] values therefore indicate that the calcite-cemented layer was formed by merging of concretions. All [delta][sup 13]C[sub PDB] values measured are in the narrow range [minus]2.2% to [minus]0.5%, which suggests that the dominant source of calcite cement in the layer was biogenic carbonate.

  5. Applying microCT and 3D visualization to Jurassic silicified conifer seed cones: A virtual advantage over thin-sectioning1

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Carole T.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: As an alternative to conventional thin-sectioning, which destroys fossil material, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (also called microtomography or microCT) integrated with scientific visualization, three-dimensional (3D) image segmentation, size analysis, and computer animation is explored as a nondestructive method of imaging the internal anatomy of 150-million-year-old conifer seed cones from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation, USA, and of recent and other fossil cones. • Methods: MicroCT was carried out on cones using a General Electric phoenix v|tome|x s 240D, and resulting projections were processed with visualization software to produce image stacks of serial single sections for two-dimensional (2D) visualization, 3D segmented reconstructions with targeted structures in color, and computer animations. • Results: If preserved in differing densities, microCT produced images of internal fossil tissues that showed important characters such as seed phyllotaxy or number of seeds per cone scale. Color segmentation of deeply embedded seeds highlighted the arrangement of seeds in spirals. MicroCT of recent cones was even more effective. • Conclusions: This is the first paper on microCT integrated with 3D segmentation and computer animation applied to silicified seed cones, which resulted in excellent 2D serial sections and segmented 3D reconstructions, revealing features requisite to cone identification and understanding of strobilus construction. PMID:25202495

  6. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic

  7. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on

  8. A Giant Pliosaurid Skull from the Late Jurassic of England

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Roger B. J.; Evans, Mark; Smith, Adam S.; Sassoon, Judyth; Moore-Faye, Scott; Ketchum, Hilary F.; Forrest, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Pliosaurids were a long-lived and cosmopolitan group of marine predators that spanned 110 million years and occupied the upper tiers of marine ecosystems from the Middle Jurassic until the early Late Cretaceous. A well-preserved giant pliosaurid skull from the Late Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation of Dorset, United Kingdom, represents a new species, Pliosaurus kevani. This specimen is described in detail, and the taxonomy and systematics of Late Jurassic pliosaurids is revised. We name two additional new species, Pliosaurus carpenteri and Pliosaurus westburyensis, based on previously described relatively complete, well-preserved remains. Most or all Late Jurassic pliosaurids represent a globally distributed monophyletic group (the genus Pliosaurus, excluding ‘Pliosaurus’ andrewsi). Despite its high species diversity, and geographically widespread, temporally extensive occurrence, Pliosaurus shows relatively less morphological and ecological variation than is seen in earlier, multi-genus pliosaurid assemblages such as that of the Middle Jurassic Oxford Clay Formation. It also shows less ecological variation than the pliosaurid-like Cretaceous clade Polycotylidae. Species of Pliosaurus had robust skulls, large body sizes (with skull lengths of 1.7–2.1 metres), and trihedral or subtrihedral teeth suggesting macropredaceous habits. Our data support a trend of decreasing length of the mandibular symphysis through Late Jurassic time, as previously suggested. This may be correlated with increasing adaptation to feeding on large prey. Maximum body size of pliosaurids increased from their first appearance in the Early Jurassic until the Early Cretaceous (skull lengths up to 2360 mm). However, some reduction occurred before their final extinction in the early Late Cretaceous (skull lengths up to 1750 mm). PMID:23741520

  9. Jurassic Park: Adventure in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shams, Marcia; Boteler, Trina

    1993-01-01

    Describes using the movie "Jurassic Park" as a foundation for a middle school interdisciplinary unit involving science, math, language arts, history, and geography. Suggested books and activities are presented. (PR)

  10. Optimal application of Morrison's iterative noise removal for deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    1986-01-01

    Morrison's iterative method of noise removal can be applied for both noise removal alone and noise removal prior to deconvolution. This method is applied to noise of various noise levels added to determine the optimum use of the method. The phase shift method of migration and modeling is evaluated and the results are compared to Stolt's approach. A method is introduced by which the optimum iterative number for deconvolution can be found. Statistical computer simulation is used to describe the optimum use of two convergent iterative techniques for seismic data. The Always-Convergent deconvolution technique was applied to data recorded during the quantitative analysis of materials through NonDestructive Evaluation (NDE) in which ultrasonic signals were used to detect flaws in substances such as composites.

  11. Anatomy and Cranial Functional Morphology of the Small-Bodied Dinosaur Fruitadens haagarorum from the Upper Jurassic of the USA

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Richard J.; Porro, Laura B.; Galton, Peter M.; Chiappe, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Heterodontosaurids are an important but enigmatic and poorly understood early radiation of ornithischian dinosaurs. The late-surviving heterodontosaurid Fruitadens haagarorum from the Late Jurassic (early Tithonian) Morrison Formation of the western USA is represented by remains of several small (<1 metre total body length, <1 kg body mass) individuals that include well-preserved but incomplete cranial and postcranial material. Fruitadens is hypothesized to represent one of the smallest known ornithischian dinosaurs. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe the cranial and postcranial anatomy of Fruitadens in detail, providing comparisons to all other known heterodontosaurid taxa. High resolution micro-CT data provides new insights into tooth replacement and the internal anatomy of the tooth-bearing bones. Moreover, we provide a preliminary functional analysis of the skull of late-surviving heterodontosaurids, discuss the implications of Fruitadens for current understanding of heterodontosaurid monophyly, and briefly review the evolution and biogeography of heterodontosaurids. Conclusions/Significance The validity of Fruitadens is supported by multiple unique characters of the dentition and hindlimb as well as a distinct character combination. Fruitadens shares highly distinctive appendicular characters with other heterodontosaurids, strengthening monophyly of the clade on the basis of the postcranium. Mandibular morphology and muscle moment arms suggest that the jaws of late-surviving heterodontosaurids, including Fruitadens, were adapted for rapid biting at large gape angles, contrasting with the jaws of the stratigraphically older Heterodontosaurus, which were better suited for strong jaw adduction at small gapes. The lack of wear facets and plesiomorphic dentition suggest that Fruitadens used orthal jaw movements and employed simple puncture-crushing to process food. In combination with its small body size, these results suggest that Fruitadens was

  12. Middle Jurassic radiolarian fauna from Rotti Island, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashida, K.; Munasri; Adachi, S.; Kamata, Y.

    1999-08-01

    A well-preserved Middle Jurassic radiolarian fauna was discriminated from calcareous shale of the Wai Luli Formation on Rotti Island, Indonesia. This fauna is characterized by the presence of Tricolocapsa plicarum, Tricolocapsa ? fusiformis, Stichocapsa japonica, S. convexa, Cyrtocapsa mastoidea, Protunuma turbo, Transhsuum maxwelli, Eucyrtidiellum sp., Archaeodictyomitra sp. A. and others. These radiolarians represent the T. plicarum Assemblage reported from Bajocian and early Bathonian (Middle Jurassic) sequences in Japan and southeastern Europe. Based on accumulated micropaleontological evidence in Timor Island contributed by the present authors, Rotti Island was probably positioned within a warm water current system originating in the low latitude Tethyan realm through the Middle Jurassic. Fifteen species belonging to seven genera are systematically investigated. Among them, Tricolocapsa multispinosa and Tricolocapsa matsuokai are described as new.

  13. Circles: Mother and Daughter Relationships in Toni Morrison's "Song of Solomon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subryan, Carmen

    1988-01-01

    Examines the mother daughter relationships portrayed in Toni Morrison's novel, "Song of Solomon." Shows how societal influences can result in the stagnation of Black womens' spirits, and how love and compassion can result in the uplifting of the spirit. (FMW)

  14. Stratigraphic and structural configuration of the Navajo (Jurassic) through Ouray (Mississippian-Devonian) formations in the vicinity of Davis and Lavender Canyons, southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    McCleary, J.R.; Romie, J.E.

    1986-04-01

    This study developed a three-dimensional computer model of stratigraphic and structural relationships within a 3497-km/sup 2/ (1350-mi/sup 2/) study area centered on the proposed site for a high-level nuclear waste repository in southeastern Utah. The model consists of a sequence of internally reconciled isopach and structure contour maps horizontally registered and stored in stratigraphic order. This model can be used to display cross sections, perspective block diagrams, or fence diagrams at any orientation; estimate depth of formation contacts and thicknesses for any new stratigraphic or hydrologic boreholes; facilitate ground-water modeling studies; and evaluate the structural and stratigraphic evolution of the study area. This study also includes limited evaluations of aquifer continuity in the Elephant Canyon and Honaker Trail Formations, and of salt dissolution and flowage features as interpreted from geophysical logs. The study identified a long history of movement in the fault system in the north-central part of the study area and a major salt flowage feature in the northeastern part. It describes the Elephant Canyon Formation aquifer as laterally limited, the Honaker Trail Formation aquifer as fairly continuous over the area, and Beef Basin in the southern part of the area as a probable dissolution feature. It also concludes that the Shay-Bridger Jack-Salt Creek Graben system is apparently a vertically continuous feature between the basement and ground surface. No stratigraphic or structural discontinuities were detected in the vicinity of Davis Canyon that appear to be detrimental to the siting of a waste repository.

  15. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  16. Jurassic faults of southwest Alabama and offshore areas

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Four fault groups affecting Jurassic strata occur in the southwest and offshore Alabama areas. They include the regional basement rift trend, the regional peripheral fault trend, the Mobile graben fault system, and the Lower Mobile Bay fault system. The regional basement system rift and regional peripheral fault trends are distinct and rim the inner margin of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The regional basement rift trend is genetically related to the breakup of Pangea and the opening of the Gulf of Mexico in the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic. This fault trend is thought to have formed contemporaneously with deposition of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic Eagle Mills Formation and to displace pre-Mesozoic rocks. The regional peripheral fault trend consists of a group of en echelon extensional faults that are parallel or subparallel to regional strike of Gulf Coastal Plain strata and correspond to the approximate updip limit of thick Louann Salt. Nondiapiric salt features are associated with the trend and maximum structural development is exhibited in the Haynesville-Smackover section. No hydrocarbon accumulations have been documented in the pre-Jurassic strata of southwest and offshore Alabama. Productive hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in Jurassic strata along the trends of the fault groups, suggesting a significant relationship between structural development in the Jurassic and hydrocarbon accumulation. Hydrocarbon traps are generally structural or contain a major structural component and include salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps. All of the major hydrocarbon accumulations are associated with movement of the Louann Salt along the regional peripheral fault trend, the Mobile graben fault system, or the Lower Mobile Bay fault system.

  17. Stratigraphy of the Jurassic system in northern Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Keeley, M.L.; Shaw, D.; Forbes, G.A.

    1988-08-01

    A regional synthesis is presented of the stratigraphy of Jurassic strata in Egypt north of 30/degree/N, based on the study of about 80 wells and outcrops from northeastern Egypt. Almost all fossil groups have been investigated for biostratigraphic control. Published work on ammonite faunas from Gebel el Maghara (north Sinai) is integrated with extensive original work on palynofloras (and, to a lesser extent, ostracod/foraminiferal faunas) recovered from marine rocks in the subsurface. The recovery of rich dinocyst assemblages enables the recognition of a ten-fold zonation scheme, largely within the Middle-Late Jurassic sedimentary package. The upper limit of this package is marked by the Cimmerian erosional event; strata younger than Oxfordian are rarely preserved. Only east of 30/degree/E is significant sedimentation known to have occurred immediately prior to the major early Bajocian transgressive event. Thereafter mean sea level rose steadily. The Lower Triassic-Lower Jurassic sedimentary package is poorly understood, largely the result of scanty and ambiguous stratigraphic evidence. However, regional correlations suggest that only very thin earliest Jurassic (Hettangian ) clastic deposition succeeded a sequence of Upper Triassic carbonates and evaporites (Wadi en Natrun Formation) in the north. Arising from these studies is a standard lithostratigraphical scheme. The upper sedimentary package, the Gebel el Maghara Group, comprises three formations (Masajid, Khatatba, and Inmar) and seven members; new units are defined and old units redefined.

  18. Geochemistry of ground water in the Gallup, Dakota, and Morrison aquifers, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dam, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    Ground water was sampled from wells completed in the Gallup, Dakota, and Morrison aquifers in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, to examine controls on solute concentrations. Samples were collected from 38 wells primarily from the Morrison aquifer (25 wells) in the northwestern part of the basin. A series of samples was collected along ground-water flow paths; dissolved constituents varied horizontally and vertically. The understanding of the flow system changed as a result of the geochemical analyses. The conceptual model of the flow system in the Morrison aquifer prior to the study reported here assumed the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison aquifer as the only significant regional aquifer; flow was assumed to be two dimensional; and vertical leakage was assumed to be negligible. The geochemical results indicate that the Westwater Canyon Member is not the only major water-yielding zone and that the flow system is three dimensional. The data presented in this report suggest an upward component of flow into the Morrison aquifer. The entire section above and below the Morrison aquifer appears to be controlled by a three-dimensional flow regime where saline brine leaks near the San Juan River discharge area. Predominant ions in the Gallup aquifer were calcium bicarbonate in recharge areas and sodium sulfate in discharge areas. In the Dakota aquifer, predominant ions were sodium bicarbonate and sodium sulfate. Water in the Morrison aquifer was predominantly sodium bicarbonate in the recharge area, changing to sodium sulfate downgradient. Chemical and radioisotopic data indicate that water from overlying and underlying units mixes with recharge water in the Morrison aquifer. Recharge water contained a large ratio of chlorine-36 to chlorine and a small ratio of bromide to chloride. Approximately 10 miles downgradient, samples from four wells completed in the Morrison aquifer were considerably different in composition compared to recharge samples. Oxygen stable

  19. Magnetic susceptibility and cyclostratigraphy of upper Jurassic marly formations (ANDRA, underground research laboratory, Bure, Eastern Paris Basin): Record of Milankovitch cycles, sedimentary gaps, and implications for regional correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilia, H.; Bruno, G.; Pierre-Yves, C.; Slah, B.; Pascal, E.; Linda, H.; Christian, R.

    2006-05-01

    This study integrates research conducted by ANDRA at the Underground Research Laboratory of Bure (Meuse, France) to investigate the feasibility of a deep geological waste repository in clay for high-level and long-lived intermediate-level radioactive waste. The aim of this study is to detect possible sedimentary gaps in the upper Callovian-lower Oxfordian homogeneous marly formation where the laboratory is located, and to estimate the duration of stages and biostratigraphic zonation by comparison with a basin sequence from the southeast of France that is presumed to have accumulated continuously. The search for hiatuses was made using a high resolution cyclostratigraphic approach based on the study of magnetic susceptibility (MS) fluctuations. Four ANDRA boreholes (EST 342, EST 322, EST 103 and EST 312) oriented on a SW-NE transect (40 kilometers) were analyzed. Magnetic susceptibility measurements were made on core samples with a Bartington Instruments MS2E1 sensor every 4 centimeters. Sedimentological data suggest that variations of the clay content influence the long term evolution of MS. The high frequency variations in MS were subjected to spectral analysis. Composite cycles of 0.5, 1 and 2.5 m thickness were recognized on the basis of frequency ratio and correspond to the frequency ratio of orbital Milankovitch cycles. The duration of the Mariae ammonite zone in the Paris Basin was estimated by counting the cycles, to be between 2.4 and 2.6 My ± 0.3 ky (borehole EST 322 & EST 103). The amplitude spectrum shows (1) sedimentation rate variations in particular in the lower Oxfordian and (2) interruptions in cycle evolution correlated to sequential limits. We interpret these zones as short condensed levels. The same methods were applied to sections from the southeast of France (Aspres-sur-Buëch, Thuoux), and the Mariae ammonite zone estimated to be between 2.3 and 2.8 My of age. By comparison of this biostratigraphic zone between the two studied regions

  20. Formation and tectonic evolution of the Cretaceous Jurassic Muslim Bagh ophiolitic complex, Pakistan: Implications for the composite tectonic setting of ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mehrab; Kerr, Andrew C.; Mahmood, Khalid

    2007-10-01

    The Muslim Bagh ophiolitic complex Balochistan, Pakistan is comprised of an upper and lower nappe and represents one of a number of ophiolites in this region which mark the boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates. These ophiolites were obducted onto the Indian continental margin around the Late Cretaceous, prior to the main collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. The upper nappe contains mantle sequence rocks with numerous isolated gabbro plutons which we show are fed by dolerite dykes. Each pluton has a transitional dunite-rich zone at its base, and new geochemical data suggest a similar mantle source region for both the plutons and dykes. In contrast, the lower nappe consists of pillow basalts, deep-marine sediments and a mélange of ophiolitic rocks. The rocks of the upper nappe have a geochemical signature consistent with formation in an island arc environment whereas the basalts of the lower nappe contain no subduction component and are most likely to have formed at a mid-ocean ridge. The basalts and sediments of the lower nappe have been intruded by oceanic alkaline igneous rocks during the northward drift of the Indian plate. The two nappes of the Muslim Bagh ophiolitic complex are thus distinctively different in terms of their age, lithology and tectonic setting. The recognition of composite ophiolites such as this has an important bearing on the identification and interpretation of ophiolites where the plate tectonic setting is less well resolved.

  1. Early Mesozoic history and petroleum potential of formations in Wyoming and northern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, M.D. )

    1993-08-01

    During the Triassic and Jurassic, over what is now Wyoming and northern Utah, roughly equal amounts of sediment were being deposited in continental settings-lake, stream, and eolian-and in shallow-marine or deltaic-plain settings-delta, beach, marsh, tidal flat, and shallow shelf. Clastic rocks dominate. In order of decreasing abundance, the rocks are fine-grained clastics (siltstone, claystone, mudstone), sandstone, carbonates, evaporites, and claystone- and carbonate-pebble conglomerate. Approximately four-fifths of the succession contains red beds or variegated layers-purple, maroon, lavender, olive, green. Unconformities bound Jurassic formations in Wyoming-Nugget, Gypsum Spring, Sundance, and Morrison. Unconformities also bound the continental Upper Triassic section-unnamed red bed unit, Jelm, Popo Agie-separating it from the underlying shallow-marine formations-Dinwoody, Red Peak, Alcova, Crow Mountain. Within the marine sequence, an unconformity occurs at the top of the Alcova and, quite likely, shorter periods of erosion took place at the top and below the base of the sandy faces that underlies the Alcova. The postulate duration of the principal unconformities totals about 18 m.y., at least one-sixth of early Mesozoic time. The bulk of the remaining 80-100 m.y. may be represented by a large number of smaller unconformities. For the lower Mesozoic, as for most stratigraphic intervals, a few beds contain the story of what has taken place during the abyss of geologic time. Like other places in the world where evaporites occur in the Triassic, the Wyoming section produces little crude oil. No significant sequence in the early Mesozoic shows source-bed characteristics. The Crow Mountain Sandstone contains the best reservoirs. The Lower( ) Jurassic Nugget Sandstone produces the most oil and gas in the thrust belt of southwestern Wyoming and northern Utah. Cretaceous claystones below the thrusts contain the source beds.

  2. Two new species of Paramesosciophilodes (Diptera, Nematocera, Mesosciophilidae) from the Middle Jurassic of China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jiaqi; Shi, Guifeng; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species, Paramesosciophilodes bellus sp. n. and Paramesosciophilodes rarissima sp. n., from the Jiulongshan Formation at Daohugou Village, Inner Mongolia, China, are described in the extinct family Mesosciophilidae. Altogether seven genera with 21 species of mesosciophilids have been described from the Jurassic of Siberia and Kazakhstan, the Lower Cretaceous of Transbaikalia, and the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia. An emended generic diagnosis of Paramesosciophilodes and a list of known taxa of mesosciophilids are provided. PMID:26257555

  3. Two new species of Paramesosciophilodes (Diptera, Nematocera, Mesosciophilidae) from the Middle Jurassic of China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiaqi; Shi, Guifeng; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Two new species, Paramesosciophilodesbellus sp. n. and Paramesosciophilodesrarissima sp. n., from the Jiulongshan Formation at Daohugou Village, Inner Mongolia, China, are described in the extinct family Mesosciophilidae. Altogether seven genera with 21 species of mesosciophilids have been described from the Jurassic of Siberia and Kazakhstan, the Lower Cretaceous of Transbaikalia, and the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia. An emended generic diagnosis of Paramesosciophilodes and a list of known taxa of mesosciophilids are provided.

  4. Petroleum potential of Lower-Jurassic deposits in Nurolsk megadepression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, Lobova; E, Osipova; V, Isaev; D, Terre

    2015-02-01

    Based on reservoir temperature measurement data from twenty-three reference well cross-sections and paleotemperature modeling, the thermal history of Lower-Jurassic Togur source rock within Nurolsk megadepression and its framing structures have been reconstructed. Plotted maps showed the density distribution of initial accumulated oil resources for Lower J15-J16 formations. Based on performed zoning of reservoirs the areas for priority hydrocarbon prospecting were proposed.

  5. Occurrence of sauropod dinosaur tracks in the Upper Jurassic of Chile (redescription of Iguanodonichnus frenki)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Karen; Benton, Michael J.

    2005-12-01

    New observations from the only studied Upper Jurassic dinosaur unit in South America, the Baños del Flaco Formation, Chile, are presented herein. The original description of the ichnospecies Iguanodonichnus frenki contains several mistakes and information that needs updating. Therefore, we provide a redescription, including new data collected in the field, that supports I. frenki as a sauropod in origin on the basis of the following features: step angles average less than 110°; pes prints intersect the trackway midline; pes prints are longer than wide, with the long axis rotated outward; the claw impression of digit I is prominent and directed forward; and claws on digits II, III, and IV are strongly reduced. These morphological characteristics might give clues about the pes morphology of the South American Jurassic sauropods, whose foot bone remains are scarce. The presence of this sauropod ichnospecies in the Late Jurassic agrees with Early-Middle Jurassic faunal associations in South America.

  6. The Origin of the Jurassic Quiet Zone -new insights from Hawaiian Jurassic magnetic anomalies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, M.; Tivey, M.; Sager, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies recorded in oceanic crust, have played a central role in documenting Earth's magnetic field history as compiled in the geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS). The oldest part of the marine record is the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) (pre-M29 chrons) which is known to be a period when field intensity was low, while reversal rate was high. The origin and character of the JQZ has been the subject of marine magnetic studies over past 20 years in the western Pacific where the oldest and arguably best preserved Jurassic magnetic anomalies create three Jurassic lineation sets (Japanese, Hawaiian, and Phoenix). The Japanese JQZ sequence was extensively investigated by an aeromagnetic and 2 deeptow magnetometer surveys, revealing (i) the presence of lineated anomalies older than M29; (ii) a GPTS record extending from M29 to M44 with a tie to ODP Hole 801C and (iii) remarkably fast reversals that decrease in intensity back in time until M38. Prior to M38 there is a low amplitude zone (LAZ) in anomalies lasting until M42, when both anomaly amplitude and a lineated character reappears around Hole 801C. Recently collected (2011) high quality seasurface marine magnetic anomaly data from the Hawaiian lineations show changes in magnetic anomaly shape and amplitude that are similar in to the Japanese lineations, suggesting that the anomalies record globally coherent geomagnetic field behavior for the Jurassic. Specifically, the strong similarity of anomaly patterns between the Japanese and Hawaiian sequences from M19 to M38 supports the remarkably dynamic geomagnetic field behavior of fast reversals and changing intensity, confirming a proposed record of the GPTS sequence for M29 to M38. While the LAZ in the Hawaiian sequence is not as clear as in the Japanese lineations, we believe we can correlate the earlier M42-M44 sequence between the two sets of lineations. The slower spreading rate in the Hawaiian lineations may contribute to this lack of resolution of

  7. A late Jurassic pterosaur (Reptilia, Pterodactyloidea) from northwestern Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codorniú, Laura; Gasparini, Zulma; Paulina-Carabajal, Ariana

    2006-03-01

    A small to medium-sized pterodactyloid pterosaur (wingspan approximately 1.10 m) from the Upper Jurassic (middle-late Tithonian) marine deposits of the Vaca Muerta Formation of Patagonia (Los Catutos area, central Neuquén Province, Argentina) is reported. The specimen lacks the skull but constitutes a nearly complete postcranial skeleton, which includes cervical and dorsal vertebrae; a few thoracic ribs; both pectoral girdles; the left pelvic girdle; a proximal right wing (humerus, ulna, and radius) and metacarpal IV; a left wing that lacks only wing phalanx four; and both hindlimbs, the right one without the foot. Ontogenetic features suggest that the new fossil corresponds to a relatively mature individual, probably a subadult. Observed characters support its assignment to the Archaeopteroactyloidea, a basal clade within the Pterodactyloidea. This specimen is the second pterosaur from Los Catutos and the most complete Jurassic pterosaur so far known from South America.

  8. Performance-Based Assessment in Schools: A Comment on Hojnoski, Morrison, Brown, and Matthews (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses a 2006 article by Hojnoski, Morrison, Brown, and Matthews on the use of performance-based measurement among school-based practitioners. Their results suggest that many of their survey respondents favor the use of this form of measurement. This line of research is important and addresses an important issue in current clinical…

  9. Between Spaces: Meditations on Toni Morrison and Whiteness in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Beth A.

    2005-01-01

    An instructor and her student offer complementary perspectives on what happened in a classroom in which reading Toni Morrison opened up nearly intractable resistances to a making and sharing of knowledge in which no one was allowed to take refuge in what Catherine Fox calls "whiteliness" and assume a position outside of others' knowing…

  10. William J. Morrison (1860-1926): co-inventor of the cotton candy machine.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2005-07-01

    William James Morrison (1860-1926), from Nashville, Tennessee was a noted dentist, lawyer, author and leader in civic and political affairs. An 1890 graduate of the University of Tennessee Dental College, Dr. Morrison became President of the Tennessee State Dental Association in 1894. He had a wide interest in both science and politics, and was personally associated with both William Jennings Bryan and President Woodrow Wilson. Additionally, he was a popular author of children's books and particularly effective in fostering reading among youngsters. Also, Dr. Morrison patented several important inventions. He developed a process for extracting oils from cotton seed, and converting them into a lard substitute. Likewise, he devised a chemical process to purify the public drinking water for Nashville. In 1897, he and John C. Wharton (a fellow Nashville candy maker) conceived and co-patented an "electric candy machine" which produced cotton candy (then called "Fairy Floss".) This article provides background information about the production of spun sugar during medieval times and later, it describes the development of their cotton candy machine, the process of its operation and details about its eventual worldwide commercialization. In addition, it discusses the introduction of this new confection to the public, during the 184 day, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, held in St. Louis, MO. in 1904. In late 1926, Dr. Morrison, died of a stroke at age 66.

  11. The Skateboard Factory: Curriculum by Design--Oasis Skateboard Factory Q&A with Craig Morrison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    Since its opening three years ago, Oasis Skateboard Factory (OSF), founded by teacher Craig Morrison, has attracted considerable media exposure and received a Ken Spencer Award from the CEA for its innovative program. OSF is one of three programs offered by Oasis Alternative Secondary School, one of 22 alternative secondary schools of the Toronto…

  12. Statistics without Substance: A Critique of Freedman et al. and Clark and Morrison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grofman, Bernard

    1991-01-01

    D. Freedman and others and W. Clark and P. Morrison misunderstand case law in the voting rights area and have unrealistic standards of precision that, if adopted, would make it virtually impossible for minority plaintiffs to succeed. Ecological regression, when used with care, is a reliable tool. (SLD)

  13. The Framework of Racism in Toni Morrison's "The Bluest Eye": A Psychosocial Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Md. Reza Hassan; Rahman, Md. Shafiqur

    2014-01-01

    In "The Bluest Eye," Toni Morrison presents a community in which a racist ideology is internalized. The sufferers of racial abuse in this community both endure and resist in a complex inverse interrelationship between the two actions. This contradiction of the internalization and the insurrection of racial abuse is one of the crucial…

  14. The Art of George Morrison and Allan Houser: The Development and Impact of Native Modernism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montiel, Anya

    2005-01-01

    The idea for a retrospective on George Morrison and Allan Houser as one of the inaugural exhibitions at the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) came from the NMAI curator of contemporary art, Truman Lowe. An artist and sculptor himself, Lowe knew both artists personally and saw them as mentors and visionaries. Lowe advised an exhibition…

  15. Jurassic plutons in the Desolation wilderness, northern Sierra Nevada batholith, California: A new segment in the Jurassic magmatic arc

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine, C. . Quaternary Sciences Center)

    1993-04-01

    A 164[+-]7 Ma U-P zircon date establishes a Middle- to Late-Jurassic age for the Pyramid Peak granite and synplutonic dioritoids and hybrid rocks that comprise the Crystal Range suite, located southwest of Lake Tahoe. A Jurassic age is also assigned to the Keiths Dome quartz monzonite and the Desolation Valley and Camper Flat granodiorites (Loomis', 1983, Early Granitic Group) which are distinctly older than surrounding Cretaceous granitoids. The Keiths Dome quartz monzonite, the oldest pluton of the group, may be as old as 180 Ma and is distinguished by ductile shear zones and recrystallization textures which indicate an episode of deformation not undergone by other plutons. The Camper flat and Desolation Valley granodiorites are the youngest plutons of the group. ENE-trending microdiorite dikes filled extensional fractures, perpendicular to the direction of shortening, in all Jurassic plutons but on none of the Cretaceous bodies. Jurassic plutons may help constrain ages of metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks and associated structures in the Mount Tallac roof pendant. The Pyramid Peak granite intrudes the Sailor Canyon Formation which bears Late Pliensbachian ammonites (Fisher, 1990), and the Keiths Dome quartz monzonite intrudes the overlying Tuttle Lake Formation and transects faults and shear zones in the pendant. Initial Sr isotope ratios for the Pyramid Peak granite range between 0.705427 and 0.706874, spanning the 0.706 value taken by some to mark the western limit of sialic lower crust. Data suggest an isotopically mixed source containing mantle and crustal components. Such an environment is not inconsistent with a passive continental margin where mafic magma invades rifted continental crust.

  16. The Jurassic of Svalbard, Sedimentology, Stratigraphy and Paleontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koevoets, Maayke; Hammer, Øyvind

    2014-05-01

    During the Mesozoic the landmass now known as Svalbard drifted from 45oN to 65oN. The average global temperature was significantly higher, disabling the formation of icecaps at the poles, resulting in a higher sea-level. At the time the location now known as Svalbard was covered by a shallow ocean and mostly marine, organic rich, black shales, interrupted by possibly deltaic sediments were deposited. These sediments are rich in invertebrate fossils. A general description of the Agardhfjellet formation, spanning the middle to upper Jurassic, was made by Dypvik in 1991. Wierzbowski (1989) described some ammonites in detail from the Kimmeridgian. It is not known if the fauna extends further up or down in the formation. Since 2004 the Museum of Natural History of Oslo has been active in Spitsbergen Svalbard. Extensive and detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic research was never conducted as the focus lay on vertebrate fossils. A detailed sedimentological analysis, description and correlation to other Jurassic Formations (such as the Kimmeridge Shales, Hekkingen Formation and draupne Formation) is essential to better understand the circumstances where the black organic-rich shales (a highly potential source rock) were deposited in and to be able to predict their occurrences. Included in this description is taxonomy, taphonomy and the stratigraphic development of invertebrate fauna to pinpoint the age of the sediments.

  17. A Jurassic mammal from South America.

    PubMed

    Rauhut, Oliver W M; Martin, Thomas; Ortiz-Jaureguizar, Edgardo; Puerta, Pablo

    2002-03-14

    The Jurassic period is an important stage in early mammalian evolution, as it saw the first diversification of this group, leading to the stem lineages of monotremes and modern therian mammals. However, the fossil record of Jurassic mammals is extremely poor, particularly in the southern continents. Jurassic mammals from Gondwanaland are so far only known from Tanzania and Madagascar, and from trackway evidence from Argentina. Here we report a Jurassic mammal represented by a dentary, which is the first, to our knowledge, from South America. The tiny fossil from the Middle to Late Jurassic of Patagonia is a representative of the recently termed Australosphenida, a group of mammals from Gondwanaland that evolved tribosphenic molars convergently to the Northern Hemisphere Tribosphenida, and probably gave rise to the monotremes. Together with other mammalian evidence from the Southern Hemisphere, the discovery of this new mammal indicates that the Australosphenida had diversified and were widespread in Gondwanaland well before the end of the Jurassic, and that mammalian faunas from the Southern Hemisphere already showed a marked distinction from their northern counterparts by the Middle to Late Jurassic.

  18. Upper Jurassic depositional systems and hydrocarbon potential of southeast Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Meendsen, F.C.; Moore, C.H.; Heydari, E.; Sassen, R.

    1987-09-01

    Upper Jurassic sedimentation in southeast Mississippi was controlled by eustatic sea level fluctuations and locally modified by salt tectonism and basement structure. This study, using conventional core data and geophysical logs, indicates that a stable carbonate platform developed along the updip margin of the Mississippi interior salt basin. The basin was partially barred from the main Gulf of Mexico water mass by the Wiggins uplift, and became evaporitic during the Late Jurassic. Moldic, intercrystalline, and vuggy dolomite porosity is developed on the crests of intermediate and high-amplitude salt highs and on the Wiggins uplift. Jurassic source rocks are lower Smackover laminated lime mudstones. Migration into adjacent reservoirs postdated formation of porosity and the growth of salt anticlines, the most common trap type. A large potential Norphlet-Smackover gas play extends along the southern flank of the Wiggins uplift. Salt anticlines within the interior basin remain viable targets. Small oil discoveries should continue in stratigraphic traps, subtle salt structures, and basement blocks on the platform.

  19. First record of the fossil snakefly genus Mesoraphidia (Insecta: Raphidioptera: Mesoraphidiidae) from the Middle Jurassic of China, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Lü, Ya-Nan; Liu, Xingyue; Dong, Ren

    2015-08-12

    Mesoraphidia daohugouensis sp. nov. is described from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Inner Mongolia, China. It is diagnosed by the following character states: subquadrate pronotum, narrowly elliptical forewing, distally darkened pterostigma closed respectively by a proximal costal crossvein and a distal radial veinlet, absence of pterostigmal crossvein. The new species represents the first record of Mesoraphidiinae from the Middle Jurassic of China.

  20. Chronostratigraphy and hydrocarbon habitat associated with the Jurassic carbonates of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharahan, A.S.; Whittle, G.L.

    1995-08-01

    Deposition of Jurassic epeiric shelf carbonates and evaporates were controlled by epeirogenic movement and sea level fluctuations which formed an excellent combination of source rocks, reservoirs and seats in Abu Dhabi. At the end of the Triassic, a relative drop in sea level, caused by eustatic sea level lowering in conjunction with minor tectonic uplift, resulted in non-deposition or erosion. In the Toarcian, deposition of carbonates and terrigenous, clastics produced the Marrat Formation. In the mid-Aalenian, a drop in sea level eroded much of the Marrat and some of the Triassic in offshore U.A.E. The deposition of the Hamlah Formation followed, under neritic, well-oxygenated conditions. The Middle Jurassic was characterized by widespread, normal marine shelf carbonates which formed the cyclic Izhara and Araej formations (reservoirs). In the Upper Jurassic, the carbonate shelf became differentiated into a broad shelf with a kerogen-rich intrashelf basin, formed in response to a eustatic rise coupled with epeirogenic downwarping and marine flooding. The intrashelf basin fill of muddy carbonate sediments constitutes the Diyab Formation and its onshore equivalent, the Dukhan Formation (source rocks). In the late Upper Jurassic, the climate became more arid and cyclic deposition of carbonates and evaporates prevailed, forming alternating peritidal anhydrite, dolomite and limestone in the Arab Formation (reservoir). Arid conditions continued into the Tithonian, fostering the extensive anhydrite of the Hith Formation (seal) in a sabkha/lagoonal setting on the shallow peritidal platform, the final regressive supratidal stage of this major depositional cycle.

  1. World petroleum systems with Jurassic source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, H.D. )

    1993-11-08

    Fourteen petroleum systems with Upper Jurassic source rocks contain one quarter of the world's discovered oil and gas. Eleven other systems with Lower and Middle Jurassic source rocks presently have a minor but significant amount of discovered oil and gas. The purpose of this article is to review the systems geologically, describe their location in space and time on a continental scale, estimate their relative petroleum system recovery efficiencies, and outline the effect their essential elements and processes have on their petroleum plumbing.

  2. Jurassic-Neocomian biostratigraphy, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Mickey, M.B.; Haga, H.

    1985-04-01

    The foraminiferal and palynological biostratigraphy of subsurface Jurassic and Neocomian (Early Cretaceous) age strata from the North Slope were investigated to better define biostratigraphic zone boundaries and to help clarify the correlation of the stratigraphic units in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA). Through use of micropaleontologic data, eight principal biostratigraphic units have been identified. The Neocomian and Jurassic strata have each been subdivided into four main units.

  3. A Study of Morrison's Iterative Noise Removal Method. Final Report M. S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, G. E.; Wright, K. A. R.

    1985-01-01

    Morrison's iterative noise removal method is studied by characterizing its effect upon systems of differing noise level and response function. The nature of data acquired from a linear shift invariant instrument is discussed so as to define the relationship between the input signal, the instrument response function, and the output signal. Fourier analysis is introduced, along with several pertinent theorems, as a tool to more thorough understanding of the nature of and difficulties with deconvolution. In relation to such difficulties the necessity of a noise removal process is discussed. Morrison's iterative noise removal method and the restrictions upon its application are developed. The nature of permissible response functions is discussed, as is the choice of the response functions used.

  4. The Oldest Jurassic Dinosaur: A Basal Neotheropod from the Hettangian of Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Martill, David M; Vidovic, Steven U; Howells, Cindy; Nudds, John R

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 40% of a skeleton including cranial and postcranial remains representing a new genus and species of basal neotheropod dinosaur is described. It was collected from fallen blocks from a sea cliff that exposes Late Triassic and Early Jurassic marine and quasi marine strata on the south Wales coast near the city of Cardiff. Matrix comparisons indicate that the specimen is from the lithological Jurassic part of the sequence, below the first occurrence of the index ammonite Psiloceras planorbis and above the last occurrence of the Rhaetian conodont Chirodella verecunda. Associated fauna of echinoderms and bivalves indicate that the specimen had drifted out to sea, presumably from the nearby Welsh Massif and associated islands (St David's Archipelago). Its occurrence close to the base of the Blue Lias Formation (Lower Jurassic, Hettangian) makes it the oldest known Jurassic dinosaur and it represents the first dinosaur skeleton from the Jurassic of Wales. A cladistic analysis indicates basal neotheropodan affinities, but the specimen retains plesiomorphic characters which it shares with Tawa and Daemonosaurus.

  5. The Oldest Jurassic Dinosaur: A Basal Neotheropod from the Hettangian of Great Britain

    PubMed Central

    Martill, David M.; Vidovic, Steven U.; Howells, Cindy; Nudds, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 40% of a skeleton including cranial and postcranial remains representing a new genus and species of basal neotheropod dinosaur is described. It was collected from fallen blocks from a sea cliff that exposes Late Triassic and Early Jurassic marine and quasi marine strata on the south Wales coast near the city of Cardiff. Matrix comparisons indicate that the specimen is from the lithological Jurassic part of the sequence, below the first occurrence of the index ammonite Psiloceras planorbis and above the last occurrence of the Rhaetian conodont Chirodella verecunda. Associated fauna of echinoderms and bivalves indicate that the specimen had drifted out to sea, presumably from the nearby Welsh Massif and associated islands (St David’s Archipelago). Its occurrence close to the base of the Blue Lias Formation (Lower Jurassic, Hettangian) makes it the oldest known Jurassic dinosaur and it represents the first dinosaur skeleton from the Jurassic of Wales. A cladistic analysis indicates basal neotheropodan affinities, but the specimen retains plesiomorphic characters which it shares with Tawa and Daemonosaurus. PMID:26789843

  6. A new rhamphorhynchid pterosaur (Pterosauria) from Jurassic deposits of Liaoning Province, China.

    PubMed

    Lü, Junchang; Pu, Hanyong; Xu, Li; Wei, Xuefang; Chang, Huali; Kundrát, Martin

    2015-01-16

    Compared to pterosaurs from the Early Cretaceous from China, Late Jurassic pterosaurs are relatively rare. A new rhamphorhynchid pterosaur, Orientognathus chaoyngensis gen. et sp. nov., is erected based on an incomplete skeleton from the Upper Jurassic Tuchengzi Formation of Chaoyang, Liaoning Province, China. It is identified by the following characters: the toothless tip of the lower jaw is slightly pointed; the length ratio of wing metacarpal to humerus is 0.38, the ulna is shorter than each wing phalanx and the tibia is nearly equal to femur in length. A phylogenetic analysis recovers Orientognathus chaoyngensis as a rhamphorhynchid pterosaur. Orientognathus chaoyngensis is perhaps the youngest Jurassic pterosaur from western Liaoning Province of China. 

  7. Mirolydidae, a new family of Jurassic pamphilioid sawfly (Hymenoptera) highlighting mosaic evolution of lower Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Rasnitsyn, Alexandr P.; Yang, Zhongqi; Shih, Chungkun; Wang, Hongbin; Ren, Dong

    2017-01-01

    We describe Pamphilioidea: Mirolydidae Wang, Rasnitsyn et Ren, fam. n., containing Mirolyda hirta Wang, Rasnitsyn et Ren, gen. et sp. n., from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China. The new taxon is characterized by unique forewing venation with the presence of forewing SC, 1-RS almost as long as 1-M, M + Cu straight, 2r-rs strongly reclival, and antenna with homonomous flagellum, revealing new and important details in antennal evolutionary transformations. Thus, M. hirta with a combination of primitive and more derived characters highlights its transitional state in the Pamphilioidea and complex mosaic evolution within Pamphilioidea in the late Middle Jurassic. The body of this species is densely covered with thin and long setae, suggesting its possible habit of visiting gymnosperm reproductive organs for pollen feeding and/or pollination during the late Middle Jurassic, much earlier than the appearance of angiosperm flowers. PMID:28266631

  8. Middle Jurassic Topawa group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona: Volcanic and sedimentary record of deep basins within the Jurassic magmatic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haxel, G.B.; Wright, J.E.; Riggs, N.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; May, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Among supracrustal sequences of the Jurassic magmatic arc of the southwestern Cordillera, the Middle Jurassic Topawa Group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona, is remarkable for its lithologic diversity and substantial stratigraphic thickness, ???8 km. The Topawa Group comprises four units (in order of decreasing age): (1) Ali Molina Formation-largely pyroclastic rhyolite with interlayered eolian and fluvial arenite, and overlying conglomerate and sandstone; (2) Pitoikam Formation-conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone overlain by interbedded silt- stone and sandstone; (3) Mulberry Wash Formation-rhyolite lava flows, flow breccias, and mass-flow breccias, with intercalated intraformational conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone, plus sparse within-plate alkali basalt and comendite in the upper part; and (4) Tinaja Spring Porphyry-intrusive rhyolite. The Mulberry Wash alkali basalt and comendite are genetically unrelated to the dominant calcalkaline rhyolite. U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon from volcanic and intrusive rocks indicate the Topawa Group, despite its considerable thickness, represents only several million years of Middle Jurassic time, between approximately 170 and 165 Ma. Sedimentary rocks of the Topawa Group record mixing of detritus from a minimum of three sources: a dominant local source of porphyritic silicic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, identical or similar to those of the Topawa Group itself; Meso- proterozoic or Cambrian conglomerates in central or southeast Arizona, which contributed well-rounded, highly durable, polycyclic quartzite pebbles; and eolian sand fields, related to Middle Jurassic ergs that lay to the north of the magmatic arc and are now preserved on the Colorado Plateau. As the Topawa Group evidently represents only a relatively short interval of time, it does not record long-term evolution of the Jurassic magmatic arc, but rather represents a Middle Jurassic "stratigraphic snapshot" of the arc

  9. Lowland-upland migration of sauropod dinosaurs during the Late Jurassic epoch.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Henry C; Hencecroth, Justin; Hoerner, Marie E

    2011-10-26

    Sauropod dinosaurs were the largest vertebrates ever to walk the Earth, and as mega-herbivores they were important parts of terrestrial ecosystems. In the Late Jurassic-aged Morrison depositional basin of western North America, these animals occupied lowland river-floodplain settings characterized by a seasonally dry climate. Massive herbivores with high nutritional and water needs could periodically experience nutritional and water stress under these conditions, and thus the common occurrence of sauropods in this basin has remained a paradox. Energetic arguments and mammalian analogues have been used to suggest that migration allowed sauropods access to food and water resources over a wide region or during times of drought or both, but there has been no direct support for these hypotheses. Here we compare oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)O) of tooth-enamel carbonate from the sauropod Camarasaurus with those of ancient soil, lake and wetland (that is, 'authigenic') carbonates that formed in lowland settings. We demonstrate that certain populations of these animals did in fact undertake seasonal migrations of several hundred kilometres from lowland to upland environments. This ability to describe patterns of sauropod movement will help to elucidate the role that migration played in the ecology and evolution of gigantism of these and associated dinosaurs.

  10. Stratigraphic and Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Hazelton Trough-Bowser Basin, Northwest British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jean-Francois

    The Hazelton trough--Bowser basin is a large sedimentary basin that developed on volcanic arc rocks of the Stikine terrane in northern British Columbia, Canada. Its fill mostly consists of the Lower to Middle Jurassic Hazelton Group and the Middle Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Bowser Lake Group. Regional correlations indicate that the Hazelton Group can be divided in two distinct lithostratigraphic intervals separated in most places by an unconformity. The lower Hazelton Group (LHG) is dominated by arc-related volcanic rocks, whereas the upper Hazelton Group (UHG) contains mainly fine-grained clastic rocks and lesser bimodal rift-related volcanic rocks. Lowermost coarse-grained strata of the UHG, including the bioturbated and fossiliferous units of the Smithers Formation and the Spatisizi River Formation, record a transgressive trend consistent with thermal subsidence and relative sea-level rise. Transgression of the Stikine arc culminated with the establishment of deep-water conditions in the Late Toarcian-Early Aalenian, and deposition of the Quock Formation. Interbedded siliceous mudstone and rusty-weathered tuff of the Quock Formation are correlated throughout most of the basin, except in the Iskut River area on the northwestern margin of the basin, where contemporaneous strata of the Iskut River Formation are dominated by rift-related volcanic rocks and conglomerates. Inception of rifting in the Iskut River area constitutes an independent extensional event on Stikinia, and could be related to reorganization of tectonic plates during a protracted period of terrane accretion in the Middle Jurassic. Obduction of the Cache Creek terrane over Stikinia in early Middle Jurassic provided a new source of sediment, which led to accumulation of the Bowser Lake Group. The second pulse of subsidence observed at Todagin Mountain can be explained by sediment loading of the accommodation previously generated during extension of the Hazelton trough in Early Jurassic time.

  11. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

    2002-03-05

    The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

  12. Morrison Receives NIH Award for Major Ras/Raf Breakthroughs | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Deborah Morrison, Ph.D., laboratory chief, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research (CCR), received an NIH Director’s Award in June “for major breakthroughs in elucidating the mechanisms of Ras/Raf signaling that will be critical for diagnosis and treatment of disease,” according to the NIH Director’s Awards Ceremony brochure. She was nominated by Ira Daar, Ph.D., senior investigator, Developmental Signal Transduction Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, CCR.

  13. The Jurassic-early Cretaceous Ilo batholith of southern coastal Peru: geology, geochronology and geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekhout, Flora; Sempere, Thierry; Spikings, Richard; Schaltegger, Urs

    2010-05-01

    The Ilo batholith (17°00 - 18°30 S) crops out in an area of about 20 by 100 km, along the coast of southern Peru. This batholith is emplaced into the ‘Chocolate‘ Formation of late Permian to middle Jurassic age, which consists of more than 1000 m of basaltic and andesitic lavas, with interbedded volcanic agglomerates and breccias. The Ilo Batholith is considered to be a rarely exposed fragment of the Jurassic arc in Peru. Our aim is to reconstruct the magmatic evolution of this batholith, and place it within the context of long-lasting magma genesis along the active Andean margin since the Paleozoic. Sampling for dating and geochemical analyses was carried out along several cross sections through the batholith that were exposed by post-intrusion eastward tilting of 20-30°. Sparse previous work postulates early to middle Jurassic and partially early Cretaceous emplacement, on the basis of conventional K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating methods in the Ilo area. Twenty new U-Pb zircon ages (LA-ICP-MS and CA-ID-TIMS) accompanied by geochemical data suggests the Ilo batholith formed via the amalgamation of middle Jurassic and early Cretaceous, subduction-related plutons. Preliminary Hf isotope studies reveal a primitive mantle source for middle Jurassic intrusions. Additional Sr, Nd and Hf isotope analyses are planned to further resolve the source regions of different pulses of plutonic activity. We strongly suggest that batholith emplacement was at least partly coeval with the emplacement of the late Permian to middle Jurassic Chocolate Formation, which was deposited in an extensional tectonic regime. Our age results and geochemical signature fit into the scheme of episodic emplacement of huge amounts of subduction related magmatism that is observed throughout the whole Andean event, particularly during the middle Jurassic onset of the first Andean cycle (southern Peru, northern Chile and southern Argentina). Although the exact geodynamic setting remains to be precisely

  14. Petrology and diagenesis of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic graben-fill sandstones of Jameson land basin, central east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Davee, K.W.; Mansfield, C.F.

    1986-05-01

    Sands of the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic Kap Stewart and Lower Jurassic Neill Klinter Formations were deposited during the early development of a major Jurassic rift basin. Depositional environments have been interpreted as alluvial fan, fluvial, and deltaic for the Kap Stewart, and as tidal estuary for the Neill Klinter. Most of these sandstones are fine to medium-grained quartz and subarkosic wackestones. Clay matrix is abundant and comprises mostly diagenetic kaolinite, illite, and complex clay mixtures derived from the breakdown of labile framework grains, especially plagioclase and biotite. Early emplacement of carbonate cement in some sandstones prevented development of diagenetic clay matrix. The carbonate cement is poikilotopic and constitutes up to 30% of some samples. The current high level of maturity indicated by the quartz-feldspar-lithic composition for these sandstones results from selective diagenetic decomposition of labile grains. The original, more feldspathic compositions reflect less maturity and an earlier stage of basin fill than the Middle Jurassic, high-porosity arenites, which also contain abundant quartz and up to 25% feldspar. Because of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic sands were deposited in continental and low-energy marine environments, they likely underwent greater in-situ alteration but less winnowing of labile grains than the overlying Middle Jurassic sands deposited in higher energy marine settings.

  15. Discovering the "-Ologies" on the Jurassic Coast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The Jurassic Coast is Britain's only natural World Heritage site, a tangible time-line that takes one through 185 million years of history in 95 miles of coast. It provides individuals with a world-famous educational resource and an unrivalled outdoor classroom that has played a key role in the study of earth sciences. The author is keen to ignite…

  16. Jurassic evolution of the Tien-Shan

    SciTech Connect

    Bebeshev, I.I.

    1994-09-01

    Complex studies led to identification of three stages in Jurassic deposits. The stages reflect development periods of the studied deposits. Each stage is represented by a paleogeographic map that indicates the evolution of ancient landforms in the Tien-Shan region in time and space.

  17. Recent Jurassic discoveries in southeastern Cass County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, J.

    1984-09-01

    Southeastern Cass County had lain virtually dormant as a prospective Jurassic oil and gas province since the mid-1960s, when East Linden field was discovered and developed. Then, in 1978, Hilliard Oil and Gas drilled the 1 Johnson and discovered Kildare field (Smackover). Subsequent development thru 1982 proved additional reserves in several Cotton Valley sandstones as well, reconfirming southeastern Cass County as territory for viable Jurassic drilling. Additional drilling occurred when Marshall Exploration redrilled and expanded the old Bloomburg field and Heflin redrilled Queen City field. All of this drilling was successful in the Smackover reservoir, finding sour gas and condensate. Wildcat activity included the two Smackover completions finding South Atlanta field, as well as two completions in formations that are highly debated as to their nomenclature. Cities Service reportedly their well in the Eagle Mills. This well brought national attention to southeastern Cass County, when it was reported on the CBS Saturday evening news. The well initially flowed at rates that were as high as 1800 BOPD, 1396 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, with pressure of 3250 psi. Just as the excitement was dying down, Primary Fuels, Inc. reentered and deepened the Highland Resources 1 Glass and completed that well in a zone correlative to the Cities Service 1-A Pruitt. The 1 glass potentialed for 200 BOPD, 570 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, at pressure of 2900 psi. The producing zone was determined to be the Norphlet, which once again was made wildcatters of all previous upper Smackover explorers.

  18. Revisiting Morrison and Osterle 1965: the efficiency of membrane-based electrokinetic energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J.; Hamelers, H. V. M.; Bentien, A.; Biesheuvel, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    We revisit Morrison and Osterle (1965) who derived a phenomenological expression for the ‘figure-of-merit’ {β\\text{EK}} of the electrokinetic energy conversion (EKEC) of a pressure difference into electric energy (and vice versa) using charged nanotubes, nanopores or ion-exchange membranes. We show the equivalence with Morrison and Osterle of a novel expression of {β\\text{EK}} derived by Bentien et al (2013). We analyze two physical models for ionic and solvent flow which directly relate {β\\text{EK}} to nanopore characteristics such as pore size and wall charge density. For the uniform potential model, we derive an analytical expression as a function of pore size, viscosity, ion diffusion coefficients and membrane charge density, and compare results with the full space-charge model by Osterle and co-workers as a function of pore size and ion diffusion coefficient. We present a novel expression for {β\\text{EK}} for salt solutions with ions with unequal diffusion coefficients (mobilities) and show that to increase {β\\text{EK}} the counterion mobility must be low and the coion mobility high.

  19. Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) reservoir sandstones in the Witch Ground Graben, U. K. North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, S.D. Ltd., Aberdeen ); Mantel, K.A. ); Morton, D.J. ); Riley, L.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Oil-bearing Late Jurassic Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sandstones of the Sgiath and Piper formations are of major economic importance in the Witch Ground Graben. They form the reservoirs in Scott, which in 1993 will be the largest producing North Sea oil field to come on stream for more than a decade. Together with Scott, the Piper, Saltire, Tartan, Highlander, Petronella, Rob Roy, and Ivanhoe fields contained almost 2 Bbbl of recoverable reserves in these formations. The Sgiath and Piper represent two phases of Late Jurassic transgression and regression, initially represented by paralic deposited sand culminating in a wave-dominated delta sequence. The history of the Sgiath and Piper formations is reviewed and lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic correlations presented to illustrate the distribution of the reservoir sandstones.

  20. Triassic and Jurassic rocks at Currie, Nevada Preliminary paleontologic evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.A.; Dubiel, R.F.; Brouwers, E.M. ); Litwin, R.J. ); Ash, S.R. ); Good, S.C. )

    1993-04-01

    A sequence of continental rocks overlies the Lower Triassic Thaynes Formation in a poorly exposed syncline near Currie in northeastern NV. The authors recognize four lithostratigraphic units above the Thaynes near Currie and provide new paleontologic data. In ascending order, unit 1 (120 ft) consists of reddish-brown, very fine grained sandstone. Unit 2 (50 ft) consists of light-gray, trough cross-stratified, coarse-grained, conglomeratic sandstone. Unit 3 (at least 500 ft) consists of green, red, and brown sandstone and mudstone. Unit 4 occurs as isolated outcrops of reddish-orange, fine- to medium-grained sandstone. New fossil evidence, while not definitive, constrain the age of this sequence. Plant megafossils in unit 1 include (1) a specimen with narrow ovate leaves, possibly from an early Mesozoic conifer and (2) abundant fragments of probable Neocalamites. The presence of these fossils and the absence of any angiosperm leaves or wood fragments suggest an early Mesozoic age. Ostracodes in unit 3 are exclusively Darwinula sp., and their association with conchostracans in the absence of younger ostracodes suggests a Triassic age. Finally, two small outcrops, previously mapped as Triassic/Jurassic, contain the gastropods Pilidae indet. and Lymnaea sp., which resemble Late Cretaceous to Paleocene faunas. The sequence is similar to the nearest Lower Mesozoic section on the Colorado Plateau at Cove Fort, Utah, 165 miles to the southeast. The authors' new evidence supports the longstanding correlation of units 1--4 with the Lower Triassic Moenkopi Formation (part), the Shinarump and Petrified Forest Members of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation, and the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of the Plateau. These rocks at Currie demonstrate that the Early Mesozoic depositional systems of the Colorado Plateau extended at least this far west and provide constraints on Early Mesozoic tectonism in the eastern Great Basin.

  1. A multidisciplinary study of the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Mussentuchit Wash, Utah: a determination of the paleoenvironment and paleoecology of the Eolambia caroljonesa dinosaur quarry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, J.R.; Brinkman, D.; Nichols, D.J.; Layer, P.; Burge, D.; Thayn, D.

    2007-01-01

    A quarry within the Cedar Mountain Formation in Mussentuchit Wash, Emery County, Utah, produced a fossil assemblage containing the remains of at least eight juvenile iguanodontid dinosaurs (Eolambia caroljonesa). The Cedar Mountain Formation lies stratigraphically between the Tithonian-Berriasian (Upper Jurassic) Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation and the Cenomanian (Upper Cretaceous) Dakota Formation. Detailed stratigraphic, sedimentological, geochronological, palynological, and paleontological data have been collected along a measured section at the site of the Cifelli #2 Eolambia caroljonesa Quarry. These data provide a chronostratigraphic and a biostratigraphic framework for the Cedar Mountain Formation and allow a detailed reconstruction of the paleoenvironment and the paleoecology of the local paleogeographic area from which E. caroljonesa have been recovered. Three 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 96.7 to 98.5 Ma have been obtained three stratigraphically distinct altered volcanic ash layers within the Mussentuchit Member, one of which passes through the E. caroljonesa quarry, that indicate that the quarry is latest Albian in age and that the stratigraphic boundary between the Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation and the overlying Dakota Formation is at or near the Albian/Cenomanian boundary. Sedimentological and biostratigraphic data suggest that significant long-term and short-term climatic changes are recorded in the Cedar Mountain Formation. During deposition of the lower part of the formation, climatic conditions were warm and arid to semi-arid. During deposition of the upper part of the formation, conditions became more humid. The progressive change in climatic conditions was probably related to the transgression of the Mowry Sea from the north. Cyclic sedimentation in the Mussentuchit Member suggests high-frequency changes from wet to dry periods. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Geochemical tectonomagnetic discrimination of metamorphosed Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks, northern Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, J.H. . Dept. of Geosciences); Hanson, R.E. . Dept. of Geology); Harwood, D.S. )

    1993-04-01

    Jurassic island-arc rocks in the Northern Sierra terrane (NSt) are represented by the Lower to Middle Jurassic Sailor Canyon Formation, consisting mainly of distal andesitic turgidities, and the overlying, Middle Jurassic Tuttle Lake Formation (TLF); both units were metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies during Mesozoic orogenesis. The TLF is a 1.6-km-thick sequence of submarine tuff-breccia debris-flow deposits intercalated with minor isolated-pillow breccias and intruded by numerous cogenetic hypabyssal intrusions that underwent extensive interaction with wet sediments in near-vent setting. Here the authors report the first geochemical studies of these regionally significant arc rocks. Pillow breccias, hypabyssal intrusions, and clasts within debris-flow deposits are predominantly basalt to basaltic andesite in composition and contain abundant plagioclase and clinopyroxene phenocrysts. Although cpx is intensely altered to actinolite, microprobe analyses were carried out on relict cpx cores. Compositions are typical of cpx from orogenic lavas and fall in combined calc-alkaline and tholeiitic fields on cpx discrimination diagrams. Most major elements show significant scatter on Harker and AFM variation diagrams, reflecting the metamorphic overprint. Immobile trace element contents (Ti, Cr, Y, Yb, Zr, Hf, Ta, Th) clearly indicate volcanic arc and calc-alkaline affinities when plotted on a variety of discrimination diagrams. REE patterns show LREE-enrichment typical of calc-alkaline lavas, commonly with small negative Eu anomalies consistent with plagioclase fractionation. The TLF shows marked petrologic and stratigraphic differences from broadly coeval Jurassic arc rocks exposed in the fault-bounded Kettle Rock sequence in the northeastern part of the NSt. This may reflect relatively rapid along-strike variations within the Jurassic arc, or that the Kettle Rock sequence and the TLF arc rocks have been brought into proximity by later faulting.

  3. Jurassic tectonic wedging and crustal block rotation, northern Sierra Nevada California

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, D.S.; Griscom, A. )

    1993-04-01

    Rocks in the northern Sierra Nevada east of the Feather River peridotite belt (FRPB) and south of 39[degree]45 minutes N. strike NNW, dip steeply E and form an east-facing homoclinal section as much as 35km thick. The lower Paleozoic Shoo Fly Complex (SFC), the oldest and western-most unit in the homoclinal section, is faulted against the FRPB. Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks (Jv) at the top of the homoclinal section are down-faulted against Paleozoic rocks to the east along the Talbot fault (TF). A positive aeromagnetic anomaly and east-sloping gradient south of 39[degree]45 minutes N. indicate that the east contact of the FRPB dips about 45[degree]E. beneath the homoclinal section and extends to a depth of at least 10km. The contact between the buried FRPB and the homoclinal section is interpreted to be the roof thrust of an east-tapering wedge of serpentinized oceanic crust and upper mantle, probably emplaced in the Early and Middle Jurassic. Normal, west-down displacement on the Talbot fault, contemporaneous with east-vergent edging, resulted in eastward block rotation of the rocks above the wedge, syndepositional thickening of the Early and Middle Jurassic Sailor Canyon Formation (Jsc) relative to the coeval rocks east of the Talbot fault, and structural control for Middle Jurassic magmatism.

  4. Late Jurassic low latitude of Central Iran: paleogeographic and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, Massimo; Muttoni, Giovanni; Cifelli, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    The individual blocks forming present-day Central Iran are now comprised between the Zagros Neo-Tethys suture to the south and the Alborz Palaeo-Tethys suture to the north. At the end of the Palaeozoic, the Iranian blocks rifted away from the northern margin of Gondwana as consequence of the opening of the Neo-Tethys, and collided with Eurasia during the Late Triassic, giving place to the Eo-Cimmerian orogeny. From then on, the Iranian block(s) should have maintained European affinity. Modern generations of apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) show the occurrence in North American and African coordinates of a major and rapid shift in pole position (=plate shift) during the Middle-Late Jurassic. This so-called monster polar shift is predicted also for Eurasia from the North Atlantic plate circuit, but Jurassic data from this continent are scanty and problematic. Here, we present paleomagnetic data from the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian (Upper Jurassic) Garedu Formation of Iran. Paleomagnetic component directions of primary (pre-folding) age indicate a paleolatitude of deposition of 10°N ± 5° that is in excellent agreement with the latitude drop predicted for Iran from APWPs incorporating the Jurassic monster polar shift. We show that paleolatitudes calculated from these APWPs, used in conjunction with simple zonal climate belts, better explain the overall stratigraphic evolution of Iran during the Mesozoic.

  5. Calpionellid zonation of the Jurassic Cretaceous transition in North-Atlasic Tunisia. Updated Upper Jurassic stratigraphy of the `Tunisian trough' and regional correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughdiri, Mabrouk; Sallouhi, Houaïda; Maâlaoui, Kamel; Soussi, Mohamed; Cordey, Fabrice

    2006-12-01

    The analysis of calpionellid associations from jebels Amar and Jédidi sections in North-Atlasic Tunisia provides, for the first time, a precise biozonation of the Jurassic-Cretaceous transition succession. In the light of the new data obtained and considering recently published results, the age of Upper Jurassic formations is clarified, allowing correlations with the Tunisian 'Dorsale' and the North-South Axis successions. Within the Maghrebides' range, sections from the external zones correlated to the Tunisian successions are quite distinctive from their equivalent in the internal zones. Both have evolved in different palaeogeographic domains related to the early structuration of the northwestern and southwestern Tethys margins. To cite this article: M. Boughdiri et al., C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  6. Replacement geometry and fabrics of Smackover (Jurassic) dolomite, southern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    The intensity of dolomitization and associated reservoir development in the Smackover Formation, Conecuh Ridge-Wiggens arch areas, is not predictable by comparison with time-temperature index methods or porosity-depth curves. Major alteration patterns and associated dolomite fabrics reflect the early paleotopographic settings, where high fluid flux and massive replacement are associated with Late Jurassic basement highs. This large-scale replacement is most important in the lowermost Smackover section overlying the Norphlet sandstone from Chunchula field into the Manila Embayment. The heterogeneous nature of dolomite reservoir development is evident in Chunchula field, where local pods of permeable dolomite cut across sedimentary facies boundaries. Predicting the orientation of a dolomite permeability barrier where there is little well control can be facilitated by mapping the regional thickness variations; the extension of impermeable dolomite trends is generally parallel to isopach trends.

  7. Discovery of silicified lacustrine micro-fossils and stromatolites: Triassic-Jurassic Fundy Group, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, B.

    1985-01-01

    A unique assemblage of silicified invertebrate and algal fresh-water lake fossils has been discovered in the Scots Bay Formation at the top of the Triassic-Jurassic Fundy Group of the Fundy Basin in Nova Scotia. This is important because the basins of the eastern North American Triassic-Jurassic rift system have not yielded many invertebrate and algal fossils. These new finds will contribute significantly to evolutionary, paleoecological and biostratigraphic studies of fresh-water Mesozoic deposits. Silicified fossils have been extracted from chert-bearing, mixed carbonate and siliciclastic lithologies. They include ostracodes, gastropods, rare bivalves, charaphytes (algae), stromatolites, and chert nodules cored with well-preserved woody tissues of tree trunks. Possible algal filaments occur in the silicified stromatolites. This association of charaphytes, ostracodes, microscopic gastropods and stromatolites is found in carbonate lakes today. The Scots Bay Formation is probably a near-shore carbonate facies of the more widespread silicilastic lacustrine McCoy Brook Formation. The gastropods and ostracodes, studied by SEM, indicate a Jurassic age for the Scots bay Formation, confirming speculations based on other data.

  8. Petrographic, stratigraphic, and structural study of the Smackover gray sand (Jurassic) in north Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Miciotto, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    The gas-producing gray sand, a dark gray to black, very fine-grained sand, occurs as 3 sand tongues in the lower member of the Smackover Formation in the subsurface of Bossier, Webster, Claiborne, and Lincoln parishes, Louisiana. A Flaser-bedded silty shale facies indicates deposition on a mid-tidal flat environment. Smackover deposition during the Jurassic in the study area was located on the gently dipping slope between a broad coastal shelf to the north and a basin to the south. The gray sand was deposited over the Norphlet formation and Louann salt before flowage and swelling of the Louann salt began. Uplift and swelling of the Louann salt later in the Jurassic created growing anticlines; sediment slumped off the structural highs of the growing salt anticlines into basinal muds and silts. The Smackover gray sand continues to challenge exploration geologists because of the lateral pinch out of its sand tongues. 11 references.

  9. Thermochronologic constraints on Jurassic rift flank denudation in the Thiel Mountains, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzgerald, P.G.; Baldwin, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Thiel Mountains are part of the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and occupy a strategic position close to the East-West Antarctic boundary. They occur in a region of relatively subdued topography distal from high topography and high relief of most of the TAM adjacent to the West Antarctic rift system. Low-temperature thermochronology on samples collected from the Reed Ridge granite on the north flank of the Thiel Mountains constrain the thermal and hence tectonic history. Apatite fission track data plus thermal models indicate cooling from ca. 165-150 Ma. In conjunction with 40Ar/39Ar K-feldspar data, the results indicate cooling was due to relatively slow erosional denudation, and not thermal relaxation following Jurassic tholeiitic magmatism. Denudation was most likely associated with the formation of the Jurassic rift system across Antarctica that marked the initial breakup of Gondwana. This is the oldest episode of denudation associated with formation of the present day TAM

  10. Reduced plumage and flight ability of a new Jurassic paravian theropod from China.

    PubMed

    Godefroit, Pascal; Demuynck, Helena; Dyke, Gareth; Hu, Dongyu; Escuillié, François; Claeys, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Feathered theropods were diverse in the Early Cretaceous Jehol Group of western Liaoning Province, China. Recently, anatomically distinct feathered taxa have been discovered in the older Middle-Late Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation in the same region. Phylogenetic hypotheses including these specimens have challenged the pivotal position of Archaeopteryx in bird phylogeny. Here we report a basal troodontid from the Tiaojishan Formation that resembles Anchiornis, also from Jianchang County (regarded as sister-taxa). The feathers of Eosinopteryx are less extensive on the limbs and tail than Anchiornis and other deinonychosaurians. With reduced plumage and short uncurved pedal claws, Eosinopteryx would have been able to run unimpeded (with large foot remiges cursorial locomotion was likely problematic for Anchiornis). Eosinopteryx increases the known diversity of small-bodied dinosaurs in the Jurassic, shows that taxa with similar body plans could occupy different niches in the same ecosystem and suggests a more complex picture for the origin of flight.

  11. A New Basal Salamandroid (Amphibia, Urodela) from the Late Jurassic of Qinglong, Hebei Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Gao, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    A new salamandroid salamander, Qinglongtriton gangouensis (gen. et sp. nov.), is named and described based on 46 fossil specimens of juveniles and adults collected from the Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Tiaojishan Formation cropping out in Hebei Province, China. The new salamander displays several ontogenetically and taxonomically significant features, most prominently the presence of a toothed palatine, toothed coronoid, and a unique pattern of the hyobranchium in adults. Comparative study of the new salamander with previously known fossil and extant salamandroids sheds new light on the early evolution of the Salamandroidea, the most species-diverse clade in the Urodela. Cladistic analysis places the new salamander as the sister taxon to Beiyanerpeton, and the two taxa together form the basalmost clade within the Salamandroidea. Along with recently reported Beiyanerpeton from the same geological formation in the neighboring Liaoning Province, the discovery of Qinglongtriton indicates that morphological disparity had been underway for the salamandroid clade by early Late Jurassic (Oxfordian) time. PMID:27144770

  12. Lithogenesis and oil potential of Jurassic terrigenous deposits of the middle-latitude OB river region

    SciTech Connect

    Lukin, A.E.; Garipov, O.M.

    1995-05-01

    The lithologic, mineralogical, and geochemical features of Jurassic terrigenous deposits of the Krasnoleninskii group of oil fields of Western Siberia are characterized. It is shown that the degree of their regional changes corresponds to the protocatagenesis-mesocatagenesis interval PC{sub 2}-MC{sub 1} and only to the start of the main phase of oil generation. At the same time pronounced fluctuations of the paleotemperature indices related to the repeated intrusion of hydrothermal fluids were noted. It was established that the formation of secondary oil reservoirs in Jurassic deposits is a multiphase metasomatic process, including tectono-geodynamic and hydrothermal alteration and oil saturation accompanied by various {open_quotes}near-oil{close_quotes} alterations of the enclosing strata and formation of a system of geophysical and geochemical anomalies.

  13. Reactivity of evaporites during burial: An example from the Jurassic of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Land, L.S.; Eustice, R.A.; Mack, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Jurassic Louann salt was the first significant sedimentary unit to accumulate in the Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin. Br/Cl and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of halite from a single core into the top of the formation record the evaporation of normal seawater to bittern stage. The bittern zone today consists of intergrown halite and sylvite. The Br and Rb contents of the solid phases, along with {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios and Rb/Sr systematics, are inconsistent with precipitation of the existing phases from seawater evaporated in Jurassic time. Rather, petrography and fluid inclusion and solid phase chemistry from the bittern zone is consistent with postdepositional water/rock interaction which diagenetically modified a marine bittern assemblage to halite + sylvite. The chemistry of the Br- and Rb-rich saline formation waters characteristic of this area today, likewise, may reflect water/evaporite interaction during burial.

  14. Basin geodynamics and sequence stratigraphy of Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic deposits of Southern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, Cédric; Hadouth, Suhail; Bouaziz, Samir; Lathuilière, Bernard; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2016-05-01

    Aims of this paper are to propose a geodynamic and sequential framework for the late Triassic and early Jurassic of and south Tunisia and to evidence the impact of local tectonics on the stratigraphic architecture. Facies of the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic of Southern Tunisia have been interpreted in terms of depositional environments. A sequential framework and correlation schemes are proposed for outcrops and subsurface transects. Nineteen middle frequency sequences inserted in three and a half low frequency transgression/regression cycles were evidenced. Despite some datation uncertainties and the unknown durations of Lower Jurassic cycles, middle frequency sequences appear to be controlled by eustasy. In contrast the tectonics acted as an important control on low frequency cycles. The Carnian flooding was certainly favored by the last stages of a rifting episode which started during the Permian. The regression accompanied by the formation of stacked angular unconformities and the deposition of lowstand deposits during the late Carnian and Norian occured during the uplift and tilting of the northern basin margins. The transpressional activity of the Jeffara fault system generated the uplift of the Tebaga of Medenine high from the late Carnian and led to the Rhaetian regional angular Sidi Stout Unconformity. Facies analysis and well-log correlations permitted to evidence that Rhaetian to Lower Jurassic Messaoudi dolomites correspond to brecciated dolomites present on the Sidi Stout unconformity in the North Dahar area. The Early-cimmerian compressional event is a possible origin for the global uplift of the northern African margin and Western Europe during the late Carnian and the Norian. During the Rhaetian and the early Jurassic a new episode of normal faulting occured during the third low frequency flooding. This tectonosedimentary evolution ranges within the general geodynamic framework of the north Gondwana margin controlled by the opening of both

  15. Timescales of orogeny: Jurassic construction of the Klamath Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Donato, Mary M.; Barnes, Calvin G.; McWilliams, M. O.; Ernst, W. G.

    1995-06-01

    An electronic supplement of this material may be obtained on a diskette or Anonymous FTP from KOSMOS.AGU.ORG (LOGIN to AGU's FTP account using ANONYMOUS as the username and GUEST as the password. Go to the right directory by typing CD APEND. Type LS to see what files are available. Type GET and the name of the file to get it. Finally, type EXIT to leave the system.) (Paper 94YCJ2454, Timescales of orogeny: Jurassic construction of the Klamath Mountains, B.R. Hacker, M.M. Donato, C.G. Barnes, M.O. McWilliams, and W.G. Ernst). Diskette may be ordered from American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009; $15.00. Payment must accompany order. Classical interpretations of orogeny were based on relatively imprecise biostratigraphic and isotopic age determinations that necessitated grouping apparently related features that may in reality have been greatly diachronous. Isotopic age techniques now have the precision required to resolve the timing of orogenic events on a scale much smaller than that of entire mountain belts. Forty-five new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Klamath Mountains illuminate the deformation, metamorphism, magmatism, and sedimentation involved in the Jurassic construction of that orogen, leading to a new level of understanding regarding how preserved orogenic features relate to ancient plate tectonic processes. The new geochronologic relationships show that many Jurassic units of the Klamath Mountains had 200 Ma or older volcanoplutonic basement. Subsequent formation of a large ˜170 Ma arc was followed by contractional collapse of the arc. Collision with a spreading ridge may have led to large-scale NW-SE extension in the central and northern Klamaths from 167 to ˜155 Ma, coincident with the crystallization of voluminous plutonic and volcanic suites. Marked cooling of a large region of the central Klamath Mountains to below ˜350°C at ˜150 Ma may have occurred as the igneous belt was extinguished by subduction of colder

  16. Upper Jurassic carbonate/evaporite shelf, south Alabama and west Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    The association of Upper Jurassic carbonates and evaporites in south Alabama and west Florida defines a brining upward and inward sequence that is indicative of deposition on an increasingly evaporitic marine shelf. Structural features that bound this evaporitic shelf were the Pensacola arch, the South Mississippi platform, and the State Line flexure. Paleo-drainage of the surrounding highlands also affected shelf salinities as fresh waters were funneled into the Covington and Manila Embayments. During the Late Jurassic, marine carbonates and evaporites of the Smackover and Lower Haynesville (Buckner) Formations were deposited over Middle Jurassic Norphlet clastics that accumulated in arid continental and marginal-marine environments. Initially, Smackover carbonate deposition was pervasive across the shallow shelf. Later, as a result of increasing water salinities, contemporaneous precipitation of central-shelf evaporites and basin-edge carbonates occurred. Maximum restriction of the basin and the culmination of subaqueous deposition resulted in the formation of a basin-wide lower Haynesville salt unit. The overlying upper Haynesville strata represents a shift to subaerial environments. Application of a shelf-basin evaporite model explains the spatial and temporal lithologic relationships observed within the study area. Onlap of evaporites over porous carbonates, due to brining-upward processes, suggest that large-scale stratigraphic traps exist within the Smackover Formation in a sparsely explored part of the basin.

  17. Regional Jurassic geologic framework of Alabama coastal waters area and adjacent Federal waters area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    To date, numerous Jurassic hydrocarbon fields and pools have been discovered in the Cotton Valley Group, Haynesville Formation, Smackover Formation and Norphlet Formation in the tri-state area of Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, and in Alabama State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters area. Petroleum traps are basement highs, salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines and extensional faults associated with salt movement. Reservoirs include continental and marine sandstones, limestones and dolostones. Hydrocarbon types are oil, condensate and natural gas. The onshore stratigraphic and structural information can be used to establish a regional geologic framework for the Jurassic for the State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters areas. Evaluation of the geologic information along with the hydrocarbon data from the tri-state area indicates that at least three Jurassic hydrocarbon trends (oil, oil and gas condensate, and deep natural gas) can be identified onshore. These onshore hydrocarbon trends can be projected into the Mobile area in the Central Gulf of Mexico and into the Pensacola, Destin Dome and Apalachicola areas in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial reserves of natural gas are expected to be present in Alabama State waters and the northern portion of the Mobile area. Significant accumulations of oil and gas condensate may be encountered in the Pensacola, Destin Dome, and Apalachicola areas. ?? 1989.

  18. Jurassic Paleolatitudes, Paleogeography, and Climate Transitions In the Mexican Subcontinen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Garza, R. S.; Geissman, J. W.; Lawton, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Jurassic northward migration of Mexico, trailing the North America plate, resulted in temporal evolution of climate-sensitive depositional environments. Lower-Middle Jurassic rocks in central Mexico contain a record of warm-humid conditions, which are indicated by coal and compositionally mature sandstone deposited in continental environments. Preliminary paleomagnetic data indicate that these rocks were deposited at near-equatorial paleolatitudes. The Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 Ma) Diquiyú volcanic sequence in central Oaxaca give an overall mean of D=82.2º/ I= +4.1º (n=10; k=17.3, α95=12º). In the Late Jurassic, the Gulf of Mexico formed as a subsidiary basin of the Atlantic Ocean, when the supercontinent Pangaea ruptured. Upper Jurassic strata, including eolianite and widespread evaporite deposits, across Mexico indicate dry-arid conditions. Available paleomagnetic data (compaction-corrected) from eolianites in northeast Mexico indicate deposition at ~15-20ºN. As North America moved northward during Jurassic opening of the Atlantic, different latitudinal regions experienced coeval Late Jurassic climatic shifts. Climate transitions have been widely recognized in the Colorado plateau region. The plateau left the horse-latitudes in the late Middle Jurassic to reach temperate humid climates at ~40ºN in the latest Jurassic. In turn, the southern end of the North America plate (central Mexico) reached arid horse-latitudes in the Late Jurassic. At that time, epeiric platforms developed in the circum-Gulf region after a long period of margin extension. We suggest that Upper Jurassic hydrocarbon source rocks in the circum-Gulf region accumulated on these platforms as warm epeiric hypersaline seas and the Gulf of Mexico itself were fertilized by an influx of wind-blown silt from continental regions. Additional nutrients were brought to shallow zones of photosynthesis by ocean upwelling driven by changes in the continental landmass configuration.

  19. Jurassic platform development, northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Triassic and Early Jurassic rifting set the stage for the subsequent development of carbonate platforms in the Late Jurassic. These platforms formed along the interior margins of salt basins separated from the main ancestral Gulf of Mexico by a series of positive features. A major sea level rise, after deposition of the Louann Salt (late Callovian), drowned the interior salt basins around the margins of the Gulf of Mexico, leading to an anoxic event. Organic-rich sediments of the lower Smackover were deposited as a basin-fill sequence, forming one of the major hydrocarbon source rocks of the region. As sea level rise slowed in the late Oxfordian, carbonate production began to catch up with sea level rise along the basin margins, leading to the initial development of a rimmed carbonate platform. The platform margin was marked by high-energy ooid grainstones, while crustacean pellet muds were deposited in the platform interior. A high-energy ooid-dominated platform (upper Smackover) developed in the late Oxfordian when sea level reached a standstill. During the subsequent Kimmeridgian sea level rise, a second rimmed carbonate platform, the Haynesville, was developed. During the initial rise, grainstones were deposited on the platform margin, while the interior was dominated by evaporites (Buckner) and siliciclastics. As sea level slowed and reached a standstill, the platform margin facies extended shoreward (Gilmer) and a high-energy platform, analogous to the upper Smackover, was formed. The Smackover and Haynesville platforms of the northwestern gulf show a parallel evolution in response to cyclic changes in Upper Jurassic sea level.

  20. Frisco City sand: New Jurassic reservoir in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, S.D.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L. ); Schneeflock, R.D. Jr. )

    1989-09-01

    The first commercial production of hydrocarbons from the Jurassic Haynesville Formation in southwestern Alabama was from the Frisco City field. The field currently produces 57.8{degree} API gravity oil on 160-ac well spacing from a depth of approximately 12,000 ft. Perforations are in the Frisco City sand interval, in the lower part of the Haynesville Formation. Average porosity is 15% and average permeability is 45 md. Currently, the field has two producing wells with cumulative production of over 138,876 bbl of oil and 213,144 mcf of gas. The hydrocarbon trap in the Frisco City field is a combination structural-stratigraphic trap. The Frisco City sand reservoir is located on a faulted anticline. The stratigraphic trap is produced by a permeability barrier near the crest of the structure and termination against a basement high. The lower part of the Haynesville Formation in this area is comprised of (in ascending order) the Buckner Anhydrite Member, the Frisco City sand, and interbedded shale and anhydrite. Sandstones of the Frisco City sand interval were deposited in a shallow marine setting and have a sheetlike morphology. The sandstones are poorly to moderately sorted, angular to rounded arkose, and contain angular to rounded pebbles. The sandstones are interbedded with thin, sandy, mudstones that contribute, along with patchy carbonate and anhydrite cement, to considerable reservoir heterogeneity. Porosity is predominantly primary intergranular with a small amount of framework grain dissolution and decementation.

  1. A Jurassic wood providing insights into the earliest step in Ginkgo wood evolution.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zikun; Wang, Yongdong; Philippe, Marc; Zhang, Wu; Tian, Ning; Zheng, Shaolin

    2016-12-16

    The fossil record of Ginkgo leaf and reproductive organs has been well dated to the Mid-Jurassic (170 Myr). However, the fossil wood record that can safely be assigned to Ginkgoales has not yet been reported from strata predating the late Early Cretaceous (ca. 100 Myr). Here, we report a new fossil wood from the Mid-Late Jurassic transition deposit (153-165 Myr) of northeastern China. The new fossil wood specimen displays several Ginkgo features, including inflated axial parenchyma and intrusive tracheid tips. Because it is only slightly younger than the oldest recorded Ginkgo reproductive organs (the Yima Formation, 170 Myr), this fossil wood very probably represents the oldest bona fide fossil Ginkgo wood and the missing ancestral form of Ginkgo wood evolution.

  2. A Jurassic wood providing insights into the earliest step in Ginkgo wood evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zikun; Wang, Yongdong; Philippe, Marc; Zhang, Wu; Tian, Ning; Zheng, Shaolin

    2016-12-01

    The fossil record of Ginkgo leaf and reproductive organs has been well dated to the Mid-Jurassic (170 Myr). However, the fossil wood record that can safely be assigned to Ginkgoales has not yet been reported from strata predating the late Early Cretaceous (ca. 100 Myr). Here, we report a new fossil wood from the Mid-Late Jurassic transition deposit (153–165 Myr) of northeastern China. The new fossil wood specimen displays several Ginkgo features, including inflated axial parenchyma and intrusive tracheid tips. Because it is only slightly younger than the oldest recorded Ginkgo reproductive organs (the Yima Formation, 170 Myr), this fossil wood very probably represents the oldest bona fide fossil Ginkgo wood and the missing ancestral form of Ginkgo wood evolution.

  3. A Jurassic wood providing insights into the earliest step in Ginkgo wood evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zikun; Wang, Yongdong; Philippe, Marc; Zhang, Wu; Tian, Ning; Zheng, Shaolin

    2016-01-01

    The fossil record of Ginkgo leaf and reproductive organs has been well dated to the Mid-Jurassic (170 Myr). However, the fossil wood record that can safely be assigned to Ginkgoales has not yet been reported from strata predating the late Early Cretaceous (ca. 100 Myr). Here, we report a new fossil wood from the Mid-Late Jurassic transition deposit (153–165 Myr) of northeastern China. The new fossil wood specimen displays several Ginkgo features, including inflated axial parenchyma and intrusive tracheid tips. Because it is only slightly younger than the oldest recorded Ginkgo reproductive organs (the Yima Formation, 170 Myr), this fossil wood very probably represents the oldest bona fide fossil Ginkgo wood and the missing ancestral form of Ginkgo wood evolution. PMID:27982113

  4. An enigmatic plant-eating theropod from the Late Jurassic period of Chile.

    PubMed

    Novas, Fernando E; Salgado, Leonardo; Suárez, Manuel; Agnolín, Federico L; Ezcurra, Martín D; Chimento, Nicolás R; de la Cruz, Rita; Isasi, Marcelo P; Vargas, Alexander O; Rubilar-Rogers, David

    2015-06-18

    Theropod dinosaurs were the dominant predators in most Mesozoic era terrestrial ecosystems. Early theropod evolution is currently interpreted as the diversification of various carnivorous and cursorial taxa, whereas the acquisition of herbivorism, together with the secondary loss of cursorial adaptations, occurred much later among advanced coelurosaurian theropods. A new, bizarre herbivorous basal tetanuran from the Upper Jurassic of Chile challenges this conception. The new dinosaur was discovered at Aysén, a fossil locality in the Upper Jurassic Toqui Formation of southern Chile (General Carrera Lake). The site yielded abundant and exquisitely preserved three-dimensional skeletons of small archosaurs. Several articulated individuals of Chilesaurus at different ontogenetic stages have been collected, as well as less abundant basal crocodyliforms, and fragmentary remains of sauropod dinosaurs (diplodocids and titanosaurians).

  5. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Baisn and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain: Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1997-March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1997-03-27

    Part I (Inventory of Existing Data and Information Sources) objectives are to provide improved access to information available in the public domain by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format. The producers in the region maintain that the accessibility of oil and gas information is the single-most important factor to assist them in finding new hydrocarbon discoveries and in improving production from established fields. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with geologists for Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. A subcontract has been executed between the University of Alabama and the Geological Survey of Alabama. A subcontract agreement is under review by the Mississippi Office of Geology. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with a number of faculty members from departments of geology in the region. A listing of theses and dissertations from the University of Alabama, Auburn University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southwestern Louisiana, and Louisiana State University related to the petroleum geology of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been compiled. This list is accessible electronically through the Home Page of the Eastern Gulf Region of the Pertroleum Technology Transfer Council (EGRPTTC) (http://egrpttc.geo.ua.edu).

  6. Application of reflectance micro-Fourier Transform infrared analysis to the study of coal macerals: An example from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous coals of the Mist Mountain Formation, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Bustin, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of the reflectance micro-Fourier Transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) technique for analyzing the distribution of functional groups in coal macerals is discussed. High quality of spectra, comparable to those obtained using other FTIR techniques (KBr pellet and transmission micro-FTIR), indicate this technique can be applied to characterizing functional groups under most conditions. The ease of sample preparation, the potential to analyze large intact samples, and ability to characterize organic matter in areas as small as 20 ??m are the main advantages of reflectance micro-FTIR. The quantitative aspects of reflectance micro-FTIR require further study. The examples from the coal seams of the Mist Mountain Formation, British Columbia show that at high volatile bituminous rank, reflectance micro-FTIR provides valuable information on the character of aliphatic chains of vitrinite and liptinite macerals. Because the character of aliphatic chains influences bond disassociation energies, such information is useful from a hydrocarbon generation viewpoint. In medium volatile bituminous coal liptinite macerals are usually not detectable but this technique can be used to study the degree of oxidation and reactivity of vitrinite and semifusinite.

  7. Jurassic climate mode governed by ocean gateway

    PubMed Central

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Ullmann, Clemens V.; Dietl, Gerd; Ruhl, Micha; Schweigert, Günter; Thibault, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The Jurassic (∼201–145 Myr ago) was long considered a warm ‘greenhouse' period; more recently cool, even ‘icehouse' episodes have been postulated. However, the mechanisms governing transition between so-called Warm Modes and Cool Modes are poorly known. Here we present a new large high-quality oxygen-isotope dataset from an interval that includes previously suggested mode transitions. Our results show an especially abrupt earliest Middle Jurassic (∼174 Ma) mid-latitude cooling of seawater by as much as 10 °C in the north–south Laurasian Seaway, a marine passage that connected the equatorial Tethys Ocean to the Boreal Sea. Coincidence in timing with large-scale regional lithospheric updoming of the North Sea region is striking, and we hypothesize that northward oceanic heat transport was impeded by uplift, triggering Cool Mode conditions more widely. This extreme climate-mode transition provides a counter-example to other Mesozoic transitions linked to quantitative change in atmospheric greenhouse gas content. PMID:26658694

  8. Jurassic climate mode governed by ocean gateway.

    PubMed

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen P; Ullmann, Clemens V; Dietl, Gerd; Ruhl, Micha; Schweigert, Günter; Thibault, Nicolas

    2015-12-11

    The Jurassic (∼201-145 Myr ago) was long considered a warm 'greenhouse' period; more recently cool, even 'icehouse' episodes have been postulated. However, the mechanisms governing transition between so-called Warm Modes and Cool Modes are poorly known. Here we present a new large high-quality oxygen-isotope dataset from an interval that includes previously suggested mode transitions. Our results show an especially abrupt earliest Middle Jurassic (∼174 Ma) mid-latitude cooling of seawater by as much as 10 °C in the north-south Laurasian Seaway, a marine passage that connected the equatorial Tethys Ocean to the Boreal Sea. Coincidence in timing with large-scale regional lithospheric updoming of the North Sea region is striking, and we hypothesize that northward oceanic heat transport was impeded by uplift, triggering Cool Mode conditions more widely. This extreme climate-mode transition provides a counter-example to other Mesozoic transitions linked to quantitative change in atmospheric greenhouse gas content.

  9. Jurassic climate mode governed by ocean gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Ullmann, Clemens V.; Dietl, Gerd; Ruhl, Micha; Schweigert, Günter; Thibault, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The Jurassic (~201-145 Myr ago) was long considered a warm `greenhouse' period; more recently cool, even `icehouse' episodes have been postulated. However, the mechanisms governing transition between so-called Warm Modes and Cool Modes are poorly known. Here we present a new large high-quality oxygen-isotope dataset from an interval that includes previously suggested mode transitions. Our results show an especially abrupt earliest Middle Jurassic (~174 Ma) mid-latitude cooling of seawater by as much as 10 °C in the north-south Laurasian Seaway, a marine passage that connected the equatorial Tethys Ocean to the Boreal Sea. Coincidence in timing with large-scale regional lithospheric updoming of the North Sea region is striking, and we hypothesize that northward oceanic heat transport was impeded by uplift, triggering Cool Mode conditions more widely. This extreme climate-mode transition provides a counter-example to other Mesozoic transitions linked to quantitative change in atmospheric greenhouse gas content.

  10. Seismic stratigraphy and geologic history of Jurassic rocks, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T.

    1997-01-01

    A grid of two-dimensional seismic data tied to exploration wells defines four Jurassic sequences in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sequences correlate with well-known northern Gulf of Mexico basin stratigraphic units: the Louann Salt (L sequence), Norphlet and Smackover formations (N-S sequence), Haynesville Formation (H sequence), and Cotton Valley Group (C sequence). The Jurassic section overlies a basement surface characterized by broad highs (Middle Ground arch and Southern platform) and lows (Apalachicola basin and Tampa embayment). This basement structure controlled the distribution, thickness, and paleogeography of all the Jurassic sequences, but its influence became progressively less pronounced as sediment filled the basin. The Jurassic geologic history of the region is developed from an interpretation of these sequences. Well control documents the presence of Louann Salt in the Apalachicola basin, whereas in the Tampa embayment the interval is interpreted only from seismic data. Salt movement on the West Florida Shelf began early, during Norphlet-Smackover deposition, and slowed dramatically by the end of Haynesville deposition. Smackover paleogeography includes progradation of a carbonate shelf in the Apalachicola basin and the Tampa embayment, as well as development of carbonate buildups updip of basement hingelines, over basement highs, and above early salt structures. In the Apalachicola basin, Haynesville clastic sedimentation updip was coeval with carbonate deposition downdip, and a localized carbonate shelf margin developed to the southwest. Haynesville clastic sedimentation may have prevailed in the Tampa embayment, where oblique clinoforms represent shelf margin progradation. During deposition of the Cotton Valley sequence, the northeastern Gulf of Mexico was characterized by delta-plain and delta-platform sedimentation with seismically defined shelf margin progradation only in the Tampa embayment.

  11. Permian, Jurassic and Early Cretaceous palynofloral assemblages from subsurface sedimentary rocks in Chuperbhita Coalfield, Rajmahal Basin, India.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, A

    2001-04-01

    The results of a palynological analysis of the sedimentary sequence of Borehole RCH-151, Chuperbhita Coalfield, Rajmahal Basin, Bihar are presented here. The borehole penetrated the Rajmahal Formation (comprising two traps sandwiching an intertrappean bed), the thinly represented Dubrajpur Formation and in its lower part, the Coal Measures. The coal-bearing interval is associated with Scheuringipollenites barakarensis, Faunipollenites varius, Densipollenites indicus, Gondisporites raniganjensis and Densipollenites magnicorpus Assemblage Zones. The presence of these biostratigraphic units indicates correlation with the Barakar Formation (Early Permian) and the Barren Measures and Raniganj Formations (both Late Permian). This is the first record, in the Chuperbhita Coalfield, of Late Permian strata, which appear to represent a condensed sequence. Prior to the present study, the Permian succession was thought to have been associated entirely with the Barakar Formation. The overlying Dubrajpur Formation yielded a distinct spore-pollen assemblage (in association with the first report of dinoflagellate, Phallocysta), which is assigned to the newly identified Callialasporites turbatus palynozone of latest Early to early Middle Jurassic age. The diverse spore-pollen flora of the intertrappean bed (Rajmahal Formation) incorporates several age marker taxa, viz. Undulatisporites, Leptolepidites, Klukisporites, Ruffordiaspora, and Coptospora. The assemblages from intertrappean beds are correlated with the Ruffordiaspora australiensis palynozone of Australia. Thus the palynodating indicates Permian, latest Early to early Mid-Jurassic and Early Cretaceous age for the strata studied. This is the first record of definite Jurassic microfossils from the non-marine sequence of Rajmahal Basin, India.

  12. Late Jurassic breakup of the Proto-Caribbean and circum-global circulation across Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Peter O.; Rojas-Agramonte, Yamirka; Sandoval-Gutierrez, Maria; Urbani, Franco; García-Delgado, Dora; Garban, Grony; Pérez Rodríguez, Mireya

    2013-04-01

    Based on earlier plate reconstructions, many authors have postulated a circum-global equatorial current system flowing through the Pangea breakup, the Tethys - Atlantic - Caribbean Seaway, to explain changes in global climate during the Middle and Late Jurassic. While a Toarcian (late Early Jurassic) breakup is well constrained for the Central Atlantic, the place and timing of initial ocean crust formation between the Americas (Gulf of Mexico or Proto-Caribbean?) is still poorly constrained. Ar/Ar ages (190 to 154 Ma) in the Tinaquillo ultramafic complex (NW-Venezuela) have been interpreted as a result of initial Proto-Caribbean rifting. However, the Tinaquillo is clearly a subconinental block and the cited ages age cannot be related with breakup. The Siquisique Ophiolite (NW-Venezuela), long known for the occurrence of Bajocian-early Bathonian ammonite fragments found in interpilow sediments, has previously been interpreted as an early Proto-Caribbean remnant. However, the ammonite fragments were recovered from blocks in a Paleogene tectonic mélange, whereas the main Siquisique ophiolite body seems to be of middle Cretaceous age, based on a few Ar/Ar dates and poorly preserved middle to late Cretaceous radiolarians, which we recovered from black cherts interbedded with volcanics. The best record of Proto-Caribbean rifting and breakup is preserved in the Guaniguanico Terrane of NW-Cuba, which represents a distal Yucatan (N-American) passive margin segment telescoped by Tertiary nappe tectonics. In this terrane middle to upper Oxfordian pelagic limestones encroach on the E-MORB type El Sabalo Basalts which represent the oldest known remnants of oceanic crust clearly identifiable as Proto-Caribbean. Older, syn-rift sediments in the Proto-Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico are known to be deltaic to shallow marine detrital, and evaporitic. Although oceanic crust seemingly started to form in the early Late Jurassic (158 my), recent plate tectonic reconstructions show

  13. Sea level reconstructions and non-marine sedimentation at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary: southwestern margin of the Neotethys in the Salt Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The environmental changes during the Triassic-Jurassic boundary interval and the associated mass extinction event are still strongly debated. Sea-level reconstruction records during this interval reveal an end-Triassic global regression event. Erosion and karstification at the top of Triassic sediments, and Lower Jurassic fluvial channels with reworked Triassic clasts indicate widespread regression in the European basins. Laterite at the top of the Triassic, and quartzose conglomerates/sandstones at the base of the Jurassic indicate a fluvial/terrestrial onset in Iran and Afghanistan. Abrupt emergence, erosion and facies dislocation, from the Triassic dolomites (Kingriali Formation) to Lower Jurassic fluvial/continental quartzose conglomerates/pebbly sandstones (Datta Formation) occur in the Tethyan Salt Range of Pakistan. Sedimentological analyses indicate marine regression and emergence under tropical-subtropical conditions (Greenhouse conditions) and negates the possibility of glacial influence in this region. Field evidences indicate the presence of an undulatory surface at the base of the Jurassic and a high (Sargodha High) is present south of the Salt Range Thrust, the southern boundary of the basin. Furthermore, geophysical data (mostly seismic sections) in different parts of the basin display normal faults in the basement. These features are interpreted as horst and graben structures at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in the Kohat-Potwar Plateau. The Lower Jurassic Datta Formation appears to have been deposited in an overall graben fill settings. Similar normal faults and graben fill geometries are observed on seismic sections in Tanzania, Mozambique, Madagascar and other regions of the southeastern margin of the African Plate and are related to the Karoo rift system. To summarize, the basement normal faults and the graben fill features at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in the Kohat-Potwar Plateau can be correlated to similar features common in the Karoo

  14. Ichnological evidence of Megalosaurid Dinosaurs Crossing Middle Jurassic Tidal Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzolini, Novella L.; Oms, Oriol; Castanera, Diego; Vila, Bernat; Santos, Vanda Faria Dos; Galobart, Àngel

    2016-08-01

    A new dinosaur tracksite in the Vale de Meios quarry (Serra de Aire Formation, Bathonian, Portugal)preserves more than 700 theropod tracks. They are organized in at least 80 unidirectional trackways arranged in a bimodal orientation pattern (W/NW and E/SE). Quantitative and qualitative comparisons reveal that the large tridactyl, elongated and asymmetric tracks resemble the typical Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Megalosauripus ichnogenus in all morphometric parameters. Few of the numerous tracks are preserved as elite tracks while the rest are preserved as different gradients of modified true tracks according to water content, erosive factors, radial fractures and internal overtrack formations. Taphonomical determinations are consistent with paleoenvironmental observations that indicate an inter-tidal flat located at the margin of a coastal barrier. The Megalosauripus tracks represent the oldest occurrence of this ichnotaxon and are attributed to large megalosaurid dinosaurs. Their occurrence in Vale de Meios tidal flat represents the unique paleoethological evidence of megalosaurids moving towards the lagoon, most likley during the low tide periods with feeding purposes.

  15. Ichnological evidence of Megalosaurid Dinosaurs Crossing Middle Jurassic Tidal Flats.

    PubMed

    Razzolini, Novella L; Oms, Oriol; Castanera, Diego; Vila, Bernat; Santos, Vanda Faria Dos; Galobart, Àngel

    2016-08-19

    A new dinosaur tracksite in the Vale de Meios quarry (Serra de Aire Formation, Bathonian, Portugal)preserves more than 700 theropod tracks. They are organized in at least 80 unidirectional trackways arranged in a bimodal orientation pattern (W/NW and E/SE). Quantitative and qualitative comparisons reveal that the large tridactyl, elongated and asymmetric tracks resemble the typical Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Megalosauripus ichnogenus in all morphometric parameters. Few of the numerous tracks are preserved as elite tracks while the rest are preserved as different gradients of modified true tracks according to water content, erosive factors, radial fractures and internal overtrack formations. Taphonomical determinations are consistent with paleoenvironmental observations that indicate an inter-tidal flat located at the margin of a coastal barrier. The Megalosauripus tracks represent the oldest occurrence of this ichnotaxon and are attributed to large megalosaurid dinosaurs. Their occurrence in Vale de Meios tidal flat represents the unique paleoethological evidence of megalosaurids moving towards the lagoon, most likley during the low tide periods with feeding purposes.

  16. Jurassic petroleum geology of southwestern Clarke County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.B.; Harris, P.M.

    1983-01-24

    The Jurassic stratigraphy of southwestern Clark County, Mississippi, is representative of the central Gulf Coast. Evaporites, carbonates, and siliciclastics were deposited in restricted marine, shallow marine, transitional, and continental environments; structural development during and after deposition by regional faulting, local faulting, and salt movement directly affected hydrocarbon accumulation. Subsurface electric log data were studied from West Nancy, Nancy, East Nancy, Prairie Branch, and Lake Utopia fields and from the surrounding wildcats for the structural relations in and between producing fields and for the thickness and stratigraphic relations that affect production in three major units: the Norphlet and Smackover formations and the Buckner member of the Haynesville formation. Results suggest that (1) the East Nancy field probably has the best potential for future development because the original depositional feature is larger and older than that at the other fields and faulting has not greatly influenced entrapment or deposition, (2) the Smackover pay zone in the Prairie Branch field may be successfully developed on the south flank, and (3) the Nancy field might be developed on its southeast and northwest flanks in the upper oolite zone seen in the flank wells.

  17. Ichnological evidence of Megalosaurid Dinosaurs Crossing Middle Jurassic Tidal Flats

    PubMed Central

    Razzolini, Novella L.; Oms, Oriol; Castanera, Diego; Vila, Bernat; Santos, Vanda Faria dos; Galobart, Àngel

    2016-01-01

    A new dinosaur tracksite in the Vale de Meios quarry (Serra de Aire Formation, Bathonian, Portugal)preserves more than 700 theropod tracks. They are organized in at least 80 unidirectional trackways arranged in a bimodal orientation pattern (W/NW and E/SE). Quantitative and qualitative comparisons reveal that the large tridactyl, elongated and asymmetric tracks resemble the typical Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Megalosauripus ichnogenus in all morphometric parameters. Few of the numerous tracks are preserved as elite tracks while the rest are preserved as different gradients of modified true tracks according to water content, erosive factors, radial fractures and internal overtrack formations. Taphonomical determinations are consistent with paleoenvironmental observations that indicate an inter-tidal flat located at the margin of a coastal barrier. The Megalosauripus tracks represent the oldest occurrence of this ichnotaxon and are attributed to large megalosaurid dinosaurs. Their occurrence in Vale de Meios tidal flat represents the unique paleoethological evidence of megalosaurids moving towards the lagoon, most likley during the low tide periods with feeding purposes. PMID:27538759

  18. Carbonate-evaporite sequences of the late Jurassic, southern and southwestern Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharhan, A.S.; Whittle, G.L.

    1995-11-01

    The carbonate-evaporite sequences of the Upper Jurassic Arab and overlying Hith formations in the southern and southwestern Arabian Gulf form many supergiant and giant fields that produce from the Arab Formation and are excellent examples of a classic reservoir/seal relationship. The present-day sabkha depositional setting that extends along most of the southern and southwestern coasts of the Arabian Gulf provides an analog to these Upper Jurassic sedimentary rocks. In fact, sabkha-related diagenesis of original grain-supported sediments in the Arab and Hith formations has resulted in five distinct lithofacies that characterize the reservoir/seal relationship: (1) oolitic/peloidal grainstone, (2) dolomitic grainstone, (3) dolomitic mudstone, (4) dolomitized grainstone, and (5) massive anhydrite. Interparticle porosity in grainstones and dolomitic grainstones and intercrystalline porosity in dolomitized rocks provide the highest porosity in the study area. These sediments accumulated in four types of depositional settings: (1) supratidal sabkhas, (2) intertidal mud flats and stromatolitic flats, (3) shallow subtidal lagoons, and (4) shallow open-marine shelves. The diagenetic history of the Arab and Hith formations in the southern and southwestern Arabian Gulf suggests that the anhydrite and much of the dolomitization are a result of penecontemporaneous sabkha diagenesis. The character and timing of the paragenetic events are responsible for the excellent porosity of the Arab Formation and the lack of porosity in the massive anhydrites of the Hith, which together result in the prolific hydrocarbon sequences of these formations.

  19. Uranium potential of the Burro Canyon Formation in western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    The Burro Canyon Formation of Early Cretaceous age overlies the Morrison Formation (Late Jurassic) and underlies the Dakota Sandstone (Late Cretaceous) over most of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado. It consists mainly of alternating beds of fluvial sandstone and overbank mudstone with sandstone dominating in the lower part of the formation and mudstone in the upper part. At the outcrop, the sandstones in the formation exhibit almost all the characteristics that are considered favorable for the occurrence of sandstone-type uranium deposits, but only a few small deposits have been discovered in the Colorado-Utah area. The major deficiency of the Burro Canyon in these outcrop areas is the absence of a reductant such as carbonaceous debris, humic or humate materials, or pyrite. Reductants were probably removed during a period of extensive oxidation at the time of deposition and during a subsequent erosional episode prior to deposition of the Dakota Sandstone. The formation reaches a lobate, inexactly located eastern margin that extends from near Meeker, Colorado, southward through the Piceance basin to near Aztec, New Mexico, in the northwestern part of the San Juan Basin. Along much of this distance, the formation is in the subsurface and has been penetrated by only a few drill holes. Along this eastern margin, the lobes project eastward where fluvial distributary streams built minor alluvial fans of relatively high-energy deposits out from the main axis of Burro Canyon stream deposition. The lower and distal reaches of these lobes may have survived the period of post depositional erosion and oxidation in a reduced condition because of low relief and the protection of a high water table. If so, the peripheral and distal parts of these lobes may have retained the precipitants necessary to form a uranium deposit. Two of the lobes extend into the southwest margin of the Piceance Basin and are considered the possible location of uranium deposits. Two additional

  20. A Middle Jurassic heterodontosaurid dinosaur from Patagonia and the evolution of heterodontosaurids.

    PubMed

    Pol, Diego; Rauhut, Oliver W M; Becerra, Marcos

    2011-05-01

    Heterodontosauridae is a morphologically divergent group of dinosaurs that has recently been interpreted as one of the most basal clades of Ornithischia. Heterodontosaurid remains were previously known from the Early Jurassic of southern Africa, but recent discoveries and studies have significantly increased the geographical and temporal range for this clade. Here, we report a new ornithischian dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic Cañadón Asfalto Formation in central Patagonia, Argentina. This new taxon, Manidens condorensis gen. et sp. nov., includes well-preserved craniomandibular and postcranial remains and represents the only diagnostic ornithischian specimen yet discovered in the Jurassic of South America so far. Derived features of its anatomy indicate that Manidens belongs to Heterodontosauridae, as the sister taxon of Heterodontosaurus and other South African heterodontosaurids. The presence of posterior dentary teeth with high crowns but lacking extensive wear facets in Manidens suggests that this form represents an intermediate stage in the development of the remarkable adaptations to herbivory described for Heterodontosaurus. The dentition of Manidens condorensis also has autapomorphies, such as asymmetrically arranged denticles in posterior teeth and a mesially projected denticle in the posteriormost teeth. At an estimated total length of 60-75 cm, Manidens furthermore confirms the small size of basal heterodontosaurids.

  1. Timing, duration, and causes for Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous anoxia in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Xu, Guangping; Bingen, Bernard; Weiss, Hermann M.

    2017-03-01

    Re-Os isochron ages for black shales of the Hekkingen Formation in the Barents Sea constrain the onset (157.7 ± 1.3 Ma) and termination (138.8 ± 1.0 Ma), and thereby indicate a long duration (∼19 Myr) of widespread Jurassic-Cretaceous anoxia in the Arctic. Integration of these new Re-Os ages with published radiometric ages, ammonite biostratigraphy and geomagnetic polarity chrons shows shorter late Oxfordian-late Kimmeridgian and longer Berriasian stages relative to estimates in the 2012 and 2016 Geological Time Scales. Late Jurassic anoxia was likely the result of warming climate due to high atmospheric CO2 levels from increased oceanic crust production. Rising temperatures enhanced weathering and nutrient supply, increased productivity, and slowed ocean circulation before a sea-level rise brought anoxic waters onto continental shelves. Assessment of new and published Os- and Sr-isotopic data suggests that prolonged oceanic anoxia required a sustained CO2 source from fast spreading rates and/or longer subduction zones and spreading ridges to balance large burial of carbon in voluminous Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous black shales.

  2. Mechanisms for high-frequency cyclicity in the Upper Jurassic limestone of northeastern Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.R.; Ward, W.C. ); Goldhammer, R.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The 520 m of Upper Jurassic Zuloaga Limestone exposed in the Sierra de Bunuelos in southern Coahuila comprise 118 cycles of peritidal carbonate rock deposited on a gently dipping ramp. Field studies with Fischer plots and time-series analysis suggest that a Milankovitchian glacioeustasy mechanism is inadequate to describe the Zuloaga cycles. Autocyclic progradation may have been the major influence on depositional cyclicity. Depositional cycles in the Zuloaga Formation typically are a few meters thick and asymmetric with subtidal wackestone and packstone grading upward into subtidal grainstone or into intertidal stromatolites. Width of the carbonate ramp is estimated to have been about 150 km. Sedimentation rates for these peritidal carbonate environments apparently exceeded subsidence rates inasmuch as most of the carbonate platform remained near sea level during Zuloaga deposition. The area was tectonically quiescent during the late Jurassic. Autocyclic shoreline progradation is a feasible mechanism for producing the high-frequency cycles, as suggested by (1) poor correlation with predicted Milankovitch periodicity shown by time-series analysis, (2) little evidence of subaerial exposure, (3) development of complete peritidal cycles, (4) general progradational sequences within each third-order unit, and (5) absence of polar glaciation during Late Jurassic.

  3. Astronomical constraints on the duration of the Early Jurassic Pliensbachian Stage and global climatic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, Micha; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Hinnov, Linda; Jenkyns, Hugh C.; Xu, Weimu; Riding, James B.; Storm, Marisa; Minisini, Daniel; Ullmann, Clemens V.; Leng, Melanie J.

    2016-12-01

    The Early Jurassic was marked by multiple periods of major global climatic and palaeoceanographic change, biotic turnover and perturbed global geochemical cycles, commonly linked to large igneous province volcanism. This epoch was also characterised by the initial break-up of the super-continent Pangaea and the opening and formation of shallow-marine basins and ocean gateways, the timing of which are poorly constrained. Here, we show that the Pliensbachian Stage and the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian global carbon-cycle perturbation (marked by a negative shift in δ13 C of 2- 4 ‰), have respective durations of ∼8.7 and ∼2 Myr. We astronomically tune the floating Pliensbachian time scale to the 405 Kyr eccentricity solution (La2010d), and propose a revised Early Jurassic time scale with a significantly shortened Sinemurian Stage duration of 6.9 ± 0.4 Myr. When calibrated against the new time scale, the existing Pliensbachian seawater 87Sr/86Sr record shows relatively stable values during the first ∼2 Myr of the Pliensbachian, superimposed on the long-term Early Jurassic decline in 87Sr/86Sr. This plateau in 87Sr/86Sr values coincides with the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary carbon-cycle perturbation. It is possibly linked to a late phase of Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) volcanism that induced enhanced global weathering of continental crustal materials, leading to an elevated radiogenic strontium flux to the global ocean.

  4. Stability of atmospheric CO2 levels across the Triassic/Jurassic boundary.

    PubMed

    Tanner, L H; Hubert, J F; Coffey, B P; McInerney, D P

    2001-06-07

    The Triassic/Jurassic boundary, 208 million years ago, is associated with widespread extinctions in both the marine and terrestrial biota. The cause of these extinctions has been widely attributed to the eruption of flood basalts of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. This volcanic event is thought to have released significant amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere, which could have led to catastrophic greenhouse warming, but the evidence for CO2-induced extinction remains equivocal. Here we present the carbon isotope compositions of pedogenic calcite from palaeosol formations, spanning a 20-Myr period across the Triassic/Jurassic boundary. Using a standard diffusion model, we interpret these isotopic data to represent a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations of about 250 p.p.m. across the boundary, as compared with previous estimates of a 2,000-4,000 p.p.m. increase. The relative stability of atmospheric CO2 across this boundary suggests that environmental degradation and extinctions during the Early Jurassic were not caused by volcanic outgassing of CO2. Other volcanic effects-such as the release of atmospheric aerosols or tectonically driven sea-level change-may have been responsible for this event.

  5. Jurassic-Cretaceous paleogeography, paleoclimate and upwelling of the northern margin of Tethys

    SciTech Connect

    Golonka, J.; Krobicki, M.

    1995-08-01

    The Jurassic and Cretaceous global paleogeographic reconstructions illustrate the changing configuration of mountains, land, shallow seas and deep ocean basins. Active plate boundaries, such as spreading centers and subduction zones, are also shown. The Pliensbachian, Toarcian, Bathonian, Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian, Tithonian-Berriasian, Valanginian, Albian, Turonian and Maastrichtian maps were generated The outlines of paleogeography are used as input for paleoclimatic modeling. The PALEOCLIMATE program models global atmospheric pressure, derive paleo-wind directions and estimate the likelihood of coastal upwelling. The program is based on the paleoclimatic methods first developed by Judith Parrish, adopted by C. R. Scotese and modified by M. I. Ross. The maps depict air pressure, wind directions, humid zones and areas favorable for upwelling conditions plotted on the paleogeographic background. Paleoclimate modeling suggests that prevailing Jurassic-Cretaceous wind directions in the northern Tethys area were from north-northeast. These winds were parallel to the axis of Czorsztyn ridge. The ridge was uplifted between Magura and Pieniny basins as the result of extension during Jurassic supercontinent breakup. The upwelling may have been induced at the southeastern margin of the ridge. The model is consistent with rock records, especially from the upper part of ammonitico rosso type Czorsztyn formation. Mass occurrence of Tithonian and Berriasian brachiopods was probably controlled by upwelling-induced trophic relationships which is resulted in the intense growth of benthic organisms on the ridge. This is additionally supported by the presence of phosphorites at localities which corresponded to the continental shelf/slope transition.

  6. A Middle Jurassic heterodontosaurid dinosaur from Patagonia and the evolution of heterodontosaurids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, Diego; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.; Becerra, Marcos

    2011-05-01

    Heterodontosauridae is a morphologically divergent group of dinosaurs that has recently been interpreted as one of the most basal clades of Ornithischia. Heterodontosaurid remains were previously known from the Early Jurassic of southern Africa, but recent discoveries and studies have significantly increased the geographical and temporal range for this clade. Here, we report a new ornithischian dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic Cañadón Asfalto Formation in central Patagonia, Argentina. This new taxon, Manidens condorensis gen. et sp. nov., includes well-preserved craniomandibular and postcranial remains and represents the only diagnostic ornithischian specimen yet discovered in the Jurassic of South America so far. Derived features of its anatomy indicate that Manidens belongs to Heterodontosauridae, as the sister taxon of Heterodontosaurus and other South African heterodontosaurids. The presence of posterior dentary teeth with high crowns but lacking extensive wear facets in Manidens suggests that this form represents an intermediate stage in the development of the remarkable adaptations to herbivory described for Heterodontosaurus. The dentition of Manidens condorensis also has autapomorphies, such as asymmetrically arranged denticles in posterior teeth and a mesially projected denticle in the posteriormost teeth. At an estimated total length of 60-75 cm, Manidens furthermore confirms the small size of basal heterodontosaurids.

  7. Stratigraphy of Smackover formation (Upper Jurassic), Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The modeled eustatic sea level rise during Smackover deposition is recorded in rocks along the Wiggins Arch--Conecuh Ridge areas of the Manila embayment as a ''large-scale'' transgressive-regressive carbonate package. Transgression of Smackover carbonates in the Conecuh Ridge area was associated with the end of pronounced fault-block movement characteristic of earlier Norphlet deposits. Underlying Louann and Norphlet strata created a ramplike surface of transgression in the Wiggins arch area, whereas the Louann pinch-out and confinement or Norphlet coarse clastics between basement blocks in the far eastern Manila embayment resulted in a rapidly changing paleotopographic surface. The subdued paleotopographic (ramp) setting was dominated by lateral progradation of sedimentary environments; in contrast, carbonates to the east over basement features responded to the same eustatic changes by vertical upbuilding (aggradation) of facies-a ''tectonic dictator'' existed that controlled depositional relief and localized environments through time. Direct evidence for meter-scale relative sea level oscillations is from multiple exposure surfaces within upper Smackover grainstones. These diagenetic caps (up to four zones recognized in the Chunchula field area) at the top of coarsening-upward sequences are characterized by chemically coated grains, gravitational vadose cements, multiple dissolution-reprecipitation features, and localized radial-fibrous cements. Stacked sedimentary packages indicate that repeated relative sea level rises again initiated carbonate deposition after exposure. Correlation of exposure caps in four wells in Chunchula field reflect internal time lines generally parallel with the Norphlet-Smackover contact, and indicate lateral equivalence of grainstones with updip anhydrite.

  8. Post-Jurassic mammal-like reptile from the Palaeocene.

    PubMed

    Fox, R C; Youzwyshyn, G P; Krause, D W

    1992-07-16

    Mammal-like reptiles of the order Therapsida document the emergence of mammals from more primitive synapsids and are of unique zoological and palaeontological interest on that account. Therapsids, first appearing in the Early Permian, were thought to become extinct in the Middle Jurassic, soon after the Late Triassic origin of mammals. Here, however, we report the discovery of a therapsid from the late Palaeocene, 100 million years younger than the youngest previous occurrence of the order. This discovery nearly doubles the stratigraphic range of therapsids and furnishes their first record from the Cenozoic. The documenting fossils, an incomplete dentary containing three teeth, and four isolated teeth from other, conspecific individuals (Fig. 1), are from the Paskapoo Formation, at Cochrane, Alberta, Canada, from beds yielding a diverse mammalian fauna of early Tiffanian age. These specimens are catalogued in the collections of the University of Alberta Laboratory for Vertebrate Paleontology (UALVP) and provide the basis for a new taxon, as named and described below: (see text)

  9. Ice age at the Middle-Late Jurassic transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dromart, G.; Garcia, J.-P.; Picard, S.; Atrops, F.; Lécuyer, C.; Sheppard, S. M. F.

    2003-08-01

    A detailed record of sea surface temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere based on migration of marine invertebrate fauna (ammonites) and isotopic thermometry (δ18O values of shark tooth enamel) indicates a severe cooling at the Middle-Late Jurassic transition (MLJT), about 160 Ma ago. The magnitude of refrigeration (1-3°C for lower middle latitudes) and its coincidence in time with an abrupt global-scale fall of sea level documented through sequence stratigraphy are both suggestive of continental ice formation at this time. Ice sheets may have developed over the high-latitude mountainous regions of Far-East Russia. The drastic cooling just post-dated the Middle-Late Callovian widespread deposition of organic-rich marine sediments (e.g. northwestern Europe, Central Atlantic, and Arabian Peninsula). This thermal deterioration can thus be ascribed to a downdraw in atmospheric CO2 via enhanced organic carbon burial which acted as a negative feedback effect (i.e. the inverse greenhouse effect). The glacial episode of the MLJT climaxed in the Late Callovian, lasted about 2.6 Myr, and had a pronounced asymmetrical pattern composed of an abrupt (˜0.8 Myr) temperature fall opposed to a long-term (˜1.8 Myr), stepwise recovery. The glacial conditions at the MLJT reveal that atmospheric CO2 levels could have dropped temporarily to values lower than 500 ppmv during Mesozoic times.

  10. Post-Jurassic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Seton, Maria; Dietmar Müller, R.; Flament, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The accretionary growth of Asia, linked to long-term convergence between Eurasia, Gondwana-derived blocks and the Pacific, resulted in a mosaic of terranes for which conflicting tectonic interpretations exist. Here, we propose solutions to a number of controversies related to the evolution of Sundaland through a synthesis of published geological data and plate reconstructions that reconcile both geological and geophysical constraints with plate driving forces. We propose that West Sulawesi, East Java and easternmost Borneo rifted from northern Gondwana in the latest Jurassic, collided with an intra-oceanic arc at ~115 Ma and subsequently sutured to Sundaland by 80 Ma. Although recent models argue that the Southwest Borneo core accreted to Sundaland at this time, we use volcanic and biogeographic constraints to show that the core of Borneo was on the Asian margin since at least the mid Jurassic. This northward transfer of Gondwana-derived continental fragments required a convergent plate boundary in the easternmost Tethys that we propose gave rise to the Philippine Archipelago based on the formation of latest Jurassic-Early Cretaceous supra-subduction zone ophiolites on Halmahera, Obi Island and Luzon. The Late Cretaceous marks the shift from Andean-style subduction to back-arc opening on the east Asian margin. Arc volcanism along South China ceased by ~60 Ma due to the rollback of the Izanagi slab, leading to the oceanward migration of the volcanic arc and the opening of the Proto South China Sea (PSCS). We use the Apennines-Tyrrhenian system in the Mediterranean as an analogue to model this back-arc. Continued rollback detaches South Palawan, Mindoro and the Semitau continental blocks from the stable east Asian margin and transfers them onto Sundaland in the Eocene to produce the Sarawak Orogeny. The extrusion of Indochina and subduction polarity reversal along northern Borneo opens the South China Sea and transfers the Dangerous Grounds-Reed Bank southward to

  11. Late Jurassic plutonism in the southwest U.S. Cordillera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Howard, K.A.; Richards, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Although plate reconstructions suggest that subduction was an approximately steady-state process from the mid-Mesozoic through the early Tertiary, recent precise geochronologic studies suggest highly episodic emplacement of voluminous continental-margin batholiths in the U.S. Cordillera. In central and southern California and western Arizona, major episodes of batholithic magmatism are known to have occurred in Permian-Triassic, Middle Jurassic, and late Early to Late Cretaceous time. However, recent studies of forearc-basin and continental-interior sediments suggest that Late Jurassic time was probably also a period of significant magmatism, although few dated plutons of this age have been recognized. We describe a belt of Late Jurassic plutonic and hypabyssal rocks at least 200 km in length that extends from the northwestern Mojave Desert through the Transverse Ranges. The belt lies outboard of both the voluminous Middle Jurassic arc and the ca. 148 Ma Independence dike swarm at these latitudes. The plutons include two intrusive suites emplaced between 157 and 149 Ma: a calc-alkaline suite compositionally unlike Permian-Triassic and Middle Jurassic mon-zonitic suites but similar to Late Cretaceous arc plutons emplaced across this region, and a contemporaneous but not comagmatic alkaline suite. The Late Jurassic was thus a time of both tectonic and magmatic transitions in the southern Cordillera. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  12. Two new species of Prolyda from the Middle Jurassic of China (Hymenoptera, Pamphilioidea)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Shih, Chungkun; Rasnitsyn, Alexandr P.; Wang, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of the genus Prolyda Rasnitsyn, 1968, Prolyda dimidia sp. n. and Prolyda elegantula sp. n., are described and illustrated. Both specimens were well-preserved and collected from the latest Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Daohugou Village in Inner Mongolia, China. Based on the new morphological data, a key to the five known species of Prolyda is provided. In addition, Prolyda has an enlarged first antennal flagellomere, which means it might have revert to the elongate plesiomorphic state for the antennal configuration as previously documented. PMID:27110151

  13. Nature of the Jurassic Magnetic Quiet Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Masako; Tivey, Maurice A.; Sager, William W.

    2015-10-01

    The nature of the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ), a region of low-amplitude oceanic magnetic anomalies, has been a long-standing debate with implications for the history and behavior of the Earth's geomagnetic field and plate tectonics. To understand the origin of the JQZ, we studied high-resolution sea surface magnetic anomalies from the Hawaiian magnetic lineations and correlated them with the Japanese magnetic lineations. The comparison shows the following: (i) excellent correlation of anomaly shapes from M29 to M42; (ii) remarkable similarity of anomaly amplitude envelope, which decreases back in time from M19 to M38, with a minimum at M41, then increases back in time from M42; and (iii) refined locations of pre-M25 lineations in the Hawaiian lineation set. Based on these correlations, our study presents evidence of regionally and possibly globally coherent pre-M29 magnetic anomalies in the JQZ and a robust extension of Hawaiian isochrons back to M42 in the Pacific crust.

  14. The bivalve Anopaea (Inoceramidae) from the Upper Jurassic-lowermost Cretaceous of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, Patrick; Crame, J. Alistair; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Seija

    2015-07-01

    In Mexico, the Upper Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous La Casita and coeval La Caja and La Pimienta formations are well-known for their abundant and well-preserved marine vertebrates and invertebrates. The latter include conspicuous inoceramid bivalves of the genus Anopaea not formally described previously from Mexico. Anopaea bassei (Lecolle de Cantú, 1967), Anopaea cf. stoliczkai (Holdhaus, 1913), Anopaea cf. callistoensis Crame and Kelly, 1995 and Anopaea sp. are rare constituents in distinctive Tithonian-lower Berriasian levels of the La Caja Formation and one Tithonian horizon of the La Pimienta Formation. Anopaea bassei was previously documented from the Tithonian of central Mexico and Cuba, while most other members of Anopaea described here are only known from southern high latitudes. The Mexican assemblage also includes taxa which closely resemble Anopaea stoliczkai from the Tithonian of India, Indonesia and the Antarctic Peninsula, and Anopaea callistoensis from the late Tithonian to ?early Berriasian of the Antarctic Peninsula. Our new data expand the palaeogeographical distribution of the high latitude Anopaea to the Gulf of Mexico region and substantiate faunal exchange, in the Late Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, between Mexico and the Antarctic Realm.

  15. Late Jurassic Crustal Thickening in the Mesozoic Arc of Ecuador and Colombia: Implications on the Evolution of Continental Arcs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, J.; Cardona, A.; Blanco-Quintero, I.; Valencia, V.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of South America during the Jurassic is related to the subduction of the Farallon plate and the formation of a series of continental arcs. In the northern Andes such arcs have been considered as controlled by extensional dominated tectonics. Paleomagnetic constraints have also suggested that between the Early and Late Jurassic several crustal domains were translate along the continental margin in association with strain partitioning in the convergent margin. A review of the character of the Salado terrane in the Cordillera Real of Ecuador indicates that it includes extensively deformed and metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary rocks that have achieved a greenschist to amphibolite facies event with chloritoid and garnet. This rocks are tightly associated with a ca. 143 Ma syn-tectonic granodiorite to monzogranite batholith that is also extensively milonitized.A similar Late Jurassic crustal thickening event that apparently affected volcano-sedimentary rocks have been also recently suspected in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes in association with Jurassic plutonic rocks (Blanco-Quintero et al., 2013) It is therefore suggested that during the Late Jurassic the Northern Andes experienced significant contractional tectonics. Such crustal thickening may be related to either the active subduction setting were the crustal slivers formed in relation to oblique convergence are transfered and re-accreted to the margin and triggered the deformational event or to a collisional event associated to the arrival of an allocthonous terrane. New geochronological constraints on the metamorphic evolution and precise understanding on the relations between magmatism and deformation are going to be obtain in the Salado Terrane to appropriately test this hypothesis and contribute to the understanding of the extensional to compressional tectonic switching in continental arcs. Blanco-Quintero, I. F., García-Casco, A., Ruíz, E. C., Toro, L. M., Moreno, M

  16. LLNL-Generated Content for the California Academy of Sciences, Morrison Planetarium Full-Dome Show: Earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A J; Petersson, N A; Morency, C E; Simmons, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2012-01-23

    The California Academy of Sciences (CAS) Morrison Planetarium is producing a 'full-dome' planetarium show on earthquakes and asked LLNL to produce content for the show. Specifically the show features numerical ground motion simulations of the M 7.9 1906 San Francisco and a possible future M 7.05 Hayward fault scenario earthquake. The show also features concepts of plate tectonics and mantle convection using images from LLNL's G3D global seismic tomography. This document describes the data that was provided to the CAS in support of production of the 'Earthquake' show. The CAS is located in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco and hosts over 1.6 million visitors. The Morrison Planetarium, within the CAS, is the largest all digital planetarium in the world. It features a 75-foot diameter spherical section projection screen tilted at a 30-degree angle. Six projectors cover the entire field of view and give a three-dimensional immersive experience. CAS shows strive to use scientifically accurate digital data in their productions. The show, entitled simply 'Earthquake', will debut on 26 May 2012. They are working on graphics and animations based on the same data sets for display on LLNL powerwalls and flat-screens as well as for public release.

  17. Hadley circulation and precipitation changes controling black shale deposition in the Late Jurassic Boreal Seaway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Howard A.; Wagner, Thomas; Herringshaw, Liam G.; Farnsworth, Alexander J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Harland, Melise; Imber, Jonathan; Loptson, Claire; Atar, Elizabeth F. L.

    2016-08-01

    New climate simulations using the HadCM3L model with a paleogeography of the Late Jurassic (155.5 Ma) and proxy-data corroborate that warm and wet tropical-like conditions reached as far north as the UK sector of the Jurassic Boreal Seaway (~35°N). This is associated with a northern hemisphere Jurassic Hadley cell and an intensified subtropical jet which both extend significantly poleward than in the modern (July-September). Deposition of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) occurred in the shallow, storm-dominated, epeiric Boreal Seaway. High-resolution paleo-environmental proxy data from the Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF; ~155-150 Ma), UK, are used to test for the role of tropical atmospheric circulation on meter-scale heterogeneities in black shale deposition. Proxy and model data show that the most organic-rich section (eudoxus to mid-hudlestoni zones) is characterized by a positive δ13Corg excursion and up to 37 wt % total organic carbon (%TOC). Orbital modulation of organic carbon burial primarily in the long eccentricity power band combined with a clear positive correlation between %TOC carbonate-free and the kaolinite/illite ratio supports peak organic carbon burial under the influence of very humid climate conditions, similar to the modern tropics. This reinterpretation of large-scale climate relationships, supported by independent modeling and geological data, has profound implications for atmospheric circulation patterns and processes affecting marine productivity and organic carbon burial further north along the Boreal Seaway, including the Arctic.

  18. Mesozoic authigenic carbonate deposition in the Arctic: Do glendonites record gas hydrate destabilization during the Jurassic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Chloe; Suan, Guillaume; Wierzbowski, Hubert; Rogov, Mikhail; Teichert, Barbara; Kienhuis, Michiel V. M.; Polerecky, Lubos; Middelburg, Jack B. M.; Reichart, Gert-Jan; van de Schootbrugge, Bas

    2015-04-01

    Glendonites are calcite pseudomorphs after ikaite, an unstable hydrated calcium carbonate mineral. Because present-day ikaite occurs predominantly in sub-polar environments and is unstable at warm temperatures, glendonites have been used as an indicator of near-freezing conditions throughout Earth history. Ikaite has also been observed in cold deep-sea environments like the Gulf of Mexico, the Japan Trench, and the Zaire Fan where their formation is possibly governed by other parameters. The description of glendonites in Paleocene-Eocene sediments of Svalbard, and Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian) deposits of northern Germany, however questions the role of temperature on ikaite precipitation (Spielhagen and Tripati, 2009; Teichert and Luppold, 2013). Anomalously low carbon isotope values of Jurassic glendonites point to the involvement of methane as a possible carbon source for ikaite/glendonite formation. Terrestrial organic matter degradation is also frequently evoked as a potential source of carbon. The involved bio- and geochemical processes remains thus not well constrained. Here we present new geochemical data of a large number of glendonites specimens from the Lower and Middle Jurassic of northern Siberia and the Lena river middle flows (Bajocian, Bathonian, Pliensbachian). Carbon and oxygen isotopic values show comparable trends between the different sections. Bulk glendonites δ13C and δ18O values vary from 0.0 to -44.5o and -15.0 to -0.8 respectively and show a negative correlation. Some samples display similar low δ13C values as the Pliensbachian glendonites of Germany (Teichert and Luppold, 2013), suggesting thermogenic and/or biogenic methane sources. The range of carbon isotope values is comparable to those observed at other methane seeps deposits. Further investigations are needed to better constrain the carbon cycle in these particular environmental conditions. The role of microbial communities into ikaite/glendonite formation equally needs to be

  19. Early Jurassic black shales: Global anoxia or regional "Dead Zones"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Schootbrugge, B.; Payne, J.; Wignall, P.

    2012-12-01

    The so-called "Schwarzer Jura" or "Black Jurassic" in Germany is informally used to designate a series of organic-rich sediments that roughly span the Early Jurassic (201.6 - 175.6 Myr), and which culminate in the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. Based on organic and inorganic geochemical as well as (micro)palaeontological data from several recently drilled cores, black shales deposited directly following the end-Triassic extinction (201.6 Ma) during the Hettangian are extremely similar to Toarcian black shales. Both events are characterized by laminated black shales that contain high amounts of the biomarker isorenieratane, a fossilized pigment derived from green sulphur bacteria. Furthermore, the two intervals show similar changes in phytoplankton assemblages from chromophyte (red) to chlorophyte (green) algae. Combined, the evidence suggests that photic zone euxinia developed repeatedly during the Early Jurassic, making wide swaths of shelf area inhospitable to benthic life. In the oceans today such areas are called "Dead Zones" and they are increasing in number and extent due to the combined effects of man-made eutrophication and global warming. During the Early Jurassic, regional anoxic events developed in response to flood basalt volcanism, which triggered global warming, increased run-off, and changes in ocean circulation. The patchiness of Early Jurassic anoxia allows comparisons to be made with present-day "Dead Zones", while at the same time ocean de-oxygenation in the past may serve to predict future perturbations in the Earth system.

  20. The Triassic-Jurassic boundary in eastern North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, P. E.; Comet, B.

    1988-01-01

    Rift basins of the Atlantic passive margin in eastern North America are filled with thousands of meters of continental rocks termed the Newark Supergroup which provide an unprecedented opportunity to examine the fine scale structure of the Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction in continental environments. Time control, vital to the understanding of the mechanisms behind mass extinctions, is provided by lake-level cycles apparently controlled by orbitally induced climate change allowing resolution at the less than 21,000 year level. Correlation with other provinces is provided by a developing high resolution magnetostratigraphy and palynologically-based biostratigraphy. A large number of at least local vertebrate and palynomorph extinctions are concentrated around the boundary with survivors constituting the earliest Jurassic assemblages, apparently without the introduction of new taxa. The palynofloral transition is marked by the dramatic elimination of a relatively high diversity Triassic pollen assemblage with the survivors making up a Jurassic assemblage of very low diversity overwhelmingly dominated by Corollina. Based principally on palynological correlations, the hypothesis that these continental taxonomic transitions were synchronous with the massive Triassic-Jurassic marine extinctions is strongly corroborated. An extremely rapid, perhaps catastrophic, taxonomic turnover at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, synchronous in continental and marine realms is hypothesized and discussed.

  1. Biogeochemistry of the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.; Ward, P. D.; Garrison, G. H.

    2006-12-01

    New biostratigraphic and biogeochemical data are presented from Triassic-Jurassic (Tr-J) boundary sections at Kennecott Point, Queen Charlotte Islands (QCI), Canada, Muller Canyon, Nevada, USA, and Marokopa Beach, New Zealand. The New Zealand record shows two negative excursions in δ13Corg of approximately 2‰ associated with the Tr-J transition. The QCI and Nevada boundary sections show a consistent isotopic trend indicative of multiple major perturbations to the carbon cycle: one negative excursion in δ13Corg of 2‰ at the boundary and one positive excursion of 3 to 5‰ following the boundary. The post-Tr-J boundary positive excursion is especially prominent in boundary sections from QCI, where the high organic content of the black shales makes the rocks suitable for a survey of lipid biomarkers. New GC-MS data are presented from this locality, revealing changes in the distribution and abundance of alkanes, hopanes, and steranes across the Tr-J transition. Litho-, bio- and chemostratigraphy from these boundary localities do not support a single impact cause for the late Triassic extinctions, although impact events such as the Manicouagan may well have exerted significant stress on a biosphere still recovering from the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. The data support the idea of a degraded late Triassic environment persisting for millions of years and characterized by low atmospheric oxygen and high carbon dioxide associated with Central Atlantic Magmatic Province volcanism. Global warming and sea level change may have led to destabilization of seafloor methane hydrates and runaway greenhouse conditions.

  2. Supraregional seismites in Triassic - Jurassic boundary strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, Sofie; Pedersen, Gunver K.; van de Schootbrugge, Bas; Johansson, Leif; Petersen, Henrik I.; Dybkjær, Karen; Weibel, Rikke; Hansen, Katrine H.; Erlström, Mikael; Alwmark, Carl; Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Oschmann, Wolfgang; Tegner, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction event (201.564 Ma) was synchronous with the earliest volcanic phase during the emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), a large igneous province (LIP) formed during the initial breakup of Pangea. Volcanic degassing of CO2 and other volatile gases, and/or thermogenic methane, from the CAMP is generally regarded as the main cause of the end-Triassic biotic crisis. However, discrepancies in the durations of the ETE (50 Kyrs) and the CAMP volcanism (600 Kyrs) as well as temporal offsets between carbon cycle perturbations and biotic turnovers suggest a more complex scenario that require further studies of the temporal succession of events in Triassic-Jurassic (TJ) boundary strata. Here, we present and examine multiple episodes of soft-sediment deformation (seismite) within uppermost Rhaetian marine and terrestrial strata of Denmark, Sweden and Germany. These seismites are stratigraphically constrained by palynology and C-isotopes to the latest Rhaetian, and are synchronous to the single seismite layer from the UK, which similarly predates the T/J boundary, and has been explained by an extraterrestrial bolide impact. Instead, we argue that the multiple episodes of soft-sediment deformation, interbedded by undisturbed strata, were formed from repeated intense earthquake activity restricted to an interval within the latest Rhaetian bracketed by two negative excursions in δ13C and also containing palynological evidence for deforestation and fern proliferation. The fact that these biotic changes coincide with repeated seismic activity has implications for the end-Triassic extinction and the CAMP scenario. We discuss the temporal position of the seismites in regards to other end-Triassic events, and argue that their supraregional distribution in pre-TJ-boundary strata of NW Europe may be linked to intensified earthquake activity during CAMP emplacement, rather than an extraterrestrial impact.

  3. Sequence and seismic stratigraphy of the Jurassic strata in northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obid, Jamal A.

    The Upper Jurassic section in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico includes the Norphlet and Smackover Formations (Oxfordian), considered as one of the most prolific oil and gas producers in the area, the Haynesville Formation (Kimmeridgian), and the Cotton Valley Group (Tithonian to Berriasian/Lower Valanginian). The study area, located in the onshore-offshore southwest Alabama, consists of mixed siliciclastic and carbonate deposits representing continental, marginal marine, and marine environments. Well log, core and two-dimensional reflection seismic data were used to provide a sequence stratigraphic framework for the Jurassic section through identification of transgressive-regressive sequences and their associated key stratigraphic surfaces. Three transgressive-regressive (T-R) sequences were identified in the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous strata onshore Alabama, using well log and limited core data. In the offshore area, four transgressive-regressive sequences were recognized on well logs. Stratigraphic analysis of the reflection seismic data yielded three T-R sequences. Sequence boundaries and marine flooding events were identified on seismic sections through interpretation of reflection termination patterns of seismic reflectors. The reflection seismic data were eventually integrated with well log data using check-shot surveys and synthetic seismogram. The recognized transgressive-regressive sequences have utility for regional stratigraphic correlation of the Jurassic sediments across the northern Gulf of Mexico. The Oxfordian (Smackover), the Late Kimmeridgian (Haynesville), and the Berriasian (Cotton Valley) marine flooding events have potential for global correlation. Sequence boundaries and marine flooding surfaces were identified as major events in the geohistory of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Several approaches to sequence stratigraphy have been established. The three most popular approaches are the depositional sequence, the genetic stratigraphic

  4. Structural complexity at and around the Triassic-Jurassic GSSP at Kuhjoch, Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palotai, M.; Pálfy, J.; Sasvári, Á.

    2017-02-01

    One of the key requirements for a Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) is the absence of tectonic disturbance. The GSSP for the Triassic-Jurassic system boundary was recently defined at Kuhjoch, Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria. New field observations in the area of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary GSSP site demonstrate that the overturned, tight, and almost upright Karwendel syncline was formed at semibrittle deformation conditions, confirmed by axial planar foliation. Tight to isoclinal folds at various scales were related to a tectonic transport to the north. Brittle faulting occurred before and after folding as confirmed by tilt tests (the rotation of structural data by the average bedding). Foliation is ubiquitous in the incompetent units, including the Kendlbach Formation at the GSSP. A reverse fault (inferred to be formed as a normal fault before folding) crosscuts the GSSP sections, results in the partial tectonic omission of the Schattwald Beds, and thus makes it impossible to measure a complete and continuous stratigraphic section across the whole Kendlbach Formation. Based on these observations, the Kuhjoch sections do not fulfil the specific requirement for a GSSP regarding the absence of tectonic disturbances near boundary level.

  5. A Jurassic avialan dinosaur from China resolves the early phylogenetic history of birds.

    PubMed

    Godefroit, Pascal; Cau, Andrea; Dong-Yu, Hu; Escuillié, François; Wenhao, Wu; Dyke, Gareth

    2013-06-20

    The recent discovery of small paravian theropod dinosaurs with well-preserved feathers in the Middle-Late Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning Province (northeastern China) has challenged the pivotal position of Archaeopteryx, regarded from its discovery to be the most basal bird. Removing Archaeopteryx from the base of Avialae to nest within Deinonychosauria implies that typical bird flight, powered by the forelimbs only, either evolved at least twice, or was subsequently lost or modified in some deinonychosaurians. Here we describe the complete skeleton of a new paravian from the Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning Province, China. Including this new taxon in a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis for basal Paraves does the following: (1) it recovers it as the basal-most avialan; (2) it confirms the avialan status of Archaeopteryx; (3) it places Troodontidae as the sister-group to Avialae; (4) it supports a single origin of powered flight within Paraves; and (5) it implies that the early diversification of Paraves and Avialae took place in the Middle-Late Jurassic period.

  6. Constraints on Upper Jurassic palaeogeography in the Ula Gyda trend

    SciTech Connect

    Mundal, I.; Milton, N.; Robinson, N.

    1995-08-01

    BP Norway`s semi-regional 3D database in the Central Trough covers an area of nearly 3000 sq.km. around BP Norway`s two producing fields, Ula and Gyda, and includes strategic acreage within tie-back distance to the fields. Prospectivity in the Ula Gyda trend involves complex salt influenced structures and localized Upper Jurassic depositional systems. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how the understanding of the semi-regional structures and salt tectonics helped constrain the interpretation of the Upper Jurassic palaeogeography. The control of basement structures (Permian) on cover structures (Upper Jurassic/Base Cretaceous) through Zechstein Salt was interpreted using the 3D semi-regional dataset. Analogue sandbox experiments from the Austin Geodynamics Laboratory provide support for the complex structures which were interpreted on the 3D seismic data. Sandbox models mimic the interpreted monoclinal drape of the Triassic and Jurassic section over the critical basin bounding fault in the Base Zechstein. Structural cells can be identified with the help of the salt isochore. The understanding of the relationship between structural development and salt distribution was a major control on the interpretation. This interpretation coupled with the Upper Jurassic reservoir distribution from well data provided the primary evidence for the gross depositional environment maps which were used in prospect evaluation in the area. 3D visualization and shaded relief displays of the interpreted horizons and isochores played a significant part in developing an understanding of the interplay between the deeper structures and the likely Upper Jurassic palaeogeography and depocentres.

  7. Total petroleum systems of the Pelagian Province, Tunisia, Libya, Italy, and Malta; the Bou Dabbous, Tertiary and Jurassic-Cretaceous composite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    Undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources were assessed within total petroleum systems of the Pelagian Province (2048) as part of the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000. The Pelagian Province is located mainly in eastern Tunisia and northwestern Libya. Small portions of the province extend into Malta and offshore Italy. Although several petroleum systems may exist, only two ?composite? total petroleum systems were identified. Each total petroleum system comprises a single assessment unit. These total petroleum systems are called the Bou Dabbous?Tertiary and Jurassic-Cretaceous Composite, named after the source-rock intervals and reservoir-rock ages. The main source rocks include mudstone of the Eocene Bou Dabbous Formation; Cretaceous Bahloul, Lower Fahdene, and M?Cherga Formations; and Jurassic Nara Formation. Known reservoirs are in carbonate rocks and sandstone intervals throughout the Upper Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary sections. Traps for known accumulations include fault blocks, low-amplitude anticlines, high-amplitude anticlines associated with reverse faults, wrench fault structures, and stratigraphic traps. The estimated means of the undiscovered conventional petroleum volumes in total petroleum systems of the Pelagian Province are as follows: [MMBO, million barrels of oil; BCFG, billion cubic feet of gas; MMBNGL, million barrels of natural gas liquids] Total Petroleum System MMBO BCFG MMBNGL Bou Dabbous?Tertiary 667 2,746 64 Jurassic-Cretaceous Composite 403 2,280 27

  8. A Dance Class, a Drag King, & the Pedagogical Possibilities of Performative Hip-Hop: An Interview with Carmen Morrison & Alex U. Inn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schönfeldt-Aultman, Scott M.; Morrison, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Alex U. Inn is the co-founder and one of the two MCs of the hip-hop drag king group, Momma's Boyz. Momma's Boyz celebrated their tenth anniversary in 2014. Carmen Morrison is the offstage name of Alex U. Inn, though "Carmen" now goes by Alex offstage, as well. Within this interview, the names "Carmen" and "Alex" are…

  9. Implications of Two Well-Known Models for Instructional Designers in Distance Education: Dick-Carey versus Morrison-Ross-Kemp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbulut, Yavuz

    2007-01-01

    This paper first summarizes, and then compares and contrasts two well-known instructional design models: Dick and Carey Model (DC) and Morrison, Ross and Kemp model (MRK). The target audiences of both models are basically instructional designers. Both models have applications for different instructional design settings. They both see the…

  10. The second Jurassic dinosaur rush and the dawn of dinomania.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-09-01

    During the second Jurassic dinosaur rush museum paleontologists raced to display the world's first mounted sauropod dinosaur. The American Museum of Natural History triumphed in 1905 when its Brontosaurus debuted before an admiring crowd of wealthy New Yorkers. The Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, the Field Columbian Museum in Chicago and other institutions were quick to follow with their own sauropod displays. Thereafter, dinomania spread far and wide, and big, showpiece dinosaurs became a museum staple. This brief but intensely competitive period of acquisitiveness fostered important Jurassic dinosaur revisions and crucial innovations in paleontological field and lab techniques.

  11. Low intensity of the geomagnetic field in early Jurassic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perrin, M.; Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    From a large collection of Jurassic continental tholeiites cropping out in Europe and Africa, we selected 90 samples for paleointensity determinations. Twenty-eight well-clustered paleointensity estimates were obtained from two European dikes that were emplaced during Early Jurassic time: the Kerforne dike at Brenterc'h in Brittany (northwestern France) and the Messejana dike on the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal). Virtual dipole moments calculated from both magmatic units are similar and only about one-third of present-day values. -from Authors

  12. The First Metriorhynchid Crocodylomorph from the Middle Jurassic of Spain, with Implications for Evolution of the Subclade Rhacheosaurini

    PubMed Central

    Parrilla-Bel, Jara; Young, Mark T.; Moreno-Azanza, Miguel; Canudo, José Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Background Marine deposits from the Callovian of Europe have yielded numerous species of metriorhynchid crocodylomorphs. While common in English and French Formations, metriorhynchids are poorly known from the Iberian Peninsula. Twenty years ago an incomplete, but beautifully preserved, skull was discovered from the Middle Callovian of Spain. It is currently the oldest and best preserved metriorhynchid specimen from the Iberian Peninsula. Until now it has never been properly described and its taxonomic affinities remained obscure. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present a comprehensive description for this specimen and in doing so we refer it to a new genus and species: Maledictosuchus riclaensis. This species is diagnosed by numerous autapomorphies, including: heterodont dentition; tightly interlocking occlusion; lachrymal anterior process excludes the jugal from the preorbital fenestra; orbits longer than supratemporal fenestrae; palatine has two non-midline and one midline anterior processes. Our phylogenetic analysis finds Maledictosuchus riclaensis to be the basal-most known member of Rhacheosaurini (the subclade of increasingly mesopelagic piscivores that includes Cricosaurus and Rhacheosaurus). Conclusions/Significance Our description of Maledictosuchus riclaensis shows that the craniodental morphologies that underpinned the success of Rhacheosaurini in the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, as a result of increasing marine specialization to adaptations for feeding on fast small-bodied prey (i.e. divided and retracted external nares; reorientation of the lateral processes of the frontal; elongate, tubular rostrum; procumbent and non-carinated dentition; high overall tooth count; and dorsolaterally inclined paroccipital processes), first appeared during the Middle Jurassic. Rhacheosaurins were curiously rare in the Middle Jurassic, as only one specimen of Maledictosuchus riclaensis is known (with no representatives discovered from the well

  13. Comparison of the chemical characteristics of the uranium deposits of the Morrison Formation in the Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, C.S.; Pierson, C.T.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of the chemical data of samples from the northeast Church Rock area, Ruby deposit, Mariano Lake deposit, and the Ambrosia Lake district indicates that primary ore-forming processes concentrated copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, vanadium, yttrium, arsenic, organic carbon, and sulfur, along with uranium. A barium halo that is associated with all of these deposits formed from secondary processes. Calcium and strontium were also enriched in the ores by secondary processes. Comparison of the chemical characteristics of the redistributed deposits in the Church Rock district to the primary deposits in the Grants uranium region indicates that calcium, manganese, strontium, yttrium, copper, iron, magnesium, molybdenum, lead, selenium, and vanadium are separated from uranium during redistribution of the deposits in the Church Rock area. Comparisons of the chemical characteristics of the Church Rock deposits and the secondary deposits at Ambrosia Lake suggest some differences in the processes that were involved in the genesis of the redistributed deposits in these two areas.

  14. Evidence for a Mid-Jurassic Adaptive Radiation in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Close, Roger A; Friedman, Matt; Lloyd, Graeme T; Benson, Roger B J

    2015-08-17

    A series of spectacular discoveries have transformed our understanding of Mesozoic mammals in recent years. These finds reveal hitherto-unsuspected ecomorphological diversity that suggests that mammals experienced a major adaptive radiation during the Middle to Late Jurassic. Patterns of mammalian macroevolution must be reinterpreted in light of these new discoveries, but only taxonomic diversity and limited aspects of morphological disparity have been quantified. We assess rates of morphological evolution and temporal patterns of disparity using large datasets of discrete characters. Rates of morphological evolution were significantly elevated prior to the Late Jurassic, with a pronounced peak occurring during the Early to Middle Jurassic. This intense burst of phenotypic innovation coincided with a stepwise increase in apparent long-term standing diversity and the attainment of maximum disparity, supporting a "short-fuse" model of early mammalian diversification. Rates then declined sharply, and remained significantly low until the end of the Mesozoic, even among therians. This supports the "long-fuse" model of diversification in Mesozoic therians. Our findings demonstrate that sustained morphological innovation in Triassic stem-group mammals culminated in a global adaptive radiation of crown-group members during the Early to Middle Jurassic.

  15. Geochemistry of the Jurassic and Upper Cretaceous shales from the Molango Region, Hidalgo, eastern Mexico: Implications for source-area weathering, provenance, and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong-Altrin, John S.; Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Madhavaraju, Jayagopal; Rosalez-Hoz, Leticia; Lee, Yong Il; Balaram, Vysetti; Cruz-Martínez, Adriana; Avila-Ramírez, Gladis

    2013-04-01

    This study focuses on the Jurassic (Huayacocotla and Pimienta Formations) and Upper Cretaceous (Méndez Formation) shales from the Molango Region, Hidalgo, Mexico. In this article, we discuss the mineralogy, major, and trace element geochemistry of the Mesozoic shales of Mexico. The goal of this study is to constrain the provenance of the shales, which belong to two different periods of the Mesozoic Era and to understand the weathering conditions and tectonic environments of the source region.

  16. The Middle Jurassic radiolarites and pelagic limestones of the Nieves unit (Rondaide Complex, Betic Cordillera): basin starvation in a rifted marginal slope of the western Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dogherty, Luis; Martín-Algarra, Agustín; Gursky, Hans-Jürgen; Aguado, Roque

    2001-11-01

    Middle Jurassic radiolarites and associated pelagic limestones occur in the Rondaide Nieves unit of the Betic Cordillera, southern Spain. The Rondaide Mesozoic includes: (a) a thick succession of Triassic platform carbonates, comparable to the Alpine Hauptdolomit and Kössen facies; (b) Lower Jurassic pelagic limestones comparable to the Alpine Hierlatz and Adnet facies; (c) the Middle Jurassic Parauta Radiolarite Formation, described herein; and (d) a thin Upper Jurassic-Cretaceous condensed limestone succession. The Parauta Radiolarite Formation and associated limestones were studied with respect to stratigraphy, petrography, micropalaeontology (radiolarians, calcareous nanno- and microfossils) and facies. Radiolarite sedimentation occurred in the Middle Bathonian in a restricted and dysoxic deep Nieves basin, perched in the distal zone of a continental margin fringing the Tethyan ocean. This margin was adjacent to a young narrow oceanic basin between the South-Iberian margin and a continental block called Mesomediterranean Terrane. The Nieves basin was part of a marine corridor between the Proto-Atlantic and Piedmont-Ligurian basins of the Alpine Tethys. The regional tectonic position, the stratigraphical evolution since the Triassic, the age and the nature of the Mesozoic facies and the palaeogeographic relations to adjacent domains show striking analogies between the Betic Rondaide margin and coeval units of the Alps.

  17. Dinosaur ichnofauna of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous of the Paraná Basin (Brazil and Uruguay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francischini, H.; Dentzien–Dias, P. C.; Fernandes, M. A.; Schultz, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sedimentary layers are represented in the Brazilian Paraná Basin by the fluvio-aeolian Guará Formation and the Botucatu Formation palaeoerg, respectively, overlapped by the volcanic Serra Geral Formation. In Uruguay, the corresponding sedimentary units are named Batoví and Rivera Members (both from the Tacuarembó Formation), and the lava flows constitute the Arapey Formation (also in Paraná Basin). Despite the lack of body fossils in the mentioned Brazilian formations, Guará/Batoví dinosaur fauna is composed of theropod, ornithopod and wide-gauge sauropod tracks and isolated footprints, as well as theropod teeth. In turn, the Botucatu/Rivera dinosaur fauna is represented by theropod and ornithopod ichnofossils smaller than those from the underlying units. The analysis of these dinosaur ichnological records and comparisons with other global Mesozoic ichnofauna indicates that there is a size reduction in dinosaur fauna in the more arid Botucatu/Rivera environment, which is dominated by aeolian dunes. The absence of sauropod trackways in the Botucatu Sandstone fits with the increasingly arid conditions because it is difficult for heavy animals to walk on sandy dunes, as well as to obtain the required amount of food resources. This comparison between the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous dinosaur fauna in south Brazil and Uruguay demonstrates the influence of aridization on the size of animals occupying each habitat.

  18. Bird-like anatomy, posture, and behavior revealed by an early jurassic theropod dinosaur resting trace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milner, A.R.C.; Harris, J.D.; Lockley, M.G.; Kirkland, J.I.; Matthews, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fossil tracks made by non-avian theropod dinosaurs commonly reflect the habitual bipedal stance retained in living birds. Only rarely-captured behaviors, such as crouching, might create impressions made by the hands. Such tracks provide valuable information concerning the often poorly understood functional morphology of the early theropod forelimb. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we describe a well-preserved theropod trackway in a Lower Jurassic (???198 millionyear- old) lacustrine beach sandstone in the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation in southwestern Utah. The trackway consists of prints of typical morphology, intermittent tail drags and, unusually, traces made by the animal resting on the substrate in a posture very similar to modern birds. The resting trace includes symmetrical pes impressions and well-defined impressions made by both hands, the tail, and the ischial callosity. Conclusions/Significance: The manus impressions corroborate that early theropods, like later birds, held their palms facing medially, in contrast to manus prints previously attributed to theropods that have forward-pointing digits. Both the symmetrical resting posture and the medially-facing palms therefore evolved by the Early Jurassic, much earlier in the theropod lineage than previously recognized, and may characterize all theropods.

  19. Fossil evidence on evolution of inner ear cochlea in Jurassic mammals.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhe-Xi; Ruf, Irina; Schultz, Julia A; Martin, Thomas

    2011-01-07

    The coiled cochlea is a key evolutionary innovation of modern therian mammals. We report that the Late Jurassic mammal Dryolestes, a relative to modern therians, has derived bony characteristics of therian-like innervation, but its uncoiled cochlear canal is less derived than the coiled cochlea of modern therians. This suggests a therian-like innervation evolved before the fully coiled cochlea in phylogeny. The embryogenesis of the cochlear nerve and ganglion in the inner ear of mice is now known to be patterned by neurogenic genes, which we hypothesize to have influenced the formation of the auditory nerve and its ganglion in Jurassic therian evolution, as shown by their osteological correlates in Dryolestes, and by the similar base-to-apex progression in morphogenesis of the ganglion in mice, and in transformation of its canal in phylogeny. The cochlear innervation in Dryolestes is the precursory condition in the curve-to-coil transformation of the cochlea in mammalian phylogeny. This provides the timing of the evolution, and where along the phylogeny the morphogenetic genes were co-opted into patterning the cochlear innervation, and the full coiling of the cochlea in modern therians.

  20. Bird-Like Anatomy, Posture, and Behavior Revealed by an Early Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur Resting Trace

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Andrew R. C.; Harris, Jerald D.; Lockley, Martin G.; Kirkland, James I.; Matthews, Neffra A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Fossil tracks made by non-avian theropod dinosaurs commonly reflect the habitual bipedal stance retained in living birds. Only rarely-captured behaviors, such as crouching, might create impressions made by the hands. Such tracks provide valuable information concerning the often poorly understood functional morphology of the early theropod forelimb. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a well-preserved theropod trackway in a Lower Jurassic (∼198 million-year-old) lacustrine beach sandstone in the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation in southwestern Utah. The trackway consists of prints of typical morphology, intermittent tail drags and, unusually, traces made by the animal resting on the substrate in a posture very similar to modern birds. The resting trace includes symmetrical pes impressions and well-defined impressions made by both hands, the tail, and the ischial callosity. Conclusions/Significance The manus impressions corroborate that early theropods, like later birds, held their palms facing medially, in contrast to manus prints previously attributed to theropods that have forward-pointing digits. Both the symmetrical resting posture and the medially-facing palms therefore evolved by the Early Jurassic, much earlier in the theropod lineage than previously recognized, and may characterize all theropods. PMID:19259260

  1. Evolution of the Apalachicola basin (northeastern Gulf of Mexico) during the Jurassic

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T. )

    1990-05-01

    A grid of multichannel seismic correlated with well data defines four Jurassic seismic sequences in the Apalachicola basin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sequences, which developed in response to basin architecture, sea level fluctuations, sediment supply, and salt movement document the depositional history of the basin during the Jurassic. Evaporation of water entering the basin resulted in deposition of the (Callovian ) Louann Salt sequence. The Louann generally lacks internal reflections, except updip where discontinuous parallel-divergent reflections probably represent interbedding of salt with clastics around the basin margin. The updip limit of thick salt coincides with a basement hinge line. The second sequence contains rocks of the Norphlet and Smackover formations. Norphlet clastics were deposited during a sea level rise. As the transgression continued, Oxfordian Smackover carbonates were deposited and upward shoaling occurred as sea level reached a stillstand. Smackover carbonates prograded over a shallow shelf, and buildups occurred over salt structures, basement highs, and basement hinge lines. The sequence thickens locally into growth faults associated with salt movement. During deposition of the Kimmeridgian Haynesville sequence, clastics entered the basin updip and carbonate deposition continued downdip. Growth faulting continued and a prominent shelf margin was established. Coarse fluvial and deltaic sediments of the Tithonian-earliest Berriasian Cotton Valley group comprise the final sequence. The Knowles Limestone records a transgression toward the end of the sequence. Progradation of the Knowles and establishment of a prominent shelf margin set the foundation for development of the overlying Lower Cretaceous margin.

  2. Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. )

    1993-09-01

    Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

  3. Jurassic paleopole controversy: Contributions from the Atlantic-bordering continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voo, Rob

    1992-11-01

    The Early-early Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous mean paleopoles for North America, Europe, South America, and Africa are very well grouped in appropriate continental reconstructions, but the intervening late Middle and Late Jurassic segment of the apparent polar wander path (APWP) is poorly defined and controversial. The available paleopoles, reconstructed for the partial opening of the central Atlantic Ocean, form a scattered grouping with no coherent age patterns, illustrating that they do not constitute a robust data set. Uncertainties in the reconstruction parameters between North America and Europe also play a role. However, excellent paleomagnetic results exist for tectonic elements near the margin of west Gondwana that are unlikely to have been significantly displaced with respect to cratonic Africa and South America. These results have not previously been used for APWP reconstructions, because local rotations are thought to have deflected the paleopoles in many cases. The inclinations of such results, however, can be used to determine a locus of paleopole positions. Paleopole loci for about 150 and 170 Ma were determined from results from Spain, Italy, Lebanon, and the Chilean Andes, and these were rotated with appropriate parameters to give locus intersections in North American coordinates. A late Middle Jurassic (early Callovian) best estimate of the paleopole in North American coordinates is located at about lat 70°N, long 135°E, and a Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) best estimate is located at about 70°N, 155°E. The resulting Jurassic-Early Cretaceous APWP follows roughly the 70th parallel, passing through the middle of the scattered individual paleopoles from the cratonic parts of the Atlantic-bordering continents.

  4. Hydrocarbon potential of a new Jurassic play, central Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, A.O.; Law, C.W.

    1996-12-31

    A largely unrecognized Jurassic Sag Basin has been identified in central Tunisia, proximal to the Permo-Carboniferous flexure delineating the northern boundary of the Saharan platform of north Africa. The northwestern margin of the Sag is delineated by an extensive region of salt-cored anticlines and localized salt diapirs extending north and west. Due to lack of deep drilling, delineation of the Sag is largely based on regional gravity data. Subsidence of the Jurassic Sag Basin is characterized by rapid expansion of Jurassic sediments from 400 m. of tidal flat and shelf carbonate at the western outcrop to over 2000 meters of tidal flat and basinal carbonate and shale within the basin center, a five-fold expansion. Rapid loading of the basin continued into Lower Cretaceous time, marked by lateral flowage of Triassic salt into pronounced structural trends. Published source rock data and interpreted subsurface well data provided the basis for GENEX 1-D hydrocarbon generation and expulsion modeling of the Sag. Middle Jurassic black source shales typically contain Type II and Type III kerogens with T.O.C.`s ranging up to 4 percent. Modeling results indicate that middle Jurassic shales are presently mature for liquid generation within portions of the Sag, with maximum generation taking place during the Tertiary. Potential hydrocarbon generation yields, based on 60 meters of mature source shale, are 20,000 BOE/acre for gas and 75,000 BOE/acre for liquids. Prospects within the region could contain an estimated potential reserve of several T.C.F. or over 1 billion barrels of oil.

  5. Hydrocarbon potential of a new Jurassic play, central Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, A.O. ); Law, C.W. )

    1996-01-01

    A largely unrecognized Jurassic Sag Basin has been identified in central Tunisia, proximal to the Permo-Carboniferous flexure delineating the northern boundary of the Saharan platform of north Africa. The northwestern margin of the Sag is delineated by an extensive region of salt-cored anticlines and localized salt diapirs extending north and west. Due to lack of deep drilling, delineation of the Sag is largely based on regional gravity data. Subsidence of the Jurassic Sag Basin is characterized by rapid expansion of Jurassic sediments from 400 m. of tidal flat and shelf carbonate at the western outcrop to over 2000 meters of tidal flat and basinal carbonate and shale within the basin center, a five-fold expansion. Rapid loading of the basin continued into Lower Cretaceous time, marked by lateral flowage of Triassic salt into pronounced structural trends. Published source rock data and interpreted subsurface well data provided the basis for GENEX 1-D hydrocarbon generation and expulsion modeling of the Sag. Middle Jurassic black source shales typically contain Type II and Type III kerogens with T.O.C.'s ranging up to 4 percent. Modeling results indicate that middle Jurassic shales are presently mature for liquid generation within portions of the Sag, with maximum generation taking place during the Tertiary. Potential hydrocarbon generation yields, based on 60 meters of mature source shale, are 20,000 BOE/acre for gas and 75,000 BOE/acre for liquids. Prospects within the region could contain an estimated potential reserve of several T.C.F. or over 1 billion barrels of oil.

  6. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  7. Multiple episodes of dolomitization and dolomite recrystallization during shallow burial in Upper Jurassic shelf carbonates: eastern Swabian Alb, southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, C.

    1998-10-01

    The Upper Jurassic of the eastern Swabian Alb is composed of oolitic platform sands with associated microbe-siliceous sponge mounds at the platform margins. They are surrounded by argillaceous or calcareous mudstones and marl-limestone alternations, deposited in adjacent marl basins. Partial to complete dolomitization is predominantly confined to the mound facies. Six types of dolomite, as well as one type of ankerite, document a complex diagenetic history during shallow burial with multiple episodes of dolomite formation and recrystallization. The earliest massive matrix dolomitization is Ca-rich, has slightly depleted oxygen isotope values relative to Late Jurassic seawater, and carbon isotopic values in equilibrium with Late Jurassic seawater. This initial massive matrix dolomitization occurred during latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous and is related to pressure dissolution during very shallow burial at temperatures of at least 50°C. Hydrologic conditions and mass-balance calculations indicate that burial compaction provided sufficient fluids for dolomitization. Mg is derived from negligibly modified seawater, that was expelled from the adjacent off-reef strata into the mound facies. Position of the mounds along the platform margins controlled the distribution of the shallow-burial dolomite. Covariant trends between textural modification, increasing stoichiometry, partial changes in trace element content (Mn, Fe, Sr) and depletion in stable isotopes as well as distinctive CL pattern illustrate two recrystallization phases of the precursor matrix dolomite during further burial at elevated temperatures. Strong Sr enrichment of the second phase of recrystallized dolomite is ascribed to Sr-rich meteoric waters descending from overlying aragonite-bearing reef limestones or evaporite-bearing peritidal carbonates. Late-stage coarsely crystalline dolomite cements occur as vug and fracture fillings and formed during burial. Ankerite, associated with sulphide and

  8. Late Paleozoic to Jurassic tectonic evolution of the Bogda area (northwest China): Evidence from detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhicheng; Li, Jianfeng; Li, Ke; Chen, Yan; Guo, Zhaojie

    2014-06-01

    Since the Cenozoic, the Tian Shan is rejuvenated by crustal shortening related to the ongoing India-Asia collision. However, the tectonic process prior to the Cenozoic remains ambiguous, especially in the Bogda area of the eastern Tian Shan. The continuous Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic sequences in the Bogda area record abundant information about the basin-mountain interaction. U-Pb (LA-ICP-MS) dating of detrital zircons from seven sandstone samples from Permian to Jurassic was used to investigate the changes of provenance and basin-mountain interaction in the Bogda area. During the Permian, proximal and synchronous pyroclastic materials were the major source. The Late Paleozoic magmatic belt in the North Tian Shan (NTS) had gradually become one of the main sources by the Late Permian, which implies the uplift and exhumation in the NTS area. This is interpreted in terms of near-source sedimentation in basin developing in a post-orogenic extension setting. The large range of U-Pb ages of detrital zircons observed in the Early-Middle Jurassic sediments encompasses most of the available sources implying a wide drainage pattern developing on a rather flat topography. Re-emergence of the Early Permian peak in the spectrum implies that the Bogda Mountains has existed as a gentle positive relief and began to provide materials to the submountain regions. The southern Junggar Basin extended towards to the south and evolved as a passively subsiding basin from the Middle Triassic to the Middle Jurassic. However, the synchronous pyroclastic (tuff) and the exhumed late Paleozoic detrital materials from the uplifted Bogda Mountains were the major component of the Upper Jurassic sediments. Associated to the conglomerate in the Kalaza Formation, the basin-range evolution entered a compression uplift stage. The basin pattern evolution of the Bogda area is consistent with that of the southern Junggar Basin.

  9. The stratigraphy of Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) reservoir sandstones in the Witch Ground Graben, United Kingdom North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, S.D. ); Mantel, K.A. ); Morton, D.J. ); Riley, L.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Oil-bearing Upper Jurassic Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sandstones of the Sgiath and Piper formations are of major economic importance in the Witch Ground Gaben, United Kingdom North Sea. They form the reservoirs in 14 fields that originally contained 2 billion bbl of oil reserves, including Scott Field, which in 1993 will be the largest producing United Kingdom North Sea oil field to come on stream in more than a decade. The Sgiath and Piper formations represent Late Jurassic transgressive and regressive phases that began with paralic deposition and culminated in a wave-dominated delta system. These phases preceded the major grabel rifting episode (late Kimmeridgian to early Ryazanian) and deposition of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, the principal source rock of the Witch Ground Graben oil fields. A threefold subdivision of the middle to upper Oxfordian Sgiath Formation is formally proposed, with Scott field well 15/21a-15 as the designated reference well. The basal Skene Member consists of thinly interbedded paralic carbonaceous shales, coals, and sandstones. This is overlain by transgressive marine shales of the Saltire Member. The upper-most Oxfordian Scott Member consists of shallow marine sandstones that prograded to the southwest. The contact of the Sgiath and Piper formations is a basinwide transgressive marine shale (I shale), which can act as an effective barrier to fluid communication between the Sgiath and Piper reservoir sandstones.

  10. Si-Metasomatism During Serpentinization of Jurassic Ultramafic Sea-floor: a Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, M.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Boschi, C.; Schwarzenbach, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Bracco-Levanto ophiolitic complex (northwestern Italy) represents one of the largest and better-exposed ophiolitic successions in the Northern Apennines. It is considered to be a fragment of heterogeneous Jurassic lithosphere that records tectono-magmatic and alteration histories similar to those documented along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), such as at the 15°20'N area and the Atlantis Massif at 30°N. Structural and petrological studies on these rocks provide constraints on metamorphic/deformation processes during formation and hydrothermal alteration of the Jurassic oceanic lithosphere. We present a petrological and geochemical study of serpentinization processes and fluid-rock interaction in the Bracco-Levanto ophiolitic complex and compare these to published data from modern oceanic hydrothermal systems, such as the Lost City hydrothermal field hosted in serpentinites on the Atlantis Massif. Major element and mineral compositional data allow us to distinguish a multiphase history of alteration characterized by: (1) widespread Si-metasomatism during progressive serpentinization, and (2) multiple phases of veining and carbonate precipitation associated with circulation of seawater in the shallow ultramafic-dominated portions of the Jurassic seafloor, resulting in the formation of ophicalcites. In detail, regional variations in Si, Mg and Al content are observed in zones of ophicalcite formation, indicating metasomatic reactions and Si-Al transport during long-lived fluid-rock interaction and channelling of hydrothermal fluids. Rare earth element and isotopic analysis indicate that the Si-rich fluids are derived from alteration of pyroxenes to talc and tremolite in ultramafic rocks at depth. Comparison with serpentinites from the Atlantis Massif and 15°20'N indicates a similar degree of Si-enrichment in the modern seafloor and suggests that Si-metasomatism may be a fundamental process associated with serpentinization at slow-spreading ridge environments

  11. Diversity and paleogeographic distribution of Early Jurassic plesiosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Peggy; Suan, Guillaume

    2010-05-01

    Early Jurassic plesiosaurs, a group of extinct marine reptiles, were one of the first groups to be described in the history of vertebrate paleontology. Nevertheless, the paleogeographic distribution and the taxonomic diversity of these forms are still unclear, particularly because most descriptions and taxonomic attributions were realized during the mid 19th to early 20th century. Here we investigate the paleodiversity and paleogeographic distribution of Early Jurassic plesiosaurs using an extensive taxonomic and anatomical revision of most known Early Jurassic specimens. We also present an examination of the biostratigraphic and sedimentological framework of deposits in which these specimens were discovered, in order to decipher whether their fossil record reflects primary paleobiological trends or taphonomic/discovery biases. Early Jurassic Plesiosaur diversity appears to reach its maximum during the Toarcian (falciferum-bifrons ammonite zones). Nevertheless, the inclusion of ghost lineages into the diversity curves indicates that this pattern likely reflects discovery and taphonomical biases rather than primary biodiversity trends. Indeed, most strata where numerous plesiosaurs species were discovered correspond to sediments that were deposited under poorly-oxygenated conditions and exploited at least in a semi-industrial way during the 1800's-1950's. The Lower Jurassic fossiliferous localities that yielded identifiable plesiosaur species are only found in Western Europe (England, Germany, and France). In Europe, the Toarcian stage is the only interval where more than one fossiliferous locality is known (the Hettangian, Sinemurian and Pliensbachian stages being each represented by only one locality where specimens are identifiable at the species level). The different Toarcian fossiliferous sites of Europe do not bear any single common taxon, suggesting a high degree of endemism in Early Jurassic plesiosaurs. Nevertheless, these sites are fundamentally

  12. Supergroup stratigraphy of the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains (Middle? Jurassic through holocene, Eastern North America)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, R.E.; ,; Edwards, L.E.

    2004-01-01

    An inclusive supergroup stratigraphic framework for the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains is proposed herein. This framework consists of five supergroups that 1) are regionally inclusive and regionally applicable, 2) meaningfully reflect the overall stratigraphic and structural history of the Coastal Plains geologic province of the southeastern United States, and 3) create stratigraphic units that are readily mappable and useful at a regional level. Only the Marquesas Supergroup (Lower Cretaceous to lowest Upper Cretaceous) has been previously established. The Trent Supergroup (middle middle Eocene to basal lower Miocene) is an existing name here raised to supergroup rank. The Minden Supergroup (Middle? through Upper Jurassic), the Ancora Supergroup (Upper Cretaceous to lower middle Eocene), and the Nomini Supergroup (lower Miocene to Recent) are new stratigraphic concepts proposed herein. In order to bring existing groups and formations into accord with the supergroups described here, the following stratigraphic revisions are made. 1) The base of the Shark River Formation (Trent Supergroup) is moved upward. 2) The Old Church Formation is removed from the Chesapeake Group (Nomini Supergroup) and moved to the Trent Supergroup without group placement. 3) The Tiger Leap and Penney Farms formations are removed from the Hawthorn Group (Nomini Supergroup) and moved to the Trent Supergroup without group placement. 4) The Piney Point and Chickahominy formations are removed from the Pamunkey Group (Ancora Supergroup) and moved to the Trent Supergroup without group placement. 5) the Tallahatta Formation is removed from the Claiborne Group (Trent Supergroup) and placed within the Ancora Supergroup without group placement.

  13. A detrital record of continent-continent collision in the Early-Middle Jurassic foreland sequence in the northern Yangtze foreland basin, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tao; Liu, Shaofeng; Wang, Zongxiu; Li, Wangpeng; Chen, Xinlu

    2016-12-01

    The Mesozoic northern Yangtze foreland basin system was formed by continental collision between the North China and South China plates along the Mianlue suture. Synorogenic stratigraphic sequences of Late Triassic to Early-Middle Jurassic age were developed in the northern Yangtze foreland basin. The upper Middle Jurassic Shaximiao Formation consists mainly of thick-bedded terrestrial successions that serve as the main body of the basin-filling sequences, suggesting intense tectonism in the peripheral orogeny of the foreland basin. Laser-ICP-MS U-Pb analysis of 254 detrital zircon grains from sandstone samples and several published Lower-Middle Jurassic samples, detrital compositions, petrofacies, and paleocurrent reconstructions in the northern Yangtze foreland basin indicate that discrete source areas included the Qinling-Dabieshan ranges and the Mianlue suture zone to the north, and the South China plate to the south. The stratigraphic succession and sediment provenance of the foreland basin imply that the early Mianlue oceanic basin, magmatic arc, and nonmarine molasse foreland basin during the period of deposition were modified or buried by the subsequent continent-continent collision between the North China-Qinling-Dabieshan plate and the Yangtze plate during the Jurassic, which followed the oblique amalgamation between these plates during the Middle-Late Triassic.

  14. Examining Data Driven Decision Making via Formative Assessment: A Confluence of Technology, Data Interpretation Heuristics and Curricular Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Gerry; Mazur, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Although the term data-driven decision making (DDDM) is relatively new (Moss, 2007), the underlying concept of DDDM is not. For example, the practices of formative assessment and computer-managed instruction have historically involved the use of student performance data to guide what happens next in the instructional sequence (Morrison, Kemp, &…

  15. A new carnivorous dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Solnhofen archipelago.

    PubMed

    Göhlich, Ursula B; Chiappe, Luis M

    2006-03-16

    Small Late Jurassic theropod dinosaurs are rare worldwide. In Europe these carnivorous dinosaurs are represented primarily by only two skeletons of Compsognathus, neither of which is well preserved. Here we describe a small new theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period of Schamhaupten in southern Germany. Being exquisitely preserved and complete from the snout to the distal third of the tail, the new fossil is the best-preserved predatory, non-avian dinosaur in Europe. It possesses a suite of characters that support its identification as a basal coelurosaur. A cladistic analysis indicates that the new taxon is closer to maniraptorans than to tyrannosauroids, grouping it with taxa often considered to be compsognathids. Large portions of integument are preserved along its tail. The absence of feathers or feather-like structures in a fossil phylogenetically nested within feathered theropods indicates that the evolution of these integumentary structures might be more complex than previously thought.

  16. Magnetostratigraphic Correlation of Marine (uk) and Non-marine (eastern Usa) Triassic/jurassic Boundary Successions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounslow, M. W.; Posen, P. E.; Andrews, J. E.; Warrington, G.

    The magnetostratigraphy of the uppermost Mercia Mudstone Group, the Penarth Group and the basal Lias Group has been defined in south-west Britain, at three lo- calities, St Audrie's Bay (Somerset), Lavernock Point (S. Wales) and Haven Cliff (S. Devon). The most complete sequence is that at St Audrie's Bay, which includes a can- didate GSSP for the base of the Jurassic. The uppermost 75m of the continental Twyn- ing Mudstone Fm (Mercia Mudstone Group) at St Audrie's includes 3 major normal magnetozones, two of which are also represented at Haven Cliff. The BAF shows an upward transition from continental to marginal marine environments, has predomi- nantly reversed polarity, except at its top, in the Williton Member (St Audrie's) and shows consistency in polarity between the 3 sections. The overlying marine Penarth Group and basal Lias Group, have predominantly normal polarity. Reverse polarity intervals occur in the middle and uppermost-part of the Westbury Fm and are seen at both St Audries and Lavernock Point. At St Audrie's thin (<0.4m) reversals span the Westbury/Lilstock Fm boundary and occur at the base of the Lias Group. The mag- netostratigraphy and sedimentology suggests there are disconformities at the bases of the Williton Member, the Westbury Formation and the Lilstock Formation. The com- posite section magnetostratigraphy compares well with the Norian to latest Rhaetian parts (E14r to E23n magnetozones) of the Newark Basin succession and indicates the potential for detailed correlation from the candidate GSSP section to non-marine successions. The thin reversed interval (SA6n.1r) at the base of the Lias Group may correlate with a similar interval (E23n.1r) in the Newark Basin. In Somerset SA6n.1r is c.4m below the base of the Jurassic, as defined by the appearance of the ammonite Psiloceras planorbis, and is 2.5m above a major change in the character of the terres- trial microfloras that is similar to one observed at a closely comparable level in the

  17. A new primitive Neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of Patagonia with gut contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Leonardo; Canudo, José I.; Garrido, Alberto C.; Moreno-Azanza, Miguel; Martínez, Leandro C. A.; Coria, Rodolfo A.; Gasca, José M.

    2017-02-01

    We describe a new species of an ornithischian dinosaur, Isaberrysaura mollensis gen. et sp. nov. The specimen, consisting in an almost complete skull and incomplete postcranium was collected from the marine-deltaic deposits of the Los Molles Formation (Toarcian-Bajocian), being the first reported dinosaur for this unit, one of the oldest from Neuquén Basin, and the first neornithischian dinosaur known from the Jurassic of South America. Despite showing a general stegosaurian appearance, the extensive phylogenetic analysis carried out depicts Isaberrysaura mollensis gen. et sp. nov. as a basal ornithopod, suggesting that both Thyreophora and neornithischians could have achieved significant convergent features. The specimen was preserved articulated and with some of its gut content place in the middle-posterior part of the thoracic cavity. Such stomach content was identified as seeds, most of them belonging to the Cycadales group. This finding reveals a possible and unexpected role of this ornithischian species as seed-dispersal agent.

  18. A new sauropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Manning, Phillip L; Egerton, Victoria M; Romano, Mike

    2015-01-01

    A new record of a sauropodomorph dinosaur is here described from the Middle Jurassic (Aalenian) Saltwick Formation of Whitby (Yorkshire), UK. A single caudal vertebra represents an early sauropodomorph and signifies the earliest recognised eusauropod dinosaur from the United Kingdom. The absence of pleurocoels and a narrow, dorsoventrally deep, but craniocaudally short centrum, suggests a primitive sauropodomorph. Distinct spinopostzygopophyseal laminae rise from the lateral margins of the postzygapophyses and pass caudally along what remains of the neural spine, a character unique to a subgroup of sauropods that includes Barapasaurus, Omeisaurus and other neosauropods and eusauropods. The lack of phylogenetically robust characters in sauropod caudal vertebrae usually makes it difficult to establish affinities, but the absence of mild procoely excludes this specimen from both Diplodocoidea and Lithostrotia. The vertebra cannot be further distinguished from those of a wide range of basal sauropods, cetiosaurids and basal macronarians. However, this plesiomorphic vertebra still signifies the earliest stratigraphic occurrence for a British sauropod dinosaur.

  19. A new primitive Neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of Patagonia with gut contents.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Leonardo; Canudo, José I; Garrido, Alberto C; Moreno-Azanza, Miguel; Martínez, Leandro C A; Coria, Rodolfo A; Gasca, José M

    2017-02-16

    We describe a new species of an ornithischian dinosaur, Isaberrysaura mollensis gen. et sp. nov. The specimen, consisting in an almost complete skull and incomplete postcranium was collected from the marine-deltaic deposits of the Los Molles Formation (Toarcian-Bajocian), being the first reported dinosaur for this unit, one of the oldest from Neuquén Basin, and the first neornithischian dinosaur known from the Jurassic of South America. Despite showing a general stegosaurian appearance, the extensive phylogenetic analysis carried out depicts Isaberrysaura mollensis gen. et sp. nov. as a basal ornithopod, suggesting that both Thyreophora and neornithischians could have achieved significant convergent features. The specimen was preserved articulated and with some of its gut content place in the middle-posterior part of the thoracic cavity. Such stomach content was identified as seeds, most of them belonging to the Cycadales group. This finding reveals a possible and unexpected role of this ornithischian species as seed-dispersal agent.

  20. Ichnofabric mapping and interpretation of Jurassic reservoir rocks of the Norwegian North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Bockelie, J.F. )

    1991-06-01

    Recurrent sediment fabric and trace fossil associations in the Norwegian offshore Jurassic sequences have been interpreted by the ichnofabric concept. In the Sognefjord Formation (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian) of the Troll Field five basic ichnofabrics were recognized and named after the dominant ichnogenus present, respectively: Helminthoida, Anconichnus, Palaeophycus, Ophiomorpha and Skolithos. These ichnofabrics developed in sediments deposited in marine environments ranging from quiescent offshore to high energy, shallow water nearshore situations. When sequence patterns of ichnofabrics were mapped within five chronostratigraphic reservoir zones of the Troll Field it was possible to recognize both how the frequency of a given ichnofabric may change in time in a restricted area or may change in its areal distribution in a restricted time interval. Such maps have been integrated with lithofacies maps and dip-meter studies in cored sequence to produce quantitative base maps for computerized reservoir models. The maps can also be used as a powerful tool for facies predictions.

  1. Magnetostratigraphy of the Lower Jurassic (Hettangian-Sinemurian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüsing, Silja Katherine; Abels, Hemmo; Deenen, Martijn; Ruhl, Micha; Krijgsman, Wout

    2013-04-01

    Magnetostratigraphy and correlation to the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) constitute a standard dating tool in Earth Sciences. When integrated with biostratigraphy and especially cyclostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy allows high-resolution correlations all over the world, because paleomagnetic polarity reversals can geologically be seen as globally synchronous events. It is therefore the stratigraphic tool of choice to perform correlations between continental and marine realms. An integrated astronomical time scale, which has been achieved for most of the Neogene and is in progress for the Palaeogene and Mesozoic, provides high resolution and accuracy. The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) for the Early Jurassic is far less robust (Gradstein et al., 2004, 2012) because magnetostratigraphic records of marine Hettangian and Sinemurian successions are rare and equivocal (Gallet et al., 1990; Yang et al., 1996). Consequently, the Global Stratotype Section and Points (GSSP's) for the Hettangian (Kuhjoch; Austria) and Sinemurian (East Quantoxhead; UK) are mainly defined on biostratigraphic (ammonite) arguments (Hillebrandt et al., 2007; Bloos and Page, 2002). Cyclostratigraphic analyses from the Lower Jurassic marine successions at St. Audrie's Bay and East Quantoxhead located on the west Somerset coast on the southern side of the Bristol Channel Basin (UK) resulted in an independent astronomical framework for the Hettangian Stage, allowing to locate the stratigraphic position of the marine defined Triassic-Jurassic and Hettangian-Sinemurian boundary in the continental realm (Ruhl et al., 2010). We will present the magnetostratigraphy of the Hettangian and lower Sinemurian successions of St. Audrie's Bay and East Quantoxhead, which will be used to evaluate the marine-continental correlations in the recovery interval following the end-Triassic mass extinction and to develop a more robust GPTS for the Lower Jurassic.

  2. Jurassic sedimentary basins in the Central Asian orogenic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Bebeshev, I.I.

    1995-05-01

    The principal stages of development of Jurassic sedimentary basins (from their origin to the end of their existence) in the Central Asian orogenic belt are considered. The interrelations of the basins with the surrounding paleorises are investigated. Paleogeographic maps are compiled representing the evolution of paleolandscapes and revealing their interrelations in space and time for each stage. Areas with the highest prospects for coal are found.

  3. Jurassic and triassic hydrocarbon exploration of southern Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell-Tapping, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Triassic and Jurassic of South Florida have been overlooked as a viable exploration target because of lack of data and plate tectonics application. In Florida {open_quotes}basement{close_quotes} is defined as crystalline, igneous, metamorphic and unmetamorphosed sediments of Paleozoic age. Age-dating of zircons has shown that the Florida lower Paleozoic terrain is not akin to that of North America but is part of the West African Guinean Shield. Pre-Atlantic reconstruction of the Gulf of Mexico in this study suggests that there was a Florida connection to Yucatan-Cuba-Africa during the Triassic. This reconstruction also shows that Jurassic rocks that are well known in the Northern Gulf Coast should have been deposited in similar depositional environments in southern Florida. Deep drilling on the Florida peninsula has confirmed this hypothesis. By using plate tectonic reconstruction based on the rifting of the North Atlantic Ocean and evidence from petrology of basement samples from deep wells, together with petrographic analyses of Jurassic sedimentary rocks, a Smackover-equivalent exploration play can be developed. Petrographic and petrophysical analysis of wells that have encountered Jurassic marine shales, anhydrite, dolomite, carbonate, and clastic sedimentary rocks has determined that they were deposited in shallow-water subtidal to supratidal environments. Excellent gas shows, oil stain in pores, and high TOC values in marine shales indicate that there are accumulations of hydrocarbon present. Application of analogous Gulf Coast Smackover stratigraphic models to this area, based on petrology and hydrogeology, should reduce risk and help define productive oil and gas reservoirs.

  4. A perfect flower from the Jurassic of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Xin

    2016-07-03

    Flower, enclosed ovule and tetrasporangiate anther are three major characters distinguishing angiosperms from other seed plants. Morphologically, typical flowers are characterised by an organisation with gynoecium and androecium surrounded by corolla and calyx. Theoretically, flowers are derived from their counterparts in ancient ancestral gymnosperms. However, as for when, how and from which groups, there is no consensus among botanists yet. Although angiosperm-like pollen and angiosperms have been claimed in the Triassic and Jurassic, typical flowers with the aforesaid three key characters are still missing in the pre-Cretaceous age, making many interpretations of flower evolution tentative. Thus searching for flower in the pre-Cretaceous has been a tantalising task for palaeobotanists for a long time. Here, we report a typical flower, Euanthus paniigen. et sp. nov., from the Middle-Late Jurassic of Liaoning, China. Euanthus has sepals, petals, androecium with tetrasporangiate dithecate anthers and gynoecium with enclosed ovules, organised just like in perfect flowers of extant angiosperms. The discovery of Euanthus implies that typical angiosperm flowers have already been in place in the Jurassic, and provides a new insight unavailable otherwise for the evolution of flowers.

  5. A perfect flower from the Jurassic of China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Flower, enclosed ovule and tetrasporangiate anther are three major characters distinguishing angiosperms from other seed plants. Morphologically, typical flowers are characterised by an organisation with gynoecium and androecium surrounded by corolla and calyx. Theoretically, flowers are derived from their counterparts in ancient ancestral gymnosperms. However, as for when, how and from which groups, there is no consensus among botanists yet. Although angiosperm-like pollen and angiosperms have been claimed in the Triassic and Jurassic, typical flowers with the aforesaid three key characters are still missing in the pre-Cretaceous age, making many interpretations of flower evolution tentative. Thus searching for flower in the pre-Cretaceous has been a tantalising task for palaeobotanists for a long time. Here, we report a typical flower, Euanthus panii gen. et sp. nov., from the Middle–Late Jurassic of Liaoning, China. Euanthus has sepals, petals, androecium with tetrasporangiate dithecate anthers and gynoecium with enclosed ovules, organised just like in perfect flowers of extant angiosperms. The discovery of Euanthus implies that typical angiosperm flowers have already been in place in the Jurassic, and provides a new insight unavailable otherwise for the evolution of flowers. PMID:27134345

  6. Carbon cycle history through the Middle Jurassic of Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Fozy, Istvan; Galacz, Andras

    2016-04-01

    A carbonate carbon isotope curve from the Aalenian-Bathonian interval is presented from the Obanya valley, of the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary. This interval is less well constrained and studied that other Jurassic time slices. The Obanya valley lies in the eastern part of the Mecsek Mountains, between Obanya and Kisujbanya and provides excellent exposures of a near continuous Aalenian to Lower Cretaceous sequence. It is not strongly affected by tectonics, as compared to other sections of eastern Mecsek of the same age. In parts, a rich fossil assemblage has been collected; the Bathonian ammonites are especially valuable as this locality. The pelagic Middle Jurassic is represented by thin-bedded limestones (the Obanya Limestone) and is overlain by Upper Jurassic siliceous limestones and radiolarites (the Fonyaszo Limestone). The new data indicates a series of positive anomalies within the late Aalenian and early-middle Bajocian. These data are comparable with carbonate carbon isotope recorded from other Tethyan margin sediments. Our integrated biostratigraphy and carbon isotope stratigraphy enables us to improve stratigraphic correlation and age determination of the examined strata.

  7. Sedimentary organic matter characterization of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary GSSP at Kuhjoch (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, M.; Veld, H.; Kürschner, W. M.

    2010-03-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) boundary interval coincides with enhanced extinction rates in the marine realm and pronounced changes in terrestrial ecosystems on the continents. It is further marked by distinct negative excursions in the δ13C org and δ13C carb signature that may represent strong perturbations of the global carbon cycle. We present integrated geochemical, stable-isotope and palynological data from the Kuhjoch section, the Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the Jurassic (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria). We show that the initial carbon isotope excursion (CIE), coinciding with the marine extinction interval and the formation of black shales in the western Tethys Eiberg Basin, is marked by only minor changes in kerogen type, which is mainly of terrestrial origin. Increased Total Organic Carbon (TOC) concentrations of 9% at the first half of the initial CIE coincide with Hydrogen Index (HI) values of over 600 mg HC/g TOC. The high correlation (with R2 = 0.93) between HI values and terrestrial Cheirolepidiaceaen conifer pollen suggests a terrestrial source for the hydrogen enriched organic compounds. The lack of major changes in source of the sedimentary organic matter suggests that changes in the δ13C org composition are genuine and represent true disturbances of the global C-cycle. The sudden decrease in total inorganic carbon (TIC) concentrations likely represents the onset of a biocalcification crisis. It coincides with a 4.5‰ negative shift in δ13C org values and possibly corresponds to the onset of CAMP related volcanic activity. The second half of the initial CIE is marked by the dramatic increase of green algae remains in the sediment. The simultaneous increase of the C org/N tot ratio suggests increased marine primary production at the final stage of black shale formation.

  8. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Fox, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine {open_quotes}Limestone Marker{close_quotes} and estuarine {open_quotes}Brown Shale{close_quotes}. The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming.

  9. Lower Jurassic unconformity (J-O) from the Colorado Plateau to the eastern Mojave Desert: evidence of a major tectonic event at the close of the Triassic

    SciTech Connect

    Marzolf, J.E. )

    1991-04-01

    From southern Nevada to the eastern Mojave Desert, the Lower Jurassic basal unconformity (J-0) cuts down section from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation to deformed Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The Chinle Formation is not present southwest of the central Spring Mountians. Stratigraphic relations suggest correlation of J-0 with unconformities in western Arizona and the Inyo Mountains. Close proximity of J-0 in time and space to (1) first appearance of western-derived volcanic clasts in lower Mesozoic cratonal stratigraphy, (2) early Mesozoic thrust faults, and (3) the J-1 cusp in the apparent polar wander path imply a major change in tetonic setting of the southwestern Cordillera at the Triassic/Jurassic boundary.

  10. Mantle sources and magma genesis in the Albanide-Hellenide ophiolites: Implications for the Triassic-Jurassic geodynamic evolution of the Eastern Tethyan branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccani, Emilio; Beccaluva, Luigi; Photiades, Adonis; Zeda, Ottavia

    2010-05-01

    The Albanide-Hellenide ophiolites and related ophiolitic mélanges include eight different types of volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. They are: 1) Triassic alkaline rocks generated in within-plate settings (WPB); 2) Triassic high-Ti mid-ocean ridge basalts showing enriched compositions (E-MORB); 3) Triassic-Jurassic high-Ti mid-ocean ridge basalts showing normal compositions (N-MORB); 4) Jurassic basalts with geochemical features intermediate between MORB and island arc tholeiites; hereafter defined as medium-Ti basalts (MTB); 5) Jurassic low-Ti, island arc tholeiitic (IAT) rocks; 6) Jurassic very low-Ti (boninitic) rocks; 7) Jurassic backarc basin basalts and basaltic andesites (BABB); 8) Triassic and Jurassic calc-alkaline (CAB). It can be assumed that these different rock-types have formed from distinct mantle sources that are associated in turn to distinct tectonic settings within an oceanic environment (and surrounding areas), and that they record the fundamental stages of ocean basin development: continental break-up, sea-floor spreading, subduction initiation, and supra-subduction zone (SSZ) lithospheric accretion. The main aim of this work is therefore to identify the possible petrogenetic mechanisms (associated to mantle evolution) for the distinct lava groups and their related tectonic settings of formation, in order to propose a reconstruction of the geodynamic evolution of the Mesozoic Tethys in the Dinaride sector. The results of this study are mainly based on REE modelling of mantle sources, primary melt generation, and mantle residua and can be synthesised as follows: 1) From the Late Paleozoic - Early Triassic, extensional tectonics affecting the Gondwana trigged the rifting of the continental lithosphere. The associated magmatic activity included: (a) the formation of calc-alkaline rocks from a sub-continental mantle modified by geochemical components inherited from Hercynian subduction below Gondwana; (b) the eruption of alkaline basalts deriving

  11. Petrogenesis of early Jurassic basalts in southern Jiangxi Province, South China: Implications for the thermal state of the Mesozoic mantle beneath South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Tao; Li, Wu-xian; Wang, Xuan-ce; Pang, Chong-jin; Li, Zheng-xiang; Xing, Guang-fu; Zhao, Xi-lin; Tao, Jihua

    2016-07-01

    Early Jurassic bimodal volcanic and intrusive rocks in southern South China show distinct associations and distribution patterns in comparison with those of the Middle Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks in the area. It is widely accepted that these rocks formed in an extensional setting, although the timing of the onset and the tectonic driver for extension are debated. Here, we present systematic LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotope data for bimodal volcanic rocks from the Changpu Formation in the Changpu-Baimianshi and Dongkeng-Linjiang basins in southern Jiangxi Province, South China. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate that the bimodal volcanic rocks erupted at ca. 190 Ma, contemporaneous with the Fankeng basalts (~ 183 Ma). A compilation of geochronological results demonstrates that basin-scale basaltic eruptions occurred during the Early Jurassic within a relatively short interval (< 5 Ma). These Early Jurassic basalts have tholeiitic compositions and OIB-like trace element distribution patterns. Geochemical analyses show that the basalts were derived from depleted asthenospheric mantle, dominated by a volatile-free peridotite source. The calculated primary melt compositions suggest that the basalts formed at 1.9-2.1 GPa, with melting temperatures of 1378 °C-1405 °C and a mantle potential temperature (TP) ranging from 1383 °C to 1407 °C. The temperature range is somewhat hotter than normal mid-ocean-basalt (MORB) mantle but similar to an intra-plate continental mantle setting, such as the Basin and Range Province in western North America. This study provides an important constraint on the Early Jurassic mantle thermal state beneath South China.

  12. Exploration concepts for syntectonic sediments of Triassic and Jurassic Age along northern and eastern rim of Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, D.A.; Wilkerson, R.P.; Putnam, M.W.

    1985-02-01

    Current tectonic models for the formation of the Gulf of Mexico generally include continental rifting starting in the Triassic and continuing through the Jurassic. A comparison between the sedimentology and structural geology of known continental rifts (such as the Gulf of Suez, Egypt) and the Triassic and Jurassic of the Gulf of Mexico suggests the following. (1) The interior salt basins of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama probably were deposited within a failed continental rift. (2) Positive features such as the Angelina-Caldwell flexure, Wiggins arch, and Middle ground arch probably represent the southern edge of the failed rift. (3) Positive features such as the Sabine uplift and Monroe arch are probably isolated horst blocks within the failed rift. Pre-evaporite sediments account for much of the production in the Gulf of Suez, and these rock sequences are well exposed there on shore. Depositional and structural histories for these rocks are similar in both the Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of Suez, and a careful comparison suggests new play concepts for the Gulf of Mexico. The post-evaporite sequences of the Gulf of Suez are also similar to the Norphlet and Smackover Formations of the Gulf of Mexico, although Smackover equivalents are currently being deposited in the Gulf of Suez. Comparisons between the two rift systems indicate that a clearer understanding of the structural setting of the Gulf of Mexico at the time of deposition of the Norphlet and Smackover should lead to better exploration plays for these syntectonic formations.

  13. Origin of crude oil in eastern Gulf Coast: Upper Jurassic, Upper Cretaceous, and lower Tertiary source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, R.

    1988-02-01

    Analysis of rock and crude oil samples suggests that three source rocks have given rise to most crude oil in reservoirs of the eastern Gulf Coast. Carbonate source rocks of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are characterized by algal-derived kerogen preserved in an anoxic and hypersaline environment, resulting in crude oils with distinct compositions. Migration commenced during the Cretaceous, explaining the emplacement of Smackover-derived crude oil in Jurassic and in some Cretaceous reservoirs. Upper Cretaceous clastic and carbonate source rocks are also present. Much crude oil in Upper Cretaceous reservoirs has been derived from organic-rich marine shales of the Tuscaloosa Formation. These shales are characterized by algal and higher plant kerogen, resulting in distinct crude oil compositions. Migration commenced during the Tertiary, but was mostly focused to Upper Cretaceous reservoirs. Lower Tertiary shales, including those of the Wilcox Formation, are quite organic-rich and include downdip marine facies characterized by both algal and higher plant kerogen. Crude oils in lower Tertiary reservoirs are dissimilar to crude oils from deeper and older source rocks. Migration from lower Tertiary shales commenced during the late Tertiary and charged Tertiary reservoirs. Although most crude oil in the eastern Gulf Coast has been emplaced by short-range migration, often with a strong vertical component, some long-range lateral migration (> 100 km) has occurred along lower Tertiary sands. The framework of crude oil generation and migration onshore has important implications with respect to origin of crude oil in the Gulf of Mexico.

  14. Internal deformation of the Shan-Thai block inferred from paleomagnetism of Jurassic sedimentary rocks in Northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Kazuyoshi; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Zaman, Haider; Inokuchi, Hiroo; Miura, Daisuke; Surinkum, Adichat; Paiyarom, Apichat; Phajuy, Burapha; Chantraprasert, Sarawute; Panjasawatwong, Yuenyong; Wongpornchai, Pisanu; Otofuji, Yo-ichiro

    2007-05-01

    Paleomagnetic samples of red sandstones were collected at 16 sites from the Lower to Upper Jurassic Phu Kradung formation and the Upper Jurassic Phra Wihan formation around Nan City (19.2°N, 101.0°E) in the southern region of the Shan-Thai block. After stepwise thermal demagnetization, a high-temperature component with an unblocking temperature of about 680 °C is isolated from 11 sites. We interpret this to be a prefold characteristic remanent magnetization because of a positive fold test at the 95% confidence level. The tilt-corrected mean paleomagnetic direction from 11 sites is D = 32.3°, I = 33.3°, α95 = 12.2°, k = 15.0, which gives a paleomagnetic pole for this area of 60.1°N, 186.5°E with A95 = 11.7°. Compared with a Jurassic paleopole for the stable part of the Yangtze block, we observe a clockwise tectonic rotation of 12.8°, which is similar to the observed rotation (18-28°) of the northern region of the Shan-Thai block. This amount contrasts with a large rotation of more than 45° that is estimated from the narrow zone extending from Luxi to Mengla in the central region of this block. This declination aspect suggests that a coherent whole block rotation by about 20° of the Shan-Thai block took place in an earlier phase during indentation of India into Asia and that an internal deformation with additional local rotation between 25° and 77° followed within a limited zone in the central part. The internal deformation of the Shan-Thai block absorbed the stress on the Asian continent induced by indentation of India as well as its coherent whole block motions of clockwise rotation and southward displacement.

  15. Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous sedimentary-tectonic development in the Chengde Basin, Yanshan fold-thrust belt, North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Ankun; Ye, Hao

    2015-12-01

    The Chengde Basin is located in the central part of the Yanshan fold-thrust belt in the northern North China Craton. The sediments in the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Tuchengzi Formation in the Chengde Basin provide a detrital record of basin dynamics and uplift of the basin margins during that time. We analyzed the sedimentary facies, paleocurrents, and provenance of the Tuchengzi Formation in the Chengde Basin for the period of the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous shortening in the Yanshan fold-thrust belt. Four sedimentary facies associations have been identified in the Tuchengzi Formation, corresponding to proximal fan, mid-fan, distal alluvial fan, and fluvial facies. The transport and distribution of the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous sediments in the Chengde Basin was controlled by the faults bounding the basin. Paleocurrent indicators and provenance data of conglomerate clasts reveal that the sediments of the Tuchengzi Formation in the northern part of the Chengde Basin were delivered from source regions to the north of the basin. The early sediments of the Tuchengzi Formation in the southern part of the basin comprise a suite of fluvial deposits, similar to the fluvial sediments in the northern part of the basin, and their paleocurrent data and the compositions of conglomerate clasts also suggest a northern source. However, the subsequent sedimentation in the Tuchengzi Formation in the southern part of the basin changed markedly to proximal fan facies, with sediments being derived from the south of the basin, according to the paleocurrent data and conglomerate clast lithology. The Sandaohe sheet, which is located in the southeast limb of the Chengde syncline, is not a klippe formed as a result of long-distance northward thrusting, but an autochthonous pop-up tectonic wedge generated by N-S shortening during the Early Cretaceous sedimentation of the Tuchengzi Formation. The sedimentation ended before the onset of the Early Cretaceous volcanic

  16. Middle Jurassic (Bajocian and Bathonian) dinosaur megatracksites, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvale, E.P.; Johnson, G.D.; Mickelson, D.L.; Keller, K.; Furer, L.; Archer, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two previously unknown rare Middle Jurassic dinosaur megatracksites are reported from the Bighorn Basin of northern Wyoming in the Western Interior of the United States. These trace fossils occur in carbonate units once thought to be totally marine in origin, and constitute the two most extensive Middle Jurassic dinosaur tracksites currently known in North America. The youngest of these occurs primarily along a single horizon at or near the top of the "basal member" of the "lower" Sundance Formation, is mid-Bathonian in age, and dates to ??? 167 ma. This discovery necessitates a major change in the paleogeographic reconstructions for Wyoming for this period. The older tracksites occur at multiple horizons within a 1 m interval in the middle part of the Gypsum Spring Formation. This interval is uppermost Bajocian in age and dates to ??? 170 ma. Terrestrial tracks found, to date, have been all bipedal tridactyl dinosaur prints. At least some of these prints can be attributed to the theropods. Possible swim tracks of bipedal dinosaurs are also present in the Gypsum Spring Formation. Digitigrade prints dominate the Sundance trackways, with both plantigrade and digitigrade prints being preserved in the Gypsum Spring trackways. The Sundance track-bearing surface locally covers 7.5 square kilometers in the vicinity of Shell, Wyoming. Other tracks occur apparently on the same horizon approximately 25 kilometers to the west, north of the town of Greybull. The Gypsum Spring megatracksite is locally preserved across the same 25 kilometer east-west expanse, with the Gypsum Spring megatracksite more extensive in a north-south direction with tracks occurring locally across a 100 kilometer extent. Conservative estimates for the trackway density based on regional mapping in the Sundance tracksite discovery area near Shell suggests that over 150, 000 in situ tracks may be preserved per square kilometer in the Sundance Formation in this area. Comparable estimates have not been made

  17. Carbon-Isotope Chemostratigraphy of the Yellow Cat Member of the Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, C. A.; Hatzell, G.; Suarez, M. B.; Salazar-Verdin, J.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Kirkland, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    Paleosols and lacustrine sediments of the Yellow Cat Member (YCM), Cedar Mountain Formation (CMF), Eastern Utah were collected at the "Lake Madsen" (a dominantly lacustrine section) and Doelling's Bowl (a mixed lacustrine/ palustrine/ paleosol section) and analyzed for bulk organic carbon isotopes (δ13Corg) . The YCM is thought to span the Barremian to Aptian based on dinosaur faunal assemblages. Correlation with distinct carbon isotope excursions (CIE) specifically those associated with the Selli Event or OAE 1a would allow insight into the response of terrestrial ecosystems to C-cycle perturbations during the Aptian, and may improve chronostratigraphy. Lake Madsen data ranges between a minimum of -28.5‰ and a maximum of -21.4‰ with an average of ~ -25‰ and shows a stepped negative isotope excursion of -3‰., with three distinct negative steps starting ~ 7.5 m above the Jurassic Morrison Formation and an intervening large positive excursion ~ 4.5 m from the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone (~119Ma) Member of the CMF. Doelling's Bowl data spans a longer vertical distance and ranges from a minimum of -29.0‰ to a maximum of -25.7‰, averages -27.7‰ and is somewhat cyclic in nature. δ13Corg chemostratigraphic profile for Doelling's Bowl poorly correlates to the Lake Madsen section, likely due to recycling of organic C and wet/dry cycles of the palustrine environment. Correlation of the Lake Madsen section to marine δ13CCO3 curve from Cismon Valley of the southern Alps indicates the lower Aptian C-isotope excursions C1 to C6, with the distinctive C3 negative CIE occur at the top of the Yellow Cat Member, therefore documenting a terrestrial manifestation of the CIE associated with OAE1a - Selli Event. This suggests the age of the majority of the Yellow Cat Member is Barremian to lower Aptian and the Barremian-Aptian boundary occurs at the top of the Member ~ 25cm below the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone. Further isotopic analysis of vertebrate

  18. Magnetostratigraphy of the middle-upper Jurassic sedimentary sequences at Yanshiping, Qiangtang Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chunhui; Zeng, Yongyao; Yan, Maodu; Wu, Song; Fang, Xiaomin; Bao, Jing; Zan, Jinbo; Liu, Xifang

    2016-09-01

    A series of important geological events occurred in the Tibetan Plateau area during the Jurassic, such as the collision of the Lhasa and Qiangtang Terranes, the closure of the Meso-Tethyan Ocean, the opening of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean and the cessation of the mega-monsoon. The ˜3000 m thick Jurassic sedimentary sequence in the Qiangtang Basin on the central Tibetan Plateau, which is called the Yanshiping (YSP) Group, recorded these geological events. However, the chronology of the sequence is surprisingly poorly constrained. Here, we perform a detailed palaeomagnetic analysis on the ˜1060 m thick middle and upper portions of the YSP Group (the Xiali and Suowa Formations) in the YSP section of the eastern Qiangtang Basin. Three bivalve zones at stratigraphic intervals of ˜40-140, 640-800 and 940-1040 m are identified, which yield a Bathonian-Callovian age for the Lower Xiali Fm., a Callovian-Oxfordian age for the Lower Suowa Fm. and an Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian age for the Upper Suowa Fm. A total of 544 oriented palaeomagnetic samples were collected from the section. By combining thermal and alternating field demagnetizations, clear characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) directions are isolated for most of the samples. The robust ChRM directions pass fold and reversals tests, which support the primary nature of the ChRMs and yield a palaeopole at 76.8°N/297.2°E (dp = 2.2°, dm = 3.7°). A total of 27 normal and 26 reversed polarity zones were successfully recorded in the section. Combined with fossil age constraints, results suggest that the section is plausibly composed of a Callovian-Early Kimmeridgian age sedimentary sequence.

  19. Preliminary nannofossil and geochemical data from Jurassic black shales from the Qiangtang Basin, northern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Jenkyns, Hugh C.; Xu, Guiwen; Mattioli, Emanuela; Da, Xuejuan; Yi, Haisheng; Xia, Minquan; Zhu, Zhangxiong; Huang, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents new biostratigraphic and geochemical data from the Biluo Co section in northern Tibet, which exposes Jurassic black organic-rich shales, locally containing abundant coccoliths. Because of a general lack of macrofossils, the stratigraphic ages have been a matter of debate. However, coccoliths suggest an Early Bajocian through Bathonian to possibly Early Callovian age (Middle Jurassic) for the middle-upper part of the section. In this study, a range of trace-metal paleoredox proxies is used to assess how seawater oxygen levels varied both locally and globally during the deposition of these shales. The redox-sensitive elements V, Cr, U, Ni, Cu, Mo, Co, Cd and Zn exhibit relatively high concentrations and element/Al ratios. In particular, the Ni compositions fluctuate between ∼75 ppm and ∼106 ppm and Mo between ∼1 ppm and ∼7 ppm: values that are higher than those of the post-Archean Average Shale. Palaeoproductivity proxies, such as Zn, P and Cd, which can be fixed in elevated concentrations in sediments deposited under generally reducing conditions, are also relatively enriched. Furthermore, the U-Mo concentrations and Enrichment Factors (EFs) are consistent with deposition under predominantly suboxic to weakly anoxic conditions. Scattered bivalves, however, point to at least intermittent oxic conditions on the sea floor. Based on the redox-sensitive trace-element concentrations, together with ratios (V/(V + Ni), Ni/Co and V/Cr), the formation of the Biluo Co black shales, in Tibet was probably caused by increased productivity and organic-matter flux, leading to enhanced preservation of organic material under low-oxygen conditions.

  20. An enormous Jurassic turtle bone bed from the Turpan Basin of Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wings, Oliver; Rabi, Márton; Schneider, Jörg W.; Schwermann, Leonie; Sun, Ge; Zhou, Chang-Fu; Joyce, Walter G.

    2012-11-01

    A spectacular new terrestrial Konzentratlagerstätte is introduced from the Turpan Basin of Xinjiang, China that probably belongs to the late Middle Jurassic Qigu Formation. It contains a mass accumulation of "xinjiangchelyid" turtles preliminarily identified as Annemys sp. In the zone with the highest turtle concentration, complete and articulated turtle skeletons are tightly packed at a density of up to 36 turtles per square meter. The fossiliferous layer is thickened here and shows an erosional base. This high concentration zone outcrops approximately 10 m in length and shows no decrease in turtle density after exposing 2 m of the layer into the hillside. Adjacent is a more expansive zone of at least 10 m by 30 m. In this region, the fossiliferous layer is evenly thick, and approximately five, fully disarticulated turtles are present per square meter. A conservatively estimated 1,800 turtles may, therefore, have been deposited at this site. It is likely that these aquatic turtles gathered in a retreating water hole in a riverine environment during a drought, much as some aquatic turtles will do today, but perished when the habitat dried up completely. A following catastrophic rainfall event caused a debris flow, possibly channelized in a dry river bed, which transported complete turtles, disarticulated turtles, and mudstone clasts and deposited them after a short distance. This taphonomic model is consistent with previous environmental reconstructions of the Turpan Basin during the late Middle Jurassic in predicting the episodic breakdown of regional monsoonal circulation resulting in a seasonally dry climate with severe episodic droughts.

  1. The Earliest Case of Extreme Sexual Display with Exaggerated Male Organs by Two Middle Jurassic Mecopterans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background Many extant male animals exhibit exaggerated body parts for display, defense or offence in sexual selection, such as male birds of paradise showing off colorful and elegant feathers and male moose and reindeers bearing large structured antlers. For insects, male rhinoceros and stag beetles have huge horn-like structure for fighting and competition and some male Leptopanorpa scorpionflies have very long abdominal terminal segments for sexual display and competition. Fossil records of insects having exaggerated body parts for sexual display are fairly rare. One example is two male holcorpids with elongate abdominal segments from sixth (A6) to eighth (A8) and enlarged male genitalia from Eocene, suggesting evolution of these characters occurred fairly late. Principal Findings We document two mecopterans with exaggerated male body parts from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation in northeastern China. Both have extremely extended abdominal segments from A6 to A8 and enlarged genitalia, which might have been used for sexual display and, to less extent, for fighting with other males in the competition for mates. Although Fortiholcorpa paradoxa gen. et sp. nov. and Miriholcorpa forcipata gen. et sp. nov. seem to have affinities with Holcorpidae, we deem both as Family Incertae sedis mainly due to significant differences in branching pattern of Media (M) veins and relative length of A8 for F. paradoxa, and indiscernible preservation of 5-branched M veins in hind wing for M. forcipata. Conclusions/Significance These two new taxa have extended the records of exaggerated male body parts of mecopterans for sexual display and/or selection from the Early Eocene to the late Middle Jurassic. The similar character present in some Leptopanorpa of Panorpidae suggests that the sexual display and/or sexual selection due to extremely elongated male abdominal and sexual organs outweigh the negative impact of bulky body and poor mobility in the evolutionary process

  2. The cranial osteology of Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos (Crocodylomorpha: Metriorhynchidae) from the Middle Jurassic of Europe

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos is one of numerous metriorhynchid crocodylomorph species known from the Oxford Clay Formation of England (Callovian-Oxfordian; Middle-Late Jurassic). This taxon is of evolutionary importance, as it is the oldest and most basal known macrophagous metriorhynchid. It has a mosaic of plesiomorphic and derived feeding related characteristics, including: teeth with microscopic, poorly formed and non-contiguous denticles; increased tooth apicobasal length; ventrally displaced dentary tooth row (increased gape); reduced dentary tooth count; and a proportionally long mandibular symphysis. However the type specimen, and current referred specimens, all lack a preserved cranium. As such, the craniofacial morphology of this taxon, and its potential feeding ecology, remains poorly understood. Here we describe two skulls and two lower jaws which we refer to T. lythrodectikos. Previously these specimens were referred to ‘Metriorhynchus’ brachyrhynchus. They share with the T. lythrodectikos holotype: the in-line reception pits on the dentary, dorsal margin of the surangular is strongly concave in lateral view, and the most of the angular ventral margin is strongly convex. Based on our description of these specimens, the skull of T. lythrodectikos has three autapomorphies: very long posterior processes of the premaxilla terminating in line with the 4th or 5th maxillary alveoli, deep lateral notches on the lateral surface of the maxillary with reception pits for dentary teeth, and the premaxilla forms the anterior margin of the first maxillary alveoli. Our description of the cranial anatomy of Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos confirms that some macrophagous characteristics evolved during the Middle Jurassic, and were not exclusive to the clade Geosaurini. Moreover, the skulls further highlight the mosaic nature of Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos and wide-gape macrophagous evolution in Geosaurinae. PMID:25289192

  3. Equatorial origin for Lower Jurassic radiolarian chert in the Franciscan Complex, San Rafael Mountains, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Murchey, B.L.; Bogar, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Lower Jurassic radiolarian chert sampled at two localities in the San Rafael Mountains of southern California (???20 km north of Santa Barbara) contains four components of remanent magnetization. Components A, B???, and B are inferred to represent uplift, Miocene volcanism, and subduction/accretion overprint magnetizations, respectively. The fourth component (C), isolated between 580?? and 680??C, shows a magnetic polarity stratigraphy and is interpreted as a primary magnetization acquired by the chert during, or soon after, deposition. Both sequences are late Pliensbachian to middle Toarcian in age, and an average paleolatitude calculated from all tilt-corrected C components is 1?? ?? 3?? north or south. This result is consistent with deposition of the cherts beneath the equatorial zone of high biologic productivity and is similar to initial paleolatitudes determined for chert blocks in northern California and Mexico. This result supports our model in which deep-water Franciscan-type cherts were deposited on the Farallon plate as it moved eastward beneath the equatorial productivity high, were accreted to the continental margin at low paleolatitudes, and were subsequently distributed northward by strike-slip faulting associated with movements of the Kula, Farallon, and Pacific plates. Upper Cretaceous turbidites of the Cachuma Formation were sampled at Agua Caliente Canyon to determine a constraining paleolatitude for accretion of the Jurassic chert sequences. These apparently unaltered rocks, however, were found to be completely overprinted by the A component of magnetization. Similar in situ directions and demagnetization behaviors observed in samples of other Upper Cretaceous turbidite sequences in southern and Baja California imply that these rocks might also give unreliable results.

  4. An enormous Jurassic turtle bone bed from the Turpan Basin of Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Wings, Oliver; Rabi, Márton; Schneider, Jörg W; Schwermann, Leonie; Sun, Ge; Zhou, Chang-Fu; Joyce, Walter G

    2012-11-01

    A spectacular new terrestrial Konzentratlagerstätte is introduced from the Turpan Basin of Xinjiang, China that probably belongs to the late Middle Jurassic Qigu Formation. It contains a mass accumulation of "xinjiangchelyid" turtles preliminarily identified as Annemys sp. In the zone with the highest turtle concentration, complete and articulated turtle skeletons are tightly packed at a density of up to 36 turtles per square meter. The fossiliferous layer is thickened here and shows an erosional base. This high concentration zone outcrops approximately 10 m in length and shows no decrease in turtle density after exposing 2 m of the layer into the hillside. Adjacent is a more expansive zone of at least 10 m by 30 m. In this region, the fossiliferous layer is evenly thick, and approximately five, fully disarticulated turtles are present per square meter. A conservatively estimated 1,800 turtles may, therefore, have been deposited at this site. It is likely that these aquatic turtles gathered in a retreating water hole in a riverine environment during a drought, much as some aquatic turtles will do today, but perished when the habitat dried up completely. A following catastrophic rainfall event caused a debris flow, possibly channelized in a dry river bed, which transported complete turtles, disarticulated turtles, and mudstone clasts and deposited them after a short distance. This taphonomic model is consistent with previous environmental reconstructions of the Turpan Basin during the late Middle Jurassic in predicting the episodic breakdown of regional monsoonal circulation resulting in a seasonally dry climate with severe episodic droughts.

  5. Early Jurassic paleopoles from the Hartford continental rift basin (eastern North America): Was an abrupt change in polar wander associated with the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, D. V.; Olsen, P. E.

    2007-12-01

    The recent recognition of what may be the largest igneous province on Earth, the ~200 Ma Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP), with its close temporal proximity to major biotic turnover at the Triassic/Jurassic boundary, adds impetus for seeking confirmation of possibly related geodynamic phenomena. For example, CAMP emplacement seems to coincide temporally with an abrupt change in North American apparent polar wander at the so-called J1 cusp, which has been suggested to reflect a major plate reorganization or an episode of true polar wander. However, early Jurassic paleopoles from the Moenave and Wingate Formations from the Colorado Plateau that virtually define the J1 cusp have few reliable counterparts from elsewhere in North America. The thick section of cyclical Lower Jurassic continental sediments with interbedded CAMP lava flows in the Hartford basin of Connecticut and Massachusetts provides an opportunity to test the reality of the J1 cusp. We collected about 400 oriented samples distributed over 80 outcrop sites that represent a ~2500 meter-thick composite section of the Shuttle Meadow and East Berlin sedimentary formations, which are interbedded with CAMP lava units, and the lower Portland Formation, which consists of cyclical lacustrine to fluvial sediments of Early Jurassic age that conformably overlie the CAMP extrusive zone in the Hartford basin. Normal and reverse polarity ChRM directions define a coherent magnetostratigraphy and are supported by a reversal test and a positive fold test. The distribution of ChRM direction from the sediments is flattened and the mean is significantly shallower than from the coeval CAMP lavas. E/I analysis of the Hartford sedimentary ChRM data produces a result consistent with the geomagnetic field model at a mean flattening factor of 0.54; the corrected mean direction is steeper and not significantly different from the mean inclination of the Newark and Hartford CAMP volcanic units.

  6. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    SciTech Connect

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  7. Upper Jurassic of east Texas, a stratigraphic sedimentologic reevaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H.; McGillis, K.; Stewart, S.; Wilkinson, S.; Harwood, G.

    1985-02-01

    The Smackover-Haynesville of east Texas has long been modeled as a simple progradational carbonate-evaporite ramp. Recent data indicate that the conventional ramp model for this sequence should be abandoned in favor of an evolving rimmed shelf to platform model, forming in response to changes in rate of relative sea level rise during the Late Jurassic. Evidence for Smackover-Haynesville shelves include: (1) thick high-energy carbonates along the basin margin in the Smackover and throughout the Haynesville, (2) low-energy pellet-dominated lagoonal carbonates, evaporites, and evaporitic siliciclastics occurring landward of, and interfingering with, the Smackover and Haynesville basin-margin carbonate barriers, (3) deeper water, open-marine low-energy limestones with black shales seaward of the basin-margin barriers (Smackover-Gilmer undifferentiated), and (4) the Gilmer shale forms a siliciclastic wedge seaward of the Haynesville basin margin and its zero isopach defines the Kimmeridgian shelf margin. The Smackover and Haynesville seem to represent 2 distinct sedimentologic cycles, with each cycle reflecting an initial relative sea level rise during which a rimmed shelf and lagoon are developed, and a terminal sea level standstill during which the shelf evolved into a high-energy platform. Although these sedimentologic patterns seem compatible with accepted Jurassic sea level curves, they may also reflect differential basin-margin subsidence combined with variable carbonate production rates. Finally, the shelf-platform model more clearly defines future exploration strategies for Smackover-Haynesville targets in east Texas and perhaps across the Gulf of Mexico, if eustatic sea level changes were the dominant causative factor for shelf development in the Late Jurassic.

  8. Principal unconformities in Triassic and Jurassic rocks, western interior United States; a preliminary survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pipiringos, G.N.; O'Sullivan, Robert Brett

    1978-01-01

    The Triassic and Jurassic rocks in Western Interior United States contain nine unconformities each of which was destroyed to some extent by a younger unconformity. Regardless of extent, all are useful for correlation of rock sequences in areas where fossils or age dates are lacking. The purpose of this report is to call attention to the presence, significance, and value for correlation of these unconformities. The Triassic unconformities are designated from oldest to youngest, Tr-1, Tr-2, and Tr-3; the Jurassic ones similarly are designated J-0, J-l, J-2, J-3, J-4, and J-5. Of these, the J-2 surface is the best preserved and most widespread. It extends throughout the Western Interior and truncates the older unconformities in different parts of this area. Consequently, the J-2 surface is discussed and illustrated in much more detail than the others. Identification of these unconformities throughout large areas where their presence hitherto had been unknown results in some new unexpected correlations and conclusions. Principal among these are: (1) The Red Draw Member of the Jelm Formation of southeastern Wyoming equals the lower part of the Crow Mountain Sandstone of central Wyoming. The Sips Creek Member of the Jelm Formation of southeastern Wyoming equals the upper part of the Crow Mountain Sandstone of central Wyoming and the Gartra Member of the Chinle Formation in the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah and northwestern Colorado. The Chinle Formation of the Colorado Plateau and the Uinta Mountains equals the upper part of the Crow Mountain plus the Popo Agie Formation of central Wyoming. (2) The Nugget Sandstone of northern Utah and southwestern Wyoming approximately equals the Glen Canyon Group of the Colorado Plateau. The Temple Cap Sandstone of southwestern Utah equals the Gypsum Spring Formation and the Gypsum Spring Member of the Twin Creek Limestone of Wyoming and the Nesson Formation of Nordquist in the subsurface of the Williston basin. The Sawtooth and

  9. Direct chemical evidence for eumelanin pigment from the Jurassic period

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Keely; Ito, Shosuke; Wilby, Philip R.; Sota, Takayuki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Bowers, C. Russell; Vinther, Jakob; Dutta, Suryendu; Summons, Roger; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Simon, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Melanin is a ubiquitous biological pigment found in bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. It has a diverse range of ecological and biochemical functions, including display, evasion, photoprotection, detoxification, and metal scavenging. To date, evidence of melanin in fossil organisms has relied entirely on indirect morphological and chemical analyses. Here, we apply direct chemical techniques to categorically demonstrate the preservation of eumelanin in two > 160 Ma Jurassic cephalopod ink sacs and to confirm its chemical similarity to the ink of the modern cephalopod, Sepia officinalis. Identification and characterization of degradation-resistant melanin may provide insights into its diverse roles in ancient organisms. PMID:22615359

  10. Peri-equatorial paleolatitudes for Jurassic radiolarian cherts of Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiello, I.W.; Hagstrum, J.T.; Principi, G.

    2008-01-01

    Radiolarian-rich sediments dominated pelagic deposition over large portions of the Tethys Ocean during middle to late Jurassic time as shown by extensive bedded chert sequences found in both continental margin and ophiolite units of the Mediterranean region. Which paleoceanographic mechanisms and paleotectonic setting favored radiolarian deposition during the Jurassic, and the nature of a Tethys-wide change from biosiliceous to biocalcareous (mainly nannofossil) deposition at the beginning of Cretaceous time, have remained open questions. Previous paleomagnetic analyses of Jurassic red radiolarian cherts in the Italian Apennines indicate that radiolarian deposition occurred at low peri-equatorial latitudes, similar to modern day deposition of radiolarian-rich sediments within equatorial zones of high biologic productivity. To test this result for other sectors of the Mediterranean region, we undertook paleomagnetic study of Mesozoic (mostly middle to upper Jurassic) red radiolarian cherts within the Aegean region on the Peloponnesus and in continental Greece. Sampled units are from the Sub-Pelagonian Zone on the Argolis Peninsula, the Pindos-Olonos Zone on the Koroni Peninsula, near Karpenissi in central Greece, and the Ionian Zone in the Varathi area of northwestern Greece. Thermal demagnetization of samples from all sections removed low-temperature viscous and moderate-temperature overprint magnetizations that fail the available fold tests. At Argolis and Koroni, however, the cherts carry a third high-temperature magnetization that generally exhibits a polarity stratigraphy and passes the available fold tests. We interpret the high-temperature component to be the primary magnetization acquired during chert deposition and early diagenesis. At Kandhia and Koliaky (Argolis), the primary declinations and previous results indicate clockwise vertical-axis rotations of ??? 40?? relative to "stable" Europe. Due to ambiguities in hemispheric origin (N or S) and thus

  11. Direct chemical evidence for eumelanin pigment from the Jurassic period.

    PubMed

    Glass, Keely; Ito, Shosuke; Wilby, Philip R; Sota, Takayuki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Bowers, C Russell; Vinther, Jakob; Dutta, Suryendu; Summons, Roger; Briggs, Derek E G; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Simon, John D

    2012-06-26

    Melanin is a ubiquitous biological pigment found in bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. It has a diverse range of ecological and biochemical functions, including display, evasion, photoprotection, detoxification, and metal scavenging. To date, evidence of melanin in fossil organisms has relied entirely on indirect morphological and chemical analyses. Here, we apply direct chemical techniques to categorically demonstrate the preservation of eumelanin in two > 160 Ma Jurassic cephalopod ink sacs and to confirm its chemical similarity to the ink of the modern cephalopod, Sepia officinalis. Identification and characterization of degradation-resistant melanin may provide insights into its diverse roles in ancient organisms.

  12. Inter-layered clay stacks in Jurassic shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pye, K.; Krinsley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy in the backscattered electron mode is used together with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to show that Lower Jurassic shales from the North Sea Basin contain large numbers of clay mineral stacks up to 150 microns in size. Polished shale sections are examined to determine the size, shape orientation, textural relationships, and internal compositional variations of the clays. Preliminary evidence that the clay stacks are authigenic, and may have formed at shallow burial depths during early diagenesis, is presented.

  13. Jurassic crustal deformation in west-central part of Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, F.

    1985-05-01

    Although the Jurassic Period is commonly thought of as a time of tectonic quiescence, updated isopach maps and new sedimentologic information indicate that it was a time of notable crustal deformation on the Colorado Plateau. A significant change in structural style occurred in Middle Jurassic time, especially during the erosion interval that produced the J-3 unconformity. Prior to late Middle Jurassic time, the region had been tilted westward and structural troughs formed in the area of the present-day Circle Cliffs uplift and in the vicinity of the Circle Cliffs and Black Mesa regions were uplifted and the nearby Henry and Kaiparowits regions began to be downwarped as troughs or basins. It cannot be determined if or how the present-day monoclines flexed during the Jurassic. However, the direction of structural tilt across these areas changed from west side down to east side down during the late Middle and early Late Jurassic. The Monument region, the largest and most persistent structural element in the region, changed from a structural bench to a positive structure in the early Late Jurassic. In most cases the positive structures subsided more slowly than adjacent downwarps. Two exceptions during the Late Jurassic are the Black Mesa and Emery uplifts. These are the only uplifts that actually rose above the level of sediment accumulation. Jurassic rocks are not known to contain significant hydrocarbon resources in this region, but their tectonic history may offer clues to the structural history of underlying Paleozoic strata, which are the primary hydrocarbon exploration targets.

  14. Characteristics of the Middle Jurassic marine source rocks and prediction of favorable source rock kitchens in the Qiangtang Basin of Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wenlong; Wan, Huan; Zhang, Yeqian; Han, Guangzhi

    2013-04-01

    We have evaluated the hydrocarbon-bearing potential of Middle Jurassic marine source rocks in the Qiangtang Basin, Tibet, through a comprehensive study of samples from a large number of surface outcrops in different structural units, and from the Qiang-D2 Well in the southern Qiangtang Depression. Data that were acquired, including the depositional environment, thickness of sedimentary units, and organic geochemistry, are used to identify the principal controlling factors and predict the location of favorable hydrocarbon kitchens. The source rocks are mainly platform limestone of the Middle Jurassic Buqu Formation. This formation comprises a suite of intra-platform sag marls, micrites, and black shales that were deposited in a deep-water and restricted depositional environment. The marls form hydrocarbon-rich source rocks with organic matter that is mainly type II and in the mature to highly mature stage. In the Dongco-Hulu Lake and Tupoco-Baitan Lake deep sags, limestone also forms a medium-level source rock. In the Qiangtang Basin, limestone is the favorable source rock kitchen and is more significant in this regard than mudstone. The results provide important constraints on evaluating the hydrocarbon potential of Jurassic marine source rocks and for locating petroleum resources in the Qiangtang Basin.

  15. Optimization of the Acetic Acid method for microfossil extraction from lithified carbonate rocks: Examples from the Jurassic and Miocene of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Septriandi; Malik, Muhammad; Kaminski, Michael; Babalola, Lamidi

    2016-04-01

    We report the first ever use of the acetic acid processing method for the extraction of microfossils from indurated limestones in Saudi Arabia. Two different limestone samples from Middle Jurassic and Middle Miocene formation in Saudi Arabia were tested under different concentrations of acid from 50% to 100% and with processing times from 2 hours to 10 hours, in an attempt to optimize the processing methodology. The recovery of acid residues shows a similar trend for both Jurassic and Miocene samples. The weight percentage of residue particle size > 1 mm decreases as acid concentration increases, especially in the 50 to 80% acid concentration range, and the weight percentage of the smallest size particles >0.063 mm increases as acid concentration increases. The small fraction of residue between 0.50 - 0.063 mm was split into 3 g subsamples and picked for microfossils in order to assess their preservation. All concentrations of acetic acid tested show promising results for both the Jurassic Dhruma and Miocene Dam formation carbonates. Higher acid concentrations with longer reaction times yield better recovery than higher concentrations with less reaction time. Based on our experiment, we recommended a 60% concentration of acetic acid to be the optimal concentration for use on routine micropaleontological samples of Saudi Arabian carbonate rocks. By lowering the concentration of acetic acid from 80% to 60%, the consumption of acid is reduced without compromising the recovery of microfossils, and the sample can be processed in a more environmentally friendly manner.

  16. Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction as trigger for the Mesozoic radiation of crocodylomorphs.

    PubMed

    Toljagic, Olja; Butler, Richard J

    2013-06-23

    Pseudosuchia, one of the two main clades of Archosauria (Reptilia: Diapsida), suffered a major decline in lineage diversity during the Triassic-Jurassic (TJ) mass extinction (approx. 201 Ma). Crocodylomorpha, including living crocodilians and their extinct relatives, is the only group of pseudosuchians that survived into the Jurassic. We reassess changes in pseudosuchian morphological diversity (disparity) across this time interval, using considerably larger sample sizes than in previous analyses. Our results show that metrics of pseudosuchian disparity did not change significantly across the TJ boundary, contrasting with previous work suggesting low pseudosuchian disparity in the Early Jurassic following the TJ mass extinction. However, a significant shift in morphospace occupation between Late Triassic and Early Jurassic taxa is recognized, suggesting that the TJ extinction of many pseudosuchian lineages was followed by a major and geologically rapid adaptive radiation of crocodylomorphs. This marks the onset of the spectacularly successful evolutionary history of crocodylomorphs in Jurassic and Cretaceous ecosystems.

  17. Prolific Overton field gas reservoirs within large transverse oolite shoals, Upper Jurassic Haynesville, Eastern Margin East Texas basin

    SciTech Connect

    Glynn, W.G.; Covington, T.E.; Lighty, R.G.; Ahr, W.M.

    1985-02-01

    Late Triassic rifting along a northeast-southwest spreading center in east Texas resulted in basement highs along the eastern margin of the East Texas basin that became sites of extensive ooid shoal deposition during Late Jurassic time. Reservoirs within oolite facies at Overton field contain over 1 tcf of natural gas. These large shoals, each approximately 15 mi (24 km) long and 3 mi (4.8 km) wide, trend north-south as a group and northeast-southwest individually. They are oblique to the basin margin but parallel with Jurassic diffracted tidal currents within the East Texas embayment. Modern Bahamian ooid shoals of similar size, trend, and depositional setting occur at the terminus of the deep Tongue-Of-The-Ocean platform reentrant. Overton field reservoirs are in ooid grainstone shoal facies and in transitional shoal margins of skeletal-oolitic-peloidal grainstones and packstones. Adjacent nonreservoir facies are peloidal-skeletal-siliciclastic wackestones and mudstones. Early diagenesis of grainstone reservoir facies included meteoric dissolution and grain stabilization, resulting in abundant chalky intraparticle porosity and equant and bladed calcite cements filling interparticle porosity. Subsequent burial diagenesis resulted in intense solution compaction and coarse equant calcite and saddle crystal dolomite that occluded remaining interparticle porosity. Whole-rock trace element analysis indicates greatest diagenetic flushing (less magnesium, strontium) in porous zones. Stable isotopes for grains and cements show strong overprint of later burial diagenesis, with greater depletion of delta/sup 18/O in reservoir facies. However, hydrocarbons were emplaced prior to late cementation, and unlike other Jurassic Gulf Coast reservoirs, deep burial diagenesis provided no late-stage formation of porosity.

  18. Isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of jurassic plutons, Southeastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayo, D.P.; Anderson, J.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The 165 Ma Eagle Mountain intrusion is a heterogeneous, enclave-bearing, metaluminous remnant of the Cordilleran Jurassic arc that cuts regionally metamorphosed pre-Mesozoic rocks in the southeastern Mojave Desert of California. The main phase of the intrusion consists of granodiorite to tonalite host facies, diorite mixed facies, and homogeneous monzogranite facies. The host facies contains microdiorite enclaves interpreted as intermingled masses of mafic magma. Late-phase leucogranite stocks cut the main phase. Mineral equilibria indicate emplacement at ???6.5 km depth, with solidus temperatures ranging from 760??C for diorite to 700??C for felsic granodiorite. Although uniform radiogenic-isotope compositions (Sri = 0.7085, ???Ndi = -9.4) suggest derivation from a single source, no known source has the composition required. A hybrid source is proposed, consisting of various proportions of juvenile mantle and recycled lower crust. Calculations indicate that the source of the Eagle Mountain intrusion comprised >60% juvenile mantle and <40% recycled crust. On the basis of their isotopic compositions, other mafic Jurassic plutons in the region were derived from sources containing different proportions of mantle and crustal components.

  19. Convergence in Thunniform Anatomy in Lamnid Sharks and Jurassic Ichthyosaurs.

    PubMed

    Lingham-Soliar, Theagarten

    2016-12-01

    Among extinct ichthyosaurs the Jurassic forms Ichthyosaurus and Stenopterygius share a number of anatomical specializations with lamnid sharks, characterized in the white shark, Carcharodon carcharias These features allow their inclusion within the mode of high-speed thunniform swimming to which only two other equally distinctive phylogenetic groups belong, tuna and dolphins-a striking testaments to evolutionary convergence. Jurassic ichthyosaurs evolved from reptiles that had returned to the sea (secondarily adapted) about 250 million years ago (MYA) while lamnid sharks evolved about 50 MYA from early cartilaginous fishes (originating ca. 400 MYA). Their shared independently evolved anatomical characteristics are discussed. These include a deep tear-drop body shape that helped initially define members as thunniform swimmers. Later, other critical structural characteristics were discovered such as the crossed-fiber architecture of the skin, high-speed adapted dorsal and caudal fins, a caudal peduncle and series of ligaments to enable transmission of power from the musculature located anteriorly to the caudal fin. Both groups also share a similar chemistry of the dermal fibers, i.e., the scleroprotein collagen.

  20. A Jurassic ceratosaur from China helps clarify avian digital homologies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Clark, James M; Mo, Jinyou; Choiniere, Jonah; Forster, Catherine A; Erickson, Gregory M; Hone, David W E; Sullivan, Corwin; Eberth, David A; Nesbitt, Sterling; Zhao, Qi; Hernandez, Rene; Jia, Cheng-kai; Han, Feng-lu; Guo, Yu

    2009-06-18

    Theropods have traditionally been assumed to have lost manual digits from the lateral side inward, which differs from the bilateral reduction pattern seen in other tetrapod groups. This unusual reduction pattern is clearly present in basal theropods, and has also been inferred in non-avian tetanurans based on identification of their three digits as the medial ones of the hand (I-II-III). This contradicts the many developmental studies indicating II-III-IV identities for the three manual digits of the only extant tetanurans, the birds. Here we report a new basal ceratosaur from the Oxfordian stage of the Jurassic period of China (156-161 million years ago), representing the first known Asian ceratosaur and the only known beaked, herbivorous Jurassic theropod. Most significantly, this taxon possesses a strongly reduced manual digit I, documenting a complex pattern of digital reduction within the Theropoda. Comparisons among theropod hands show that the three manual digits of basal tetanurans are similar in many metacarpal features to digits II-III-IV, but in phalangeal features to digits I-II-III, of more basal theropods. Given II-III-IV identities in avians, the simplest interpretation is that these identities were shared by all tetanurans. The transition to tetanurans involved complex changes in the hand including a shift in digit identities, with ceratosaurs displaying an intermediate condition.

  1. Amphibious flies and paedomorphism in the Jurassic period.

    PubMed

    Huang, Diying; Nel, André; Cai, Chenyang; Lin, Qibin; Engel, Michael S

    2013-03-07

    The species of the Strashilidae (strashilids) have been the most perplexing of fossil insects from the Jurassic period of Russia and China. They have been widely considered to be ectoparasites of pterosaurs or feathered dinosaurs, based on the putative presence of piercing and sucking mouthparts and hind tibio-basitarsal pincers purportedly used to fix onto the host's hairs or feathers. Both the supposed host and parasite occur in the Daohugou beds from the Middle Jurassic epoch of China (approximately 165 million years ago). Here we analyse the morphology of strashilids from the Daohugou beds, and reach markedly different conclusions; namely that strashilids are highly specialized flies (Diptera) bearing large membranous wings, with substantial sexual dimorphism of the hind legs and abdominal extensions. The idea that they belong to an extinct order is unsupported, and the lineage can be placed within the true flies. In terms of major morphological and inferred behavioural features, strashilids resemble the recent (extant) and relict members of the aquatic fly family Nymphomyiidae. Their ontogeny are distinguished by the persistence in adult males of larval abdominal respiratory gills, representing a unique case of paedomorphism among endopterygote insects. Adult strashilids were probably aquatic or amphibious, shedding their wings after emergence and mating in the water.

  2. Jurassic extension and Alpine inversion of the northern Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Zizi, M. )

    1993-09-01

    The lower Mesozoic half grabens of northern Morocco form part of an extensional system that is related to the opening of the western Tethys. They appear to be somewhat younger than the Triassic-Jurassic systems associated with the opening the Atlantic Ocean. During the Tertiary and as consequence of the Alpine collision of Africa with Europe, these half graben systems were inverted as shown by the High and the Middle Atlas mountains. Seismic illustrations of similar but smaller inversion structures are available from the Guercif area and the [open quotes]Rides Prerifaines[close quotes] of northern Morocco. These seismic profiles serve as small models for the much larger Atlas Mountains. In the Guercif area, the inversions are limited in scope, but in the [open quotes]Ride Prerifaines[close quotes] are extensive decollement systems that sole out in the Triassic evaporites. These systems evolve into complex thrust faults and associated lateral ramps that are strongly influenced by the configuration of the Jurassic transtensional systems. Significant hydrocarbon accumulation have been known for some time from the [open quotes]Rides Prerifaines.[close quotes] A review of the geometry of the inverted half-graben systems, combined with detailed stratigraphic studies, is likely to lead to the discovery of additional reserves in the area.

  3. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Fox, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine "Limestone Marker" and estuarine "Brown Shale". The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming. At Red Bird field the primary exploration target was the Pennsylvanian "Leo sands" of the Minnelusa Formation, and

  4. Total petroleum systems of the Bonaparte Gulf Basin area, Australia; Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic; Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian; Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Bonaparte Gulf Basin Province (USGS #3910) of northern Australia contains three important hydrocarbon source-rock intervals. The oldest source-rock interval and associated reservoir rocks is the Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian petroleum system. This petroleum system is located at the southern end of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf and includes both onshore and offshore areas within a northwest to southeast trending Paleozoic rift that was initiated in the Devonian. The Milligans Formation is a Carboniferous marine shale that sources accumulations of both oil and gas in Carboniferous and Permian deltaic, marine shelf carbonate, and shallow to deep marine sandstones. The second petroleum system in the Paleozoic rift is the Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian. Source rocks include Lower Permian Keyling Formation delta-plain coals and marginal marine shales combined with Upper Permian Hyland Bay Formation prodelta shales. These source-rock intervals provide gas and condensate for fluvial, deltaic, and shallow marine sandstone reservoirs primarily within several members of the Hyland Bay Formation. The Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian petroleum system is located in the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, north of the Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian petroleum system, and may extend northwest under the Vulcan graben sub-basin. The third and youngest petroleum system is the Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic system that is located seaward of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf on the Australian continental shelf, and trends southwest-northeast. Source-rock intervals in the Vulcan graben sub-basin include deltaic mudstones of the Middle Jurassic Plover Formation and organic-rich marine shales of the Upper Jurassic Vulcan Formation and Lower Cretaceous Echuca Shoals Formation. These intervals produce gas, oil, and condensate that accumulates in, shallow- to deep-marine sandstone reservoirs of the Challis and Vulcan Formations of Jurassic to Cretaceous age. Organic-rich, marginal marine claystones and coals of the

  5. Jurassic onychites (hooks from squid-like cephalopods) associated with statolith occurrences in the Wessex Basin, southern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Malcolm; Page, Kevin; Price, Gregory; Smart, Christopher; Wilby, Philip

    2016-04-01

    , A., PAGE, K.N., PRICE, G.D. & SMART, C.W. (in press). Exceptional accumulations of statoliths in association with the Christian Malford lagerstätte (Callovian, Jurassic) in Wiltshire, United Kingdom. Palaios. KULICKI, C. & SZANIAWSKI, H. 1972. Cephalopod arm hooks from the Jurassic of Poland. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 17, 379-419. WILBY, P.R., HUDSON, J.D., CLEMENTS, R.G. & HOLLINGWORTH, N.T.J. 2004. Taphonomy and origin of an accumulate of soft-bodied cephalopods in the Oxford Clay Formation (Jurassic, England). Palaeontology, 47, 1159-1180. WILBY, P.R., DUFF, K., PAGE, K. & MARTIN, S. 2008. Preserving the unpreservable: a lost world discovered at Christian Malford, UK. Geology Today, 24(3), 95-98.

  6. Chemostratigraphic Constraints on Late Jurassic Paleoceanography of the East Texas Basin, Southern Margin of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainali, P.; Rowe, H. D.

    2010-12-01

    Late Jurassic deposition of organic-rich muds occurred in the East Texas Basin of modern-day Texas and Louisiana in a ramp-style marine setting during the early formation of the Gulf of Mexico. These mudrocks are regional known as the Haynesville and Bossier Formations. The goals of the current project are to 1) develop a better understanding of the paleoceanographic conditions and the depositional environment, and 2) develop linkages between the record from the southern margin of North America and other well-documented paleoceanographic records of Kimmeridgian age. Ten drill cores from the study area have been studied for their geochemistry. Each core was scanned at a 1-foot interval using a handheld x-ray fluorescence instrument, providing rapid, quantitative analysis of the following elemental concentrations: Mg, Al, S, Si, P, K, Ti, Ca, Mn, Fe, Mo, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Th, Rb, U, Sr, Zr, and V. In addition, preliminary interpretations for total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (%N), and bulk rock TOC and N isotopic composition of core samples reveal distinct differences between the Bossier and Haynesville formations. Results from previous geochemical studies suggest that the siliciclastic-dominated Bossier formation has less TOC than the underlying Haynesville formation. Furthermore, the Haynesville is much more carbonate-rich (calcite) than the overlying Bossier. An upwardly increasing trend in Si/Al in some cores suggests increasing detrital quartz influx. A linear relationship between Fe and Al suggest that iron is primarily in clay mineral phases in the Haynesville. Enrichments in Mo concentrations and Cr/V ratios reveal periods of anoxic conditions.

  7. A new basal sauropodiform dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic of Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-Ming; You, Hai-Lu; Wang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The Lufeng Formation in Lufeng Basin of Yunnan Province, southwestern China preserves one of the richest terrestrial Lower Jurassic vertebrate faunas globally, especially for its basal sauropodomorphs, such as Lufengosaurus and Yunnanosaurus. Here we report a new taxon, Xingxiulong chengi gen. et sp. nov. represented by three partial skeletons with overlapping elements. Xingxiulong possesses a number of autapomorphies, such as transversely expanded plate-like summit on top of the neural spine of posterior dorsal vertebrae, four sacral vertebrae, robust scapula, and elongated pubic plate approximately 40% of the total length of the pubis. Phylogenetic analysis resolves Xingxiulong as a basal member of Sauropodiformes, and together with another two Lufeng basal sauropodiforms Jingshanosaurus and Yunnanosaurus, they represent the basalmost lineages of this clade, indicating its Asian origin. Although being relatively primitive, Xingxiulong displays some derived features normally occurred in advanced sauropodiforms including sauropods, such as a four sacral-sacrum, a robust scapula, and a pubis with elongated pubic plate. The discovery of Xingxiulong increases the diversity of basal sauropodomorphs from the Lufeng Formation and indicates a more complicated scenario in the early evolution of sauropodiforms.

  8. A new basal sauropodiform dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic of Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Ming; You, Hai-Lu; Wang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The Lufeng Formation in Lufeng Basin of Yunnan Province, southwestern China preserves one of the richest terrestrial Lower Jurassic vertebrate faunas globally, especially for its basal sauropodomorphs, such as Lufengosaurus and Yunnanosaurus. Here we report a new taxon, Xingxiulong chengi gen. et sp. nov. represented by three partial skeletons with overlapping elements. Xingxiulong possesses a number of autapomorphies, such as transversely expanded plate-like summit on top of the neural spine of posterior dorsal vertebrae, four sacral vertebrae, robust scapula, and elongated pubic plate approximately 40% of the total length of the pubis. Phylogenetic analysis resolves Xingxiulong as a basal member of Sauropodiformes, and together with another two Lufeng basal sauropodiforms Jingshanosaurus and Yunnanosaurus, they represent the basalmost lineages of this clade, indicating its Asian origin. Although being relatively primitive, Xingxiulong displays some derived features normally occurred in advanced sauropodiforms including sauropods, such as a four sacral-sacrum, a robust scapula, and a pubis with elongated pubic plate. The discovery of Xingxiulong increases the diversity of basal sauropodomorphs from the Lufeng Formation and indicates a more complicated scenario in the early evolution of sauropodiforms. PMID:28205592

  9. Facies architecture of a Late Jurassic carbonate ramp: the Korallenoolith of the Lower Saxony Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kästner, M.; Schülke, I.; Winsemann, J.

    2008-09-01

    The sedimentary succession of a Late Jurassic (Oxfordian to basal Kimmeridgian) carbonate ramp is described and interpreted. The study area is located in the central part of the Lower Saxony Basin in NW Germany, which forms part of the Central European Basin. Eight well-exposed and undeformed sections of the study area (Süntel area, Wesergebirge and eastern part of the Wiehengebirge) provide detailed information about lithofacies and lateral thickness variations. Biostratigraphically, the age of these sediments is poorly constrained. Twenty microfacies types are recognized that can be grouped into seven facies associations: (a) strongly bioturbated marlstones deposited near storm wave base (SWB), (b) foraminifera-rich wackestones, (c) wackestones and floatstones with biostromes and (d) bioclastic limestones deposited between SWB and fair-weather wave base (FWWB), (e) oolitic and iron-oolitic limestones and (f) siliciclastic sediments deposited above FWWB, and (g) lagoonal deposits. These facies associations characterize a storm dominated shallow mixed carbonate-siliciclastic ramp. Based on facies changes, quartz content, and gamma ray logs, the Korallenoolith Formation can be subdivided into a lower carbonate-dominated and an upper siliciclastic-dominated part, build up by different scales of small- to large-scale deepening- and shallowing-upward cycles. A preliminary correlation of measured outcrops of this formation is presented.

  10. Evidence of macrophagous teleosaurid crocodylomorphs in the Corallian Group (Oxfordian, Late Jurassic) of the UK.

    PubMed

    Foffa, Davide; Young, Mark T; Brusatte, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Teleosaurids were a group of semi-aquatic crocodylomorphs with a fossil record that spanned the Jurassic Period. In the UK, abundant specimens are known from the Oxford Clay Formation (OCF, Callovian to lower Oxfordian), but are very rare in the Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF, Kimmeridgian to lower Tithonian), despite their abundance in some contemporaneous deposits in continental Europe. Unfortunately, due to the paucity of material from the intermediate 'Corallian Gap' (middle to upper Oxfordian), we lack an understanding of how and why teleosaurid taxic abundance and diversity declined from the OCF to the KCF. The recognition of an incomplete teleosaurid lower jaw from the Corallian of Weymouth (Dorset, UK) begins to rectify this. The vertically oriented dentition, blunt tooth apices, intense enamel ornamentation that shifts to an anastomosed pattern apically, and deep reception pits on the dentary unambiguously demonstrates the affinity of this specimen with an unnamed sub-clade of macrophagous/durophagous teleosaurids ('Steneosaurus' obtusidens + Machimosaurus). The high symphyseal tooth count allows us to exclude the specimen from M. hugii and M. mosae, but in absence of more diagnostic material we cannot unambiguously assign DORCM G.3939 to a more specific level. Nevertheless, this specimen represents the first mandibular material referable to Teleosauridae from the poorly sampled middle-upper Oxfordian time-span in the UK.

  11. Salt glands in the Jurassic metriorhynchid Geosaurus: implications for the evolution of osmoregulation in Mesozoic marine crocodyliforms.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Marta; Gasparini, Zulma

    2008-01-01

    The presence of salt-excreting glands in extinct marine sauropsids has been long suspected based on skull morphology. Previously, we described for the first time the natural casts of salt-excreting glands in the head of the Jurassic metriorhynchid crocodyliform Geosaurus araucanensis from the Tithonian of the Vaca Muerta Formation in the Neuquén Basin (Argentina). In the present study, salt-excreting glands are identified in three new individuals (adult, a sub-adult and a juvenile) referable to the same species. New material provides significant information on the salt glands form and function and permit integration of evolutionary scenarios proposed on a physiological basis in extant taxa with evidence from the fossil record. G. araucanensis represents an advanced stage of the basic physiological model to marine adaptations in reptiles. G. araucanensis salt glands were hypertrophied. On this basis, it can be hypothesized that these glands had a high excretory capability. This stage implies that G. araucanensis (like extant pelagic reptiles, e.g. cheloniids) could have maintained constant plasma osmolality even when seawater or osmoconforming prey were ingested. A gradual model of marine adaptation in crocodyliforms based on physiology (freshwater to coastal/estuarine to estuarine /marine to pelagic life) is congruent with the phylogeny of crocodyliforms based on skeletal morphology. The fossil record suggests that the stage of marine pelagic adaptation was achieved by the Early Middle Jurassic. Salt gland size in the juvenile suggests that juveniles were, like adults, pelagic.

  12. Calpionellid distribution and microfacies across the Jurassic/ Cretaceous boundary in western Cuba (Sierra de los Órganos)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Martínez, Rafael; Barragán, Ricardo; Reháková, Daniela; Cobiella-Reguera, Jorge Luis

    2013-06-01

    A detailed bed-by-bed sampled stratigraphic section of the Guasasa Formation in the Rancho San Vicente area of the "Sierra de los Órganos", western Cuba, provides well-supported evidence about facies and calpionellid distribution across the Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary. These new data allowed the definition of an updated and sound calpionellid biozonation scheme for the section. In this scheme, the drowning event of a carbonate platform displayed by the facies of the San Vicente Member, the lowermost unit of the section, is dated as Late Tithonian, Boneti Subzone. The Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary was recognized within the facies of the overlying El Americano Member on the basis of the acme of Calpionella alpina Lorenz. The boundary is placed nearly six meters above the contact between the San Vicente and the El Americano Members, in a facies linked to a sea-level drop. The recorded calpionellid bioevents should allow correlations of the Cuban biozonation scheme herein proposed, with other previously published schemes from distant areas of the Tethyan Domain.

  13. Salt glands in the Jurassic metriorhynchid Geosaurus: implications for the evolution of osmoregulation in Mesozoic marine crocodyliforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Marta; Gasparini, Zulma

    2008-01-01

    The presence of salt-excreting glands in extinct marine sauropsids has been long suspected based on skull morphology. Previously, we described for the first time the natural casts of salt-excreting glands in the head of the Jurassic metriorhynchid crocodyliform Geosaurus araucanensis from the Tithonian of the Vaca Muerta Formation in the Neuquén Basin (Argentina). In the present study, salt-excreting glands are identified in three new individuals (adult, a sub-adult and a juvenile) referable to the same species. New material provides significant information on the salt glands form and function and permit integration of evolutionary scenarios proposed on a physiological basis in extant taxa with evidence from the fossil record. G. araucanensis represents an advanced stage of the basic physiological model to marine adaptations in reptiles. G. araucanensis salt glands were hypertrophied. On this basis, it can be hypothesized that these glands had a high excretory capability. This stage implies that G. araucanensis (like extant pelagic reptiles, e.g. cheloniids) could have maintained constant plasma osmolality even when seawater or osmoconforming prey were ingested. A gradual model of marine adaptation in crocodyliforms based on physiology (freshwater to coastal/estuarine to estuarine /marine to pelagic life) is congruent with the phylogeny of crocodyliforms based on skeletal morphology. The fossil record suggests that the stage of marine pelagic adaptation was achieved by the Early Middle Jurassic. Salt gland size in the juvenile suggests that juveniles were, like adults, pelagic.

  14. Subduction erosion of the Jurassic Talkeetna-Bonanza arc and the Mesozoic accretionary tectonics of western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clift, P.D.; Pavlis, T.; DeBari, S.M.; Draut, A.E.; Rioux, M.; Kelemen, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Jurassic Talkeetna volcanic arc of south-central Alaska is an oceanic island arc that formed far from the North American margin. Geochronological, geochemical, and structural data indicate that the arc formed above a north-dipping subduction zone after ca. 201 Ma. Magmatism migrated northward into the region of the Talkeetna Mountains ca. 180 Ma. We interpret this magmatism as the product of removal of the original forearc while the arc was active, mainly by tectonic erosion. Rapid exhumation of the arc after ca. 160 Ma coincided with the sedimentation of the coarse clastic Naknek Formation. This exhumation event is interpreted to reffect collision of the Talkeetna arc with either the active margin of North America or the Wrangellia composite terrane to the north along a second north-dipping subduction zone. The juxtaposition of accreted trench sedimentary rocks (Chugach terrane) against the base of the Talkeetna arc sequence requires a change from a state of tectonic erosion to accretion, probably during the Late Jurassic (before 150 Ma), and definitely before the Early Cretaceous (ca. 125 Ma). The change from erosion to accretion probably reflects increasing sediment flux to the trench due to collision ca. 160 Ma. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  15. Long bone histology of the stem salamander Kokartus honorarius (Amphibia: Caudata) from the Middle Jurassic of Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Skutschas, Pavel; Stein, Koen

    2015-04-01

    Kokartus honorarius from the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) of Kyrgyzstan is one of the oldest salamanders in the fossil record, characterized by a mixture of plesiomorphic morphological features and characters shared with crown-group salamanders. Here we present a detailed histological analysis of its long bones. The analysis of a growth series demonstrates a significant histological maturation during ontogeny, expressed by the progressive appearance of longitudinally oriented primary vascular canals, primary osteons, growth marks, remodelling features in primary bone tissues, as well as progressive resorption of the calcified cartilage, formation of endochondral bone and development of cartilaginous to bony trabeculae in the epiphyses. Apart from the presence of secondary osteons, the long bone histology of Kokartus is very similar to that of miniaturized temnospondyls, other Jurassic stem salamanders, miniaturized seymouriamorphs and modern crown-group salamanders. We propose that the presence of secondary osteons in Kokartus honorarius is a plesiomorphic feature, and the loss of secondary osteons in the long bones of crown-group salamanders as well as in those of miniaturized temnospondyls is the result of miniaturization processes. Hitherto, all stem salamander long bong histology (Kokartus, Marmorerpeton and 'salamander A') has been generally described as having paedomorphic features (i.e. the presence of Katschenko's Line and a layer of calcified cartilage), these taxa were thus most likely neotenic forms. The absence of clear lines of arrested growth and annuli in long bones of Kokartus honorarius suggests that the animals lived in an environment with stable local conditions.

  16. High resolution reservoir architecture of late Jurassic Haynesville ramp carbonates in the Gladewater field, East Texas Salt Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhammer, R.K.

    1996-12-31

    The East Texas Salt Basin contains numerous gas fields within Upper Jurassic Haynesville ramp-complex reservoirs. A sequenced-keyed, high-resolution zonation scheme was developed for the Haynesville Formation in Gladewater field by integrating core description, well-log, seismic, porosity and permeability data. The Haynesville at Gladewater represents a high-energy ramp system, localized on paleotopographic highs induced by diapirism of Callovian Age Salt (Louann). Ramp crest grainstones serve as reservoirs. We have mapped the distribution of reservoir facies within a hierarchy of upward-shallowing parasequences grouped into low-frequency sequences. The vertical stacking patterns of parasequences and sequences reflect the interplay of eustasy, sediment accumulation patterns, and local subsidence (including salt movement and compaction). In this study we draw on regional relations from analogous, Jurassic systems in Mexico to constrain the stratigraphic architecture, age model, and facies model. Additionally, salt-cored Holocene, grain-rich shoals from the Persian Gulf provide excellent facies analogs. The result is a new high-resolution analysis of reservoir architecture at a parasequence scale that links reservoir facies to depositional facies. The new stratigraphy scheme demonstrates that different geographic portions of the field have markedly distinct reservoir intervals, both in terms of total pay and the sequence-stratigraphic interval within which it occurs. Results from this study are used to evaluate infill drill well potential, in well planning, for updating reservoir models, and in refining field reserve estimates.

  17. High resolution reservoir architecture of late Jurassic Haynesville ramp carbonates in the Gladewater field, East Texas Salt Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhammer, R.K. )

    1996-01-01

    The East Texas Salt Basin contains numerous gas fields within Upper Jurassic Haynesville ramp-complex reservoirs. A sequenced-keyed, high-resolution zonation scheme was developed for the Haynesville Formation in Gladewater field by integrating core description, well-log, seismic, porosity and permeability data. The Haynesville at Gladewater represents a high-energy ramp system, localized on paleotopographic highs induced by diapirism of Callovian Age Salt (Louann). Ramp crest grainstones serve as reservoirs. We have mapped the distribution of reservoir facies within a hierarchy of upward-shallowing parasequences grouped into low-frequency sequences. The vertical stacking patterns of parasequences and sequences reflect the interplay of eustasy, sediment accumulation patterns, and local subsidence (including salt movement and compaction). In this study we draw on regional relations from analogous, Jurassic systems in Mexico to constrain the stratigraphic architecture, age model, and facies model. Additionally, salt-cored Holocene, grain-rich shoals from the Persian Gulf provide excellent facies analogs. The result is a new high-resolution analysis of reservoir architecture at a parasequence scale that links reservoir facies to depositional facies. The new stratigraphy scheme demonstrates that different geographic portions of the field have markedly distinct reservoir intervals, both in terms of total pay and the sequence-stratigraphic interval within which it occurs. Results from this study are used to evaluate infill drill well potential, in well planning, for updating reservoir models, and in refining field reserve estimates.

  18. Astronomical Constraints on the Duration of Early Jurassic Stages and Global Carbon Cycle and Climatic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, M.; Hesselbo, S. P.; Hinnov, L.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Storm, M.; Xu, W.; Riding, J. B.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The Early Jurassic (201.3 to 174.1 Ma) is bracketed by the end-Triassic mass extinction and global warming event, and the Toarcian-Aalenian shift to (global) icehouse conditions (McElwain et al., 1999; Hesselbo et al., 2002; Ruhl et al., 2011; Korte et al., in review). It is further marked by the early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE), with possibly the largest exogenic carbon cycle perturbation of the Mesozoic and related perturbations in global geochemical cycles, climate and the environment, which are linked to large igneous province emplacement in the Karoo-Ferrar region (Jenkyns, 2010; Burgess et al., 2015). Furthermore, Early Jurassic continental rifting and the break-up of Pangaea and subsequent Early Jurassic opening of the Hispanic Corridor and Viking Strait respectively linked the equatorial Tethys Ocean to Eastern Panthalassa and the high-latitude Arctic Boreal realm. This initiated changes in (global) ocean currents and Earth's heat distribution and ultimately was followed by the opening of the proto-North Atlantic (Porter et al., 2013; Korte et al., in review). Here, we present high-resolution (sub-precession scale) elemental concentration data from the Mochras borehole (UK), which represents ~1300m of possibly the most complete and expanded lower Jurassic hemi-pelagic marine sedimentary archive known. We construct a floating ~9 Myr astronomical time-scale for the complete Early Jurassic Pliensbachian stage and biozones. Combined with radiometric and astrochronological constraints on early Jurassic stage boundaries, we construct a new Early Jurassic Time-Scale. With this we assess the duration and rate of change of early Jurassic global carbon cycle and climatic perturbations and we asses fundamental changes in the nature and expression of Early Jurassic long (100 - 1000 kyr) eccentricity cycles.

  19. Palaeoceanographic approach to the Kimmeridge Clay Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.G. )

    1988-08-01

    The Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) is northern Europe's premier source rock and can be understood using a new but relatively simple oceanographic model. This explains or accommodates most current observations about the KCF and its depositional environment and draws upon paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, geochemical, sedimentological, and paleontological evidence.

  20. A revision of Sanpasaurus yaoi Young, 1944 from the Early Jurassic of China, and its relevance to the early evolution of Sauropoda (Dinosauria)

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Paul; Mannion, Philip D.; Sullivan, Corwin; Butler, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The Early Jurassic of China has long been recognized for its diverse array of sauropodomorph dinosaurs. However, the contribution of this record to our understanding of early sauropod evolution is complicated by a dearth of information on important transitional taxa. We present a revision of the poorly known taxon Sanpasaurus yaoi Young, 1944 from the late Early Jurassic Ziliujing Formation of Sichuan Province, southwest China. Initially described as the remains of an ornithopod ornithischian, we demonstrate that the material catalogued as IVPP V156 is unambiguously referable to Sauropoda. Although represented by multiple individuals of equivocal association, Sanpasaurus is nonetheless diagnosable with respect to an autapomorphic feature of the holotypic dorsal vertebral series. Additional material thought to be collected from the type locality is tentatively referred to Sanpasaurus. If correctly attributed, a second autapomorphy is present in a referred humerus. The presence of a dorsoventrally compressed pedal ungual in Sanpasaurus is of particular interest, with taxa possessing this typically ‘vulcanodontid’ character exhibiting a much broader geographic distribution than previously thought. Furthermore, the association of this trait with other features of Sanpasaurus that are broadly characteristic of basal eusauropods underscores the mosaic nature of the early sauropod–eusauropod transition. Our revision of Sanpasaurus has palaeobiogeographic implications for Early Jurassic sauropods, with evidence that the group maintained a cosmopolitan Pangaean distribution. PMID:27781168

  1. Significance of Jurassic radiolarians from the Cache Creek terrane, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordey, Fabrice; Mortimer, N.; Dewever, Patrick; Monger, J. W. H.

    1987-12-01

    The discovery of new radiolarian localities in the western belt of the Cache Creek terrane in southern British Columbia possibly changes its upper age limit from Late Triassic to Early or Middle Jurassic. It favors a Middle Jurassic, rather than a Late Triassic, age of amalgamation for the Cache Creek terrane and Quesnellia (parts of superterrane I) in southern British Columbia. The new Jurassic ages also mean that the western Cache Creek terrane could be equivalent in age to the Bridge River Hozameen terrane in British Columbia and to terranes containing the Tethyan fusulinid Yabeina in northwest Washington and the Klamath Mountains of California.

  2. Morrison Rebuttal to Adragna.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, David C.

    1985-01-01

    Steven Adragna's arguments for a space-based ballistic missile defense (Georgia Social Science Journal; v16 n2 p14-16 Spr 1985) are founded on the High Frontier organization's usual distortions of the historical record, coupled with a wildly optimistic technological euphoria shared by few of even the Strategic Defense Initiative's most ardent…

  3. Molecular composition and ultrastructure of Jurassic paravian feathers

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Johan; Sjövall, Peter; Carney, Ryan M.; Cincotta, Aude; Uvdal, Per; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Gustafsson, Ola; Lefèvre, Ulysse; Escuillié, François; Heimdal, Jimmy; Engdahl, Anders; Gren, Johan A.; Kear, Benjamin P.; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Yans, Johan; Godefroit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Feathers are amongst the most complex epidermal structures known, and they have a well-documented evolutionary trajectory across non-avian dinosaurs and basal birds. Moreover, melanosome-like microbodies preserved in association with fossil plumage have been used to reconstruct original colour, behaviour and physiology. However, these putative ancient melanosomes might alternatively represent microorganismal residues, a conflicting interpretation compounded by a lack of unambiguous chemical data. We therefore used sensitive molecular imaging, supported by multiple independent analytical tests, to demonstrate that the filamentous epidermal appendages in a new specimen of the Jurassic paravian Anchiornis comprise remnant eumelanosomes and fibril-like microstructures, preserved as endogenous eumelanin and authigenic calcium phosphate. These results provide novel insights into the early evolution of feathers at the sub-cellular level, and unequivocally determine that melanosomes can be preserved in fossil feathers. PMID:26311035

  4. Ecological succession of a Jurassic shallow-water ichthyosaur fall.

    PubMed

    Danise, Silvia; Twitchett, Richard J; Matts, Katie

    2014-09-10

    After the discovery of whale fall communities in modern oceans, it has been hypothesized that during the Mesozoic the carcasses of marine reptiles created similar habitats supporting long-lived and specialized animal communities. Here, we report a fully documented ichthyosaur fall community, from a Late Jurassic shelf setting, and reconstruct the ecological succession of its micro- and macrofauna. The early 'mobile-scavenger' and 'enrichment-opportunist' stages were not succeeded by a 'sulphophilic stage' characterized by chemosynthetic molluscs, but instead the bones were colonized by microbial mats that attracted echinoids and other mat-grazing invertebrates. Abundant cemented suspension feeders indicate a well-developed 'reef stage' with prolonged exposure and colonization of the bones prior to final burial, unlike in modern whale falls where organisms such as the ubiquitous bone-eating worm Osedax rapidly destroy the skeleton. Shallow-water ichthyosaur falls thus fulfilled similar ecological roles to shallow whale falls, and did not support specialized chemosynthetic communities.

  5. Extreme adaptations for aquatic ectoparasitism in a Jurassic fly larva.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Bo; Engel, Michael S; Wappler, Torsten; Jarzembowski, Edmund A; Zhang, Haichun; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Xiaoting; Rust, Jes

    2014-06-24

    The reconstruction of ancient insect ectoparasitism is challenging, mostly because of the extreme scarcity of fossils with obvious ectoparasitic features such as sucking-piercing mouthparts and specialized attachment organs. Here we describe a bizarre fly larva (Diptera), Qiyia jurassica gen. et sp. nov., from the Jurassic of China, that represents a stem group of the tabanomorph family Athericidae. Q. jurassica exhibits adaptations to an aquatic habitat. More importantly, it preserves an unusual combination of features including a thoracic sucker with six radial ridges, unique in insects, piercing-sucking mouthparts for fluid feeding, and crocheted ventral prolegs with upward directed bristles for anchoring and movement while submerged. We demonstrate that Q. jurassica was an aquatic ectoparasitic insect, probably feeding on the blood of salamanders. The finding reveals an extreme morphological specialization of fly larvae, and broadens our understanding of the diversity of ectoparasitism in Mesozoic insects.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02844.001.

  6. Three new Jurassic euharamiyidan species reinforce early divergence of mammals.

    PubMed

    Bi, Shundong; Wang, Yuanqing; Guan, Jian; Sheng, Xia; Meng, Jin

    2014-10-30

    The phylogeny of Allotheria, including Multituberculata and Haramiyida, remains unsolved and has generated contentious views on the origin and earliest evolution of mammals. Here we report three new species of a new clade, Euharamiyida, based on six well-preserved fossils from the Jurassic period of China. These fossils reveal many craniodental and postcranial features of euharamiyidans and clarify several ambiguous structures that are currently the topic of debate. Our phylogenetic analyses recognize Euharamiyida as the sister group of Multituberculata, and place Allotheria within the Mammalia. The phylogeny suggests that allotherian mammals evolved from a Late Triassic (approximately 208 million years ago) Haramiyavia-like ancestor and diversified into euharamiyidans and multituberculates with a cosmopolitan distribution, implying homologous acquisition of many craniodental and postcranial features in the two groups. Our findings also favour a Late Triassic origin of mammals in Laurasia and two independent detachment events of the middle ear bones during mammalian evolution.

  7. Direct evidence of hybodont shark predation on Late Jurassic ammonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vullo, Romain

    2011-06-01

    Sharks are known to have been ammonoid predators, as indicated by analysis of bite marks or coprolite contents. However, body fossil associations attesting to this predator-prey relationship have never been described so far. Here, I report a unique finding from the Late Jurassic of western France: a complete specimen of the Kimmeridgian ammonite Orthaspidoceras bearing one tooth of the hybodont shark Planohybodus. Some possible tooth puncture marks are also observed. This is the first direct evidence of such a trophic link between these two major Mesozoic groups, allowing an accurate identification of both organisms. Although Planohybodus displays a tearing-type dentition generally assumed to have been especially adapted for large unshelled prey, our discovery clearly shows that this shark was also able to attack robust ammonites such as aspidoceratids. The direct evidence presented here provides new insights into the Mesozoic marine ecosystem food webs.

  8. Triassic-Jurassic Mass Extinction: Evidence for Bolide Impact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R.; Becker, L.; Haggart, J.; Poreda, R.

    2003-04-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic (TJ) mass extinction event is one of the most severe in geologic history and is one of the five largest in the Phanerozoic with as many as 80% of the species lost. It is also one of the most poorly understood. Only a few geologic sections have been identified for the TJ extinction and most of those are not well preserved. Previously, the paucity of suitable stratigraphic sections has prevented corroborative geochemical studies. Recently a well-preserved stratigraphic section spanning the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (˜200 mya) was identified at Kennecott Point, Queen Charlotte, Islands, British Columbia. Initial studies have shown that the Kennecott Point sequence is one of the best preserved and contains one of the most complete radiolarian microfossil turnovers known. Analyses of stable isotopes have shown that a 13C perturbation exits within the sequence and suggests a decline in organic productivity (Ward et al., 2001). Preliminary results of laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) of selected Queen Charlotte samples suggest that fullerenes (C60 to C200) may be present in the Kennecott Point stratigraphic sequence. Previous studies have shown that fullerenes are present in the mass extinction boundary of the Permian-Triassic (˜251 mya) as well as the well-known "dinosaur" extinction event of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (˜65 mya). Therefore, three of the big five extinction events appear to have associated fullerenes. The possible presence of fullerenes along with the productivity collapse (rapid environmental change) suggests that a cometary or asteroidal impact may have occurred. Although no known impact crater exists, we hope to present chemical evidence that an impact or multiple impacts may have been responsible for the TJ mass extinction.

  9. Paleoenvironments of the Jurassic and Cretaceous Oceans: Selected Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogg, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    There are many themes contributing to the sedimentation history of the Mesozoic oceans. This overview briefly examines the roles of the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) and the associated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, of the evolution of marine calcareous microplankton, of major transgressive and regressive trends, and of super-plume eruptions. Initiation of Atlantic seafloor spreading in the Middle Jurassic coincided with an elevated carbonate compensation depth (CCD) in the Pacific-Tethys mega-ocean. Organic-rich sediments that would become the oil wealth of regions from Saudi Arabia to the North Sea were deposited during a continued rise in CCD during the Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian, which suggests a possible increase in carbon dioxide release by oceanic volcanic activity. Deep-sea deposits in near-equatorial settings are dominated by siliceous shales or cherts, which reflect the productivity of siliceous microfossils in the tropical surface waters. The end-Jurassic explosion in productivity by calcareous microplankton contributed to the lowering of the CCD and onset of the chalk ("creta") deposits that characterize the Tithonian and lower Cretaceous in all ocean basins. During the mid-Cretaceous, the eruption of enormous Pacific igneous provinces (Ontong Java Plateau and coeval edifices) increased carbon dioxide levels. The resulting rise in CCD terminated chalk deposition in the deep sea. The excess carbon was progressively removed in widespread black-shale deposits in the Atlantic basins and other regions - another major episode of oil source rock. A major long-term transgression during middle and late Cretaceous was accompanied by extensive chalk deposition on continental shelves and seaways while the oceanic CCD remained elevated. Pacific guyots document major oscillations (sequences) of global sea level superimposed on this broad highstand. The Cretaceous closed with a progressive sea-level regression and lowering of the CCD that again enabled

  10. Fe-Ni Micrometorites from Upper Jurassic Cañadon Asfalto Fm., Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, M.; Hauser, N.; Cabaleri, N.; Silva Nieto, D.; Cuadros, F. A.; Reyes, S.

    2014-09-01

    Microspherules from an upper Jurassic sediments from Patagonia, show mineralogical, geochemical and textural features very similar to those reported for I-type micrometeorites whereas some spherules are interpreted as typical G-type micrometeorites.

  11. A new primitive Neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of Patagonia with gut contents

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Leonardo; Canudo, José I.; Garrido, Alberto C.; Moreno-Azanza, Miguel; Martínez, Leandro C. A.; Coria, Rodolfo A.; Gasca, José M.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a new species of an ornithischian dinosaur, Isaberrysaura mollensis gen. et sp. nov. The specimen, consisting in an almost complete skull and incomplete postcranium was collected from the marine-deltaic deposits of the Los Molles Formation (Toarcian-Bajocian), being the first reported dinosaur for this unit, one of the oldest from Neuquén Basin, and the first neornithischian dinosaur known from the Jurassic of South America. Despite showing a general stegosaurian appearance, the extensive phylogenetic analysis carried out depicts Isaberrysaura mollensis gen. et sp. nov. as a basal ornithopod, suggesting that both Thyreophora and neornithischians could have achieved significant convergent features. The specimen was preserved articulated and with some of its gut content place in the middle-posterior part of the thoracic cavity. Such stomach content was identified as seeds, most of them belonging to the Cycadales group. This finding reveals a possible and unexpected role of this ornithischian species as seed-dispersal agent. PMID:28202910

  12. Lithofacies of deep marine basalts emplaced on a Jurassic backarc apron, Baja California (Mexico)

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Spera, C.J.

    1987-09-01

    Basalts of the mid-Jurassic Gran Canon Formation, Cedros Island, Mexico, were emplaced on a volcaniclastic apron in a deep marine backarc basin. Elongate pillows and lava tubes, as well as paleocurrent data from the volcaniclastic apron, indicate a southward regional paleoslope away from the island arc source. Basalts emplaced on relatively proximal parts of the apron are nearly entirely pillowed and have thick flow units with mega-pillows. Basalts on distal parts of the apron (about 15 to 20 km down paleo-current) are dominated by pillow fragment breccias (flow foot rubble), and individual lava flows are generally thin, with small pillows, suggesting that the distal ends of lava flows, erupted upslope, are represented. These distal flow fronts, however, are interstratified with features that typically form close to a vent, including thick massive to mega-pillowed lavas and lava tubes up to 8 m in diameter. It is inferred that a fissure (or system of fissures) extended from the arc into the backarc basin, erupting basalt lavas onto both proximal and distal parts of the volcaniclastic apron. Such intraplate volcanism may be common on the hot frontal arc side of backarc basins. 26 references.

  13. Petroleum geology of the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous, Baltimore Canyon trough, western North Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, B.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Numerous hydrocarbon shows, including a noncommercial gas and gas-condensate accumulation, occur in the Baltimore Canyon Trough within sandstone units deposited in prograding coastal-plain and transitional-marine environments located updip of an Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian carbonate shelf edge. The coastal-plain and transitional-marine facies are overlain by a fine-grained deltaic complex dominated by delta-plain shales which collectively form a regionally extensive top seal unit. Wells drilled seaward of the continental shelf edge ( > 1,500 m water depth) tested large structural/stratigraphic closures along the downdip termination of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous carbonate shelf edge but encountered no significant hydrocarbon shows. Reservoir rocks in these wells consist of (1) oolite grain-stone, which was deposited within a shoal-water complex located at the Aptian shelf edge, and (2) coral-stromatoporoid grainstone and boundstone. Structural closures having reservoir and top seals are present in both updip and downdip trends. hydrocarbon shows in wells along the shelf interior trend indicate the presence of mature source beds, at least locally. The absence of hydrocarbon shows in downdip carbonate reservoirs and around the Schlee Dome, however, suggests charge/migration mechanisms within the fetch areas of these objectives have failed. Continued development of play concepts in the Baltimore Canyon Trough, therefore, requires identification and mapping of potential source-rock intervals and construction of hydrocarbon expulsion models to time hydrocarbon generation relative to trap formation.

  14. Depositional environments and hydrocarbon occurrence of upper Jurassic Cotton Valley sandstones, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kornfeld, I.

    1985-02-01

    The sandstones of the Kimmeridgian (Jurassic) upper Cotton Valley Formation of Mississippi, northern Louisiana, and eastern Texas were deposited on a stable subsiding shelf. These sands are regressive and are part of a complex of deltaic and marine systems. They are quartz-rich and exhibit a variety of sedimentary structures. Cotton Valley fluvial-deltaic systems drained Paleozoic and younger highlands to the north and northwest, depositing sands on the shelf where they were subsequently reworked. Three depositional environments have been interpreted for these sands in Mississippi: (1) a constructive delta in the west-central part of the state, (2) a destructive delta in the east-central part of the state, and (3) an interdeltaic system in central Mississippi between the other systems. In northern Louisiana and northeastern Texas, the following environments have been interpreted: a proximal destructive delta system in northwest Louisiana and northeast Texas and another delta system in northeastern Louisiana with an interdeltaic system consisting of barrier beaches and barrier bars located centrally between them. Production is controlled by porosity and permeability barriers, fault traps, and salt- and basement-induced structures.

  15. Numerical evaluation of mechanisms driving Early Jurassic changes in global carbon cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beerling, D.J.; Brentnall, S.J.

    2007-03-15

    The Early Jurassic (early Toarcian, ca. 183 Ma) carbon cycle perturbation is characterized by aabout -5 parts per thousand {delta} {sup 13}C excursion in the exogenic carbon reservoirs, a 1000 ppm rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and a 6-7 degrees warming. Two proposed explanations for this presumed global carbon cycle perturbation are the liberation of massive amounts of isotopically light CH4 from (1) Gondwanan coals by heating during the intrusive eruption of the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province (LIP) or (2) the thermal dissociation of gas hydrates. Carbon cycle modeling indicates that the release of CH4 from Gondwanan coals synchronous with the eruption of the Karoo-Ferrar LIP fails to reproduce the magnitude or timing of the CO{sub 2} and {delta} {sup 13}C excursions. However, sensitivity analyses constrained by a marine cyclostratigraphically dated {delta}{sup 13}C record indicate that both features of geologic record can be explained with the huge input of about 15,340-24,750 Gt C over about 220 k.y., a result possibly pointing to the involvement of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin. The simulated release of > 6000 Gt C from gas hydrates also reproduces aspects of the early Toarcian rock record, but the large mass involved raises fundamental questions about its formation, storage, and release.

  16. A bizarre Jurassic maniraptoran theropod with preserved evidence of membranous wings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Zheng, Xiaoting; Sullivan, Corwin; Wang, Xiaoli; Xing, Lida; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaomei; O'Connor, Jingmai K; Zhang, Fucheng; Pan, Yanhong

    2015-05-07

    The wings of birds and their closest theropod relatives share a uniform fundamental architecture, with pinnate flight feathers as the key component. Here we report a new scansoriopterygid theropod, Yi qi gen. et sp. nov., based on a new specimen from the Middle-Upper Jurassic period Tiaojishan Formation of Hebei Province, China. Yi is nested phylogenetically among winged theropods but has large stiff filamentous feathers of an unusual type on both the forelimb and hindlimb. However, the filamentous feathers of Yi resemble pinnate feathers in bearing morphologically diverse melanosomes. Most surprisingly, Yi has a long rod-like bone extending from each wrist, and patches of membranous tissue preserved between the rod-like bones and the manual digits. Analogous features are unknown in any dinosaur but occur in various flying and gliding tetrapods, suggesting the intriguing possibility that Yi had membranous aerodynamic surfaces totally different from the archetypal feathered wings of birds and their closest relatives. Documentation of the unique forelimbs of Yi greatly increases the morphological disparity known to exist among dinosaurs, and highlights the extraordinary breadth and richness of the evolutionary experimentation that took place close to the origin of birds.

  17. The earliest fossil record of Panorpidae (Mecoptera) from the Middle Jurassic of China

    PubMed Central

    Ding, He; Shih, Chungkun; Bashkuev, Alexei; Zhao, Yunyun; Ren, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The early history of Panorpidae (Mecoptera) is poorly known due to sparse fossil records. Up to date, only nine fossil species have been described, all from the Paleogene, except the Early Cretaceous Solusipanorpa gibbidorsa Lin, 1980. However, we suggest S. gibbidorsa is too incompletely preserved to permit even family classification. A new genus with two new species, Jurassipanorpa impunctata gen. et sp. n. and Jurassipanorpa sticta sp. n., are described based on four well-preserved specimens from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China. These two new species are the earliest fossil records of Panorpidae. The new genus is erected based on a combination of forewing characters: both R1 and Rs1 with two branches, 1A reaching posterior margin of wing distad of the forking of Rs from R1, and no crossveins or only one crossvein between veins of 1A and 2A. In all four specimens, long and robust setae ranging from 0.09 to 0.38 mm in length and pointing anteriorly, are present on anal veins of forewings. The function of these setae is enigmatic. PMID:25152669

  18. Tetradactyl Footprints of an Unknown Affinity Theropod Dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Jaouad; Díaz-Martínez, Ignacio; Pérez-Lorente, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Background New tetradactyl theropod footprints from Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian) have been found in the Iouaridène syncline (Morocco). The tracksites are at several layers in the intermediate lacustrine unit of Iouaridène Formation. The footprints were named informally in previous works “Eutynichnium atlasipodus”. We consider as nomen nudum. Methodology/Principal Findings Boutakioutichnium atlasicus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. is mainly characterized by the hallux impression. It is long, strong, directed medially or forward, with two digital pads and with the proximal part of the first pad in lateral position. More than 100 footprints in 15 trackways have been studied with these features. The footprints are large, 38–48 cm in length, and 26–31 cm in width. Conclusions/Significance Boutakioutichnium mainly differs from other ichnotaxa with hallux impression in lacking metatarsal marks and in not being a very deep footprint. The distinct morphology of the hallux of the Boutakioutichnium trackmaker –i.e. size and hallux position- are unique in the dinosaur autopodial record to date. PMID:22180775

  19. Triassic-Jurassic Flora of Poland; Floristical Support of Climatic Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbacka, Maria; Pacyna, Grzegorz; Feldman-Olszewska, Anna; Ziaja, Jadwiga; Bodor, Emese

    2014-12-01

    Plant macroremains from five boreholes in Poland were studied. Two of them (Huta OP-1 and Studzianna) from the northern margin of the Holy Cross Mountains, yielded several taxa. In the other three boreholes determinable fos-sil plants were sporadic, albeit important. Most of the taxa from the Huta OP-1 and Studzianna boreholes are typi-cal of the European Early Jurassic (Hettangian and Sinemurian). Both localities, although close to one another, show incertae sedis, Desmiophyllum harrisii phytes and conifers (a new species incertae sedis, Desmiophyllum harrisii Barbacka et Pacyna is herein proposed), which would suggest rather wet and warm conditions. This flora is typical of the European Province of the Euro-Sinian Region. In Studzianna the Siberian elements dominate, gymnosperms, mainly Czekanowskiales, which in-dicate a drier and colder environment. The palaeobotanical data correspond to the results of clay mineral studies, in particular the kaolinite/illite ratio in the source formations. The kaolinite content confirms a decrease in temperature and a reduction in rainfall in the late Early Hettangian and the latest Hettangian in the area.

  20. Pore network connectivity anisotropy in Jurassic argillite specimens from eastern Paris Basin (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Lionel; Géraud, Yves; Bouchez, Jean Luc

    In order to test the feasibility of nuclear waste storage, Andra, the French radioactive waste management agency, gave us the opportunity to study preserved specimens of Jurassic clay-rich rocks from eastern Paris Basin. These rocks, deposited during the Callovian and beginning of the Oxfordian, are dark- to light-grey marls that consist mainly in a mixture of clay, calcite and silt. Magnetic susceptibility and remanence vary according to the clay/calcite/silt ratios and the mineral preferred orientations are characterized by the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility. A few test specimens, sampled from borehole-core #HTM 102, and coming from the base and top levels of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite formation, were subjected to connected porosity measurements using the mercury injection technique. By imposing mercury to flow parallel to a given direction, we were able to determine the anisotropy of connectivity along the three principal magnetic susceptibility axes. We find that the clay-richest specimens have a large and sub-isotropic connected porosity which is mostly accessible through the smallest pore threshold diameters (<0.02 μm). By contrast, carbonate-enriched specimens have anisotropic and smaller connected porosities accessible through larger pore thresholds (˜0.08 μm). Except in a carbonate-enriched specimen where the largest connectivity axis is vertical, attributed to tension cracks normal to bedding, the pore connectivity anisotropy positively correlates with the magnetic anisotropy, hence with the mineral arrangement.

  1. Middle Jurassic Oseberg delta, northern North Sea: A sedimentological and sequence stratigraphic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, T.; Steel R.J.

    1997-07-01

    The Aalenian Oseberg Formation (0-80 m thick) is an important reservoir unit in the Middle Jurassic Brent Group in the northern North Sea, consisting of multiple sets of sandy Gilbert-type deltas. Small-scale (1.5-10 m) fining-upward units seen in the gamma-ray log correspond with individual delta sets, as independently confirmed by steepening-upward trends seen in the dip log. Within each set, the steep foreset slopes typically show thinly bedded sandstone facies (avalanche grain flows), whereas the lower foreset slopes, toesets, and bottomsets are formed largely by massive sandstone facies (sandy debris flows). On an intermediate scale (up to 40 m), the gamma-ray logs show both fining-upward and coarsening-upward trends through stacked delta sets, and these trends, traceable between wells, are interpreted in terms of decelerating and accelerating rates of relative sea level rise, respectively. The relative abundance of the sandy debris-flow deposits reflects a periodic and significant instability of the delta`s upper foreset slope, probably during times of increased water depth in front of the delta. The normal progradation of individual Gilbert-type sets, however, is likely to have been along a subhorizontal topography during periods of little or no change in water depth. The long-term change to produce the observed vertical stacking of deltaic sets was one of a generally rising relative sea level.

  2. The Costa Rican Jurassic to Miocene oceanic complexes: Origin, tectonics and relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denyer, Percy; Gazel, Esteban

    2009-12-01

    The occurrences of oceanic assemblages on the Pacific shore of Costa Rica are part of an intricate group of complexes with different tectonic origins. Although they are dismembered and disrupted, they are the only available inland source of information to decipher the evolution of this active margin. Six main regions are described in this paper: (1) Santa Elena Peninsula, constituted by a supra-subduction zone (Santa Elena Nappe), that is overthrusting an igneous-sedimentary Aptian-Cenomanian sequence (Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex), which includes OIB (Ocean Island Basalts) portions, (2) the Nicoya Complex, which is a Jurassic-Cretaceous chert sediment pile disrupted and detached from its original basement by multiple magmatic events that occurred during the formation of the CLIP (Caribbean Large Igneous Province), (3) the Tortugal area formed by the Tortugal Suite with OIB signature and surrounded by Nicoya Complex outcrops, (4) the Herradura Block composed of the Tulín Formation to Maastrichtian to Lower Eocene OIB accreted oceanic island and the Nicoya Complex as basement, (5) Quepos Block correlated with the Tulín Formation, (6) the Osa-Burica Block composed of the Golfito and Burica Terranes (geochemically and chronologically correlated to the Nicoya Complex), Rincón Block (Early Paleocene to Early Eocene accreted seamounts), and the Miocene Osa-Caño Accretionary Complex. The Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex together with the Tortugal Suite have OIB signatures and possibly without Galapagos hotspot geochemical affinity. These coincidences would be explained by the hypothetical existence of an "autochthonous" Cretaceous basement formed by these two regions together with the rest of the Caribbean. Costa Rican basement is constituted by several CLIP portions and seamounts accreted from the end of Cretaceous in the northwest to the Miocene in the southeast, forming the diverse oceanic occurrences of the Pacific, which are mainly connected to the Galapagos

  3. Pennsylvanian to Jurassic eolian transportation systems in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, F.

    1988-01-01

    The direction of sediment transport in eolian sandstones of Pennsylvanian to Jurassic age was interpreted from crossbedding resultants (vector means) obtained from studies of eolian rocks in the western U.S., supplemented by data from the few eolian units of eastern North America. These were compiled from the published or unpublished (theses) literature, from unpublished field data contributed by colleagues, or from measurements made for this study. In addition, new paleogeographic maps were compiled to evaluate the influence of geographic features on the atmospheric circulation patterns that are inferred from the crossbedding studies. Regionally, the crossbedding indicates northeasterly, northerly, or northwesterly winds (present coordinates) from Pennsylvanian through most of Middle Jurassic time. A rather abrupt change in wind directions occurred in late Middle Jurassic time (late part of the Callovian Age) when westerly wind patterns developed. By the Late Jurassic the winds shifted to southwesterly. Calculations of the consistency factor (vector mean strength) made from region-wide analyses of the resultants indicate fairly unidirectional winds from the Pennsylvanian through the Early Jurassic. Middle Jurassic circulation was more varied, judging from crossbedding studies in the lower part of the Entrada Sandstone. Crossbedding in Upper Jurassic eolian rocks of Wyoming and South Dakota yielded a random pattern but Upper Jurassic rocks farther south on the Colorado Plateau and adjoining areas show a return to a fairly unidirectional pattern. Comparing the resultants with their reconstructed paleogeographic setting shows surprisingly little influence of major geographic features on overall circulation patterns. However, the greatest amount of local variation occurred at or near highly indented shorelines where the temperature contrast between land and water produces local wind currents that may vary appreciably from regional circulation patterns. Although they

  4. Late Triassic-Jurassic paleogeography and origin of Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador, A.

    1987-04-01

    The basic structural and stratigraphic framework of the Gulf of Mexico Basin was established during the Late Triassic and the Jurassic. During the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic, as the North American plate started to separate from the South American and African plates, the area of the future basin was part of an extensive landmass broken by tensional grabens that were filled by red beds and volcanics. Marine deposition was restricted to embayments of the Pacific Ocean in northwestern and central Mexico. These marine embayments persisted during the early Middle Jurassic, but seawater did not reach the future Gulf of Mexico Basin until the Callovian. Widespread salt deposits known today from two separate areas of the basin resulted from this initial flooding. During the Late Jurassic, marine conditions progressively extended over increasingly larger parts of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. However, the basin was not connected to the Atlantic Ocean until late in the Jurassic. This paleogeographic reconstruction suggests that the Gulf of Mexico Basin formed as a result of the southward drift of the Yucatan continental block away from the remainder of the North American plate. The separation began in the Late Triassic, continued slowly and sporadically during the Early and Middle Jurassic, and quickened after the Middle Jurassic salt formed. As a result, the salt deposits were split into the two segments known today, and oceanic crust formed in the center of the basin. Early in the Late Jurassic, the Yucatan platform reached its present position and the Gulf of Mexico Basin was born. 14 figures.

  5. Pennsylvanian to Jurassic eolian transportation systems in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Fred

    1988-04-01

    The direction of sediment transport in eolian sandstones of Pennsylvanian to Jurassic age was interpreted from crossbedding resultants (vector means) obtained from studies of eolian rocks in the western U.S., supplemented by data from the few eolian units of eastern North America. These were compiled from the published or unpublished (theses) literature, from unpublished field data contributed by colleagues, or from measurements made for this study. In addition, new paleogeographic maps were compiled to evaluate the influence of geographic features on the atmospheric circulation patterns that are inferred from the crossbedding studies. Regionally, the crossbedding indicates northeasterly, northerly, or northwesterly winds (present coordinates) from Pennsylvanian through most of Middle Jurassic time. A rather abrupt change in wind directions occurred in late Middle Jurassic time (late part of the Callovian Age) when westerly wind patterns developed. By the Late Jurassic the winds shifted to southwesterly. Calculations of the consistency factor (vector mean strength) made from region-wide analyses of the resultants indicate fairly unidirectional winds from the Pennsylvanian through the Early Jurassic. Middle Jurassic circulation was more varied, judging from crossbedding studies in the lower part of the Entrada Sandstone. Crossbedding in Upper Jurassic eolian rocks of Wyoming and South Dakota yielded a random pattern but Upper Jurassic rocks farther south on the Colorado Plateau and adjoining areas show a return to a fairly unidirectional pattern. Comparing the resultants with their reconstructed paleogeographic setting shows surprisingly little influence of major geographic features on overall circulation patterns. However, the greatest amount of local variation occurred at or near highly indented shorelines where the temperature contrast between land and water produces local wind currents that may vary appreciably from regional circulation patterns. Although they

  6. Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Facies characterization at Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, John Grayson

    The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a shallow-marine carbonate unit in the subsurface of the U.S. Gulf Coast, spanning from south Texas to west Florida. This field case-study focuses on Little Cedar Creek Field located in southeastern Conecuh County, Alabama. The objectives of this study are to (1) construct a 3-D depositional model for the Smackover Formation at Little Cedar Creek Field; (2) establish a sequence stratigraphic framework for the construction of the depositional model; (3) characterize and map lithofacies with high resource potential based on the depositional model; and (4) demonstrate the use of the depositional model to maximize hydrocarbon recovery in the field area. Little Cedar Creek Field is located near the up-dip limit of the Smackover Formation. The top of the Smackover is found at depths between 10,000 to 12,000 feet, and the formation ranges in thickness from 60 to 120 feet. The Smackover Formation overlies the Callovian-Oxfordian Norphlet Formation and underlies the Kimmeridgian Haynesville Formation. The petroleum reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, unlike most Smackover fields in the eastern Gulf region, are composed predominantly of limestone, not dolomite, and do not possess a Buckner Anhydrite top seal immediately above the reservoir. Beginning from the top of the Smackover, the facies are: (S-1) Peritidal lime mudstone-wackestone; (S-2) tidal channel conglomeratic floatstone-rudstone; (S-3) peloid-ooid shoal grainstone-packstone; (S-4) subtidal lime wackestone-mudstone; (S-5) microbially-influenced packstone-wackestone; (S-6) microbial (thrombolite) boundstone; and (S-7) transgressive lime mudstone-dolostone. Production is from both the thrombolite boundstone and shoal grainstone facies, though pressure and fluid data indicate no communication between the two reservoirs. The data indicate that the microbial communities developed on subtle topographic highs overlying the transgressive lime mudstone-dolostone in

  7. Vertebrate fossils and trace fossils in Upper Jurassic-Lower cretaceous red beds in the Atacama region, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, C. M.; Suárez, M.

    Pterosaur, dinosaur, and crocodile bones are recorded here for the first time in Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous red beds in the Atacama region east of Copiapó, Chile. Trace fossils produced by vertebrate animals include the footprints of theropod dinosaurs and the depressions of sandstone laminae interpreted as burrows and foot impressions. The fossils occur in the 1500-meter-thick Quebrada Monardes Formation, which consists predominantly of the aeolian and alluvial deposits of a semi-arid terrestrial environment. Vertebrate fossils are very rare in Chile. Dinosaur bones and footprints have previously been recorded at only seven locations, and pterosaur remains at only one location. The newly discovered dinosaur bones are the oldest to be described in Chile.

  8. Palaeobiogeographic implications of Late Bajocian-Late Callovian (Middle Jurassic) dinoflagellate cysts from the Central Alborz Mountains, northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejad, Ebrahim; Sabbaghiyan, Hossein; Mosaddegh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The Dalichai Formation with an age of Late Bajocian-Late Callovian was sampled in Central Alborz Mountains of northern Iran and studied for palynological, palaeobiogeographical and palynocorrelation purposes. Palynological studies revealed diverse and well-preserved dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and lead to identification of three zones i.e., Cribroperidiniumcrispum (Late Bajocian), Dichadogonyaulaxsellwoodii (Bathonian to Early Callovian) and Ctenidodiniumcontinuum (Early to Middle Callovian) Zones. Subzone a of the D. sellwoodii Zone (Early to Middle Bathonian) was also differentiated. This biozonation corresponds to those recognised in Northwest Europe. Furthermore, the ammonoid families recorded including Phylloceratidae, Oppeliidae, Reineckeiidae, Perisphinctidae, Haploceratidae, Parkinsoniidae and Sphaeroceratidae, which confirm the Late Bajocian to Late Callovian age, are quite similar to those of Northwest Europe and the northwestern Tethys. The close similarities of the dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and ammonite fauna of northern Iran with those of Northwest Europe and the northwestern Tethys during the Middle Jurassic indicate direct but episodic marine connection and faunal exchange between the two areas.

  9. Triassic-Jurassic sediments and multiple volcanic events in North Victoria Land, Antarctica: A revised stratigraphic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schöner, R.; Viereck-Goette, L.; Schneider, J.; Bomfleur, B.

    2007-01-01

    Field investigations in North Victoria Land, Antarctica during GANOVEX IX (2005/2006) allow the revision of the Triassic-Jurassic stratigraphy of ~300 m thick continental deposits in between the crystalline basement and the Kirkpatrick lava flows of the Ferrar Group. The lower stratigraphic unit (Section Peak Formation) is characterised by braided river-type quartzose sandstone deposits with intercalations of shale and coal occurring at the top. It is overlain by a homogeneous unit of reworked tuffs composed of fine-grained silicic shards, quartz and feldspar (new name: "Shafer Peak Formation"). These deposits can be correlated with parts of the Hanson Formation in the Central Transantarctic Mountains and require a distal yet unknown source of massive silicic volcanism. Clastic products of mafic volcanic eruptions, formerly described as a separate stratigraphic formation (Exposure Hill Formation), occur within local diatreme structures as well as intercalated at various stratigraphic levels within the sedimentary succession. These dominantly hydroclastic eruptions are the first subaerial expression of Ferrar magmatism. The initial Kirkpatrick lavas/pillow lavas were generated from local eruptive centres and again may be overlain by thin sediments, which are covered by the thick plateau lava succession known throughout the Transantarctic Mountain Range.

  10. Constraints on the Jurassic time scale by /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar dating of North Caucasian volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, J.C.; Lippolt, H.J.; Borsuk, A.M.

    1987-07-01

    /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age measurements on biotites and high-temperature plagioclases of Jurassic basaltic to rhyolitic subvolcanic rocks from the Northern Great Caucasus (USSR) yielded plateau and total argon ages between 190 and 180 Ma. The dated rocks are intrusive sills, dikes and laccoliths in sediments of the middle to upper Pliensbachian and of the lower Toarcian (Lower Jurassic). Pebbles of the volcanic rocks exist in the basal conglomerates of the Aalenian (base of the Middle Jurassic). Thus, their stratigraphic age is restricted to the Lower Jurassic stages of middle to upper Pliensbachian and Toarcian. Because of the scarcity of tie-points in the Lower Jurassic, the isotopic ages of these volcanic rocks, in spite of their rather large stratigraphic range, may serve as new calibration points for the improvement of the Jurassic time-scale.

  11. Chapter 6. Tabular data and graphical images in support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment-East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system (504902), Travis Peak and Hosston formations.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on the CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Because of the number and variety of platforms and software available, graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files).

  12. Palaeoceanography: methane release in the Early Jurassic period.

    PubMed

    Wignall, Paul B; McArthur, John M; Little, Crispin T S; Hallam, Anthony

    2006-06-01

    Dramatic global warming, triggered by release of methane from clathrates, has been postulated to have occurred during the early Toarcian age in the Early Jurassic period. Kemp et al. claim that this methane was released at three points, as recorded by three sharp excursions of delta13C(org) of up to 3 per thousand magnitude. But they discount another explanation for the excursions: namely that some, perhaps all, of the rapid excursions could be a local signature of a euxinic basin caused by recycling of isotopically light carbon from the lower water column. This idea has been proposed previously (see ref. 3, for example) and is supported by the lack evidence for negative delta13C excursions in coeval belemnite rostra. Kemp et al. dismiss this alternative, claiming that each abrupt shift would have required the recycling of about double the amount of organic carbon that is currently present in the modern ocean; however, their measurements are not from an ocean but from a restricted, epicontinental seaway and so would not require whole-ocean mixing to achieve the excursions.

  13. Revision of the Late Jurassic teleosaurid genus Machimosaurus (Crocodylomorpha, Thalattosuchia).

    PubMed

    Young, Mark T; Hua, Stéphane; Steel, Lorna; Foffa, Davide; Brusatte, Stephen L; Thüring, Silvan; Mateus, Octávio; Ruiz-Omeñaca, José Ignacio; Havlik, Philipe; Lepage, Yves; De Andrade, Marco Brandalise

    2014-10-01

    Machimosaurus was a large-bodied genus of teleosaurid crocodylomorph, considered to have been durophagous/chelonivorous, and which frequented coastal marine/estuarine ecosystems during the Late Jurassic. Here, we revise the genus based on previously described specimens and revise the species within this genus. We conclude that there were three European Machimosaurus species and another taxon in Ethiopia. This conclusion is based on numerous lines of evidence: craniomandibular, dental and postcranial morphologies; differences in estimated total body length; geological age; geographical distribution; and hypothetical lifestyle. We re-diagnose the type species Machimosaurus hugii and limit referred specimens to only those from Upper Kimmeridgian-Lower Tithonian of Switzerland, Portugal and Spain. We also re-diagnose Machimosaurus mosae, demonstrate that it is an available name and restrict the species to the uppermost Kimmeridgian-lowermost Tithonian of northeastern France. We re-diagnose and validate the species Machimosaurus nowackianus from Harrar, Ethiopia. Finally, we establish a new species, Machimosaurus buffetauti, for the Lower Kimmeridgian specimens of France and Germany (and possibly England and Poland). We hypothesize that Machimosaurus may have been analogous to the Pliocene-Holocene genus Crocodylus in having one large-bodied taxon suited to traversing marine barriers and additional, geographically limited taxa across its range.

  14. Extreme adaptations for aquatic ectoparasitism in a Jurassic fly larva

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Bo; Engel, Michael S; Wappler, Torsten; Jarzembowski, Edmund A; Zhang, Haichun; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Xiaoting; Rust, Jes

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of ancient insect ectoparasitism is challenging, mostly because of the extreme scarcity of fossils with obvious ectoparasitic features such as sucking-piercing mouthparts and specialized attachment organs. Here we describe a bizarre fly larva (Diptera), Qiyia jurassica gen. et sp. nov., from the Jurassic of China, that represents a stem group of the tabanomorph family Athericidae. Q. jurassica exhibits adaptations to an aquatic habitat. More importantly, it preserves an unusual combination of features including a thoracic sucker with six radial ridges, unique in insects, piercing-sucking mouthparts for fluid feeding, and crocheted ventral prolegs with upward directed bristles for anchoring and movement while submerged. We demonstrate that Q. jurassica was an aquatic ectoparasitic insect, probably feeding on the blood of salamanders. The finding reveals an extreme morphological specialization of fly larvae, and broadens our understanding of the diversity of ectoparasitism in Mesozoic insects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02844.001 PMID:24963142

  15. Understanding Jurassic salt tectonics: An integrated approach utilizing visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    Understanding the mechanisms of salt deformation are critical in the identification of key prospects in a Jurassic salt basin. Understanding the geometry of the complex salt body significantly reduces risk in such prospects. A volume of 3D data was depth migrated to improve the delineation of the salt geometry. The major velocity changes with depth were interpreted in a state of the art seismic interpretation package. The results were then analyzed in 3D velocity visualization package which permitted refinement of the original model and validation via ray tracing. This velocity model was then reapplied to the Omega KK post stack depth migration process to create a final depth volume. The main prospects were interpreted using floodfill autopicking technology and mapped using conventional gridding and contouring techniques. The interpretations were then validated in a visual 3D palinspastic restoration package. Backstripping through time allowed the analysis of the salt deformation with respect to sediment loading. The validated interpretations were then analyzed in 3D voxel space to gain a true understanding of the salt geometry and its effect on the two key prospective reservoirs. Reservoir volumes were estimated using 3D sub volume detection. Finally a deviated wellbore was designed in order to test both prospects. The entire process shows the manner in which 3D visualization tools may be applied in a multi-disciplinary environment to better understand the prospect and communicate this understanding among team members.

  16. Closely associated theropod trackways from the Jurassic of Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Lingham-Soliar, Theagarten; Broderick, Tim; Ait Kaci Ahmed, Ali

    2003-12-01

    Eighty-eight tracks of large theropod dinosaurs were found in the mid-Jurassic of Zimbabwe. Among the tracks, at least five adjacent trackways are recorded. The adjacent tracks were probably made by animals traveling as a group, given that they are in relatively close succession; that there are three overlapping tracks (among just 23) suggesting reasonably close associations of the animals; that all the tracks are apparently of the same ichnotaxon; that the preservational types of the tracks are similar; and that the tracks are all of animals traveling in one general direction closely associated in time (there are no returning tracks of the same animals or of those of other species; presence of such tracks would be highly probable if the tracks were made over a period of time of even several hours). Nearby, recently discovered giant sauropod tracks, the first in sub-Saharan Africa, indicate a realistic potential of predator/prey interactions between the two groups of dinosaurs.

  17. Occurrences of Chert in Jurassic-Cretaceous Calciturbidites (SW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, Murat

    2015-10-01

    The Lycian Nappes, containing ophiolite and sedimentary rocks sequences, crop out in the southwest Turkey. The Tavas Nappe is a part of the Lycian Nappes. It includes the Lower Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous calciturbidites. Chert occurrences were observed in the lower part of this calciturbidite. These cherts can be classified on the basis of length, internal structure and host rock. Chert bands are 3.20-35.0min length and 7.0-35.0 cm thick. Chert lenses are 5.0-175.0 cm in length and 1.0-33.0 cm thick. According to its internal structure, granular chert (bladedlarge equitant quartz minerals replaced the big calcite mineral of fossil shell) and porcelanious chert (microcrystalline silica replaced micrite) have been separated. Cherts are generally associated with calcarenite-calcirudite, the others with calcilutite. Micritic calcite patches of cherts point out an uncompleted silicification. The source of silica was dominantly quartz-rich, older, basal rocks and to a lesser extent radiolarians. The coarse-grained calciturbidites act as a way for silica transportation. Some calcite veins (formed during transportation and emplacement of nappes) cut both calciturbidites and cherts. Thus, chert occurrences evolved before emplacement of nappes (the latest Cretaceous-Late Miocene period) during the epigenetic phase.

  18. Astronomical pacing of methane release in the Early Jurassic period.

    PubMed

    Kemp, David B; Coe, Angela L; Cohen, Anthony S; Schwark, Lorenz

    2005-09-15

    A pronounced negative carbon-isotope (delta13C) excursion of approximately 5-7 per thousand (refs 1-7) indicates the occurrence of a significant perturbation to the global carbon cycle during the Early Jurassic period (early Toarcian age, approximately 183 million years ago). The rapid release of 12C-enriched biogenic methane as a result of continental-shelf methane hydrate dissociation has been put forward as a possible explanation for this observation. Here we report high-resolution organic carbon-isotope data from well-preserved mudrocks in Yorkshire, UK, which demonstrate that the carbon-isotope excursion occurred in three abrupt stages, each showing a shift of -2 per thousand to -3 per thousand. Spectral analysis of these carbon-isotope measurements and of high-resolution carbonate abundance data reveals a regular cyclicity. We interpret these results as providing strong evidence that methane release proceeded in three rapid pulses and that these pulses were controlled by astronomically forced changes in climate, superimposed upon longer-term global warming. We also find that the first two pulses of methane release each coincided with the extinction of a large proportion of marine species.

  19. Revision of the Late Jurassic teleosaurid genus Machimosaurus (Crocodylomorpha, Thalattosuchia)

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mark T.; Hua, Stéphane; Steel, Lorna; Foffa, Davide; Brusatte, Stephen L.; Thüring, Silvan; Mateus, Octávio; Ruiz-Omeñaca, José Ignacio; Havlik, Philipe; Lepage, Yves; De Andrade, Marco Brandalise

    2014-01-01

    Machimosaurus was a large-bodied genus of teleosaurid crocodylomorph, considered to have been durophagous/chelonivorous, and which frequented coastal marine/estuarine ecosystems during the Late Jurassic. Here, we revise the genus based on previously described specimens and revise the species within this genus. We conclude that there were three European Machimosaurus species and another taxon in Ethiopia. This conclusion is based on numerous lines of evidence: craniomandibular, dental and postcranial morphologies; differences in estimated total body length; geological age; geographical distribution; and hypothetical lifestyle. We re-diagnose the type species Machimosaurus hugii and limit referred specimens to only those from Upper Kimmeridgian–Lower Tithonian of Switzerland, Portugal and Spain. We also re-diagnose Machimosaurus mosae, demonstrate that it is an available name and restrict the species to the uppermost Kimmeridgian–lowermost Tithonian of northeastern France. We re-diagnose and validate the species Machimosaurus nowackianus from Harrar, Ethiopia. Finally, we establish a new species, Machimosaurus buffetauti, for the Lower Kimmeridgian specimens of France and Germany (and possibly England and Poland). We hypothesize that Machimosaurus may have been analogous to the Pliocene–Holocene genus Crocodylus in having one large-bodied taxon suited to traversing marine barriers and additional, geographically limited taxa across its range. PMID:26064545

  20. Porosity controls in Late Jurassic algal reefs, Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, E.; Moore, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    Reefs associated with high-rise salt structures that were active during Late Jurassic deposition (Smackover-Haynesville) have been the target of numerous deep tests in the Mississippi Salt basin. One such test, in Wayne County, Mississippi, encountered a 24-m reef. The reef exhibited no porosity or permeability, while sequences above (21 m) and below (24 m) were dolomitized, porous, and permeable. The reef sequence consists of a facies mosaic of encrusting to columnar massive red coralline algae, laminated to stromatolitic blue-green algae(.) with associated pelleted internal sediments and other features characteristic of modern framework reefs. The reef complex exhibits a strong early marine diagenetic overprint consisting of bladed to fibrous magnesian calcite(.) cements and botryoidal masses of magnesian calcite or aragonite. The lack of discernible freshwater diagenesis and the nature of the reef framework seem to indicate deeper water conditions for reef development and subsequent early diagenesis. The associated dolomites have relict texture indicating that they were originally grainstones, perhaps derived from the reef itself. In the reef sequence, the geologic setting (relatively deep water), early marine cementation, and encrusting nature of the reef-formers produced a non-porous rock which was not susceptible to early dolomitization. However, the associated porous grainstones allowed active circulation of dolomitizing fluids (marine water.), leading to total dolomitization and a favorable reservoir facies.

  1. Neuroanatomy of the marine Jurassic turtle Plesiochelys etalloni (Testudinata, Plesiochelyidae).

    PubMed

    Carabajal, Ariana Paulina; Sterli, Juliana; Müller, Johannes; Hilger, André

    2013-01-01

    Turtles are one of the least explored clades regarding endocranial anatomy with few available descriptions of the brain and inner ear of extant representatives. In addition, the paleoneurology of extinct turtles is poorly known and based on only a few natural cranial endocasts. The main goal of this study is to provide for the first time a detailed description of the neuroanatomy of an extinct turtle, the Late Jurassic Plesiochelysetalloni, including internal carotid circulation, cranial endocast and inner ear, based on the first digital 3D reconstruction using micro CT scans. The general shape of the cranial endocast of P. etalloni is tubular, with poorly marked cephalic and pontine flexures. Anteriorly, the olfactory bulbs are clearly differentiated suggesting larger bulbs than in any other described extinct or extant turtle, and indicating a higher capacity of olfaction in this taxon. The morphology of the inner ear of P. etalloni is comparable to that of extant turtles and resembles those of slow-moving terrestrial vertebrates, with markedly low, short and robust semicircular canals, and a reduced lagena. In P. etalloni the arterial pattern is similar to that found in extant cryptodires, where all the internal carotid branches are protected by bone. As the knowledge of paleoneurology in turtles is scarce and the application of modern techniques such as 3D reconstructions based on CT scans is almost unexplored in this clade, we hope this paper will trigger similar investigations of this type in other turtle taxa.

  2. Jurassic failed rift system below the Filchner-Ronne-Shelf, Antarctica: New evidence from geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokat, Wilfried; Herter, Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    During the austral summer of 1994/95, reasonable ice conditions in the Weddell Sea allowed the acquisition of new high quality seismic refraction data parallel to the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (FRS), Antarctica. Although pack ice conditions resulted in some data gaps, the final velocity-depth/2D-density models cover the entire FRS in E-W direction using all available deep seismic data/picks from this remote area. The velocity-depth model shows a sedimentary basin with a thickness up to 12 km and a large velocity inversion in the lowermost sedimentary unit. The crustal thickness reaches a maximum of 40 km along the basin's margins in the Antarctic Peninsula and East Antarctica. In the central shelf area, numerous interfering seismic phases occur from the crust-mantle boundary at decreasing distances indicating a thinning of the crust. Here, the modelled velocities and densities reveal a thickness of 20 km for the igneous crust. This corridor of overthickened oceanic or close to oceanic crust is 160 km wide. The corridor is characterized by weak, but in general continuous magnetic anomalies, which we interpret as isochrons developed during the rifting or the initial formation of oceanic crust. If the crustal composition represents an old stripe of oceanic crust, a minimum estimate for the early formation of the oceanic crust is 145/148 Ma (Late Jurassic). However, based on the velocity of rift propagation during the initial opening of the adjacent Weddell Sea the oceanic crust is likely to have formed around 160 Ma. The onset of rifting and development of a thick igneous crust can be related to stresses developed between the interior and the southwestern paleo-Pacific subduction margin of the fragmenting Gondwana supercontinent in combination with additional melt supply from a deeper mantle source that arrived and spread in the period 183-155 Ma.

  3. A New Basal Sauropod Dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Niger and the Early Evolution of Sauropoda

    PubMed Central

    Remes, Kristian; Ortega, Francisco; Fierro, Ignacio; Joger, Ulrich; Kosma, Ralf; Marín Ferrer, José Manuel; Ide, Oumarou Amadou; Maga, Abdoulaye

    2009-01-01

    Background The early evolution of sauropod dinosaurs is poorly understood because of a highly incomplete fossil record. New discoveries of Early and Middle Jurassic sauropods have a great potential to lead to a better understanding of early sauropod evolution and to reevaluate the patterns of sauropod diversification. Principal Findings A new sauropod from the Middle Jurassic of Niger, Spinophorosaurus nigerensis n. gen. et sp., is the most complete basal sauropod currently known. The taxon shares many anatomical characters with Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods, while it is strongly dissimilar to Lower and Middle Jurassic South American and Indian forms. A possible explanation for this pattern is a separation of Laurasian and South Gondwanan Middle Jurassic sauropod faunas by geographic barriers. Integration of phylogenetic analyses and paleogeographic data reveals congruence between early sauropod evolution and hypotheses about Jurassic paleoclimate and phytogeography. Conclusions Spinophorosaurus demonstrates that many putatively derived characters of Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods are plesiomorphic for eusauropods, while South Gondwanan eusauropods may represent a specialized line. The anatomy of Spinophorosaurus indicates that key innovations in Jurassic sauropod evolution might have taken place in North Africa, an area close to the equator with summer-wet climate at that time. Jurassic climatic zones and phytogeography possibly controlled early sauropod diversification. PMID:19756139

  4. Jurassic petroleum trends in eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and central and eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1986-05-01

    Three Jurassic petroleum trends can be delineated in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, and in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico. These trends are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps, reservoirs, and hydrocarbon types. The source for the Jurassic hydrocarbons is Smackover algal mudstones. The Jurassic oil trend includes the area north of the regional peripheral fault systems in the tri-state area, and extends into the area north of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs and salt anticlines, with Smackover grainstones and dolostones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones as reservoirs. This trend has potential for Jurassic oil accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic oil and gas-condensate trend includes the onshore area between the regional peripheral fault systems and Wiggins arch and extends into the area of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs, salt related anticlines, and extensional faults. Cotton Valley fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Haynesville carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Smackover grainstones, packstones, dolostones, and marine sandstones, and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones serve as reservoirs. This trend contains most of the Jurassic fields in the eastern Gulf coastal plain. The trend has high potential for significant petroleum accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic deep natural gas trend includes the onshore area south of the Wiggins arch and extends into the Mississippi-Alabama shelf. Traps are faulted salt anticlines with basement highs as potential traps. Cotton Valley deltaic-strandplain sandstones and Norphlet eolian sandstones are the reservoirs. Several gas discoveries below 20,000 ft have been made in this trend in Mississippi and offshore Alabama. The trend has excellent potential for major gas accumulations in coastal Alabama and central Gulf of Mexico.

  5. High-latitude paleomagnetic poles from Middle Jurassic plutons and moat volcanics in New England and the controversy regarding Jurassic apparent polar wander for North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Fossen, Mickey C.; Kent, Dennis V.

    1990-10-01

    A paleomagnetic study of Middle Jurassic plutonic and volcanic rocks in New England (White Mountains Magma Series) yields high-latitude pole positions for North America. High unblocking temperature, moderate to high coercivity magnetizations of normal polarity have been isolated in three plutons (White Mountains batholith, Mount Monadnock, and the Belknap Mountains; mean age ~169 Ma), but the mean pole (88.4°N, 82.1°E, A95=6.1°) is not distinguishable from the geographic axis and therefore the hypothesis that the plutons have been contaminated by recent field overprints can not be rejected. However, a dual polarity, high unblocking temperature, and high coercivity magnetization isolated from the Moat volcanics (169 Ma, Rb-Sr age) was apparently acquired soon after caldera collapse and tilting, at about the time of intrusion and cooling of the Conway granite (reported ages K-Ar biotite, 168 Ma; zircon fission track, 163 Ma). The Moat volcanics pole position (78.7°N, 90.3°E, dp=7.1°, dm=10.2°) calculated using the mean magnetization direction of reversed polarity (the Cr component) falls at high latitude but is distinguishable from the spin axis. Moreover, published Middle Jurassic paleomagnetic poles from Gondwana (Africa, Australia, and East Antarctica) transferred to the North American reference frame also suggest a high-latitude Middel Jurassic pole position for North America, in agreement with the Moat volcanics pole. The new evidence for a Middle Jurassic loop to high latitudes in the North American apparent polar wander path conflicts by 15°-20° with some key published Jurassic reference poles (e.g., the Newark Trend N2 and the Corral Canyon poles) used to constrain current paleomagnetic Euler pole (PEP) apparent polar wander paths for the Jurassic. We suggest that a plausible explanation for the discrepancy is that the N2 and Corral Canyon magnetizations are in fact secondary and were acquired after tilting. The hypothesis that the North American

  6. Episodic Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous intraplate compression in Central Patagonia during Gondwana breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, César; Gianni, Guido; Echaurren, Andrés; Kingler, Federico Lince; Folguera, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    From Lower Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, several intraplate compression events affected discrete sectors of Central Patagonia, under a general context of crustal extension associated with Gondwana breakup. This was demonstrated by means of 2D and 3D seismic and borehole data, which show partial inversion of Lower and Middle Jurassic extensional structures of the Chubut and Cañadón Asfalto basins, during the earliest stages of breakup. A comparison with surrounding areas in Patagonia, where similar Jurassic intraplate compression was described, allowed the discrimination of three discrete pulses of subtle compression (C1: ∼188-185 Ma; C2: ∼170-163; C3: ∼157-136? Ma). Interestingly, episodic intraplate compressional events are closely followed by high flux magmatic events linked to the westward expansion of the Karoo-Ferrar thermal anomaly, which impacted on the lithosphere of southwest Gondwana in Lower Jurassic. In addition, we determined the approximate direction of the main compressive strain (σ1) compatible with other Jurassic intraplate belts of South America. These observations led us to propose a linkage between a thermo mechanically weakened continental crust due to LIPs activity, changes in plate motions and ridge-push forces generated by the opening of the Weddell Sea, in order to explain intraplate shortening, interrupted while Karoo LIPs magmatic invigoration took place.

  7. Complete exposure of Jurassic strata from the Newark Basin, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosh, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Exploratory drilling in 1985 has been undertaken along the right-of-way of a proposed flood diversion tunnel in northern New Jersey. The 21.8 kilometer long tunnel route is across the strike of Late Triassic and Early Jurassic rocks of the Newark Basin in an area where rock exposures are few due to glaciation. Approximately 2400 meters of the 6300 meter thick northern portion of the Newark Basin is represented in rock cores. The uppermost 870 meters of Late Triassic strata have been drilled and show an increased percentage of gravel toward the Jurassic contact. Approximately 1620 meters of Early Jurassic strata have been drilled including the three Watchung basalt flows. The oldest basalt flow at the Triassic-Jurassic contact has undergone extensive faulting with high angle normal and reverse oblique slip faults extending into the underlying Triassic rocks. Lacustrine deposits sandwiched between the basalt flows are cyclic with the entire transgressive-regressive sequences up to 12 meters thick and deep water shales and algal mats up to 4 meters thick. What emerges for the first time is a continuous picture of the Newark Basin Jurassic strata. These strata, containing kerogen-rich layers, are some of the youngest found in any of the Mesozoic rift basins. These rock cores represent the western most Mesozoic strata which extend eastward to similar-aged deposits found in outer continental shelf drill holes.

  8. Yuhania: a unique angiosperm from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Despite increasing claims of pre-Cretaceous angiosperms, whether there really are angiosperms in the Jurassic is apparently still an open question for many people before further evidence is available. This question can only be answered by studying more Jurassic plant fossils. Here we report a fossil angiosperm, Yuhania daohugouensis gen. et sp. nov, from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China. The plant includes connected stem, leaves, flowers, aggregate fruits, fruitlets, and seeds within fruitlets. The leaves are helically arranged along the curving stem, linear in shape, with 5–6 parallel veins. The aggregate fruit is pedicellate, composed of over 20 carpels/fruitlets helically arranged. Each fruitlet encloses a seed. The reproductive organs in various stages are found in the same plant, allowing us to understand the development of Yuhania. The occurrence of Yuhania in the Middle Jurassic re-confirms the Jurassic history for angiosperms that has been suggested by other independent research and adds to the on-going study on the early evolution of angiosperms.

  9. Middle and upper jurassic depositional environments at outer shelf and slope of Baltimore Canyon Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, L.A.; Stoffa, P.L.; Truchan, M.

    1985-04-01

    New CDP data acquired in the Baltimore Canyon Trough during project LASE made it possible to map a continuous Jurassic sedimentary sequence from the continental margin to the abyssal plain without interruption by basement structures. Intense carbonate sedimentation is inferred at the outer shelf during the Middle and Late Jurassic. Carbonate sedimentation probably started during the Middle Jurassic with a platform that prograded seaward with the development of ramps. By the Late Jurassic, a major reef complex had developed at the outer continental shelf. The onset of reef growth can be tentatively dated as 138 Ma by using the J1 reflector dated by the Deep Sea Drilling Project. A well-developed reef-talus deposit can be identified overlying the interface that generates the J1 reflector. A detailed analysis of semblancederived interval velocities in the reef-talus sequence indicates a compressional velocity of 4.3-4.5 km/sec (14,100-14,800 ft/sec) for that interval, which was part of a major barrier reef along the United States eastern margin. After the reef formed, the deep oceanic basin was mostly starved from shelf-derived sediments until the reef died and was buried by clastic sediments. By correlation of our seismic data and COST well information, that in the Baltimore Canyon Trough this reef had terminated by about the end of the Jurassic Period.

  10. Plutonic rocks of Jurassic age in the Alaska-Aleutian Range batholith: chemical variation and polarity.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, B.I.; Miesch, A.T.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Plutonic rocks of Jurassic age exposed on the Pacific side of this batholith form a compositionally continuous calc-alkaline suite that ranges from hornblende gabbro to quartz monzonite. Tonalite and quartz diorite are the dominant rock types. Trend-surface analysis of 102 samples indicates that the direction of slope of the trend is approximately normal to the Jurassic magmatic arc. K2O and SiO2 increase towards the E-SE and the other oxides towards the W-NW. If the chemical trends reflect the approximate geometry of a palaeo-subduction zone, the polarity of the Jurassic magmatic arc is to the NW, i.e. subduction was directed towards the SE. Thus the palaeo-subduction zone is on the opposite side of the arc from the position that has generally been assumed, indicating that the Jurassic plutonic rocks were not generated in response to classical Andean-type convergent plate margins. The magmatic arc may have been formed in an intra-ocean environment and subsequently has been rafted northwards and accreted to this part of the N Pacific rim during the late Mesozoic. Middle and Upper Jurassic clastics underlying Cook Inlet to the SE and derived from the magmatic arc are classified as back-arc deposits, rather than as an arc-trench gap sequence.-L.C.H.

  11. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic radiolarian chert above the Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain, California, and implications for its paleogeographic origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Murchey, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    Upper Jurassic red tuffaceous chert above the Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain, California (lat 35??N, long 240??E), contains three components of remanent magnetization. The first component (A; removed by ???100-???200 ??C) has a direction near the present-day field for southern California and is probably a recently acquired thermoviscous magnetization. A second component (B; removed between ???100 and ???600 ??C) is identical to that observed by previous workers in samples of underlying pillow basalt and overlying terrigenous sedimentary rocks. This component has constant normal polarity and direction throughout the entire section, although these rocks were deposited during a mixed polarity interval of the geomagnetic field. The B magnetization, therefore, is inferred to be a secondary magnetization acquired during accretion, uplift, or Miocene volcanism prior to regional clockwise rotation. The highest temperature component (C; removed between ???480 and 680 ??C) is of dual polarity and is tentatively interpreted as a primary magnetization, although it fails a reversal test possibly due to contamination by B. Separation of the B and C components is best shown by samples with negative-inclination C directions, and a corrected mean direction using only these samples indicates an initial paleolatitude of 32??N ?? 8??. Paleobiogeographic models relating radiolarian faunal distribution patterns to paleolatitude have apparently been incorrectly calibrated using the overprint B component. Few other paleomagnetic data have been incorporated in these models, and faunal distribution patterns are poorly known and mostly unqualified. The available data, therefore, do not support formation of the Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain near the paleoequator or accretion at ???10??N paleolatitude, as has been previously suggested based on paleomagnetic data, but indicate deposition near expected paleolatitudes for North America (35??N ?? 4??) during Late Jurassic

  12. Building a Seismic Sequence Stratigraphy Model Using HorizonCubes: A Jurassic Case Study in the Arabian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlYousuf, T. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the regional stratigraphic framework of the Middle and Upper Jurassic (Late Callovian-Oxfordian - Early Kimmeridgian) formations in the Arabian Basin is extremely important for unlocking the area's hydrocarbon potential. With recent advances in computing power and interpretation software, seismic sequence stratigraphy has become an important tool in reservoir characterization, and for reducing exploration risk. This paper provides a workflow that can be used to model seismic horizons using a dip steering volume. The workflow consists of data conditioning to produce a dip steering volume to generate a volume of densely spaced, automatically tracked seismic horizons, a "HorizonCube". The horizons are derived from the dip and azimuth information stored in the dip steered seismic volume model. In the Wheeler domain, the seismic volume is recomputed and flattened accordingly to match the Wheeler transformed HorizonCube. Based on the HorizonCube model, it is possible to identify stratigraphic carbonate buildups and depositional sequences. Isolating the horizon cube into smaller packages shows the dynamic variation in the deposition of sediments through time and space during the Jurassic period, starting from the top of Minjur sandstone to the Arab D limestone. The geologist is also able to identify system tracts with stratigraphic surfaces and estimate a stratigraphic base level curve. The approach is extended to integrate with the well correlation panel for better confidence in picking well tops. Visualizing system tract-interpretations together with the HorizonCube and overlaying the seismic and Wheeler-transformed domains helps to identify depositional features of interest that may form stratigraphic traps.

  13. Comparison of geology of Jurassic Norphlet Mary Ann field, Mobile Bay, Alabama, to onshore regional Norphlet trends

    SciTech Connect

    Marzono, M.; Pense, G.; Andronaco, P.

    1988-09-01

    The geology of the Mary Ann field is better understood in light of regional studies, which help to establish a depositional model in terms of both facies and thickness variations. These studies also illustrate major differences between onshore and offshore Norphlet deposits concerning topics such as diagenesis, hydrocarbon trapping, and migration. The Jurassic Norphlet sandstone was deposited in an arid basin extending from east Texas to Florida by a fluvial-eolian depositional system, prior to the transgression of the Smackover Formation. Until discovery of the Mary Ann field in 1979, Norphlet production was restricted to onshore areas, mostly along the Pickens-Pollard fault system in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. The Mary Ann field is a Norphlet dry-gas accumulation, and was the first offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico to establish economic reserves in the Jurassic. The field is located in Mobile Bay, approximately 25 mi (40 km) south of Mobile, Alabama. Formed by a deep-seated (more than 20,000 ft or 6096 m) faulted salt pillow, Mary Ann field produces from a series of stacked eolian dune sands situated near the Norphlet paleocoastline. Five lithofacies have been recognized in cores from the Mobil 76 No. 2 well. Each lithofacies has a distinct reservoir quality. Optimum reservoir faces are the dune and sheet sands. Nonreservoir facies are interdune (wet and dry), marine reworked, and evaporitic sands. Following deposition, these sediments have undergone varying amounts of diagenesis. Early cementation of well-sorted sands supported the pore system during compaction. However, late cementation by chlorite, silica, and alteration of liquid hydrocarbons to an asphaltic residue have completely occluded the pore system in parts of the reservoir.

  14. Onset of foreland -- Basin subsidence in the Middle Jurassic Utah -- Idaho trough, E Nevada and W Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum, C.J.; Dorsey, R.J.; Becker, U. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Analysis of Middle Jurassic strata and regional unconformities of the central Colorado Plateau indicates that these sediments were deposited in the distal part of a retroarc foreland basin. Middle Jurassic strata are divided into two major unconformity-bounded sequences (of Riggs and Blakey, 1993) for modeling purposes. Numerical flexural modeling has produced deflection profiles that match published regional stratigraphic profiles of the two sequences. The best fits between the flexural models and stratigraphic data were obtained using an infinite plate with a flexural rigidity of 10[sup 24] Nm, a mountain-belt topography similar to the Cretaceous Sevier fold-thrust belt, and a tapered alluvial-fluvial system extending 400 km and 600 km, respectively, eastward from the margin of the inferred thrust load. The match between the model and the data is improved by including a dune-field topography on the edge of the forebulge. The models do not include post-depositional uplift, erosion, and development of regional unconformities in the area of the forebulge. However, the stratigraphic architecture and geometry of unconformities closely resemble facies patterns produced in recent numerical models of sedimentation and erosion in foreland basins controlled by episodic thrusting. The data and model results strongly suggest that the onset of regional flexural subsidence in the early Sevier foreland basin took place at the time of formation of the J-2 (or possibly J-1) unconformity. Initial erosion of the J-2 occurred approximately during early Bajocian time ([approximately]170 Ma), which is close to the time of earliest known regional contraction in SE California and Nevada.

  15. High diversity, low disparity and small body size in plesiosaurs (Reptilia, Sauropterygia) from the Triassic-Jurassic boundary.

    PubMed

    Benson, Roger B J; Evans, Mark; Druckenmiller, Patrick S

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of the open ocean by tetrapods represents a major evolutionary transition that occurred independently in cetaceans, mosasauroids, chelonioids (sea turtles), ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs. Plesiosaurian reptiles invaded pelagic ocean environments immediately following the Late Triassic extinctions. This diversification is recorded by three intensively-sampled European fossil faunas, spanning 20 million years (Ma). These provide an unparalleled opportunity to document changes in key macroevolutionary parameters associated with secondary adaptation to pelagic life in tetrapods. A comprehensive assessment focuses on the oldest fauna, from the Blue Lias Formation of Street, and nearby localities, in Somerset, UK (Earliest Jurassic: 200 Ma), identifying three new species representing two small-bodied rhomaleosaurids (Stratesaurus taylori gen et sp. nov.; Avalonnectes arturi gen. et sp. nov) and the most basal plesiosauroid, Eoplesiosaurus antiquior gen. et sp. nov. The initial radiation of plesiosaurs was characterised by high, but short-lived, diversity of an archaic clade, Rhomaleosauridae. Representatives of this initial radiation were replaced by derived, neoplesiosaurian plesiosaurs at small-medium body sizes during a more gradual accumulation of morphological disparity. This gradualistic modality suggests that adaptive radiations within tetrapod subclades are not always characterised by the initially high levels of disparity observed in the Paleozoic origins of major metazoan body plans, or in the origin of tetrapods. High rhomaleosaurid diversity immediately following the Triassic-Jurassic boundary supports the gradual model of Late Triassic extinctions, mostly predating the boundary itself. Increase in both maximum and minimum body length early in plesiosaurian history suggests a driven evolutionary trend. However, Maximum-likelihood models suggest only passive expansion into higher body size categories.

  16. Diagenetic history of fluvial and lacustrine sandstones of the Hartford Basin (Triassic Jurassic), Newark Supergroup, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A. M.; Gierlowski-Kordesch, E. H.

    2007-04-01

    The early introduction of clays into continental sandstones has been attributed to mechanical infiltration by percolation of clay-rich surface waters into grain framework or cutans formed from pedogenic processes. The discovery of pedogenic mud aggregates as traction-load mud in ancient fluvial deposits suggests that permeability and porosity of terrigenous sandstones can be influenced at deposition and control early diagenetic patterns. This study compares diagenesis in fluvial (subaerially exposed) sandstones with lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones in a Triassic-Jurassic continental rift basin (Hartford Basin, Newark Supergroup). Diversity of diagenetic minerals and sequence of diagenetic alteration can be directly related to depositional environment. The fluvial sandstones in the New Haven Arkose, East Berlin Formation, and Shuttle Meadow Formation of the Hartford Basin are dominated by concretionary calcite and early calcite cement, infiltrated clays (illite-smectite), pedogenic mud aggregates (smectite and illite-smectite), grain coating clays (illite/hematite, illite-chlorite/hematite), quartz overgrowths, late stage carbonate cements (calcite, ferroan calcite), pore-filling clays (illite, kaolinite with minor amounts of smectite, smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite) and hematite. However, pedogenic processes in these fluvial sandstones retarded the development of quartz and feldspar overgrowths, and carbonate authigenesis, as well as the quality of diagenetically enhanced porosity. Dark gray-black lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones and mudrocks in the East Berlin and Shuttle Meadow Formations are dominated by pyrite, concretionary dolomite and early dolomite cement, radial grain coating clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite), late stage carbonate cements (dolomite, ferroan dolomite, ankerite), albite and pore-filling clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite, illite-chlorite). Clay minerals exist as detrital, mechanically infiltrated, and neoformed clay

  17. New geochronologic constraints on Early, Middle, and Late Jurassic orogenesis in the Klamath Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Donato, M.M. ); Hacker, B.R.; McWilliams, M.O.

    1993-04-01

    More than 40 new Ar/Ar ages, in conjunction with radiometric data published by many other authors, allow improved recognition of the spatial and temporal ranges of magmatic, metamorphic and deformational events associated with the formation of continental crust in the Klamath Mountains. Magmatism in earliest Jurassic time, [approx]200 Ma, is now recognized to have been widespread. Volcanoplutonic arcs of this age are present in upper levels of the Rattlesnake Creek terrane and in lower levels of the North Fork/Salmon River terrane. Roughly 200 Ma metaplutonic rocks are also found in the basement of the Rogue/Chetco arc, Preston Peak mafic complex, and Lems Ridge olistostrome. From 167--155 Ma, magmatic and structural extension occurred along a NW-SE corridor restricted to the northern Klamaths. Igneous rocks include the Wooley Creek, Preston Peak, Josephine, and Rogue/Chetco suites, and the Marble Mountains fault may represent a contemporaneous normal fault. The southern edge of the extended corridor is the Salmon tectonic line of Irwin (1985), but the northern boundary has not been recognized or named. Both boundaries were presumably transfer zones accommodating differential subhorizontal extension, but many details are still to be determined. The Siskiyou and Nevadan orogenies can no longer be assigned specific, narrow time windows and may have outlived their usefulness as currently defined. Enough geochronologic data are now available to consider the ages and characteristics of specific plutons, deformation fabrics, and metamorphic minerals in individual areas, rather than assuming such events occur throughout the orogen within specific time ranges.

  18. Petrology of a Jurassic cold seep carbonate mound, Great Valley Group, northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.A.; Bottjer, D.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Ancient sites of chemosynthetic marine invertebrate communities have been increasingly described from the stratigraphic record. Fossil cold seeps are best identified by the stratigraphically restricted co-occurrence of anomalous carbonates and fossils of organisms that in modern environments are chemosymbiotic. A Late Jurassic (Tithonian) age fossil seep site is preserved in deep-water turbidites of the Stony Creek Formation (Great Valley Group). Two low-relief carbonate mounds contain an abundant and diverse fossil macrofauna including taxa whose modern counterparts are chemosymbiotic, as well as several associate taxa. Two broad carbonate fabric types are present: a bioturbated, peloidal, fossiliferous micrite with abundant flecks of organic matter and several wavy laminated marine cements. The micrite and cements are either irregularly interlayered on distinctly separated by corrosion surfaces coated with iron oxides that may mark pulses of H[sub 2]S-rich fluids to the seep. Petrographic observations indicate the following idealized paragenetic sequence: deposition of micrite, with contemporaneous biotic activity; corrosion event, with preferential preservation of some peloids; precipitation of pyrite on some corrosion surfaces and concentration of insoluble siltstone linings where corrosion has opened vugs; precipitation of blocky yellow calcite cement with organic-rich inclusions in void spaces and around peloids; growth of clear to gray, botryoidal to fibrous cement; and precipitation of late, clear calcite spar. Similar fabrics and abundant tube-like structures are present in another Great Valley carbonate lens of Early Cretaceous (Albian-Aptian) age exposed on the Cold Fork of Cottonwood Creek near Red Bluff, California. Detailed integration of petrological studies of these fabrics with stable isotope studies and fossil faunal distributions provide a powerful approach for understanding the history of development and individual fossil seeps.

  19. Sequential stratigraphy of Jurassic and Cretaceous in the central Saudi Arabian platform

    SciTech Connect

    Le Nindre, Y.M.; Manivit, J.; Vaslet, D. ); Manivit, H. Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris )

    1991-08-01

    Depositional sequences and system tracts in the Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Central Saudi Arabian platform have been established on the basis of precise lithofacies analysis, detailed sedimentologic interpretation, and accurate age determination by ammonites, nautoli, brachipods, echinoids, and nannoflora. A eustatic depositional model integrated with accepted worldwide sequential stratigraphic data is proposed, and appears to correlate fairly well with the 1988 global sea level chart by Haq and others, particularly for the Lower and Middle Jurassic and the Middle and Upper Cretaceous. Ages determined by accurate biostratigraphic data enable time correlations to be made with third-order eustatic cycles from Vail's 1988 global chart. Eustatic changes therefore appear to be the main factors of sedimentary control during the Jurassic and Cretaceous on the Arabian platform.

  20. On two pterosaur humeri from the Tendaguru beds (Upper Jurassic, Tanzania).

    PubMed

    Costa, Fabiana R; Kellner, Alexander W A

    2009-12-01

    Jurassic African pterosaur remains are exceptionally rare and only known from the Tendaguru deposits, Upper Jurassic, Tanzania. Here we describe two right humeri of Tendaguru pterosaurs from the Humboldt University of Berlin: specimens MB.R. 2828 (cast MN 6661-V) and MB.R. 2833 (cast MN 6666-V). MB.R. 2828 consists of a three-dimensionally preserved proximal portion. The combination of the morphological features of the deltopectoral crest not observed in other pterosaurs suggests that this specimen belongs to a new dsungaripteroid taxon. MB.R. 2833 is nearly complete, and because of a long and round proximally placed deltopectoral crest it could be referred to the Archaeopterodactyloidea. It is the smallest pterosaur from Africa and one of the smallest flying reptiles ever recorded. These specimens confirm the importance of the Tendaguru deposits for the Jurassic pterosaur record. This potential, however, has to be fully explored with more field work.

  1. Integrated geological, geophysical, and geochemical interpretation of Upper Jurassic petroleum trends in eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1986-09-01

    The petroleum potential of the Upper Jurassic strata in the eastern Gulf of Mexico region is excellent. At least three Upper Jurassic petroleum trends can be delineated in the region. An oil trend can be identified onshore in the area north of the regional peripheral fault trend and is interpreted to extend offshore into the area north of the Destin anticline in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. An oil and gas-condensate trend can be defined onshore between the regional peripheral fault trend and the Wiggins arch. This trend is projected to extend offshore into the area of the Destin anticline. A deep natural gas trend can be delineated onshore south of the Wiggins arch and extends offshore into the Mississippi-Alabama shelf area. These trends are recognized by hydrocarbon types, basinal position, and relationship to regional structural features. The main petroleum source rocks for the Upper Jurassic hydrocarbons are Smackover carbonate mudstones.

  2. Central Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province Cenozoic igneous activity and its relation in space and time with the Late Jurassic rift-to-drift-related alkalic dikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, R.; Schultz, L.; Hendriks, B. W.; Harbor, D. J.; Connors, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    A Swarm of Late Jurassic alkalic intrusions, geographically limited mainly to the Augusta County in western Virginia has been studied geochemically. These dykes were emplaced along a northwest-southeast cross-strike basement fracture zone during Mesozoic extension. However, not all igneous rocks in Virginia are Jurassic; published K-Ar ages already suggested an Eocene age activity around Monterey, VA. We systematically sampled and studied these rocks geochemically and used the Ar-Ar dating technique to define a more precise age for this youngest volcanic activity East of the Mississippi. The younger igneous bodies have traditionally been interpreted as intrusive bodies representing old plumbing systems of eroded volcanic centers. This hypothesis is based on studies of aphanitic to porphyritic and occasionally vesicular hard rocks from quarries and road cuts. Pyroclastic deposits have mainly been neglected during theses earlier studies. However additional petrographic studies of volcanic sediments are able to shed light not only on the volcanic nature of these pyroclastic rocks but also on eruption mechanisms and magma crust interactions. Our petrographic studies indicate that these volcanic sediments contain different clasts of igneous and sedimentary country rocks (sandstones and limestones of different formations), fresh glass shards and crystals of predominantly pyroxene, hornblende and micas. A previously unmapped, massive, m-thick andesitic pyroclastic deposit has been studied in detail to shed light on the formation of theses volcanic sediments. Field relations and observations (e.g. denser rock fragments are enriched in the lower part of the sequence and bedding is largely parallel to the present topography) are consistent with a massive welded ignimbrite. As a result, surface erosion after the eruption must be less significant than previously believed and some rocks are clearly volcanic in nature. Petrogenetically the Jurassic magmas are much more alkalic

  3. Total petroleum systems of the Paleozoic and Jurassic, Greater Ghawar Uplift and adjoining provinces of central Saudi Arabia and northern Arabian-Persian Gulf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    Oil of the Arabian Sub-Basin Tuwaiq/Hanifa-Arab TPS is sourced by organic-rich, marine carbonates of the Jurassic Tuwaiq Mountain and Hanifa Formations. These source rocks were deposited in two of three intraplatform basins during the Jurassic and, where thermally mature, have generated a superfamily of oils with distinctive geochemical characteristics. Oils were generated and expelled from these source rocks beginning in the Cretaceous at about 75 Ma. Hydrocarbon production is from 3 cyclic carbonate-rock reservoirs of the Arab Formation that are sealed by overlying anhydrite. Several giant and supergiant fields, including the world's largest oil field at Ghawar, Saudi Arabia, produce mostly from the Arab carbonate-rock reservoirs. Two assessment units are also recognized in the Arabian Sub-Basin Tuwaiq/Hanifa-Arab TPS that are similarly related to structural trap style and presence of underlying Infracambrian salt: (1) an onshore Horst-Block Anticlinal Oil AU, and (2) a mostly offshore Salt-Involved Structural Oil AU. The mean total volume of undiscovered resource for the Arabian Sub-Basin Tuwaiq/Hanifa-Arab TPS is estimated at about 49 billion barrels of oil equivalent (42 billion barrels of oil, 34 trillion feet of gas, and 1.4 billion barrels of natural gas liquids).

  4. Three new species of mesosciophilid gnats from the Middle-Late Jurassic of China (insecta: Diptera: Nematocera: Mesosciophilidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, J F

    2008-11-15

    Three extinct new species from the Callovian or Oxfordian (uppermost Middle Jurassic or lowermost Upper Jurassic) Daohugou beds in Inner Mongolia, China is described as Mesosciophila abstracta sp. n., Mesosciophilodes synchrona sp. n. and Paramesosciophilodes eximia sp. n. (Family Mesosciophilidae). All the records of mesosciophilid gnats are briefly reviewed.

  5. Provenance evolution of the Jurassic northern Qaidam Basin (West China) and its geological implications: evidence from detrital zircon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Long; Xiao, Ancheng; Wu, Lei; Tian, Yuntao; Rittner, Martin; Lou, Qianqian; Pan, Xiaotian

    2017-03-01

    The Jurassic system is the major hydrocarbon source rock and of crucial importance for understanding the Mesozoic intra-continental tectonics in West China. This paper presents systematic detrital zircon geochronology of the Jurassic outcropping at the Dameigou locality in the northern Qaidam Basin, and reports 1000 single-grain U-Pb zircon ages that have implications for the provenance, the corresponding basin property as well as the tectonic setting of West China during Jurassic. Zircon ages exhibit two major clusters at 250 and 2400 Ma whereas two minor clusters at 450 and 850 Ma, suggesting primary sources from the East Kunlun Shan and Oulongbuluke Block, secondary sources from the North Qaidam UHP belt and South Qilian Shan. Combined with observation of lithology and sedimentary facies, two rifting periods were inferred in the earliest Jurassic and the early stage of the Middle Jurassic, respectively, accompanied by further extension throughout the Jurassic. Our results do not support a foreland basin related to the Jurassic southward thrusting of the South Qilian Shan, but favor that the Mesozoic intra-continental tectonics in West China were characterised by pulsed responses to specific collisions rather than a persisting contractional setting during Jurassic period.

  6. Structural development of the Jurassic Magnetic Quiet Zone off Morocco and identification of Middle Jurassic magnetic lineations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeser, H. A.; Steiner, C.; Schreckenberger, B.; Block, M.

    2002-10-01

    Geophysical investigations carried out during two Meteor cruises have revealed weak linear magnetic anomalies in those parts of the Jurassic Magnetic Quiet Zone (JMQZ) off Morocco that are not affected by Cenozoic igneous activity. The linear magnetic anomalies are not correlated with variations in relief or structure of oceanic crust. Using the reversal sequence M25-M41, the anomalies of the JMQZ can be modeled with a half spreading rate of 2.2 cm/yr. Extrapolation of the weak lineations back to the slope anomaly S1 results in a breakup age of 170 Ma. According to this interpretation the crust of the JMQZ off Morocco has formed during the time 170-155 Ma (Bajocian to Oxfordian). However, much lower spreading rates (around 1 cm/yr) cannot be excluded. S1 coincides with a poorly developed "seaward dipping reflector sequence" (SDRS), which is most likely its source. The SDRS corroborates the earlier claim that S1 marks the ocean-continent transition. Seaward of S1 is a 70-km-wide strip of horizontal reflectors that become landward dipping to the west in the uppermost part of the basement; it parallels S1 over a distance of 200 km and may indicate excessive magma supply within the first 2 m.y. of seafloor spreading. Similar landward dipping reflectors are observed also in the conjugate Sohm Abyssal Plain off Nova Scotia. The average magnetization of the landward dipping reflectors is much lower than that of the SDRS. A lower crustal body with a seismic velocity of ˜7.3 km/s, which formed during the Neogene beneath the eastern part of the Essaouira Rise, has only a weak magnetization (<0.5 A/m).

  7. The Early Jurassic climate: General circulation model simulations and the paleoclimate record

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of several general circulation model simulations of the Early Jurassic climate. The general circulation model employed was developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies while most paleoclimate data were provided by the Paleographic Atlas Project of the University of Chicago. The first chapter presents an Early Jurassic base simulation, which uses detailed reconstructions of paleogeography, vegetation, and sea surface temperature as boundary condition data sets. The resulting climatology reveals an Earth 5.2[degrees]C warmer, globally, than at present and a latitudinal temperature gradient dominated by high-latitude warming (+20[degrees]C) and little tropical change (+1[degrees]C). Comparisons show a good correlation between simulated results and paleoclimate data. Sensitivity experiments are used to investigate any model-data mismatches. Chapters two and three discuss two important aspects of Early Jurassic climate, continental aridity and global warming. Chapter two focuses on the hydrological capabilities of the general circulation model. The general circulation model's hydrologic diagnostics are evaluated, using the distribution of modern deserts and Early Jurassic paleoclimate data as validating constraints. A new method, based on general circulation model diagnostics and empirical formulae, is proposed for evaluating moisture balance. Chapter three investigates the cause of past global warming, concentrating on the role of increased ocean heat transport. Early Jurassic simulations show that increased ocean heat transports may have been a major factor in past climates. Increased ocean heat transports create latitudinal temperature gradients that closely approximate paleoclimate data and solve the problem of tropical overheating that results from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. Increased carbon dioxide cannot duplicate the Jurassic climate without also including increased ocean heat transports.

  8. Jurassic Early Cretaceous intermediate virtual geomagnetic poles and Pangaean subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizán, Haroldo; Van Zele, María Andrea

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to show that the distribution of Jurassic-Early Cretaceous intermediate virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) seems to be conditioned by Pangaean subducted slabs. Palaeomagnetic data from between ˜ 200Ma and 125Ma were compiled from reliable studies and their VGPs repositioned in their Jurassic-Early Cretaceous geographic location considering a "zero-longitude" motion of Africa over the last 200m.y. and the corresponding palaeomagnetic poles from each sequence. Those repositioned VGPs lying between latitudes of ± 60° were considered to be intermediate. To avoid bias as a function of simple sampling numbers for those sequences with more data, each VGP was weighted by Love's methodology. A colour-scale map (shadow-scale map in printed issue) of density of the weighted intermediate VGPs was obtained and compared with the Pangaean subduction zones. There is a good visual correlation between the distribution of these VGPs and the location of the subduction zones during the Jurassic, suggesting that there is a relationship between the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous geomagnetic reversals and the plate tectonic setting at that time. Minima of intermediate VGPs correlate well with the absence of VGPs predicted with a tomographic model and the intermediate VGP distribution is also well correlated with zones of faster seismic wave propagation in the lower mantle (just above of the core-mantle boundary), which suggests that the Jurassic geomagnetic polarity transitions could have been controlled by a structure of the core-mantle boundary similar to that at the Present time. We suspect that the subducted lithospheric slabs refrigerated the deepest mantle causing more heat than average flowing out from the core and controlling the geometry of the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous polarity transitions. The Earth's lithospheric plate motion history could have played a controlling role in the geometry of the geomagnetic reversals.

  9. Tectonic and magmatic evolution of a fossil (Ultra-)Slow Spreading Ocean: the study case of the Jurassic Ligurian Tethys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardo, G. B.

    2008-12-01

    refertilized peridotites) rock types. Isotope data indicate that asthenosphere melting and lithosphere melt percolation started during Early Jurassic times and the pristine lithospheric peridotites were isotopically equilibrated with the percolating melts, attaining MORB isotopic signatures. Melt impregnation (i.e. interstitial crystallization) caused significant melt entrapment in the extending lithosphere: accordingly, the rift evolution of the continental system, from rifting to drifting to formation of the passive margins was significantly not-volcanic (but not a-magmatic). Ongoing extension caused complete failure of the continental crust and peridotites from the sub-continental mantle were exposed to the sea-floor. Sub-continental peridotites were exhumed and exposed at the sea- floor close to the continental margins, whereas the strongly modified peridotites formed by melt-rock interaction were exhumed and exposed at more internal oceanic settings of the basin. Present knowledge indicates that none of the known AA ophiolitic peridotites from the Jurassic Ligurian Tethys can be recognized as simple refractory residua after Jurassic asthenosphere partial melting. This could indicate that the Ligurian Tethys never reached a complete oceanic stage, where magmatic rocks and mantle refractory residua should be almost coeval and cogenetic.

  10. A new stem turtle from the Middle Jurassic of Scotland: new insights into the evolution and palaeoecology of basal turtles.

    PubMed

    Anquetin, Jérémy; Barrett, Paul M; Jones, Marc E H; Moore-Fay, Scott; Evans, Susan E

    2009-03-07

    The discovery of a new stem turtle from the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) deposits of the Isle of Skye, Scotland, sheds new light on the early evolutionary history of Testudinata. Eileanchelys waldmani gen. et sp. nov. is known from cranial and postcranial material of several individuals and represents the most complete Middle Jurassic turtle described to date, bridging the morphological gap between basal turtles from the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic and crown-group turtles that diversify during the Late Jurassic. A phylogenetic analysis places the new taxon within the stem group of Testudines (crown-group turtles) and suggests a sister-group relationship between E. waldmani and Heckerochelys romani from the Middle Jurassic of Russia. Moreover, E. waldmani also demonstrates that stem turtles were ecologically diverse, as it may represent the earliest known aquatic turtle.

  11. Earliest evolution of multituberculate mammals revealed by a new Jurassic fossil.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chong-Xi; Ji, Qiang; Meng, Qing-Jin; Tabrum, Alan R; Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2013-08-16

    Multituberculates were successful herbivorous mammals and were more diverse and numerically abundant than any other mammal groups in Mesozoic ecosystems. The clade also developed diverse locomotor adaptations in the Cretaceous and Paleogene. We report a new fossil skeleton from the Late Jurassic of China that belongs to the basalmost multituberculate family. Dental features of this new Jurassic multituberculate show omnivorous adaptation, and its well-preserved skeleton sheds light on ancestral skeletal features of all multituberculates, especially the highly mobile joints of the ankle, crucial for later evolutionary success of multituberculates in the Cretaceous and Paleogene.

  12. A basal alvarezsauroid theropod from the early Late Jurassic of Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Choiniere, Jonah N; Xu, Xing; Clark, James M; Forster, Catherine A; Guo, Yu; Han, Fenglu

    2010-01-29

    The fossil record of Jurassic theropod dinosaurs closely related to birds remains poor. A new theropod from the earliest Late Jurassic of western China represents the earliest diverging member of the enigmatic theropod group Alvarezsauroidea and confirms that this group is a basal member of Maniraptora, the clade containing birds and their closest theropod relatives. It extends the fossil record of Alvarezsauroidea by 63 million years and provides evidence for maniraptorans earlier in the fossil record than Archaeopteryx. The new taxon confirms extreme morphological convergence between birds and derived alvarezsauroids and illuminates incipient stages of the highly modified alvarezsaurid forelimb.

  13. Examining early-diagenetic processes as a chief sink for carbonate in the aftermath of the Triassic-Jurassic crisis: Hettangian concretions of Muller Canyon, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritterbush, K. A.; Loyd, S. J.; Corsetti, F. A.; Bottjer, D. J.; Berelson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic, climate, and biotic changes across the Triassic-Jurassic transition appear to have resulted in a "carbonate gap" in the rock record of many shallow marine environments. Ecological state changes documented in near-shore settings in both Tethys and Panthassa show an earliest Jurassic switch to sponge-dominated biosiliceous sedimentation regimes. The Sunrise Formation exposed in the Gabbs Valley Range of Nevada (USA) records a peculiar juxtaposition of Hettangian carbonate-rich strata that contain demosponge spicules as the primary bioclast. It is unclear 1) why biocalcifiers were not recorded in higher abundance in this near-shore back-arc basin setting; 2) why carbonates formed following a biosiliceous regime; and 3) what the lithology indicates about post-extinction marine geochemical dynamics. Detailed sedimentological, paleontological, and geochemical analyses were applied to a 20-m thick sequence of limestone and chert in the Muller Canyon area, which is the Auxiliary Stratotype for the Triassic/Jurassic boundary. Concretion anatomy, bioclast microfacies, and oxygen and carbon isotopic signatures all indicate the Hettangian limestones are chiefly diagenetic concretions that all formed very shallowly, some essentially at the sediment-water interface. We infer that local bottom waters and/or pore waters were supersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate and that this contributed to widespread concretion sedimentation independent of biomineralization. Ecological incumbency of the demosponge meadows may have been supported by concurrent augmentation of marine silica concentration and this apparently proved inhospitable to re-colonization of benthic biocalcifying macrofauna. Together the biotic and lithologic consequences of the extinction represent million-year scale ecological restructuring and highlight early diagenetic precipitation as a major sink in long-term regional carbonate cycling. Perhaps the widespread 'carbonate gap' is actually a gap in

  14. The timing of Jurassic orogenesis in the continental arc terrane of the western US Cordillera: Jackston Mountains, northwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, M.J.; Wright, J.E. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Pre-Nevadan, Jurassic orogenesis appears to be characteristic of many Mesozoic arc assemblages of the western US Cordillera. In most places this deformation is Middle Jurassic ([approximately]170--160 Ma). The authors recent work in the Black Rock Desert (BRD) documents an episode of Early Jurassic metamorphism and tectonism in the Jackson Mountains (JM). Here, an extensive arc section, including the Norian to Middle ( ) Jurassic Happy Creek Volcanics and Early to Middle Jurassic plutons, indicate vigorous arc magmatism in the arly Mesozoic. Among the southwest flank of the range the lower Mesozoic section is overridden by an east vergent thrust sheet carrying upper Paleozoic rocks of the McGill Canyon Unit. Another thrust package is located on the same side of the range, but further to the north, and contains variably metamorphosed clastic rocks, carbonate, and mafic volcanics. There is also an abrupt drop in metamorphic grade across the main thrust fault where greenschist facies rocks are in contact with virtually unmetamorphosed Happy Creek Volcanics. Two plutons with U/Pb zircon age of 188 [+-] 2 Ma and 193 [+-] 3 Ma crosscut the northern thrust fault. These relations suggest than an episode of regional metamorphism followed by E-W compressional tectonism was completed during the Early Jurassic in this portion of the arc terrane. These results differ significantly from previous studies that have interpreted all compressive deformation in the JM to have taken place between the Middle Jurassic and Cretaceous. The authors new data indicate that pre-Nevada Jurassic deformation is somewhat older in the BRD than that documented in other parts of the Mesozoic arc. Because voluminous Jurassic magmatism also began at an earlier time (Early Jurassic) in the BRD than elsewhere, they suggest that deformation and metamorphis within the arc may be facilitated and localized during periods of high heat flux related to magmatic input.

  15. Polar record of Early Jurassic massive carbon injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suan, Guillaume; Nikitenko, Boris L.; Rogov, Mikhail A.; Baudin, François; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Knyazev, Valeriy G.; Glinskikh, Larisa A.; Goryacheva, Anna A.; Adatte, Thierry; Riding, James B.; Föllmi, Karl B.; Pittet, Bernard; Mattioli, Emanuela; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) (ca. 182 Myr, Early Jurassic) represents one of the best-recognized examples of greenhouse warming, decreased seawater oxygenation and mass extinction. The leading hypothesis to explain these changes is the massive injection of thermogenic or gas hydrate-derived 13C-depleted carbon into the atmosphere, resulting in a > 3 per mil negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE), accelerated nutrient input and dissolved oxygen consumption in the oceans. Nevertheless, the lack of a precisely dated record of the T-OAE outside low latitudes has led to considerable debate about both its temporal and spatial extent and hence concerning its underlying causes. Here we present new isotopic and lithological data from three precisely dated N Siberian sections, which demonstrate that mass extinction and onset of strong oxygen-deficiency occurred near synchronously in polar and most tropical sites and were intimately linked to the onset of a marked 6‰ negative CIE recorded by bulk organic carbon. Rock Eval pyrolysis data from Siberia and comparisons with low latitudes show that the CIE cannot be explained by the extent of stratification of the studied basins or changes in organic matter sourcing and suggest that the negative CIE reflects rapid 13C-depleted carbon injection to all exchangeable reservoirs. Sedimentological and palynological indicators show that the injection coincided with a change from cold (abundant glendonites and exotic boulder-sized clasts) to exceptionally warm conditions (dominance of the thermophyllic pollen genus Classopollis) in the Arctic, which likely triggered a rapid, possibly partly glacioeustatic sea-level rise. Comparisons with low latitude records reveal that warm climate conditions and poor marine oxygenation persisted in continental margins at least 600 kyr after the CIE, features that can be attributed to protracted and massive volcanic carbon dioxide degassing. Our data reveal that the T-OAE profoundly

  16. The role of Variscan to pre-Jurassic active extension in controlling the architecture of the rifted passive margin of Adria: the example of the Canavese Zone (Western Southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Succo, Andrea; De Caroli, Sara; Centelli, Arianna; Barbero, Edoardo; Balestro, Gianni; Festa, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The Canavese Zone, in the Italian Western Southern Alps, represents the remnant of the Jurassic syn-rift stretching, thinning and dismemberment of the distal passive margin of Adria during the opening of the Penninic Ocean (i.e., Northern Alpine Tethys). Our findings, based on detailed geological mapping, structural analysis and stratigraphic and petrographic observations, document however that the inferred hyper-extensional dismemberment of this distal part of the passive margin of Adria, up to seafloor spreading, was favored by the inherited Variscan geometry and crustal architecture of the rifted margin, and by the subsequent Alpine-related strike-slip deformation. The new field data document, in fact, that the limited vertical displacement of syn-extensional (syn-rift) Jurassic faults was ineffective in producing and justifying the crustal thinning observed in the Canavese Zone. The deformation and thinning of the continental basement of Adria are constrained to the late Variscan time by the unconformable overlying of Late Permian deposits. Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene and Late Cenozoic strike-slip faulting (i.e., Alpine and Insubric tectonic stages) reactivated previously formed faults, leading to the formation of a complex tectonic jigsaw which only partially coincides with the direct product of the Jurassic syn-rift dismemberment of the distal part of the passive margin of Adria. Our new findings document that this dismemberment of the rifted continental margin of Adria did not simply result from the syn-rift Jurassic extension, but was strongly favored by the inheritance of older (Variscan and post-Variscan) tectonic stages, which controlled earlier lithospheric weakness. The formation of rifted continental margins by extension of continental lithosphere leading to seafloor spreading is a complex and still poorly understood component of the plate tectonic cycle. Geological mapping of rifted continental margins may thus provide significant information to

  17. Distribution and Origin of Iridium in Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic Continental Strata of the Fundy, Deerfield and Hartford Basins, Newark Supergroup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, L. H.; Kyte, F. T.

    2015-12-01

    To date, elevated Ir levels in continental sediments proximal to the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (TJB) have been reported only from Upper Triassic strata of the Newark and Fundy basins, below the basal extrusive units of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. We report here the first occurrence of elevated Ir above the oldest volcanic units, as well as additional horizons of Ir enrichment from other basins of the Newark Supergroup. In the Fundy Basin (Nova Scotia, Canada), lacustrine sediments of the Scots Bay Member of the McCoy Brook Formation that directly overlie the North Mountain Basalt contain Ir up to 413 pg/g in fish-bearing strata very close to the palynological TJB. Higher in the formation the strata lack significant Ir enrichment. Similarly, sedimentary strata from between flows of North Mount Basalt show no Ir appreciable enrichment. The Deerfield Basin (Massachusetts) extension of the Hartford Basin contains only one CAMP extrusive unit, the Lower Jurassic Deerfield Basalt. Very modest Ir enrichment, up to 90 pg/g, occurs in the Fall River Beds of the Sugarloaf Formation, several meters below the basalt, and up to 70 pg/g in the Turners Falls Formation less than 2 meters above the basalt. The uppermost New Haven Formation (Upper Triassic) at the Silver Ridge locality (Guilford, CT) in the Hartford Basin contains abundant plant debris, but no evidence of elevated Ir. At the Clathopteris locality to the north (Holyoke, MA), potentially correlative strata that are fine grained and rich in plant remains have Ir enriched to 542 pg/g, an order of magnitude higher than in the coarser-grained strata in direct stratigraphic contact. The high-Ir beds also have elevated REEs relative to other Hartford Basin samples, although there is no evidence of HREE enrichment. We consider the basalts of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province, widely accepted as the driver of Late Triassic extinctions, as the origin of the elevated Ir levels in the Newark Supergroup.

  18. Structure and climate controls on the evolution of a Mid-Late Jurassic alluvial fan-delta system in the western part of Yanshan fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chengfa; Liu, Shaofeng; Yao, Xiang; Ma, Pengfei

    2016-04-01

    The Yanshan fold-thrust belt experienced several significant tectonic events during Mesozoic time and developed thrust fault-bounded intramontane sedimentary basins. However, elaborate works of sedimentology is inadequate in the Yanshan belt, particularly in its western segment, leading to a failure in comprehensively understanding how bounding-faults and climate change influence the basin filling processes. Our detailed sedimentological study of the Middle Jurassic Xiahuayuan Formation and Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Jiulongshan Formation in the Xiahuayuan basin of northern Hebei province, indicates a genetic relationship between the evolution of an alluvial fan-delta system and the tectonic and climate setting. The Xiahuayuan Formation was assigned to a debris flow-dominated Gilbert-type fan-delta composed of topset conglomerates, foreset massive siltstone-fine grained sandstone interbedded with lenticular conglomerate units and bottomset/lake bottom fine-grained deposits, spatially restricted to the northern part of the basin. While the lower Jiulongshan Formation was considered as a relatively small debris flow- and turbidity currents-dominated fan-delta with a single-ramp portrait, prograding into the middle part of the basin. And the upper part of Jiulongshan Formation contributed to the lake bottom component of the delta system during the forming of the Jiulongshan Formation. Our results reveal a transformation of a fan-delta from Gilbert-type to single-ramp type and the basinward migration of this fan-delta during Mid-Late Jurassic in the Xiahuayuan basin. And it is assumed that the activity of a thrust fault along the northern basin margin and the rapid switch of climate conditions from warm and humid to hot and dry triggered the transformation and migration of this fan-delta system.

  19. Porosity and grain size controls on compaction band formation in Jurassic Navajo Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, Richard A.; Okubo, Chris H.; Fossen, Haakon

    2010-01-01

    Determining the rock properties that permit or impede the growth of compaction bands in sedimentary sequences is a critical problem of importance to studies of strain localization and characterization of subsurface geologic reservoirs. We determine the porosity and average grain size of a sequence of stratigraphic layers of Navajo Sandstone that are then used in a critical state model to infer plastic yield envelopes for the layers. Pure compaction bands are formed in layers having the largest average grain sizes (0.42–0.45 mm) and porosities (28%), and correspondingly the smallest values of critical pressure (-22 MPa) in the sequence. The results suggest that compaction bands formed in these layers after burial to -1.5 km depth in association with thrust faulting beneath the nearby East Kaibab monocline, and that hardening of the yield caps accompanied compactional deformation of the layers.

  20. Assessment of unconventional oil and gas resources in the Jurassic Sargelu Formation of Iraq, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Pitman, Janet K.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Leathers, Heidi M.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    The USGS assessment methodology consists of a well-performance approach that recognizes the geologic variability within assessed reservoirs. For non-U.S. assessments, the USGS assesses shale-gas or shale-oil reservoirs that (1) contain greater than 2 weight percent total organic carbon (TOC), (2) are within the proper thermal maturity window for oil or gas generation, (3) have greater than 15-m thickness of organic-rich shale, and (4) contain Type I or II organic matter. These specific USGS criteria when applied to any given shale-oil or shale-gas reservoir might significantly reduce the potential resource assessment area compared to maps made with greater than 1 weight percent TOC.

  1. Estimates of vertical hydraulic conductivity and regional ground-water flow rates in rocks of Jurassic and Cretaceous age, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, P.F.; Lyford, F.P.

    1982-01-01

    The San Juan structural basin northwestern New Mexico was modeled in three dimensions using a finite-difference, steady-state model. The modeled space was divided into seven layers of square prisms that were 6 miles on a side in the horizontal directions. In the vertical direction, the layers of prisms ranged in thickness from 300 to 1,500 feet. The model included the geologic section between the base of the Entrada Sandstone and the top of Mesaverde Group. Principal aquifers in this section are mostly confined and include the Entrada Sandstone, the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation , and the Gallup Sandstone. Values for vertical hydraulic conductivities from 10 to the minus 12th power to 10 to the minus 11th power feet per second for the confining layers gave a good simulation of head differences between layers, but a sensitivity analysis indicated that these values could be between 10 and 100 times greater. The model-derived steady-state flow was about 30 cubic feet per second. About one-half of the flow was in the San Juan River drainage basin about one-third in the Rio Grande drainage basin, and one-sixth in the Puerco River drainage basin. (USGS)

  2. Battling Jurassic Park: From a Fascination with Violence toward Constructive Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Beverlyn; Bohrer, Cynthia

    1997-01-01

    Studied preschool children's inability to distinguish fantasy from fact utilizing the case of the popular movie Jurassic Park and the subsequent false information children obtained about dinosaurs. Described attempts made by teachers to address the resultant aggressive behavior and false knowledge gained and replace it with constructive knowledge.…

  3. First glimpse into Lower Jurassic deep-sea biodiversity: in situ diversification and resilience against extinction.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Ben; Kiel, Steffen; Dulai, Alfréd; Gale, Andy S; Kroh, Andreas; Lord, Alan R; Numberger-Thuy, Lea D; Stöhr, Sabine; Wisshak, Max

    2014-07-07

    Owing to the assumed lack of deep-sea macrofossils older than the Late Cretaceous, very little is known about the geological history of deep-sea communities, and most inference-based hypotheses argue for repeated recolonizations of the deep sea from shelf habitats following major palaeoceanographic perturbations. We present a fossil deep-sea assemblage of echinoderms, gastropods, brachiopods and ostracods, from the Early Jurassic of the Glasenbach Gorge, Austria, which includes the oldest known representatives of a number of extant deep-sea groups, and thus implies that in situ diversification, in contrast to immigration from shelf habitats, played a much greater role in shaping modern deep-sea biodiversity than previously thought. A comparison with coeval shelf assemblages reveals that, at least in some of the analysed groups, significantly more extant families/superfamilies have endured in the deep sea since the Early Jurassic than in the shelf seas, which suggests that deep-sea biota are more resilient against extinction than shallow-water ones. In addition, a number of extant deep-sea families/superfamilies found in the Glasenbach assemblage lack post-Jurassic shelf occurrences, implying that if there was a complete extinction of the deep-sea fauna followed by replacement from the shelf, it must have happened before the Late Jurassic.

  4. Upper Jurassic carbonate sediments and reefs in the Carpathian foreland of Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Golenka, J. )

    1993-09-01

    Paleogeographic analyses and plate reconstructions indicate that the Upper Jurassic series of the Carpathian foreland accumulated on the Eurasian shelf of the Tethys Ocean. In the Carpathian foreland of southern Poland, marine Upper Jurassic carbonate series, exceeding 1000 m in thickness, are covered by Tertiary Molasse series or by thrust units of the Outer Carpathians. From a lithostratigraphic point of view, six facies units can be recognized in these Oxfordian to Tithonian carbonates, namely calcareous plankton, calcareous sponge, algal-oolitic, calcareous-marly coquina, dolomitic-calcareous, and upper algal series. During the lower part of the Upper Jurassic, deeper neritic conditions prevailed (calcareous plankton series). These gave way to upward shoaling conditions (calcareous sponge series, deeper basin calcareous-marly series) and a final shallow water environment (algal-oolitic and younger series). Thickness changes of the calcareous-marly series and the diachronous character of the facies boundary between the Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian show that the basin deepened to the south. Barrier reefs and associated fore-reef and back-reef facies occur within the algal-oolitic series. These trend northwest-southeast and reach 30-50 m in thickness. The reefs were mainly built by algae. Algal reefs under the Molasse and Carpathian thrust sheets are potential hydrocarbon exploration targets. The paleogeographic position of the Jurassic of the Carpathian foreland lies within the Tethys realm, which contains a large part of the world's producible oil reserves; this lends encouragement to this play.

  5. Lower Jurassic Navaho-Aztec-Equivalent Sandstones in southern Arizona and their paleogeographic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Bilodeau, W.L.; Keith, S.B.

    1986-06-01

    Thick sequences of Lower Jurassic rhyolitic and andesitic volcanic rocks in several mountain ranges of southern Arizona contain interbedded quartzarenites. Locally up to 250 m thick, these sandstone lenses, composed of well-sorted and well-rounded quartz grains, commonly contain large-scale cross-stratification and are considered to be eolian sand deposits. The eolian sands were blown up against the continental side of the Early Jurassic volcanic arc that trended northwest-southeast across the southwestern margin of the North American continent and/or plate at that time. Paleocurrent data suggest southerly eolian transport of the sands from the Colorado Plateau area. Correlation of these sandstones with the Lower Jurassic Navaho and Aztec Sandstones is indicated by the paleocurrent data as well as radiometric dating of the interbedded volcanics. Eolian sand transport southward across central Arizona in the Early Jurassic indicates that the Mogollon highlands either did not then exist, or were merely low, discontinuous inselbergs on a broad back-arc ramp, more appropriately called the Mogollon slope.

  6. Continental Rifting and Transform Faulting Along the Jurassic Transantarctic Rift, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Dwight L.; Rowley, Peter D.

    1986-04-01

    The Transantarctic rift, an extensional continental rift valley, formed between East and West Antarctica during latest Early and Middle Jurassic time and is represented today by the high Transantarctic Mountains, which contain large volumes of continental flood basalt, diabase, and gabbro. Transantarctic rifting marked the beginning of the breakup of Gondwanaland; it was contiguous and synchronous with continental rifting between East Antarctica-India and Africa as represented by the continental basalt and diabase of Queen Maud Land and the Karroo of southern Africa. During Late Jurassic time, about 150 Ma or slightly earlier, East and West Gondwanaland separated and new oceanic crust of the earliest Indian Ocean formed between East Antarctica-India and Africa. If, as assumed, West Antarctica and South America remained fixed through a tip-to-tip join between the Antarctic Peninsula and Tierra del Fuego, then this seafloor spreading required major right-lateral transform faulting of 500 to 1000 km on the Transantarctic rift system between East and West Antarctica. The Transantarctic Mountains were elevated at about the same time in Late Jurassic; such uplifts are characteristic of active rift margins worldwide. During Cenozoic time, extensional block faulting, independent of the Jurassic rifting, further disrupted large areas of West Antarctica. During the same time, the Transantarctic Mountains were further uplifted.

  7. The Late Jurassic Oblique Collisional Orogen of SW Japan. New Structural Data and Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Michel; Caridroit, Martial; Charvet, Jacques

    1986-12-01

    The structural configuration of SW Japan mainly reflects a late Jurassic-early Cretaceous orogeny. The region is divided into an inner belt and an outer belt, on the Japan sea and Pacific ocean sides respectively, by a strike-slip fault, the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Both consist of a series of stacked nappes. The inner belt is divided into a Jurassic olistostrome known as the Tanba zone and a hinterland area comprising continental Triassic-Jurassic sediments. The Tanba zone is sliced into two units: a lower one with late Jurassic matrix and Triassic-early Jurassic radiolarite olistoliths, tectonically overthrust by an upper unit comprising an olistostrome with middle Jurassic matrix and blocks which include late Paleozoic limestone, basic lava, and radiolarite. The Tanba zone is overthrust by a Paleozoic nappe complex derived from the hinterland. The basal sole of the nappe corresponds to a peculiar unit called the ultra-Tanba zone. In the Chugoku area, the hinterland is divided into an upper nappe: the Oga nappe, formed by Permo-Carboniferous limestone and Permian clastic rocks and a lower one: the Sangun-Maizuru nappe, formed by Paleozoic high pressure (HP) metamorphics (the Sangun schists), the Permian Maizuru olistostrome, and the dismembered Paleozoic Yakuno ophiolites. In the northern part of SW Japan, the Tanba zone is in faulted contact with the circum-Hida and the Hida zones. The former is interpreted as the equivalent of the Oga and Sangun-Maizuru nappes of the Chugoku domain crushed by post Cretaceous tectonics. The latter consists of Paleozoic high temperature (HT) metamorphic rocks and late Triassic-early Jurassic granite, locally mylonitized and covered by early Jurassic sandstone. The outer belt is formed by a superficial nappe similar to the Tanba zone thrust upon a "deep domain" characterized by a synmetamorphic ductile deformation. The "deep domain" is divided into a lower unit, the Oboke unit formed by continental derived arenites and a Green

  8. Jurassic extension and Cenozoic inversion tectonics in the Asturian Basin, NW Iberian Peninsula: 3D structural model and kinematic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzkeda, Hodei; Bulnes, Mayte; Poblet, Josep; García-Ramos, José Carlos; Piñuela, Laura

    2016-09-01

    We constructed a geological map, a 3D model and cross-sections, carried out a structural analysis, determined the stress fields and tectonic transport vectors, restored a cross section and performed a subsidence analysis to unravel the kinematic evolution of the NE emerged portion of the Asturian Basin (NW Iberian Peninsula), where Jurassic rocks crop out. The major folds run NW-SE, normal faults exhibit three dominant orientations: NW-SE, NE-SW and E-W, and thrusts display E-W strikes. After Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic thermal subsidence, Middle Jurassic doming occurred, accompanied by normal faulting, high heat flow and basin uplift, followed by Upper Jurassic high-rate basin subsidence. Another extensional event, possibly during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, caused an increment in the normal faults displacement. A contractional event, probably of Cenozoic age, led to selective and irregularly distributed buttressing and fault reactivation as reverse or strike-slip faults, and folding and/or offset of some previous faults by new generation folds and thrusts. The Middle Jurassic event could be a precursor of the Bay of Biscay and North Atlantic opening that occurred from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, whereas the Cenozoic event would be responsible for the Pyrenean and Cantabrian ranges and the partial closure of the Bay of Biscay.

  9. Potential Triassic and Jurassic CO2 Storage Reservoirs in the Skagerrak Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, I.; Aagaard, P.; Fawad, M.; Sassier, C.; Faleide, J. I.; Jahren, J.; Gabrielsen, R. H.; Nielsen, L. H.; Kristensen, L.; Bergmo, P. E. S.

    2012-04-01

    Based on a screening study for CO2 storage in the Skagerrak area, we have focused on the Upper Triassic/Lowermost Jurassic Gassum Formation. A large shallow dipping reservoir structure has been identified in the northern Skagerrak area. The current study presents reservoir characteristics of the Gassum formation in the Fjerritslev trough and onto the Skagerrak Kattegat platform, and the corresponding reservoir model. This reservoir model is part of an ongoing interdisciplinary project with the overall goal to establish a basis for large-scale handling of CO2 in this area, including regional CO2 source and capture possibilities, transportation and infrastructure, possible storage sites as well as legal aspects relating to the whole CCS chain. The shallow dipping aquifer is regionally exteded and mapped in the Norwegian-Danish Basin, the Fjerritslev trough, and onto the Skagerrak Kattegat platform, and is found deeper than 800 m below sea level. In the south the formation is affected by salt tectonics (salt pillows, diapirs), while forming gently dipping layer structures towards the north. The Gassum reservoir consists of mainly shallow marine shoreface sandstones with associated estuarine deposits possibly deposited during sea-level low stands. Thickness of Gassum Formation from Danish wells is 70 - 220 m with sand to shale ratios between 60 - 70%. Based on the study, an injection well is proposed 50 km offshore Norway. The proposed injection depth is 2070 m with the reservoir pinch-out 38 km away towards north where the top reservoir is 117 m below the Quaternary sediments. The southern portion of the reservoir located in Denmark can be characterized from wells drilled for hydrocarbons and geothermal energy. In order to predict the reservoir facies/parameters and to make a realistic geologic model comprising the area closer to Norway, a regional geological model based on sequence stratigraphic interpretations is imperative. Using thicknesses from seismic data a

  10. Degradation processes and consolidation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur tracks in museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Sofia; mateus, Octavio; Tomas, Carla; Dionisio, Amelia

    2014-05-01

    The current study aims to conciliate conservation and restoration museology diagnosis with paleontological and geological curational needs and has, as subject of study, dinosaur footprints (vertebrates fossils). The footprints have been being exposed since 2004 in the paleontology hall of the Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal, and are part of a important paleontological collection of Late Jurassic vertebrate fossils from Lourinhã Formation. Presently, it is considered a unique heritage in danger of disappearing due to high decay level of disaggregation of its geological structure. The dinosaur footprints, (ML557) found, more precisely, on a coastline cliff in Lourinhã, Porto das Barcas, Lagido do Forno (coordinate 39° 14. 178'N, 9° 20. 397'W), Jurassic period, on the 5th of June 2001, by Jesper Milàn. This cliff of high slope presents sedimentary stratigraphic characteristics of a sandstone/siltstone of gray and red colors, by the '' Munsell scale and Color Chart''. Geological the tracks are Late Jurassic in age, and colected in the Lourinhã Formation, Praia Azul Member, of the Lusitanian Basin. There are three natural infills tridactyl tracks, possibly ascribed to ornithopod, a bipedal herbivore, resultant of a left foot movement, right and left. Footprints have 300-400mm of wide and 330-360mm of height with round fingers, which are elongated due to some degradation/erosion. In 2001, the footprints were collected from the field, cleaned, consolidated and glued in the laboratory of the Museum of Lourinhã before being exhibited in a museum display. Stone matrix was removed and a consolidation product applied, probably a polyvinyl acetate, of the brand Plexigum. The footprint with broken central digit was glued with an epoxy resin, Araldite. Both applied products were confirmed by analysis of µ-FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) and both presented colour change and detachment surface problems. After collecting and storing, in 2004, footprints were

  11. Lithofacies and sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Upper Jurassic siliciclastics in the eastern Kopet-Dagh Basin, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zand-Moghadam, Hamed; Moussavi-Harami, Reza; Mahboubi, Asadollah; Aghaei, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian) Mozduran Formation is the most important gas reservoirs of the northeast Iran. Siliciclastic facies of this formation in eastern most parts of the basin have not been studied yet. Therefore, four stratigraphic sections of Mozduran Formation have been selected in the Kole-Malekabad, Kale-Karab, Deraz-Ab and Karizak to interpret depositional history and analyze depositional sequences. Based on texture and sedimentary structures, 14 slilciclastic lithofacies were identified and classified into four categories, including conglomerate (Gms, Gp, Gt), sandstone (Sh, Sp, St, Sr, Sl, Sm, Se), mud rock (Fl) and intermediate sandstone-mud rock (Sr (Fl), Sr/Fl, Fl (Sr)). Identified lithofacies formed four architectural elements CH, SB, LA and FF. Lithofacies characteristics and architectural elements with mostly bimodal pattern of paleocurrents show that the majority of Mozduran lithofacies deposited in the coastal environment (tidal influence). Sequence stratigraphic analysis shows that the Kole-Malekabad section consists of two depositional sequences while other sections are characterized by three depositional sequences. The lower and upper sequence boundaries of the Mozduran Formation in all stratigraphic sections are SB1 that are distinguished by paleosol and sometime conglomerate horizons. Most of depositional sequences in studied sections are composed only of TST and HST. The TST deposits consist mostly of quartzarenite and litharenite petrofacies that have been deposited in the tidal zone. HST packages are mostly including mud rocks with interdeds of sandstone lithofacies that are deposited in supratidal setting. The LST facies is recognized only in the DS3 (equivalent to the second depositional sequences of the Kole-Malekabad), which consist of conglomerate facies. Instead, the Kole-Malekabad section is often composed of supratidal gypsiferrous shales, indicating sea level fall in the study area.

  12. Qingshankou-Putaohua/Shaertu and Jurassic Coal-Denglouku/Nongan total petroleum systems in the Songliao Basin, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Qiang, Jin; McCabe, Peter J.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Persits, Felix

    2003-01-01

    The Qingshankou-Putaohua/Shaertu petroleum system involves the generation of oil and gas from a mature pod of lacustrine source rock near the center of the Songliao Basin in northeastern China. The primary source rock is the Lower Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation, and a secondary source rock is Member 1 of the Lower Cretaceous Nenjiang Formation. The most productive of six sandstone reservoirs are the Putaohua reservoir (Member 1 of the Lower Cretaceous Yaojia Formation) and the Shaertu reservoir (Members 2 and 3 of the Yaojia Formation and Member 1 of the Nenjiang Formation). Most oil and associated gas generated from the Qingshankou Formation and Nenjiang Formation (Member 1) are trapped in large faulted anticlines, fault blocks, and faulted anticlinal noses in combination with facies-change and (or) diagenetic stratigraphic traps. Two assessment units are defined in the petroleum system: (1) an anticlinal assessment unit; and (2) a subtle-traps assessment unit consisting of (a) anticlinal noses in combination with fault or stratigraphic traps, (b) stratigraphic traps, and (c) unconventional reservoirs. Undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources are expected in both assessment units in small (5?10 million barrels of oil; 30?60 billion ft3 gas) and medium (10?25 million barrels of oil; 60?150 billion ft3 of gas) fields. Also, undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources are expected in several large fields (25?73 million barrels of oil; 150?173 billion ft3 of gas). The Jurassic coal?Dengloukou/Nongan petroleum system involves the generation of natural gas from multiple pods of mature source rock in graben structures at the base of the Songliao Basin. Sandstone and conglomeratic sandstone in the Lower Cretaceous Denglouku Formation and the Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation are the major reservoir rocks. Most of the known natural gas is trapped in anticlines, anticlinal noses, and fault blocks. This petroleum system is largely unexplored in comparison to

  13. Structuring of The Jurassic Basin of Chott in Gabes region (Southern Tunisia) associated to the Liassic rifting from geophysical and well data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassine, Mouna; Abbes, Chedly; Azaiez, Hajer; Gabtni, Hakim; Bouzid, Wajih

    2016-04-01

    The graben system of El Hamma, west of Gabes in Tunisia, corresponds to a pull apart basin developed in an extensive relay zone between two principal shear corridors (PSC) with a dextral sliding of N110-120 average direction. These PSC corresponds to two segments of the south-Atlasic shear corridor of NW-SE direction, which extends from Chott El Hodna in Algeria, to the NW, to the Libyan Djeferra to the SE (M.Hassine and al., 2015; M.Hassine and al., work in progress). This work aims to define the basin structuring during the Jurassic, especially from the Upper Lias during the Liassic rifting. For this, we performed seismic, gravity and well data analysis. Several wells situated in this basin and on its edges, which totally or partly crossed the Jurassic series which were described by several authors (J. Bonnefous, 1972 ; M. Soussi, 2002, 2004). These series corresponds to the Nara formation (PF Burollet, 1956) elevated to a group rank by M. Soussi (2003). It consists of two carbonate units separated by a marl-carbonate and sandstone member, dated successively of lower Lias (Hettangian- lower Pliensbachian.), Toarcian to Callovian and Upper Callovian-Tithonian. The correlation of this Jurassic formations along a North-South transect shows, from the South to the North, a significant variation in facies and thickness of the Jurassic series especially from the Upper Lias. Two resistant moles appears to the Northern and Southern edges of the pull-apart basin of El Hamma. The trend reversal of the lateral evolution of this series take place on the border NW-SE faults of the basin (PSC). The analysis of several seismic lines calibrated to well data, reveals a differentiated structuring inside the pull-apart basin itself, associated on the one hand, to the play of the N160 and N130-140 direction fault network which structure the basin in horsts and grabens of second order ( M. Hassine and al., 2015); and on the other hand, to the rise of the upper Triassic evaporates

  14. Hybrid grid-particle methods and Penalization: A Sherman-Morrison-Woodbury approach to compute 3D viscous flows using FFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelin, Robin; Poncet, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Particle methods are very convenient to compute transport equations in fluid mechanics as their computational cost is linear and they are not limited by convection stability conditions. To achieve large 3D computations the method must be coupled to efficient algorithms for velocity computations, including a good treatment of non-homogeneities and complex moving geometries. The Penalization method enables to consider moving bodies interaction by adding a term in the conservation of momentum equation. This work introduces a new computational algorithm to solve implicitly in the same step the Penalization term and the Laplace operators, since explicit computations are limited by stability issues, especially at low Reynolds number. This computational algorithm is based on the Sherman-Morrison-Woodbury formula coupled to a GMRES iterative method to reduce the computations to a sequence of Poisson problems: this allows to formulate a penalized Poisson equation as a large perturbation of a standard Poisson, by means of algebraic relations. A direct consequence is the possibility to use fast solvers based on Fast Fourier Transforms for this problem with good efficiency from both the computational and the memory consumption point of views, since these solvers are recursive and they do not perform any matrix assembling. The resulting fluid mechanics computations are very fast and they consume a small amount of memory, compared to a reference solver or a linear system resolution. The present applications focus mainly on a coupling between transport equation and 3D Stokes equations, for studying biological organisms motion in a highly viscous flows with variable viscosity.

  15. Children of homosexuals more apt to be homosexuals? A reply to Morrison and to Cameron based on an examination of multiple sources of data.

    PubMed

    Schumm, Walter R

    2010-11-01

    Ten narrative studies involving family histories of 262 children of gay fathers and lesbian mothers were evaluated statistically in response to Morrison's (2007) concerns about Cameron's (2006) research that had involved three narrative studies. Despite numerous attempts to bias the results in favour of the null hypothesis and allowing for up to 20 (of 63, 32%) coding errors, Cameron's (2006) hypothesis that gay and lesbian parents would be more likely to have gay, lesbian, bisexual or unsure (of sexual orientation) sons and daughters was confirmed. Percentages of children of gay and lesbian parents who adopted non-heterosexual identities ranged between 16% and 57%, with odds ratios of 1.7 to 12.1, depending on the mix of child and parent genders. Daughters of lesbian mothers were most likely (33% to 57%; odds ratios from 4.5 to 12.1) to report non-heterosexual identities. Data from ethnographic sources and from previous studies on gay and lesbian parenting were re-examined and found to support the hypothesis that social and parental influences may influence the expression of non-heterosexual identities and/or behaviour. Thus, evidence is presented from three different sources, contrary to most previous scientific opinion, even most previous scientific consensus, that suggests intergenerational transfer of sexual orientation can occur at statistically significant and substantial rates, especially for female parents or female children. In some analyses for sons, intergenerational transfer was not significant. Further research is needed with respect to pathways by which intergenerational transfer of sexual orientation may occur. The results confirm an evolving tendency among scholars to cite the possibility of some degree of intergenerational crossover of sexual orientation.

  16. Deep-burial microporosity in upper Jurassic Haynesville oolitic grainstones, East Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravis, Jeffrey J.

    1989-07-01

    Secondary micromoldic porosity generated during deep-burial diagenesis occurs pervasively in Upper Jurassic Haynesville oolitic grainstones in East Texas and constitutes the major pore type in these gas reservoirs. Petrographic and geochemical relationships establish that development of this microporosity postdates emplacement of bitumen and most pressure solution fabrics in the reservoir grainstones. Microporosity development is strictly controlled by depositional texture and is restricted to either active shoal complex grainstones or thicker grainstones shed downramp by storm processes. Haynesville diagenetic and porosity relationships are consistent along the entire length of the east flank of the East Texas Basin, a distance greater than 100 km; identical relationships have also been observed along the west flank of this basin. Haynesville micromoldic porosity development is confined principally to ooids but also occurs in normally "stable" calcitic skeletal grains like oysters. Resultant micropores are a few microns across or less; complete dissolution of ooids to form oomoldic macroporosity is not observed in Haynesville limestones. Nearly all primary porosity in the Haynesville is now occluded by carbonate cement. Confirmation of a late, deep-burial origin for Haynesville secondary microporosity is based on physical relationships observed in numerous cores, regional petrography and geochemical data. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that Haynesville sediments were never locally or regionally exposed to freshwater but have undergone progressive burial diagenesis punctuated by a major late dissolution event which created the microporosity. Key observations which support Haynesville deep-burial microporosity development include: (1) petrographic relationships which demonstrate microporosity developed after emplacement of bitumen; (2) lack of subaerial exposure features in core, both atop shoal complexes and at the contact between the Haynesville and

  17. Tango in the Mid-Jurassic: 10,000-Yr Geomagnetic Field Reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M.

    2001-12-01

    A continuous magnetostratigraphic signature of Layer 2A from Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) oceanic crust now is known from two separate paleo-magnetic data sets. Measurement/demagnetization along the length of the entire core at 5-cm intervals generated ~100,000 data points, whereas a suite of 472 discrete samples also were taken from throughout the core. Both data sets display the same magnetization pattern, a series of repeated sinusoidal inclination changes downhole. Six inter-vals of maximum inclination (three positive, three negative) are obser-ved. Maximum inclination intervals of +/-40° are separated by regions of smoothly varying intermediate inclination values. Despite lack of azmuithal orientation of the core, downhole magnetic logging (Larson et al., in prep.) shows full ~360° directional change in the magnetization vector. Therefore, the maximum inclination regions represent polarity intervals of the geomagnetic field, and six polarity intervals in stacked sequence are contained in the upper 400 m thickness of Layer 2A at this site. The time duration spanned by these six reversals was estimated from recent seismic studies of young ocean crustal construction on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Estimates of completion of construction of Layer 2A within 1-3 km from the rise crest and typical EPR half-spreading rates of 5-8 cm/yr suggest that the studied 400 m of ocean crust represents 37,000-60,000 years. The fast construction of EPR crust implies that the Middle Jurassic geomagnetic field was reversing at a phenomenal rate of 5000-10,000 years. These data establish that the `quiet' signature in the oldest portion of the lineated magnetic anomaly patterns in the ocean crust is due to exceedingly rapid reversals of the geomagnetic field, because succes-sive, superposed opposite-polarity magnetic signatures will essentially cancel one another out at the sea surface. The width of the 'quiet' magnetic signature in the western Pacific Ocean implies that the 5000

  18. Post-sedimentation transformations of Lower-Middle Jurassic sandstones of Great Caucases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchkova, M. I.

    2003-04-01

    POST-SEDIMENTATION TRANSFORMATIONS OF LOWER-MIDDLE JURASSIC SANDSTONES OF GREAT CAUCASES M.I. Tuchkova Geological Institute Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia tuchkova@geo.tv-sign.ru/ /Fax: (095) 2310443 Generalization of author’s and literature data is based on the analysis of sandstones cement and structure, composition and politypism of clay minerals and index of mica crystallinity. Fore zones of sandstone transformations are distinguished for Lower-Middle Jurassic sedimentary complexes of Great Caucases: 1) zone of neogenic chlorite and muscovite (index of crystallinity IC=1.0-2.0 mm) with wide development of epidote; solubility, blastic and spinulose structures, 2) zone of neogenic chlorite and sericite (IC=2.0-3.0 mm); solubility and spinulose structures, 3) zone of neogenic hydromica (IC=2.5-3.5 mm), kaolinite and/or montmorillonite minerals with microstylolite, conformal and conformal-regenerational contacts between grains, 4) zone of kaolinite and/or montmorillonite, mixed-layered and chlorite minerals with carbonate cement of pores filling, ferugination and conformal and microstylolite contacts between grains. Index of crystallinity of mica mineral IC=3.5-5.5 mm. In modern geological structure the region with most intensive transformations (zone 1) is traced in sandstones of here and there preserved Sinemurian-Lower Pliensbachian and Toarcian deposits in the belt of Jurassic deposits of the southern slope of Great Caucases. The extent of rock transformation increases northward and southward from the axial zone of Great Caucases. Represented zonality doesn’t depend on deposits thickness and doesn’t coincide with stratigraphycal borders. Post-sedimentation zonality of Jurassic deposits originated as a result of stress during the period of folding at the end of Middle and the beginning of Late Jurassic following the thrusting of northern flank of Great Caucases basin onto its axial part. The rocks of lowest part of Jurassic deposits of the

  19. Depositional history of Jurassic rocks in the area of the Powder River basin, northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the history of clastic sedimentation in the eastern part of the middle Western Interior during the Middle and Late Jurassic. Fourteen lithostratigraphic units are discussed in relation to five separate marine inundations and six intervening erosional events.

  20. UV Light Reveals the Diversity of Jurassic Shell Colour Patterns: Examples from the Cordebugle Lagerstätte (Calvados, France)

    PubMed Central

    Caze, Bruno; Merle, Didier; Schneider, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Viewed under UV light the diverse and exceptionally well-preserved molluscs from the Late Jurassic Cordebugle Konservat Lagerstätte (Calvados, Normandy, France) reveal fluorescent fossil shell colour patterns predating the oldest previously known instance of such patterns by 100 Myr. Evidently, residual colour patterns are observable in Mesozoic molluscs by application of this non-destructive method, provided the shells are not decalcified or recrystallized. Among 46 species which are assigned to twelve gastropod families and eight bivalve families, no less than 25 species yielded positive results. Out of nine colour pattern morphologies that have been distinguished six occur in gastropods and three in bivalves. The presence of these variant morphologies clearly indicates a significant pre-Cenozoic diversification of colour patterns, especially in gastropods. In addition, the occurrence of two distinct types of fluorescence highlights a major difference in the chemical composition of the pigments involved in colour pattern formation in gastropods. This discovery enables us to discriminate members of higher clades, i.e. the Vetigastropoda emitting red fluorescence from the Caenogastropoda and Heterobranchia emitting whitish-beige to yellow fluorescence. Consequently, fluorescent colour patterns may help to allocate part of the numerous enigmatic Mesozoic gastropod taxa to their correct systematic position. PMID:26039592

  1. A new transitional sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and the evolution of sauropod feeding and quadrupedalism

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Adam M.; Bonnan, Matthew F.; Neveling, Johann; Chinsamy, Anusuya; Blackbeard, Marc G.

    2010-01-01

    Aardonyx celestae gen. et sp. nov. is described from the upper Elliot Formation (Early Jurassic) of South Africa. It can be diagnosed by autapomorphies of the skull, particularly the jaws, cervical column, forearm and pes. It is found to be the sister group of a clade of obligatory quadrupedal sauropodomorphs (Melanorosaurus + Sauropoda) and thus lies at the heart of the basal sauropodomorph–sauropod transition. The narrow jaws of A. celestae retain a pointed symphysis but appear to have lacked fleshy cheeks. Broad, U-shaped jaws were previously thought to have evolved prior to the loss of gape-restricting cheeks. However, the narrow jaws of A. celestae retain a pointed symphysis but appear to have lacked fleshy cheeks, demonstrating unappreciated homoplasy in the evolution of the sauropod bulk-browsing apparatus. The limbs of A. celestae indicate that it retained a habitual bipedal gait although incipient characters associated with the pronation of the manus and the adoption of a quadrupedal gait are evident through geometric morphometric analysis (using thin-plate splines) of the ulna and femur. Cursorial ability appears to have been reduced and the weight bearing axis of the pes shifted to a medial, entaxonic position, falsifying the hypothesis that entaxony evolved in sauropods only after an obligate quadrupedal gait had been adopted. PMID:19906674

  2. A new transitional sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and the evolution of sauropod feeding and quadrupedalism.

    PubMed

    Yates, Adam M; Bonnan, Matthew F; Neveling, Johann; Chinsamy, Anusuya; Blackbeard, Marc G

    2010-03-07

    Aardonyx celestae gen. et sp. nov. is described from the upper Elliot Formation (Early Jurassic) of South Africa. It can be diagnosed by autapomorphies of the skull, particularly the jaws, cervical column, forearm and pes. It is found to be the sister group of a clade of obligatory quadrupedal sauropodomorphs (Melanorosaurus + Sauropoda) and thus lies at the heart of the basal sauropodomorph-sauropod transition. The narrow jaws of A. celestae retain a pointed symphysis but appear to have lacked fleshy cheeks. Broad, U-shaped jaws were previously thought to have evolved prior to the loss of gape-restricting cheeks. However, the narrow jaws of A. celestae retain a pointed symphysis but appear to have lacked fleshy cheeks, demonstrating unappreciated homoplasy in the evolution of the sauropod bulk-browsing apparatus. The limbs of A. celestae indicate that it retained a habitual bipedal gait although incipient characters associated with the pronation of the manus and the adoption of a quadrupedal gait are evident through geometric morphometric analysis (using thin-plate splines) of the ulna and femur. Cursorial ability appears to have been reduced and the weight bearing axis of the pes shifted to a medial, entaxonic position, falsifying the hypothesis that entaxony evolved in sauropods only after an obligate quadrupedal gait had been adopted.

  3. Low-volume intraplate volcanism in the Early/Middle Jurassic Pacific basin documented by accreted sequences in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchs, David M.; Pilet, SéBastien; Cosca, Michael; Flores, Kennet E.; Bandini, Alexandre N.; Baumgartner, Peter O.

    2013-05-01

    Countless seamounts occur on Earth that can provide important constraints on intraplate volcanism and plate tectonics in the oceans, yet their nature and origin remain poorly known due to difficulties in investigating the deep ocean. We present here new lithostratigraphic, age and geochemical data from Lower/Middle Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sequences in the Santa Rosa accretionary complex, Costa Rica, which offer a valuable opportunity to study a small-sized seamount from a subducted plate segment of the Pacific basin. The seamount is characterized by very unusual lithostratigraphic sequences with sills of potassic alkaline basalt emplaced within thick beds of radiolarite, basaltic breccia and hyaloclastite. An integration of new geochemical, biochronological and geochronological data with lithostratigraphic observations suggests that the seamount formed ~175 Ma ago on thick oceanic crust away from subduction zones and mid-ocean ridges. This seamount traveled ~65 Ma in the Pacific before accretion. It resembles lithologically and compositionally "petit-spot" volcanoes found off Japan, which form in response to plate flexure near subduction zones. Also, the composition of the sills and lava flows in the accreted seamount closely resembles that of potassic alkaline basalts produced by lithosphere cracking along the Line Islands chain. We hypothesize based on these observations, petrological constraints and formation of the accreted seamount coeval with the early stages of development of the Pacific plate that the seamount formed by extraction of small volumes of melt from the base of the lithosphere in response to propagating f