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Sample records for jurassic navajo sandstone

  1. Bleaching of Jurassic Navajo Sandstone on Colorado Plateau Laramide highs: Evidence of exhumed hydrocarbon supergiants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitler, Brenda; Chan, Marjorie A.; Parry, William T.

    2003-12-01

    Spectacular color variations in the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone reflect stratigraphic and structural control on the spatial distribution of fluid-driven alteration. Field observations and supervised classification of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) satellite imagery show that the most extensive regional bleaching of the Navajo Sandstone occurs on eroded crests of Laramide uplifts on the Colorado Plateau in southern Utah. Alteration patterns suggest that the blind reverse faults that core the eastern monoclines associated with these uplifts were carriers for hydrocarbons and brought the buoyant fluids to the crests of monoclines and anticlines, where they bleached the sandstone in both structural and stratigraphic traps. The extent of bleaching indicates that the Navajo Sandstone (Navajo Sandstone, Aztec Sandstone, and Nugget Sandstone) may have been one of the largest hydrocarbon reservoirs known. Rapid incision and breaching of this reservoir during Tertiary uplift and erosion of the Colorado Plateau could have released enough carbon into the atmosphere to significantly contribute to global carbon fluxes and possibly influence climate.

  2. A New Basal Sauropodomorph Dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of Southern Utah

    PubMed Central

    Sertich, Joseph J. W.; Loewen, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Basal sauropodomorphs, or ‘prosauropods,’ are a globally widespread paraphyletic assemblage of terrestrial herbivorous dinosaurs from the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic. In contrast to several other landmasses, the North American record of sauropodomorphs during this time interval remains sparse, limited to Early Jurassic occurrences of a single well-known taxon from eastern North America and several fragmentary specimens from western North America. Methodology/Principal Findings On the basis of a partial skeleton, we describe here a new basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah, Seitaad ruessi gen. et sp. nov. The partially articulated skeleton of Seitaad was likely buried post-mortem in the base of a collapsed dune foreset. The new taxon is characterized by a plate-like medial process of the scapula, a prominent proximal expansion of the deltopectoral crest of the humerus, a strongly inclined distal articular surface of the radius, and a proximally and laterally hypertrophied proximal metacarpal I. Conclusions/Significance Phylogenetic analysis recovers Seitaad as a derived basal sauropodomorph closely related to plateosaurid or massospondylid ‘prosauropods’ and its presence in western North America is not unexpected for a member of this highly cosmopolitan clade. This occurrence represents one of the most complete vertebrate body fossil specimens yet recovered from the Navajo Sandstone and one of the few basal sauropodomorph taxa currently known from North America. PMID:20352090

  3. An example of liquefaction-induced interdune sedimentation from the early Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Gerald; Monegato, Giovanni; Miall, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Extensive outcrops of Navajo Sandstone in the southwestern United States expose eolian dune deposits that are subdivided in a complex array of foresets and bounding surfaces. In the Glen Canyon region, and other places, this architecture is frequently disrupted by large-scale, soft-sediment deformation features. These features have been attributed to episodic liquefaction events that affected saturated sand below the level of the interdune surface. Though erosional truncation of deformation features indicates that liquefaction often occurred in the uppermost levels of Navajo dune deposits, very few paleotopographic disruptions due to subsurface deformation have been documented. Navajo Sandstone outcrops in West Canyon, Utah, provide unusually comprehensive exposure of architectural details linking large-scale deformation features and associated interdune deposits, enabling a well constrained appraisal of their genesis. At this location, a 23 m succession of sandstone, mudstone, carbonate, and chert deposits overlies a zone of deformation that extends, laterally, for hundreds of meters. This horizontally stratified lens occupies an abrupt synform along a bounding surface between successive crossbeds that otherwise appears as a featureless, sub-horizontal plane. Large-scale foresets below this bounding surface oversteepen at the margins of the synform and grade downdip into contorted stratification and structureless expanses. The authors propose that liquefaction in the Jurassic erg caused localized subsidence of a minor portion of a dry interdune surface to a position several meters below the contemporary water table. A succession of hyperpycnal sand flows, lacustrine evaporites, and eolian sheet and dune deposits filled this depression prior to the advance of large dunes across the site. The process/response dynamics evident in this outcrop suggest that deformation may have exercised significant, non-systematic control over depositional architectures in areas of

  4. Porosity and grain size controls on compaction band formation in Jurassic Navajo Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, Richard A.; Okubo, Chris H.; Fossen, Haakon

    2010-01-01

    Determining the rock properties that permit or impede the growth of compaction bands in sedimentary sequences is a critical problem of importance to studies of strain localization and characterization of subsurface geologic reservoirs. We determine the porosity and average grain size of a sequence of stratigraphic layers of Navajo Sandstone that are then used in a critical state model to infer plastic yield envelopes for the layers. Pure compaction bands are formed in layers having the largest average grain sizes (0.42–0.45 mm) and porosities (28%), and correspondingly the smallest values of critical pressure (-22 MPa) in the sequence. The results suggest that compaction bands formed in these layers after burial to -1.5 km depth in association with thrust faulting beneath the nearby East Kaibab monocline, and that hardening of the yield caps accompanied compactional deformation of the layers.

  5. Downslope coarsening in aeolian grainflows of the Navajo Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, David B.; Elder, James F.; Sweeney, Mark R.

    2012-07-01

    Downslope coarsening in grainflows has been observed on present-day dunes and generated in labs, but few previous studies have examined vertical sorting in ancient aeolian grainflows. We studied the grainflow strata of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in the southern Utah portion of its outcrop belt from Zion National Park (west) to Coyote Buttes and The Dive (east). At each study site, thick sets of grainflow-dominated cross-strata that were deposited by large transverse dunes comprise the bulk of the Navajo Sandstone. We studied three stratigraphic columns, one per site, composed almost exclusively of aeolian cross-strata. For each column, samples were obtained from one grainflow stratum in each consecutive set of the column, for a total of 139 samples from thirty-two sets of cross-strata. To investigate grading perpendicular to bedding within individual grainflows, we collected fourteen samples from four superimposed grainflow strata at The Dive. Samples were analyzed with a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 laser diffraction particle analyser. The median grain size of grainflow samples ranges from fine sand (164 μm) to coarse sand (617 μm). Using Folk and Ward criteria, samples are well-sorted to moderately-well-sorted. All but one of the twenty-eight sets showed at least slight downslope coarsening, but in general, downslope coarsening was not as well-developed or as consistent as that reported in laboratory subaqueous grainflows. Because coarse sand should be quickly sequestered within preserved cross-strata when bedforms climb, grain-size studies may help to test hypotheses for the stacking of sets of cross-strata.

  6. Blueberries on Earth and Mars: Correlations Between Concretions in Navajo Sandstone and Terra Meridiani on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Milner, M. W.; Netoff, D.; Dohm, J.; Kalm, V.; Krinsley, D.; Sodhi, R. N.; Anderson, R. C.; Boccia, S.; Malloch, D.; Kapran, B.; Havics, A.

    2008-12-01

    Concretionary Fe-Mn-rich nodular authigenic constituents of Jurassic Navajo sandstone (moki marbles) bear a certain relationship to similar concretionary forms ('blueberries') observed on Mars. Their origin on Earth is considered to invoke variable redox conditions with underground fluids penetrating porous quartz-rich sandstone leading to precipitation of hematite and goethite-rich material from solution, generally forming around a central nucleus of fine particles of quartz and orthoclase, recently verified by XRD and SEM-EDS analyses. At the outer rim/inner nucleus boundary, bulbous lobes of fine-grained quartz often invade and fracture the outer rim armored matrix. The bulbous forms are interpreted to result from fluid explusion from the inner concretionary mass, a response to pressure changes accompanying overburden loading. Moki marbles, harder than enclosing rock, often weather out of in situ sandstone outcrops that form a surface lag deposit of varnished marbles that locally resemble desert pavement. The marbles appear morphologically similar to 'blueberries' identified on the martian surface in Terra Meridiani through the MER-1 Opportunity rover. On Earth, redox fluids responsible for the genesis of marbles may have emanated from deep in the crust (often influenced by magmatic processes). These fluids, cooling to ambient temperatures, may have played a role in the genesis of the cemented outer rim of the concretions. The low frequency of fungi filaments in the marbles, contrasts with a high occurrence in Fe-encrusted sands of the Navajo formation [1], indicating that microbial content is of secondary importance in marble genesis relative to the fluctuating influx of ambient groundwater. Nevertheless, the presence of filaments in terrestrial concretions hints at the possibility of discovering fossil/extant life on Mars, and thus should be considered as prime targets for future reconnaissance missions to Mars. 1] Mahaney, W.C., et al. (2004), Icarus, 171, 39-53.

  7. Geohydrology of the Navajo sandstone in western Kane, southwestern Garfield, and southeastern Iron counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freethey, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Navajo and Lamb Point aquifers in the Navajo Sandstone are the principal source of water for the city of Kanab, irrigation, stock, and for rural homes in the study area. Well logs and outcrop descriptions indicate the Navajo Sandstone consists of the Lamb Point Tongue and an unnamed upper member that are separated by the Tenney Canyon Tongue of the Kayenta Formation. The main Kayenta Formation underlies the Lamb Point Tongue. The Lamb Point Tongue and the upper member of the Navajo Sandstone are saturated and hydraulically connected through the Tenney Canyon Tongue. Available data indicate that precipitation percolates to the groundwater reservoir where the Navajo Sandstone crops out. Estimates of the rate of recharge at the outcrop range from 0.1 to as much as 2.8 in/yr. Water level data indicate that water moves from the upper member of the Navajo Sandstone, through the Tenney Canyon Tongue, and into the Lamb Point Tongue. Lateral flow is generally from the outcrop areas toward the incised canyons formed by tributaries of Kanab Creek and Johnson Wash. Direction and rate of groundwater movement and the location and character of the natural hydrologic boundaries in the northern part of the area where the Navajo Sandstone is buried cannot be determined conclusively without additional water level data. (Author 's abstract)

  8. CO2-Driven Convection Produced the Vertical Distribution of Sandstone Colors and Iron Concretions in Navajo Sandstone at Zion National Park, Utah (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettler, R. M.; Loope, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Along cliff faces exposed in Zion National Park (SW Utah), the porous and permeable Navajo Sandstone (Jurassic) is 700 m thick, and is capped by impermeable mudrocks and evaporites of the Carmel Formation. Previous workers have documented an areally extensive color pattern that is easily visible across much of southwestern and south-central Utah: the uppermost Navajo Sandstone is nearly white, the middle third of the formation is pink, and the lowermost fraction is reddish brown. To the northwest of the park, however, the formation is uniformly red (likely its primary color; G.B. Nielsen et al., 2009). Spheroidal concretions with dense, iron-oxide-cemented rinds and iron-poor cores are abundant in the pink and brown sandstones. Rhomb-shaped clots of iron oxide cement that are pseudomorphous after siderite are present in the cores of the largest concretions. The color variations are evidence that iron was transported from the upper portion of the Navajo SS to the lower portion. The pseudomorphs are evidence that the concretions are the oxidized remains of siderite-cemented precursors. The vertical iron transport and the precipitation of siderite require similar vertical transport of reducing, CO2-rich formation waters through the Navajo Sandstone. We argue that this circulation was driven in part by groundwater convection beneath a CO2 accumulation that was trapped below the Navajo-Carmel contact. This circulation caused aqueous iron and aqueous carbonate to be displaced downward and to accumulate (in the form of siderite) in the lower Navajo Sandstone. There are numerous CO2 reservoirs in the Colorado Plateau region; the gas was derived mainly from mantle sources. We hypothesize that, in the late Tertiary, the Carmel Formation capped a broad, structurally high accumulation of CO2 and CH4 in the Navajo Sandstone. The CH4 bleached the upper portion of the sandstone, releasing Fe2+ into the formation water. CO2 dissolved in the water, thereby increasing its density

  9. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, D.R.; Blum, A.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 ??m thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ???105 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  10. Characterization of Navajo Sandstone concretions: Mars comparison and criteria for distinguishing diagenetic origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Sally L.; Chan, Marjorie A.; Petersen, Erich U.; Dyar, M. Darby; Sklute, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The eolian Jurassic Navajo Sandstone spheroidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) concretions are divided into two size classes: macro-concretions of > 5 mm diameter and micro-concretions of < 5 mm diameter. Three internal structural end-members of macro-concretions are described as rind, layered, and solid. Two end-members of micro-concretions are rind and solid. Chemical and mineralogical gradients (μm- to mm-scale) are identified with QEMSCAN (Quantitative Elemental Mineralogy using a SCANning electron microscope) and visible to near infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectroscopy. Three HFO phases are identified using VNIR reflectance spectroscopy. An amorphous HFO phase is typically located in the rinds. Goethite is present along interior edges of rinds and throughout the interiors of layered and solid concretions. Hematite is present in the centers of rind concretions. A synthesis of petrographic, mineralogical and chemical analyses suggests that concretions grow pervasively (as opposed to radially expanding). Our model proposes that concretions precipitate initially as an amorphous HFO that sets the radius and retains some original porosity. Subsequent precipitation fills remaining pore space with younger mineral phases. Inward digitate cement crystal growth corroborates concretion growth from a set radius toward the centers. Internal structure is modified during late stage precipitation that diffuses reactants through semi-permeable rinds and overprints the interiors with younger cements. Physical characterization of textures and minerals provides diagnostic criteria for understanding how similar concretions ("blueberries") form in Meridiani Planum, Mars. The analogous Navajo Sandstone concretions show similar characteristics of in situ self-organized spacing, spheroidal geometries, internal structures, conjoined forms, and precursor HFO phases that dehydrate to goethite or hematite. These characteristics indicate a common origin via groundwater diagenesis.

  11. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, David R.; Blum, Alex E.; Chipera, Stephen J.

    2006-09-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 μm thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ˜10 5 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  12. Eolian sabkha sandstones in the Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic), Vernal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, C.J.; Peterson, F. )

    1991-06-01

    The Jurassic Nugget Sandstone in the Vernal, Utah, area is characterized by thick (up to 25 m) sets of cross-stratified eolian dune sandstone separated by either erosional planar bounding surfaces or thin (mostly < 3 m) sandstones interpreted as sabkha sandstones. Structures in Nugget sabkha sandstones are predominantly wavy or irregular bedding and thin, remnant sets of dune cross-strata consisting of eolian ripple and avalanche strata. The types of sedimentary structures and erosional features in Nugget sabkha sandstones indicate a close relationship between sand deposition and erosion and fluctuations in the local water table. Thin, remnant eolian dune sets are common in Nugget sabkha sandstones. The remnant sets form when dunes migrating across a sabkha are partially wetted as the water table rises slightly (on a scale of tens of centimeters); the lower part of the dune with wetted sand remains on the sabkha as the rest of the dune continues to migrate. Typically, ripple strata of the dune apron and the toes of avalanche strata are preserved in dune remnants. The avalanche strata, being slightly coarser grained, are preferentially deflated, leaving microtopography. This topography is commonly filled in with ripple strata that form as dry sand again blows across the sabkha. Stacked sets of remnant dunes separated by erosional surfaces illustrate the control of sand deposition on eolian sabkhas by the local water table.

  13. Mineralogical Characterization of Navajo Sandstone Iron Oxide Concretions Using QEMSCAN and Reflectance Spectroscopy; Analogue for Martian Diagenetic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; Petersen, E. U.

    2008-03-01

    The Navajo Sandstone concretions were evaluated to detect mineralogical changes and chemical gradients. Sequential relationships suggest an evolution of phases of cements. The Mars "blueberries" may have a similar evolution of cements.

  14. Oxidative dissolution of uraninite precipitated on Navajo sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelouas, A.; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, H. E.

    1999-03-01

    Column and batch experiments were conducted with sandstone and ground water samples to investigate oxidation of uraninite precipitated by microbially mediated reduction of U(VI), a contaminant in ground water beneath a uranium mill tailings site near Tuba City, AZ, USA. Uraninite precipitated together with mackinawite (FeS 0.9) because Fe(III) from the sandstone and sulfate, another contaminant in the water were reduced together with U(VI). After completion of U(VI) reduction, experiments were conducted to find out whether uraninite is protected by mackinawite against reoxidation. Uncontaminated ground water from the same site, containing 7 mg/l of dissolved oxygen, was passed through the columns or mixed with sandstone in batch experiments. The results showed that small masses of uraninite, 0.1 μg/g of sandstone, are protected by mackinawite from reoxidation. Uraninite masses on the order of 0.1 μg/g correspond to U(VI) concentrations of 0.5 mg/l, typically encountered in uranium contaminated ground waters. Mackinawite is an effective buffer and is formed in sufficient quantity to provide long-term protection of uraninite. Uranium concentrations in ground water passed through the columns are too low (4 μg/l) to distinguish between dissolution and oxidative dissolution of uraninite. However, batch experiments showed that uraninite oxidation takes place.

  15. Paleohydrologic controls on soft-sediment deformation in the Navajo Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Gerald; Cushman, Robert; Nick, Kevin; Miall, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Many workers have noted the presence of contorted cross-strata in the Navajo Sandstone and other ancient eolianites, and have recognized their significance as indicators of sediment saturation during the accumulation history. Horowitz (1982) proposed a general model for the production of such features in ancient ergs by episodic, seismically induced liquefaction of accumulated sand. A key feature of that popular model is the prevalence of a flat water table, characteristic of a hyper-arid climatic regime, during deformation. Under arid climatic conditions, the water table is established by regional flow and liquefaction is limited to the saturated regions below the level of interdune troughs. However, various paleohydrological indicators from Navajo Sandstone outcrops point toward a broader range of water table configurations during the deformation history of that eolianite. Some outcrops reveal extensive deformation complexes that do not appear to have extended to the contemporary depositional surface. These km-scale zones of deformation, affecting multiple sets of cross-strata, and grading upward into undeformed crossbeds may represent deep water table conditions, coupled with high intensity triggers, which produced exclusively intrastratal deformation. Such occurrences contrast with smaller-scale complexes formed within the zone of interaction between the products of soft-sediment deformation and surface processes of deposition and erosion. The Horowitz model targets the smaller-scale deformation morphologies produced in this near-surface environment. This study examines the implications of a wet climatic regime for the Horowitz deformation model. It demonstrates how a contoured water table, characteristic of humid climates, may have facilitated deformation within active bedforms, as well as in the accumulation. Intra-dune deformation would enable deflation of deformation features during the normal course of dune migration, more parsimoniously accounting for

  16. 3D visualization of liquefaction-induced dune collapse in the Navajo Sandstone, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Colby; Nick, Kevin; Bryant, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    The eolian Navajo Sandstone outcrop on the Canyon Overlook Trail in Zion National Park in Southern Utah is dissected by modern erosion in a way which reveals a great deal of the three-dimensional architecture of a major soft-sediment deformation event. The feature is bounded below by a well-developed interdune complex made up of two superimposed carbonate lenses, above by an irregular truncational surface, and incorporates 3 - 10 m of sandstone over an approximately 2 km area. The material above the deformed interval is undeformed cross-bedded sandstone, with crossbeds downlapping onto the surface of truncation. The stratigraphic confinement of deformation and the irregularity of the upper bounding surface suggests a deformation process which created topography, which was in turn covered by the next upwind dune before it could be eroded flat. The deformed material itself is laterally segmented by a stacked succession of shear surfaces, which all strike approximately perpendicular to the paleo-wind direction and dip at decreasing angles in the down paleo-wind direction. These factors point to the collapse of a major dune into the downwind interdune area, likely initiated by liquefaction in the interdune complex. The foundering of the dune's toe into the liquefied area created a powerful lateral stress field which did not extend significantly into the subsurface. The dune collapse process has been used in the past to describe other soft-sediment deformation features in the Navajo Sandstone, but this site provides a wealth of physical details which were not previously associated with dune collapse. Shear surfaces originate in the interdune deposit as slip between laminae, then the cohesive muds provided support as they were thrust upward to angles of up to 50 degrees. The margins of the site also contain important paleoenvironmental indicators. Dinosaur tracks are exposed both at the extreme upwind and downwind margins of the interdune deposit in and slightly above

  17. Net-Infiltration map of the Navajo Sandstone outcrop area in western Washington County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, Victor M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in the arid southwestern United States and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration and recharge becomes critically important for inventorying groundwater resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. A Geographic Information System (GIS)-based model utilizing readily available soils, topographic, precipitation, and outcrop data has been developed for predicting net infiltration to exposed and soil-covered areas of the Navajo Sandstone outcrop of southwestern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is an important regional bedrock aquifer. The GIS model determines the net-infiltration percentage of precipitation by using an empirical equation. This relation is derived from least squares linear regression between three surficial parameters (soil coarseness, topographic slope, and downgradient distance from outcrop) and the percentage of estimated net infiltration based on environmental tracer data from excavations and boreholes at Sand Hollow Reservoir in the southeastern part of the study area.Processed GIS raster layers are applied as parameters in the empirical equation for determining net infiltration for soil-covered areas as a percentage of precipitation. This net-infiltration percentage is multiplied by average annual Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) precipitation data to obtain an infiltration rate for each model cell. Additionally, net infiltration on exposed outcrop areas is set to 10 percent of precipitation on the basis of borehole net-infiltration estimates. Soils and outcrop net-infiltration rates are merged to form a final map.Areas of low, medium, and high potential for ground-water recharge have been identified, and estimates of net infiltration range from 0.1 to 66 millimeters per year (mm/yr). Estimated net-infiltration rates of less than 10 mm/yr are considered low, rates of 10 to 50 mm/yr are

  18. Architectural evidence of dune collapse in the Navajo Sandstone, Zion National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Colby; Bryant, Gerald; Nick, Kevin E.

    2016-10-01

    The Canyon Overlook Trail of Zion National Park follows an outcrop of Navajo Sandstone, which displays a uniquely well-exposed assemblage of features associated with failure of the lee face of a large eolian dune, and run-out over an expanse of interdune sediments downwind of that bedform. Exposed features include dramatic folds in the interdune succession and a stacked series of thrust sheets incorporating both interdune and overlying dune deposits. Thrust surfaces display consistent strikes, parallel to those of undeformed foresets, and incorporate zones of brittle failure and fluid deformation, including folds overturned in the direction of foreset dip. These features correspond to predictions made by a previous researcher's model of dune collapse, formulated from less fortuitously exposed architectures in the Navajo Sandstone. Unlike the previous model, however, this site preserves distinct indications that the bulk of deformed material accumulated above the level of the contemporary interdune surface, in an aggradational succession. Paleotopographic reconstruction, based on preserved facies relationships at this site, indicates the presence of a large dune, partially encroached upon a well-developed wet interdune succession, made up of two half-meter carbonate mud layers, separated by a meter of medium-grained sand. Trapping of pore water pressure between these mud layers during liquefaction reduced shear strength in this interval, facilitating the collapse of the lee face of the upwind dune into the interdune area, and transmitted resultant shear forces to distal portions of the interdune expanse, in the shallow subsurface. Shear failure developed along bedding planes in the horizontally laminated carbonate muds, which provided both lubrication of the shear surfaces and structural support for the preservation of coherent thrust sheets during production of an imbricated succession of shear zones in the toe portion of the slump. Individual shear surfaces

  19. Frisco City sandstone: Upper Jurassic play in southern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.; Baria, L.R.; Handford, C.R.

    1997-10-01

    The Frisco City sandstone play in southern Alabama is an example of hydrocarbon entrapment on the flanks of basement erosional features, with principal reservoirs occurring in proximal alluvial-fan to marine shoreface facies. Productive fields are developed on four-way closures of complex geometry, with reservoir sandstones showing maximum thickness along the margins of basement highs that are roughly 1.3-5.18 km{sup 2} in size and have 136-151 m of relief. Detailed analysis of sandstone facies indicates a downdip progression from alluvial-fan through wadi, eolian, beach, tidal-flat, and shoreface deposits. A sequence stratigraphic model based on identification of backstepping strata representing successive transgressive events is useful in predicting maximum reservoir occurrence in the vicinity of inselbergs. Reservoir quality in productive sandstones is high, with porosities ranging from 13 to 27% and permeabilities of 50 md to 5 d. Hydrocarbon occurrence is related to the distribution of high-quality source rock in the Smackover Formation and to maturation history.

  20. Lower Jurassic Navaho-Aztec-Equivalent Sandstones in southern Arizona and their paleogeographic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Bilodeau, W.L.; Keith, S.B.

    1986-06-01

    Thick sequences of Lower Jurassic rhyolitic and andesitic volcanic rocks in several mountain ranges of southern Arizona contain interbedded quartzarenites. Locally up to 250 m thick, these sandstone lenses, composed of well-sorted and well-rounded quartz grains, commonly contain large-scale cross-stratification and are considered to be eolian sand deposits. The eolian sands were blown up against the continental side of the Early Jurassic volcanic arc that trended northwest-southeast across the southwestern margin of the North American continent and/or plate at that time. Paleocurrent data suggest southerly eolian transport of the sands from the Colorado Plateau area. Correlation of these sandstones with the Lower Jurassic Navaho and Aztec Sandstones is indicated by the paleocurrent data as well as radiometric dating of the interbedded volcanics. Eolian sand transport southward across central Arizona in the Early Jurassic indicates that the Mogollon highlands either did not then exist, or were merely low, discontinuous inselbergs on a broad back-arc ramp, more appropriately called the Mogollon slope.

  1. Temperatures of quartz cementation in Jurassic sandstones from the Norwegian continental shelf -- evidence from fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Walderhaug, O. )

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies of fluid inclusions in quartz overgrowths have shown quartz cementation to have taken place at temperatures within the range 60--145 C in several sandstones from the North Sea and offshore mid-Norway (Malley et al. 1986; Konnerup-Madsen and Dypvik 1988; Burley et al. 1989; Walderhaug 1990; Ehrenberg 1990; Saigal et al. 1992; Nedkvitne et al. 1993). This study aims at determining whether these results are typical for quartz cementation of sandstones by presenting homogenization temperatures for 274 aqueous and 366 hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz overgrowths from Jurassic reservoir sandstones on the Norwegian continental shelf, and by reviewing previously published fluid-inclusion data. Possible explanations for different ranges of homogenization temperatures in different sandstones are also discussed, and possible sources of quartz cement and the effect of hydrocarbon emplacement on quartz cementation are considered.

  2. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the Updip Jurassic trend of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Subsequent to the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sand of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical for wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields; API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sand and the Megargel sand. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked fining-upward sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Petrophysical properties differ between the two areas. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporate minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

  3. Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) reservoir sandstones in the Witch Ground Graben, U. K. North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, S.D. Ltd., Aberdeen ); Mantel, K.A. ); Morton, D.J. ); Riley, L.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Oil-bearing Late Jurassic Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sandstones of the Sgiath and Piper formations are of major economic importance in the Witch Ground Graben. They form the reservoirs in Scott, which in 1993 will be the largest producing North Sea oil field to come on stream for more than a decade. Together with Scott, the Piper, Saltire, Tartan, Highlander, Petronella, Rob Roy, and Ivanhoe fields contained almost 2 Bbbl of recoverable reserves in these formations. The Sgiath and Piper represent two phases of Late Jurassic transgression and regression, initially represented by paralic deposited sand culminating in a wave-dominated delta sequence. The history of the Sgiath and Piper formations is reviewed and lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic correlations presented to illustrate the distribution of the reservoir sandstones.

  4. Post-sedimentation transformations of Lower-Middle Jurassic sandstones of Great Caucases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchkova, M. I.

    2003-04-01

    POST-SEDIMENTATION TRANSFORMATIONS OF LOWER-MIDDLE JURASSIC SANDSTONES OF GREAT CAUCASES M.I. Tuchkova Geological Institute Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia tuchkova@geo.tv-sign.ru/ /Fax: (095) 2310443 Generalization of author’s and literature data is based on the analysis of sandstones cement and structure, composition and politypism of clay minerals and index of mica crystallinity. Fore zones of sandstone transformations are distinguished for Lower-Middle Jurassic sedimentary complexes of Great Caucases: 1) zone of neogenic chlorite and muscovite (index of crystallinity IC=1.0-2.0 mm) with wide development of epidote; solubility, blastic and spinulose structures, 2) zone of neogenic chlorite and sericite (IC=2.0-3.0 mm); solubility and spinulose structures, 3) zone of neogenic hydromica (IC=2.5-3.5 mm), kaolinite and/or montmorillonite minerals with microstylolite, conformal and conformal-regenerational contacts between grains, 4) zone of kaolinite and/or montmorillonite, mixed-layered and chlorite minerals with carbonate cement of pores filling, ferugination and conformal and microstylolite contacts between grains. Index of crystallinity of mica mineral IC=3.5-5.5 mm. In modern geological structure the region with most intensive transformations (zone 1) is traced in sandstones of here and there preserved Sinemurian-Lower Pliensbachian and Toarcian deposits in the belt of Jurassic deposits of the southern slope of Great Caucases. The extent of rock transformation increases northward and southward from the axial zone of Great Caucases. Represented zonality doesn’t depend on deposits thickness and doesn’t coincide with stratigraphycal borders. Post-sedimentation zonality of Jurassic deposits originated as a result of stress during the period of folding at the end of Middle and the beginning of Late Jurassic following the thrusting of northern flank of Great Caucases basin onto its axial part. The rocks of lowest part of Jurassic deposits of the

  5. Diagenetic history of fluvial and lacustrine sandstones of the Hartford Basin (Triassic Jurassic), Newark Supergroup, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A. M.; Gierlowski-Kordesch, E. H.

    2007-04-01

    The early introduction of clays into continental sandstones has been attributed to mechanical infiltration by percolation of clay-rich surface waters into grain framework or cutans formed from pedogenic processes. The discovery of pedogenic mud aggregates as traction-load mud in ancient fluvial deposits suggests that permeability and porosity of terrigenous sandstones can be influenced at deposition and control early diagenetic patterns. This study compares diagenesis in fluvial (subaerially exposed) sandstones with lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones in a Triassic-Jurassic continental rift basin (Hartford Basin, Newark Supergroup). Diversity of diagenetic minerals and sequence of diagenetic alteration can be directly related to depositional environment. The fluvial sandstones in the New Haven Arkose, East Berlin Formation, and Shuttle Meadow Formation of the Hartford Basin are dominated by concretionary calcite and early calcite cement, infiltrated clays (illite-smectite), pedogenic mud aggregates (smectite and illite-smectite), grain coating clays (illite/hematite, illite-chlorite/hematite), quartz overgrowths, late stage carbonate cements (calcite, ferroan calcite), pore-filling clays (illite, kaolinite with minor amounts of smectite, smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite) and hematite. However, pedogenic processes in these fluvial sandstones retarded the development of quartz and feldspar overgrowths, and carbonate authigenesis, as well as the quality of diagenetically enhanced porosity. Dark gray-black lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones and mudrocks in the East Berlin and Shuttle Meadow Formations are dominated by pyrite, concretionary dolomite and early dolomite cement, radial grain coating clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite), late stage carbonate cements (dolomite, ferroan dolomite, ankerite), albite and pore-filling clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite, illite-chlorite). Clay minerals exist as detrital, mechanically infiltrated, and neoformed clay

  6. Petrology and diagenesis of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic graben-fill sandstones of Jameson land basin, central east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Davee, K.W.; Mansfield, C.F.

    1986-05-01

    Sands of the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic Kap Stewart and Lower Jurassic Neill Klinter Formations were deposited during the early development of a major Jurassic rift basin. Depositional environments have been interpreted as alluvial fan, fluvial, and deltaic for the Kap Stewart, and as tidal estuary for the Neill Klinter. Most of these sandstones are fine to medium-grained quartz and subarkosic wackestones. Clay matrix is abundant and comprises mostly diagenetic kaolinite, illite, and complex clay mixtures derived from the breakdown of labile framework grains, especially plagioclase and biotite. Early emplacement of carbonate cement in some sandstones prevented development of diagenetic clay matrix. The carbonate cement is poikilotopic and constitutes up to 30% of some samples. The current high level of maturity indicated by the quartz-feldspar-lithic composition for these sandstones results from selective diagenetic decomposition of labile grains. The original, more feldspathic compositions reflect less maturity and an earlier stage of basin fill than the Middle Jurassic, high-porosity arenites, which also contain abundant quartz and up to 25% feldspar. Because of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic sands were deposited in continental and low-energy marine environments, they likely underwent greater in-situ alteration but less winnowing of labile grains than the overlying Middle Jurassic sands deposited in higher energy marine settings.

  7. Diagenetic quartzarenite and destruction of secondary porosity: An example from the Middle Jurassic Brent sandstone of northwest Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, N.B. )

    1989-04-01

    Significant amounts of feldspar have been dissolved from Middle Jurassic sandstone oil reservoirs in the North Sea (northwest Europe) during burial diagenesis Sandstones of the Middle Jurassic Brent Group become increasingly quartzose with increasing burial depth. At Statfjord field (2500 m depth), sandstones are arkose to subarkose; at Hutton field (3050 m depth), they are subarkose to quartzarenite, and at Lyell field (3500 m depth), sandstones are typically quartzarenite. In spite of extensive feldspar dissolution, the abundance of secondary porosity due to feldspar dissolution is similar for all fields, averaging 2.9% of the total rock volume. Thus, far more feldspar has been dissolved than is recorded as secondary porosity. The limit on preservation of secondary porosity may be largely the effect of the mechanical strength of the rock. An excessive number of large secondary pores lowers the rock strength below the point at which the rock can withstand overburden stress, thus causing collapse of some of the secondary pores.

  8. Diagenetic quartzarenite and destruction of secondary porosity: An example from the Middle Jurassic Brent sandstone of northwest Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas B.

    1989-04-01

    Significant amounts of feldspar have been dissolved from Middle Jurassic sandstone oil reservoirs in the North Sea (northwest Europe) during burial diagenesis. Sandstones of the Middle Jurassic Brent Group become increasingly quartzose with increasing burial depth. At Stafford field (2500 m depth), sandstones are arkose to subarkose; at Hutton field (3050 m depth), they are subarkose to quartzarenite; and at Lyell field (3500 m depth), sandstones are typically quartzarenite. In spite of extensive feldspar dissolution, the abundance of secondary porosity due to feldspar dissolution is similar for all fields, averaging 2.9% of the total rock volume. Thus, far more feldspar has been dissolved than is recorded as secondary porosity. The limit on preservation of secondary porosity may be largely the effect of the mechanical strength of the rock. An excessive number of large secondary pores lowers the rock strength below the point at which the rock can withstand overburden stress, thus causing collapse of some of the secondary pores.

  9. The Jurassic section along McElmo Canyon in southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Sullivan, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    In McElmo Canyon, Jurassic rocks are 1500-1600 ft thick. Lower Jurassic rocks of the Glen Canyon Group include (in ascending order) Wingate Sandstone, Kayenta Formation and Navajo Sandstone. Middle Jurassic rocks are represented by the San Rafael Group, which includes the Entrada Sandstone and overlying Wanakah Formation. Upper Jurassic rocks comprise the Junction Creek Sandstone overlain by the Morrison Formation. The Burro Canyon Formation, generally considered to be Lower Cretaceous, may be Late Jurassic in the McElmo Canyon area and is discussed with the Jurassic. The Upper Triassic Chinle Formation in the subsurface underlies, and the Upper Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone overlies, the Jurassic section. An unconformity is present at the base of the Glen Canyon Group (J-0), at the base of the San Rafael Group (J-2), and at the base of the Junction Creek Sandstone (J-5). Another unconformity of Cretaceous age is at the base of the Dakota Sandstone. Most of the Jurassic rocks consist of fluviatile, lacustrine and eolian deposits. The basal part of the Entrada Sandstone and the Wanakah Formation may be of marginal marine origin.

  10. Depositional environments and hydrocarbon occurrence of upper Jurassic Cotton Valley sandstones, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kornfeld, I.

    1985-02-01

    The sandstones of the Kimmeridgian (Jurassic) upper Cotton Valley Formation of Mississippi, northern Louisiana, and eastern Texas were deposited on a stable subsiding shelf. These sands are regressive and are part of a complex of deltaic and marine systems. They are quartz-rich and exhibit a variety of sedimentary structures. Cotton Valley fluvial-deltaic systems drained Paleozoic and younger highlands to the north and northwest, depositing sands on the shelf where they were subsequently reworked. Three depositional environments have been interpreted for these sands in Mississippi: (1) a constructive delta in the west-central part of the state, (2) a destructive delta in the east-central part of the state, and (3) an interdeltaic system in central Mississippi between the other systems. In northern Louisiana and northeastern Texas, the following environments have been interpreted: a proximal destructive delta system in northwest Louisiana and northeast Texas and another delta system in northeastern Louisiana with an interdeltaic system consisting of barrier beaches and barrier bars located centrally between them. Production is controlled by porosity and permeability barriers, fault traps, and salt- and basement-induced structures.

  11. The stratigraphy of Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) reservoir sandstones in the Witch Ground Graben, United Kingdom North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, S.D. ); Mantel, K.A. ); Morton, D.J. ); Riley, L.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Oil-bearing Upper Jurassic Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sandstones of the Sgiath and Piper formations are of major economic importance in the Witch Ground Gaben, United Kingdom North Sea. They form the reservoirs in 14 fields that originally contained 2 billion bbl of oil reserves, including Scott Field, which in 1993 will be the largest producing United Kingdom North Sea oil field to come on stream in more than a decade. The Sgiath and Piper formations represent Late Jurassic transgressive and regressive phases that began with paralic deposition and culminated in a wave-dominated delta system. These phases preceded the major grabel rifting episode (late Kimmeridgian to early Ryazanian) and deposition of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, the principal source rock of the Witch Ground Graben oil fields. A threefold subdivision of the middle to upper Oxfordian Sgiath Formation is formally proposed, with Scott field well 15/21a-15 as the designated reference well. The basal Skene Member consists of thinly interbedded paralic carbonaceous shales, coals, and sandstones. This is overlain by transgressive marine shales of the Saltire Member. The upper-most Oxfordian Scott Member consists of shallow marine sandstones that prograded to the southwest. The contact of the Sgiath and Piper formations is a basinwide transgressive marine shale (I shale), which can act as an effective barrier to fluid communication between the Sgiath and Piper reservoir sandstones.

  12. Sedimentation of the Triassic Jurassic Adigrat Sandstone Formation, Blue Nile (Abay) Basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A.

    2008-09-01

    Exploration of oil and gas deposits in the Blue Nile Basin targeted the Adigrat Sandstone Formation as a reservoir objective. Conglomerates, gravely sandstones, coarse to medium-grained sandstones, very fine-grained cross-bedded sandstones, siltstones and mudstones of the Adigrat Sandstone Formation were deposited in semi-arid to arid climates. The North-western highlands are the main source for the sedimentation. The poorly-sorted, crudely-bedded conglomerates and gravely sandstones are interpreted as alluvial fan deposits. The basal polymictic orthoconglomerate passes up vertically into gravely sandstone, possibly indicating proximal to mid-fan sedimentation. The alluvial fan sedimentation passes up vertically into channel, point bars and flood-plain fines. The meandering river sedimentation is characterized by single and amalgamated multi-storey sandstone bodies. In places, the uppermost part of the Adigrat Sandstone Formation is represented by coal-bearing sediments possibly reflect lacustrine depositional environment. The medium-coarse-grained sandstone is a possible oil and gas reservoir, whilst the fine-grained sediments are a possible gas reservoir.

  13. Simulation analysis of water-level changes in the Navajo sandstone due to changes in the altitude of Lake Powell near Wahweap Bay, Utah and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    A two-dimensional, finite difference, digital computer model was used to simulate various concepts of groundwater flow near Wahweap Bay, Lake Powell. The filling of Lake Powell started in March 1963; and by 1983 the lake had risen almost 550 ft. This resulted in a maximum observed water level rise of 395 ft in a well in the Navajo Sandstone 1 mi from the lake. A steady-state model was prepared with subsurface recharge rates of 5,720 acre-ft/yr, 10,440 acre-ft/yr, and 14,820 acre-ft/yr, resulting in a range of hydraulic conductivity of 0.25 to 3.38 ft/da. Comparing measured and simulated water level changes resulted in a range of specific yield of 0.02 to 0.15. Using larger values for hydraulic conductivity in the model area corresponding to the axis of the Wahweap syncline and the Echo monocline was instrumental in attaining a reasonable match for the water level distribution. This supports previous concepts that areas where rocks are structurally deformed more readily transmit groundwater because of the higher degree of fracturing. Using the most likely simulation of the flow system, groundwater storage in the Navajo increased by about 25,000 acre ft/mi of shoreline form 1963-83, but the flow system will require about 400 yr to reach a state of equilibrium. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone in the Upper Jurassic Naknek Formation on the south shore of Kamishak Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Richard G.; Herriott, Trystan M.; Helmold, Kenneth P.; Gillis, Robert J.; Lillis, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of an active petroleum system in Kamishak Bay is demonstrated by an outcrop of hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone in the Upper Jurassic Naknek Formation near the south shore of the bay (fig. 1). The outcrop is about 140 km southwest of Homer on a small, unnamed island near the mouth of the Douglas River (fig. 17). The existence of this outcrop was kindly reported to us by Les Magoon (U.S. Geological Survey, emeritus), who also provided a topographic map showing its exact position. The outcrop was mentioned very briefly in publications by Magoon and others (1975, p. 19) and by Lyle and Morehouse (1977, p. E-1), but to our knowledge there are no detailed descriptions of this outcrop or its hydrocarbons in the published scientific literature.

  15. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the updip-Jurassic trend of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Since the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sandstone of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe Counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical in wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2,000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields had produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 Mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields, API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sandstone and the Megargel sandstone. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked upward-fining sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2,000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1,800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than that in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporite minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

  16. Investigation of exfoliation joints in Navajo sandstone at the Zion National Park and in granite at the Yosemite National Park by tectonofractographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bahat, D.; Grossenbacher, K.; Karasaki, K.

    1995-04-01

    Tectonofractographic techniques have been applied to the study of joint exfoliation in the Navajo sandstone at Zion National Park and in the granite at Yosemite National Park. New types of fracture surface morphologies have been observed which enabled the discerning of incipient joints and consequent fracture growth in these rocks. Incipient jointing in the sandstone is mostly manifested by elliptical and circular fractures (meters to tens meters across) initiating from independent origins. They interfere with each other and grow to larger circular fractures producing exfoliation surfaces up to hundreds of meters across. Less frequently, series of large concentric undulations demonstrate the propagation of a large fracture front producing exfoliation from an individual origin. One such fracture front reveals refraction of undulations at a layer boundary. Certain en echelon fringes surround the joint mirror plane with well defined rims of en echelons and hackles which enable the determination of the tensile fracture stress, {sigma}f. Arches in Zion National Park are ubiquitous in shape and size, revealing stages in their evolution by a mechanical process, which was associated with exfoliation, but independent of local faulting. Exfoliation and arching mostly occurred on vertical surfaces of N-NNW and NE sets of prominent joints, but there are also deviations from this general trend. In Yosemite National Park large exfoliations (hundreds of meters in size) developed on the El Capitan cliff by the interaction and merging of many previous smaller incipient joints that vary in size from meters to tens of meter.

  17. Field guide to sedimentary structures in the Navajo and Entrada sandstones in southern Utah and northern Arizona: Chapter in Field-trip guidebook, 100th annual meeting, The Geological Society of America, Phoenix, Arizona, October 26-29, 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; Hunter, Ralph E.

    1987-01-01

    This field-trip guide describes the common sedimentary structures that occur in eolian sands. The outcrops that are described occur in the Navajo and Entiaia Sandstones between the areas of Page, Arizona and St. George, Utah (figure I), but the sedimentary structures of these two sandstones are typical of most eolian deposits. The main part of the guide discusses the geologic setting and the origin of the various structures, and the road log discusses which structures are best displayed at selected outcrops.

  18. Role of halite in the evolution of sandstone porosity, upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W. )

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of petrographic point-count data, cement paragenesis, and scanning electron microscopy examination of pores has shown that poikilitic halite cement in sandstones of the Norphlet Formation in a core from Wayne County, Mississippi, formed following cementation by quartz, feldspar, dolomite, and anhydrite. Intergranular volume ranges from 26 to 42%, averaging 35%, indicating that an average of 10% of the rock volume was lost to compaction, and a further 10-15%, was lost to cementation prior to halite cementation, assuming a depositional porosity of about 45%. Most halite occurs as intergranular cement, but some halite is present as intragranular cement within framework feldspars and lithic fragments. Halite is easily removed from a sandstone during coring, slabbing, and thin-section preparation techniques that do not use oil-based fluids and muds, so the amount of porosity in these samples that is a product of artificial removal of halite is unknown. Although the present and former distribution of halite is poorly known, natural halite dissolution could have produced about 20% secondary porosity in the Norphlet Formation at depth in this part of the Mississippi Salt basin.

  19. Storm-influenced deltaic deposits of the Middle Jurassic Gaikema Sandstone in a measured section on the northern Iniskin Peninsula, Cook Inlet basin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Richard G.; Helmold, Kenneth P.; LePain, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Middle Jurassic strata of the Gaikema Sandstone were deposited about 170 million years ago on a delta that was located on the western shoreline of the Cook Inlet basin (Detterman and Hartsock, 1966; LePain and others, 2011, 2013). The delta was built by swift, sediment-laden rivers that flowed southeastward from a mountainous volcanic terrane west of the Bruin Bay fault (fig. 6-1). Upon reaching the edge of the Jurassic sea, the rivers dumped abundant sand, gravel, and mud into a depocenter on the northern Iniskin Peninsula, about 240 km southwest of Anchorage (figs. 6-1, 6-2). This report provides a preliminary description and interpretation of a detailed, 34-m-thick measured section in the Gaikema Sandstone on the south shore of Chinitna Bay at latitude 59.816°N, longitude 153.168°W (figs. 6-1–6-3). The sandstone in this measured section exhibits hummocky cross lamination and other features suggestive of storm-influenced deposition on the shallow-marine, seaward margin of the Gaikema delta. Our field studies of the Gaikema Sandstone were conducted during 2013 and 2014 as part of a collaborative effort by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), Alaska Division of Oil and Gas (DOG), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide the public with reliable information on the geologic framework and petroleum resource potential of Cook Inlet basin (Gillis, 2013, 2014). Jurassic rocks in Cook Inlet, including the Gaikema Sandstone, are of economic interest because they could contain significant undiscovered petroleum resources (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 2011; Stanley and others, 2011a, 2011b, 2013a; LePain and others, 2013).

  20. Reconstruction and geochemical modelling of the diagenetic history of the middle Jurassic Oseberg sandstone reservoir, Oseberg Field, Norwegian North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, J.P.; Sanjuan, B.; Fouillac, C.

    1995-08-01

    A detailed multidisciplinary integrated study of the Middle Jurassic Oseberg reservoir in 13 wells of the Oseberg field, Norwegian North Sea, was carried out in order to (1) reconstruct precisely the timing, conditions and spatial variation of diagenetic transformations (2) characterize the nature and origin of the diagenetic fluids, and (3) develop a geochemical model of the observed diagenesis. The 20-60 in thick Oseberg Formation occurs at depths of 2.5 to 3.2 km, and at present temperatures ranging from 100 to 125{degrees}C. The detrital assemblage is mainly composed of quartz, K-feldspar, albrite, muscovite and lithic clay clasts, and is very homogeneous throughout the study area. The chronological sequence of diagenetic phases established from petrographic observations includes: minor siderite and pyrite, K-feldspar overgrowths, ankerite, feldspar dissolution, vermiform, kaolinite, quartz overgrowths, poikilotopic Fe-rich calcite, dickite. Diagenetic temperatures were determined from fluid inclusions in ankerite, quarts and calcite. Combination with modelled burial/thermal history permitted to constrain approximate ages and duration of major diagenetic events. Isotopic compositions of diagenetic cements indicate that meteoric water was (and still is) a major constituant of diagenetic fluids. Present formation waters are fairly similar chemically and isotopically at reservoir scale and represent mixing of three endmembers: seawater, meteoric water and primary evaporative brine. Stability diagrams and chemical geothermometers suggest that formation fluids are close to equilibrium with the host sandstone at present reservoir temperatures. Geochemical modelling of the diagenetic evolution of water-reservoir interactions was carried out using the EQ3/6 code and the Allan{sup TM}/Neptunix integrated simulator system. Results emphasize the importance of circulations of large volumes of fluid within the reservoir throughout the diagenetic history.

  1. Degradation processes and consolidation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur tracks in museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Sofia; mateus, Octavio; Tomas, Carla; Dionisio, Amelia

    2014-05-01

    The current study aims to conciliate conservation and restoration museology diagnosis with paleontological and geological curational needs and has, as subject of study, dinosaur footprints (vertebrates fossils). The footprints have been being exposed since 2004 in the paleontology hall of the Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal, and are part of a important paleontological collection of Late Jurassic vertebrate fossils from Lourinhã Formation. Presently, it is considered a unique heritage in danger of disappearing due to high decay level of disaggregation of its geological structure. The dinosaur footprints, (ML557) found, more precisely, on a coastline cliff in Lourinhã, Porto das Barcas, Lagido do Forno (coordinate 39° 14. 178'N, 9° 20. 397'W), Jurassic period, on the 5th of June 2001, by Jesper Milàn. This cliff of high slope presents sedimentary stratigraphic characteristics of a sandstone/siltstone of gray and red colors, by the '' Munsell scale and Color Chart''. Geological the tracks are Late Jurassic in age, and colected in the Lourinhã Formation, Praia Azul Member, of the Lusitanian Basin. There are three natural infills tridactyl tracks, possibly ascribed to ornithopod, a bipedal herbivore, resultant of a left foot movement, right and left. Footprints have 300-400mm of wide and 330-360mm of height with round fingers, which are elongated due to some degradation/erosion. In 2001, the footprints were collected from the field, cleaned, consolidated and glued in the laboratory of the Museum of Lourinhã before being exhibited in a museum display. Stone matrix was removed and a consolidation product applied, probably a polyvinyl acetate, of the brand Plexigum. The footprint with broken central digit was glued with an epoxy resin, Araldite. Both applied products were confirmed by analysis of µ-FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) and both presented colour change and detachment surface problems. After collecting and storing, in 2004, footprints were

  2. Provenance of Late Carboniferous to Jurassic sandstones for southern Taimyr, Arctic Russia: A comparison of heavy mineral analysis by optical and QEMSCAN methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Pease, Victoria; Omma, Jenny; Benedictus, Aukje

    2015-11-01

    Sandstone framework-grain petrography, optical and QEMSCAN (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy) heavy mineral analysis carried out on 40 samples collected from east and west southern Taimyr are used to constrain the provenance and tectonic history of Late Carboniferous to Late Jurassic siliciclastic sequences. The tectonic settings of provenance evolved gradually from a mix of volcanic arc and recycled orogen to craton interior. Much of the detritus in the Late Paleozoic to Mesozoic siliciclastic succession came from proximal sources with contributions from multi-type source rocks including acid igneous rocks, basalts, sedimentary rocks and low to medium-grade metamorphic rocks. Carboniferous to Permian sandstones contain low-diversity suites of heavy minerals, including apatite, tourmaline, zircon, rutile, Cr-spinel, monazite and titanite. Cr-spinel indicates probable influx from exposed ophiolitic basement. Abundant euhedral zircon and apatite suggest a volcanic arc source related with Uralian collision. The appearance of garnet in the early Triassic signals the unroofing of a metamorphic source. The abrupt increase of clinopyroxene in Middle to Late Triassic sandstones indicates the influx of detritus from basic rocks related with Siberian Trap magmatism. The decrease of Cr-spinel and an abundance of staurolite in Jurassic samples indicate that unroofing of an ophiolitic source ceased and that stripping of a different thrust sheet containing plenty of staurolite-bearing metamorphic rocks commenced.

  3. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic evidence for a secondary yet early magnetization in large sandstone pipes and host Late Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Summerville Formation and Bluff Sandstone near Mesita, west central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, John W.; Harlan, Stephen S.

    2004-07-01

    Processes responsible for the acquisition of ancient yet secondary magnetizations are important facets of the geologic history of rocks and, when the age of such magnetizations can be estimated with confidence, provide useful information on the ancient geomagnetic field. In west central New Mexico near Mesita, on the Colorado Plateau, hematitic sandstone and siltstone beds of the Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Summerville Formation and overlying Bluff Sandstone are host to numerous large (up to 100 m2 in map area) pipe-like sandstone bodies. The pipes are as strongly cemented by hematite (colors range from 10R 6/6 to 10R 3/4) as the host strata; paleomagnetic data from them and their host strata are interpreted to indicate that these rocks have been remagnetized, probably in association with sandstone pipe formation. Reverse polarity magnetizations isolated in both alternating field and thermal demagnetization from pipes are well grouped and are similar to, and not statistically distinct from, those in adjacent host strata. The grand-mean direction for 16 sites (7 sites in sandstone pipes and 9 in host strata), corrected for slight (5°) west-northwest tilt of the strata, is D = 163.0°, I = -44.3° (α95 = 2.7°, k = 169). This direction yields a pole position of 72.8°N, 135.7°E (dp = 2.1°, dm = 3.4°). Assuming a modest (i.e., ˜5°) clockwise rotation of the Colorado Plateau, the pole lies at 68.7°N, 143.8°E. Median destructive fields for the remanence in pipes and host strata are typically 40-50 mT; over 90% of the remanence is "unblocked" or removed during changes in the magnetic mineralogy by temperatures of ˜400-450°C. Isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition data, and thermal demagnetization of "saturation" IRM, however, demonstrate that the dominant magnetic phase is of high coercivity and relatively high (above 600°C) laboratory unblocking temperatures in both sandstone pipes and host strata, yet it does not appear to contribute

  4. THE NAVAJOS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Tribe Public Relations and Information Dept., Window Rock, AZ.

    A STUDY OF NAVAJO AMERICAN INDIANS IS PRESENTED. INCLUDED ARE THE TRIBE'S HISTORY, RESOURCES, ECONOMIC SITUATION, AND WAYS TO IMPROVE IT. THE NAVAJOS ARE DIFFERENT FROM OTHER AMERICAN INDIAN TRIBES IN THAT THEY ARE RAPIDLY INCREASING, THEY HAVE INCREASED THE SIZE OF THEIR RESERVATION, THEY STILL LIVE IN ISOLATION AND IN A PRIMITIVE FASHION, AND…

  5. Erosional remnants and adjacent unconformities along an eolian-marine boundary of the Page Sandstone and Carmel Formation, Middle Jurassic, south-central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.S.; Blakey, R.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    Sandstone ridges along the marine-eolian boundary of the Middle Jurassic Page Sandstone (eolian) with the lower Carmel Formation (restricted marine) in south-central Utah have been identified as erosional remnants consisting of strata of siliciclastic sabkha and eolian origin. The ridges lie within two distinct units of the Thousand Pockets Tongue of the Page. Two equally plausible models explain the genesis of these ridges. One model involves (1) early cementation of eolian and sabkha strata, (2) wind erosion leading to development of yardangs and unconformities, (3) yardang tilting due to evaporite dissolution, and (4) renewed deposition and burial. The alternative model explains ridge development through (1) subsidence, with tilting, of eolian and sabkha strata into evaporites due to loading from linear dunes, (2) evaporite dissolution and unconformity development, and (3) renewed deposition and burial. These models provide important clues about the nature of a missing part of the rock record. Reconstruction of units that were deposited but later eroded improves paleogeographic interpretation and here indicates that the Carmel paleo-shoreline was considerably farther to the northwest than previously believed.

  6. Diagenesis of Eolian and fluvial feldspathic sandstones, Norphlet formation (upper Jurassic), Rankin County, Mississippi, and Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, E.F.; Land, L.S.; Mack, L.E.

    1987-09-01

    Norphlet sandstones in seven cores from Mississippi and Alabama are arkoses and subarkoses deposited in eolian-dune, interdune, and fluvial environments. Similar to the deeply buried (> 5 km) Tertiary feldspathic sandstones of the Gulf basin, all detrital plagioclase that survived dissolution has been albitized. Fluvial red sandstone lost all initial porosity by the introduction of preburial pedogenic calcite and compaction. Initial porosity of eolian sands was reduced by compaction to an average of 29%; and later by cementation by quartz, carbonates, anhydrite, halite, K-feldspar, and illite. Quartz and anhydrite cements precipitated between 90/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/C (approximately 2.3 km deep), carbonates and halite cements formed below 120/sup 0/C (< 3 km), and late-stage illite cement formed between 130/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C (4-5 km deep). Cements are patchy, and some, especially quartz and anhydrite, are texture-selective, being more abundant in coarser laminae. Secondary porosity, which makes up approximately half the porosity in thin sections, formed by dissolution of detrital grains (feldspar, rock fragments) and cements (anhydrite, carbonate, halite). Reservoir bitumen records an early phase of oil entrapment. Reservoir quality is influenced by the abundance of reservoir bitumen and thread-like illite, both of which bridge pores. Isotopic data suggest that during the first 30 to 40 m.y. of burial, subsurface diagenesis of the Norphlet Formation was dominated by deep-circulating, hot, meteoric water. This phenomenon may be characteristic of the early diagenetic history of rifted basins. 10 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Siderite (FeCO3)—the Hidden (but Primary) Player in Iron Diagenesis of Non-Marine Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, D.; Kettler, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Siderite precipitates in reducing pore waters in which iron reduction exceeds sulfate reduction. Abundant siderite should be expected in non-marine strata in which a reductant was present. The Triassic Shinarump Member (Chinle Fm) and Cretaceous Dakota Fm are fluvial and contain siderite in outcrops of floodplain mudstones. Siderite is present in cores of Dakota channel sandstones. Rinded and jointed iron-oxide concretions, Wonderstone patterns, and rhombic, iron-oxide pseudomorphs are present in outcrops of these sandstones. Vascular plants growing on floodplains provided the reductant. Similar concretions, patterns, and pseudomorphs are present in outcropping eolian cross-strata of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone and in fluvial sandstone of the Cambrian Umm Ishrin Fm. Bleached sandstones indicate reductant was present in both units during late diagenesis. Because Jurassic deserts and Cambrian river systems lacked vascular plants, extra-formational methane was the likely reductant. We interpret the various iron-oxide-cemented phenomena of the Shinarump, Dakota, Navajo, and Umm Ishrin as products of siderite oxidation that accompanied exhumation. In the Navajo, large concretions are enclosed in thick sheaths of iron-oxide cement. Through-going horizontal and vertical joints cut sheaths. Outside concretion sheaths, joints are unassociated with iron-oxide cements, but inside the sheaths, thick cement zones are present on both sides of (still-open) joints. Joints were conduits for oxidizing water entering the concretions. Redox gradients formed on both sides of joints and iron oxide accumulated as Fe+2 diffused from dissolving siderite toward joints and O2 diffused away from joints. Horizontal joints formed <100 m from the land surface. Iron-oxide accumulations on the horizontal joints and on the vertical joints that abut them (see figure) are evidence that siderite oxidation is ongoing and linked to exhumation.

  8. Triassic and Jurassic rocks at Currie, Nevada Preliminary paleontologic evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.A.; Dubiel, R.F.; Brouwers, E.M. ); Litwin, R.J. ); Ash, S.R. ); Good, S.C. )

    1993-04-01

    A sequence of continental rocks overlies the Lower Triassic Thaynes Formation in a poorly exposed syncline near Currie in northeastern NV. The authors recognize four lithostratigraphic units above the Thaynes near Currie and provide new paleontologic data. In ascending order, unit 1 (120 ft) consists of reddish-brown, very fine grained sandstone. Unit 2 (50 ft) consists of light-gray, trough cross-stratified, coarse-grained, conglomeratic sandstone. Unit 3 (at least 500 ft) consists of green, red, and brown sandstone and mudstone. Unit 4 occurs as isolated outcrops of reddish-orange, fine- to medium-grained sandstone. New fossil evidence, while not definitive, constrain the age of this sequence. Plant megafossils in unit 1 include (1) a specimen with narrow ovate leaves, possibly from an early Mesozoic conifer and (2) abundant fragments of probable Neocalamites. The presence of these fossils and the absence of any angiosperm leaves or wood fragments suggest an early Mesozoic age. Ostracodes in unit 3 are exclusively Darwinula sp., and their association with conchostracans in the absence of younger ostracodes suggests a Triassic age. Finally, two small outcrops, previously mapped as Triassic/Jurassic, contain the gastropods Pilidae indet. and Lymnaea sp., which resemble Late Cretaceous to Paleocene faunas. The sequence is similar to the nearest Lower Mesozoic section on the Colorado Plateau at Cove Fort, Utah, 165 miles to the southeast. The authors' new evidence supports the longstanding correlation of units 1--4 with the Lower Triassic Moenkopi Formation (part), the Shinarump and Petrified Forest Members of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation, and the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of the Plateau. These rocks at Currie demonstrate that the Early Mesozoic depositional systems of the Colorado Plateau extended at least this far west and provide constraints on Early Mesozoic tectonism in the eastern Great Basin.

  9. Navajo Electrification Demonstraiton Project

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Ahasteen, Project Manager

    2006-07-17

    This is a final technical report required by DOE for the Navajo Electrification Demonstration Program, This report covers the electric line extension project for Navajo families that currently without electric power.

  10. Strong Navajo Marriages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogrand, Linda; Mueller, Mary Lou; Arrington, Rachel; LeBlanc, Heidi; Spotted Elk, Davina; Dayzie, Irene; Rosenbrand, Reva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, conducted in two Navajo Nation chapters, was to learn what makes Navajo marriages strong because no research has been done on this topic. Twenty-one Navajo couples (42 individuals) who felt they had strong marriages volunteered to participate in the study. Couples identified the following marital strengths:…

  11. From Back-arc Drifting to Arc Accretion: the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Evolution of the Guerrero Terrane Recorded by a Major Provenance Change in Sandstones from the Sierra de los Cuarzos, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios Garcia, N. B.; Martini, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Guerrero terrane composed of Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous arc assemblages, were drifted from the North American continental mainland during lower Early Cretaceous spreading in the Arperos back arc basin, and subsequently accreted back to the continental margin in the late Aptian. Although the accretion of the Guerrero terrane represents one of the major tectonic processes that shaped the southern North American Pacific margin, the stratigraphic record related to such a regional event was not yet recognized in central Mexico. Due to the Sierra de los Cuarzos is located just 50 km east of the Guerrero terrane suture belt, its stratigraphic record should be highly sensitive to first order tectonic changes and would record a syn-tectonic deposits related to this major event. In that study area, were identified two main Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous clastic units. The Sierra de los Cuarzos formation represents the lowermost exposed stratigraphic record. Sedimentary structures, sandstones composition, and U-Pb detrital zircon ages document that the Sierra de los Cuarzos formation reflects a vigorous mass wasting along the margin of the North American continental mainland, representing the eastern side of the Arperos back arc basin. Sandstones of the Sierra de los Cuarzos formation are free from detrital contributions related to the Guerrero terrane juvenile sources, indicating that the Arperos Basin acted like an efficient sedimentological barrier that inhibited the influence of the arc massifs on the continental mainland deposits. The Sierra de los Cuarzos formation is overlain by submarine slope deposits of the Pelones formation, which mark a sudden change in the depositional conditions. Provenance analysis documents that sandstones from the Pelones formation were fed by the mafic to intermediate arc assemblages of the Guerrero terrane, as well as by quartz-rich sources of the continental mainland, suggesting that, by the time of deposition of the Pelones

  12. Conference on Navajo Orthography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohannessian, Sirarpi; And Others

    This report on the Conference on Navajo Orthography, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 2-3, 1969 constitutes a summary of the discussion and decisions of a meeting which was convened by the Center for Applied Linguistics under contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to agree on an orthography for the Navajo language. The immediate purpose…

  13. The Navajo Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert W., Comp.

    The Navajo Yearbook began as an annual report to relate progress in carrying out provisions of the Navajo-Hopi Long Range Rehabilitation Act (P.L. 474 - 81st Congress), but the scope has been expanded to include all programs conducted on the reservation. This volume, the eighth in the series, is designed to reflect changing problems, changing…

  14. Navajo Mineral Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffing, Lorraine Turner

    1978-01-01

    Comparing the resource development of the Navajo Nation with that of Third World countries, this article examines Navajo-Third World similarities in terms of various decision-making alternatives such as transitional corporations and the new forms of agreements now used by Third World countries. (JC)

  15. Architectural studies of Jurassic-Cretaceous fluvial units, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Miall, A.D.; Bromley, M.H.; Cowan, E.J.; Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    A sixfold hierarchy of architectural elements and bounding surfaces evolved from outcrop studies of three fluvial units: Westwater Canyon member (WCM), Morrison Formation, Upper Jurassic; Torrivio sandstone member (TSM), Gallup Sandstone, Upper Cretaceous, northwestern New Mexico; and Kayenta Formation (KF), Lower Jurassic, southwestern Colorado. This hierarchy is discussed.

  16. Navajo-ABLE: Replication Model Navajo Assistive Technology Loan Program. Final Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Katie Jebb

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of the Navajo Assistive Bank of Loanable Equipment (Navajo-ABLE), a federally funded program designed to provide assistive technology (AT) devices, services, technical information, funding information, and training for Navajo children and youth with disabilities. The program was operated and…

  17. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  18. Contemporary Navajo Affairs: Navajo History Volume III, Part B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, Norman K.

    Written specifically for Navajo junior high through college students, but also serving those interested in modern reservation developments and processs, the third volume of a curricular series on Navajo history provides a synthesis of data and pictorial records on current events in the areas of Navajo government, economic development, and health.…

  19. Navajos Sign an Apprenticeship Pact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Diane B.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Navajo Tribe's joining with the AFL-CIO building and construction trades unions to develop an apprentice job training program geared to the special employment problems of Navajos and to the projected labor needs for construction projects on or near the reservation. Focus is on the Navajo Construction Industry Manpower Program…

  20. Walking in Navajo Footprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Katie B.

    This module presents a guide for the study of the Navajo Indians' life and customs as they existed about thirty years ago. The length of time necessary to complete the activities, which are designed for use in kindergarten through third grades, may vary from one to two weeks. The module includes language, science, mathematics, art, music, dramatic…

  1. The Navajos, A Critical Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Peter

    Perhaps the most significant issue in the history of the Navajos is the tribe's success in maintaining its traditional culture while adapting to the massive pressures of Euramerican society. Few tribal groups have had to contend with as many and as diverse cultural and political competitors for as long a period of time as have the Navajos--Spain,…

  2. Piagetian Conservation in Navajo Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odell, Sandra J.; Ferraro, Douglas P.

    In order to determine the cognitive development of Navajo children in terms of Piagetian conservation of number, mass, and continuous quantity, 168 Navajo children at seven different age levels from 5 to adult were presented with a series of three conservation tasks. The tasks consisted of a standard object and an equivalent object that could be…

  3. To Be A Navajo. Second Edition, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begay, Shirley M., Ed.

    Designed to provide culturally relevant and interesting reading material in Navajo for Navajo speaking children, this booklet presents 20 short stories written and illustrated by students at Rough Rock Demonstration School. Intended to encourage Navajo speaking children, and others, to read and to instill pride in being a Navajo, the stories…

  4. A History of Navajo Clans. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Regina H.; And Others

    Pen and ink drawings illustrate characterizations of 29 Navajo clans in this book, which is intended to acquaint young Navajo people and others with Navajo history and culture. The introduction discusses the significance of the Navajo clan system and the relationship among family bonds, self-esteem, and cultural values. The illustrated text tells…

  5. Navajo Coal: Demands, Attitudes, and Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, James M.

    The operation of several coal mines with vast proven reserves on the Navajo reservation is a manifestation of conflict between: a power hungry external world; the preservationist attitudes of traditional Navajo culture; the disadvantaged socio-economic status of the average Navajo wage earner; and the Navajo Nation's long term needs for internal…

  6. A Navajo health consumer survey.

    PubMed

    Stewart, T; May, P; Muneta, A

    1980-12-01

    The findings of a health consumer survey of 309 Navajo families in three areas of the Navajo Reservation are reported. The survey shows that access to facilities and lack of safe water and sanitary supplies are continuing problems for these families. The families show consistent use of Indian Health Service providers, particularly nurses, pharmacists and physicians, as well as traditional Navajo medicine practitioners. Only incidental utilization of private medical services is reported. Extended waiting times and translation from English to Navajo are major concerns in their contacts with providers. A surprisingly high availability of third-party insurance is noted. Comparisons are made between this data base and selected national and regional surveys, and with family surveys from other groups assumed to be disadvantaged in obtaining health care. The comparisons indicate somewhat lower utilization rates and more problems in access to care for this Navajo sample. The discussion suggests that attitudes regarding free health care eventually may be a factor for Navajo people and other groups, that cultural considerations are often ignored or accepted as truisms in delivering care, and that the Navajo Reservation may serve as a unique microcosm of health care in the U.S.

  7. Fault evolution in volcanic tuffs and quartz-rich eolian sandstone as mechanical analogs for faulting in Martian pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    In order to establish a foundation for studies of faulting in Martian rocks and soils in volcanic terrain, the distribution of brittle strain around faults within the North Menan Butte Tuff in the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho and the Joe Lott Tuff Member of the Mount Belknap Volcanics, Utah, has been recently described. These studies employed a combination of macroscopic and microscopic observations, including measurements of in situ permeability as a proxy for non-localized brittle deformation of the host rock. In areas where the tuff retained its primary granular nature at the time of deformation, initial plastic yielding in both tuffs occurred along deformation bands. Both compactional and dilational types of deformation bands were observed, and faulting occurred along clusters of deformation bands. Where secondary alteration processes imparted a massive texture to the tuff, brittle deformation was accommodated along fractures. Host-rock permeability exhibits little variation from non-deformed values in the North Menan Butte Tuff, whereas host rock permeability is reduced by roughly an order of magnitude through compaction alone (no alteration) in the Joe Lott Tuff. To create a bridge between these observations in tuff and the more substantial body of work centered on deformation band formation and faulting in quartz-rich sandstones, the same techniques employed in the North Menan Butte Tuff and the Joe Lott Tuff have also been applied to a kilometer-scale fault in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in the Waterpocket Fold, Utah. These observations demonstrate that the manifestation of strain and evolution of faulting in the Mars-analog tuffs are comparable to that in quartz-rich sandstones. Therefore, current understanding of brittle deformation in quartz-rich sandstones can be used to inform investigations into fault growth within porous tuffs on Mars. A discussion of these observations, practical limitations, and directions for future work are presented here.

  8. Provenance of Norphlet sandstone, northern Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.P.; Ward, W.C.; Kuglar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet sandstone of the northern Gulf Coast is predominantly subarkose, with some arkose in the eastern area and sublitharenite and quartzarenite in the western area. Despite great depths of burial and despite feldspar and rock-fragment constituents, diagenesis has not appreciably altered the composition of Norphlet sandstone. Therefore, reconstruction of original composition of Norphlet sandstone presented little difficulty. Variation in detrital modes of the Norphlet suggests compositionally distinct source terranes. Samples from Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi reflect the influence of metamorphic and plutonic rocks of the Appalachian Piedmont Province and of Triassic-Jurassic volcanic rocks. Sandstones in east Texas, northern Louisiana, and southern Arkansas were derived from sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks of the Ouachita system. The Arbuckle Mountains and Llano uplift may have supplied trace amounts of quartzo-feldspathic and volcanic-rock fragments to the extreme western part of the study area. Norphlet sandstones represent a mixture of collision-orogen-derived sediment from the Appalachian and/or Ouachita system and continental-block-derived sediment from paleohighs and uplifts within the Gulf basin. However, Norphlet sandstones plot in the craton-interior and transitional-continental fields on Q-F-L and QM-F-Lt tectonic-provenance diagrams, because of mineralogically mature source rocks, elimination of unstable grains by abrasion and sorting during deposition, and/or sediment mixing from different source terranes.

  9. Navajo Pawn: A Misunderstood Traditional Trading Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiser, William S.

    2012-01-01

    Navajo trading has been a crucial component of that tribe's localized economy for generations and has been the subject of much scholarship over the years. The role of the Navajo trader in influencing the types and styles of crafts that Navajos created as well as providing tribal members with an outlet for those items remains important to their…

  10. A Utah Navajo History = Dineji Nakee' Naahane'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benally, Clyde; And Others

    This book presents Navajo history in two aspects--traditional stories that describe the ancestors of the Navajo and explain how the Earth-Surface World was changed from monster-filled chaos into the well-ordered world of today, and historical events from 1525 to today after the Navajos had settled in the Southwest. Events described include…

  11. NAVAJO MADE EASIER--A COURSE IN CONVERSATIONAL NAVAJO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOOSSEN, IRVY W.

    THIS TEXT IS DESIGNED TO INTRODUCE THE BASIC VOCABULARY OF NAVAHO (NAVAJO) IN CONVERSATIONAL FORM. EACH OF THE 64 SHORT LESSON UNITS CONTAINS A PAGE OF QUESTION-AND-RESPONSE PATTERNS IN NAVAHO (TRANSLATED IN ENGLISH ON THE NEXT PAGE), FOLLOWED BY DESCRIPTIVE GRAMMATICAL EXPLANATIONS AND OCCASIONAL COMMENTS ON NAVAHO USAGE AND CULTURE. A…

  12. The craniofacial team and the Navajo patient.

    PubMed

    Smoot, E C; Kucan, J O; Cope, J S; Aase, J M

    1988-10-01

    The craniofacial team at the University of New Mexico Medical Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico has treated a large population of Navajo Indians. Team awareness of the Navajo concept of health as man in balance with his environment has resulted in more expedient treatment of the Navajo children. An understanding of Navajo concerns with ghosts, skinwalkers, and rules for orderly living has allowed team members to integrate the family and the Navajo medicine man in caring for the children with craniofacial disease. Special concerns for informed surgical consent and genetic counseling of the Navajo are reviewed. Respect for the traditional Navajo healing ceremonies and special handling of disposed body parts in surgery are required of the health professionals caring for these people.

  13. EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT AND THE NAVAJO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAAS, JOHN; MELVILLE, ROBERT

    A STUDY WAS DEVISED TO APPRAISE THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF NAVAJO STUDENTS LIVING IN DORMITORIES AWAY FROM THE INDIAN RESERVATION. THE FOLLOWING SEVEN FACTORS WERE CHOSEN TO BE INVESTIGATED AS BEING DIRECTLY RELATED TO ACHIEVEMENT--(1) INTELLIGENCE, (2) READING ABILITY, (3) ANXIETY, (4) SELF-CONCEPT, (5) MOTIVATION, (6) VERBAL DEVELOPMENT, (7)…

  14. Elementary Guidance Program. Navajo Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Window Rock, AZ.

    A program designed to assist guidance staff in working with Navajo elementary school students, particularly boarding school students, is presented in this booklet with emphasis directed toward meeting both individual and group needs in the areas of home living, student activities, and counseling. The first section gives 14 separate functions of…

  15. Navajos and National Nuclear Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Tom

    1979-01-01

    Describes the history of nuclear development in New Mexico, notes the cumulative detrimental effect on the Navajo Nation, and emphasizes federal inaction regarding health and safety standards and regulation in the nuclear power industry. Journal availability: see RC 503 522. (SB)

  16. Dinetah: Navajo History. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessel, Robert A., Jr.

    Using archaeological data, written chronicles of Spanish explorers and missionaries, and oral narratives and legends, the book traces the history of the Navajo people to their original homeland, Dinetah, located primarily off the present reservation in an area south and east of Farmington, New Mexico. The book discusses various theories on Navajo…

  17. New Paper Words: Historical Images of Navajo Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Louise

    1996-01-01

    Weaves a Navajo elementary teacher's anecdotes from her own and her father's educational experiences with archival materials to provide a historical context for Navajo literacy. Discusses early written Navajo; the role of schools and churches in the expansion of written Navajo; and the advancement of Navajo linguistics during John Collier's…

  18. Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute: Impact of Forced Relocation on Navajo Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Betty Beetso

    Emphasizing the fact that the Federal government has failed to recognize the inherent differences of the Hopi and Navajo lifestyles, this study examines the century-old Navajo-Hopi American Indian land dispute; the literature on forced removal of peoples; multi-dimensional stressors associated with the forced relocation of 15 Navajo families; and…

  19. Traders on the Navajo Reservation. A Report on the Economic Bondage of the Navajo People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Indian Development, Inc., Window Rock, AZ.

    Conducted in 1969 by 8 Navajo students, this study investigates the Anglo trader in terms of his socioeconomic influence on the American Indians of the Navajo Reservation. Limited to 30 randomly selected trading posts located in the central and eastern portions of the Navajo Reservation, this study reflects findings derived from personal…

  20. Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1989-03-01

    Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by the heavy rainfall, soil zones, lush vegetation, and accompanying voluminous production of organic and inorganic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution, causing a net gain in porosity near unconformities. Thus, porosity in sandstones tends to increase toward overlying unconformities. Such porosity trends have been observed in hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, Norwegian North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas. A common attribute of these reservoirs is that they were all subaerially exposed under heavy rainfall conditions. An empirical model has been developed for the Triassic and Jurassic sandstone reservoirs in the Norwegian North Sea on the basis of the observed relationship that shows an increase in porosity in these reservoirs with increasing proximity to the overlying base of Cretaceous unconformity. An important practical attribute of this model is that it allows for the prediction of porosity in the neighboring undrilled areas by recognizing the base of Cretaceous unconformity in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps.

  1. A Jurassic Shock-Aftershock Earthquake Sequence Recorded by Small Clastic Pipes and Dikes within Dune Cross-Strata, Zion National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, D. B.; Zlotnik, V. A.; Kettler, R. M.; Pederson, D. T.

    2012-12-01

    Eolian sandstones of south-central and southeast Utah contain large volumes of contorted cross-strata that have long been recognized as products of liquefaction caused by seismic shaking. Unlike most sites where Navajo Sandstone is exposed, in Zion National Park (southwestern Utah), the Navajo contains very, very few contorted strata. We have, however, mapped the distribution of more than 1,000 small-scale, vertical pipes and dikes in uncontorted cross-strata of the Navajo at two small study sites in Zion. Pipes are 2-5 cm in diameter and up to 3 m long; dikes are ~6 cm wide. Clusters of the water-escape structures lie directly above and below numerous, near-horizontal bounding surfaces. Dikes are restricted to the wind-ripple strata that lie above the bounding surfaces. Pipes are common both above and below the bounding surfaces. In map view, most pipes are arranged in lines. Near the bounding surfaces, pipes merge upward with shallow dikes trending parallel to the lines of pipes. Pipes formed in grainflows—homogeneous, well-sorted sand lacking cohesion. Dikes formed above the bounding surface, in more-cohesive, poorly sorted, wind-ripple strata. As liquefaction began, expansion of subsurface sand caused spreading within the unliquified (capping) beds near the land surface. Dikes intruded cracks in the wind-ripple strata, and pipes rose from the better-sorted sand to interdune surfaces, following trends of cracks. Because the wind-ripple strata had low cohesive strength, a depression formed around each rupture, and ejected sand built upward to a flat-topped surface rather than forming the cone of a classic sand volcano. In one 3 m2 portion of the map area, a cluster of about 20 pipes and dikes, many with truncated tops, record eight stratigraphically distinct seismic events. The large dunes that deposited the Navajo cross-strata likely moved ~1m/yr. When, in response to seismic shaking, a few liters of fluidized sand erupted onto the lowermost portion of the

  2. Jurassic Paleolatitudes, Paleogeography, and Climate Transitions In the Mexican Subcontinen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Garza, R. S.; Geissman, J. W.; Lawton, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Jurassic northward migration of Mexico, trailing the North America plate, resulted in temporal evolution of climate-sensitive depositional environments. Lower-Middle Jurassic rocks in central Mexico contain a record of warm-humid conditions, which are indicated by coal and compositionally mature sandstone deposited in continental environments. Preliminary paleomagnetic data indicate that these rocks were deposited at near-equatorial paleolatitudes. The Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 Ma) Diquiyú volcanic sequence in central Oaxaca give an overall mean of D=82.2º/ I= +4.1º (n=10; k=17.3, α95=12º). In the Late Jurassic, the Gulf of Mexico formed as a subsidiary basin of the Atlantic Ocean, when the supercontinent Pangaea ruptured. Upper Jurassic strata, including eolianite and widespread evaporite deposits, across Mexico indicate dry-arid conditions. Available paleomagnetic data (compaction-corrected) from eolianites in northeast Mexico indicate deposition at ~15-20ºN. As North America moved northward during Jurassic opening of the Atlantic, different latitudinal regions experienced coeval Late Jurassic climatic shifts. Climate transitions have been widely recognized in the Colorado plateau region. The plateau left the horse-latitudes in the late Middle Jurassic to reach temperate humid climates at ~40ºN in the latest Jurassic. In turn, the southern end of the North America plate (central Mexico) reached arid horse-latitudes in the Late Jurassic. At that time, epeiric platforms developed in the circum-Gulf region after a long period of margin extension. We suggest that Upper Jurassic hydrocarbon source rocks in the circum-Gulf region accumulated on these platforms as warm epeiric hypersaline seas and the Gulf of Mexico itself were fertilized by an influx of wind-blown silt from continental regions. Additional nutrients were brought to shallow zones of photosynthesis by ocean upwelling driven by changes in the continental landmass configuration.

  3. Jurassic petroleum trends in eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and central and eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1986-05-01

    Three Jurassic petroleum trends can be delineated in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, and in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico. These trends are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps, reservoirs, and hydrocarbon types. The source for the Jurassic hydrocarbons is Smackover algal mudstones. The Jurassic oil trend includes the area north of the regional peripheral fault systems in the tri-state area, and extends into the area north of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs and salt anticlines, with Smackover grainstones and dolostones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones as reservoirs. This trend has potential for Jurassic oil accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic oil and gas-condensate trend includes the onshore area between the regional peripheral fault systems and Wiggins arch and extends into the area of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs, salt related anticlines, and extensional faults. Cotton Valley fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Haynesville carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Smackover grainstones, packstones, dolostones, and marine sandstones, and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones serve as reservoirs. This trend contains most of the Jurassic fields in the eastern Gulf coastal plain. The trend has high potential for significant petroleum accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic deep natural gas trend includes the onshore area south of the Wiggins arch and extends into the Mississippi-Alabama shelf. Traps are faulted salt anticlines with basement highs as potential traps. Cotton Valley deltaic-strandplain sandstones and Norphlet eolian sandstones are the reservoirs. Several gas discoveries below 20,000 ft have been made in this trend in Mississippi and offshore Alabama. The trend has excellent potential for major gas accumulations in coastal Alabama and central Gulf of Mexico.

  4. Beating the Odds: Navajo Children Becoming Literate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartle-Schutte, David

    A retrospective ethnographic study examined the sociocultural environments of fifth-grade Navajo children who have become successful readers. During the second month of school, six fifth-grade teachers at Fort Defiance Elementary School on the Navajo Reservation identified 66 of their 150 students as successful readers, a judgment that was…

  5. Teacher-Aide Guide for Navajo Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzilth-Na-O-Dith-Hle Boarding School, Bloomfield, NM.

    Results of a 1970 teacher and Navajo aide workshop, sponsored by the Navajo Area Division of Education, are compiled in this guide developed particularly for use by those who work with Indian students. Workshop curriculum content and objectives are provided, as well as a section on role identification for teacher/aide teams; checklists concerning…

  6. Defining Student Success through Navajo Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Colleen Wilma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine the definition of student success as defined by the Navajo people. The data collection method used was the focus group. The data were collected from two geographical settings from two public schools located within the boundaries of the Navajo Indian Reservation. The focus group participants…

  7. "1970" Inter-Agency Health Meeting (Navajo).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    An inter-agency health meeting regarding health services for Navajo Indians is reported on in this document. The meeting, sponsored by the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, involved agencies such as the U.S. Public Health Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Navajo Tribe. Included in the proceedings are reports and remarks by…

  8. Navajo Health Authority: Accomplishments--Future Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    Accomplishments of the Navajo Health Authority (NHA) since it began in 1972 are presented in synopsis form in a report of programs underway at Window Rock and Shiprock, along with NHA goals: to promote development of Navajo Health manpower, preventive medicine, health education, and native healing sciences. After a brief review of executive and…

  9. Sovereignty: The Navajo Nation and Taxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Michael

    Contending that it is wrong for the Navajo Government to continue to neglect its citizens by not implementing a taxation program, this monograph is written to generate interest in and discussion of a taxation program and the Navajo Tax Commission, created in 1974. Specifically, this booklet presents basic information re: the financing of the…

  10. An Ethnography of the Navajo Reproductive Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Anne

    1982-01-01

    Describes the reproductive cycle (menarche, menstrual cycle, fertility and contraceptive use, and menopause) as experienced by two groups of contemporary Navajo women. Eighty Navajo women, 40 traditional and 40 acculturated, participated in the 1978 research project which focused on influences of menopause. (ERB)

  11. When Navajos Had Too Many Sheep: the 1940's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, George A.

    The book is the story of the Navajos during the decade of forced stock reduction on the Navajo Reservation. This decade was marked by confusion, frustration, and bitterness on the part of the Navajo Nation. It is of the 1940's, during which the Navajos faced their greatest crisis since their removal to military confinement from 1864 to 1868, that…

  12. Traditional versus Contemporary Navajo Views of Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Catherine; Jones, Doris; Miller, Susan

    A survey and interviews examined the beliefs of traditional and contemporary Navajos concerning individuals with disabilities. Participants were 30 staff members from the Kayenta and Pinon Unified School Districts (Arizona), of whom 21 were Navajos, 8 Anglos, and 1 Hispanic; 1 Anglo and 8 Navajo community professionals; and 15 Navajo parents,…

  13. Navajo Leadership and Government: A History. Sixth-Ninth Grade Navajo Bilingual-Bicultural Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, T. L.; Wallace, Stephen

    This history of Navajo leadership and government, part of the sixth-ninth grade Navajo bilingual-bicultural social studies curriculum from the Navajo Curriculum Centers, covers types of government from the animal leaders of Navajo legend to modern times. The text is divided into five chapters: "The First Leaders,""New Neighbors--New…

  14. Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

    2007-03-31

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

  15. Geohydrology and effects of water use in the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychaner, James H.

    1983-01-01

    The N aquifer is the main source of water in the 5,400-square-mile Black Mesa area in the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations in northeastern Arizona. The N aquifer consists of the Navajo Sandstone and parts of the underlying Kayenta Formation and Wingate Sandstone of Jurassic and Triassic age. Maximum saturated thickness of the aquifer is about 1,050 feet in the northwestern part of the area, and the aquifer thins to extinction to the southeast. Water is under confined conditions in the central 3,300 square miles of the area. To the east, north, and west of Black Mesa, the aquifer is exposed at the surface, and water is unconfined. The aquifer was in equilibrium before about 1965. Recharge of about 13,000 acre-feet per year was balanced primarily by discharge near Moenkopi Wash and Laguna Creek and by evapotranspiration. At least 180 million acre-feet of water was in storage. The estimated average hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is 0.65 foot per day. The confined storage coefficient is estimated to be about 0.0004 where the aquifer is thickest, and the estimated unconfined storage coefficient ranges from 0.10 to 0.15. Ground-water withdrawals that averaged 5,300 acre-feet per year from 1976 to 1979 have caused water levels to decline in wells in the confined part of the aquifer. Withdrawals include an average of 3,700 acre-feet per year to supply a coal-slurry pipeline from a coal mine on Black Mesa. Six observation wells equipped with water-level recorders have been used to monitor aquifer response. The water level in one well 32 miles south of the mine declined 17 feet from 1972 through 1979 and 3.5 feet during 1979. A mathematical model of the N aquifer was developed and calibrated for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The model was used in part to improve estimates of aquifer characteristics and the water budget, and it successfully reproduced the observed response of the aquifer through 1979. The model results indicate that about 95 percent of

  16. Origin of the Nubian and similar sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.D.

    1963-01-01

    The Nubian Sandstone and similar sandstone bodies exposed across much of northern Africa and adjoining parts of Asia are characteristically formed of clean sand that is conspicuously cross stratified throughout. Such sandstone, here called Nubian-type sandstone, ranges from Cambrian through Cretaceous in age and its genesis has been interpreted in many ways. Studies of its primary structures, and of the direction of sand transport, based on statistical measurements of foreset dip directions, have contributed new data on its genesis. By far the most common structure in Nubian-type sandstone is a medium-scale planar-type cross stratification in which sets of evenly dipping cross beds are bounded by essentially flat-lying top and bottom surfaces to form tabular bodies. Other less numerous but typical structures are large-scale, truncated-wedge cross strata, trough-type cross strata, intraformational recumbent folds, small-scale ripple laminae, and dipping sets of tabular-planar cross beds. An analysis of these structures suggests that in the typical Nubian Sandstone of Cretaceous age eolian deposits are not represented and normal marine types probably also are lacking; flood plain, pond or lagoon, and other continental and marginal environments are indicated. In the Carboniferous rocks of Sinai Peninsula some beach sandstone and possibly some eolian, in addition to the types described, form part of the sequence. Direction of sand transport, as determined from cross-bed dips, was northerly in the Cretaceous Nubian of Libya, Sudan, and Egypt; easterly in the Jurassic Adigrat of Ethiopia; westerly in the Carboniferous of Sinai; northwesterly in the early Paleozoic of Jordan. ?? 1963 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  17. Navajo Nation: Cleaning Up Abandoned Uranium Mines

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site provides information about the progress of EPA's cleanup of abandoned uranium mines on Navajo and Hopi lands and in other areas of Arizona and New Mexico, including health impacts, major enforcement and removal milestones, and community actions.

  18. Kinaalda: The Pathway to Navajo Womanhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Danita Begay

    1988-01-01

    Presents a personal account of the Navajo ceremony of Kinaalda, performed when a girl reaches puberty. Describes ceremonial running, corn grinding, and grooming, and admonitions and blessings received from grandmother, elderly women of the tribe, and medicine man. (SV)

  19. Dual Language = Saad Ahaah Sinil. A Navajo-English Dictionary. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Martha, Ed.; Lynch, Regina, Ed.

    A dual-language Navajo-English dictionary provides a chart of the Navajo kinship system, a two-page map of the Navajo Nation, and English equivalents for Navajo words in 46 linguistic and cultural categories. Included are words for: races (Indian and other ethnic groups); Navajo clans; age groups; Navajo ceremonies; body parts; sickness; clothing;…

  20. Water-quality data for Navajo National Monument, northeastern Arizona--2001-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Blakemore E.

    2003-01-01

    Water-quality data are provided for six sites in Navajo National Monument in northeastern Arizona. These data describe the current water quality and provide baseline water-quality information for monitoring future trends. Water samples were collected from six sites near three ancient Indian ruins during September 2001 to August 2002. Two springs and one well near Betatakin Ruin, one spring is near Keet Seel Ruin, and one spring and one stream are near Inspection House Ruin. Water from all the sites is from the N aquifer, a regional sandstone aquifer that is the source of drinking water for most members of the Navajo Nation and Hopi Tribe in northeastern Arizona. Concentrations of dissolved solids, major ions, trace elements, and uranium were low at the six sites. Dissolved-solids concentration ranged from 94 to 221 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate (as nitrogen) were generally low (less than 0.05 to 0.92 milligrams per liter) and were within the range of concentrations at other N-aquifer sites within 20 miles of the study area. Water samples from Inscription House Spring, Navajo Creek Tributary (near Inscription House Ruin), and Keet Seel Ruin Spring contained indicators of human or animal wastes--fecal coliform and Escherichia coli bacteria.

  1. New Paper Words: Historical Images of Navajo Language Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Louise

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of the history of Navajo language literacy. Discusses efforts of missionaries to transcribe a written Navajo language, early native language instruction using the Bible and religious texts, the first Native teachers, development of Navajo dictionaries and grammar books, and memories of the school experiences of a present-day…

  2. Family Planning Attitudes of Traditional and Acculturated Navajo Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Alan; And Others

    To determine whether various indices of "acculturation" would predict attitudes towards family planning was the major purpose of a survey conducted among a highly educated group of Navajo people at Navajo Community College (NCC). Owned and operated by the Navajo Tribe, NCC served as a target survey model due to its 90% population of…

  3. Navajo Reading Study. Progress Report No. 4, December 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Paul, Ed.

    A summary of the discussions of the Navajo Reading Study Conference, held on December 4-5, 1969, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was presented in this report. A group of consultants met to discuss the collection of data and its analysis for a study on Navajo reading materials and the language of 6-year-old Navajo children. The consultants included Mr.…

  4. Navajo Evaluators Look at Rough Rock Demonstration School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begaye, John Y.; And Others

    Four prominent Navajo leaders evaluated Rough Rock Demonstration School by invitation of the school board. Inquiry was directed toward ascertaining the type of education Navajos desire for their children, the extent Indian culture should be included in the curriculum, and how Navajos want their schools operated. It was concluded that the student…

  5. Health Problems of the Navajo Area and Suggested Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltenbach, Charles

    Analysis of morbidity, mortality, and demographic data on Navajo people was undertaken to identify leading health problems in the Navajo area and to suggest intervention activities. Comparisons with total U.S. population were made to provide perspective. Data on Navajo mortality showed: a ratio of male to female deaths of 2:1, more than 50 percent…

  6. Discovery of the early Jurassic Gajia mélange in the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone: Southward subduction of the Bangong-Nujiang Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wen; Hu, Xiumian; Zhu, Dicheng; An, Wei; Ma, Anlin

    2016-10-01

    Mélange records a series of geological processes associated with oceanic subduction and continental collision. This paper reports for the first time the presence of Early Jurassic mélange from NW Nagqu in the southern margin of the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, termed as the Gajia mélange. It shows typically blocks-in-matrix structure with matrix of black shale and siliceous mudstone, and several centimeters to several meters sized blocks of sandstone, silicalite, limestone and basalt. The sandstone blocks consist of homologous sandstone and two types of exotic sandstone, with different modal compositions. The Group 1 of exotic sandstone blocks consists of mainly of feldspar and quartz, whereas the Group 2 is rich in volcanic detritus. The Group 3 of homologous sandstone blocks is rich in feldspar and volcanic detritus with rare occurrence of quartz. U-Pb age data and in situ Hf isotopic compositions of detrital zircons from sandstone blocks are similar to those from the Lhasa terrane, suggesting that the sandstone blocks in the Gajia mélange most probably came from the Lhasa terrane. The YC1σ(2+) age of homologous sandstone blocks is 177 ± 2.4 Ma, suggesting an Early Jurassic depositional age for the sandstones within the Gajia mélange. The Gajia mélange likely records the southward subduction of the Bangong-Nujiang Ocean during the Early Jurassic.

  7. Navajo Language and Culture in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Louise

    1999-01-01

    Examples of culturally relevant education for Navajo adults are described: (1) Arizona State Prison Literacy Program; (2) Dine College Teacher Preservice Program; (3) Salt Lake City East Community School; and (4) Family and Child Education Program. The examples attest to the power of native language literacy. (SK)

  8. Determinants of Blood Pressure in Navajo Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulehan, John L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Among 580 Navajo adolescents, 11.1 percent of males and 1.6 percent of females had high blood pressure. Blood pressure was related to age in males and to body mass index in females but was not related to level of acculturation or traditionality. Contains 17 references. (SV)

  9. Reclaiming Indigenous Intellectual, Political, and Geographic Space: A Path for Navajo Nationhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lloyd L.

    2008-01-01

    For millennia, Navajo society was self-sufficient. After 1863, beginning with Kit Carson's murderous rampage among the Navajo and the subsequent removal to the Bosque Redondo reservation, Navajo nationhood changed. Navajo society began a slow transformation away from the distinct Dine way of life. In the twentieth century Navajo nationalism was…

  10. The Navajo Way of Life: A Resource Unit with Activities for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordova, Dahlia

    A resource unit on the Navajo way of life, for grades 4-6, contains sections on Navajo history, art, and crafts, homes, music, poetry and games; Navajo and Pueblo cookery (including recipes); traditional Navajo dress, ceremony and legends; and successful Navajos, past and present. Sections include text, vocabulary words, drawings, maps, and…

  11. Navajo Participation in Labor Unions. Lake Powell Research Project Bulletin Number 15, December 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Lynn A.

    Navajo participation in labor unions and Navajo labor relations have undergone rapid and fundamental changes since the development of industry around Lake Powell and on Black Mesa. Early attempts to unionize Navajo workers met with stiff resistance from employees and the Navajo Tribal Council. Union entry into the Navajo Reservation was viewed as…

  12. Diagenetic pathways for sandstones: The role of initial composition

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, N.B.

    1995-09-01

    The initial composition of a clastic section is critical in determining the diagenetic reactions that a sandstone will undergo during burial, reactions which strongly influence its reservoir properties. The role of initial composition is illustrated for Middle Jurassic sandstones of northwest Europe (including the Brent sandstone of the North Sea) and Tertiary sandstones of the Gulf of Mexico. The composition of the former evolves from arkose to quartz arenite, with massive dissolution first of plagioclase and subsequently K-feldspar. As the bulk composition changes, the suite of clay minerals changes from kaolinite-dominated to illite-dominated, suite of clay minerals changes from kaolinite-dominated to illite-dominated, typically accompanied by a pronounced decrease in permeability. The Gulf of Mexico sandstones are also initially arkoses. Their composition, however, evolves toward a mixture of quartz and compositionally pure albite. Kaolinite remains the dominant authigenic clay within the sandstones; however detrital clays change from a Na-rich, smectitic mixed layer clay to a K-rich, illitic mixed layer clay. The contrasting diagenetic pathways result from differing mineralogy in the clastic section. The smectite-rich mudstones in the Gulf of Mexico provide a powerful sink for potassium and source of sodium. The resulting low potassium activity results in K-feldspar dissolution; it also prevents illite formation, while high sodium activity stabilizes albite. The Middle Jurassic clastic section in northwest Europe contains relatively little smectite, thus lacks the potassium sink and sodium source. Sodium activity is low, so plagioclases preferentially dissolve. K-feldspars also dissolve, but the potassium here is available for illite formation.

  13. Deformation of Aztec Sandstone at Valley of Fire of Nevada: failure modes, sequence of deformation, structural products and their interplay with paleo fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Valley of Fire State Park, 60 km NE of Las Vegas, is a beacon of knowledge for deformation of Aztec Sandstone, a cross-bedded quartz arenite deposited in the Aztec-Navajo-Nugget erg in early Jurassic. It displays great diversity of physical properties, different localization types and micromechanics. The two deformation episodes, the Sevier folding & thrusting and the Basin & Range extension affected the area. The appearance of compaction bands marks the earliest deformation structure and their distribution, orientation, and dimension are controlled by the depositional architecture and loading. The earliest shear structures in the area are the Muddy Mountain, Summit, and Willow Tank thrusts and numerous small-scale bed-parallel faults. They altogether produced several kilometers of E-SE transport and shortening in the late Cretaceous and display numerous shear bands in its damage zone within the Aztec Sandstone. Shear bands also occur along dune boundaries and cross-bed interfaces. These observations indicate that the early deformation of the sandstone was accommodated by strain localization with various kinematics. The younger generation of faults in the area is of mid-Miocene age, and crops out pervasively. It includes a series of small offset normal faults (less than a few ten meters) which can be identified at steep cliff faces. These faults are highly segmented and are surrounded by a dense population of splay fractures. A large number of these splays were later sheared sequentially resulting in a well-defined network of left- and right-lateral strike-slip faults with slip magnitudes up to a few kilometers in the Park. The formation mechanisms of both the normal and strike-slip faults can be characterized as the sliding along planes of initial weaknesses and the accompanying cataclastic deformation. Some of the initial weak planes are associated with the depositional elements such as interdune boundaries and cross-bed interfaces while others are joint

  14. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  15. Hydrologic analyses in support of the Navajo Generating Station–Kayenta Mine Complex environmental impact statement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, Stanley A.; Macy, Jamie P.; Truini, Margot

    2016-06-01

    IntroductionThe U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region (Reclamation) is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Navajo Generating Station-Kayenta Mine Complex Project (NGS-KMC Project). The proposed project involves various Federal approvals that would facilitate continued operation of the Navajo Generating Station (NGS) from December 23, 2019 through 2044, and continued operation of the Kayenta Mine and support facilities (collectively called the Kayenta Mine Complex, or KMC) to supply coal to the NGS for this operational period. The EIS will consider several project alternatives that are likely to produce different effects on the Navajo (N) aquifer; the N aquifer is the principal water resource in the Black Mesa area used by the Navajo Nation, Hopi Tribe, and Peabody Western Coal Company (PWCC).The N aquifer is composed of three hydraulically connected formations—the Navajo Sandstone, the Kayenta Formation, and the Lukachukai Member of the Wingate Sandstone—that function as a single aquifer. The N aquifer is confined under most of Black Mesa, and the overlying stratigraphy limits recharge to this part of the aquifer. The N aquifer is unconfined in areas surrounding Black Mesa, and most recharge occurs where the Navajo Sandstone is exposed in the area near Shonto, Arizona. Overlying the N aquifer is the D aquifer, which includes the Dakota Sandstone, Morrison Formation, Entrada Sandstone, and Carmel Formation. The aquifer is named for the Dakota Sandstone, which is the primary water-bearing unit.The NGS is located near Page, Arizona on the Navajo Nation. The KMC, which delivers coal to NGS by way of a dedicated electric railroad, is located approximately 83 miles southeast of NGS (about 125 miles northeast of Flagstaff, Arizona). The Kayenta Mine permit area is located on about 44,073 acres of land leased within the boundaries of the Hopi and Navajo Indian Reservations. KMC has been conducting mining and

  16. Pennsylvanian to Jurassic eolian transportation systems in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, F.

    1988-01-01

    The direction of sediment transport in eolian sandstones of Pennsylvanian to Jurassic age was interpreted from crossbedding resultants (vector means) obtained from studies of eolian rocks in the western U.S., supplemented by data from the few eolian units of eastern North America. These were compiled from the published or unpublished (theses) literature, from unpublished field data contributed by colleagues, or from measurements made for this study. In addition, new paleogeographic maps were compiled to evaluate the influence of geographic features on the atmospheric circulation patterns that are inferred from the crossbedding studies. Regionally, the crossbedding indicates northeasterly, northerly, or northwesterly winds (present coordinates) from Pennsylvanian through most of Middle Jurassic time. A rather abrupt change in wind directions occurred in late Middle Jurassic time (late part of the Callovian Age) when westerly wind patterns developed. By the Late Jurassic the winds shifted to southwesterly. Calculations of the consistency factor (vector mean strength) made from region-wide analyses of the resultants indicate fairly unidirectional winds from the Pennsylvanian through the Early Jurassic. Middle Jurassic circulation was more varied, judging from crossbedding studies in the lower part of the Entrada Sandstone. Crossbedding in Upper Jurassic eolian rocks of Wyoming and South Dakota yielded a random pattern but Upper Jurassic rocks farther south on the Colorado Plateau and adjoining areas show a return to a fairly unidirectional pattern. Comparing the resultants with their reconstructed paleogeographic setting shows surprisingly little influence of major geographic features on overall circulation patterns. However, the greatest amount of local variation occurred at or near highly indented shorelines where the temperature contrast between land and water produces local wind currents that may vary appreciably from regional circulation patterns. Although they

  17. Pennsylvanian to Jurassic eolian transportation systems in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Fred

    1988-04-01

    The direction of sediment transport in eolian sandstones of Pennsylvanian to Jurassic age was interpreted from crossbedding resultants (vector means) obtained from studies of eolian rocks in the western U.S., supplemented by data from the few eolian units of eastern North America. These were compiled from the published or unpublished (theses) literature, from unpublished field data contributed by colleagues, or from measurements made for this study. In addition, new paleogeographic maps were compiled to evaluate the influence of geographic features on the atmospheric circulation patterns that are inferred from the crossbedding studies. Regionally, the crossbedding indicates northeasterly, northerly, or northwesterly winds (present coordinates) from Pennsylvanian through most of Middle Jurassic time. A rather abrupt change in wind directions occurred in late Middle Jurassic time (late part of the Callovian Age) when westerly wind patterns developed. By the Late Jurassic the winds shifted to southwesterly. Calculations of the consistency factor (vector mean strength) made from region-wide analyses of the resultants indicate fairly unidirectional winds from the Pennsylvanian through the Early Jurassic. Middle Jurassic circulation was more varied, judging from crossbedding studies in the lower part of the Entrada Sandstone. Crossbedding in Upper Jurassic eolian rocks of Wyoming and South Dakota yielded a random pattern but Upper Jurassic rocks farther south on the Colorado Plateau and adjoining areas show a return to a fairly unidirectional pattern. Comparing the resultants with their reconstructed paleogeographic setting shows surprisingly little influence of major geographic features on overall circulation patterns. However, the greatest amount of local variation occurred at or near highly indented shorelines where the temperature contrast between land and water produces local wind currents that may vary appreciably from regional circulation patterns. Although they

  18. Recognition and source correlation of migrated hydrocarbons in Upper Jurassic Hareelv Formation, Jameson Land, east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Requejo, A.G.; Hollywood, J.; Halpern, H.I. )

    1989-09-01

    Organic geochemical analysis of an interbedded shales and sandstone sequence from the Upper Jurassic Hareelv Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland, has revealed oil shows in the sandstones, consistent with petroleum generation and migration. A comparison of the molecular characteristics of extractable material from the sandstones with those of kerogen and bitumen from the shales indicates that the most likely origin of these shows is generation within the shales with expulsion and short-range migration into the sandstones. This conclusion is based on comparisons of biological marker distributions, stable carbon isotopic compositions of extractable material and kerogen, and pyrolysate compositions of kerogen and asphaltenes. Oil from a seep in the Savoia Halvo region south of Jameson Land can be correlated to the Jurassic sandstone oil shows based on similar isotopic compositions and asphaltene pyrolysate distributions. Impregnation of both sandstones and shales throughout the sequence by products generated at higher maturities is considered unlikely, but cannot be ruled out by the existing data. 18 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Incidence and prevalence of Parkinson's disease among Navajo people living in the Navajo nation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Paul H; Mehal, Jason M; Holman, Robert C; Bartholomew, Michael L; Cheek, James E; Rowland, Andrew S

    2015-04-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is largely unstudied among American Indians. Unique populations might harbor clues to elusive causes. We describe the incidence and prevalence of PD among Navajo people residing in the Navajo Nation, home to the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. We analyzed 2001-2011 inpatient and outpatient visit data for Navajo people obtained from the Indian Health Service, which provides health care to American Indian people living on the Navajo Reservation. Cases were defined by at least two inpatient or outpatient visits with the diagnosis of PD. Crude and age-adjusted incidence and prevalence rates were calculated overall as well as by age, sex, region of residence, and time period. Five hundred twenty-four Navajo people with median age-at-onset of 74.0 years were diagnosed with PD during the study period, yielding an average annual crude incidence rate of 22.5/100,000. Age-specific incidence was 232.0 for patients 65 years of age or older and 302.0 for 80 years of age or older. Age-adjusted incidence was 35.9 overall (238.1 for ≥65 years), was higher in men than in women (47.5 vs. 27.7; P<0.001), varied by region (P=0.03), and was similar between time periods (2002-2004 vs. 2009-2011). The age-adjusted point prevalence rate was 261.0. The rate of PD among Navajo People appears to be as high as or higher than rates reported in many other populations. Rates increased to the highest age group, consistent with population-based studies. Further investigation is warranted to examine risk factors for PD in this remote population.

  20. Using geochemical data to identify sources of salinity to the freshwater Navajo aquifer in southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, David L.; Spangler, Lawrence E.; Peterman, Zell E.

    1995-01-01

    Ground water is an important freshwater source for domestic and livestock uses in southeastern Utah because of the arid climate and unavailability of surface water from the San Juan River. The study area includes about 1,200 square miles in the southeastern corner of Utah (fig. 1). Precipitation on mountainous areas north, south, and east of the study area (fig. 2) seeps into the Navajo and overlying aquifers where the sandstones that contain the aquifers are exposed at the surface along mountain flanks. The ground water then moves slowly away from the mountainous areas toward the area of lowest elevation 109°30' in the region, the San Juan River. The ground water reappears at land surface where it discharges as seepage to the San Juan River or is consumed by vegetation on the flood plain. Generally, wells finished in the Navajo aquifer near the San Juan River do not require pumping because water flows freely from the well casing when it is not sealed.

  1. Controls on the variability of net infiltration to desert sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; McKinney, T.S.; Zhdanov, M.S.; Watt, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in and climates and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration becomes critically important for accurately inventorying water resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. This paper presents a conceptual model of net infiltration to desert sandstone and then develops an empirical equation for its spatial quantification at the watershed scale using linear least squares inversion methods for evaluating controlling parameters (independent variables) based on estimated net infiltration rates (dependent variables). Net infiltration rates used for this regression analysis were calculated from environmental tracers in boreholes and more than 3000 linear meters of vadose zone excavations in an upland basin in southwestern Utah underlain by Navajo sandstone. Soil coarseness, distance to upgradient outcrop, and topographic slope were shown to be the primary physical parameters controlling the spatial variability of net infiltration. Although the method should be transferable to other desert sandstone settings for determining the relative spatial distribution of net infiltration, further study is needed to evaluate the effects of other potential parameters such as slope aspect, outcrop parameters, and climate on absolute net infiltration rates. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Oral History Shares the Wealth of a Navajo Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begay, Sara L.; Jimmie, Mary; Lockard, Louise

    This paper describes a collaborative project in which K-3 Navajo students used oral history interviews, archival photos, and primary documents to explore the history of their communities. Participating students attended schools that were implementing the Dine (Navajo) Language and Culture teaching perspective, which is based on the premises that…

  3. Nursing Care and Beliefs of Expectant Navajo Women (Part 1).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, B. Carol

    1984-01-01

    Provides cultural background relevant for the delivery of health services to expectant Navajo women and their offspring including morbidity/mortality rates and trends and prevalent health problems. Reports results of a questionnaire administered to 479 expectant Navajo women and used to identify cultural practices distinguishing among traditional,…

  4. Socializing English-Speaking Navajo Children to Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vining, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how young children are socialized to the process and products of storytelling as part of everyday family life is important for language and literacy instruction. A language socialization framework was used to understand storytelling practices on the Navajo Nation. This study examined how three young English-speaking Navajo children,…

  5. Mask of Black God: The Pleiades in Navajo Cosmology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Teresa M.

    2005-01-01

    One Navajo legend attributes the creation of the primary stars and constellations to Black God. Today, a famous star cluster--the Pleiades--often appears on the traditional mask worn by chanters impersonating Black God during special ceremonies. In this case study, students learn about the Pleiades in Navajo cosmology while honing their…

  6. Navajo Area Health and Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomah, Kent; And Others

    Based on health education needs of Navajo children as established by the Navajo Area health and physical education committees, this curriculum guideline for health and physical education is delineated into three phases reflecting emphasis of instructional techniques (introductory, exploration/extended learning, widened learning) and three levels…

  7. "Dine Bikeya": Teaching about Navajo Citizenship and Sovereignty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Elizabeth Yeager; van Hover, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    The Navajo Nation, comprising the largest land area allocated mainly to a Native American jurisdiction in the United States, offers a unique opportunity to enhance students' understandings of citizenship rights and sovereignty. For example, what does sovereignty mean on the reservation? What is the relationship between the Navajo Nation and the…

  8. Navajo Community College--The President's Report, 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Dean C.

    An overview of the Navajo Community College (NCC) is presented with a message from the president and facts pertaining to both the Tsaile and Shiprock campuses. NCC President Jackson states that the uniqueness of NCC lies primarily in the instructional area which promotes the use of educational concepts contained in the Navajo culture to reinforce…

  9. Navajo Youth and Anglo Racism: Cultural Integrity and Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyhle, Donna

    1995-01-01

    Results of a 10-year ethnographic study of Navajo youth show that racial and cultural differences intertwine with power relations and that Navajos' success or failure in school is part of the process of racial conflict. Subject to discrimination in workplaces and curricula, they are more academically successful when more secure in their…

  10. Middle Jurassic Topawa group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona: Volcanic and sedimentary record of deep basins within the Jurassic magmatic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haxel, G.B.; Wright, J.E.; Riggs, N.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; May, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Among supracrustal sequences of the Jurassic magmatic arc of the southwestern Cordillera, the Middle Jurassic Topawa Group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona, is remarkable for its lithologic diversity and substantial stratigraphic thickness, ???8 km. The Topawa Group comprises four units (in order of decreasing age): (1) Ali Molina Formation-largely pyroclastic rhyolite with interlayered eolian and fluvial arenite, and overlying conglomerate and sandstone; (2) Pitoikam Formation-conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone overlain by interbedded silt- stone and sandstone; (3) Mulberry Wash Formation-rhyolite lava flows, flow breccias, and mass-flow breccias, with intercalated intraformational conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone, plus sparse within-plate alkali basalt and comendite in the upper part; and (4) Tinaja Spring Porphyry-intrusive rhyolite. The Mulberry Wash alkali basalt and comendite are genetically unrelated to the dominant calcalkaline rhyolite. U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon from volcanic and intrusive rocks indicate the Topawa Group, despite its considerable thickness, represents only several million years of Middle Jurassic time, between approximately 170 and 165 Ma. Sedimentary rocks of the Topawa Group record mixing of detritus from a minimum of three sources: a dominant local source of porphyritic silicic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, identical or similar to those of the Topawa Group itself; Meso- proterozoic or Cambrian conglomerates in central or southeast Arizona, which contributed well-rounded, highly durable, polycyclic quartzite pebbles; and eolian sand fields, related to Middle Jurassic ergs that lay to the north of the magmatic arc and are now preserved on the Colorado Plateau. As the Topawa Group evidently represents only a relatively short interval of time, it does not record long-term evolution of the Jurassic magmatic arc, but rather represents a Middle Jurassic "stratigraphic snapshot" of the arc

  11. Laughter: The Navajo Way. Humorous Stories of the People (in Navajo and English) Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Alan; Dennison, Gene

    This book has been prepared for the use of teachers, ethnologists, linguists, Indian studies scholars, language students and those who have an interest in the languages and cultures of the earlier inhabitants of this continent. The stories reflect the Navajo love for and genius with words and humor. Most of the humor represented is of three basic…

  12. 40 CFR 49.24 - Federal Implementation Plan Provisions for Navajo Generating Station, Navajo Nation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (NGS) on the Navajo Nation located in the Northern Arizona Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (see... and did not result from inadequate design or construction of the process or air pollution control... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE INDIAN COUNTRY: AIR QUALITY PLANNING...

  13. EPA and Navajo Nation EPA Enter Historic Agreements with Navajo Tribal Utility Authority to Halt Water Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (07/07/15) SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Navajo Nation EPA announced a pair of settlements with the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority to bring its wastewater treatment facility in Window Rock into compliance both wit

  14. Looking after the Land: The Navajo Dryland Environments Laboratory Researches the Environmental Needs of the Navajo Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semken, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the formation and operations of the Navajo Dryland Environments Laboratory (NDEL). NDEL, established by the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium of New Mexico on the campus of Navajo Community College, focuses on environmental geology, hydrology, and resource management of the Colorado Plateau drylands. (DMM)

  15. Collapsing the Fear of Mathematics: A Study of the Effects of Navajo Culture on Navajo Student Performance in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Henry H.

    2010-01-01

    Collapsing the Fear of Mathematics: A Study of the Effects of Navajo Culture on Navajo Student Performance in Mathematics by Henry H Fowler Abstract American schools are in a state of "mediocrity" because of the low expectations in math (National Commission on Excellence in Education, 1983; No Child Left Behind Act of 2001; Duncan,…

  16. 25 CFR 161.307 - When may a permittee commence grazing on Navajo Partitioned Land?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When may a permittee commence grazing on Navajo... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Permit Requirements § 161.307 When may a permittee commence grazing on Navajo Partitioned Land? The permittee may graze on Navajo Partitioned Land on the...

  17. 25 CFR 161.307 - When may a permittee commence grazing on Navajo Partitioned Land?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When may a permittee commence grazing on Navajo... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Permit Requirements § 161.307 When may a permittee commence grazing on Navajo Partitioned Land? The permittee may graze on Navajo Partitioned Land on the...

  18. Report on the First Conference on Navajo Orthography: Albuquerque, New Mexico, May 2-3, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohannessian, Sirarpi

    1996-01-01

    At the first Conference on Navajo Orthography held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in 1969, participants agreed upon a uniform orthography for Navajo developed by William Morgan and Robert Young and recommended development of a Navajo adult literacy program. Participants included representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Navajo Tribal Council…

  19. A Framework for Engaging Navajo Women in Clean Energy Development through Applied Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osnes, Beth; Manygoats, Adrian; Weitkamp, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Through applied theatre, Navajo women can participate in authoring a new story for how energy is mined, produced, developed, disseminated and used in the Navajo Nation. This article is an analysis of a creative process that was utilised with primarily Navajo women to create a Navajo Women's Energy Project (NWEP). The framework for this creative…

  20. Diné (Navajo) Ethno- and Archaeoastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Von Del

    The Navajo (Diné) are an Athabascan-speaking people who migrated from the far northwest of America into the desert southwest where they became the largest surviving Native American culture. Three words portray Diné philosophy - beauty, harmony, and balance. Their traditions are rich with astronomical symbolism found in literature, ceremony, iconography, artifacts, rock art, and the sacred landscape. This chapter summarizes Diné astronomical traditions, identification of stars known to be important to the Diné, and how these are depicted on artifacts and rock art.

  1. Navajo coal and air quality in Shiprock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, Joseph E.; Garcia, Linda V.

    2006-01-01

    Among the Navajo people, high levels of respiratory disease, such as asthma, exist in a population with low rates of cigarette smoking. Air quality outdoors and indoors affects respiratory health. Many Navajo Nation residents burn locally mined coal in their homes for heat, as coal is the most economical energy source. The U.S. Geological Survey and Dine College, in cooperation with the Navajo Division of Health, are conducting a study in the Shiprock, New Mexico, area to determine if indoor use of this coal might be contributing to some of the respiratory health problems experienced by the residents. Researchers in this study will (1) examine respiratory health data, (2) identify stove type and use, (3) analyze samples of coal that are used locally, and (4) measure and characterize air quality inside selected homes. This Fact Sheet summarizes the interim results of the study in both English and Navajo. This Fact Sheet is available in three versions: * English [800-KB PDF file ] * Navajo [computer must have Navajo language fonts installed - 304-KB PDF file] * Image of the Navajo language version [19.8-MB PDF file

  2. Navajo minettes in the Cerros de las Mujeres, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaniman, D.; Laughlin, A. W.; Gladney, E. S.

    1985-06-01

    The Cerros de las Mujeres in west-central New Mexico are three mafic minette plugs that should be considered part of the Navajo volcanic fields on the central Colorado Plateau. This newly recognized occurrence extends the Navajo volcanic fields to the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau, within 45 km of the extensional tectonic setting in which the Mogollon ash-flow tuff cauldrons occur. The Cerros de las Mujeres provide additional evidence for contemporaneous sodic and potassic volcanism within the Navajo volcanic fields.

  3. Geology and ground water of the Red Lake area, Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.; McClymonds, N.E.; Harshbarger, John William

    1962-01-01

    The Red Lake area in the Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona and New Mexico, was studied by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine if 1 mgd (mil- lion gallons per day) of water could be obtained for the requirements of a proposed sawmill. Geologic mapping and stratigraphic studies indicated three favorable areas where ground water may be developed. Test holes were drilled under contract in the areas, and pumping tests indicate that 500,000 gpd (gal- lons per day) is available from alluvium along Tohdildonih Wash near Frog Rock, 100,000 gpd is available from the Shinarump member of the Chinle forma- tion and the De Chelly sandstone near Red Lake, and 800,000 gpd is available from alluvium and cinder beds in lapiUi tuff in Buell Park, an eroded diatreme. The diatreme at Buell Park is about 2% miles in diameter. It was formed by several explosions in which lapilli tuff and cinders were erupted. These materials, together with later basaltic intrusive and extrusive rock, now fill the diatreme. The tuff and cinders are water bearing, 'and they receive re- charge from rainwater and snowmelt moving through overlying alluvium and from storage in the De Chelly sandstone which encloses the east half of the diatreme. The quality of water from all areas is suitable for domestic use. However, special treatment may be necessary to make the water suitable for pulp processing.

  4. Reevaluation of upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Western Interior

    SciTech Connect

    Mantzios, C.

    1989-03-01

    Comparison of the Brushy Basin member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the Colorado Plateau with the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Morrison-Cloverly sequence in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, shows great similarities in their depositional environments and stratigraphy. The lower Brushy Basin member is a fluvial deposit composed of channel sandstones and overbank mudstones which display a great number of pedogenic features. Similar depositional setting has been observed in the Morrison Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, where pedogenic features suggest a distal floodplain setting with low-sinuosity channels cutting through. In both localities the dominant clay mineral is illite. The upper Brushy Basin member in the Colorado Plateau is composed mostly of gray and purpose mudstones rich in montmorillonite. Devitrified tuff beds and bentonite occur in certain levels throughout the unit. Pedogenic features are not conspicuously developed. The Lower Cretaceous Clovery Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, is strikingly similar in terms of lithological aspects. The depositional environment is interpreted in both localities as a playa deposit. A great variety of nodules is present such as silcretes, septaria, and silica-carbonate nodules. Radiometric dating of bentonites in central Utah revealed that the upper Brushy Basin member is Early Cretaceous in age. Field and geochemical data support these conclusions and aid the understanding of the exact nature of the depositional basin, environments, stratigraphy, and paleotectonics of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous interval in the Western Interior.

  5. Jurassic Park: Adventure in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shams, Marcia; Boteler, Trina

    1993-01-01

    Describes using the movie "Jurassic Park" as a foundation for a middle school interdisciplinary unit involving science, math, language arts, history, and geography. Suggested books and activities are presented. (PR)

  6. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Fox, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine {open_quotes}Limestone Marker{close_quotes} and estuarine {open_quotes}Brown Shale{close_quotes}. The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming.

  7. Navajo coal and air quality in Shiprock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, Joseph E.; Garcia, Linda V.

    2006-01-01

    Among the Navajo people, high levels of respiratory disease, such as asthma, exist in a population with low rates of cigarette smoking. Air quality outdoors and indoors affects respiratory health. Many Navajo Nation residents burn locally mined coal in their homes for heat, as coal is the most economical energy source. The U.S. Geological Survey and Dine College, in cooperation with the Navajo Division of Health, are conducting a study in the Shiprock, New Mexico, area to determine if indoor use of this coal might be contributing to some of the respiratory health problems experienced by the residents. Researchers in this study will (1) examine respiratory health data, (2) identify stove type and use, (3) analyze samples of coal that are used locally, and (4) measure and characterize air quality inside selected homes. This Fact Sheet summarizes the interim results of the study in both English and Navajo.

  8. RadNet Air Data From Navajo Lake, NM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Navajo Lake, NM from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  9. Assistive Technology Provision Within the Navajo Nation

    PubMed Central

    Ripat, Jacquie D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we explored the factors that affect assistive technology (AT) provision within the Navajo Nation using a qualitative approach to inquiry. Focus groups were held in which AT users discussed their awareness of AT and their need for, use of, and satisfaction with AT devices and services. Twenty-eight individuals who used wheelchairs, orthotics or prosthetics, hearing aids, communication aids, vision aids, and other AT participated in one of seven focus groups. Seven AT providers discussed the facilitators and barriers that affect AT provision. The findings revealed six themes common to both stakeholder groups and two additional themes for AT users. The central theme for AT users centered on (not) feeling understood; the central theme for AT providers revolved around the processes, activities, and roles the providers engaged in at times for different clients. Activities to increase awareness and to promote successful AT provision and satisfaction with AT devices were proposed. PMID:25147224

  10. Frisco City sand: New Jurassic reservoir in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, S.D.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L. ); Schneeflock, R.D. Jr. )

    1989-09-01

    The first commercial production of hydrocarbons from the Jurassic Haynesville Formation in southwestern Alabama was from the Frisco City field. The field currently produces 57.8{degree} API gravity oil on 160-ac well spacing from a depth of approximately 12,000 ft. Perforations are in the Frisco City sand interval, in the lower part of the Haynesville Formation. Average porosity is 15% and average permeability is 45 md. Currently, the field has two producing wells with cumulative production of over 138,876 bbl of oil and 213,144 mcf of gas. The hydrocarbon trap in the Frisco City field is a combination structural-stratigraphic trap. The Frisco City sand reservoir is located on a faulted anticline. The stratigraphic trap is produced by a permeability barrier near the crest of the structure and termination against a basement high. The lower part of the Haynesville Formation in this area is comprised of (in ascending order) the Buckner Anhydrite Member, the Frisco City sand, and interbedded shale and anhydrite. Sandstones of the Frisco City sand interval were deposited in a shallow marine setting and have a sheetlike morphology. The sandstones are poorly to moderately sorted, angular to rounded arkose, and contain angular to rounded pebbles. The sandstones are interbedded with thin, sandy, mudstones that contribute, along with patchy carbonate and anhydrite cement, to considerable reservoir heterogeneity. Porosity is predominantly primary intergranular with a small amount of framework grain dissolution and decementation.

  11. STEM Summer Academy on the Navajo Reservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The US Rosetta Project is the NASA contribution to the International Rosetta Mission, an ESA cornerstone mission to comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. While the project's outreach efforts span multi-media, and a variety of age and ethnic groups, a special emphasis has been made to find a way to provide meaningful outreach to the reservation communities. Because language preservation is an issue of urgent concern to the reservation communities, and because Rosetta, uniquely among NASA missions, has been named after the notion that keys to missing understanding of elements of the ancient past were found in the language on the original Rosetta stone, the US Rosetta Project has embarked upon outreach with a focus on STEM vocabulary in ancient US languages of the Navajo, Hopi, Ojibwe, and other tribal communities as the project expands. NASA image and science are used and described in the native language, alongside lay English and scientific English curriculum elements. Additionally, science (geology/chemistry/botany/physics) elements drawn from the reservation environment, including geomorphology, geochemistry, soil physics, are included and discussed in the native language as much as possible — with their analogs in other planetary environments (such as Mars). In this paper we will report on the most recent Summer Science Academy [2012], a four week summer course for middle school children, created in collaboration with teachers and administrators in the Chinle Unified School District. The concept of the Academy was initiated in 2011, and the first Academy was conducted shortly thereafter, in June 2011 with 14 children, 3 instructors, and a NASA teacher workshop. The community requested three topics: geology, astronomy, and botany. The 2012 Academy built on the curriculum already developed with more robust field trips, addressed to specific science topics, additional quantitative measurements and activities, with more written material for the cultural components from

  12. Policy Development by the People: The Navajo Child Care Standards Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, Coleen

    1980-01-01

    Traces the development of the Navajo Child Care Standards Project and also the Model Law and Regulations for Navajo Foster Care Providers. Describes the successful involvement of Indian Parents in the development of tribal standards for foster child care. (AN)

  13. EPA Science Matters Newsletter: Working with Navajo Nation for Cleaner, Healthier Heat

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA researchers and partners are teaming up to explore how to improve indoor air and health for Navajo Nation. Read about the results of the study and the proposed solutions to minimize indoor air pollution for the Navajo.

  14. 78 FR 32273 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... for Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0162. This.... Data OMB Control Number: 1076-0162. Title: Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits, 25 CFR 161....

  15. Late Jurassic – early Cretaceous inversion of rift structures, and linkage of petroleum system elements across post-rift unconformity, U.S. Chukchi Shelf, arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Connors, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Oil-prone source rocks, reservoir-quality sandstone, migration pathways, and structural closure are linked intimately across the Jurassic unconformity, which reflects inversion. Thus, all these key petroleum systems elements were in place when Triassic source rocks entered the oil generation window during Cretaceous–Cenozoic stratigraphic burial.

  16. We Could Make a Book: The Textual Tradition of Navajo Language Literacy in 1940-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Louise

    1998-01-01

    The textual tradition of Navajo language literacy is illustrated with the story of the production of the first Navajo language readers by Ann Nolan Clark, an effort based in Navajo classrooms and communities in the 1930s. Origins of the project, influence of linguists on its evolution, classroom implications of having the readers, and publications…

  17. Peer Group Evaluation of Narrative Competence: A Navajo Example. Working Papers in Sociolinguistics, No. 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret

    The narrative performances of Navajo children were examined to determine the ways in which the skills of competently structuring a narrative are informally learned within the peer group. Ten- and eleven-year-old Navajo children, living near Window Rock, Arizona, were evaluated in telling stories about the most traditional figures of Navajo belief,…

  18. 78 FR 15036 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing... for Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0162. This..., modify, or assign a grazing permit on Navajo Partitioned Lands is eligible and complies with...

  19. Crosscultural Contacts: Changes in the Diet and Nutrition of the Navajo Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Judy

    1986-01-01

    Describes changes in Navajo food sources in pre-colonial times, through nineteenth-century war with American soldiers and to contemporary times. Discusses nutritional value of Navajo diets, suggesting food changes following Indian contact with economically developed White culture was harmful to Navajo health. Suggests areas for further study. (TES)

  20. Early Childhood Intervention Partnerships on the Navajo Reservation with an Emphasis on Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sealander, Karen; Medina, Catherine; Gamble, Armanda; Pettigrew, Bobbie; Snyder, Maria; White, Sherri; Begay, Mary Helen; Bradley, Brian; Bradley-Wilkinson, Evangeline; Heimbecker, Connie; McCarty, Nellie; Nelson, Bernita; Nelson, Jacob; Smith, Jody; Whitehair, Marsha; Redsteer, Denise; Prater, Greg

    Kayenta Unified School District (KUSD) is located in the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. In addition to serving over 2,600 K-12 students, KUSD collaborates with the Navajo Nation and the Kayenta community to provide three early childhood education programs: Acceptance Belonging Caring (ABC) preschool, Navajo Nation Head Start, and Child Care…

  1. A Little History of North American Indians: The Navajos. New Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipps, Oscar H.

    This reprint of a 1909 volume portrays the life and history of the Navajo people, based on the personal experiences of an unusually enlightened white observer. The first three chapters cover the Navajo's early history, discovery by Spanish explorers, evidence of a prehistoric and possibly ancestral race, and the beauties of the Navajo's rugged…

  2. The Trading Post System on the Navajo Reservation. Staff Report to the Federal Trade Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Trade Commission, Los Angeles, CA.

    Since the late 19th century, trading posts have been a prominant feature in Navajo economic life. Today, due to geographic isolation and an absence of economic alternatives, many Navajos are still dependent upon trading posts. This report of a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) investigation details the system on the Navajo Reservation, including the…

  3. 25 CFR 700.843 - Permitting procedures for Navajo Nation Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permitting procedures for Navajo Nation Lands. 700.843... RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.843 Permitting procedures for Navajo Nation Lands. (a) Pursuant... of the Navajo Nation Council or delegated committee of that Council. (b) When Indian tribal lands...

  4. Tuning In to Navajo: The Role of Radio in Native Language Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Leighton C.

    Since 1986, KTNN Radio (tribally owned) has broadcast Navajo-language programming to the entire Navajo Nation. Its large broadcast range and position as the "Voice of the Navajo Nation" gives KTNN the "symbolic" power to affect linguistic change, as well as the unenviable position of being held to a high language standard although no such…

  5. The Feasibility of Test Translation between Unrelated Languages: English to Navajo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbluth, Annabelle R.

    1976-01-01

    The Boehm Test of Basic Concepts was translated into Navajo to investigate whether an English test can be translated into Navajo in a form suitable for assessing the language development of K-2 level Navajos. Differences were in: syntactic difficulty, organization of experience into concepts, accidental similarity of words, ranges of meaning. (SCC)

  6. 40 CFR 147.3400 - Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells. 147.3400 Section 147.3400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Navajo Indian Lands § 147.3400 Navajo...

  7. 40 CFR 147.3400 - Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells. 147.3400 Section 147.3400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Navajo Indian Lands § 147.3400 Navajo...

  8. 40 CFR 147.3400 - Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells. 147.3400 Section 147.3400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Navajo Indian Lands § 147.3400 Navajo...

  9. 40 CFR 147.3400 - Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells. 147.3400 Section 147.3400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Navajo Indian Lands § 147.3400 Navajo...

  10. 25 CFR 161.101 - How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 161.101 How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands? (a) Unless prohibited by federal law... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo...

  11. Potential tight gas resources in a frontier province - Jurassic through Tertiary strata beneath the Brooks Range foothills, Arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Houseknecht, David W.; Potter, Christopher J.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Beneath the foothills of the Brooks Range, rocks of the Lower Cretaceous-Tertiary Brookian and Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Beaufortian megasequences have been deeply buried and exhumed, and now exhibit characteristics of 'tight gas sandstones'. The data recovered from drilling, well tests, and cores exhibit the potential for substantial gas reserves over a large area. These data include recovery of gas from drillstem tests, indications of overpressure from well tests and mud weights, low porosity and permeability in sandstones, and vitrinite reflectance values ranging from 1.0 to 2.0 percent throughout substantial depth intervals.

  12. Replacement geometry and fabrics of Smackover (Jurassic) dolomite, southern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    The intensity of dolomitization and associated reservoir development in the Smackover Formation, Conecuh Ridge-Wiggens arch areas, is not predictable by comparison with time-temperature index methods or porosity-depth curves. Major alteration patterns and associated dolomite fabrics reflect the early paleotopographic settings, where high fluid flux and massive replacement are associated with Late Jurassic basement highs. This large-scale replacement is most important in the lowermost Smackover section overlying the Norphlet sandstone from Chunchula field into the Manila Embayment. The heterogeneous nature of dolomite reservoir development is evident in Chunchula field, where local pods of permeable dolomite cut across sedimentary facies boundaries. Predicting the orientation of a dolomite permeability barrier where there is little well control can be facilitated by mapping the regional thickness variations; the extension of impermeable dolomite trends is generally parallel to isopach trends.

  13. Advancing smoke-free policy adoption on the Navajo Nation

    PubMed Central

    Nez Henderson, Patricia; Roeseler, April; Moor, Gregg; Clark, Hershel W; Yazzie, Alfred; Nez, Priscilla; Nez, Chantal; Sabo, Samantha; Leischow, Scott J

    2016-01-01

    Background Comprehensive smoke-free laws are effective at protecting non-smokers and reducing tobacco use, yet they are not widely adopted by tribal governments. Methods A series of smoke-free policy initiatives on the Navajo Nation, beginning in 2008, were reviewed to identify key issues, successes and setbacks. Results It has been essential that proposed policies acknowledge the Navajo people's spiritual use of nát'oh, a sacred plant used for gift-giving, medicinal purposes and traditional ceremonies, while simultaneously discouraging a secular use of commercial tobacco. Concern that smoke-free policies economically harm tribal casinos has been a major barrier to broad implementation of comprehensive smoke-free laws in Navajo Nation. Conclusions It is necessary for tobacco control researchers and advocates to build relationships with tribal leaders and casino management in order to develop the business case that will take comprehensive smoke-free policies to scale throughout tribal lands. PMID:27697945

  14. Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Benally, Deputy Director,

    2012-05-15

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO), a Navajo Nation executive branch agency has conducted activities to determine capacity-building, institution-building, outreach and management activities to initiate the development of large-scale renewable energy - 100 megawatt (MW) or larger - generating projects on land in Northwestern New Mexico in the first year of a multi-year program. The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP) is a one year program that will develop and market a strategic business plan; form multi-agency and public-private project partnerships; compile site-specific solar, wind and infrastructure data; and develop and use project communication and marketing tools to support outreach efforts targeting the public, vendors, investors and government audiences.

  15. Middle Jurassic strata link Wallowa, Olds Ferry, and Izee terranes in the accreted Blue Mountains island arc, northeastern Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.D.L. ); Vallier, T. ); Stanley, G.D. Jr. ); Ash, S.R. ); White, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    Middle Jurassic strata atop the Wallowa terrane in northeastern Oregon link the Wallowa, Izee, and Olds Ferry terranes as related elements of a single long-lived and complex oceanic feature, the Blue Mountains island arc. Middle Jurassic strata in the Wallowa terrane include a dacitic ash-flow deposit and contain fossil corals and bivalves of North American affinity. Plant fossils in fluvial sandstones support a Jurassic age and indicate a seasonal temperate climate. Corals in a transgressive sequence traditionally overlying the fluvial units are of Bajocian age and are closely related to endemic varieties of the Western Interior embayment. They are unlike Middle Jurassic corals in other Cordilleran terranes; their presence suggests that the Blue Mountains island arc first approached the North American craton at high paleolatitudes in Middle Jurassic time. The authors consider the Bajocian marine strata and underlying fluvial volcaniclastic units to be a basin-margin equivalent of the Izee terrane, a largely Middle Jurassic (Bajocian) succession of basinal volcaniclastic and volcanic rocks known to overlie the Olds Ferry and Baker terranes.

  16. Preliminary bedrock and surficial geologic map of the west half of the Sanders 30' x 60' quadrangle, Navajo and Apache Counties, northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amoroso, Lee; Priest, Susan S.; Hiza-Redsteer, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The bedrock and surficial geologic map of the west half of the Sanders 30' x 60' quadrangle was completed in a cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Navajo Nation to provide regional geologic information for management and planning officials. This report provides baseline geologic information that will be useful in future studies of groundwater and surface water resources, geologic hazards, and the distribution of soils and plants. The west half of the Sanders quadrangle encompasses approximately 2,509 km2 (980 mi2) within Navajo and Apache Counties of northern Arizona and is bounded by lat 35°30' to 35° N., long 109°30' to 110° W. The majority of the land within the map area lies within the Navajo Nation. South of the Navajo Nation, private and State lands form a checkerboard pattern east and west of Petrified Forest National Park. In the west half of the Sanders quadrangle, Mesozoic bedrock is nearly flat lying except near folds. A shallow Cenozoic erosional basin that developed about 20 Ma in the western part of the map area cut across late Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks that were subsequently filled with flat-lying Miocene and Pliocene mudstone and argillaceous sandstone and fluvial sediments of the Bidahochi Formation and associated volcanic rocks of the Hopi Buttes volcanic field. The Bidahochi rocks are capped by Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene fluvial sediments and Quaternary eolian and alluvial deposits. Erosion along northeast-southwest-oriented drainages have exposed elongated ridges of Bidahochi Formation and basin-fill deposits that are exposed through shallow eolian cover of similarly oriented longitudinal dunes. Stokes (1964) concluded that the accumulation of longitudinal sand bodies and the development of confined parallel drainages are simultaneous processes resulting in parallel sets of drainages and ridges oriented along the prevailing southwest wind direction on the southern Colorado Plateau.

  17. The Scalpel and the Silver Bear. The First Navajo Woman Surgeon Combines Western Medicine and Traditional Healing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvord, Lori Arviso; Van Pelt, Elizabeth Cohen

    In this autobiography, Lori Arviso Alvord describes her journey to become the first Navajo woman surgeon and her realization of the benefits of Navajo philosophy to the healing process. Raised on the Navajo reservation by a White mother and a Navajo father and grandmother, Alvord learned to walk in two worlds. Encouraged to get an education, she…

  18. Palaeoenvironmental and sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Jurassic Datta Formation, Salt Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Jan, Irfan U.; Akhter, M. Gulraiz; Bibi, Mehwish

    2015-06-01

    The Lower Jurassic Datta Formation, western Salt Range, Pakistan, comprises three facies associations: (1) channel belt facies association (CBFA), (2) channel margin, and overbank facies association (CMOFA), and (3) lagoonal facies association (LFA). A cyclic fining-upward trend in the succession is represented by basal quartzose conglomerate/pebbly sandstone, through coarse to fine quartzose sandstone to siltstone and shales/claystone, which contains some carbonate accumulation. Two prominent depositional sequences are recognized in the Datta Formation with the lower high and upper low magnitude cycles. The Datta Formation thus represents a thick sedimentary succession and in the study area, i.e., western Salt Range, mainly channel belt, flood plain and/or delta top facies are exposed. The palaeocurrent analysis shows that the source area with acidic plutonic rocks laid to S-SE in the Indian shield, aravalies or older sedimentary rocks of the Indus Basin (i.e., Khewra, Tobra and Warchha formations). A tentative stratigraphic correlation of the Datta Formation with the lower Jurassic Lathi Formation, India invites further work in parts of India, which will elaborate the extent of the Datta Formation in the Greater Indian peninsula and develop palaeogeographic setting for this Lower Jurassic deltaic rock unit.

  19. Recent Jurassic discoveries in southeastern Cass County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, J.

    1984-09-01

    Southeastern Cass County had lain virtually dormant as a prospective Jurassic oil and gas province since the mid-1960s, when East Linden field was discovered and developed. Then, in 1978, Hilliard Oil and Gas drilled the 1 Johnson and discovered Kildare field (Smackover). Subsequent development thru 1982 proved additional reserves in several Cotton Valley sandstones as well, reconfirming southeastern Cass County as territory for viable Jurassic drilling. Additional drilling occurred when Marshall Exploration redrilled and expanded the old Bloomburg field and Heflin redrilled Queen City field. All of this drilling was successful in the Smackover reservoir, finding sour gas and condensate. Wildcat activity included the two Smackover completions finding South Atlanta field, as well as two completions in formations that are highly debated as to their nomenclature. Cities Service reportedly their well in the Eagle Mills. This well brought national attention to southeastern Cass County, when it was reported on the CBS Saturday evening news. The well initially flowed at rates that were as high as 1800 BOPD, 1396 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, with pressure of 3250 psi. Just as the excitement was dying down, Primary Fuels, Inc. reentered and deepened the Highland Resources 1 Glass and completed that well in a zone correlative to the Cities Service 1-A Pruitt. The 1 glass potentialed for 200 BOPD, 570 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, at pressure of 2900 psi. The producing zone was determined to be the Norphlet, which once again was made wildcatters of all previous upper Smackover explorers.

  20. Geographic information system (G.I.S.) research project at Navajo Community College - Shiprock Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Yazzie, R.; Peter, C.; Aaspas, B.; Isely, D.; Grey, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Navajo and Hopi GIS Project was established to assess the feasibility and impact of implementing GIS techology at Tribal institutions. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories funded the Navajo and Hopi Geographic Information System (G.I.S.) Project and assigned a mentor from LANL to help guide the project for three summer months of 1995. The six organizations involved were: LANL, LLNL, Navajo Community College, Navajo Nation Land Office, Northern Arizona University and San Juan College. The Navajo Land Office provided the system software, hardware and training. Northern Arizona University selected two students to work at Hopi Water Resource Department. Navajo Community College provided two students and two faculty members. San Juan College provided one student to work with the N.C.C. group. This made up two project teams which led to two project sites. The project sites are the Water Resource Department on the Hopi reservation and Navajo Community College in Shiprock, New Mexico.

  1. Learning to Construct Verbs in Navajo and Quechua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Ellen H.; Saville-Troike, Muriel

    2002-01-01

    Navajo and Quechua, both languages with a highly complex morphology, provide intriguing insights into the acquisition of inflectional systems. The development of the verb in the two languages is especially interesting, since the morphology encodes diverse grammatical notions, with the complex verb often constituting the entire sentence. While the…

  2. Of Saints and Lamanites: An Analysis of Navajo Mormonism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Many Navajos have affiliated with the Mormon church because of the inherent place of Native Americans in church doctrine, the church's opposition to alcohol, deterioration of tribal social order, Mormon tolerance of Indian culture, and material benefits of church association, including the Indian Student Placement Program. Contains 55 references.…

  3. Classroom Inquiry and Navajo Learning Styles: A Call for Reassessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, T. L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes experimental K-9 bilingual-bicultural curriculum in Navajo studies emphasizing open-ended questioning, inductive/analytical reasoning, and student verbalization in both small and large groups, and discusses reasons why it has been well received by teachers and students. Findings challenge conventional view that these students are…

  4. Learning to construct verbs in Navajo and Quechua.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Ellen H; Saville-Troike, Muriel

    2002-08-01

    Navajo and Quechua, both languages with a highly complex morphology, provide intriguing insights into the acquisition of inflectional systems. The development of the verb in the two languages is especially interesting, since the morphology encodes diverse grammatical notions, with the complex verb often constituting the entire sentence. While the verb complex in Navajo is stem-final, with prefixes appended to the stem in a rigid sequence, Quechua verbs are assembled entirely through suffixation, with some variation in affix ordering. We explore issues relevant to the acquisition of verb morphology by children learning Navajo and Quechua as their first language. Our study presents naturalistic speech samples produced by five Navajo children, aged 1;1 to 4;7, and by four Quechua-speaking children, aged 2;0 to 3;5. We centre our analysis on the role of phonological criteria in segmentation of verb stems and affixes, the production of amalgams, the problem of homophony, and the significance of distributional learning and semantic criteria in the development of the verb template. The phenomena observed in our data are discussed in light of several proposals, especially those of Peters (1983, 1995), Pinker (1984), Slobin (1985), and Hyams (1986, 1994).

  5. "Dine Bizaad" (Navajo Language) at a Crossroads: Extinction or Renewal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benally, AnCita; Viri, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Until about 20 years ago, the Navajo language was one of the most resilient American Indian languages in modern U.S. history. Today, at the dawn of the 21st century, that has all changed. Some changes can be attributed to the normal dynamics of cultural transmission that affect language use. Some others, such as the dramatic shift toward English…

  6. David P. McAllester on Navajo Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Patricia Shehan

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that music teachers increasingly are interested in music that originates outside the Western European tradition. Presents an interview with David P. McAllester on world music, the musical culture of the Navajo people, and how it should be taught in music classrooms. (CFR)

  7. Eastern Agency Navajo Abandoned Uranium Mine Open House

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the Contaminated Structures Program in the greater Eastern Agency with representatives from EPA, DOE, and Navajo Abandoned Mine Lands Program with updates on activities at NE Church Rock, Kerr-McGee/Quivira, and United Nuclear Co. Mill site.

  8. Prevalence of Hepatitis A Virus Antibody Among Navajo School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert

    1986-01-01

    A serologic investigation of prevalence of immunity to hepatitis A (anti-HAV) was conducted in a rural school adjacent to a Navajo reservation in New Mexico. The results show rates of anti-HAV that are the highest reported at the ages tested in any subpopulation in the United States, comparable only with those in developing countries. (KH)

  9. Career Unit. The Art of Navajo Rug Weaving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Edna; And Others

    This career exploration instructional unit on Navajo rug weaving is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). This unit consists of (1) five unit objectives (to recognize the importance of sheep in the Indians' life, to realize the time required to prepare wool for…

  10. Navajo Uranium Education Programs: The Search for Environmental Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charley, Perry H.; Dawson, Susan E.; Madsen, Gary E.; Spykerman, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    Uranium mining and milling in the Four Corners' area of the American Southwest has had serious negative impacts on American Indian workers, their families, and their communities. In this article, we will examine Navajo education programs which inform citizens about risks and health impacts associated with radiation exposures. Because the Navajo…

  11. Politics of Local Control: Ramah Navajo Community Forms a School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Robert

    For more than 100 years the Native Americans of the U.S. have been dominated economically, socially, educationally, and culturally by the larger society in which they live. The U.S. government has set policies, primarily through the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), without consulting Native Americans. The Ramah Navajo Community experienced…

  12. 75 FR 71138 - Land Acquisitions; Navajo Nation, Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Navajo Nation, Arizona AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... made a final agency determination to acquire approximately 405.61 acres of land into trust for the... notice be given to the public of the Secretary's decision to acquire land in trust at least 30 days...

  13. Petrography and diagenesis of Eagle Mills sandstones, subsurface - Northeast Texas and southwest Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, W.C.; Callender, C.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Eagle Mills Formation (Triassic-Jurassic) has been penetrated by several deep wells (12,000 to 18,000 ft) in northeast Texas and southwest Arkansas. It consists of green, red, and pink conglomeratic lithic arenites and fine- to coarse-grained feldspathic arenites, interbedded with red and greenish gray shales and siltstones. Lithic arenites contain basalt, chert, quartzite, and dolomite rock fragments; plagioclase is the predominant feldspar. All Eagle Mills sandstones have low textural and mineralogic maturities. Eagle Mills red beds and associated intrusive igneous rocks (diabase and basalt dikes and sills) represent the fillings of grabens or rift basins that actively subsided during deposition (in alluvial, fluvial-deltaic, and lacustrine paleoenvironments). Eagle Mills lithic and feldspathic sandstones have undergone a complex diagenetic history, including chlorite cementation (pore linings and pore fillings), compaction, quartz and feldspar overgrowths, dolomite cementation, chloritization and albitization of detrital feldspars, local dissolution of framework grains (igneous lithics and feldspars), precipitation of kaolinite, late Fe-calcite cementation, and saddle dolomite formation. Cement mineralogies are strongly correlative with lithofacies. Lithic sandstones contain the highest frequency of chlorite cements, whereas feldspathic sandstones are preferentially cemented with carbonates and anhydrite; quartz and feldspar overgrowths are ubiquitous. The suite of authigenic minerals in Eagle Mills sandstones records progressive burial into a deep, high-temperature (120-150C), semiclosed, diagenetic regime.

  14. Eruptive conditions and depositional processes of Narbona Pass Maar volcano, Navajo volcanic field, Navajo Nation, New Mexico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Semken, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Phreatomagmatic deposits at Narbona Pass, a mid-Tertiary maar in the Navajo volcanic field (NVF), New Mexico (USA), were characterized in order to reconstruct the evolution and dynamic conditions of the eruption. Our findings shed light on the temporal evolution of the eruption, dominant depositional mechanisms, influence of liquid water on deposit characteristics, geometry and evolution of the vent, efficiency of fragmentation, and the relative importance of magmatic and external volatiles. The basal deposits form a thick (5-20 m), massive lapilli tuff to tuff-breccia deposit. This is overlain by alternating bedded sequences of symmetrical to antidune cross-stratified tuff and lapilli tuff; and diffusely-stratified, clast-supported, reversely-graded lapilli tuffs that pinch and swell laterally. This sequence is interpreted to reflect an initial vent-clearing phase that produced concentrated pyroclastic density currents, followed by a pulsating eruption that produced multiple density currents with varying particle concentrations and flow conditions to yield the well-stratified deposits. Only minor localized soft-sediment deformation was observed, no accretionary lapilli were found, and grain accretion occurs on the lee side of dunes. This suggests that little to no liquid water existed in the density currents during deposition. Juvenile material is dominantly present as blocky fine ash and finely vesiculated fine to coarse lapilli pumice. This indicates that phreatomagmatic fragmentation was predominant, but also that the magma was volatile-rich and vesiculating at the time of eruption. This is the first study to document a significant magmatic volatile component in an NVF maar-diatreme eruption. The top of the phreatomagmatic sequence abruptly contacts the overlying minette lava flows, indicating no gradual drying-out period between the explosive and effusive phases. The lithology of the accidental clasts is consistent throughout the vertical pyroclastic

  15. Late Jurassic weather forecast, Four Corners area: Dry, hot, and partly sunny

    SciTech Connect

    Turner-Peterson, C.E.; Fishman, N.S. )

    1989-09-01

    Interfingering between members of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation and inferences based on their various environments of deposition permit interpretation of a persistent paleoclimate during the Late Jurassic in the Colorado Plateau region. Paleoclimate interpretation is based on evaporites in the Tidwell member, at the base of the Morrison; eolian deposits in the Recapture and Bluff Sandstone members; and saline, alkaline-lake deposits (which indicate high evaporation rates) in the Brushy Basin member at the top of the Morrison. Interfingering of these members with all other members of the Morrison Formation implies that a semiarid to arid climate was likely throughout Morrison time. The semiarid to arid interpretation is consistent with the global climatic zone inferred from the paleogeographic/paleotectonic setting. The Four Corners area during the Late Jurassic was in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and thus was affected by prevailing westerly winds. A magmatic arc located several hundred kilometers to the west of the Morrison depositional basin may have caused a broad rain-shadow effect, which contributed to a dry continental climate downwind. A typical Late Jurassic day in the Four Corners area is predicted to have been hot and dry, although seasonally heavy rains probably fed intermittent streams that transported sediments into the region. Explosive eruptions of silicic volcanic ash may have darkened the skies episodically, and thus partly sunny would have been a conservative forecast.

  16. Geohydrology and effects of water use in the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychaner, James H.

    1981-01-01

    The main source of water in the 5,400-square-mile Black Mesa area is the N aquifer, which consists of the Navajo Sandstone and underlying Kayenta Formation and Wingate Sandstone. Water is under confined conditions in the central 3,300 square miles. Transmissivity is less than 1,000 feet squared per day. Storage coefficient is less than 0.0004 in the confined part of the aquifer and at least 0.1 in the unconfined part. Recharge is about 13,000 acre-feet per year, and storage at equilibrium, which was before 1965, was at least 180 million acre-feet. Ground-water withdrawals were less than 400 acre-feet per year before 1970 and increased to 5,300 acre-feet per year 1976-1979. By 1980, municipal-supply pumpage is expected to exceed that for a coal-slurry pipeline. Water levels have declined throughout the confined part of the aquifer. Decline of more than 100 feet was calculated for an area of 200 square miles through 1979 and was projected for 440 square miles through 2001. In the unconfined part, project declines averaged less than 1 foot. If pumping for coal slurry stopped, most of the decline would recover within 10 years. (USGS)

  17. Provenance changes for sandstones from the Sierra de los Cuarzos (central Mexico): the possible record of a terrane accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios García, N. B.; Martini, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Guerrero terrane is composed of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous arc successions exposed along the western Pacific margin of Mexico. Several lines of evidence indicate that the Guerrero terrane represents the Mexican leading-edge of the North American plate, which was drifted in the paleo-Pacific domain during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous back-arc spreading, and subsequently accreted back to the Mexican continental core before the Albian. In this paper, we present new stratigraphic data and a detailed provenance analysis of sandstones from the Sierra de Los Cuarzos area, which is located in central Mexico, ~50 km to the east of the Guerrero terrane suture belt. In the Sierra de Los Cuarzos is exposed a Mesozoic succession composed of: 1) quartz-rich turbidites grading upward to 2) calcareous slump deposits, which are overlain by 3) volcaniclastic sandstone and scarce conglomerate hosting 20 cm- to 100 m-wide blocks and slabs of basalt. Sandstone provenance and paleocurrent marks indicate that turbidites and slumps deposits were fed by sources from the Mexican continental core. Similar Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous turbidites and calcareous slump deposits are exposed in the Sierra de Guanajuato, ~50 km to the west of the Sierra de Los Cuarzos area, and are preliminarily correlated with the lower units (1 and 2) of the study area. On the other hand, provenance analysis indicates that volcaniclastic sandstones from unit 3 were principally fed by the arc successions exposed in the Guerrero terrane. The drastic change in provenance of sandstones from the Sierra de los Cuarzos suggests a complex depositional history, characterized by the contribution of distinct supplying sources during the infilling of the basin. In this paper, it is explored the possibility of a syn-tectonic origin for the volcaniclastic rocks of the Sierra de Los Cuarzos, related to the accretion of the Guerrero terrane to the Mexican continental core.

  18. Dine bikeyah bik'ah (Navajo oil): An ethnohistory, 1922-1960

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Kathleen Patricia

    1998-11-01

    Oil was discovered on the Navajo reservation in 1922, and as a result, the U.S. Department of the Interior pressured Navajos into leasing their lands to develop it. This study reveals that, at first, government officials hoped Navajos would quietly acquiesce, but instead Navajos fought for control. Moreover, oil development served as a basis for tribal debates over such issues as assimilation, land use, and the environment, especially the destruction of grazing areas and sacred sites. Manuscript collections and federal government documents provided the minutes of many tribal council meetings from 1923 to 1960, correspondence between Navajo, Interior Department, and oil company personnel, and royalty and leasing data. Research revealed a tremendous diversity of opinion not only between Navajos and non-Navajos, but between Navajos themselves. Interviews conducted in Farmington, Aztec, Gallup, and Albuquerque, New Mexico, added further complexity and provided local "color." The main difficulty, of course, was locating the Navajo voice and particularly the voices of those not involved in tribal government. A second problem was the paucity of accurate production and royalty documents. Oil company reports were not subject to verification during this period, so it is unlikely that those available provide correct figures. Moreover, oil companies deny possessing archives. This study attempts to balance Navajo and non-Navajo responses to oil development on reservation land from 1922 to 1960 and to suggest future research beyond this period. When dealing with two very diverse cultures, however, there is a tendency to vilify one of them and to examine the other uncritically, perhaps even romantically. Research revealed many complex individuals within both cultures, men and women with varying ambitions and viewpoints. This study presents a tumultuous period in Navajo history and focuses on the successes and failures, abilities and weaknesses of both Navajos and Anglo-Americans.

  19. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  20. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Fox, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine "Limestone Marker" and estuarine "Brown Shale". The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming. At Red Bird field the primary exploration target was the Pennsylvanian "Leo sands" of the Minnelusa Formation, and

  1. Operation Sandstone: 1948. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhouse, L.H.; Hallowell, J.H.; McMullan, F.W.; Davis, S.E.; Jones, C.B.

    1983-12-19

    SANDSTONE was a three-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during the spring of 1948 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  2. Coping with arsenic-based pesticides on Dine (Navajo) textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jae R.

    Arsenic-based pesticide residues have been detected on Arizona State Museum's (ASM) Dine (Navajo) textile collection using a handheld portable X-ray (pXRF) spectrometer. The removal of this toxic pesticide from historic textiles in museums collections is necessary to reduce potential health risks to Native American communities, museum professionals, and visitors. The research objective was divided into three interconnected stages: (1) empirically calibrate the pXRF instrument for arsenic contaminated cotton and wool textiles; (2) engineer an aqueous washing treatment exploring the effects of time, temperature, agitation, and pH conditions to efficiently remove arsenic from wool textiles while minimizing damage to the structure and properties of the textile; (3) demonstrate the devised aqueous washing treatment method on three historic Navajo textiles known to have arsenic-based pesticide residues. The preliminary results removed 96% of arsenic from a high arsenic concentration (~1000 ppm) textile opposed to minimal change for low arsenic concentration textiles (<100 ppm).

  3. Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Brinkman, G.; Funk, K.; Gelman, R.; Lantz, E.; Larney, C.; Peterson, D.; Worley, C.; Liebsch, E.

    2012-01-01

    Pursuant to the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced in 2009 its intent to issue rules for controlling emissions from Navajo Generating Station that could affect visibility at the Grand Canyon and at several other national parks and wilderness areas. The final rule will conform to what EPA determines is the best available retrofit technology (BART) for the control of haze-causing air pollutants, especially nitrogen oxides. While EPA is ultimately responsible for setting Navajo Generating Station's BART standards in its final rule, it will be the U.S. Department of the Interior's responsibility to manage compliance and the related impacts. This study aims to assist both Interior and EPA by providing an objective assessment of issues relating to the power sector.

  4. A quantitative model of ground-water flow during formation of tabular sandstone uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a quantitative simulation of regional groundwater flow during uranium deposition in the Westwater Canyon Member and Jackpile Sandstone Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the San Juan basin. Topographic slope, shoreline position, and density contrasts in the lake and pore fluids controlled the directions of flow and recharge-discharge areas. The most important results for uranium ore deposit formation are that regional groundwater discharged throughout the basin, regional discharge was concentrated along the shore line or playa margin, flow was dominantly gravity driven, and compaction dewatering was negligible. A strong association is found between the tabular sandstone uranium deposits and major inferred zones of mixed local and regional groundwater discharge. -from Author

  5. Field manual for the collection of Navajo Nation streamflow-gage data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Robert J.; Fisk, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    The Field Manual for the Collection of Navajo Nation Streamflow-Gage Data (Navajo Field Manual) is based on established (standard) U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging methods and provides guidelines specifically designed for the Navajo Department of Water Resources personnel who establish and maintain streamflow gages. The Navajo Field Manual addresses field visits, including essential field equipment and the selection of and routine visits to streamflow-gaging stations, examines surveying methods for determining peak flows (indirect measurements), discusses safety considerations, and defines basic terms.

  6. Gasoline sniffing and lead toxicity in Navajo adolescents.

    PubMed

    Coulehan, J L; Hirsch, W; Brillman, J; Sanandria, J; Welty, T K; Colaiaco, P; Koros, A; Lober, A

    1983-01-01

    During a 6-year period, 23 Navajo adolescents were hospitalized 47 times for presumed lead intoxication secondary to gasoline sniffing. Most patients were male (87%) and sniffed gasoline as a social activity, more frequently in spring and summer. Sixty-five percent of the patients first presented with toxic encephalopathy. Of total episodes, 31% involved asymptomatic lead overload; 31% involved tremor, ataxia, and other neurologic signs; and 38% involved encephalopathy with disorientation and hallucinations. Free erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were not consistently high, although blood lead levels were all elevated. One death occurred. Approximately 11% of 537 Navajo adolescents said they inhaled gasoline for enjoyment at least occasionally. Among 147 junior high school students, blood lead levels averaged 18 +/- 6 micrograms/dL with no values greater than 40 micrograms/dL. Three of these students had elevated zinc protoporphyrin levels and all three were anemic. No correlation was found between levels of blood lead or zinc protoporphyrin and whether or not the youth reported sniffing gasoline. However, sniffing gasoline was associated with poor school performance and delinquent behavior. Although apparently many Navajo adolescents experiment with gasoline inhalation, only a few engage in this activity frequently enough to develop either asymptomatic or symptomatic lead overload.

  7. The Lowell Observatory Navajo-Hopi Astronomy Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, K. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Bosh, A. S.; Johnson, M.; Schindler, K.

    2012-08-01

    We present an overview of the Lowell Observatory Navajo-Hopi Astronomy Outreach Program, which is modeled after the ASP's Project ASTRO (Richter & Fraknoi 1994). Since 1996, our missions have been (1) to use the inherent excitement about the night sky to help teachers get Navajo and Hopi students excited about science and education, and (2) to help teachers of Navajo and Hopi students learn about astronomy and hands-on activities so that they will be better able to incorporate astronomy in their classrooms. Lowell astronomers pair up for a school year with an elementary or middle school (5th-8th grade) teacher and make numerous visits to their teachers' classes, partnering with the educators in leading discussions linked with hands-on activities. Lowell staff also work with educators and amateur astronomers to offer evening star parties that involve the family members of the students as well as the general community. Toward the end of the school year, teachers bring their classes to Lowell Observatory. The classes spend some time exploring the Steele Visitor Center and participating in tours and programs. They also voyage to Lowell's research facility in the evening to observe at two of Lowell's research telescopes. Furthermore, we offer biennial teacher workshops in Flagstaff to provide teachers with tools, curricula materials, and personalized training so that they are able to include astronomy in their classrooms. We also work with tribal educators to incorporate traditional astronomical knowledge. Funding for the program comes from many different sources.

  8. Sources of the elements in the sandstone-type uranium deposits of the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, Eugene M.; Newman, W.L.; Miesch, A.T.

    1956-01-01

    Sandstone-type uranium deposits of the Colorado Plateau are epigenetic. Certain elements have been added locally to the sandstone host to form the deposits; the added fraction of each element in the deposits is call extrinsic to distinguish it from the part present in the original unmineralized host. The principal extrinsic components, in their approximate order of abundance, are vanadium, iron magnesium, uranium, sulfur, arsenic, copper, lead, molbedenum, selenium, cobalt, and nickel. At lest six possible sources of the extrinsic components of the uranium deposits may be considered reasonably likely: 1) the sandstone beds enclosing the uranium deposits, 2) the marine Mancos shales of Cretaceous ages, 3) bentonitic shales of Jurassic and Triassic age, 4) petroliferous rocks of Pennsylvanian age, 5) Precambrian crystalline rocks underlying the Colorado Plateau, and 6) magmatic reservoirs of latest Cretaceous or Tertiary age. If the major source of some of the elements of external to the sandstone beds enclosing the deposits, it is likely that several sources have contributed to some if not most of the extrinsic components and that the importance of the various sources differs from one component to the next. Precambrian crystalline rocks are considered the most likely major source of the extrinsic uranium in the deposits.

  9. A subsurface study of the Denkman sandstone member, Norphlet Formation, hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Anderson, E.G.; Baria, L.R. ); Higginbotham, R.S.

    1990-09-01

    Hatters Pond field is in east-central Mobile County in southwestern Alabama and it produces from both the Norphlet and Smackover formations. The structural trap involves salt movement along the west side of the Mobile Fault System that resulted in a faulted salt anticline. The Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama consists of red to gray siltstone and pinkish to gray sandstone with conglomerate layers. Three facies have been distinguished within the Norphlet Formation: a lower shale, a red siltstone sequence, and an upper quartzose unit. The thickness of the formation ranges from a feather edge to more than 800 ft (234.8 m) in southwestern Alabama. The Upper Jurassic Denkman Sandstone Member of the Norphlet Formation at Hatters Pond field is a medium- to fine-grained, well-sorted arkosic sandstone between the underlying Norphlet redbed lithofacies and the carbonates of the overlying Smackover Formation. Here, the Denkman Member can be subdivided into a massive upper unit and a low- to high-angle cross-stratified lower unit. The sandstones are quartz-rich with a high percentage of feldspars. The majority of the feldspar grains observed are potassium feldspar. Microcline is usually less altered when compared with other types of feldspar grains. The major types of feldspar replacement include illitization, hematitization, dolomitization, chloritization, calcitization, vacuolization, and anhydritization. Carbonate replacement of feldspars is very abundant, mostly by ferroan dolomite. Rock fragments are not abundant in the Denkman Member, although there is good evidence of a metamorphic/volcanic source area. The sandstones are cemented by dolomite, calcite, anhydrite, and quartz and feldspar overgrowths. The lower Denkman unit is slightly more porous than the upper Denkman unit. The pore-lining authigenic clay, illite, greatly reduces permeability and porosity in these sandstones.

  10. A Jurassic mammal from South America.

    PubMed

    Rauhut, Oliver W M; Martin, Thomas; Ortiz-Jaureguizar, Edgardo; Puerta, Pablo

    2002-03-14

    The Jurassic period is an important stage in early mammalian evolution, as it saw the first diversification of this group, leading to the stem lineages of monotremes and modern therian mammals. However, the fossil record of Jurassic mammals is extremely poor, particularly in the southern continents. Jurassic mammals from Gondwanaland are so far only known from Tanzania and Madagascar, and from trackway evidence from Argentina. Here we report a Jurassic mammal represented by a dentary, which is the first, to our knowledge, from South America. The tiny fossil from the Middle to Late Jurassic of Patagonia is a representative of the recently termed Australosphenida, a group of mammals from Gondwanaland that evolved tribosphenic molars convergently to the Northern Hemisphere Tribosphenida, and probably gave rise to the monotremes. Together with other mammalian evidence from the Southern Hemisphere, the discovery of this new mammal indicates that the Australosphenida had diversified and were widespread in Gondwanaland well before the end of the Jurassic, and that mammalian faunas from the Southern Hemisphere already showed a marked distinction from their northern counterparts by the Middle to Late Jurassic.

  11. Sea level reconstructions and non-marine sedimentation at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary: southwestern margin of the Neotethys in the Salt Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The environmental changes during the Triassic-Jurassic boundary interval and the associated mass extinction event are still strongly debated. Sea-level reconstruction records during this interval reveal an end-Triassic global regression event. Erosion and karstification at the top of Triassic sediments, and Lower Jurassic fluvial channels with reworked Triassic clasts indicate widespread regression in the European basins. Laterite at the top of the Triassic, and quartzose conglomerates/sandstones at the base of the Jurassic indicate a fluvial/terrestrial onset in Iran and Afghanistan. Abrupt emergence, erosion and facies dislocation, from the Triassic dolomites (Kingriali Formation) to Lower Jurassic fluvial/continental quartzose conglomerates/pebbly sandstones (Datta Formation) occur in the Tethyan Salt Range of Pakistan. Sedimentological analyses indicate marine regression and emergence under tropical-subtropical conditions (Greenhouse conditions) and negates the possibility of glacial influence in this region. Field evidences indicate the presence of an undulatory surface at the base of the Jurassic and a high (Sargodha High) is present south of the Salt Range Thrust, the southern boundary of the basin. Furthermore, geophysical data (mostly seismic sections) in different parts of the basin display normal faults in the basement. These features are interpreted as horst and graben structures at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in the Kohat-Potwar Plateau. The Lower Jurassic Datta Formation appears to have been deposited in an overall graben fill settings. Similar normal faults and graben fill geometries are observed on seismic sections in Tanzania, Mozambique, Madagascar and other regions of the southeastern margin of the African Plate and are related to the Karoo rift system. To summarize, the basement normal faults and the graben fill features at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in the Kohat-Potwar Plateau can be correlated to similar features common in the Karoo

  12. Teenager-, Mother-, Daughter-, Who Am I? Navajo Adolescent Mothers' Perceptions of the Maternal Role & Implications for Child Developmental Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalla, Rochelle L.

    This study explored the meaning of motherhood among Navajo teenagers, their mothers, and community informants living in a small, rural town on a Navajo Reservation. Participating were 8 Navajo teenage mothers ranging from 16 to 19 years, 7 grandmothers (mothers of the teens) who ranged from 41 to 57 years, and 6 community informants: two teachers,…

  13. A Bibliography of Navajo and Native American Teaching Materials = Dine K'eeji Naaltsoos Bee Nida'nitinigii. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, T. L., Comp.; And Others

    A revised annotated bibliography of Navajo and Native American teaching materials published between 1910 and 1982 (most from 1970 to 1982), compiled as part of the Title IV-B Navajo Materials Development Project, lists resources for teachers of Navajo and other Native American students. Most citations are of written materials, although some…

  14. "When I Am Lonely the Mountains Call Me": The Impact of Sacred Geography on Navajo Psychological Well Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin-Pierce, Trudy

    1997-01-01

    Explores the extent of Navajos' bond with their homeland. The land is critical to the Navajo world view, which emphasizes harmony and orderly conditions, and plays an essential role in myths and ceremonies. When Navajos leave their homeland to pursue educational or professional endeavors, emotional distress can undermine their success. Includes…

  15. 25 CFR 161.713 - How will BIA determine the amount of damages to Navajo Partitioned Lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How will BIA determine the amount of damages to Navajo... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Penalties, Damages, and Costs § 161.713 How will BIA determine the amount of damages to Navajo Partitioned Lands? (a) BIA will determine...

  16. Up against Giants: The National Indian Youth Council, the Navajo Nation, and Coal Gasification, 1974-77

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shreve, Bradley Glenn

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 1977, members of the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC), along with the Coalition for Navajo Liberation, barraged the Secretary of the Interior and the chairman of the Navajo Nation with petitions calling for a halt to the proposed construction of several coal gasification plants on the Navajo Reservation in northwestern New…

  17. A Dine (Navajo) Perspective on Self-Determination: An Exposition of an Egalitarian Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manuelito, Kathryn D.

    2006-01-01

    Worldview of any culture and society is explicated through epistemological principles that frame the way one sees the world. Dine (Navajo) worldview is explicated through epistemology that has been rejected and debased by the dominant society since contact centuries ago. However, enduring powerful Dine (Navajo) worldview persists in contemporary…

  18. No One Remembers a Winter Like This: A Year at the Navajo Agency, 1882-1883.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Louise

    This paper documents a single year in the history of Navajo education from the perspective of the Navajo Agent Dennis Matthew Riordan. It draws on Riordan's correspondence, 1882-83, with the Secretary of the Interior, with Captain Richard Henry Pratt at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, and with his brother. In December 1882, Riordan arrived…

  19. The Navajo Nation: An American Colony. A Report of the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Carol J.; Lewis, Hester

    The major portion of this report is devoted to the Anglo and American Indian testimony from the 1973 Commission on Civil Rights Hearings on Navajo economic development, employment, education, and health care. Among the major recommendations cited are those calling for: (1) legal recognition of the Navajo Tribal Council to provide for favorable tax…

  20. Fieldwork among the Navajo: Implications for Social Work Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Susan E.

    1994-01-01

    Examines cross-cultural issues encountered during a survey on the Navajo Reservation about the psychosocial aspects of uncompensated occupational illnesses. Discusses cultural concerns for non-Indian researchers and social workers related to research design, culture shock, working conditions, legitimation, access, Navajo world view, and Navajo…

  1. An Initial Exploration of the Navajo Nation's Language and Culture Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachelder, Ann; Markel, Sherry

    This paper presents some preliminary findings from an opinion survey on the nature and depth of language and cultural studies to be included in school curricula as required by the Navajo Tribe's Language and Culture Mandate (1984). A 10-question survey was sent to 20 elementary and secondary schools in the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and Arizona.…

  2. Dine Baa Hane Bi Naaltsoos: Collected Papers from the Seventh through Tenth Navajo Studies Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, June-el, Ed.

    This document contains 29 papers presented at the 7th-10th Navajo Studies Conferences, 1994-97. The papers are arranged in five sections: "Aesthetics: Rugs, Baskets, and Rock Art"; "Doing Anthropology"; "Health"; "Economics"; and "Contact between Cultures." The papers are: "The First Navajo Studies Conference: Reflections by the Cofounders"…

  3. Bilingual Education for American Indians. Vol. II--Navajo. Curriculum Bulletin 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Albuquerque, NM.

    Bilingual education for Navajos is the central element in changing education from an alien function to one shared and controlled by the community. A number of community-controlled educational systems have become the driving force in Navajo bilingual education, and the past three years have produced not just higher quanitity, but considerably…

  4. 40 CFR 147.3400 - Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells. 147.3400 Section 147.3400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Indian Lands § 147.3400 Navajo Indian lands—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II injection...

  5. Comparison of Native American Navajo Bender-Gestalt Performance with Koppitz and Sompa Norms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Clay L.; Zarske, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Compared Bender-Gestalt performance of 452 Navajo children with 1974 Koppitz and System of Multicultural Pluralistic Assessment norms (SOMPA), and investigated the use of the Bender-Gestalt for diagnosing learning disabilities. Results suggested the Koppitz and SOMPA White norms may be useful in psychological assessment of Navajo children. (JAC)

  6. On the Role of "YounganMorgan" in the Development of Navajo Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Wayne

    1996-01-01

    Highlights the lifelong work of linguists Robert W. Young and William Morgan in developing written Navajo. In contrast to technical orthographies, Young and Morgan developed a practical orthography that took advantage of native speakers' implicit knowledge and opened up possibilities for producing materials in written Navajo. Young and Morgan also…

  7. Psychosocial and health impacts of uranium mining and milling on Navajo lands.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Susan E; Madsen, Gary E

    2011-11-01

    The uranium industry in the American Southwest has had profoundly negative impacts on American Indian communities. Navajo workers experienced significant health problems, including lung cancer and nonmalignant respiratory diseases, and psychosocial problems, such as depression and anxiety. There were four uranium processing mills and approximately 1,200 uranium mines on the Navajo Nation's over 27,000 square miles. In this paper, a chronology is presented of how uranium mining and milling impacted the lives of Navajo workers and their families. Local community leaders organized meetings across the reservation to inform workers and their families about the relationship between worker exposures and possible health problems. A reservation-wide effort resulted in activists working with political leaders and attorneys to write radiation compensation legislation, which was passed in 1990 as the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) and included underground uranium miners, atomic downwinders, and nuclear test-site workers. Later efforts resulted in the inclusion of surface miners, ore truck haulers, and millworkers in the RECA Amendments of 2000. On the Navajo Nation, the Office of Navajo Uranium Workers was created to assist workers and their families to apply for RECA funds. Present issues concerning the Navajo and other uranium-impacted groups include those who worked in mining and milling after 1971 and are excluded from RECA. Perceptions about uranium health impacts have contributed recently to the Navajo people rejecting a resumption of uranium mining and milling on Navajo lands.

  8. Peoples, Resources, and Lifestyles: The Hopi-Navajo Land Partition Act of 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, James M.

    The Hopi and Navajo tribes have been engaged in a long and complex land dispute within the 1882 Executive Order Area (Joint Use Area) of Arizona, an area recently redefined via the Partition Act of 1974 which calls for the relocation of 5 to 10,000 Navajos. This rearrangement of political domain threatens to influence the future management and…

  9. By-Laws of the Parent Advisory Councils Navajo (BIA) Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Window Rock, AZ.

    To promote maximum Title I services to Navajo students attending the Navajo Area Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools, by-laws for the establishment and operation of a Parent Advisory Council (PAC) have been prepared. Council objectives are to develop good liaison and communication between students' parents and the local school administration; promote…

  10. 25 CFR 161.101 - How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 161.101 How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands? (a) Unless prohibited by... Partitioned Lands, including tribal laws relating to land use, environmental protection, and historic...

  11. Cultural and Technical Evaluation of Heating Alternatives to Improve Indoor Air Quality on the Navajo Nation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Navajo Nation it is estimated that 62% of households use wood as their primary means of heating1. A 2010 study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Diné College found that in Shiprock, NM, the largest town in the Navajo Nation (pop. = 8,300)2, heating is often w...

  12. 25 CFR 161.101 - How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 161.101 How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands? (a) Unless prohibited by... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How will tribal laws be enforced on the...

  13. 25 CFR 161.101 - How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 161.101 How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands? (a) Unless prohibited by... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How will tribal laws be enforced on the...

  14. 25 CFR 161.101 - How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 161.101 How will tribal laws be enforced on the Navajo Partitioned Lands? (a) Unless prohibited by... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How will tribal laws be enforced on the...

  15. 78 FR 8273 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Navajo Nation; Regional Haze Requirements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing a source-specific federal implementation plan (FIP) requiring the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), located on the Navajo Nation, to reduce emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) under the Best Available Retrofit Technology (BART) provision of the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act) in order to reduce visibility impairment resulting from......

  16. "Please Read Loose": Intimate Grammars and Unexpected Languages in Contemporary Navajo Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Anthony K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses Philip Deloria's "Indians in Unexpected Places" as a lens by which to understand the expectations and reviews of Navajo author Blackhorse Mitchell's "Miracle Hill." Written in Navajo English, the book, from an introduction by T. D. Allen to a number of reviews of the book in the popular press, consistently misrecognized the…

  17. The Circulation and Silence of Weaving Knowledge in Contemporary Navajo Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yohe, Jill Ahlberg

    2012-01-01

    This article draws upon ethnographic fieldwork within a Navajo community to illustrate how weaving knowledge and practices shape contemporary notions of community identity and belonging. The ongoing exchange of Navajo weaving taboos and the careful management of weaving teachings offers community members various opportunities to share and keep…

  18. The Federal Physician Survey for the Navajo Area: A Predictive Model for Recruitment and Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Philip A.

    The 114 physicians working for the Navajo Area Indian Health Service (IHS) in June 1976 were surveyed to determine what attracted and retained physicians to the Navajo area. Of the 114 questionnaires mailed, 90 were returned. Designed to obtain data on the physician's background, choice of location, and satisfaction with both community and work…

  19. Storms and tsunamis: evidence of event sedimentation in the Late Jurassic Tendaguru Beds of southeastern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussert, Robert; Aberhan, Martin

    2004-06-01

    In Late Jurassic shallow marine siliciclastic sediments of the dinosaur-bearing Tendaguru Beds from the Mandawa Basin of southeastern Tanzania we identified several event deposits. Based on an analysis of their sedimentological and palaeontological features, a storm-induced origin can be assumed for the majority of these deposits. This interpretation is in agreement with the regional palaeogeography and palaeoclimatological data, and is further supported by the widespread evidence of Late Jurassic storm-controlled sedimentation in adjacent basins along the East African margin. A particularly striking feature is a laterally extensive, conglomeratic bed with gravel components up to 30 cm in diameter, and megaripples indicating southward transport directions. The troughs between ripples are filled by cross-bedded fine-grained sandstones and siltsones with inferred transport directions to the north. Giant bedforms, a mixture of clasts of marine and continental origin, and evidence of opposite current directions suggest that this chaotically deposited sediment may have formed from a tsunami. Within the available time resolution this event is synchronous with the Morokweng impact structure in South Africa. However, because of the considerable distance of Morokweng from the Jurassic sea, direct links between both events cannot be established. Alternative mechanisms such as a landslide-generated tsunami are plausible, but not yet supported by geophysical data.

  20. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain: Applications to hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, B.H.; Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Based on regional stratigraphic and sedimentologic data, three unconformity-bounded depositional sequences associated with cycles of relative sea-level change and coastal onlap are recognized for Jurassic strata in the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain area. These sequences are designated, in ascending order, the LZAGC (Lower Zuni A Gulf Coast)-3.1, the LZAGC-4.1, and the LZAGC-4.2 sequences and include Callovian through Kimmeridgian Stage strata. An understanding of the relationship of Jurassic reservoirs to sequence stratigraphy can serve as an aid to hydrocarbon exploration in the eastern gulf area. The most extensive and productive Jurassic hydrocarbon reservoirs in the study area occur within the progradational, regressive highstand deposits of the LZAGC-3.1 and LZAGC-4.1 depositional sequences. For example, the majority of Norphlet sandstone reservoirs in the onshore and offshore Alabama area are interpreted to have accumulated in eolian dune, interdune, and wadi (fluvial) depositional environments, which occurred in association with the highstand regressive system of the LZAGC-3.1 sequence. The most important Smackover reservoirs generally consist of partially to completely dolomitized ooid and peloid packstones and grainstones in the upper portion of the unit. These reservoirs occur in subtidal to supratidal, shoaling-upward carbonate mudstone to grainstone cycles in the highstand regressive system of the LZAGC-4.1 sequence. In addition, minor reservoirs that are discontinuous and not well developed are associated with the shelf margin and transgressive systems of the LZAGC-4.1.

  1. Regional Jurassic geologic framework of Alabama coastal waters area and adjacent Federal waters area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    To date, numerous Jurassic hydrocarbon fields and pools have been discovered in the Cotton Valley Group, Haynesville Formation, Smackover Formation and Norphlet Formation in the tri-state area of Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, and in Alabama State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters area. Petroleum traps are basement highs, salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines and extensional faults associated with salt movement. Reservoirs include continental and marine sandstones, limestones and dolostones. Hydrocarbon types are oil, condensate and natural gas. The onshore stratigraphic and structural information can be used to establish a regional geologic framework for the Jurassic for the State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters areas. Evaluation of the geologic information along with the hydrocarbon data from the tri-state area indicates that at least three Jurassic hydrocarbon trends (oil, oil and gas condensate, and deep natural gas) can be identified onshore. These onshore hydrocarbon trends can be projected into the Mobile area in the Central Gulf of Mexico and into the Pensacola, Destin Dome and Apalachicola areas in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial reserves of natural gas are expected to be present in Alabama State waters and the northern portion of the Mobile area. Significant accumulations of oil and gas condensate may be encountered in the Pensacola, Destin Dome, and Apalachicola areas. ?? 1989.

  2. Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play: Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A.

    1995-10-01

    Exploration for Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic reservoirs associated with updip basement structures currently is the most active exploratory oil play in Alabama. High initial flow rates, on the order of hundreds to thousands of barrels of oil per day, are commonly encountered at depths between 8,200 and 14,500 feet. Fifty-one fields have been established and 25 million barrels of oil have been produced from these fields developed in Lower Cretaceous Hosston and Upper Jurassic Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet reservoirs. Production from Smackover carbonates began at Toxey field in 1967 and from Haynesville sandstones at Frisco City field in 1986. As of September 1994, Smackover wells averaged 88 barrels of oil per day and Haynesville wells averaged 284 barrels of oil per day. In 1994, production was established in the Norphlet at North Excel field and in the Hosston at Pleasant Home field. Reservoirs in the updip basement structure play cluster in three distinct areas; (1) a western area on the Choctaw ridge complex, (2) a central area on the Conecuh ridge complex, and (3) an eastern area in the Conecuh embayment. Reservoir lithologies include Smackover limestones and dolostones and Hosston, Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet sandstones. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps where reservoirs occur on the flanks or over the crests of basement palohighs. An understanding of the complex reservoir properties and trap relationships is the key to successful discovery and development of Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play of southwest Alabama.

  3. Jurassic exploration trends of East Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Presly, M.W.; Reed, C.H.

    1984-09-01

    This article deals with exploration and production from the Jurassic reservoirs of East Texas. The paper discussed the trapping mechanisms, structural configurations, lithologies and stratigraphic relationships. The major formations presented are the Smackover and the Haynesville (Cotton Valley).

  4. World petroleum systems with Jurassic source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, H.D. )

    1993-11-08

    Fourteen petroleum systems with Upper Jurassic source rocks contain one quarter of the world's discovered oil and gas. Eleven other systems with Lower and Middle Jurassic source rocks presently have a minor but significant amount of discovered oil and gas. The purpose of this article is to review the systems geologically, describe their location in space and time on a continental scale, estimate their relative petroleum system recovery efficiencies, and outline the effect their essential elements and processes have on their petroleum plumbing.

  5. Jurassic-Neocomian biostratigraphy, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Mickey, M.B.; Haga, H.

    1985-04-01

    The foraminiferal and palynological biostratigraphy of subsurface Jurassic and Neocomian (Early Cretaceous) age strata from the North Slope were investigated to better define biostratigraphic zone boundaries and to help clarify the correlation of the stratigraphic units in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA). Through use of micropaleontologic data, eight principal biostratigraphic units have been identified. The Neocomian and Jurassic strata have each been subdivided into four main units.

  6. Pore-throat sizes in sandstones, tight sandstones, and shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2009-01-01

    Pore-throat sizes in silidclastic rocks form a continuum from the submillimeter to the nanometer scale. That continuum is documented in this article using previously published data on the pore and pore-throat sizes of conventional reservoir rocks, tight-gas sandstones, and shales. For measures of central tendency (mean, mode, median), pore-throat sizes (diameters) are generally greater than 2 μm in conventional reservoir rocks, range from about 2 to 0.03 μm in tight-gas sandstones, and range from 0.1 to 0.005 μm in shales. Hydrocarbon molecules, asphaltenes, ring structures, paraffins, and methane, form another continuum, ranging from 100 Å (0.01 μm for asphaltenes to 3.8 A (0.00038 μm) for methane. The pore-throat size continuum provides a useful perspective for considering (1) the emplacement of petroleum in consolidated siliciclastics and (2) fluid flow through fine-grained source rocks now being exploited as reservoirs.

  7. Iron Isotopes in Spherical Hematite and Goethite Concretions from the Navajo Sandstone (Utah, USA): A Prospective Study for "Martian Blueberries"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busigny, V.; Dauphas, N.

    2006-03-01

    Iron isotopes of terrestrial hematite and goethite concretions provide clues on fluid transport, reservoir sizes, redox variations and biotic versus abiotic processes. This opens several avenues of research for future work on Martian blueberries.

  8. Blueberries on Earth and Mars: Some Correlations Between Andean Paleosols, Geothermal Pipes in Navajo Sandstone and Terra Meridiani on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Milner, M. W.; Netoff, D. I.; Dohm, J. M.; Sodhi, R. N. S.; Aufreiter, S.; Hancock, R. G. V.; Bezada, M.; Kalm, V.; Malloch, D.

    2006-03-01

    The origin of "blueberries" on Mars and their relationship to similar concretionary forms on Earth invokes a process of variable redox conditions in underground fluids. The possible role of microorganisms in the origin of bluberries opens an avenue for biological investigations.

  9. The Navajo Atlas: Environments, Resources, People, and History of the Dine Bikeyah. The Civilization of the American Indian Series, Volume 157.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, James M.

    The 48 maps and descriptive narratives in this atlas of the Navajo Reservation are divided into six sections. Part I, Navajo Country, displays Navajo land in relationship to the United States and the region, and becomes more detailed to place locations within the Dine Bikeyah, or Navajo Land, including administrative and political subdivisions of…

  10. Sequence stratigraphy of the Kingak Shale (Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous), National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, D.W.; Bird, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Beaufortian strata (Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) are a focus of exploration since the 1994 discovery of the nearby Alpine oil field (>400 MMBO). These strata include the Kingak Shale, a succession of depositional sequences influenced by rift opening of the Arctic Ocean Basin. Interpretation of sequence stratigraphy and depositional facies from a regional two-dimensional seismic grid and well data allows the definition of four sequence sets that each displays unique stratal geometries and thickness trends across NPRA. A Lower to Middle Jurassic sequence set includes numerous transgressive-regressive sequences that collectively built a clastic shelf in north-central NPRA. Along the south-facing, lobate shelf margin, condensed shales in transgressive systems tracts downlap and coalesce into a basinal condensed section that is likely an important hydrocarbon source rock. An Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sequence set, deposited during pulses of uplift on the Barrow arch, includes multiple transgressive-regressive sequences that locally contain well-winnowed, shoreface sandstones at the base of transgressive systems tracts. These shoreface sandstones and overlying shales, deposited during maximum flooding, form stratigraphic traps that are the main objective of exploration in the Alpine play in NPRA. A Valanginian sequence set includes at least two transgressive-regressive sequences that display relatively distal characteristics, suggesting high relative sea level. An important exception is the presence of a basal transgressive systems tract that locally contains shoreface sandstones of reservoir quality. A Hauterivian sequence set includes two transgressive-regressive sequences that constitute a shelf-margin wedge developed as the result of tectonic uplift along the Barrow arch during rift opening of the Arctic Ocean Basin. This sequence set displays stratal geometries suggesting incision and synsedimentary collapse of the shelf

  11. Irrigation management with remote sensing. [Navajo Indian Irrigation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlan, C.; Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D.; Myers, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Two visible/near IR hand held radiometers and a hand held thermoradiometer were used along with soil moisture and lysimetric measurements in a study of soil moisture distribution in afalfa fields on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project near farmington, New Mexico. Radiances from irrigated plots were measured and converted to reflectances. Surface soil water contents (o cm to 4 cm) were determined gravimetrically on samples collected at the same time as the spectral measurements. The relationship between the spectral measurements and the crop coefficient were evaluated to demonstrate potential for using spectral measurement to estimate crop coefficient.

  12. The Late Jurassic Oblique Collisional Orogen of SW Japan. New Structural Data and Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Michel; Caridroit, Martial; Charvet, Jacques

    1986-12-01

    The structural configuration of SW Japan mainly reflects a late Jurassic-early Cretaceous orogeny. The region is divided into an inner belt and an outer belt, on the Japan sea and Pacific ocean sides respectively, by a strike-slip fault, the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Both consist of a series of stacked nappes. The inner belt is divided into a Jurassic olistostrome known as the Tanba zone and a hinterland area comprising continental Triassic-Jurassic sediments. The Tanba zone is sliced into two units: a lower one with late Jurassic matrix and Triassic-early Jurassic radiolarite olistoliths, tectonically overthrust by an upper unit comprising an olistostrome with middle Jurassic matrix and blocks which include late Paleozoic limestone, basic lava, and radiolarite. The Tanba zone is overthrust by a Paleozoic nappe complex derived from the hinterland. The basal sole of the nappe corresponds to a peculiar unit called the ultra-Tanba zone. In the Chugoku area, the hinterland is divided into an upper nappe: the Oga nappe, formed by Permo-Carboniferous limestone and Permian clastic rocks and a lower one: the Sangun-Maizuru nappe, formed by Paleozoic high pressure (HP) metamorphics (the Sangun schists), the Permian Maizuru olistostrome, and the dismembered Paleozoic Yakuno ophiolites. In the northern part of SW Japan, the Tanba zone is in faulted contact with the circum-Hida and the Hida zones. The former is interpreted as the equivalent of the Oga and Sangun-Maizuru nappes of the Chugoku domain crushed by post Cretaceous tectonics. The latter consists of Paleozoic high temperature (HT) metamorphic rocks and late Triassic-early Jurassic granite, locally mylonitized and covered by early Jurassic sandstone. The outer belt is formed by a superficial nappe similar to the Tanba zone thrust upon a "deep domain" characterized by a synmetamorphic ductile deformation. The "deep domain" is divided into a lower unit, the Oboke unit formed by continental derived arenites and a Green

  13. Wind directions predicted from global circulation models and wind directions determined from eolian sandstones of the western United States-A comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrish, Judith T.; Peterson, F.

    1988-01-01

    Wind directions for Middle Pennsylvanian through Jurassic time are predicted from global circulation models for the western United States. These predictions are compared with paleowind directions interpreted from eolian sandstones of Middle Pennsylvanian through Jurassic age. Predicted regional wind directions correspond with at least three-quarters of the paleowind data from the sandstones; the rest of the data may indicate problems with correlation, local effects of paleogeography on winds, and lack of resolution of the circulation models. The data and predictions suggest the following paleoclimatic developments through the time interval studied: predominance of winter subtropical high-pressure circulation in the Late Pennsylvanian; predominance of summer subtropical high-pressure circulation in the Permian; predominance of summer monsoonal circulation in the Triassic and earliest Jurassic; and, during the remainder of the Jurassic, influence of both summer subtropical and summer monsoonal circulation, with the boundary between the two systems over the western United States. This sequence of climatic changes is largely owing to paleogeographic changes, which influenced the buildup and breakdown of the monsoonal circulation, and possibly owing partly to a decrease in the global temperature gradient, which might have lessened the influence of the subtropical high-pressure circulation. The atypical humidity of Triassic time probably resulted from the monsoonal circulation created by the geography of Pangaea. This circulation is predicted to have been at a maximum in the Triassic and was likely to have been powerful enough to draw moisture along the equator from the ocean to the west. ?? 1988.

  14. Diagenesis of fluvial sands in Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic), Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Keighin, C.W.; Schenk, C.J.

    1989-03-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important hydrocarbon reservoir in Baldwin and Mobile Counties and offshore in Mobile Bay, Alabama. The formation is not productive in the Little Escambia Creek field, Escambia County, but underlies the productive Smackover Formation at a depth of approximately 15,500 ft (4725 m). The Norphlet sandstones examined in cores from two drill holes are largely fluvial in origin and consist of moderately to well-sorted, very fine to coarse-grained feldspathic sandstones extensively altered by a complex sequence of diagenetic reactions. Visible evidence of chemical and mechanical compaction is relatively minor in the sandstones. Paucity of compaction suggests that extensive early cementation by anhydrite and/or calcite reduced compaction; these cements were subsequently removed by migrating fluids. Porosity, both intergranular and intragranular, is generally well developed. Intergranular pores are due primarily to partial to complete dissolution of cements and mineral grains, especially feldspar. Intragranular pores are largely the result of partial leaching of rock fragments and of microporosity formed by precipitation of clay minerals in earlier dissolution pores.

  15. Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, M.; Ishihara, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the tectonic evolution of the Jurassic Pacific plate based on magnetic anomly lineations and abyssal hills. The Pacific plate is the largest oceanic plate on Earth. It was born as a microplate aroud the Izanagi-Farallon-Phoenix triple junction about 192 Ma, Early Jurassic [Nakanishi et al., 1992]. The size of the Pacific plate at 190 Ma was nearly half that of the present Easter or Juan Fernandez microplates in the East Pacific Rise [Martinez et at, 1991; Larson et al., 1992]. The plate boundary surrounding the Pacific plate from Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous involved the four triple junctions among Pacific, Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix plates. The major tectonic events as the formation of oceanic plateaus and microplates during the period occurred in the vicinity of the triple junctions [e.g., Nakanishi and Winterer, 1998; Nakanishi et al., 1999], implying that the study of the triple junctions is indispensable for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate. Previous studies indicate instability of the configuration of the triple junctions from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (155-125 Ma). On the other hand, the age of the birth of the Pacific plate was determined assuming that all triple junctions had kept their configurations for about 30 m.y. [Nakanishi et al., 1992] because of insufficient information of the tectonic history of the Pacific plate before Late Jurassic.Increase in the bathymetric and geomagnetic data over the past two decades enables us to reveal the tectonic evolution of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction before Late Jurassic. Our detailed identication of magnetic anomaly lineations exposes magnetic bights before anomaly M25. We found the curved abyssal hills originated near the triple junction, which trend is parallel to magnetic anomaly lineations. These results imply that the configuration of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction had been RRR before Late Jurassic.

  16. Sequence architecture and lithofacies assemblages of submarine fan deposits in Los Molles Formation (Jurassic), Neuquen Basin, Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.S.

    1986-05-01

    The Neuquen basin is a remnant of the Mesozoic back-arc basin trend that developed along the western margin of South America. It contains a thick, diverse sequence of Jurassic sedimentary strata, whose facies distribution was strongly influenced by syndepositional tectonism. The predominantly dark, laminated shales and siltstones of the Los Molles Formation range from Pliensbachian to Callovian in age and record the progradation of the outer shelf, slope, and basin-plain sediments deposited during the shoaling phase of the lowermost, or Cuyan, Jurassic cycle. Based on outcrop, well, and seismic data, several thick packages of sandstone and conglomerate within the Los Molles are interpreted to represent submarine fan deposits that developed during periods of relative sea level lowstand. Sea level falls were probably related to local synchronous tectonic pulses rather than true eustatic fluctuations. The distribution of coarse-grained fan deposits was apparently strongly controlled by the location of major Jurassic fault trends that stabilized the position of the shelf-slope break through time. Based on the geometry and sequence architecture, two distinct styles of fan development are recognized in the Los Molles sandstones. The most common style (type A) is characterized by sequences that have poorly defined, sand-poor lobes with well-developed channel-levee complexes. Some channels exhibit large-scale accretion surfaces, probably resulting from lateral migration. Thick-bedded arenite facies are limited to amalgamated channel fills, whereas thin-bedded classical turbidites are present as overbank deposits. Type A fans were built by turbidity and fluxoturbidity currents from submarine canyon point sources. The less common fan sequences (type B) lack channeling; they are dominated by thick, massive beds of internally featureless sandstone that are bounded by chaotic slump deposits.

  17. Navajo Coal Combustion and Respiratory Health Near Shiprock, New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bunnell, Joseph E.; Garcia, Linda V.; Furst, Jill M.; Lerch, Harry; Olea, Ricardo A.; Suitt, Stephen E.; Kolker, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution has been identified as a major risk factor for acute and chronic respiratory diseases throughout the world. In the sovereign Navajo Nation, an American Indian reservation located in the Four Corners area of the USA, people burn coal in their homes for heat. To explore whether/how indoor coal combustion might contribute to poor respiratory health of residents, this study examined respiratory health data, identified household risk factors such as fuel and stove type and use, analyzed samples of locally used coal, and measured and characterized fine particulate airborne matter inside selected homes. In twenty-five percent of homes surveyed coal was burned in stoves not designed for that fuel, and indoor air quality was frequently found to be of a level to raise concerns. The average winter 24-hour PM2.5 concentration in 20 homes was 36.0 μg/m3. This is the first time that PM2.5 has been quantified and characterized inside Navajo reservation residents' homes. PMID:20671946

  18. Navajo Coal Combustion and Respiratory Health Near Shiprock, New Mexico

    DOE PAGES

    Bunnell, Joseph E.; Garcia, Linda V.; Furst, Jill M.; ...

    2010-01-01

    Indoormore » air pollution has been identified as a major risk factor for acute and chronic respiratory diseases throughout the world. In the sovereign Navajo Nation, an American Indian reservation located in the Four Corners area of the USA, people burn coal in their homes for heat. To explore whether/how indoor coal combustion might contribute to poor respiratory health of residents, this study examined respiratory health data, identified household risk factors such as fuel and stove type and use, analyzed samples of locally used coal, and measured and characterized fine particulate airborne matter inside selected homes. In twenty-five percent of homes surveyed coal was burned in stoves not designed for that fuel, and indoor air quality was frequently found to be of a level to raise concerns. The average winter 24-hour PM 2.5 concentration in 20 homes was 36.0  μ g/ m 3 . This is the first time that PM 2.5 has been quantified and characterized inside Navajo reservation residents' homes.« less

  19. Mutable R-Navajo Alleles of Cyclic Origin in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Brink, R. Alexander; Williams, Elizabeth

    1973-01-01

    The generation in cyclic fashion of 26 mutable R-Navajo (mRnj) alleles in maize involved transposition of a non-specific repressor of gene action, Modulator (Mp), first away from, and then back to, the R locus represented by the R-Navajo (Rnj) allele on chromosome 10. The mRnj alleles reconstituted in this way varied widely, and continuously, in mutability to Rnj—that is, in transposition of Mp away from the R locus, thus derepressing the Rnj gene. They were alike, or nearly so, however, in activating Ds chromosome breakage and in increasing the stability of variegated pericarp, another unstable compound allele comprising Mp conjoined with Prr on chromosomal 1. These latter two phenomena are based primarily on loci elsewhere in the genome. It is postulated that the 26 reconstituted mRnj alleles carry a common Mp which, however, is intercalated at a different site within each allele. Nucleotide sequence in the regions adjacent to Mp is assumed to determine the frequency with which a form of micro-nondisjunction occurs whereby Mp is released from a donor site. Transposition to a new site is interpreted in terms of a chromosome model that gives effect to nicking, or single strand breaks, occurring throughout the genome as a prerequisite to unwinding, strand separation, and replication, of the DNA double helix. PMID:17248592

  20. Carbohydrate biofuels II: The need and the potential for rootfuel in the Navajo Nation

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, E.B.; Jr.; Bragg, W.G.; Whittier, J.

    1995-11-01

    Over 80% of rural Navajos and about two-thirds of all Navajos use scarce woodfuel and low-grade coal for home heating half the year, with coal used mainly as a nighttime adjunct. Serious health problems arise because stoves are old and leak smoke and carbon monoxide. The impacts are gender-biased to women and small children. Respiratory disease is a major cause of Navajo mortality and unusually high admissions to Navajo Indian Health Service hospitals. A 1990 study at a Navajo hospital showed that Navajo children under two years of age from homes with woodstoves are nearly five times more likely to contract acute lower respiratory tract infections than children from homes with no stove. Correctives include improved stoves and fuels. Our previous studies on clean-burning starchy/cellulosic {open_quotes}rootfuels{close_quotes} in Latin America, Africa, and Asia are applicable. We discuss our preliminary work on the Navajo reservation, the current status of household stoves and stovefuels, the health impacts of woodsmoke and coalsmoke from old, faulty stoves, the conditions for growing rootfuel on the reservation, and policy and strategy for coping with the problem.

  1. Regional porosity trends of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity, with comparisons to formations of other basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    Sandstone porosity of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation decreases systematically as depth and thermal maturity increase over a wide range. Median porosity is about 25% where equivalent vitrinite reflectance (Ro) is slightly over 0.7% in the northern part of the study area (Clarke County, Mississippi). Median porosity is reduced to 8% where Ro approaches 2.7% in the southern part of the study area. Based on the comparisons at similar Ro levels, median (50th-percentile) Norphlet porosity exceeds porosities of "typical' sandstones in other basins by more than a factor of two throughout the study area. Even the lower (10th-percentile) Norphlet porosities are higher than median porosities of sandstones in general. -from Authors

  2. The ethical issues in uranium mining research in the Navajo Nation.

    PubMed

    Panikkar, Bindu; Brugge, Doug

    2007-01-01

    We explore the experience of Navajo communities living under the shadow of nuclear age fallout who were subjects of five decades of research. In this historical analysis of public health (epidemiological) research conducted in the Navajo lands since the inception of uranium mining from the 1950s untill the end of the 20th century, we analyze the successes and failures in the research initiatives conducted on Navajo lands, the ethical breaches, and the harms and benefits that this research has brought about to the community. We discuss how scientific and moral uncertainty, lack of full stakeholder participation and community wide outreach and education can impact ethical decisions made in research.

  3. Characterization of Petroleum Residue in the Entrada Sandstone, Colorado National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lillis, Paul G.; King, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Introduction As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) petroleum resource assessment of the Uinta-Piceance Province, Colorado and Utah, in 2000 (USGS Uinta-Piceance Assessment Team, 2003), some 170 oils, oil stains, and oil seeps were geochemically characterized and divided into genetic types (Lillis and others, 2003). Recognized oil types include Minturn, Phosphoria, Grassy Trail Creek, Mancos, Mesaverde, and Green River. Subsequent to that study, the existence and general locality of petroleum residue in the Middle Jurassic Entrada Sandstone in Colorado National Monument (CNM) was brought to the attention of the authors (Scott and others, 2001). Because the analysis of such non-commercial petroleum deposits commonly yields valuable regional resource-trend information, we collected and characterized the reported CNM petroleum residue and compared the results with identified oil types in the Uinta-Piceance Province. Three samples of Entrada Sandstone with petroleum residue were collected near Little Park Road along the south edge of the CNM in sec.20, T.12S., R.101W. The approximate extent of the petroleum staining was determined by field testing with solvent, and the stains appear to be restricted to the upper part of the 'board beds' unit (informal name, Scott and others, 2001) of the Entrada Sandstone between the two fault traces of the Glade Park fault.

  4. Solar membrane distillation: desalination for the Navajo Nation.

    PubMed

    Karanikola, Vasiliki; Corral, Andrea F; Mette, Patrick; Jiang, Hua; Arnoldand, Robert G; Ela, Wendell P

    2014-01-01

    Provision of clean water is among the most serious, long-term challenges in the world. To an ever increasing degree, sustainable water supply depends on the utilization of water of impaired initial quality. This is particularly true in developing nations and in water-stressed areas such as the American Southwest. One clear example is the Navajo Nation. The reservation covers 27,000 square miles, mainly in northeastern Arizona. Low population density coupled with water scarcity and impairment makes provision of clean water particularly challenging. The Navajos rely primarily on ground water, which is often present in deep aquifers or of brackish quality. Commonly, reverse osmosis (RO) is chosen to desalinate brackish ground water, since RO costs are competitive with those of thermal desalination, even for seawater applications. However, both conventional thermal distillation and RO are energy intensive, complex processes that discourage decentralized or rural implementation. In addition, both technologies demand technical experience for operation and maintenance, and are susceptible to scaling and fouling unless extensive feed pretreatment is employed. Membrane distillation (MD), driven by vapor pressure gradients, can potentially overcome many of these drawbacks. MD can operate using low-grade, sub-boiling sources of heat and does not require extensive operational experience. This presentation discusses a project on the Navajo Nation, Arizona (Native American tribal lands) that is designed to investigate and deploy an autonomous (off-grid) system to pump and treat brackish groundwater using solar energy. Βench-scale, hollow fiber MD experiment results showed permeate water fluxes from 21 L/m2·d can be achieved with transmembrane temperature differences between 40 and 80˚C. Tests run with various feed salt concentrations indicate that the permeate flux decreases only about 25% as the concentration increases from 0 to 14% (w/w), which is four times seawater salt

  5. Late Jurassic salamandroid from western Liaoning, China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ke-Qin; Shubin, Neil H.

    2012-01-01

    A Jurassic salamander, Beiyanerpeton jianpingensis (gen. et sp. nov.), from a recently found site in western Liaoning Province, China is the earliest known record of Salamandroidea. As a Late Jurassic record of the group, it extends the range of the clade by ~40 Ma. The Late Jurassic taxon is neotenic and represented by exceptionally preserved specimens, including fully articulated cranial and postcranial skeletons and bony gill structures close to the cheek region. The fossil beds, consisting of dark-brown volcanic ash shales of the Upper Jurassic Tiaojishan (Lanqi) Formation (Oxfordian), underlie trachyandesite rocks that have yielded a SHRIMP zircon U-Pb date of 157 ± 3 Ma. The fossiliferous beds are substantially older than the Jehol Group, including the Yixian Formation (40Ar/39Ar dates of 122–129 Ma), but slightly younger than the Middle Jurassic Daohugou horizon (40Ar/39Ar date of 164 ± 4 Ma). The early fossil taxon shares with extant salamandroids derived character states, including: separated nasals lacking a midline contact, angular fused to the prearticular in the lower jaw, and double-headed ribs on the presacral vertebrae. In contrast to extant salamandroids, however, the salamander shows a discrete and tooth-bearing palatine, and unequivocally nonpedicellate and monocuspid marginal teeth in large and presumably mature individuals. The finding provides insights into the evolution of key characters of salamanders, and also provides direct evidence supporting the hypothesis that the split between Cryptobranchoidea and Salamandroidea had taken placed before the Late Jurassic Oxfordian time. In this aspect, both paleontological and molecular data now come to agree. PMID:22411790

  6. Reservoir sandstone bodies in lower Silurian Clinton sandstone interval, eastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    The stratigraphic relationships of the sandstones, shales, limestones, dolomites, and related beds of the Lower Silurian Clinton sandstone interval in Ohio have been examined using several thousand well logs from Medina County to Coshocton County in eastern Ohio. This north-south band of counties lies semiparallel to the north-northeast-trending depositional edge of the Clinton lower deltaic and coastal plain. Continuous and discontinuous bar sandstones with patterns similar to barrier island deposits are found at the edge of the deltaic plain. The thicker sandstone reservoirs in these deposits have been prolific oil and gas pools. The discontinuous bar sands are more common, however, and where drilling is sparse or where only the cleaner sandstones are mapped, these bar sands appear as isolated, thick, porous sandstone bodies. Examples exist in Holmes and Wayne Counties, Ohio. Elongate, nearly straight, narrow sandstone bodies occur on the lower deltaic plain, and were deposited in channels that were fluvial or partly estuarine. The channel sandstones are less than 1000 ft wide, extend for distances up to 10 mi and can be seen in Coshocton, Summit, and Medina Counties. The reservoirs in these sandstones are prolific oil and gas producers, but they are not easy to locate. At the seaward end of the elongate channel, sandstones are thick, localized sand bodies that fit in the sedimentological picture as river mouth bars. An example from Medina County illustrates this reservoir geometry at the site of excellent oil production from the Clinton interval.

  7. Breast Cancer Education for Navajo Women: a Pilot Study Evaluating a Culturally Relevant Video

    PubMed Central

    Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I.; Baldwin, Julie A.; Sandoval, Nellie; Robinson, Frances

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated a culturally specific video designed to teach Navajo women about breast cancer treatment options. Fourteen Navajo women diagnosed with breast cancer and 26 healthcare providers participated in a mixed-method evaluation that documented their perceptions immediately and 6 months after viewing the video. After initial viewing, women reported reduced anxiety about treatment and interest in support groups. Six months later, women said the video prompted them to seek more information from printed sources and their provider. Younger Navajo women who were 44 to 51 years old were more likely to attend support groups than women who were 55–67 years. Providers corroborated the positive effects of the video. The providers believed the video encouraged patients to seek information about breast cancer and to ask questions about treatment plans and side effects. A culturally relevant video for Navajo women can be an effective teaching tool and can enhance patient–provider communication. PMID:20111913

  8. EPA Update on Gold King Mine Response: Navajo Nation, Additional Data, Public Records

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released an update on water quality and sediment data for the Navajo Nation, as well as new data sets and additional public records on the Gold King Mine response.

  9. 30 CFR 756.14 - Approval of amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Introduction Section 101—Findings Section 102—Purposes Section 201—Duties of Navajo Abandoned Mine Lands... September 3, 1996, are approved effective April 15, 1997. Section II, E, 1, Project selection, Sections...

  10. 75 FR 16174 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... collection is currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0162, which expires March 31, 2010. The... collection activity. III. Data OMB Control Number: 1076-0162. Title: Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing...

  11. 30 CFR 756.14 - Approval of amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund Report Section 413—Miscellaneous Powers, and Section 414—Interagency Cooperation Navajo Nation Rules II(D) (1) and (2)—Reclamation Priorities II(L) (1) and (2)—General...

  12. Navajo Generating Station and Clean-Energy Alternatives: Options for Renewables

    SciTech Connect

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Turchi, C. S.; Burman, K.

    2012-06-01

    In January 2012, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory delivered to the Department of the Interior the first part of a study on Navajo Generating Station (Navajo GS) and the likely impacts of BART compliance options. That document establishes a comprehensive baseline for the analysis of clean energy alternatives, and their ability to achieve benefits similar to those that Navajo GS currently provides. This analysis is a supplement to NREL's January 2012 study. It provides a high level examination of several clean energy alternatives, based on the previous analysis. Each has particular characteristics affecting its relevance as an alternative to Navajo GS. It is assumed that the development of any alternative resource (or portfolio of resources) to replace all or a portion of Navajo GS would occur at the end of a staged transition plan designed to reduce economic disruption. We assume that replacing the federal government's 24.3% share of Navajo GS would be a cooperative responsibility of both the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Central Arizona Water Conservation District (CAWCD).

  13. Healthy gardens/healthy lives: Navajo perceptions of growing food locally to prevent diabetes and cancer.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Kevin A; Beresford, Shirley A A; Ornelas, India J; Topaha, Carmelita; Becenti, Tonia; Thomas, Dustin; Vela, Jaime G

    2014-03-01

    Poor access to nutritious foods, departure from traditional diets, and reduced physical activity are associated with a rise in type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancers among the Navajo. Diabetes in particular is of concern because of its increased prevalence among Navajo youth. Gardening can successfully address issues of poor availability of fruits and vegetables and offer many other social and health benefits. Our assessment aimed to determine Navajo attitudes about gardening and health in San Juan County, New Mexico. We conducted seven focus groups (including 31 people) to assess knowledge and attitudes related to gardening and uncover barriers and facilitators to participation in a garden project. Each group session was moderated by two Navajo students. Transcripts revealed that many Navajo are aware of adverse health issues that occur on the reservation, predominantly obesity and diabetes. Participants expressed a preference for educational approaches that incorporated cultural traditions, respect for elders, use of visual aids, and experiential learning. Several social and agronomic barriers to gardening were also mentioned. Results suggested a broad interest in promoting gardening especially to reduce the risk of diabetes with the added value of enhancing social capital in Navajo communities.

  14. Healthy Gardens/Healthy Lives: Navajo perceptions of growing food locally to prevent diabetes and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, Shirley A.A.; Ornelas, India; Topaha, Carmelita; Becenti, Tonia; Thomas, Dustin; Vela, Jaime G.

    2013-01-01

    Poor access to nutritious foods, departure from traditional diets, and reduced physical activity are associated with a rise in type-2 diabetes and certain types of cancers among the Navajo. Diabetes in particular is of concern because of its increased prevalence among Navajo youth. Gardening can successfully address issues of poor availability of fruits and vegetables and offer many other social and health benefits. Our assessment aimed to determine Navajo attitudes about gardening and health in San Juan County, New Mexico. We conducted seven focus groups (including 31 people) to assess knowledge and attitudes related to gardening, and uncover barriers and facilitators to participation in a garden project. Each group session was moderated by two Navajo students. Transcripts revealed that many Navajo are aware of adverse health issues, predominantly obesity and diabetes, which occur on the reservation. Participants expressed a preference for educational approaches that incorporated cultural traditions, respect for elders, use of visual aids and experiential learning. Several social and agronomic barriers to gardening were also mentioned. Results suggested a broad interest in promoting gardening especially to reduce the risk of diabetes with the added value of enhancing social capital in Navajo communities. PMID:23855020

  15. Discovering the "-Ologies" on the Jurassic Coast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The Jurassic Coast is Britain's only natural World Heritage site, a tangible time-line that takes one through 185 million years of history in 95 miles of coast. It provides individuals with a world-famous educational resource and an unrivalled outdoor classroom that has played a key role in the study of earth sciences. The author is keen to ignite…

  16. Jurassic evolution of the Tien-Shan

    SciTech Connect

    Bebeshev, I.I.

    1994-09-01

    Complex studies led to identification of three stages in Jurassic deposits. The stages reflect development periods of the studied deposits. Each stage is represented by a paleogeographic map that indicates the evolution of ancient landforms in the Tien-Shan region in time and space.

  17. Jurassic stratigraphy of the Wiggins Arch, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.; Maxwell, G.B. )

    1993-09-01

    Mobil and Shell jointly explored the Wiggins arch area in southern Mississippi from 1985 to 1991. The effort concentrated on the Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations. Two wells were drilled into Paleozoic crystalline rocks and one well into the Pine Hill formation. Two of these wells were located on the southern side of the Wiggins arch and provide significant data for interpreting Jurassic stratigraphy. The Mobil No. 1 U.S.A. well encountered a complete Jurassic section, but with some significantly different facies than those encountered by wells to the north. A granite wash section is the equivalent to the Frisco City formation previously only found 100 mi to the north-northeast. All 300 ft of Smackover is crystalline dolomite. The Norphlet section is entirely granite wash. The Pine Hill anhydrite is unusually thick and interpreted to be equivalent to the Louann Salt. Correlations to other wells on the Wiggins arch, particularly the Conoco No. 1 Higgins, indicate that the Jurassic can be divided into three transgressive events separated by the Norphlet/Pine Hill and Frisco City/Buckner regressive events.

  18. South and North Barents Triassic-Jurassic total petroleum system of the Russian offshore Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindquist, Sandra J.

    1999-01-01

    One major gas-prone petroleum system characterizes the sparsely explored South and North Barents Basin Provinces of the Russian Arctic in the eastern Barents Sea. More than 13 billion barrels of oil equivalent (79 trillion cubic feet of gas) known ultimately recoverable gas reserves in seven fields were sourced from Triassic marine and continental shales and stored in Jurassic (97%) and Triassic (3%) marine and continental sandstone reservoir rocks. The basins contain 18-20 kilometers of pre-Upper Permian carbonate and post-Upper Permian siliciclastic sedimentary fill. Late Permian-Triassic(?) rifting and subsidence resulted in the deposition of as much as 9 kilometers of Triassic strata, locally injected with sills. Rapidly buried Lower Triassic source rocks generated hydrocarbons as early as Late Triassic into stratigraphic traps and structural closures that were modified periodically. Thermal cooling and deformation associated with Cenozoic uplift impacted seal integrity and generation processes, modified traps, and caused gas expansion and remigration.

  19. Behavior of Sandstones Under Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppert, M.; Fořt, J.; Trník, A.; Koňáková, D.; Vejmelková, E.; Pokorný, J.; Svora, P.; Pavlík, Z.; Černý, R.

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of materials behavior under heat treatment is of high importance in construction and safety engineering; tunnels represent a special field because of their specific safety issues. In the case of fire, tunnel structure and surrounding rock are subjected to extreme temperatures which induces irreversible changes in the material's microstructure and consequently its mechanical properties. Significant portion of the Earth's crust is formed by sandstones; this group of sedimentary rocks is highly variable in structure, composition and engineering properties. Quartz grains (alternatively together with other minerals) form the clastic part of sandstones; the space between clasts is filled by variable amount of cement and matrix which can contain particularly clay minerals, quartz and calcite. The porosity of sandstones is again highly variable from a nearly compact material to a highly porous one. The paper aims to find out and explain differences in response of various kinds of sandstones to heat treatment. The behavior of a representative set of sandstones under heat treatment was studied by TG/DSC, thermodilatometry and residual strength measurement. These experiments were accompanied by SEM and porosimetry measurement. The effect of increased temperature on the compressive strength was found to be crucially dependent on the nature of the cement and matrix present in the individual rock. The rocks with calcite cement which had high initial strength and low porosity were damaged by calcite decomposition. The siliceous sandstones were damaged by cracking due to thermally induced volume changes. In contrary, the strength of the clayey sandstones was even improved after the heat treatment. It can be concluded that behavior of sandstone under heat treatment is controlled by its composition and diagenesis.

  20. Geologic map of the Winslow 30’ × 60’ quadrangle, Coconino and Navajo Counties, northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Block, Debra; Redsteer, Margaret Hiza

    2013-01-01

    The Winslow 30’ × 60’ quadrangle encompasses approximately 5,018 km2 (1,960 mi2) within Coconino and Navajo Counties of northern Arizona. It is characterized by gently dipping Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata that dip 1° to 2° northeastward in the southwestern part of the quadrangle and become nearly flat-lying in the northeastern part of the quadrangle. In the northeastern part, a shallow Cenozoic erosional basin developed about 20 million years ago, which subsequently was filled with flat-lying Miocene and Pliocene lacustrine sediments of the Bidahochi Formation, as well as associated volcanic rocks of the Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field. The lacustrine sediments and volcanic rocks unconformably overlie Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous strata. Beginning about early Pliocene time, the Little Colorado River and its tributaries began to remove large volumes of Paleozoic and Mesozoic bedrock from the map area. This erosional development has continued through Pleistocene and Holocene time. Fluvial sediments accumulated episodically throughout this erosional cycle, as indicated by isolated Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene Little Colorado River terrace-gravel deposits on Tucker Mesa and Toltec Divide west of Winslow and younger terrace-gravel deposits along the margins of the Little Colorado River Valley. These gravel deposits suggest that the ancestral Little Colorado River and its valley has eroded and migrated northeastward toward its present location and largely parallels the strike of the Chinle Formation. Today, the Little Colorado River meanders within a 5-km (3-mi) wide valley between Winslow and Leupp, where soft strata of the Chinle Formation is mostly covered by an unknown thickness of Holocene flood-plain deposits. In modern times, the Little Colorado River channel has changed its position as much as a 1.5 km (1 mi) during flood events, but for much of the year the channel is a dry river bed. Surficial alluvial and eolian deposits cover extensive parts of the

  1. Remote detection of fluid-related diagenetic mineralogical variations in the Wingate Sandstone at different spatial and spectral resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okyay, Unal; Khan, Shuhab D.

    2016-02-01

    Well-exposed eolian units of the Jurassic system on the Colorado Plateau including the Wingate Sandstone, show prominent color variations throughout southeastern Utah due to diagenetic changes that include precipitation and/or removal of iron oxide, clay, and carbonate cement. Spatially variable characteristic diagenetic changes suggest fluid-rock interactions through the sandstone. Distinctive spectral signatures of diagenetic minerals can be used to map diagenetic mineral variability and possibly fluid-flow pathways. The main objective of this work was to identify characteristic diagenetic minerals, and map their spatial variability from regional to outcrop scale in Wingate Sandstone exposures of Lisbon Valley, Utah. Laboratory reflectance spectroscopy analysis of the samples facilitated identification of diagnostic spectral characteristics of the common diagenetic minerals and their relative abundances between altered and unaltered Wingate Sandstone. Comparison of reflectance spectroscopy with satellite, airborne, and ground-based imaging spectroscopy data provided a method for mapping and evaluating spatial variations of diagenetic minerals. The Feature-oriented Principal Component Selection method was used on Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer data so as to map common mineral groups throughout the broader Wingate Sandstone exposure in the area. The Minimum Noise Fraction and Spectral Angle Mapper methods were applied on airborne HyMap and ground-based hyperspectral imaging data to identify and map mineralogical changes. The satellite and airborne data showed that out of 25.55 km2 total exposure of Wingate Sandstone in Lisbon Valley, unaltered sandstone cover 12.55 km2, and altered sandstone cover 8.90 km2 in the northwest flank and 5.09 km2 in the southern flank of the anticline. The ground-based hyperspectral data demonstrated the ability to identify and map mineral assemblages with two-dimensional lateral continuity on near

  2. Microstructure of deformed graywacke sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Dengler, L.A.

    1980-03-05

    Microsctures in low-permeability graywacke sandstones were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM specimens were prepared by ion-bombardment of thick polished samples. The undeformed rock contains grains in a matrix composed primarily of authigenic chlorite and kaolinite. Chlorite platelets are randomly arranged in face-to-edge relation to one another. Kaolinite occurs as pseudohexagonal crystals stacked face-to-face in pore filling books. Uniaxial-stress experiments covered a range of confining pressures from .1 to 600 MPa. Below 50 MPa confining pressure, intergranular fracturing occurs within the fault zone and near the sample's cylindrical surface. Between 100 and 300 MPa confining pressure, fault zones contain highly fractured grains, gauge and slickensides on grain surfaces. At 600 MPa, the sample contains a diffuse shear zone of highly fractured grains and no well-defined fault. In all samples, the distribution of microcracks is heterogeneous. Different clay minerals exhibit different modes of deformation. Chlorite structure responds to applied stress by compaction, reducing both pore size and volume. Chlorite platelets are plastically deformed in even the least strained samples. Kaolinite does not deform plastically in any of the samples examined. Deformation of kaolinite is restricted to toppling of the book structure. Dilatant crack growth was studied in two samples unloaded prior to failure. Uniaxially-strained samples deform primarily along grain boundaries, producing intergranular cracks and realignment of chlorite platelets. Intragranular crack density is linearly related to axial-strain, although grains are less fractured than in uniaxially-stressed samples tested at equivalent mean pressures. Cracks are rarely longer than a grain diameter. Nuclear-explosively deformed samples were recovered after the Rio Blanco gas stimulation experiment. (JGB)

  3. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  4. Bird-like anatomy, posture, and behavior revealed by an early jurassic theropod dinosaur resting trace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milner, A.R.C.; Harris, J.D.; Lockley, M.G.; Kirkland, J.I.; Matthews, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fossil tracks made by non-avian theropod dinosaurs commonly reflect the habitual bipedal stance retained in living birds. Only rarely-captured behaviors, such as crouching, might create impressions made by the hands. Such tracks provide valuable information concerning the often poorly understood functional morphology of the early theropod forelimb. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we describe a well-preserved theropod trackway in a Lower Jurassic (???198 millionyear- old) lacustrine beach sandstone in the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation in southwestern Utah. The trackway consists of prints of typical morphology, intermittent tail drags and, unusually, traces made by the animal resting on the substrate in a posture very similar to modern birds. The resting trace includes symmetrical pes impressions and well-defined impressions made by both hands, the tail, and the ischial callosity. Conclusions/Significance: The manus impressions corroborate that early theropods, like later birds, held their palms facing medially, in contrast to manus prints previously attributed to theropods that have forward-pointing digits. Both the symmetrical resting posture and the medially-facing palms therefore evolved by the Early Jurassic, much earlier in the theropod lineage than previously recognized, and may characterize all theropods.

  5. Bird-Like Anatomy, Posture, and Behavior Revealed by an Early Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur Resting Trace

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Andrew R. C.; Harris, Jerald D.; Lockley, Martin G.; Kirkland, James I.; Matthews, Neffra A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Fossil tracks made by non-avian theropod dinosaurs commonly reflect the habitual bipedal stance retained in living birds. Only rarely-captured behaviors, such as crouching, might create impressions made by the hands. Such tracks provide valuable information concerning the often poorly understood functional morphology of the early theropod forelimb. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a well-preserved theropod trackway in a Lower Jurassic (∼198 million-year-old) lacustrine beach sandstone in the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation in southwestern Utah. The trackway consists of prints of typical morphology, intermittent tail drags and, unusually, traces made by the animal resting on the substrate in a posture very similar to modern birds. The resting trace includes symmetrical pes impressions and well-defined impressions made by both hands, the tail, and the ischial callosity. Conclusions/Significance The manus impressions corroborate that early theropods, like later birds, held their palms facing medially, in contrast to manus prints previously attributed to theropods that have forward-pointing digits. Both the symmetrical resting posture and the medially-facing palms therefore evolved by the Early Jurassic, much earlier in the theropod lineage than previously recognized, and may characterize all theropods. PMID:19259260

  6. Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic) of southwestern and offshore Alabama: environments of deposition and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Mink, R.M.; Wilkerson, R.P.

    1985-06-01

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern and offshore Alabama accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama to provide a barrier for air and water circulation during the deposition of the Norphlet Formation. These mountains produced topographic conditions that contributed to the arid climate, and they affected sedimentation. Norphlet paleogeography in southwestern Alabama was dominated by a broad desert plain, rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. The desert plain extended westward into eastern and central Mississippi. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent; six oil and gas fields already have been established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist primarily of quartz-rich sandstones that are eolian, wadi, and marine in origin. Porosity is principally secondary (dissolution) with some intergranular porosity. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. Jurassic oil generation and migration probably were initiated in the Early Cretaceous.

  7. Recoverable natural gas reserves from Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Alabama coastal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Hamilton, R.P.

    1987-09-01

    To date, 11 Norphlet gas fields have been established in offshore Alabama. These fields are part of a deep Jurassic gas trend that extends across southern Mississippi and Alabama into the Gulf of Mexico. Recoverable gas reserves of 4.9-8.1 tcf are estimated for the Norphlet Formation in Alabama's coastal waters. Proven gas reserves are estimated to be 3.7-4.6 tcf and potential reserves are estimated to be 1.2-3.5 tcf. The natural gas is trapped in a series of generally east-west-trending salt anticlines. The mechanism of structure formation appears to be salt flowage that has formed broad, low-relief anticlines, most of which are faulted, and many of which are related to small-scale growth faults. Salt movement is the critical factor in the formation of these petroleum traps. The primary Norphlet reservoir lithofacies are eolian dune and interdune sandstones that range in thickness from 140 to over 600 ft in Alabama's coastal waters. Gas pay can exceed 280 ft in thickness. Porosity is principally secondary, developed as a result of decementation and grain dissolution. Jurassic Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were the main source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. The seal for the gas is the nonpermeable upper portion of the Norphlet Formation. The overlying lower Smackover carbonates are also nonpermeable and may serve as part of the seal.

  8. Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. )

    1993-09-01

    Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

  9. Depositional setting of the Jurassic Haynesville seismic sequence in the Apalachicola Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Seismic and well data from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico were used to define the seismic stratigraphy, geologic history, and depositional setting of the Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) Haynesville sequence in the Apalachicola basin. The data show that Haynesville clastic sedimentation updip was coeval with Haynesville carbonate deposition downdip. The regional Jurassic seismic stratigraphic framework includes, in ascending order, the Louann Salt Norphlet-Smackover, Haynesville, and Cotton Valley sequences. In the vicinity of Destin dome, wells have penetrated Haynesville sandstones, shales, and anhydrites. These clastics correlate with low amplitude, low-continuity reflections that characterize the Haynesville over a broad area updip. Similar reflections within the overlying (Tithonian-earliest Berriasian) Cotton Valley clastic sequence make seismic definition of the top Haynesville sequence boundary difficult updip. As Haynesville clastics are replaced by carbonates downdip, a high amplitude reflection marks the top of the sequence. Haynesville carbonates conformably overlie (Oxfordian) Smackover carbonates in the basin center, and the lower sequence boundary cannot be defined where disrupted by growth faults associated with early movement of the (Callovian ) Louann Salt. Sigmoid clinoforms document Haynesville shelf margin development Seismic facies also include oblique clinoforms that prograde eastward into the basin from the Southern Platform and Middle Ground Arch. No wells penetrate this facies. Mapping of the seismic facies and correlation with well data suggest a depositional setting for the Haynesville sequence in which influx of terrigenous clastics probably derived from adjacent land areas to the north and northeast filled a broad lagoon behind a carbonate shelf margin.

  10. Didactyl Tracks of Paravian Theropods (Maniraptora) from the ?Middle Jurassic of Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mudroch, Alexander; Richter, Ute; Joger, Ulrich; Kosma, Ralf; Idé, Oumarou; Maga, Abdoulaye

    2011-01-01

    Background A new dinosaur tracksite from ?Middle Jurassic sediments of the Irhazer Group on the plains of Agadez (Rep. Niger, northwest Africa) revealed extraordinarily well preserved didactyl tracks of a digitigrade bipedal trackmaker. The distinct morphology of the pes imprints indicates a theropod trackmaker from a paravian maniraptoran closely related to birds. Methodology/Principal Findings The early age and the morphological traits of the tracks allow for description of the new ichnotaxon Paravipus didactyloides. A total of 120 tracks are assigned to 5 individual trackways. The ‘medium-sized’ tracks with an average footprint length of 27.5 cm and footprint width of 23.1 cm are deeply imprinted into the track bearing sandstone. Conclusions/Significance A comparison with other didactyl tracks gives new insights into the foot morphology of advanced maniraptoran theropods and contributes to knowledge of their evolutionary history. The new ichnotaxon takes an important position in the ichnological fossil record of Gondwana and the mid-Jurassic biota worldwide, because it is among the earliest known records of paravian maniraptorans and of didactyl theropod tracks from Africa. PMID:21339816

  11. The Navajos' Long Walk for Education (Dine Nizaagoo lina Bihooaah Yikanaaskai). A History of Navajo Education (Dine Ohoot aahii Baa Hane).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Hildegard

    Comprised of nine chapters, this book documents the educational history of the Navajo Nation. Written by one "who was there" as Director of Indian Education during the Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson administrations, this book describes the labors of many, many American Indians and Anglos who worked together to bring about…

  12. Evaluating Reading Materials in Navajo: Report of a Teachers' Conference (Gallup, New Mexico, April 28-29, 1972). Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gradman, Harry L.; Young, Robert W.

    Elementary-grade reading materials produced in the Navajo language were evaluated at a teacher's conference held in Gallup, New Mexico, on April 28-29, 1972. Participants, mostly teachers, at the conference numbered approximately 45. The 5 texts evaluated were "Mosilgai" (School Cat), "Jasper," Pabii Doo Masi" (Puppy and…

  13. The geological constraints of the development of sandstone landforms in Central Europe, a case study of the Świętokrzyskie (Holy Cross) Mountains, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Eighty sites of crag groups and individual crags occurring in the Świętokrzyskie (Holy Cross) Mts., upland situated in central Poland, were described in detail in order to examine the lithological, structural, mechanic properties and the tectonic features of sandstones and quartzites representing six crag-forming lithostratigraphic units: Cambrian quartzites, Devonian quartzitic sandstones, Triassic and Jurassic sandstones. Specific features of these rocks are: their occurrence within the sequences consisting of different rock series, high energy depositional environments and siliceous composition. The cragforming rocks differ in the amount of cement (from strongly cemented quartzites to very porous sandstones with poor cement), which determines the diverse mechanical properties (from very strong to friable rocks). The crucial feature enabling formation of crags built of porous and friable sandstones is very dense grain packing due to chemical and mechanical compaction. Regarding the principal role of the gravitational disintegration of rock massifs under the periglacial conditions in the Late Pleistocene, other factors constraining the crag formation and shaping are: the tectonic situation of rocks (the orientation of strata and joints) as well as adequate joint spacing and bed thickness. Petrographic, structural and tectonic features are interrelated.

  14. New Perspectives on the Old Red Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miall, Andrew D.

    The Old Red Sandstone is amongst the most distinctive and well-known stratigraphic units in the British Isles. It is mainly of Devonian age; in fact, its lower boundary was used to define the base of the Devonian until relatively recently and it was called "Old" back in the nineteenth century to distinguish it from a superficially similar succession of Triassic age named the New Red Sandstone. The Old Red Sandstone has long been known to be a non-marine syntectonic to post-tectonic deposit associated with the Caledonian Orogeny One of the most famous outcrops of the red sandstone is at Siccar Point in northeast England at one of several outcrops named "Hutton's unconformity" where it lies, with marked angularity on Silurian lithic sandstones and shales. It was at these outcrops, toward the end of the eigthteenth century that James Hutton first came to understand the meaning of angular unconformities as structures representing vast amounts of missing time during which major upheavals of the Earth's crust occurred.

  15. Model for isopaching Jurassic-age Norphlet Formation in Mobile Bay, Alabama area

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, L.F.

    1989-03-01

    Deep gas was discovered in the Norphlet Sandstone of Mobile Bay Alabama in 1979. Sixteen wells, of which Exxon Company, U.S.A. has had an interest in eight, have tested gas from depths greater than 20,000 ft and at an average rate of 19 million ft/sub 3/ of gas per day. The dominant structural features in Mobile Bay are large east-west-trending salt-supported anticlines associated with salt pull-apart listric normal faulting. Throws on these faults measure up to 1000 ft. Individual structures have dimensions as large as 15 mi in an east-west strike direction and 8 mi in a north-south dip direction. The Jurassic age (Callovian) Norphlet of Mobile Bay is characterized by eolian dune sand deposits up to 700 ft thick. An important factor affecting future development drilling is the accurate prediction of reservoir thickness. This presentation shows that an integrated study of seismic and well data has facilitated the development of a geological model for isopaching the Norphlet Formation. The isopach exhibits a strong north-northwest-south-southeast orientation of parallel thicks and thins. These trends are believed to be the result of original eolian deposition of complex linear dunes in the Norphlet Sandstone. The major east-west structural grain of faults and anticlines overprints this preserved depositional trend.

  16. Middle Jurassic Oseberg delta, northern North Sea: A sedimentological and sequence stratigraphic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, T.; Steel R.J.

    1997-07-01

    The Aalenian Oseberg Formation (0-80 m thick) is an important reservoir unit in the Middle Jurassic Brent Group in the northern North Sea, consisting of multiple sets of sandy Gilbert-type deltas. Small-scale (1.5-10 m) fining-upward units seen in the gamma-ray log correspond with individual delta sets, as independently confirmed by steepening-upward trends seen in the dip log. Within each set, the steep foreset slopes typically show thinly bedded sandstone facies (avalanche grain flows), whereas the lower foreset slopes, toesets, and bottomsets are formed largely by massive sandstone facies (sandy debris flows). On an intermediate scale (up to 40 m), the gamma-ray logs show both fining-upward and coarsening-upward trends through stacked delta sets, and these trends, traceable between wells, are interpreted in terms of decelerating and accelerating rates of relative sea level rise, respectively. The relative abundance of the sandy debris-flow deposits reflects a periodic and significant instability of the delta`s upper foreset slope, probably during times of increased water depth in front of the delta. The normal progradation of individual Gilbert-type sets, however, is likely to have been along a subhorizontal topography during periods of little or no change in water depth. The long-term change to produce the observed vertical stacking of deltaic sets was one of a generally rising relative sea level.

  17. DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF POORLY CONSOLIDATED MEDIA - Borehole Failure Mechanisms in High-Porosity Sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bezalel c. Haimson

    2005-06-10

    We investigated failure mechanisms around boreholes and the formation of borehole breakouts in high-porosity sandstone, with particular interest to grain-scale micromechanics of failure leading to the hitherto unrecognized fracture-like borehole breakouts and apparent compaction band formation in poorly consolidated granular materials. We also looked at a variety of drilling-related factors that contribute to the type, size and shape of borehole breakouts. The objective was to assess their effect on the ability to establish correlations between breakout geometry and in situ stress magnitudes, as well as on borehole stability prediction, and hydrocarbon/water extraction in general. We identified two classes of medium to high porosity (12-30%) sandstones, arkosic, consisting of 50-70% quartz and 15 to 50% feldspar, and quartz-rich sandstones, in which quartz grain contents varied from 90 to 100%. In arkose sandstones critical far-field stress magnitudes induced compressive failure around boreholes in the form of V-shaped (dog-eared) breakouts, the result of dilatant intra-and trans-granular microcracking subparallel to both the maximum horizontal far-field stress and to the borehole wall. On the other hand, boreholes in quartz-rich sandstones failed by developing fracture-like breakouts. These are long and very narrow (several grain diameters) tabular failure zones perpendicular to the maximum stress. Evidence provided mainly by SEM observations suggests a failure process initiated by localized grain-bond loosening along the least horizontal far-field stress springline, the packing of these grains into a lower porosity compaction band resembling those discovered in Navajo and Aztec sandstones, and the emptying of the loosened grains by the circulating drilling fluid starting from the borehole wall. Although the immediate several grain layers at the breakout tip often contain some cracked or even crushed grains, the failure mechanism enabled by the formation of the

  18. Lithological and Petrographic Analyses of Carbonates and Sandstones From the Southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Avendaño, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present results of sedimentological and petrological studies of drill cores from the Bay of Campeche in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Based on reports on drill cores obtained from oil exploratory wells in the Cantarell Complex located 80 kilometres offshore in the Bay of Campeche and studies related to regional geology composite simplified stratigraphic columns for offshore Campeche region have been constructed up to depths of approximately 5000 m. The stratigraphic column is formed by a thick sediment sequence of Middle Jurassic age (evaporites, Callovian), Late Jurassic (terrigenous, calcareous clays and calcareous layers), Lower Cretaceous (carbonates), Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene (calcareous breccias), Paleogene-Neogene (terrigenous-carbonates intercalations) and Quaternary (terrigenous). The core samples studied come from wells in the Sihil and Akal fields in Cantarell. Analysis of reports on lithological descriptions indicates that these wells sample dolomitized sedimentary breccias from the Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene and fine-grained sandstones from the Late Jurassic Tithonian, respectively. Based on results of petrographic studies, the texture, cementing material and porosity of the units have been documented. The thin sections for carbonates were classified based on their texture according to Dunham (1962) for carbonate rocks, classified according to their components using the ternary diagrams of Folk (1974). Percentages refer to the data presented in tables, which were obtained by point-counting technique (with a total 250). Photomicrographs of scanning electron microscope (SEM) provide magnification for easy documentation of crystalline arrangements and description of micro-porous for different types of carbonates such as dolomite, in addition to the morphology of authigenic clays. Results of these studies and previous works in the area permit characterization of diagenetic processes of the carbonate sediments in the Campeche Bay, and provide

  19. Navajo birth outcomes in the Shiprock uranium mining area

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, L.M.; Wiese, W.H.; Skipper, B.J.; Charley, B.; Benally, L. )

    1992-11-01

    The role of environmental radiation in the etiology of birth defects, stillbirths, and other adverse outcomes of pregnancy was evaluated for 13,329 Navajos born at the Public Health Service/Indian Health Service Hospital in the Shiprock, NM, uranium mining area (1964-1981). More than 320 kinds of defective congenital conditions were abstracted from hospital records. Using a nested case-control design, families of 266 pairs of index and control births were interviewed. The only statistically significant association between uranium operations and unfavorable birth outcome was identified with the mother living near tailings or mine dumps. Among the fathers who worked in the mines, those of the index cases had histories of more years of work exposure but not necessarily greater gonadal dosage of radiation. Also, birth defects increased significantly when either parent worked in the Shiprock electronics assembly plant. Overall, the associations between adverse pregnancy outcome and exposure to radiation were weak and must be interpreted with caution with respect to implying a biogenetic basis.

  20. A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Battiest

    2012-11-30

    The project, A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation, is funded under a solicitation issued by the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program. Funding provided by the grant allowed the Navajo Nation to measure wind potential at two sites, one located within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation and the other off-reservation during the project period (September 5, 2005 - September 30, 2009). The recipient for the grant award is the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA). The grant allowed the Navajo Nation and NTUA manage the wind feasibility from initial site selection through the decision-making process to commit to a site for wind generation development. The grant activities help to develop human capacity at NTUA and help NTUA to engage in renewable energy generation activities, including not only wind but also solar and biomass. The final report also includes information about development activities regarding the sited included in the grant-funded feasibility study.

  1. Total petroleum systems of the Pelagian Province, Tunisia, Libya, Italy, and Malta; the Bou Dabbous, Tertiary and Jurassic-Cretaceous composite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    Undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources were assessed within total petroleum systems of the Pelagian Province (2048) as part of the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000. The Pelagian Province is located mainly in eastern Tunisia and northwestern Libya. Small portions of the province extend into Malta and offshore Italy. Although several petroleum systems may exist, only two ?composite? total petroleum systems were identified. Each total petroleum system comprises a single assessment unit. These total petroleum systems are called the Bou Dabbous?Tertiary and Jurassic-Cretaceous Composite, named after the source-rock intervals and reservoir-rock ages. The main source rocks include mudstone of the Eocene Bou Dabbous Formation; Cretaceous Bahloul, Lower Fahdene, and M?Cherga Formations; and Jurassic Nara Formation. Known reservoirs are in carbonate rocks and sandstone intervals throughout the Upper Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary sections. Traps for known accumulations include fault blocks, low-amplitude anticlines, high-amplitude anticlines associated with reverse faults, wrench fault structures, and stratigraphic traps. The estimated means of the undiscovered conventional petroleum volumes in total petroleum systems of the Pelagian Province are as follows: [MMBO, million barrels of oil; BCFG, billion cubic feet of gas; MMBNGL, million barrels of natural gas liquids] Total Petroleum System MMBO BCFG MMBNGL Bou Dabbous?Tertiary 667 2,746 64 Jurassic-Cretaceous Composite 403 2,280 27

  2. A detrital record of continent-continent collision in the Early-Middle Jurassic foreland sequence in the northern Yangtze foreland basin, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tao; Liu, Shaofeng; Wang, Zongxiu; Li, Wangpeng; Chen, Xinlu

    2016-12-01

    The Mesozoic northern Yangtze foreland basin system was formed by continental collision between the North China and South China plates along the Mianlue suture. Synorogenic stratigraphic sequences of Late Triassic to Early-Middle Jurassic age were developed in the northern Yangtze foreland basin. The upper Middle Jurassic Shaximiao Formation consists mainly of thick-bedded terrestrial successions that serve as the main body of the basin-filling sequences, suggesting intense tectonism in the peripheral orogeny of the foreland basin. Laser-ICP-MS U-Pb analysis of 254 detrital zircon grains from sandstone samples and several published Lower-Middle Jurassic samples, detrital compositions, petrofacies, and paleocurrent reconstructions in the northern Yangtze foreland basin indicate that discrete source areas included the Qinling-Dabieshan ranges and the Mianlue suture zone to the north, and the South China plate to the south. The stratigraphic succession and sediment provenance of the foreland basin imply that the early Mianlue oceanic basin, magmatic arc, and nonmarine molasse foreland basin during the period of deposition were modified or buried by the subsequent continent-continent collision between the North China-Qinling-Dabieshan plate and the Yangtze plate during the Jurassic, which followed the oblique amalgamation between these plates during the Middle-Late Triassic.

  3. Cross-bedding Related Anisotropy and its Role in the Orientation of Joints in an Aeolian Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, S.; Cilona, A.; Mapeli, C.; Panfilau, A.; Aydin, A.; Prasad, M.

    2014-12-01

    Previous research revealed that the cross-bedding related anisotropy in aeolian sandstones affects the orientation of compaction bands, also known as anticracks. We hypothesize that cross-bedding should a have similar influence on the orientation of the joints within the same rock at the same location. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between the cross-beds and the cross-bed package confined joints in the Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone cropping out in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada. The field data demonstrates that the cross-bed package confined joints occur at high-angle to bedding and trend roughly parallel to the dip direction of the cross-beds. This shows that the cross-bed orientation and the associated anisotropy also exert a strong control on the formation and orientation of the joints. In order to characterize the anisotropy due to cross-bedding in the Aztec Sandstone, we measured the P-wave velocities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from 11 samples in the laboratory using a bench-top ultrasonic assembly. The measured P-wave anisotropy is about 13% on average. Based on these results, a numerical model based on the generalized Hooke's law for anisotropic materials is analyzed assuming the cross-bedded sandstone to be transversely isotropic. Using this model, we tested various cross-bed orientations as well as different strain boundary conditions (uniaxial, axisymmetric and triaxial). It is possible to define a boundary condition under which the modeled results roughly match with the observed relationship between cross-bed package confined joints and cross-beds. These results have important implications for fluid flow through aeolian sandstones in reservoirs and aquifers.

  4. Dakota sandstone facies, western Oklahoma panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Atalik, E.; Mansfield, C.F.

    1984-04-01

    The Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone in Cimarron County comprised three sandstone units and intervening mudrocks; it overlies the Kiowa Shale Member of the Purgatoire Formation. Deposits include shoreface, beach (foreshore) and dune, estuarine and tidal channel, marine marginal bay and swamp/marsh in a generally progradational sequences associated with marine regression in the Western Interior. The shoreface sand, characterized by ripple lamination, bioturbation and the trace fossils Teichichnus and Thalassinoides, is fine-grained, 5-10 m (15-30 ft) thick and grades into the underlying Kiowa Shale. Beach and associated dune deposits are 2-5 m (6-16 ft) thick, medium to fine-grained, medium to thick-bedded, tabular-planar cross-bedded, and lenticular; cross-bed paleocurrent headings are northeasterly and northwesterly. Estuarine channel deposits are 3-5 m (10 to 16 ft) thick, trough to tabular-planar cross-bedded, and medium to coarse-grained with local conglomerate overlying the scoured base which commonly cuts into the Kiowa Shale or overlying shoreface sandstone; rip-up clasts and wood pieces are common but trace fossils are rare; southeasterly and southwesterly paleocurrents predominate. Tidal channel deposits are thinner (up to 2 m of 6 ft) and finer grained (medium to fine-grained) that the estuarine channel deposits; they occur within fine-grained sandstone and mudrock sequences, are trough cross-bedded, and commonly contain trace fossils (e.g., Skolithos) and wood fragments. Marine marginal (tidal flat or bay.) deposits comprise fine-grained sandstone, siltstone and interbedded shale, that are 1-3m (3-10 ft) thick with abundant burrows, small ripple marks, and parallel lamination. These grade into the fine to very fine-grained sandstones, siltstones, shales, and coals of the swamp/marsh deposits that are 1-5m (3-16 ft) thick and contain ripple marks, burrows, other trace fossils, and parallel lamination.

  5. Clastic Pipes: Proxies of High Water Tables and Strong Ground Motion, Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, David; Chan, Marjorie

    2015-04-01

    Multiple soft sediment deformation features from bed-scale to basin-scale are well preserved within the Jurassic Carmel Formation of Southern Utah. Field mapping reveals thousands of small-scale clastic injectite pipes (10 cm to 10 m diameter, up to 20 m tall) in extremely high densities (up to 500+ pipes per 0.075 square kilometers). The pipes weather out in positive relief from the surrounding host strata of massive sandstone (sabkha) and crossbedded sands with minor conglomerate and shale (fluvial) deposits. The host rock shows both brittle and ductile deformation. Reverse, normal, and antithetical faulting is common with increased frequency, including ring faults, surrounding the pipes. The pipes formed from liquefaction and subsequent fluidization induced by strong ground motion. Down-dropped, graben blocks and ring faults surrounding pipes indicate initial sediment volume increase during pipe emplacement followed by sediment volume decrease during dewatering. Complex crosscutting relationships indicate several injection events where some pipe events reached the surface as sand blows. Multiple ash layers provide excellent stratigraphic and temporal constraints for the pipe system with the host strata deposited between 166 and 164 Ma. Common volcanic fragments and rounded volcanic cobbles occur within sandstone and conglomerate beds, and pipes. Isolated volcanic clasts in massive sandstone indicate explosive volcanic events that could have been the exogenic trigger for earthquakes. The distribution of pipes are roughly parallel to the Middle Jurassic paleoshoreline located in marginal environments between the shallow epicontinental Sundance Sea and continental dryland. At the vertical stratigraphic facies change from dominantly fluvial sediments to dominantly massive sabkha sediments, there is a 1-2 m-thick floodplain mudstone that was a likely seal for underlying, overpressurized sediments. The combination of loose porous sediment at a critical depth of water

  6. 25 CFR 161.102 - What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits on the Navajo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... grazing permits on the Navajo Partitioned Lands? 161.102 Section 161.102 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 161.102 What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits...

  7. 25 CFR 161.102 - What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits on the Navajo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits on the Navajo Partitioned Lands? 161.102 Section 161.102 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and...

  8. Concurrent and Longitudinal Effects of Ethnic Identity and Experiences of Discrimination on Psychosocial Adjustment of Navajo Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliher, Renee V.; Jones, Matthew D.; Dahl, Angie

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined concurrent and longitudinal relations among Navajo adolescents' ethnic identity, experiences of discrimination, and psychosocial outcomes (i.e., self-esteem, substance use, and social functioning). At Time 1, 137 Navajo adolescents (67 male, 70 female), primarily in Grades 9 and 10, completed a written survey assessing…

  9. "Enemies Like a Road Covered with Ice": The Utah Navajos' Experience during the Long Walk Period, 1858-1868

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsby, Sarah; McPherson, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Much has been written of the Navajo Long Walk period when the Navajo people, following what appears to be a fairly short resistance, surrendered in droves to the US military, collected at Fort Defiance and other designated sites, then moved in a series of "long walks" to Fort Sumner (Hweeldi) on the Pecos River in eastern New Mexico.…

  10. A Path to Peace of Mind: Providing Exemplary Services to Navajo Children with Developmental Disabilities and Their Families. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agosta, John M., Ed.; And Others

    Findings are presented from a project which aimed to estimate the prevalence of developmental disabilities among Navajo children, aged 0-5 years, living in the Navajo Nation; determine what services they and their families require; and recommend policy and practice to assure that needed services are received. Section I provides a description of…

  11. Late Paleozoic to Jurassic tectonic evolution of the Bogda area (northwest China): Evidence from detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhicheng; Li, Jianfeng; Li, Ke; Chen, Yan; Guo, Zhaojie

    2014-06-01

    Since the Cenozoic, the Tian Shan is rejuvenated by crustal shortening related to the ongoing India-Asia collision. However, the tectonic process prior to the Cenozoic remains ambiguous, especially in the Bogda area of the eastern Tian Shan. The continuous Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic sequences in the Bogda area record abundant information about the basin-mountain interaction. U-Pb (LA-ICP-MS) dating of detrital zircons from seven sandstone samples from Permian to Jurassic was used to investigate the changes of provenance and basin-mountain interaction in the Bogda area. During the Permian, proximal and synchronous pyroclastic materials were the major source. The Late Paleozoic magmatic belt in the North Tian Shan (NTS) had gradually become one of the main sources by the Late Permian, which implies the uplift and exhumation in the NTS area. This is interpreted in terms of near-source sedimentation in basin developing in a post-orogenic extension setting. The large range of U-Pb ages of detrital zircons observed in the Early-Middle Jurassic sediments encompasses most of the available sources implying a wide drainage pattern developing on a rather flat topography. Re-emergence of the Early Permian peak in the spectrum implies that the Bogda Mountains has existed as a gentle positive relief and began to provide materials to the submountain regions. The southern Junggar Basin extended towards to the south and evolved as a passively subsiding basin from the Middle Triassic to the Middle Jurassic. However, the synchronous pyroclastic (tuff) and the exhumed late Paleozoic detrital materials from the uplifted Bogda Mountains were the major component of the Upper Jurassic sediments. Associated to the conglomerate in the Kalaza Formation, the basin-range evolution entered a compression uplift stage. The basin pattern evolution of the Bogda area is consistent with that of the southern Junggar Basin.

  12. Mixed fluvial systems of the Messak Sandstone, a deposit of the Nubian lithofacies, southwestern Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, John C.

    1987-11-01

    The Messak Sandstone is a coarse-grained to pebbly, tabular-crossbedded deposit of the widespread nubian lithofacies. It was deposited during Late Jurassic and/or Early Cretaceous time at the northern edge of the Murzuq basin, in southwestern Libya. Although the sedimentary record is predominantly one of braided fluvial systems, a common subfacies within the formation is interpreted to record the passage of straight-crested sand waves across laterally migrating point bars in sinuous rivers, similar to parts of the modern Ganga and Yamuna rivers. Because the sand waves were larger on the lower parts of the point bar, lateral migration created diagnostic thinning-upward cosets of tabular crossbeds, as well as fining-upward grain-size trends. Common thick, interbedded claystones, deposited in associated paludal and lacustrine environments, and high variance in crossbed dispersion patterns, also suggest the local presence of sinuous fluvial systems within the overall braided regime. The Messak Sandstone contains some of the features that led to the proposal of an unconventional low-sinuosity fluvial environment for the Nubian lithofacies in Egypt, and the continuously high water levels of this model may explain channel-scale clay drapes and overturned crossbeds in the Messak. However, most of the Messak characteristics are incompatible with a low-sinuosity model, suggesting instead that the fluvial channels in the Murzuq basin alternated between braided and high-sinuosity channel patterns.

  13. Paleoenvironments and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama and adjacent coastal water area

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-09-01

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern Alabama and the adjacent coastal water area accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama, providing a barrier for air and water circulation during Norphlet deposition. Norphlet paleogeography was dominated by a broad desert plain rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. Initiation of Norphlet sedimentation was a result of erosion of the southern Appalachians. Norphlet conglomerates were deposited in coalescing alluvial fans in proximity to an Appalachian source. The conglomeratic sandstones grade downdip into red-bed lithofacies that accumulated in distal portions of alluvial fan and wadi systems. Quartzose sandstones (Denkman Member) were deposited as dune and interdune sediments on a broad desert plain. The source of the sand was the updip and adjacent alluvial fan, plain, and wadi deposits. A marine transgression was initiated late in Denkman deposition, resulting in the reworking of previously deposited Norphlet sediments. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent with four oil and gas fields already established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist of quartzose sandstones, which are principally eolian in origin. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons.

  14. Upper Jurassic Norphlet formation: new frontier for hydrocarbon prospecting in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-04-01

    Since the discovery of oil in 1967 from the Smackover Formation at Toxey field, Choctaw County, Alabama, and of condensate in 1968 from the Norphlet Formation at Flomaton field, Escambia County, Alabama, the Upper Jurassic has become the primary exploration target in southwestern Alabama. Norphlet petroleum traps in the region are principally combination traps involving favorable stratigraphy and salt anticlines (Copeland field), extensional fault traps associated with salt movement (Flomaton field), and faulted salt anticlines (Hatter's Pond and Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann fields). Reservoir rocks include marine, dune, and fluvial sandstone lithofacies. Sandstone porosity involves both primary intergranular and secondary dissolution and fracture. Smackover algal carbonate mudstone is probably the source for much of the Norphlet hydrocarbon, but downdip Norphlet marine shales may also be source rocks. The central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions should continue to be excellent areas to explore for hydrocarbons in the years ahead. Successful Norphlet petroleum prospecting in the area has involved the identification of favorable sandstone lithofacies and structural hydrocarbon traps by using geologic and geophysical methods. Future Norphlet discoveries will require the delineation of stratigraphic and structural/stratigraphic combination hydrocarbon traps using seismic-stratigraphic techniques.

  15. Upper Jurassic Norphlet formation: new frontier for hydrocarbon prospecting in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-04-01

    Since the discovery of oil in 1967 from the Smackover Formation at Toxey field, Choctaw County, Alabama, and of condensate in 1968 from the Norphlet Formation at Flomaton field, Escambia County, Alabama, the Upper Jurassic has become the primary exploration target in southwestern Alabama. Norphlet petroleum traps in the region are principally combination traps involving favorable stratigraphy and salt anticlines (Copeland field), exensional fault traps associated with salt movement (Flomaton field), and faulted salt anticlines (Hatter's Pond and Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann fields). Reservoir rocks include marine, dune, and fluvial sandstone lithofacies. Sandstone porosity involves both primary intergranular and secondary dissolution and fracture. Smackover algal carbonate mudstone is probably the source for much of the Norphlet hydrocarbon, but downdip Norphlet marine shales may also be source rocks. The central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions should continue to be excellent areas to explore for hydrocarbons in the years ahead. Successful Norphlet petroleum prospecting in the area has involved the identification of favorable sandstone lithofacies and structural hydrocarbon traps by using geologic and geophysical methods. Future Norphlet discoveries will require the delineation of stratigraphic and structural/stratigraphic combination hydrocarbon traps using seismic-stratigraphic techniques.

  16. Navajo oral history of a pre-Columbian amphitheater in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackhorse, Taft, Jr.; Williams, Jay S.

    2002-11-01

    A large performance space attached to a natural amphitheater in the cliff face has recently been identified at the center of the pre-Columbian Chaco Complex in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. This location is known in the ceremonial history of the Navajo people (Din) as Tsbiinaholtsa Yalti (Concavity in Bedrock that Speaks). Tsbiinaholtsa Yalti is a portal to the dimension of the deities and it is opened by way of tonally induced acousma. The physical manifestation of the amphitheater and its acoustical properties invoke the concepts of Tal (Chants) and Taal (Ceremonial pathway). Navajo ceremonies are called Haataal and religious practitioners Hataalii (Chanters). The origin of the tones which give power to contemporary Navajo chants may be traced to the Tsbiinaholtsa Yalti. These tones are produced vocally and are accompanied by the shell trumpet, eagle bone whistle, and reed flute (jadzoosh).

  17. Diabetes on the Navajo nation: what role can gardening and agriculture extension play to reduce it?

    PubMed

    Lombard, Kevin A; Forster-Cox, Susan; Smeal, Dan; O'Neill, Mick K

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes has emerged as a serious health problem in the Navajo nation, the largest Indigenous tribe in the US. Persons with diabetes are at greater risk for developing other diseases such as cardiovascular disease. Navajos with diabetes almost certainly face a diminished quality of life if their diabetes is not managed properly. Aside from genetics, the incidence of diabetes is highly correlated with income, poor diet, and limited physical exercise. A review of the literature also implicates dietary shifts initiated by historical events and contemporary trends. Numerous studies have shown that moderate consumption of fruits and vegetables, combined with exercise, reduces the risk of or delays the onset of many diseases including diabetes. As part of a larger holistic approach, home and community garden projects have successfully addressed nutrition and food security issues on a grassroots scale. The Navajos have a tradition of farming and therefore expanding Navajo diabetes interventions to include the promotion of community and home gardens provides multiple opportunities. The benefits of these actions include: (i) a variety of nutritious food grown locally; (ii) physical activity attained through the act of daily gardening tasks; (iii) positive income garnered in terms of savings in food otherwise purchased at stores and excess produce canned, or if desired, sold at a farmer's market or trading post; and (iv) positive mental outlook through a combined sense of accomplishment at harvest time, bonding with the earth, and spiritual growth. The objectives of this article were to review the development of diabetes on the Navajo nation though historical and contemporary literature, to provide insight into the role of diet and exercise in the progression of the disease, and to offer cases and suggestions in the role that home and community gardening can play in diabetes reduction. A concluding discussion proposes a multidisciplinary approach to tackling diabetes on the

  18. Impact Metamorphism of Sandstones at Amguid Crater, Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoui, R.; Belhai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Amguid is a 450 m diameter sample crater; it is emplaced in Lower Devonian sandstones.We have carried out a petrographic study in order to investigate shock effects recorded in these sandstones and define shock stages in Amguid.

  19. Assessments of aquifer sensitivity on Navajo Nation and adjacent lands and ground-water vulnerability to pesticide contamination on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requested that the Navajo Nation conduct an assessment of aquifer sensitivity on Navajo Nation lands and an assessment of ground-water vulnerability to pesticide contamination on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project. Navajo Nation lands include about 17,000 square miles in northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and southeastern Utah. The Navajo Indian Irrigation Project in northwestern New Mexico is the largest area of agriculture on the Navajo Nation. The Navajo Indian Irrigation Project began operation in 1976; presently (2001) about 62,000 acres are available for irrigated agriculture. Numerous pesticides have been used on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project during its operation. Aquifer sensitivity is defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as 'The relative ease with which a contaminant [pesticide] applied on or near a land surface can migrate to the aquifer of interest. Aquifer sensitivity is a function of the intrinsic characteristics of the geologic material in question, any underlying saturated materials, and the overlying unsaturated zone. Sensitivity is not dependent on agronomic practices or pesticide characteristics.' Ground-water vulnerability is defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as 'The relative ease with which a contaminant [pesticide] applied on or near a land surface can migrate to the aquifer of interest under a given set of agronomic management practices, pesticide characteristics, and aquifer sensitivity conditions.' The results of the aquifer sensitivity assessment on Navajo Nation and adjacent lands indicated relative sensitivity within the boundaries of the study area. About 22 percent of the study area was not an area of recharge to bedrock aquifers or an area of unconsolidated deposits and was thus assessed to have an insignificant potential for contamination. About 72 percent of the Navajo Nation study area was assessed to be in the categories of most potential

  20. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Northrop, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This project is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Harvey E. Yates Company being conducted under the auspices of the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project seeks to apply perspectives related to the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology to the simulation and production of low-permeability gas reservoirs to low-permeability oil reservoirs as typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Permian Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report presents the results and analysis obtained in 1989 from 233 ft of oriented core, comprehensive suite of logs, various in situ stress measurements, and detailed well tests conducted in conjunction with the drilling of two development wells. Natural fractures were observed in core and logs in the interbed carbonates, but there was no direct evidence of fractures in the sandstones. However, production tests of the sandstones indicated permeabilities and behavior typical of a dual porosity reservoir. A general northeast trend for the maximum principal horizontal stress was observed in an elastic strain recovery measurements and in strikes of drilling-induced fractures; this direction is subparallel to the principal fracture trend observed in the interbed carbonates. Many of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  1. Spectral Induced Polarization of Sandstones: Temperature Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A.; Kruschwitz, S.; Lesmes, D.

    2007-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for a wide range of environmental applications, in particular those focused on hydrogeological investigations. Recent experimental work has demonstrated that the mean relaxation time of electrical impedance spectra measured in sandstones is linked to the grain surface area and strongly correlated to some measure of a dominant pore throat size. Such empirically derived relationships lead to potential models of SIP - hydraulic conductivity, which has immense value for the hydrological community. Furthermore, the links between surface area and electrical response may lead to other, equally exciting, applications, such as in characterizing geochemical reactivity of sediments. However, there is a need to understand the fundamental behavior of SIP in such porous media in order for such models to be applied usefully. In an attempt to address this, we focus here on the influence of temperature on the SIP behavior of a range of sandstones. Classical models of dielectric dispersion in colloids have proposed direct inverse relationships between relaxation time and temperature. Through a series of experimental trials we have studied this behavior: examining the impedance spectra (in the 1 mHz to 1 kHz range) of four different sandstones over a temperature range of 5 to 30 degrees Celsius. Analysis of the spectra with the widely used Pelton Cole-Cole model has confirmed hypothesized effects on a mean relaxation time but revealed that the responses to temperature change is a function of physical properties of the sandstone. In addition, the analysis has illustrated how temperature effects on surface complex conductivity of the sandstones differ as a function of pore fluid and formation factor. The results add to the growing experimental evidence of controls on spectral impedance in porous media and help ascertain generalized petrophysical models for a wide range of applications.

  2. Jurassic platform development, northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Triassic and Early Jurassic rifting set the stage for the subsequent development of carbonate platforms in the Late Jurassic. These platforms formed along the interior margins of salt basins separated from the main ancestral Gulf of Mexico by a series of positive features. A major sea level rise, after deposition of the Louann Salt (late Callovian), drowned the interior salt basins around the margins of the Gulf of Mexico, leading to an anoxic event. Organic-rich sediments of the lower Smackover were deposited as a basin-fill sequence, forming one of the major hydrocarbon source rocks of the region. As sea level rise slowed in the late Oxfordian, carbonate production began to catch up with sea level rise along the basin margins, leading to the initial development of a rimmed carbonate platform. The platform margin was marked by high-energy ooid grainstones, while crustacean pellet muds were deposited in the platform interior. A high-energy ooid-dominated platform (upper Smackover) developed in the late Oxfordian when sea level reached a standstill. During the subsequent Kimmeridgian sea level rise, a second rimmed carbonate platform, the Haynesville, was developed. During the initial rise, grainstones were deposited on the platform margin, while the interior was dominated by evaporites (Buckner) and siliciclastics. As sea level slowed and reached a standstill, the platform margin facies extended shoreward (Gilmer) and a high-energy platform, analogous to the upper Smackover, was formed. The Smackover and Haynesville platforms of the northwestern gulf show a parallel evolution in response to cyclic changes in Upper Jurassic sea level.

  3. Regional porosity trends of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity, with comparisons to formations of other basins

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Sandstone porosity of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity decreases systematically as depth and thermal maturity increase over a wide range. Median porosity is about 25% where equivalent vitrinite reflectance (R[sub o]) is slightly over 0.7% in the northern part of the study area (Clarke County, Mississippi). Median porosity is reduced to 8% where R[sub o] approaches 2.7% in the southern part of the study area (state waters of Mobile Bay). Porosity of the cemented, tight zone at the top of the Norphlet in downdip locations is roughly 10% lower than porosities of facies underlying the tight zone, but nevertheless is slightly above the norm for other sandstones at similar R[sub o] levels. Porosity of dune facies is consistently 2-5% higher than that of interdune facies, other factors being equal. Our data show 3-6% higher porosity in chlorite-dominated intervals relative to intervals where illite is the dominant clay mineral. Norphlet porosity has little or no correlation with position relative to the present-day hydrocarbon-water contact. Based on comparisons at similar R[sub o] levels, median (50th-percentile) Norphlet porosity exceeds porosities of [open quotes]typical[close quotes] sandstones in other basins by more than a factor of two throughout the study area. Even the lower (10th-percentile) Norphlet porosities are higher than median porosities of sandstones in general. 48 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Volcanic Facies of the Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation, Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay, Alaska Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation (Jtk), a >1,000-km-long belt of vol­canic facies within the accreted intra-oceanic Talkeetna Arc has been characterized within the Talkeetna Mountains, but on the Alaska Peninsula Jtk facies have not previously been described in detail. Here we describe facies of the Jtk stretching from the Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay. On the Iniskin Peninsula, a high concentration and great thickness of mafic to intermediate lavas, associated autobreccias and hyaloclastites, fluidal-clast breccias and possible pillows are suggestive of one or more submarine effusive eruption centers. Also volumetrically significant are non-stratified polymictic volcaniclastic breccia facies. Minor facies include thinly bedded volcaniclastic sandstone to pebble breccia-conglomerate facies, some of which are shard- and pumice-bearing pyroclastic deposits preserved in thinly bedded deposits, indicative of episodes of explosive volcanism and the eruption-fed nature of some of the deposits. North of Chinitna Bay, coherent facies tend to be thin and relatively small in volume. Volcaniclastic facies provide evidence of subaerial-fluvial deposition, and pyroclastic activity. Thinly bedded, laterally continuous beds locally exhibit cross-laminations, channel fills, normal grading and lenticular beds, and contain plant fossils. Within this sequence is a 10-m-thick pumice breccia containing fossilized logs, underlain by a thin, weakly laminated, pumice- and lithic-bearing volcaniclastic siltstone to sandstone. The log-bearing pumice breccia and the lithic-bearing laminated basal unit represent pyroclastic density current (PDC) facies deposited in a subaerial or possibly shallow aqueous environment. Underlying the PDC deposit are several 30-cm-thick maroon and olive green volcaniclastic fine-grained sandstone and siltstone beds containing channel fills, cross-beds and lenticular beds. Marbles exposed in the contact zone between the intrusions of Alaska

  5. Jurassic climate mode governed by ocean gateway

    PubMed Central

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Ullmann, Clemens V.; Dietl, Gerd; Ruhl, Micha; Schweigert, Günter; Thibault, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The Jurassic (∼201–145 Myr ago) was long considered a warm ‘greenhouse' period; more recently cool, even ‘icehouse' episodes have been postulated. However, the mechanisms governing transition between so-called Warm Modes and Cool Modes are poorly known. Here we present a new large high-quality oxygen-isotope dataset from an interval that includes previously suggested mode transitions. Our results show an especially abrupt earliest Middle Jurassic (∼174 Ma) mid-latitude cooling of seawater by as much as 10 °C in the north–south Laurasian Seaway, a marine passage that connected the equatorial Tethys Ocean to the Boreal Sea. Coincidence in timing with large-scale regional lithospheric updoming of the North Sea region is striking, and we hypothesize that northward oceanic heat transport was impeded by uplift, triggering Cool Mode conditions more widely. This extreme climate-mode transition provides a counter-example to other Mesozoic transitions linked to quantitative change in atmospheric greenhouse gas content. PMID:26658694

  6. Jurassic climate mode governed by ocean gateway.

    PubMed

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen P; Ullmann, Clemens V; Dietl, Gerd; Ruhl, Micha; Schweigert, Günter; Thibault, Nicolas

    2015-12-11

    The Jurassic (∼201-145 Myr ago) was long considered a warm 'greenhouse' period; more recently cool, even 'icehouse' episodes have been postulated. However, the mechanisms governing transition between so-called Warm Modes and Cool Modes are poorly known. Here we present a new large high-quality oxygen-isotope dataset from an interval that includes previously suggested mode transitions. Our results show an especially abrupt earliest Middle Jurassic (∼174 Ma) mid-latitude cooling of seawater by as much as 10 °C in the north-south Laurasian Seaway, a marine passage that connected the equatorial Tethys Ocean to the Boreal Sea. Coincidence in timing with large-scale regional lithospheric updoming of the North Sea region is striking, and we hypothesize that northward oceanic heat transport was impeded by uplift, triggering Cool Mode conditions more widely. This extreme climate-mode transition provides a counter-example to other Mesozoic transitions linked to quantitative change in atmospheric greenhouse gas content.

  7. Jurassic climate mode governed by ocean gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Ullmann, Clemens V.; Dietl, Gerd; Ruhl, Micha; Schweigert, Günter; Thibault, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The Jurassic (~201-145 Myr ago) was long considered a warm `greenhouse' period; more recently cool, even `icehouse' episodes have been postulated. However, the mechanisms governing transition between so-called Warm Modes and Cool Modes are poorly known. Here we present a new large high-quality oxygen-isotope dataset from an interval that includes previously suggested mode transitions. Our results show an especially abrupt earliest Middle Jurassic (~174 Ma) mid-latitude cooling of seawater by as much as 10 °C in the north-south Laurasian Seaway, a marine passage that connected the equatorial Tethys Ocean to the Boreal Sea. Coincidence in timing with large-scale regional lithospheric updoming of the North Sea region is striking, and we hypothesize that northward oceanic heat transport was impeded by uplift, triggering Cool Mode conditions more widely. This extreme climate-mode transition provides a counter-example to other Mesozoic transitions linked to quantitative change in atmospheric greenhouse gas content.

  8. Using the Sweat Lodge Ceremony as Group Therapy for Navajo Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmant, Stephen A.; Merta, Rod J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the sweat lodge ceremony used at a residential treatment center located on the Navajo Nation and compares the ceremony to modern group work identifying Yalom's (1995) 11 therapeutic factors of group therapy within the ceremony. Considers widespread use of the ceremony with Native Americans and nonnative Americans as well as…

  9. Learn in Beauty: A Professional Development Project for Navajo Bilingual Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Louise; de Groat, Jennie; Bedonie, Clara

    The Learn in Beauty Project at Northern Arizona University worked with a consortium of seven Navajo Nation school districts seeking to implement the Dine Language and Culture teaching perspective. This perspective is based on the premises that education is best when it reflects a sense of place; education should be based on the philosophy and…

  10. "He Said It All in Navajo!": Indigenous Language Immersion in Early Childhood Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Louise; De Groat, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the historical and social foundations of the Navajo Headstart Immersion program. The researchers have worked as teachers, teacher educators, and parents in these programs. They reflect on the need for new partnerships among tribes, tribal colleges and universities to prepare teachers and to develop curriculum materials for…

  11. From Break Dancing to Heavy Metal: Navajo Youth, Resistance, and Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyhle, Donna

    1998-01-01

    Research on Navajo youth lives and choices examines the messages conveyed through their breakdancing and heavy-metal music. Central to the messages is resistance to assimilation into mainstream culture and maintenance of their cultural identity in a racially divided community. (MMU)

  12. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and Navajo Students' Struggle for Self Esteem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Kay

    1996-01-01

    Maslow's theory of a hierarchy of needs is used to analyze Navajo youths' struggles for identity, fulfillment, and self-esteem. Answers to the challenges of substance abuse, violence, and gang membership are offered based upon George Bearden's eight-step plan, which stresses the importance of understanding human needs to perceive and transform…

  13. Improving residential coal stoves: Air quality issues on the Navajo Reservation and the implications for China

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.; Hickmott, D.D.; Brown, L.F.; Currier, R.P.; Thayer, G.R.; Semken, S.C.; Lameman, T.; Martin, S.; Yazzie, S.

    1997-12-31

    This is a report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program development (PD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to evaluate the environmental impacts of home-scale coal combustion on the Navajo Reservation and develop strategies to reduce adverse health effects associated with home-scale coal combustion. Principal accomplishments of this project were: (1) determination of the metal and gaseous emissions of a representative stove on the Navajo Reservation; (2) recognition of cyclic gaseous emissions in combustion in home-scale combustors; (3) back of the envelope calculation that home-scale coal combustion may impact Navajo health; and (4) identification that improved coal stoves require the ability to burn diverse feedstocks (coal, wood, biomass). Ultimately the results of Navajo home-scale coal combustion studies will be extended to the Developing World, particularly China, where a significant number (> 150 million) of households continue to utilize low-grade coal in their homes.

  14. Navajo Electrification for Sustainable Development: The Potential Economic and Social Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballentine, Crystal; DeSouza, Anil; Bain, Craig; Majure, Lisa; Smith, Dean Howard; Turek, Jill

    2004-01-01

    The concomitant secondary consequences of an electrification program and the potential long-term benefits of such a program are described. An electrification program can stimulate a move toward true self-determination and self-sufficiency for the Navajo nation.

  15. The Navajo Learning Network and the NASA Life Sciences/AFOSR Infrastructure Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The NSF-funded Navajo Learning Network project, with help from NASA Life Sciences and AFOSR, enabled Dine College to take a giant leap forward technologically - in a way that could never had been possible had these projects been managed separately. The combination of these and other efforts created a network of over 500 computers located at ten sites across the Navajo reservation. Additionally, the college was able to install a modern telephone system which shares network data, and purchase a new higher education management system. The NASA Life Sciences funds further allowed the college library system to go online and become available to the entire campus community. NSF, NASA and AFOSR are committed to improving minority access to higher education opportunities and promoting faculty development and undergraduate research through infrastructure support and development. This project has begun to address critical inequalities in access to science, mathematics, engineering and technology for Navajo students and educators. As a result, Navajo K-12 education has been bolstered and Dine College will therefore better prepare students to transfer successfully to four-year institutions. Due to the integration of the NSF and NASA/AFOSR components of the project, a unified project report is appropriate.

  16. Cognitive Processes Underlying WISC-R Performance of Gifted and Learning-Disabled Navajos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shitala P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Administered Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised to 45 learning-disabled and 41 gifted Navajo elementary students. Interpreted performance according to Luria-Das Model of Simultaneous and Successive cognitive processes. Gifted and learning disabled students had disparate loadings for some subtests expected to involve Successive and…

  17. EPA Statement on Data from New Mexico to Navajo Nation from Gold King Mine Release

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FARMINGTON, NM - Today, EPA is releasing additional water quality data from Aug. 7 to Aug. 8, 2015 for the Animas and San Juan Rivers from the Northern Border of New Mexico to Navajo Nation. Based upon the surface water sample results in New Mexico

  18. Native American Navajo Teenage Parenting Women, Cross-Generational Support and Implications for Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalla, Rochelle L.; Gamble, Wendy C.

    This study examined teenage parenting among Native Americans, focusing on the support received from grandmothers. The sample was comprised of 15 subjects living on a Navajo reservation: 8 adolescent mothers between 16 to 19 years--most with one child and enrolled either in high school or in an alternative education program; and seven women…

  19. Classroom Resiliency--A Comparison of Navajo Elementary Students' Perceptions of Their Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piechowski, Alta Begay

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a gender difference in how students perceived their classroom environment on the Navajo Nation public school. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be…

  20. 78 FR 16825 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Navajo Nation; Regional Haze Requirements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... information provided, unless the comment includes Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information... materials, please schedule an appointment during normal business hours with the contact listed in the FOR... importance of NGS to the Navajo Nation, Hopi Tribe, and other numerous tribes located in Arizona, EPA...

  1. Navajo Community College Funding Problems. Report by the Comptroller General of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Funding for the Navajo Community College was reviewed by the Comptroller General of the United States to determine if the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) regulations and method of computing full-time equivalent enrollments were consistent with the Tribally Controlled Community College Assistance Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-471). The investigation…

  2. Rates and causes of end-stage renal disease in Navajo Indians, 1971-1985.

    PubMed

    Megill, D M; Hoy, W E; Woodruff, S D

    1988-08-01

    The rates of end-stage renal disease are much increased in American Indians, but no longitudinal study of its rates and causes has been undertaken in any tribe. This 15-year study of rates and causes of treated end-stage renal disease in the Navajo, the largest Indian tribe, supplies an important model on which to base projections and plan interventions. Treated end-stage renal disease in Navajos has increased to an age-adjusted incidence 4 times that in whites in the United States. Diabetic nephropathy accounted for 50% of all new cases in 1985, with an incidence 9.6 times that in US whites, and was due entirely to type II disease. Glomerulonephritis caused end-stage renal disease in Navajos at a rate at least 1.8 times that in US whites and afflicted a much younger population. The predominant form was mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with an immune complex deposition. Renal disease of unknown etiology, which probably includes much silent glomerulonephritis, accounted for 20% of all new cases. The aggregate Navajo population with end-stage renal disease was 9 years younger than its US counterpart. These observations reflect the genesis of the epidemic of diabetic nephropathy afflicting many tribes. Urgent measures are needed to contain this. In addition, the etiology and control of mesangiopathic, immune-complex glomerulonephritis of unusual severity, a previously unrecognized problem, need to be addressed.

  3. The Economic Contributions of Women in a Rural Western Navajo Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Scott C.; McDonald, Mark B.

    1982-01-01

    Examines and enumerates economic changes that have occurred in the traditional rural Navajo community of Shonto. While women's net income contributions to Shonto's economy has declined, their position has seen only a slight erosion; their activities (sheep and goat husbandry, agriculture, arts and crafts) are still considered necessary and…

  4. Of Mother Earth and Father Sky: A Photographic Study of Navajo Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, T. L.; And Others

    Utilizing 52 black and white photographs, the book tells a story about the Navajo people, their hopes and problems, the strategies they have adopted to cope with the problems, their interactions with each other and with the land, and their feelings about the land which provides a basis for their livelihood. Part of a series of curriculum materials…

  5. Literature on Early Literacy Instruction in Four Languages (Chinese, Korean, Navajo, Russian).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlow, Martha; Liu, Kristin; Albus, Debra; Shyyan, Vitaliy

    2003-01-01

    This report, sponsored by the Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA), is a summary of evidence-based research on teaching reading to Chinese, Korean, Navajo, and Russian children. It complements a recent summary of the literature on teaching reading to Spanish speaking students. There is a significant need for evidence-based research on…

  6. Navajo and Caucasian Children's Verbal and Nonverbal-Visual Behavior in the Urban Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilmet, George M.

    1978-01-01

    A formal observation technique was used in an urban classroom context to assess the verbal and nonverbal-visual behavior of 17 Navajo and 7 Caucasian children. Two statistical techniques revealed significant intergroup differences in verbal and nonverbal-visual style. ( Author)

  7. Instructor Reaction to Verbal and Nonverbal-Visual Styles: An Example of Navajo and Caucasian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilmet, George M.

    1979-01-01

    Holds that differences observed in instructor attention to Navajo and Caucasian children are due to the contrasting verbal and nonverbal-visual styles displayed by the two groups. Offers an evaluation program which attempts to offset teachers' tendencies to attend differentially to children displaying diverse behavioral styles in the classroom.…

  8. 25 CFR 161.800 - How does the Navajo Nation provide concurrence to BIA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How does the Navajo Nation provide concurrence to BIA? 161.800 Section 161.800 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... findings of fact, that the proposed action is necessary to protect the land under the Settlement Act...

  9. 40 CFR 49.5512 - Federal Implementation Plan Provisions for Four Corners Power Plant, Navajo Nation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall complete a minimum of one cycle of operation (sampling, analyzing, and data recording) for each... otherwise, to the Director, Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 339, Window Rock, Arizona 86515... Rock, Arizona 86515, or by facsimile to: (928) 871-7996 (facsimile), and to the Regional...

  10. 40 CFR 49.5512 - Federal Implementation Plan Provisions for Four Corners Power Plant, Navajo Nation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall complete a minimum of one cycle of operation (sampling, analyzing, and data recording) for each... otherwise, to the Director, Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 339, Window Rock, Arizona 86515... Rock, Arizona 86515, or by facsimile to: (928) 871-7996 (facsimile), and to the Regional...

  11. 40 CFR 49.5512 - Federal Implementation Plan Provisions for Four Corners Power Plant, Navajo Nation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall complete a minimum of one cycle of operation (sampling, analyzing, and data recording) for each... otherwise, to the Director, Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 339, Window Rock, Arizona 86515... Rock, Arizona 86515, or by facsimile to: (928) 871-7996 (facsimile), and to the Regional...

  12. Doing Something about Young Navajo Women Who Are School Dropouts. [A Project Evaluation).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokler, Mary M.; Hernandez, Francisca

    This is an external evaluation of the "Career Education and High School Completion Project for Girls and Young Women" at the Crownpoint (New Mexico) Institute of Technology (CIT). The project, funded by the federal Women's Educational Equity Act Program (WEEAP), targeted primarily Navajo females age 18 and under in grades 7 through 12…

  13. An Analysis of Community-School Relations in One Suburban and Four Navajo School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherspoon, Gary Jay

    The primary concern of this research was with community-school relations in American Indian education, particularly Navajo education. Major data on which this study was based came from interviews with 223 parents whose children attended various types of schools in Arizona during 1967-68: Nazlini (Bureau of Indian Affairs), Many Farms (BIA and…

  14. Methods and Resources for the Construction and Maintenance of a Navajo Population Register.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, William H.

    The most feasible method for constructing a Navajo population register was to produce a preliminary register from data contained in existing records and to perfect and extend this register either through subsequent clerical and record-accumulating operations, the existing school census operation, a special program of field enumeration, or a…

  15. American Indian Bilingual Education. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard

    Bilingual education programs have been established in such Native American languages as Aleut, Yupik, Tlingit, Haida, Athabaskan, Cherokee, Lakota, Navajo, Papago, Pomo, Passamaquoddy, Seminole, Tewa, and Zuni. These programs include the: Choctaw Bilingual Education Program, Northern Cheyenne Bilingual Education Program, Lakota Bilingual Education…

  16. Qualitative Study of the Use of Traditional Healing by Asthmatic Navajo Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Sickle, David; Morgan, Frank; Wright, Anne L.

    2003-01-01

    Despite increasing prevalence of asthma among American Indians and/or Alaska Natives, little is known about their use of traditional healing in its management. A convenience sample of 24 Navajo families with asthmatic members (n=35) was interviewed between June 1997 and September 1998. While 46% of families had previously used traditional healing,…

  17. Cross Country, Rodeo, Archery: Navajo Athletic Programs Give Students Running Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Natasha Kaye

    2009-01-01

    While tribal college athletic programs were not designed to market the colleges, there is no denying they have generated positive attention and have perhaps even helped to highlight the colleges' purpose. Dine College and Navajo Technical College are among a handful of tribal colleges who have made athletic programs a priority. They have since…

  18. The Goal Wheel: Adapting Navajo Philosophy and the Medicine Wheel to Work with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Holly; Bruce, Mary Alice; Stellern, John

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a group counseling model that is based on the indigenous medicine wheel as well as Navajo philosophy by which to help troubled adolescents restore harmony and balance in their lives, through establishing goals and sequential steps to accomplish these goals. The authors call this model the Goal Wheel. A…

  19. Provenance and tectonic-paleogeographic evolution: Constraints from detrital zircon U-Pb ages of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic deposits in the northern Sichuan basin, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tongbin; Cheng, Nanfei; Song, Maoshuang

    2016-09-01

    U-Pb ages of 290 new detrital zircons from five Late Triassic-Early Jurassic sandstone samples in the northern Sichuan basin, along with other geological data, are used to constrain the sediment provenance and evaluate tectonic-paleogeographic evolution for the adjacent orogens through/from which these sediments were potentially derived. The Upper Triassic depocenter was located at the front of the Longmen Shan belt, and sediments in the western, southern and eastern Sichuan basin shared the southern North China block (NCB) and Qinling belt with the eastern Songpan-Ganzi terrane of Middle-Upper Triassic via the Longmen Shan belt, whereas the northern part of the basin was fed by dominant South Qinling belt (SQB) and northern Yangtze block and possibly subordinate southern NCB. Also, the youngest population in the northern Sichuan basin has a slightly younger age peak (∼235 Ma) than those (∼270 Ma) in other parts of the basin. During the Early Jurassic, the depocenter was still at the front of the Longmen Shan belt but only northern regions (e.g., SQB and northern Yangtze block) fed the basin. The northern Sichuan basin received less sediments from the southern NCB and more from the SQB and northern Yangtze block during the Early Jurassic than during the Late Triassic. The middle Mesoproterozoic detrital zircons, which likely originated from the North Qinling belt and northern Yangtze block where rocks with these zircons may be unexposed, occur more widely in the Lower Jurassic than in the Upper Triassic. These facts suggest that from the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, it was increasingly difficult for sediments to transport from the NCB into the northern Sichuan basin and the provenance transferred progressively from the southern NCB to both the SQB and northern Yangtze block, implying the continuous South China block-NCB collision during that time.

  20. Is there a basin-centered gas accumulation in Cotton Valley Group Sandstones, Gulf Coast Basin, U.S.A.?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartberger, Charles E.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Condon, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is reevaluating the resource potential of selected domestic basin-centered gas accumulations. Basin-centered gas accumulations are characterized by presence of gas in extensive low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in which conventional seals and trapping mechanisms are absent, abnormally high or low reservoir pressures exist, and gas-water contacts are absent. In 1995, the USGS assessed one basin-centered gas play and two conventional plays within the trend of Jurassic and Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group fl uvial-deltaic and barrierisland/ strandplain sandstones across the onshore northern Gulf of Mexico Basin. Detailed evaluation of geologic and production data provides new insights into these Cotton Valley plays. Two Cotton Valley sandstone trends are identifi ed based on reservoir properties and gas-production characteristics. Transgressive blanket sandstones across northern Louisiana have relatively high porosity and permeability and do not require fracture stimulation to produce gas at commercial rates. South of this trend, and extending westward into eastern Texas, massive sandstones of the Cotton Valley trend exhibit low porosity and permeability and require fracture stimulation. The high permeability of Cotton Valley blanket sandstones is not conducive to the presence of basin-centered gas, but lowpermeability massive sandstones provide the type of reservoir in which basin-centered gas accumulations commonly occur. Data on source rocks, including burial and thermal history, are consistent with the interpretation of potential basincentered gas within Cotton Valley sandstones. However, pressure gradients throughout most of the blanket- and massivesandstone trends are normal or nearly normal, which is not characteristic of basin-centered gas accumulations. The presence of gas-water contacts in at least seven fi elds across the blanket-sandstone trend together with relatively

  1. Experimental research on seismoelectric effects in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rong; Wei, Jian-Xing; Di, Bang-Rang; Ding, Pin-Bo; Liu, Zi-Chun

    2016-09-01

    The seismoelectric effects induced from the coupling of the seismic wave field and the electromagnetic field depend on the physical properties of the reservoir rocks. We built an experimental apparatus to measure the seismoelectric effects in saturated sandstone samples. We recorded the seismoelectric signals induced by P-waves and studied the attenuation of the seismoelectric signals induced at the sandstone interface. The analysis of the seismoelectric effects suggests that the minimization of the potential difference between the reference potential and the baseline potential of the seismoelectric disturbance area is critical to the accuracy of the seismoelectric measurements and greatly improves the detectability of the seismoelectric signals. The experimental results confirmed that the seismoelectric coupling of the seismic wave field and the electromagnetic field is induced when seismic wave propagating in a fluid-saturated porous medium. The amplitudes of the seismoelectric signals decrease linearly with increasing distance between the source and the interface, and decay exponentially with increasing distance between the receiver and the interface. The seismoelectric response of sandstone samples with different permeabilities suggests that the seismoelectric response is directly related to permeability, which should help obtaining the permeability of reservoirs in the future.

  2. Matrix versus fracture permeability in a regional sandstone aquifer (Wajid sandstone, SW Saudi Arabia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Ajmi, Hussain; Hinderer, Matthias; Rausch, Randolf; Hornung, Jens; Bassis, Alexander; Keller, Martin; Schüth, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Sandstones are often characterized as fractured aquifers. We present a case study of the Wajid sandstone, which forms a regional aquifer system in SW Saudi Arabia, where matrix, fracture, and large-scale hydraulic conductivities are coincident. The measurements deal with different scales and methods and are based on porosity and permeability measurements in the laboratory, as well as pumping tests in the field. Porosities of the sandstone samples in general are high and range between less than 5 % and more than 45 %. Gas permeabilities for strongly cemented samples are < 1 mD, whereas most samples range in between 500 and 5,000 mD. There is only a weak anisotropy with preference of the horizontal x-, y-directions. Hydraulic conductivities of the matrix samples (5.5 · 10-6 m/s and 1.1 · 10-5 m/s for the Upper and Lower Wajid sandstone, respectively) were in the same order of magnitude compared to hydraulic conductivities derived from pumping tests (8.3 · 10-5 m/s and 2.2 · 10-5 m/s for the Upper and Lower Wajid sandstone, respectively).

  3. Vertebrate fossils and trace fossils in Upper Jurassic-Lower cretaceous red beds in the Atacama region, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, C. M.; Suárez, M.

    Pterosaur, dinosaur, and crocodile bones are recorded here for the first time in Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous red beds in the Atacama region east of Copiapó, Chile. Trace fossils produced by vertebrate animals include the footprints of theropod dinosaurs and the depressions of sandstone laminae interpreted as burrows and foot impressions. The fossils occur in the 1500-meter-thick Quebrada Monardes Formation, which consists predominantly of the aeolian and alluvial deposits of a semi-arid terrestrial environment. Vertebrate fossils are very rare in Chile. Dinosaur bones and footprints have previously been recorded at only seven locations, and pterosaur remains at only one location. The newly discovered dinosaur bones are the oldest to be described in Chile.

  4. Tectonic evolution of the Malay Peninsula inferred from Jurassic to Cretaceous paleomagnetic results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otofuji, Yo-ichiro; Moriyama, Yuji T.; Arita, Maiko P.; Miyazaki, Masanari; Tsumura, Kosuke; Yoshimura, Yutaka; Shuib, Mustaffa Kamal; Sone, Masatoshi; Miki, Masako; Uno, Koji; Wada, Yutaka; Zaman, Haider

    2017-02-01

    A primary remanent magnetization is identified in the Jurassic-Cretaceous red bed sandstones of the Tembeling Group in Peninsular Malaysia. This high-temperature magnetic component is unblocked at 680-690 °C, revealing a clockwise deflected direction of Ds = 56.8°, Is = 31.6° (where ks = 8.5, α95 = 11.3° and N = 22) in stratigraphic coordinates. The primary origin of this component is ascertained by a positive fold test and a geomagnetic polarity reversal in the Kuala Wau section. Secondary remanent magnetizations are identified in the rocks of the Tembeling and Bertangga basins, which indicate a counter-clockwise deflection in the geographic coordinates (Dg = 349.1°, Ig = 15.3° where kg = 11.8, α95 = 5.1°, N = 72). The comparison with the expected paleomagnetic directions from the 130 Ma and 40 Ma Eurasian poles indicates two-stages of tectonic movement in the southern Malay Peninsula: (1) a clockwise rotation of 61.1° ± 11.9° accompanied by a 13.3° ± 8.1° southward displacement after the Cretaceous; and (2) a subsequent counter-clockwise rotation of 18.5° ± 5.0° to the present day position. The first stage of rotation is ascribed to tectonic deformation caused by the indentation of India into Asia after 55 Ma, while the second stage is attributed to the collision of the Australian Plate with SE Asia after 30-20 Ma. The present paleomagnetic results from the Jurassic-Cretaceous Tembeling Group thus reveal impacts of both of these collisions on SE Asia in general and on Peninsular Malaysia in particular.

  5. Paleomagnetic evidence for Post-Jurassic stability of southeastern Mexico: Maya Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Jose C.; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Helsley, Charles E.

    1990-05-01

    The tectonic evolution of southeastern Mexico has been a subject of major controversy, not only in regard to past geometry but also in the timing of proposed geological events as well. For the past 10 years, most, if not all, investigators agree that the Gulf of Mexico Basin was formed by Late Jurassic time and that the Maya Terrane was in its current location prior to the Cretaceous. In order to gain further insight into the drift history of the Maya Terrane we have undertaken a paleomagnetic study of the uppermost Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous (Tithonian-lower Neocomian?) San Ricardo Formation in southeastern Mexico, at 93.7°W, 16.8°N. The sampling site is located east of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, on the southwest side of the Maya block, at the base of the Yucatan Peninsula. A suite of 133 samples was collected in stratigraphic succession from a 114-m-thick sequence of red shales and sandstones near Cintalapa, Chiapas, Mexico. After progressive thermal demagnetization of all samples at six steps from 350°C to 630°C, 89 samples were selected for final paleopole analysis on the basis of their magnetic stability. Four different polarity intervals were observed, the sequence being from bottom to top: N, R, N, R which assists in the assessment of the reliability of the observations. The mean pole position obtained, 160.0°E, 69.8°N, agrees with the mean pole position of the upper part of the Morrison Formation of Colorado, a unit of virtually identical age. These results indicate that no discernible rotation or displacement of the Maya block has occurred since at least early Neocomian times.

  6. Synkinematic quartz cementation in partially open fractures in sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukar, Estibalitz; Laubach, Stephen E.; Fall, Andras; Eichhubl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Faults and networks of naturally open fractures can provide open conduits for fluid flow, and may play a significant role in hydrocarbon recovery, hydrogeology, and CO2 sequestration. However, sandstone fracture systems are commonly infilled, at least to some degree, by quartz cement, which can stiffen and occlude fractures. Such cement deposits can systematically reduce the overall permeability enhancement due to open fractures (by reducing open fracture length) and result in permeability anisotropies. Thus, it is important to identify the factors that control the precipitation of quartz in fractures in order to identify potential fluid conduits under the present-day stress field. In many sandstones, quartz nucleates syntaxially on quartz grain or cement substrate of the fracture wall, and extends between fracture walls only locally, forming pillars or bridges. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images reveal that the core of these bridges are made up of bands of broken and resealed cement containing wall-parallel fluid inclusion planes. The fluid inclusion-rich core is usually surrounded by a layer of inclusion-poor clear quartz that comprises the lateral cement. Such crack-seal textures indicate that this phase was precipitating while the fractures were actively opening (synkinematic growth). Rapid quartz accumulation is generally believed to require temperatures of 80°C or more. Fluid inclusion thermometry and Raman spectroscopy of two-phase aqueous fluid-inclusions trapped in crack-seal bands may be used to track the P-T-X evolution of pore fluids during fracture opening and crack-seal cementation of quartz. Quartz cement bridges across opening mode fractures in the Cretaceous Travis Peak Formation of the tectonically quiescent East Texas Basin indicate individual fractures opened over a 48 m.y. time span at rates of 16-23 µm/m.y. Similarly, the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Piceance Basin, Colorado contains fractures that

  7. Suitability of Frigg, Åre, and Sognefjord Formation sandstones (North Sea) for storage of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saether, O. M.; Webb, J. C.; Wissing, B. W.; Bøe, R.

    2012-12-01

    The steady increase in concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere owing to the combustion of hydrocarbons is considered a major factor contributing to global warming. The storage of CO2 as subcritical gas in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and deep aquifers is considered a viable mitigation for reducing the impact of global temperature increase as a consequence of increased atmospheric CO2 (Hitcheon 1999, Bachu 2008). The volume of CO2 stored in the subsurface as supercritical liquid in any given sedimentary rock formation could be limited to <1% of the total pore space. Storage of larger volumes might lead to increased pressure and cause injection rates to undergo exponential decline (Ehlig-Economides and Economides 2010). Petrographic investigations of samples of sandstone from three quartz-rich sandstone formations in the Norwegian part of the North Sea, i.e. Tertiary Frigg Formation, Lower Jurassic Åre Formation, and Upper Jurassic Sognefjord Formation, reveal that all three sandstone formations exhibit features that favor suitability for CO2 storage. Favorable features include: 1) Abundant effective porosity 2) Stable mineralogy (i.e. abundant quartz) 3) Lack of chemically unstable detrital minerals (i.e. potassium and plagioclase feldspar, carbonates, volcanic rock fragments) 4) Lack of acid-soluble cements (e.g. iron-chlorite clay, siderite, calcite, or dolomite) 5) Lack of fresh-water sensitive (expansive) clay mineral cements (e.g. montmorillonite and mixed-layer illite-smectite (ML-IS). Intergranular porosity for each of the formations is estimated to be 28-31% of total rock volume for the Frigg Formation, 19-34% for the Åre Formation, and 16-29% for the Sognefjord Formation. Intergranular porosity of sandstones in each of the three formations is very well connected. Pore-throat radii of intergranular pores are interpreted to be significantly larger than 0.5 μm. Pore throats are not occluded by clay mineral cements, resulting in excellent estimated

  8. Principal unconformities in Triassic and Jurassic rocks, western interior United States; a preliminary survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pipiringos, G.N.; O'Sullivan, Robert Brett

    1978-01-01

    The Triassic and Jurassic rocks in Western Interior United States contain nine unconformities each of which was destroyed to some extent by a younger unconformity. Regardless of extent, all are useful for correlation of rock sequences in areas where fossils or age dates are lacking. The purpose of this report is to call attention to the presence, significance, and value for correlation of these unconformities. The Triassic unconformities are designated from oldest to youngest, Tr-1, Tr-2, and Tr-3; the Jurassic ones similarly are designated J-0, J-l, J-2, J-3, J-4, and J-5. Of these, the J-2 surface is the best preserved and most widespread. It extends throughout the Western Interior and truncates the older unconformities in different parts of this area. Consequently, the J-2 surface is discussed and illustrated in much more detail than the others. Identification of these unconformities throughout large areas where their presence hitherto had been unknown results in some new unexpected correlations and conclusions. Principal among these are: (1) The Red Draw Member of the Jelm Formation of southeastern Wyoming equals the lower part of the Crow Mountain Sandstone of central Wyoming. The Sips Creek Member of the Jelm Formation of southeastern Wyoming equals the upper part of the Crow Mountain Sandstone of central Wyoming and the Gartra Member of the Chinle Formation in the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah and northwestern Colorado. The Chinle Formation of the Colorado Plateau and the Uinta Mountains equals the upper part of the Crow Mountain plus the Popo Agie Formation of central Wyoming. (2) The Nugget Sandstone of northern Utah and southwestern Wyoming approximately equals the Glen Canyon Group of the Colorado Plateau. The Temple Cap Sandstone of southwestern Utah equals the Gypsum Spring Formation and the Gypsum Spring Member of the Twin Creek Limestone of Wyoming and the Nesson Formation of Nordquist in the subsurface of the Williston basin. The Sawtooth and

  9. 78 FR 2685 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Navajo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... be limited to, mechanical, cultural, biological and herbicidal treatments, and other methods that may... authorize new treatments of noxious and invasive weed infestations throughout the Navajo Indian Reservation... historic resources; biological resources; public health; and socioeconomics. The BIA will use...

  10. Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies relationships in a passive margin basin, western North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, B.E.

    1988-02-01

    Correlation of facies from hydrocarbon-bearing continental and transitional marine sandstones to time-equivalent high-energy shelf-margin carbonates provide insight into hydrocarbon habitats of the Baltimore Canyon basin. These facies occur within a thick (> 10,000 ft) prograded wedge of shelf sediments in this passive margin basin. Wells drilled to test structural closures in shallow-water (< 600 ft) areas of Baltimore Canyon penetrate clastic facies which are time-equivalent to the downdip carbonate facies tested in deep-water wells. Numerous hydrocarbon shows, including a noncommercial gas and gas-condensate accumulation, occur with sandstone units that were deposited in prograding continental/fluvial and transitional marine environments located updip of the Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian carbonate shelf edge. The continental and transitional facies are overlain by a fine-grained deltaic complex which forms a regionally extensive top seal unit. The deltaic complex was deposited during aggradation of the Kimmeridgian through Berriasian shelf-margin carbonates penetrated by the deep-water wells. Deep-water wells (> 5000 ft) drilled off the continental shelf edge to test large structural closures along the downdip termination of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous carbonate shelf edge encountered no significant hydrocarbon shows. Reservoir rocks in these wells consist of (1) oolite grainstone which was deposited within a shoal-water complex located at the Aptian shelf edge, and (2) coral-stromatoporoid grainstone and boundstone which formed an aggraded shelf-margin complex located at the Kimmeridgian through Berriasian shelf edge. Structural closures with reservoir and top seals are present in both updip and downdip trends. The absence of hydrocarbon shows in downdip carbonate reservoirs suggests a lack of source rocks available to charge objectives at the shelf margin.

  11. Natural gas plays in Jurassic reservoirs of southwestern Alabama and the Florida panhandle area

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A. Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa ); Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Three Jurassic natural gas trends can be delineated in Alabama and the Florida panhandle area. They include a deep natural gas trend, a natural gas and condensate trend, and an oil and associated natural gas trend. These trends are recognized by hydrocarbon types, basinal position, and relationship to regional structural features. Within these natural gas trends, at least eight distinct natural gas plays can be identified. These plays are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps and reservoirs. The deep natural gas trend includes the Mobile Bay area play, which is characterized by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Lower Mobile Bay fault system and Norphlet eolian sandstone reservoirs exhibiting primary and secondary porosity at depths exceeding 20,000 ft. The natural gas and condensate trend includes the Mississippi Interior Salt basin play, Mobile graben play, Wiggins arch flank play, and the Pollard fault system play. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin play is typified by salt anticlines associated with salt tectonism in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin and Smackover dolomitized peloidal and pelmoldic grainstone and packstone reservoirs at depths of approximately 16,000 ft. The Mobile graben play is exemplified by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Mobile graben and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Wiggins arch flank play is characterized by structural traps consisting of salt anticlines associated with stratigraphic thinning and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Pollard fault system play is typified by combination petroleum traps. The structural component is associated with the Pollard fault system and reservoirs at depths of approximately 15,000 ft. These reservoirs are dominantly Smackover dolomitized oomoldic and pelmoldic grainstones and packstones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones exhibiting primary and secondary porosity.

  12. Dinosaur ichnofauna of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous of the Paraná Basin (Brazil and Uruguay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francischini, H.; Dentzien–Dias, P. C.; Fernandes, M. A.; Schultz, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sedimentary layers are represented in the Brazilian Paraná Basin by the fluvio-aeolian Guará Formation and the Botucatu Formation palaeoerg, respectively, overlapped by the volcanic Serra Geral Formation. In Uruguay, the corresponding sedimentary units are named Batoví and Rivera Members (both from the Tacuarembó Formation), and the lava flows constitute the Arapey Formation (also in Paraná Basin). Despite the lack of body fossils in the mentioned Brazilian formations, Guará/Batoví dinosaur fauna is composed of theropod, ornithopod and wide-gauge sauropod tracks and isolated footprints, as well as theropod teeth. In turn, the Botucatu/Rivera dinosaur fauna is represented by theropod and ornithopod ichnofossils smaller than those from the underlying units. The analysis of these dinosaur ichnological records and comparisons with other global Mesozoic ichnofauna indicates that there is a size reduction in dinosaur fauna in the more arid Botucatu/Rivera environment, which is dominated by aeolian dunes. The absence of sauropod trackways in the Botucatu Sandstone fits with the increasingly arid conditions because it is difficult for heavy animals to walk on sandy dunes, as well as to obtain the required amount of food resources. This comparison between the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous dinosaur fauna in south Brazil and Uruguay demonstrates the influence of aridization on the size of animals occupying each habitat.

  13. Total petroleum systems of the Bonaparte Gulf Basin area, Australia; Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic; Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian; Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Bonaparte Gulf Basin Province (USGS #3910) of northern Australia contains three important hydrocarbon source-rock intervals. The oldest source-rock interval and associated reservoir rocks is the Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian petroleum system. This petroleum system is located at the southern end of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf and includes both onshore and offshore areas within a northwest to southeast trending Paleozoic rift that was initiated in the Devonian. The Milligans Formation is a Carboniferous marine shale that sources accumulations of both oil and gas in Carboniferous and Permian deltaic, marine shelf carbonate, and shallow to deep marine sandstones. The second petroleum system in the Paleozoic rift is the Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian. Source rocks include Lower Permian Keyling Formation delta-plain coals and marginal marine shales combined with Upper Permian Hyland Bay Formation prodelta shales. These source-rock intervals provide gas and condensate for fluvial, deltaic, and shallow marine sandstone reservoirs primarily within several members of the Hyland Bay Formation. The Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian petroleum system is located in the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, north of the Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian petroleum system, and may extend northwest under the Vulcan graben sub-basin. The third and youngest petroleum system is the Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic system that is located seaward of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf on the Australian continental shelf, and trends southwest-northeast. Source-rock intervals in the Vulcan graben sub-basin include deltaic mudstones of the Middle Jurassic Plover Formation and organic-rich marine shales of the Upper Jurassic Vulcan Formation and Lower Cretaceous Echuca Shoals Formation. These intervals produce gas, oil, and condensate that accumulates in, shallow- to deep-marine sandstone reservoirs of the Challis and Vulcan Formations of Jurassic to Cretaceous age. Organic-rich, marginal marine claystones and coals of the

  14. Internal deformation of the Shan-Thai block inferred from paleomagnetism of Jurassic sedimentary rocks in Northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Kazuyoshi; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Zaman, Haider; Inokuchi, Hiroo; Miura, Daisuke; Surinkum, Adichat; Paiyarom, Apichat; Phajuy, Burapha; Chantraprasert, Sarawute; Panjasawatwong, Yuenyong; Wongpornchai, Pisanu; Otofuji, Yo-ichiro

    2007-05-01

    Paleomagnetic samples of red sandstones were collected at 16 sites from the Lower to Upper Jurassic Phu Kradung formation and the Upper Jurassic Phra Wihan formation around Nan City (19.2°N, 101.0°E) in the southern region of the Shan-Thai block. After stepwise thermal demagnetization, a high-temperature component with an unblocking temperature of about 680 °C is isolated from 11 sites. We interpret this to be a prefold characteristic remanent magnetization because of a positive fold test at the 95% confidence level. The tilt-corrected mean paleomagnetic direction from 11 sites is D = 32.3°, I = 33.3°, α95 = 12.2°, k = 15.0, which gives a paleomagnetic pole for this area of 60.1°N, 186.5°E with A95 = 11.7°. Compared with a Jurassic paleopole for the stable part of the Yangtze block, we observe a clockwise tectonic rotation of 12.8°, which is similar to the observed rotation (18-28°) of the northern region of the Shan-Thai block. This amount contrasts with a large rotation of more than 45° that is estimated from the narrow zone extending from Luxi to Mengla in the central region of this block. This declination aspect suggests that a coherent whole block rotation by about 20° of the Shan-Thai block took place in an earlier phase during indentation of India into Asia and that an internal deformation with additional local rotation between 25° and 77° followed within a limited zone in the central part. The internal deformation of the Shan-Thai block absorbed the stress on the Asian continent induced by indentation of India as well as its coherent whole block motions of clockwise rotation and southward displacement.

  15. Paleozoic to Jurassic terrane accretion along the northeastern margin of Tibet plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Yongjiang; Genser, Johann; Ren, Shoumai

    2010-05-01

    The Tibet plateau is considered to have been constructed by a number of basement terranes accreted to the Eurasian margin during Paleozoic to Mesozoic times, and accretion is interpreted to have progressed southwards. The northern margin, exposed in Altyn and Qilian Mountains, is generally considered as an Lower Paleozoic orogen including previously subducted ultra-high successions (Yin and Harrison, 2000; Xiao et al., 2009). Previous tectonic models of the Qaidam block and adjacent mountain ranges at the northeastern margin of the Tibet plateau assumed a minor role of Indosinian tectonism in that region, and firm evidence was only reported from eastern Kunlun Mountains (e.g., Liu et al., 2005). Based on four sources of new data, we propose that the Indosinian tectonism was much more widespread in the northeastern Qaidam block and adjacent mountain ranges, Altyn and Qilian Mts., as believed before and we propose a new tectonic model. The new data sources comprise: (1) 40Ar/39Ar dating of detrital white mica of Jurassic to Pliocene sandstones from the north-eastern Qaidam basin fill; (2) interpretation of Ordovician, Devonian and Jurassic sedimentary successions, from which we interpret the Jurassic successions as intramontane molasse to the Indosinian orogen; (3) 40Ar/39Ar dating of detrital white mica in recent rivers from the southern Qilian Shan revealing possible basement sources in the Qilian Shan draining towards the Qaidam basin; and (4) structural study of basement rocks and subordinate 40Ar/39Ar mineral ages of metamorphic basement rocks. An Ordovician greywacke exposed in the eastern Qaidam basin (W of Delinghua) yields three 40Ar/39Ar age groups of detrital white mica: 900-922, 610-654 and 527-554 Ma. Furthermore, similar old age groups centering at ca. 670 and 1010 Ma are virtually widespread in recent rivers from Qilian Mountains and clearly demonstrate the presence of Panafrican and Grenvillian tectonic elements in the southern Qilian Mts. at the

  16. Poncho field - Cretaceous J sandstone stratigraphic traps - Denver basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, F.G.; Ziegler, J.R.

    1983-08-01

    Distributary channel and delta destructional sandstones of Early Cretaceous age are important reservoirs for stratigraphic traps in the J sandstone at Poncho field, Adams and Arapahoe Counties, Colorado. Cores and logs from the field area reveal a lowermost, nonproductive, northeast-trending delta front sandstoe (J-3); a middle complex of southeast- and east-trending, productive distributary channel sandstones (J-2) that grade into tightly cemented delta fringe marine sediments to the southeast and northeast; and an upper, northeast trending, productive delta destructional sandstone (J-1). Vertical and lateral sequences of sedimentary structures, textures, trace fossil assemblages, and geometry and trend of sandstone bodies suggest that these units were part of a wave-dominated delta complex that prograded to the east and southeast from the area of Lonetree field. Thin section and SEM analyses reveal that the principal cements in both reservoir sandstones are quartz overgrowths, kaolinite, and chlorite, and that the bulk of the porosity is secondary and related to dissolution of carbonate cement and feldspar grains. Porosities and permeabilities are most variable and lowest in the nonproductive delta front sandstones, averaging 15% and 7 md; variable and intermediate in the productive distributary channel sandstones, averaging 16% and 28 md; and most uniform and highest in the overlying delta destructional sandstones, averaging 21% and 88 md.

  17. Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hutley, J.K.

    1985-02-01

    Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

  18. Late Jurassic plutonism in the southwest U.S. Cordillera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Howard, K.A.; Richards, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Although plate reconstructions suggest that subduction was an approximately steady-state process from the mid-Mesozoic through the early Tertiary, recent precise geochronologic studies suggest highly episodic emplacement of voluminous continental-margin batholiths in the U.S. Cordillera. In central and southern California and western Arizona, major episodes of batholithic magmatism are known to have occurred in Permian-Triassic, Middle Jurassic, and late Early to Late Cretaceous time. However, recent studies of forearc-basin and continental-interior sediments suggest that Late Jurassic time was probably also a period of significant magmatism, although few dated plutons of this age have been recognized. We describe a belt of Late Jurassic plutonic and hypabyssal rocks at least 200 km in length that extends from the northwestern Mojave Desert through the Transverse Ranges. The belt lies outboard of both the voluminous Middle Jurassic arc and the ca. 148 Ma Independence dike swarm at these latitudes. The plutons include two intrusive suites emplaced between 157 and 149 Ma: a calc-alkaline suite compositionally unlike Permian-Triassic and Middle Jurassic mon-zonitic suites but similar to Late Cretaceous arc plutons emplaced across this region, and a contemporaneous but not comagmatic alkaline suite. The Late Jurassic was thus a time of both tectonic and magmatic transitions in the southern Cordillera. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  19. Multistage variable probability forest volume inventory. [Defiance Unit of the Navajo Nation in Arizona and Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The net board foot volume (Scribner log rule) of the standing Ponderosa pine timber on the Defiance Unit of the Navajo Nation's forested land was estimated using a multistage forest volume inventory scheme with variable sample selection probabilities. The inventory designed to accomplish this task required that both LANDSAT MSS digital data and aircraft acquired data be used to locate one acre ground splits, which were subsequently visited by ground teams conducting detailed tree measurements using an optical dendrometer. The dendrometer measurements were then punched on computer input cards and were entered in a computer program developed by the U.S. Forest Service. The resulting individual tree volume estimates were then expanded through the use of a statistically defined equation to produce the volume estimate for the entire area which includes 192,026 acres and is approximately a 44% the total forested area of the Navajo Nation.

  20. Written reflection and drawing as assessment: A case study of a Navajo elementary science classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Madeline

    The purpose of the study was to assess if science learning could be determined by using written reflection and drawings in a science classroom of 5 th-grade Navajo students. The significance of this study was the understanding of the culture, assessments and learning of Navajo students. I studied a classroom on the Navajo reservation wherein 26 members of the class took part in science instruction complemented by using writing and drawing which were used as their assessments. The perceptions of the 8 students who were interviewed represent the case. In the study I profiled the 8 participants. Their culture, language, and views on assessment and learning were documented by their words. Their responses described their learning experiences. Assessments were seen as frustrating and limiting expression of what was known and damaging when not contributed to learning. Students explained that drawing enabled them to remember along with provoking vocabulary development. Student cultural knowledge was documented as valuable background experience contributing to learning within the classroom. Students viewed science as needing to be useful in their culture. Finally, they were also very candid that their teachers must first get to know them for meaningful learning to begin. Learning for students was reinforced through writing and drawing the lesson's activities. Further concept development was assisted utilizing metacognition and creative problem solving techniques of elaboration and fluency applied to the writing and drawings. Based on the findings of this study, recommendations were made for use of holistic means of assessing Navajo children in science where preferred learning styles along with cultural background need to be included in assessment protocols. Using new and better assessment techniques can directly impact how students document their learning as well as reveal how they acquire new knowledge.

  1. Monitoring and analysis of sand dune movement and growth on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redsteer, Margaret Hiza; Bogle, Rian C.; Vogel, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Recurring drought and rising temperatures have caused reactivation and renewed growth of sand dunes on the lands of the Navajo Nation on the Colorado Plateau. Migrating dunes threaten health, housing, and transportation pathways. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are conducting research to better understand the processes of dune growth and movement. This research will provide critical data to the Native peoples of the region in their response to the changing environment.

  2. Anisotropy of permeability in faulted porous sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, N. J. C.; Healy, D.; Taylor, C. W.

    2014-06-01

    Studies of fault rock permeabilities advance the understanding of fluid migration patterns around faults and contribute to predictions of fault stability. In this study a new model is proposed combining brittle deformation structures formed during faulting, with fluid flow through pores. It assesses the impact of faulting on the permeability anisotropy of porous sandstone, hypothesising that the formation of fault related micro-scale deformation structures will alter the host rock porosity organisation and create new permeability pathways. Core plugs and thin sections were sampled around a normal fault and oriented with respect to the fault plane. Anisotropy of permeability was determined in three orientations to the fault plane at ambient and confining pressures. Results show that permeabilities measured parallel to fault dip were up to 10 times higher than along fault strike permeability. Analysis of corresponding thin sections shows elongate pores oriented at a low angle to the maximum principal palaeo-stress (σ1) and parallel to fault dip, indicating that permeability anisotropy is produced by grain scale deformation mechanisms associated with faulting. Using a soil mechanics 'void cell model' this study shows how elongate pores could be produced in faulted porous sandstone by compaction and reorganisation of grains through shearing and cataclasis.

  3. Compaction of Norphlet sandstones, Rankin County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, E.F.

    1987-09-01

    Fabric and porosity changes resulting from compaction were studied in sandstones from three cores sampled at depths between 15,900 and 22,500 ft. Point counts of 30 thin sections indicate that 0.4% of the rock volume was lost by ductile grain deformation and 3% by pressure solution at both grain contacts and at widely spaced stylolites. Pre-cement porosities of eolian sandstone range from 27 to 35% (mean = 29%), indicating that a total of from 10 to 18% porosity (mean = 16%) was lost by compaction (assuming 45% initial porosity). The difference between the total porosity loss and the sum of the other two processes is assumed to be the porosity lost by grain rearrangement (mean = 12.6%). The amount of pressure solution at grain contacts for each well is independent of depth, temperature, and amount of both quartz cement and total cement. Stylolites transect both grains and cements, which indicates they formed late in the diagenetic sequence. Silica released by pressure solution at quartz grain contacts could not be the sole source and was probably not even the major source of quartz cement in the formation, because cementation by quartz preceded the episode of strong pressure solution. In addition, the volume of silica released by pressure solution appears to have been inadequate to provide the volume of quartz cement present.

  4. Undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the U.S. Gulf Coast Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover Formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Ofori N.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has completed assessments of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and gas resources in the Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations of the onshore coastal plain and State waters of the U.S. Gulf Coast. The Norphlet Formation consists of sandstones and interbedded shales and siltstones deposited during a marine transgression. Along its northeast margin, deposition of the Norphlet was in alluvial fans, fluvial systems, and dune and clastic sabkha environments. Mudstones of the underlying Smackover Formation act as source rocks for Norphlet reservoirs. The Norphlet was divided into the following three assessment units (AUs): the Norphlet Salt Basins and Updip AU, the Norphlet Mobile Bay Deep Gas AU, and the Norphlet South Texas Gas AU. The lower part of the Smackover consists primarily of dark carbonate mudstone and argillaceous limestone deposited in low-energy environments, and is one of the Gulf of Mexico Basin’s major source rocks. The upper part of the Smackover is comprised primarily of grain-supported carbonates deposited in high-energy environments. The Smackover was divided into the following four AUs: the Smackover Updip and Peripheral Fault Zone AU, the Smackover Salt Basin AU, the Smackover South Texas AU, and the Smackover Downdip Continuous Gas AU. Although the Norphlet and Smackover formations have been the focus of extensive exploration and production, they probably still contain significant undiscovered oil and gas resources.

  5. Petroleum geology of the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous, Baltimore Canyon trough, western North Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, B.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Numerous hydrocarbon shows, including a noncommercial gas and gas-condensate accumulation, occur in the Baltimore Canyon Trough within sandstone units deposited in prograding coastal-plain and transitional-marine environments located updip of an Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian carbonate shelf edge. The coastal-plain and transitional-marine facies are overlain by a fine-grained deltaic complex dominated by delta-plain shales which collectively form a regionally extensive top seal unit. Wells drilled seaward of the continental shelf edge ( > 1,500 m water depth) tested large structural/stratigraphic closures along the downdip termination of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous carbonate shelf edge but encountered no significant hydrocarbon shows. Reservoir rocks in these wells consist of (1) oolite grain-stone, which was deposited within a shoal-water complex located at the Aptian shelf edge, and (2) coral-stromatoporoid grainstone and boundstone. Structural closures having reservoir and top seals are present in both updip and downdip trends. hydrocarbon shows in wells along the shelf interior trend indicate the presence of mature source beds, at least locally. The absence of hydrocarbon shows in downdip carbonate reservoirs and around the Schlee Dome, however, suggests charge/migration mechanisms within the fetch areas of these objectives have failed. Continued development of play concepts in the Baltimore Canyon Trough, therefore, requires identification and mapping of potential source-rock intervals and construction of hydrocarbon expulsion models to time hydrocarbon generation relative to trap formation.

  6. Sedimentological evolution, diagenesis and hydrocarbon potentiality of late Jurassic carbonates, Eastern Region, Yemen Arab Republic

    SciTech Connect

    El-anbaawy, M.I.H.; Al-thour, K.A. )

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of the lateral and vertical distribution of the lithofacies identified within the Late Jurassic Amran sequence (Thoma Member) in Jabal Al-Balaq area, Marib, Y.A.R., three megafacies were recognized. Proceeding from the shore landwards they are: Ooid bank, including barriers such as reefs and carbonate sand shoals adjacent to the margin of a shallow platform having intertidal to subtidal agitated water, the bank being composed of skeletal packstone, oolitic grainstone and oncolitic packstone; Shelf lagoon, behind the shoal, characterized by less turbulent pelletoidal wackestone, sandy mudstone and algal stromatolite (boundstone); Alluvial coastal plain, including tidal sand flat of the marine shoreline-intertidal area, where cross-bedded sandstone and alluvial fan toe conglomerate were deposited. The apparent small-scale facies variations which are the result of the allocyclic tectonically controlled sea level fluctuations, reflect a complex interfingering of the depositional environments and the resulting rock types. The paragenetic sequence of the post-depositional processes within the siliciclastics inferred is: iron oxide cementation, authigenic growth of mica clays, generation of pressure solution and compaction, and generation of quartz overgrowths. It is indicated that the compaction process followed the neomorphism and cementation within the carbonates.

  7. Tunasniyoj, a dinosaur tracksite from the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary of Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Apesteguía, Sebastián; Gallina, Pablo A

    2011-03-01

    Here we report a superbly preserved and profusely represented five-ichnotaxa dinosaur track assemblage near Icla village, 100 km southeast of Sucre, Bolivia. As preserved in reddish Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary aeolian sandstones, this rich and uncommon assemblage is, additionally, the oldest dinosaur tracksite for Bolivia. Four trackmakers were identified in the area: three quadrupedal and one bipedal, all of them with tracks of around 35 cm in lenght. One of the quadrupedals is represented by no less than five adult individuals (ichnotaxon A), and four purported juveniles (ichnotaxon B) walking in association. The other two quadrupedals (ichnotaxa C and D) involve four trackways, and the last, the bipedal trackmaker (ichnotaxon E), is represented by one trackway. The five ichnotaxa represented in the "Palmar de Tunasniyoj" could be tentatively assigned to the following trackmakers: Ichnotaxa A and B are assigned to basal stegosaurians; ichnotaxon C to a basal tyreophoran, perhaps related to the ankylosaur lineage; ichnotaxon D to the Ankylosauria, and ichnotaxon E to Theropoda. The Tunasniyoj assemblage, the oldest dinosaur tracksite for Bolivia, includes the oldest known evidence assigned to ankylosaurs and stegosaurs for South America.

  8. Monitoring Drought Conditions in the Navajo Nation Using NASA Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Vickie; Gao, Michael; Cary, Cheryl; Turnbull-Appell, Sophie; Surunis, Anton

    2016-01-01

    The Navajo Nation, a 65,700 sq km Native American territory located in the southwestern United States, has been increasingly impacted by severe drought events and changes in climate. These events are coupled with a lack of domestic water infrastructure and economic resources, leaving approximately one-third of the population without access to potable water in their homes. Current methods of monitoring drought are dependent on state-based monthly Standardized Precipitation Index value maps calculated by the Western Regional Climate Center. However, these maps do not provide the spatial resolution needed to illustrate differences in drought severity across the vast Nation. To better understand and monitor drought events and drought regime changes in the Navajo Nation, this project created a geodatabase of historical climate information specific to the area, and a decision support tool to calculate average Standardized Precipitation Index values for user-specified areas. The tool and geodatabase use Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission (TRMM) and Global Precipitation Monitor (GPM) observed precipitation data and Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model modeled historical precipitation data, as well as NASA's modeled Land Data Assimilation Systems deep soil moisture, evaporation, and transpiration data products. The geodatabase and decision support tool will allow resource managers in the Navajo Nation to utilize current and future NASA Earth observation data for increased decision-making capacity regarding future climate change impact on water resources.

  9. Psychological effects of technological/human-caused environmental disasters: examination of the Navajo and uranium.

    PubMed

    Markstrom, Carol A; Charley, Perry H

    2003-01-01

    Disasters can be defined as catastrophic events that challenge the normal range of human coping ability. The technological/human-caused disaster, a classification of interest in this article, is attributable to human error or misjudgment. Lower socioeconomic status and race intersect in the heightened risk for technological/human-caused disasters among people of color. The experience of the Navajo with the uranium industry is argued to specifically be this type of a disaster with associated long-standing psychological impacts. The history of the Navajo with uranium mining and milling is reviewed with a discussion of the arduous efforts for compensation. The psychological impacts of this long-standing disaster among the Navajo are organized around major themes of: (a) human losses and bereavement, (b) environmental losses and contamination, (c) feelings of betrayal by government and mining and milling companies, (d) fears about current and future effects, (e) prolonged duration of psychological effects, (f) anxiety and depression, and (g) complicating factors of poverty and racism. The paper concludes with suggestions for culturally-appropriate education and intervention.

  10. Stratigraphic and structural configuration of the Navajo (Jurassic) through Ouray (Mississippian-Devonian) formations in the vicinity of Davis and Lavender Canyons, southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    McCleary, J.R.; Romie, J.E.

    1986-04-01

    This study developed a three-dimensional computer model of stratigraphic and structural relationships within a 3497-km/sup 2/ (1350-mi/sup 2/) study area centered on the proposed site for a high-level nuclear waste repository in southeastern Utah. The model consists of a sequence of internally reconciled isopach and structure contour maps horizontally registered and stored in stratigraphic order. This model can be used to display cross sections, perspective block diagrams, or fence diagrams at any orientation; estimate depth of formation contacts and thicknesses for any new stratigraphic or hydrologic boreholes; facilitate ground-water modeling studies; and evaluate the structural and stratigraphic evolution of the study area. This study also includes limited evaluations of aquifer continuity in the Elephant Canyon and Honaker Trail Formations, and of salt dissolution and flowage features as interpreted from geophysical logs. The study identified a long history of movement in the fault system in the north-central part of the study area and a major salt flowage feature in the northeastern part. It describes the Elephant Canyon Formation aquifer as laterally limited, the Honaker Trail Formation aquifer as fairly continuous over the area, and Beef Basin in the southern part of the area as a probable dissolution feature. It also concludes that the Shay-Bridger Jack-Salt Creek Graben system is apparently a vertically continuous feature between the basement and ground surface. No stratigraphic or structural discontinuities were detected in the vicinity of Davis Canyon that appear to be detrimental to the siting of a waste repository.

  11. The Origin of the Jurassic Quiet Zone -new insights from Hawaiian Jurassic magnetic anomalies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, M.; Tivey, M.; Sager, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies recorded in oceanic crust, have played a central role in documenting Earth's magnetic field history as compiled in the geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS). The oldest part of the marine record is the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) (pre-M29 chrons) which is known to be a period when field intensity was low, while reversal rate was high. The origin and character of the JQZ has been the subject of marine magnetic studies over past 20 years in the western Pacific where the oldest and arguably best preserved Jurassic magnetic anomalies create three Jurassic lineation sets (Japanese, Hawaiian, and Phoenix). The Japanese JQZ sequence was extensively investigated by an aeromagnetic and 2 deeptow magnetometer surveys, revealing (i) the presence of lineated anomalies older than M29; (ii) a GPTS record extending from M29 to M44 with a tie to ODP Hole 801C and (iii) remarkably fast reversals that decrease in intensity back in time until M38. Prior to M38 there is a low amplitude zone (LAZ) in anomalies lasting until M42, when both anomaly amplitude and a lineated character reappears around Hole 801C. Recently collected (2011) high quality seasurface marine magnetic anomaly data from the Hawaiian lineations show changes in magnetic anomaly shape and amplitude that are similar in to the Japanese lineations, suggesting that the anomalies record globally coherent geomagnetic field behavior for the Jurassic. Specifically, the strong similarity of anomaly patterns between the Japanese and Hawaiian sequences from M19 to M38 supports the remarkably dynamic geomagnetic field behavior of fast reversals and changing intensity, confirming a proposed record of the GPTS sequence for M29 to M38. While the LAZ in the Hawaiian sequence is not as clear as in the Japanese lineations, we believe we can correlate the earlier M42-M44 sequence between the two sets of lineations. The slower spreading rate in the Hawaiian lineations may contribute to this lack of resolution of

  12. Lithofacies and sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Upper Jurassic siliciclastics in the eastern Kopet-Dagh Basin, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zand-Moghadam, Hamed; Moussavi-Harami, Reza; Mahboubi, Asadollah; Aghaei, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian) Mozduran Formation is the most important gas reservoirs of the northeast Iran. Siliciclastic facies of this formation in eastern most parts of the basin have not been studied yet. Therefore, four stratigraphic sections of Mozduran Formation have been selected in the Kole-Malekabad, Kale-Karab, Deraz-Ab and Karizak to interpret depositional history and analyze depositional sequences. Based on texture and sedimentary structures, 14 slilciclastic lithofacies were identified and classified into four categories, including conglomerate (Gms, Gp, Gt), sandstone (Sh, Sp, St, Sr, Sl, Sm, Se), mud rock (Fl) and intermediate sandstone-mud rock (Sr (Fl), Sr/Fl, Fl (Sr)). Identified lithofacies formed four architectural elements CH, SB, LA and FF. Lithofacies characteristics and architectural elements with mostly bimodal pattern of paleocurrents show that the majority of Mozduran lithofacies deposited in the coastal environment (tidal influence). Sequence stratigraphic analysis shows that the Kole-Malekabad section consists of two depositional sequences while other sections are characterized by three depositional sequences. The lower and upper sequence boundaries of the Mozduran Formation in all stratigraphic sections are SB1 that are distinguished by paleosol and sometime conglomerate horizons. Most of depositional sequences in studied sections are composed only of TST and HST. The TST deposits consist mostly of quartzarenite and litharenite petrofacies that have been deposited in the tidal zone. HST packages are mostly including mud rocks with interdeds of sandstone lithofacies that are deposited in supratidal setting. The LST facies is recognized only in the DS3 (equivalent to the second depositional sequences of the Kole-Malekabad), which consist of conglomerate facies. Instead, the Kole-Malekabad section is often composed of supratidal gypsiferrous shales, indicating sea level fall in the study area.

  13. Variations in fluvial style in the Westwater Canyon Member, Morrison formation (Jurassic), San Juan basin, Colorado plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miall, A.D.; Turner-Peterson, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques of architectural element analysis and lateral profiling have been applied to the fluvial Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic) in southern San Juan Basin. On a large scale, the sandstone-body architecture consists mainly of a series of tabular sandstone sheets 5-15 m thick and hundreds of meters wide, separated by thin fine-grained units. Internally these sheets contain lateral accretion surfaces and are cut by channels 10-20 m deep and at least 250 m wide. On a more detailed scale, interpretations made from large-scale photomosaics show a complex of architectural elements and bounding surfaces. Typical indicators of moderate- to high-sinuosity channels (lateral accretion deposits) coexist in the same outcrop with downstream-accreted macroform deposits that are typical of sand flats of low-sinuosity, multiple-channel rivers. Broad, deep channels with gently to steeply dipping margins were mapped in several of the outcrops by carefully tracing major bounding surfaces. Locally thick accumulations of plane-laminated and low-angle cross-laminated sandstone lithofacies suggest rapid flow, probably transitional to upper flow regime conditions. Such a depositional style is most typical of ephemeral rivers or those periodically undergoing major seasonal (or more erratic) stage fluctuations, an interpretation consistent with independent mineralogical evidence of aridity. Fining-upward sequences are rare in the project area, contrary to the descriptions of Campbell (1976). The humid alluvial fan model of Galloway (1978) cannot be substantiated and, similarly, the architectural model of Campbell (1976) requires major revision. Comparisons with the depositional architecture of the large Indian rivers, such as the Ganges and Brahmaputra, still seem reasonable, as originally proposed by Campbell (1976), although there is now convincing evidence for aridity and for major stage fluctuations, which differs both from those modern rivers and Campbell

  14. Nature of the Jurassic Magnetic Quiet Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Masako; Tivey, Maurice A.; Sager, William W.

    2015-10-01

    The nature of the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ), a region of low-amplitude oceanic magnetic anomalies, has been a long-standing debate with implications for the history and behavior of the Earth's geomagnetic field and plate tectonics. To understand the origin of the JQZ, we studied high-resolution sea surface magnetic anomalies from the Hawaiian magnetic lineations and correlated them with the Japanese magnetic lineations. The comparison shows the following: (i) excellent correlation of anomaly shapes from M29 to M42; (ii) remarkable similarity of anomaly amplitude envelope, which decreases back in time from M19 to M38, with a minimum at M41, then increases back in time from M42; and (iii) refined locations of pre-M25 lineations in the Hawaiian lineation set. Based on these correlations, our study presents evidence of regionally and possibly globally coherent pre-M29 magnetic anomalies in the JQZ and a robust extension of Hawaiian isochrons back to M42 in the Pacific crust.

  15. Diagenesis of the Almond sandstone in the Washakie Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Peigui; Liu, Jie; Surdam, C.R. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    The marginal marine and nonmarine Almond sandstones are mostly sublitharenite, litharenite, and lithic arkose. The sandstones are fine-to very-fine-grained, and are well-sorted. The framework composition, authigenic minerals, and porosity and permeability distributions in the Almond sandstones are different below and above 8,000 feet, resulting in a variation in hydrocarbon reservoir types. The shallow conventional reservoirs are permeable, producing both liquid oil and gas, whereas the deep gas-bearing sandstones are very tight and overpressured. Porosity of the shallow Almond sandstones have been significantly enhanced by dissolution of the feldspar grains and lithic fragments. Quartz overgrowth cement and authigenic clay rims have occluded most of the intergranular pores, as well as the previously leached pores. The Almond sandstones have been buried deeper than their present depths. The sandstones in each part of the Washakie Basin have experienced different uplift and subsidence. Reconstruction of the burial history and diagenetic modeling are essential steps for understanding the diagenetic evolution of the Almond sandstones.

  16. Development of risk maps to minimize uranium exposures in the Navajo Churchrock mining district

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Decades of improper disposal of uranium-mining wastes on the Navajo Nation has resulted in adverse human and ecological health impacts as well as socio-cultural problems. As the Navajo people become increasingly aware of the contamination problems, there is a need to develop a risk-communication strategy to properly inform tribal members of the extent and severity of the health risks. To be most effective, this strategy needs to blend accepted risk-communication techniques with Navajo perspectives such that the strategy can be used at the community level to inform culturally- and toxicologically-relevant decisions about land and water use as well as mine-waste remediation. Objective The objective of this study was to develop GIS-based thematic maps as communication tools to clearly identify high risk exposure areas and offer alternatives to minimize public and ecological health impacts. Methods Thematic maps were produced that incorporated data derived from environmental sampling and public health surveys. The maps show the location and quality of unregulated water resources and identify regulated water sources that could be used as alternatives. In addition, the maps show the location of contaminated soil and sediment areas in which disturbance of surface deposits should be avoided. Preliminary feedback was collected from an informal Navajo working group to assess the clarity and efficacy of this proposed communication method. Results The working group found the maps to be both clear and effective, and made suggestions for improvements, such as the addition of more map features. The working group predicted that once the maps are presented to the public, water hauling and soil use behaviors will change, and dialogue with chapter officials will be initiated to accelerate further risk reduction efforts. Implications Because risk communication is complicated by language barriers, lack of infrastructure, and historical mistrust of non-Navajo researchers

  17. A Giant Pliosaurid Skull from the Late Jurassic of England

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Roger B. J.; Evans, Mark; Smith, Adam S.; Sassoon, Judyth; Moore-Faye, Scott; Ketchum, Hilary F.; Forrest, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Pliosaurids were a long-lived and cosmopolitan group of marine predators that spanned 110 million years and occupied the upper tiers of marine ecosystems from the Middle Jurassic until the early Late Cretaceous. A well-preserved giant pliosaurid skull from the Late Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation of Dorset, United Kingdom, represents a new species, Pliosaurus kevani. This specimen is described in detail, and the taxonomy and systematics of Late Jurassic pliosaurids is revised. We name two additional new species, Pliosaurus carpenteri and Pliosaurus westburyensis, based on previously described relatively complete, well-preserved remains. Most or all Late Jurassic pliosaurids represent a globally distributed monophyletic group (the genus Pliosaurus, excluding ‘Pliosaurus’ andrewsi). Despite its high species diversity, and geographically widespread, temporally extensive occurrence, Pliosaurus shows relatively less morphological and ecological variation than is seen in earlier, multi-genus pliosaurid assemblages such as that of the Middle Jurassic Oxford Clay Formation. It also shows less ecological variation than the pliosaurid-like Cretaceous clade Polycotylidae. Species of Pliosaurus had robust skulls, large body sizes (with skull lengths of 1.7–2.1 metres), and trihedral or subtrihedral teeth suggesting macropredaceous habits. Our data support a trend of decreasing length of the mandibular symphysis through Late Jurassic time, as previously suggested. This may be correlated with increasing adaptation to feeding on large prey. Maximum body size of pliosaurids increased from their first appearance in the Early Jurassic until the Early Cretaceous (skull lengths up to 2360 mm). However, some reduction occurred before their final extinction in the early Late Cretaceous (skull lengths up to 1750 mm). PMID:23741520

  18. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  19. Geochemistry of vanadium in an epigenetic, sandstone-hosted vanadium- uranium deposit, Henry Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, R.B.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Northrop, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    The epigenetic Tony M vanadium-uranium orebody in south-central Utah is hosted in fluvial sandstones of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic). Measurements of the relative amounts of V+3 and V +4 in ore minerals show that V+3 is more abundant. Thermodynamic calculations show that vanadium was more likely transported to the site of mineralization as V+4. The ore formed as V+4 was reduced by hydrogen sulfide, followed by hydrolysis and precipitation of V+3 in oxide minerals or chlorite. Uranium was transported as uranyl ion (U+6), or some complex thereof, and reduced by hydrogen sulfide, forming coffinite. Detrital organic matter in the rocks served as the carbon source for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Vanadium most likely was derived from the dissolution of iron-titanium oxides. Uranium probably was derived from the overlying Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation. Previous studies have shown that the ore formed at the density-stratified interface between a basinal brine and dilute meteoric water. The mineralization processes described above occurred within the mixing zone between these two fluids. -from Authors

  20. Preservation of anomalously high porosity in deeply buried sandstones by grain-coating chlorite: Examples from the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenberg, S.N. )

    1993-07-01

    Five Lower to Middle Jurassic sandstone reservoirs from the Norwegian sector provide examples of deep porosity preservation caused by grain-coating, authigenic chlorite. Wide porosity variations in clean sandstones correlate with an abundance of grain-coating chlorite and consequent inhibition of quarts cementation. Maximum porosities tend to decrease with increasing depth but generally are 10-15% higher than would be predicted from regional trends of mean porosity vs. depth. It is proposed in this paper that the high chlorite content of the porous zones reflects syndepositional concentration of Fe-rich marine clays analogous to minerals of the modern verdine facies. Fe-clay mineralization would have been localized where Fe-rich river water was discharged into the sea. The syndepositional clays were transformed during burial diagenesis into grain coatings of radially oriented chlorite crystals. Petrographic relationships indicate that these coatings grew mainly before the beginning of quartz cementation and feldspar grain dissolution (probably within the first 2 km of burial) but after grain contacts had become adjusted by mechanical compaction. The Norwegian examples demonstrate that a wide range of nearshore marine sand-body types is susceptible to chlorite mineralization. The distribution of anomalous porosity and the proportion of the net sand affected depend upon sedimentary facies architecture and the pattern of discharge of Fe-rich river water during sand deposition. This phenomenon can be critically important for hydrocarbon exploration because it can provide good reservoir quality at depths far below the [open quotes]economic basement[close quotes] originally defined on the basis of sandstones lacking chlorite coatings. 58 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Provenance of sandstones in the Golconda terrane, north central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.A. )

    1991-02-01

    The upper Paleozoic Golconda terrane of north-central Nevada is a composite of several structurally bounded subterranes made of clastic, volcanic, and carbonate rocks. The clastic rocks provide important clues for the interpretation of the provenance and paleogeographic settings of the different lithologic assemblages found in these subterranes. Two petrographically distinct sandstones are identified in the Golconda terrane in the Osgood Mountains and the Hot springs Range of north-central Nevada. The sandstone of the Mississippian Farrel Canyon Formation, part of the Dry Hills subterrane, is characterized by quartzose and sedimentary and lithic-rich clasts with a small feldspar component. in contrast, the sandstone of the Permian Poverty Peak (II) subterrane is a silty quartzarenite with no lithic component, and a very limited feldspar component. The sandstone of the Farrel Canyon Formation is similar to nonvolcanic sandstones reported from elsewhere in the Golconda terrane. Modal data reflect a provenance of a recycled orogen and permit the interpretation that it could have been derived from the antler orogen as has been proposed for other sandstones of the golconda terrane. The sandstone of the Poverty Peak (II) subterrane is more mature than any of the other sandstones in either the Golconda terrane, the Antler overlap sequence, or the Antler foreland basin sequence. Modal data put the Poverty Peak (II) sandstone in the continental block provenance category. The distinct extrabasinal provenances represented in these different sandstones support the idea that the Golconda basin was made up of complex paleogeographic settings, which included multiple sources of extrabasinal sediment.

  2. Factors controlling localization of uranium deposits in the Dakota Sandstone, Gallup and Ambrosia Lake mining districts, McKinley County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Charles Thomas; Green, Morris W.

    1977-01-01

    Geologic studies were made at all of the uranium mines and prospects in the Dakota Sandstone of Early(?) and Late Cretaceous age in the Gallup mining district, McKinley County, New Mexico. Dakota mines in the adjacent Ambrosia Lake mining district were visited briefly for comparative purposes. Mines in the eastern part of the Gallup district, and in the Ambrosia Lake district, are on the Chaco slope of the southern San Juan Basin in strata which dip gently northward toward the central part of the basin. Mines in the western part of the Gallup district are along the Gallup hogback (Nutria monocline) in strata which dip steeply westward into the Gallup sag. Geologic factors which controlled formation of the uranium deposits in the Dakota Sandstone are: (1) a source of uranium, believed to be uranium deposits of the underlying Morrison Formation of Late Jurassic age; (2) the accessibility to the Dakota of uranium-bearing solutions from the Morrison; (3) the presence in the Dakota of permeable sandstone beds overlain by impermeable carbonaceous shale beds; and (4) the occurrence within the permeable Dakota sandstone beds of carbonaceous reducing material as bedding-plane laminae, or as pockets of carbonaceous trash. Most of the Dakota uranium deposits are found in the lower part of the formation in marginal-marine distributary-channel sandstones which were deposited in the backshore environment. However, the Hogback no. 4 (Hyde) Mine (Gallup district) occurs in sandy paludal shale of the backshore environment, and another deposit, the Silver Spur (Ambrosia Lake district), is found in what is interpreted to be a massive beach or barrier-bar sandstone of the foreshore environment in the upper part of the Dakota. The sedimentary depositional environment most favorable for the accumulation of uranium is that of backshore areas lateral to main distributary channels, where levee, splay, and some distributary-channel sandstones intertongue with gray carbonaceous shales and

  3. Geologic aspects of reservoir souring - Brent Group sandstones, North Sea: The use of conventional and laser extraction techniques in sulfur isotope studies of authigenic pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Brint, J.F. ); Fallick, A.E. )

    1991-03-01

    The Middle Jurassic Brent Group sandstones are prolific oil reservoirs in the North Sea. Recently, a number of Brent wells have experienced increased levels of hydrogen sulfide contamination during production. A study involving the characterization of all iron-bearing minerals to understand the controls of mineralogy on the nature and timing of souring has been undertaken. The potential of iron minerals to scavenge hydrogen sulfide and hence delay/inhibit souring by precipitation of pyrite has been investigated by determining its distribution, quantity, and origin. Authigenic pyrite occurs as disseminated (framboidal, cubic, and octahedral) crystals and as a pore-filling cement. The pyrite has formed throughout the diagenetic history of the sandstones. however, most of the pyrite is considered to be a late cement formed during burial diagenesis. Conventional separation and sulfur isotope analysis of the authigenic pyrite was conducted on samples from oil- and water-bearing sequences to give a bulk signature for all pyrite present. Subsequently, laser sulfur isotope analysis was used to characterize the signature and origin of the different pyrite morphologies present. The enhanced level of sulfur isotope signature characterization can be used to improve the knowledge of the origin and timing of the different pyrite morphologies. This allows closer reconciliation of the isotopic data to the diagenetic history of the Brent sandstones. Calculations have been made using the known quantities of iron in these minerals and the hydrogen sulfide concentrations present. This indicates the effect of sulfide precipitation on the hydrogen sulfide levels remaining in the reservoir.

  4. Attenuation of Landfill Leachate In Unsaturated Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, A. P.; Brook, C.; Godley, A.; Lewin, K.; Young, C. P.

    Landfill leachate emanating from old "dilute and disperse" sites represents a potential (and in many cases actual) threat to the integrity of groundwater. Indeed, this concern has been included in EU legislation (80/86/EEC), where key contaminants (e.g. ammonia, various toxic organic compounds and heavy metals) are explicitly highlighted in terms of their impact on groundwater. In the UK, whilst there are a substantial number of unlined landfills sited on major aquifers, many of these are in locations where there is a substantial unsaturated zone. Thus, there exists the opportunity for the modification and attenuation of contaminants prior to it encountering the water table. An understanding of likely changes in leachate content and concentrations at such sites will enable a more comprehensive assessment of the potential risks and liabilities posed by such sites to be evaluated. The Burntstump landfill, situated 8 km north of Nottingham (UK), is sited on an outcrop of Sherwood sandstone. The fine friable sand has been quarried since the 1960s and the excavated volume used to store municipal waste. Filling at the site commenced in the mid 1970s and originally was unlined. In 1978 the first of what was to become a series of boreholes was installed within an area of roughly 5 m radius over one of the original waste cells. Cores of the waste and underlying sandstone were extracted and analysed for a range of physical and chemical parameters. The most recent set of analyses were obtained in 2000. The series of investigations therefore provide an important record of leachate migration and modification through the unsaturated zone for over twenty years. The progression of the leachate front is clearly delineated by the chloride concentration profile with an average velocity of around 1.6 m.yr-1. Combining this value with an average (and reasonably uniform) measured moisture content of about 7% gives a mean inter-granular specific discharge of 110 mm.yr-1. An interesting

  5. Early Jurassic black shales: Global anoxia or regional "Dead Zones"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Schootbrugge, B.; Payne, J.; Wignall, P.

    2012-12-01

    The so-called "Schwarzer Jura" or "Black Jurassic" in Germany is informally used to designate a series of organic-rich sediments that roughly span the Early Jurassic (201.6 - 175.6 Myr), and which culminate in the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. Based on organic and inorganic geochemical as well as (micro)palaeontological data from several recently drilled cores, black shales deposited directly following the end-Triassic extinction (201.6 Ma) during the Hettangian are extremely similar to Toarcian black shales. Both events are characterized by laminated black shales that contain high amounts of the biomarker isorenieratane, a fossilized pigment derived from green sulphur bacteria. Furthermore, the two intervals show similar changes in phytoplankton assemblages from chromophyte (red) to chlorophyte (green) algae. Combined, the evidence suggests that photic zone euxinia developed repeatedly during the Early Jurassic, making wide swaths of shelf area inhospitable to benthic life. In the oceans today such areas are called "Dead Zones" and they are increasing in number and extent due to the combined effects of man-made eutrophication and global warming. During the Early Jurassic, regional anoxic events developed in response to flood basalt volcanism, which triggered global warming, increased run-off, and changes in ocean circulation. The patchiness of Early Jurassic anoxia allows comparisons to be made with present-day "Dead Zones", while at the same time ocean de-oxygenation in the past may serve to predict future perturbations in the Earth system.

  6. The Triassic-Jurassic boundary in eastern North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, P. E.; Comet, B.

    1988-01-01

    Rift basins of the Atlantic passive margin in eastern North America are filled with thousands of meters of continental rocks termed the Newark Supergroup which provide an unprecedented opportunity to examine the fine scale structure of the Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction in continental environments. Time control, vital to the understanding of the mechanisms behind mass extinctions, is provided by lake-level cycles apparently controlled by orbitally induced climate change allowing resolution at the less than 21,000 year level. Correlation with other provinces is provided by a developing high resolution magnetostratigraphy and palynologically-based biostratigraphy. A large number of at least local vertebrate and palynomorph extinctions are concentrated around the boundary with survivors constituting the earliest Jurassic assemblages, apparently without the introduction of new taxa. The palynofloral transition is marked by the dramatic elimination of a relatively high diversity Triassic pollen assemblage with the survivors making up a Jurassic assemblage of very low diversity overwhelmingly dominated by Corollina. Based principally on palynological correlations, the hypothesis that these continental taxonomic transitions were synchronous with the massive Triassic-Jurassic marine extinctions is strongly corroborated. An extremely rapid, perhaps catastrophic, taxonomic turnover at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, synchronous in continental and marine realms is hypothesized and discussed.

  7. Contractional deformation of porous sandstone: Insights from the Aztec Sandstone, SE Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossen, Haakon; Zuluaga, Luisa F.; Ballas, Gregory; Soliva, Roger; Rotevatn, Atle

    2015-05-01

    Contractional deformation of highly porous sandstones is poorly explored, as compared to extensional deformation of such sedimentary rocks. In this work we explore the highly porous Aztec Sandstone in the footwall to the Muddy Mountain thrust in SE Nevada, which contains several types of deformation bands in the Buffington tectonic window: 1) Distributed centimeter-thick shear-enhanced compaction bands (SECBs) and 2) rare pure compaction bands (PCBs) in the most porous parts of the sandstone, cut by 3) thin cataclastic shear-dominated bands (CSBs) with local slip surfaces. Geometric and kinematic analysis of the SECBs, the PCBs and most of the CSBs shows that they formed during ∼E-W (∼100) shortening, consistent with thrusting related to the Cretaceous to early Paleogene Sevier orogeny of the North American Cordilleran thrust system. Based on stress path modeling, we suggest that the compactional bands (PCBs and SECBs) formed during contraction at relatively shallow burial depths, before or at early stages of emplacement of the Muddy Mountains thrust sheet. The younger cataclastic shear bands (CSBs, category 3), also related to E-W Sevier thrusting, are thinner and show larger shear offsets and thus more intense cataclasis, consistent with the initiation of cataclastic shear bands in somewhat less porous materials. Observations made in this work support earlier suggestions that contraction lead to more distributed band populations than what is commonly found in the extensional regime, and that shear-enhanced compaction bands are widespread only where porosity (and permeability) is high.

  8. A clean-burning biofuel as a response to adverse impacts of woodsmoke and coalsmoke on Navajo health

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, E.B. Jr.; Bragg, W.G.; Whittier, J.

    1994-12-31

    Because over 60% of Navajo households are heated with woodfuel and coal, and indoor air pollution from woodsmoke and coalsmoke is problematic, most Navajos are probably at risk of respiratory and other smoke-induced illnesses. A previous study has shown that Navajo children living in homes heated by a wood/coal stove are nearly five times more likely to contract acute lower respiratory tract infections than children from homes that do not use those fuels. Stove and flue improvements to reduce leakage of smoke into the home would help. So would clean-burning solid fuels in replacement of woodfuel and coal. The authors describe a clean-burning fast-growing carbohydrate biofuel, prepared by sun-drying the roots of a wild southwestern gourd plant, Cucurbita foetidissima. They call it {open_quotes}rootfuel.{close_quotes} A test plot is growing during the 1994 season at the NMSU Agricultural Science Center on the Navajo Nation, near Farmington, New Mexico. Irrigation requirements are being measured. In the Fall, a preliminary needs assessment will be conducted to learn more about how fuel usage impacts Navajo health. The acceptability of rootfuel in selected homes will be tested during the upcoming heating season.

  9. Biogeochemistry of the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.; Ward, P. D.; Garrison, G. H.

    2006-12-01

    New biostratigraphic and biogeochemical data are presented from Triassic-Jurassic (Tr-J) boundary sections at Kennecott Point, Queen Charlotte Islands (QCI), Canada, Muller Canyon, Nevada, USA, and Marokopa Beach, New Zealand. The New Zealand record shows two negative excursions in δ13Corg of approximately 2‰ associated with the Tr-J transition. The QCI and Nevada boundary sections show a consistent isotopic trend indicative of multiple major perturbations to the carbon cycle: one negative excursion in δ13Corg of 2‰ at the boundary and one positive excursion of 3 to 5‰ following the boundary. The post-Tr-J boundary positive excursion is especially prominent in boundary sections from QCI, where the high organic content of the black shales makes the rocks suitable for a survey of lipid biomarkers. New GC-MS data are presented from this locality, revealing changes in the distribution and abundance of alkanes, hopanes, and steranes across the Tr-J transition. Litho-, bio- and chemostratigraphy from these boundary localities do not support a single impact cause for the late Triassic extinctions, although impact events such as the Manicouagan may well have exerted significant stress on a biosphere still recovering from the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. The data support the idea of a degraded late Triassic environment persisting for millions of years and characterized by low atmospheric oxygen and high carbon dioxide associated with Central Atlantic Magmatic Province volcanism. Global warming and sea level change may have led to destabilization of seafloor methane hydrates and runaway greenhouse conditions.

  10. Supraregional seismites in Triassic - Jurassic boundary strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, Sofie; Pedersen, Gunver K.; van de Schootbrugge, Bas; Johansson, Leif; Petersen, Henrik I.; Dybkjær, Karen; Weibel, Rikke; Hansen, Katrine H.; Erlström, Mikael; Alwmark, Carl; Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Oschmann, Wolfgang; Tegner, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction event (201.564 Ma) was synchronous with the earliest volcanic phase during the emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), a large igneous province (LIP) formed during the initial breakup of Pangea. Volcanic degassing of CO2 and other volatile gases, and/or thermogenic methane, from the CAMP is generally regarded as the main cause of the end-Triassic biotic crisis. However, discrepancies in the durations of the ETE (50 Kyrs) and the CAMP volcanism (600 Kyrs) as well as temporal offsets between carbon cycle perturbations and biotic turnovers suggest a more complex scenario that require further studies of the temporal succession of events in Triassic-Jurassic (TJ) boundary strata. Here, we present and examine multiple episodes of soft-sediment deformation (seismite) within uppermost Rhaetian marine and terrestrial strata of Denmark, Sweden and Germany. These seismites are stratigraphically constrained by palynology and C-isotopes to the latest Rhaetian, and are synchronous to the single seismite layer from the UK, which similarly predates the T/J boundary, and has been explained by an extraterrestrial bolide impact. Instead, we argue that the multiple episodes of soft-sediment deformation, interbedded by undisturbed strata, were formed from repeated intense earthquake activity restricted to an interval within the latest Rhaetian bracketed by two negative excursions in δ13C and also containing palynological evidence for deforestation and fern proliferation. The fact that these biotic changes coincide with repeated seismic activity has implications for the end-Triassic extinction and the CAMP scenario. We discuss the temporal position of the seismites in regards to other end-Triassic events, and argue that their supraregional distribution in pre-TJ-boundary strata of NW Europe may be linked to intensified earthquake activity during CAMP emplacement, rather than an extraterrestrial impact.

  11. He Will Lift Up His Head: A Report to the Developmental Disabilities Office on the Situation of Handicapped Navajos and the Implications Thereof for All Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, James S.; Stifle, J. M.

    Issues involved in education of handicapped Navajo children are examined. Background sections contrast the history of treatment for the handicapped in America with the treatment received by handicapped Navajos. Unemployment, substandard housing, lack of accessibility within the reservation, overpopulation, language barriers, and the relationship…

  12. Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America; Part IV: The Southwest (Navajo--Zuni). Occasional Publications in Anthropology Ethnology Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, George E., Comp.

    Part IV of a series of publications consisting of American Indian tribal governmental documents, this volume includes charters, constitutions, articles of association, and by-laws of Indian tribes of New Mexico and Arizona. Documents are included relative to the Navajo Tribe of Arizona and New Mexico; the Eastern Navajo Council--New Mexico; the…

  13. The Effects of Power Production and Strip Mining on Local Navajo Populations. Lake Powell Research Project Bulletin Number 22, June 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Donald G.; And Others

    In an effort to evaluate the impact of the 1972-73 Navajo Generating Station at Page, Arizona and the strip mine at Black Mesa on the Navajo Reservation, areas adjacent to each of these operations were surveyed (N=134 and 60 respectively) and compared with two control populations (N=60 from the rural area of Red Lake and 58 from the wagework area…

  14. Middle Jurassic radiolarian fauna from Rotti Island, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashida, K.; Munasri; Adachi, S.; Kamata, Y.

    1999-08-01

    A well-preserved Middle Jurassic radiolarian fauna was discriminated from calcareous shale of the Wai Luli Formation on Rotti Island, Indonesia. This fauna is characterized by the presence of Tricolocapsa plicarum, Tricolocapsa ? fusiformis, Stichocapsa japonica, S. convexa, Cyrtocapsa mastoidea, Protunuma turbo, Transhsuum maxwelli, Eucyrtidiellum sp., Archaeodictyomitra sp. A. and others. These radiolarians represent the T. plicarum Assemblage reported from Bajocian and early Bathonian (Middle Jurassic) sequences in Japan and southeastern Europe. Based on accumulated micropaleontological evidence in Timor Island contributed by the present authors, Rotti Island was probably positioned within a warm water current system originating in the low latitude Tethyan realm through the Middle Jurassic. Fifteen species belonging to seven genera are systematically investigated. Among them, Tricolocapsa multispinosa and Tricolocapsa matsuokai are described as new.

  15. Constraints on Upper Jurassic palaeogeography in the Ula Gyda trend

    SciTech Connect

    Mundal, I.; Milton, N.; Robinson, N.

    1995-08-01

    BP Norway`s semi-regional 3D database in the Central Trough covers an area of nearly 3000 sq.km. around BP Norway`s two producing fields, Ula and Gyda, and includes strategic acreage within tie-back distance to the fields. Prospectivity in the Ula Gyda trend involves complex salt influenced structures and localized Upper Jurassic depositional systems. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how the understanding of the semi-regional structures and salt tectonics helped constrain the interpretation of the Upper Jurassic palaeogeography. The control of basement structures (Permian) on cover structures (Upper Jurassic/Base Cretaceous) through Zechstein Salt was interpreted using the 3D semi-regional dataset. Analogue sandbox experiments from the Austin Geodynamics Laboratory provide support for the complex structures which were interpreted on the 3D seismic data. Sandbox models mimic the interpreted monoclinal drape of the Triassic and Jurassic section over the critical basin bounding fault in the Base Zechstein. Structural cells can be identified with the help of the salt isochore. The understanding of the relationship between structural development and salt distribution was a major control on the interpretation. This interpretation coupled with the Upper Jurassic reservoir distribution from well data provided the primary evidence for the gross depositional environment maps which were used in prospect evaluation in the area. 3D visualization and shaded relief displays of the interpreted horizons and isochores played a significant part in developing an understanding of the interplay between the deeper structures and the likely Upper Jurassic palaeogeography and depocentres.

  16. Jurassic faults of southwest Alabama and offshore areas

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Four fault groups affecting Jurassic strata occur in the southwest and offshore Alabama areas. They include the regional basement rift trend, the regional peripheral fault trend, the Mobile graben fault system, and the Lower Mobile Bay fault system. The regional basement system rift and regional peripheral fault trends are distinct and rim the inner margin of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The regional basement rift trend is genetically related to the breakup of Pangea and the opening of the Gulf of Mexico in the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic. This fault trend is thought to have formed contemporaneously with deposition of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic Eagle Mills Formation and to displace pre-Mesozoic rocks. The regional peripheral fault trend consists of a group of en echelon extensional faults that are parallel or subparallel to regional strike of Gulf Coastal Plain strata and correspond to the approximate updip limit of thick Louann Salt. Nondiapiric salt features are associated with the trend and maximum structural development is exhibited in the Haynesville-Smackover section. No hydrocarbon accumulations have been documented in the pre-Jurassic strata of southwest and offshore Alabama. Productive hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in Jurassic strata along the trends of the fault groups, suggesting a significant relationship between structural development in the Jurassic and hydrocarbon accumulation. Hydrocarbon traps are generally structural or contain a major structural component and include salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps. All of the major hydrocarbon accumulations are associated with movement of the Louann Salt along the regional peripheral fault trend, the Mobile graben fault system, or the Lower Mobile Bay fault system.

  17. "When I am lonely the mountains call me": the impact of sacred geography on Navajo psychological well being.

    PubMed

    Griffin-Pierce, T

    1997-01-01

    As we approach the twenty-first century, sacred geography continues to have a profound impact on Navajo psychological well being. This article explores the extent of the Navajo's bond with their homeland through an emphasis on orderly conditions in their world view, myths, and ceremonies. When traditional Navajos leave their homeland to pursue educational and professional endeavors or to seek biomedical treatment, a sense of emotional dislocation can undermine their success. The emotional trauma goes far beyond mere homesickness because it is based on an often unconscious sense of having violated the moral order of the universe. It is essential that mental health professionals respond with sensitivity to this issue by understanding the extent to which the sacred mountains and other landforms serve as a vital source of spiritual strength.

  18. The second Jurassic dinosaur rush and the dawn of dinomania.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-09-01

    During the second Jurassic dinosaur rush museum paleontologists raced to display the world's first mounted sauropod dinosaur. The American Museum of Natural History triumphed in 1905 when its Brontosaurus debuted before an admiring crowd of wealthy New Yorkers. The Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, the Field Columbian Museum in Chicago and other institutions were quick to follow with their own sauropod displays. Thereafter, dinomania spread far and wide, and big, showpiece dinosaurs became a museum staple. This brief but intensely competitive period of acquisitiveness fostered important Jurassic dinosaur revisions and crucial innovations in paleontological field and lab techniques.

  19. Low intensity of the geomagnetic field in early Jurassic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perrin, M.; Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    From a large collection of Jurassic continental tholeiites cropping out in Europe and Africa, we selected 90 samples for paleointensity determinations. Twenty-eight well-clustered paleointensity estimates were obtained from two European dikes that were emplaced during Early Jurassic time: the Kerforne dike at Brenterc'h in Brittany (northwestern France) and the Messejana dike on the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal). Virtual dipole moments calculated from both magmatic units are similar and only about one-third of present-day values. -from Authors

  20. Geological model of the Jurassic section in the State of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Yousif, S.; Nouman, G.

    1995-11-01

    Until the end of the seventies, the knowledge of Jurassic Geology in the State of Kuwait was very limited, since only one deep well was drilled and bottomed in the Triassic sediments. Few scattered wells partially penetrated the Jurassic sequence. During the eighties, appreciable number of wells were drilled through the Jurassic, and added a remarkable volume of information. consequently it was necessary to analyze the new data, in order to try to construct a geological model for the Jurassic in the State of Kuwait. This paper includes a number of isopach maps explaining the Jurassic depositional basin which also helps in trying to explain the Jurassic basin in the Arabian Gulf basin. Structural evolution of the Jurassic sequence indicated an inversion of relief when compared with the Cretaceous sequence. In fact, the main Cretaceous arches were sites of sedimentation troughs during the Jurassic period. This fact marks a revolution in the concepts for the Jurassic oil exploration. One of the very effective methods of the definition of the Jurassic structures is the isopaching of the Gotnia Formation. Najmah, Sargelu and Marrat Formations include the main Jurassic reservoirs which were detected as a result of the exploration activities during the eighties. Selective stratigraphic and structural cross sections have been prepared to demonstrate and explain the nature of the Jurassic sediments.

  1. A two scale analysis of tight sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Davy, C. A.; Song, Y.; Troadec, D.; Hauss, G.; Skoczylas, F.

    2015-12-01

    Tight sandstones have a low porosity and a very small permeability K. Available models for K do not compare well with measurements. These sandstones are made of SiO_2 grains, with a typical size of several hundreds of micron. These grains are separated by a network of micro-cracks, with sizes ranging between microns down to tens of nm. Therefore, the structure can be schematized by Voronoi polyhedra separated by plane and permeable polygonal micro-cracks. Our goal is to estimate K based on a two scale analysis and to compare the results to measurements. For a particular sample [2], local measurements on several scales include FIB/SEM [3], CMT and 2D SEM. FIB/SEM is selected because the peak pore size given by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry is of 350nm. FIB/SEM imaging (with 50 nm voxel size) identifies an individual crack of 180nm average opening, whereas CMT provides a connected porosity (individual crack) for 60 nm voxel size, of 4 micron average opening. Numerical modelling is performed by combining the micro-crack network scale (given by 2D SEM) and the 3D micro-crack scale (given by either FIB/SEM or CMT). Estimates of the micro-crack density are derived from 2D SEM trace maps by counting the intersections with scanlines, the surface density of traces, and the number of fracture intersections. K is deduced by using a semi empirical formula valid for identical, isotropic and uniformly distributed fractures [1]. This value is proportional to the micro-crack transmissivity sigma. Sigma is determined by solving the Stokes equation in the micro-cracks measured by FIB/SEM or CMT. K is obtained by combining the two previous results. Good correlation with measured values on centimetric plugs is found when using sigma from CMT data. The results are discussed and further research is proposed. [1] Adler et al, Fractured porous media, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012. [2] Duan et al, Int. J. Rock Mech. Mining Sci., 65, p75, 2014. [3] Song et al, Marine and Petroleum Eng., 65, p63

  2. New isotopic evidence for the origin of groundwater from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer in the Negev, Israel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vengosh, A.; Hening, S.; Ganor, J.; Mayer, B.; Weyhenmeyer, C.E.; Bullen, T.D.; Paytan, A.

    2007-01-01

    SO4-rich groundwater from the underlying Jurassic aquifer contributes significantly to the salt budget of the Nubian Sandstone aquifer. The unique chemical and isotopic composition of the Jurassic groundwater (??34SSO4 ??? +14???; ??18OSO4 ??? 14???; 87Sr/86Sr ???0.70764) is interpreted as reflecting dissolution of Late Triassic marine gypsum deposits. In the southern Arava Valley the authors postulate that SO4-rich groundwater with distinctively high Br/Cl (3 ?? 10-3) low 87Sr/86Sr (0.70734), and high ??34SSO4 values (+15???) is derived from mixing with underlying brines from the Paleozoic units. The radiocarbon measurements reveal low 14C activities (0.2-5.8 pmc) in both the northeastern Negev and southern Arava Valley. Taking into account dissolution of carbonate rocks and bacterial SO4 reduction in the unconfined area, estimated mean residence times of groundwater in the confined zone in the northeastern Negev are on the order of 21-38 ka, which suggests recharge predominantly during the last glacial period. The 14C signal in groundwater from the southern Arava Valley is equally low but due to evidence for mixing with external water sources the residence time estimates are questionable. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Crossroads and Connections: An Evolving Relationship between NASA and the Navajo Nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalice, D.; Carron, A.

    2010-08-01

    Is working with Native Americans business as usual? We live in a project-based world that operates on three-to-five-year grants. A long term commitment can be next to impossible to keep, even if you have the best of intentions. Are there things one "must know" before approaching an indigenous population? How is it best to evaluate projects and programs involving Native Americans? In the NASA and the Navajo Nation project, which will turn five in January, 2010, we have compiled some key lessons learned that we hope will inform and encourage future partnerships between the space science education and Native American communities.

  4. Multistage variable probability forest volume inventory. [the Defiance Unit of the Navajo Nation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    An inventory scheme based on the use of computer processed LANDSAT MSS data was developed. Output from the inventory scheme provides an estimate of the standing net saw timber volume of a major timber species on a selected forested area of the Navajo Nation. Such estimates are based on the values of parameters currently used for scaled sawlog conversion to mill output. The multistage variable probability sampling appears capable of producing estimates which compare favorably with those produced using conventional techniques. In addition, the reduction in time, manpower, and overall costs lend it to numerous applications.

  5. Uranium migration through intact sandstone cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D.; Lawless, T. A.; Sims, R. J.; Butter, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    Uranium is often considered to be a mobile radioelement in the natural environment owing to its tendency to form stable complexes with a number of aqueous anions, particularly in oxidising milieu. A series of infiltration experiments were devised to investigate this migration behaviour under rigidly controlled laboratory conditions. Intact cores of Permo-Triassic Clashach Sandstone were pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater solutions and continuous flow-through of uranium monitored together with pH and concentrations of other ions. Prior to performing each experiment a simulation was carried out using a one-dimensional coupled chemical transport code, encompassing a thermodynamic description of the electrical double layer. These calculations together with electron microscopy indicated the potential role played by iron oxyhydroxide grain coatings in retarding the uranium plume. Thus, a second series of experiments was initiated on pre-acidified cores from which all surface exposed iron had been removed, allowing an assessment of the retention capacity of non-ferric components. Taken together, the data clearly illustrate the strong affinity of aqueous uranium species for natural surfaces even under strongly oxidising conditions. The success of the model in predicting a priori the dominant trends in uranium migration behaviour is encouraging and may aid in prioritising analytical requirements for investigations in more complex geochemical situations than those studied here.

  6. Ejecta Dynamics during Hypervelocity Impacts into Dry and Wet Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.; Poelchau, M.; Kenkmann, T.; Deutsch, A.

    2011-03-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments into dry and water saturated porous Seeberger sandstone were conducted at the two-stage light gas accelerator at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI) and the ejecta dynamics were analyzed.

  7. Evidence for a Mid-Jurassic Adaptive Radiation in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Close, Roger A; Friedman, Matt; Lloyd, Graeme T; Benson, Roger B J

    2015-08-17

    A series of spectacular discoveries have transformed our understanding of Mesozoic mammals in recent years. These finds reveal hitherto-unsuspected ecomorphological diversity that suggests that mammals experienced a major adaptive radiation during the Middle to Late Jurassic. Patterns of mammalian macroevolution must be reinterpreted in light of these new discoveries, but only taxonomic diversity and limited aspects of morphological disparity have been quantified. We assess rates of morphological evolution and temporal patterns of disparity using large datasets of discrete characters. Rates of morphological evolution were significantly elevated prior to the Late Jurassic, with a pronounced peak occurring during the Early to Middle Jurassic. This intense burst of phenotypic innovation coincided with a stepwise increase in apparent long-term standing diversity and the attainment of maximum disparity, supporting a "short-fuse" model of early mammalian diversification. Rates then declined sharply, and remained significantly low until the end of the Mesozoic, even among therians. This supports the "long-fuse" model of diversification in Mesozoic therians. Our findings demonstrate that sustained morphological innovation in Triassic stem-group mammals culminated in a global adaptive radiation of crown-group members during the Early to Middle Jurassic.

  8. Stratigraphy of the Jurassic system in northern Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Keeley, M.L.; Shaw, D.; Forbes, G.A.

    1988-08-01

    A regional synthesis is presented of the stratigraphy of Jurassic strata in Egypt north of 30/degree/N, based on the study of about 80 wells and outcrops from northeastern Egypt. Almost all fossil groups have been investigated for biostratigraphic control. Published work on ammonite faunas from Gebel el Maghara (north Sinai) is integrated with extensive original work on palynofloras (and, to a lesser extent, ostracod/foraminiferal faunas) recovered from marine rocks in the subsurface. The recovery of rich dinocyst assemblages enables the recognition of a ten-fold zonation scheme, largely within the Middle-Late Jurassic sedimentary package. The upper limit of this package is marked by the Cimmerian erosional event; strata younger than Oxfordian are rarely preserved. Only east of 30/degree/E is significant sedimentation known to have occurred immediately prior to the major early Bajocian transgressive event. Thereafter mean sea level rose steadily. The Lower Triassic-Lower Jurassic sedimentary package is poorly understood, largely the result of scanty and ambiguous stratigraphic evidence. However, regional correlations suggest that only very thin earliest Jurassic (Hettangian ) clastic deposition succeeded a sequence of Upper Triassic carbonates and evaporites (Wadi en Natrun Formation) in the north. Arising from these studies is a standard lithostratigraphical scheme. The upper sedimentary package, the Gebel el Maghara Group, comprises three formations (Masajid, Khatatba, and Inmar) and seven members; new units are defined and old units redefined.

  9. Diagenesis Along Fractures in an Eolian Sandstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Yen, A. S.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Downs, R.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.; Vaniman, D. T.; Gellert, R.; Sutter, B.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring sedimentary deposits in Gale crater since August 2012. The rover has traversed up section through approx.100 m of sedimentary rocks deposited in fluvial, deltaic, lacustrine, and eolian environments (Bradbury group and overlying Mount Sharp group). The Stimson formation lies unconformable over a lacustrine mudstone at the base of the Mount Sharp group and has been interpreted to be a cross-bedded sandstone of lithified eolian dunes. Mineralogy of the unaltered Stimson sandstone consists of plagioclase feldspar, pyroxenes, and magnetite with minor abundances of hematite, and Ca-sulfates (anhydrite, bassanite). Unaltered sandstone has a composition similar to the average Mars crustal composition. Alteration "halos" occur adjacent to fractures in the Stimson. Fluids passing through these fractures have altered the chemistry and mineralogy of the sandstone. Silicon and S enrichments and depletions in Al, Fe, Mg, Na, K, Ni and Mn suggest aqueous alteration in an open hydrologic system. Mineralogy of the altered Stimson is dominated by Ca-sulfates, Si-rich X-ray amorphous materials along with plagioclase feldspar, magnetite, and pyroxenes, but less abundant in the altered compared to the unaltered Stimson sandstone and lower pyroxene/plagioclase feldspar. The mineralogy and geochemistry of the altered sandstone suggest a complicated history with several (many?) episodes of aqueous alteration under a variety of environmental conditions (e.g., acidic, alkaline).

  10. Building a Seismic Sequence Stratigraphy Model Using HorizonCubes: A Jurassic Case Study in the Arabian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlYousuf, T. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the regional stratigraphic framework of the Middle and Upper Jurassic (Late Callovian-Oxfordian - Early Kimmeridgian) formations in the Arabian Basin is extremely important for unlocking the area's hydrocarbon potential. With recent advances in computing power and interpretation software, seismic sequence stratigraphy has become an important tool in reservoir characterization, and for reducing exploration risk. This paper provides a workflow that can be used to model seismic horizons using a dip steering volume. The workflow consists of data conditioning to produce a dip steering volume to generate a volume of densely spaced, automatically tracked seismic horizons, a "HorizonCube". The horizons are derived from the dip and azimuth information stored in the dip steered seismic volume model. In the Wheeler domain, the seismic volume is recomputed and flattened accordingly to match the Wheeler transformed HorizonCube. Based on the HorizonCube model, it is possible to identify stratigraphic carbonate buildups and depositional sequences. Isolating the horizon cube into smaller packages shows the dynamic variation in the deposition of sediments through time and space during the Jurassic period, starting from the top of Minjur sandstone to the Arab D limestone. The geologist is also able to identify system tracts with stratigraphic surfaces and estimate a stratigraphic base level curve. The approach is extended to integrate with the well correlation panel for better confidence in picking well tops. Visualizing system tract-interpretations together with the HorizonCube and overlaying the seismic and Wheeler-transformed domains helps to identify depositional features of interest that may form stratigraphic traps.

  11. Comparison of geology of Jurassic Norphlet Mary Ann field, Mobile Bay, Alabama, to onshore regional Norphlet trends

    SciTech Connect

    Marzono, M.; Pense, G.; Andronaco, P.

    1988-09-01

    The geology of the Mary Ann field is better understood in light of regional studies, which help to establish a depositional model in terms of both facies and thickness variations. These studies also illustrate major differences between onshore and offshore Norphlet deposits concerning topics such as diagenesis, hydrocarbon trapping, and migration. The Jurassic Norphlet sandstone was deposited in an arid basin extending from east Texas to Florida by a fluvial-eolian depositional system, prior to the transgression of the Smackover Formation. Until discovery of the Mary Ann field in 1979, Norphlet production was restricted to onshore areas, mostly along the Pickens-Pollard fault system in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. The Mary Ann field is a Norphlet dry-gas accumulation, and was the first offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico to establish economic reserves in the Jurassic. The field is located in Mobile Bay, approximately 25 mi (40 km) south of Mobile, Alabama. Formed by a deep-seated (more than 20,000 ft or 6096 m) faulted salt pillow, Mary Ann field produces from a series of stacked eolian dune sands situated near the Norphlet paleocoastline. Five lithofacies have been recognized in cores from the Mobil 76 No. 2 well. Each lithofacies has a distinct reservoir quality. Optimum reservoir faces are the dune and sheet sands. Nonreservoir facies are interdune (wet and dry), marine reworked, and evaporitic sands. Following deposition, these sediments have undergone varying amounts of diagenesis. Early cementation of well-sorted sands supported the pore system during compaction. However, late cementation by chlorite, silica, and alteration of liquid hydrocarbons to an asphaltic residue have completely occluded the pore system in parts of the reservoir.

  12. The Navajo country: A geographic and hydrographic reconnaissance of parts of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregory, Herbert E.

    1916-01-01

    To my mind the period of direct contact with nature is the true "heroic age" of human history, an age in which heroic accomplishment and heroic endurance are parts of the daily routine. The activities of people on this stage of progress deserve a place among the cherished traditions of the human race. I believe also that the sanest missionary effort includes an endeavor to assist the uncivilized man in his adjustment to natural laws. With these ideas in mind the opportunity to conduct exploratory work in the Navajo country appealed to me with peculiar force. Within this little-known region are the remnants of an almost extinct race whose long occupation of the country is recorded in ruined dwellings and abandoned fields. This country is also the home of the vigorous and promising Navajos - a tribe in remarkably close adjustment to their physical surroundings. To improve the condition of this long-neglected but capable race, to render their life more intelligently wholesome by applying scientific knowledge, gives pleasure in no degree less than that obtained by the study of the interesting geologic problems which this country affords.

  13. Jurassic paleopole controversy: Contributions from the Atlantic-bordering continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voo, Rob

    1992-11-01

    The Early-early Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous mean paleopoles for North America, Europe, South America, and Africa are very well grouped in appropriate continental reconstructions, but the intervening late Middle and Late Jurassic segment of the apparent polar wander path (APWP) is poorly defined and controversial. The available paleopoles, reconstructed for the partial opening of the central Atlantic Ocean, form a scattered grouping with no coherent age patterns, illustrating that they do not constitute a robust data set. Uncertainties in the reconstruction parameters between North America and Europe also play a role. However, excellent paleomagnetic results exist for tectonic elements near the margin of west Gondwana that are unlikely to have been significantly displaced with respect to cratonic Africa and South America. These results have not previously been used for APWP reconstructions, because local rotations are thought to have deflected the paleopoles in many cases. The inclinations of such results, however, can be used to determine a locus of paleopole positions. Paleopole loci for about 150 and 170 Ma were determined from results from Spain, Italy, Lebanon, and the Chilean Andes, and these were rotated with appropriate parameters to give locus intersections in North American coordinates. A late Middle Jurassic (early Callovian) best estimate of the paleopole in North American coordinates is located at about lat 70°N, long 135°E, and a Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) best estimate is located at about 70°N, 155°E. The resulting Jurassic-Early Cretaceous APWP follows roughly the 70th parallel, passing through the middle of the scattered individual paleopoles from the cratonic parts of the Atlantic-bordering continents.

  14. Hydrocarbon potential of a new Jurassic play, central Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, A.O.; Law, C.W.

    1996-12-31

    A largely unrecognized Jurassic Sag Basin has been identified in central Tunisia, proximal to the Permo-Carboniferous flexure delineating the northern boundary of the Saharan platform of north Africa. The northwestern margin of the Sag is delineated by an extensive region of salt-cored anticlines and localized salt diapirs extending north and west. Due to lack of deep drilling, delineation of the Sag is largely based on regional gravity data. Subsidence of the Jurassic Sag Basin is characterized by rapid expansion of Jurassic sediments from 400 m. of tidal flat and shelf carbonate at the western outcrop to over 2000 meters of tidal flat and basinal carbonate and shale within the basin center, a five-fold expansion. Rapid loading of the basin continued into Lower Cretaceous time, marked by lateral flowage of Triassic salt into pronounced structural trends. Published source rock data and interpreted subsurface well data provided the basis for GENEX 1-D hydrocarbon generation and expulsion modeling of the Sag. Middle Jurassic black source shales typically contain Type II and Type III kerogens with T.O.C.`s ranging up to 4 percent. Modeling results indicate that middle Jurassic shales are presently mature for liquid generation within portions of the Sag, with maximum generation taking place during the Tertiary. Potential hydrocarbon generation yields, based on 60 meters of mature source shale, are 20,000 BOE/acre for gas and 75,000 BOE/acre for liquids. Prospects within the region could contain an estimated potential reserve of several T.C.F. or over 1 billion barrels of oil.

  15. Hydrocarbon potential of a new Jurassic play, central Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, A.O. ); Law, C.W. )

    1996-01-01

    A largely unrecognized Jurassic Sag Basin has been identified in central Tunisia, proximal to the Permo-Carboniferous flexure delineating the northern boundary of the Saharan platform of north Africa. The northwestern margin of the Sag is delineated by an extensive region of salt-cored anticlines and localized salt diapirs extending north and west. Due to lack of deep drilling, delineation of the Sag is largely based on regional gravity data. Subsidence of the Jurassic Sag Basin is characterized by rapid expansion of Jurassic sediments from 400 m. of tidal flat and shelf carbonate at the western outcrop to over 2000 meters of tidal flat and basinal carbonate and shale within the basin center, a five-fold expansion. Rapid loading of the basin continued into Lower Cretaceous time, marked by lateral flowage of Triassic salt into pronounced structural trends. Published source rock data and interpreted subsurface well data provided the basis for GENEX 1-D hydrocarbon generation and expulsion modeling of the Sag. Middle Jurassic black source shales typically contain Type II and Type III kerogens with T.O.C.'s ranging up to 4 percent. Modeling results indicate that middle Jurassic shales are presently mature for liquid generation within portions of the Sag, with maximum generation taking place during the Tertiary. Potential hydrocarbon generation yields, based on 60 meters of mature source shale, are 20,000 BOE/acre for gas and 75,000 BOE/acre for liquids. Prospects within the region could contain an estimated potential reserve of several T.C.F. or over 1 billion barrels of oil.

  16. Increasing Vulnerability to Drought and Climate Change on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiza, M. M.; Kelley, K. B.; Francis, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, is an ecologically sensitive semi-arid to arid area where rapid growth of one of the largest population of Native Americans is outstripping the capacity of the land to sustain them. Recent drought conditions, combined with increasing temperatures, are significantly altering the habitability of a region already characterized by harsh living conditions. In addition to altered landscape conditions due to climatic change, drought, and varying land use practices over the last 200 years, the Navajo people have been affected by land use policies and harsh economic conditions that weaken their cultural fabric. Increasing aridity combined with drought threaten the very existence of Navajo culture and the survival of traditional Navajo communities. People presently living on these Native lands are unique in American society as their traditional lifestyle requires intimate knowledge of the ecosystem, knowledge that has been passed on for generations through oral traditions. We present data from the lifelong observations of 73 Native American elders that provide a record of the changes in plants and animals, water availability, weather, and sand or dust storms. This information is used to complement the scant long-term meteorological records and historical documentation for the region to further refine our understanding of the historical trends and local impacts of climate change and drought. Among the most cited changes is a long-term decrease in the amount of annual snowfall over the past century, a transition from wet conditions to dry conditions in the 1940s, and a decline in surface water features. The lack of available water, in addition to changing socioeconomic conditions, was mentioned as a leading cause for the decline in the ability to grow corn and other crops. Other noted changes include the disappearance of springs, and of plant and animal populations (particularly medicinal plants, cottonwood trees, beavers

  17. Samples from the Jurassic ocean crust beneath Gran Canaria, La Palma and Lanzarote (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Klügel, Andreas; Hansteen, Thor H.; Hoernle, Kaj; van den Bogaard, Paul

    1998-11-01

    Gabbro and minor metabasalt fragments of MORB composition were found on three of the seven Canary Islands. On Gran Canaria, they occur as metamorphosed (greenschist facies) metabasalt and metagabbro clasts in Miocene fanglomerates and sandstones overlying the shield basalts. On Lanzarote and La Palma, MORB gabbros occur as xenoliths in Pleistocene and historic basanite scoria cones and lava flows. The MORB xenoliths are interpreted as fragments of layers 2 and 3 of the underlying Mesozoic oceanic crust, based on mineral compositions (An-rich plagioclase, Ti- and Al-poor clinopyroxene, ± orthopyroxene ± olivine), depleted major and trace element signatures, and Jurassic ages (ca. 180 Ma) determined on single primary plagioclase and secondary amphibole crystals using the 40Ar/ 39Ar laser technique. The Lanzarote gabbros are very mafic (mg# 87 to 89 in clinopyroxene), moderately deformed, and highly depleted. Gran Canaria gabbros are more evolved (mg# 69 to 83 in clinopyroxene) and texturally mostly isotropic. La Palma MORB gabbros have a range of compositions (mg# 68 to 83 in clinopyroxene), some rocks being strongly metasomatized by interaction with basanite magma. The occurrence of MORB fragments on Lanzarote provides definite evidence that oceanic crust beneath the Canary Island archipelago continues at least as far east as the eastern Canary Islands. We postulate that MORB gabbros on Lanzarote which are commonly associated with peridotite xenoliths, represent the base of oceanic layer 3 where gabbros and peridotites were possibly tectonically interleaved. Such tectonic mixing would explain the enigmatic seismic velocities in this area. Gabbro xenoliths from La Palma were derived from within layer 3, probably from wall rock close to magma reservoirs emplaced during the Pleistocene/Holocene growth of La Palma. The Gran Canaria xenoliths are interpreted to represent the metamorphosed layer 2 and upper layer 3. The abundance of lower crustal xenoliths emphasizes

  18. A new pterosaur tracksite from the jurassic summerville formation, near Ferron, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mickelson, D.L.; Lockley, M.G.; Bishop, J.; Kirkland, J.

    2003-01-01

    Pterosaur tracks (cf. Pteraichnus) from the Summerville Formation of the Ferron area of central Utah add to the growing record of Pteraichnus tracksites in the Late Jurassic Summerville Formation and time-equivalent, or near time-equivalent, deposits. The site is typical in revealing high pterosaur track densities, but low ichnodiversity suggesting congregations or "flocks" of many individuals. Footprint length varies from 2.0 to 7.0 cms. The ratio of well-preserved pes:manus tracks is about 1:3.4. This reflects a bias in favor of preservation of manus tracks due to the greater weight-bearing role of the front limbs, as noted in other pterosaur track assemblages. The sample also reveals a number of well-preserved trackways including one suggestive of pes-only progression that might be associated with take off or landing, and another that shows pronounced lengthening of stride indicating acceleration. One well-preserved medium-sized theropod trackway (Therangospodus) and other larger theropod track casts (cf. Megalosauripus) are associated with what otherwise appears to be a nearly monospecific pterosaur track assemblage. However, traces of a fifth pes digit suggest some tracks are of rhamphorynchoid rather than pterodactyloid origin, as usually inferred for Pteraichnus. The tracks occur at several horizons in a thin stratigraphic interval of ripple marked sandstones and siltstones. Overall the assemblage is similar to others found in the same time interval in the Western Interior from central and eastern Utah through central and southern Wyoming, Colorado, northeastern Arizona, and western Oklahoma. This vast "Pteraichnus ichnofacies" with associated saurischian tracks, remains the only ichnological evidence of pre-Cretaceous pterosaurs in North America and sheds important light on the vertebrate ecology of the Summerville Formation and contiguous deposits. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

  19. Perception, Cultural, and Technical Assessment of Heating Alternatives to Improve Indoor Air Quality on the Navajo Nation

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is estimated that 62 percent of households in the Navajo Nation use wood as their primary heating source, while 25 percent use gaseous fuels, 11 percent use electricity, and the remaining 2 percent use coal, kerosene, other fossil fuels, or solar energy. A 2010 study by the U....

  20. 77 FR 50686 - Notice of Approval of Title V Operating Permit for Peabody Western Coal Company (Navajo Nation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... AGENCY Notice of Approval of Title V Operating Permit for Peabody Western Coal Company (Navajo Nation EPA... 40 C.F.R. Part 71, has issued a federal Clean Air Act Title V operating permit to Peabody Western Coal Company (``Peabody'') governing air emissions from Peabody's mining operation at the Kayenta...

  1. Navajo Environmental Health Review by the National Environmental Health Association (Window Rock, Arizona, May 24-27, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    The Indian Health Committee met with key staff of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Area Office to review the environmental health services provided on the Navajo Reservation and make recommendations for improvement or expansion of current programs, if needed. Recommendations were made regarding environmental health and institutional personnel,…

  2. Factors Involved in Job Satisfaction Among Teachers in the Bureau of Indian Affairs System on the Navajo Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frederick D.

    1977-01-01

    One of the principal problems the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has in carrying out its responsibility to educate Indian children is the high turnover rate among its teachers; a large proportion of teachers in the BIA school system leave after their first year or second year of work. Teachers at six elementary schools on the Navajo Reservation…

  3. Navajo Code Talker Joe Morris, Sr. shared insights from his time as a secret World War Two messenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Navajo Code Talker Joe Morris, Sr. shared insights from his time as a secret World War Two messenger with his audience at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Nov. 26, 2002. NASA Dryden is located on Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert.

  4. EPA Data Shows Water Quality in San Juan River in the Navajo Nation Back to Pre-Event Levels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DURANGO, CO - Based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) surface water data collected following the August 5, 2015 Gold King Mine release, San Juan River water quality in Navajo Nation has returned to pre-event conditions. This determinatio

  5. A Study of Navajo Perceptions of the Impact of Environmental Changes Relating to Energy Resource Development. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoepfle, G. Mark; And Others

    Ethnographic interview methods were utilized to determine the social costs of energy development (i.e. uranium mining) and the mitigation of these costs. Determination was made from the viewpoint of the Navajos in the Burnhams Chapter (a geopolitical unit) in Western New Mexico; they anticipated four major costs (losses) to their present way of…

  6. The Impact of Power Developments on the Navajo Nation. Lake Powell Research Project Bulletin Number 7, April 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Lynn A.

    The Federal government and private corporations involved in energy production are placing great emphasis on the strip-mining of vast coal reserves. The Navajo Nation, whose lands contain 20 billion tons of low-sulphur coal, sells vast quantities of its natural resources for use in the urban centers of Arizona and southern California. However, the…

  7. 25 CFR 161.102 - What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits on the Navajo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 161.102 What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits on... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What notifications are required that tribal laws apply...

  8. 25 CFR 161.102 - What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits on the Navajo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 161.102 What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits on... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What notifications are required that tribal laws apply...

  9. 25 CFR 161.102 - What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits on the Navajo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 161.102 What notifications are required that tribal laws apply to grazing permits on... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What notifications are required that tribal laws apply...

  10. Sandstone Diagenesis at Gale Crater, Mars, As Observed By Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebach, K. L.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McLennan, S. M.; Hurowitz, J.; Kah, L. C.; Edgett, K. S.; Williams, R. M. E.; Wiens, R. C.; Schieber, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, has encountered a significant number of poorly-sorted and very well-lithified sandstones along its traverse on the floor of Gale Crater. We use images from the hand-lens imager (MAHLI) and elemental chemistry from the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument (LIBS) and the alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer (APXS) to begin to constrain the diagenetic history of these sandstones, including lithification and possible later dissolution. Investigation of MAHLI images reveals that the sediments are poorly-sorted and show very low apparent porosity, generally less than ~5%. However, in some cases, such as the Gillespie Lake sandstone identified in Yellowknife Bay, this apparent porosity includes a significant fraction of void spaces larger than typical sediment grain sizes (~30% by number or 75% of void spaces by area). One possible explanation of these larger pits is that they represent recent removal of soft intraclasts by eolian abrasion. Another possibility is that later diagenetic fluids caused dissolution of more soluble grains, and production of secondary porosity. Investigation into the elemental chemistry of the sandstones has shown that they have a relatively unaltered basaltic bulk composition in spite of possessing a variety of secondary minerals and amorphous material, indicating isochemical diagenetic processes. The chemistry and mineralogy of the cement is not immediately evident based on the initial analyses; there is not a high percentage of salts or evaporative minerals that may easily cement near-surface sandstones. Furthermore, these sandstones lack textures and compositions consistent with pedogenic processes, such as calcrete, silcrete, or ferricrete. Instead, they may record burial and cementation at depth. Cement composition may be constrained through comparison to terrestrial basaltic sandstones, and studying chemical variations along ChemCam and APXS transects of the rocks.

  11. Geochemistry of Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous deposits in the Nagato Basin, SW Japan: implication of factor analysis to sorting effects and provenance signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Tohru

    2004-10-01

    One of the intractable problems in provenance analysis is the hydraulic sorting effect and resultant mineralogical heterogeneity in coarse- and fine-grained sediments which conceals provenance characteristics. The present study uses factor analysis to address geochemical responses to the sorting effect and provenance of Late Mesozoic sediments in the Nagato Basin, SW Japan. Factor analysis has proven useful for comprehending geochemical gradients between coarse- and fine-grained sediments. In the present example, compositional differences are based on varying proportions of quartz, plagioclase, chrome spinel, authigenic minerals and phyllosilicates. The contrasting behaviors of these minerals during the depositional stage resulted in the systematic fractionation of SiO 2/Al 2O 3, Na 2O/K 2O and Cr/Ba. Sandstones and mudstones exhibit an array of compositions in SiO 2/Al 2O 3-Na 2O/K 2O and SiO 2/Al 2O 3-Cr/Ba diagrams, the ranges of which reflect compositional variations due to the sorting effect. Sediments of different provenance exhibit distinctive mineral arrays and can be discriminated simply by reading the gradients of the continua. Therefore, this kind of data management concurrently quantifies the sorting effect and allows an estimation of the original source material. The SiO 2/Al 2O 3-Na 2O/K 2O diagram is particularly useful for scrutinizing igneous and mature continental provenances, while the SiO 2/Al 2O 3-Cr/Ba diagram ascertains contributions from mafic sources. This investigative approach delineates a systematic provenance transition within the Nagato Basin: a serpentinite melange provenance in the early Early Jurassic, a magmatic arc in the late Early to middle Middle Jurassic and a continental interior in the latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous. The provenance changed by the direct input of mature continental material into the Nagato Basin, which resulted from dissection of the volcanic arc.

  12. Diversity and paleogeographic distribution of Early Jurassic plesiosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Peggy; Suan, Guillaume

    2010-05-01

    Early Jurassic plesiosaurs, a group of extinct marine reptiles, were one of the first groups to be described in the history of vertebrate paleontology. Nevertheless, the paleogeographic distribution and the taxonomic diversity of these forms are still unclear, particularly because most descriptions and taxonomic attributions were realized during the mid 19th to early 20th century. Here we investigate the paleodiversity and paleogeographic distribution of Early Jurassic plesiosaurs using an extensive taxonomic and anatomical revision of most known Early Jurassic specimens. We also present an examination of the biostratigraphic and sedimentological framework of deposits in which these specimens were discovered, in order to decipher whether their fossil record reflects primary paleobiological trends or taphonomic/discovery biases. Early Jurassic Plesiosaur diversity appears to reach its maximum during the Toarcian (falciferum-bifrons ammonite zones). Nevertheless, the inclusion of ghost lineages into the diversity curves indicates that this pattern likely reflects discovery and taphonomical biases rather than primary biodiversity trends. Indeed, most strata where numerous plesiosaurs species were discovered correspond to sediments that were deposited under poorly-oxygenated conditions and exploited at least in a semi-industrial way during the 1800's-1950's. The Lower Jurassic fossiliferous localities that yielded identifiable plesiosaur species are only found in Western Europe (England, Germany, and France). In Europe, the Toarcian stage is the only interval where more than one fossiliferous locality is known (the Hettangian, Sinemurian and Pliensbachian stages being each represented by only one locality where specimens are identifiable at the species level). The different Toarcian fossiliferous sites of Europe do not bear any single common taxon, suggesting a high degree of endemism in Early Jurassic plesiosaurs. Nevertheless, these sites are fundamentally

  13. Development of Shear Banding in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, J. J.; Labuz, J. F.

    2004-05-01

    Closed-loop, servo-controlled testing was used to investigate the development of shear failure in Berea sandstone under low confining pressure. The experiments were performed with the University of Minnesota Plane-Strain Apparatus, designed to allow the failure plane to propagate in an unrestricted manner. Deformation was imposed into the strain softening regime and controlled so that the specimens remained intact. Thin-section microscopy provided direct observation in, adjacent to, and around the tip of the rupture zone. The shear band appeared to initiate near a stress concentration, either the corner of the specimen or, when present, an imperfection (3 mm diameter hole) introduced into the specimen. Intragranular microcracking was the dominant observable failure mechanism. The intensity of grain cracking was greatest near the initiation point and decreased as the failure surface was traced towards the tip. Areas of high crack density also appeared to have the greatest amount of grain size reduction and there seemed to be a larger amount of pore space. In areas where intragranular microcracks were distinguishable, (e.g. near the tip of the rupture zone), microcracks showed very little or no shear displacement, suggesting the features were not reoriented after formation. Microcrack orientations showed a dominant direction of -16 degrees from the maximum principal stress direction and -26 degrees from the failure surface. A numerical imaging technique was developed to provide an efficient means for analyzing the relative porosity of epoxy-impregnated thin-sections. The code was set up to receive a digital image (*.bmp), where three parameters (R, G, and B) describe the color of each pixel. The intensity of the R channel consistently defined the boundary of grain and pore space and was used to differentiate blue pore space from the white grains composing the matrix. Porosity increase within the rupture zone was 3-4 grain diameters wide. An absence of notable

  14. Tertiary age for upper Nubian sandstone formation, central Sudan

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, G.; Lejal-Nicol, A.; Vaudois-Mieja, N.

    1986-02-01

    In central and northern Sudan, oil exploration is now active in the basins containing sediments of the Nubian Sandstone Formation. On the evidence of planned pipeline construction, significant volumes of oil appear to have been discovered in southwestern Sudan. A newly discovered flora from the upper Nubian Sandstone Formation near Khartoum in central Sudan is Tertiary in age. The flora is well preserved, and comprises leaves, flowers, and fruits, many not yet described. At the generic level, they are comparable to forms that are known fro the Eocene to Miocene. Aquatic plants indicate a lacustrine paleoenvironment; humid tropical forests thrived on the lakeshores. The Nubian Sandstone Formation of Sudan had been considered to be entirely of Cretaceous age; this new flora shifts the upper boundary into the Tertiary. The Tertiary Hudi Chert, found in scattered outcrops in the region of Atbara, was considered to overlie the Nubian Sandstone Formation. The authors suggest that the Hudi Chert is partly age equivalent to the Tertiary upper Nubian Sandstone at Jebel Mudaha.

  15. Transport of engineered silver (Ag) nanoparticles through partially fractured sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Christoph; Braun, Anika; Azzam, Rafig

    2014-08-01

    Transport behavior and fate of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in the subsurface is of major interest concerning soil and groundwater protection in order to avoid groundwater contamination of vital resources. Sandstone aquifers are important groundwater resources which are frequently used for public water supply in many regions of the world. The objective of this study is to get a better understanding of AgNP transport behavior in partially fractured sandstones. We executed AgNP transport studies on partially fissured sandstone drilling cores in laboratory experiments. The AgNP concentration and AgNP size in the effluent were analyzed using flow field-flow fractionation mainly. We employed inverse mathematical models on the measured AgNP breakthrough curves to identify and quantify relevant transport processes. Physicochemical filtration, time-dependent blocking due to filling of favorable attachment sites and colloid-facilitated transport were identified as the major processes for AgNP mobility. Physicochemical filtration was found to depend on solute chemistry, mineralogy, pore size distribution and probably on physical and chemical heterogeneity. Compared to AgNP transport in undisturbed sandstone matrix reported in the literature, their mobility in partially fissured sandstone is enhanced probably due to larger void spaces and higher hydraulic conductivity.

  16. Fault-related Silurian Clinton sandstone deposition in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, A.H. )

    1988-08-01

    Mapping the thickness of the Silurian Clinton sandstone reservoir and associated shale, sandstone, and carbonate facies in the subsurface of 40 counties in eastern Ohio reveals a general correspondence between major patterns of deposition and the location of faults that strike parallel with or subparallel to the depositional trends. Clinton delta-front sandstones, which occur along a line from Hocking and Perry Counties, through Knox, Holmes, and Wayne Counties northeast to Lake County, Ohio, parallel a line of major change in magnetic intensity in the basement, which is interpreted here to be the juncture between the more stable, less subsiding central Ohio carbonate bank and the more subsiding western edge of the Appalachian basin. The principal Clinton deltaic lobes occur in east-central and northeastern Ohio. The Clinton sandstone interval is thinner and starved of coarse clastic sediment close to the Rome trough, which is located along the southeasternmost Ohio border. Sediment distribution patterns indicate that deltaic deposits of Clinton sandstone were captured in the subsiding Rome trough at the border of southern Ohio during the Early Silurian. Farther north, deltaic sediments spread out across eastern Ohio to reach an elongate depocenter caused by minor subsidence at the central Ohio platform edge. There, deltaic sands intermittently filled the delta-edge trough, and spilled out as thin shelf sands onto the more stable platform, a site of predominantly mixed shale and carbonate deposition during the Early Silurian.

  17. Characterization and mischaracterization of authigenic magnesium-bearing minerals: Examples from Norphlet Sandstone, Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Jurassic Norphlet sandstones are significant gas, condensate, and carbon dioxide reservoirs in the eastern Gulf Coast region. Diagenetic factors affecting the quality of these reservoirs are variable at microscopic to megascopic scales. Major authigenic components of the reservoirs include quartz, albite, K-feldspar, a variety of carbonate minerals, anhydrite, pyrite, illite, and chlorite; minor components include zeolite, tourmaline, apatite, and anatase. Although the diagenetic character of Norphlet sandstone has been intensely investigated, diagenetic pathways and the origin of porosity remain controversial. Characterization of chemically variable authigenic minerals is crucial to understanding fluid migration pathways and rock-water interactions. Detailed polarized-light and electron microscopy, energy- and wavelength-dispersion X-ray microanalysis, and X-ray diffractometry reveal that common authigenic Mg-bearing minerals in Norphlet reservoirs have been overlooked or improperly chemically characterized. Breunnerite has not been identified by other investigators, although it is abundant in cores from some wells. Authigenic chlorite, which is widespread in offshore reservoirs, commonly has been described as being Fe-rich, whereas electron probe microanalyses indicate that this chlorite is Mg-rich. Qualitative chemical characterization of authigenic minerals commonly is determined by EDX analysis during routine observation of textural relationships with a SEM. This type of analysis typically is performed with little regard for beam-sample-detector geometric relationships and other operational parameters. Peak intensities on EDX spectra collected using a lower electron beam potential (10 kV) more closely reflect proportions of Mg and Fe in breunnerite and chlorite. Thus, SEM operating parameters should be carefully considered, even for qualitative chemical analysis.

  18. A reservoir model for the Lower Cretaceous deep marine sandstones in the Maloy Fault Block area, Norwegian North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kloster, A.; Areklett, E.K.; Milton, N.

    1995-08-01

    The Maloy Fault Block area of the North Viking Graben forms a platform to the east of the Sogn Graben next to the coast of Norway. This area is characterized by an unusual and thick Lower Cretaceous section containing a number of discrete sandstone packages. Wells drilled elsewhere in the Norwegian North Sea are in contrast dominated by a relatively thin mud and marl dominated section in the Lower Cretaceous. Two wells in block 35/3 (the Agat field) encountered gas bearing sandstones of Albian age interpreted to represent deposition in a deep marine environment. An integrated sequence stratigraphic approach to the Lower Cretaceous stratigraphy in the Maloy Fault Block area has led to a new and more detailed understanding of controls on deposition in this area. This is based both on a regional dataset and good quality 3D seismic data. A Valanginian-Hauterivian relict slope/shelf system is present along the eastern basin margin. It formed a long-lasting topographic feature and in some areas was not onlapped until the Campanian time. A dramatic change in the basin configuration took place most likely in the Aptian time. This was initiated by erosion of the slope/shelf system which cut multiple huge canyons along the basin-margin. The canyons focused sediment input to the basin along discrete and mappable transport routes, some of which are controlled by erosion features inherited from the Late Jurassic. A complex history of deposition and filling followed. This was controlled by a constantly changing basin floor topography and left a complex pattern of partly constrained fan deposition.

  19. Potential Triassic and Jurassic CO2 Storage Reservoirs in the Skagerrak Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, I.; Aagaard, P.; Fawad, M.; Sassier, C.; Faleide, J. I.; Jahren, J.; Gabrielsen, R. H.; Nielsen, L. H.; Kristensen, L.; Bergmo, P. E. S.

    2012-04-01

    Based on a screening study for CO2 storage in the Skagerrak area, we have focused on the Upper Triassic/Lowermost Jurassic Gassum Formation. A large shallow dipping reservoir structure has been identified in the northern Skagerrak area. The current study presents reservoir characteristics of the Gassum formation in the Fjerritslev trough and onto the Skagerrak Kattegat platform, and the corresponding reservoir model. This reservoir model is part of an ongoing interdisciplinary project with the overall goal to establish a basis for large-scale handling of CO2 in this area, including regional CO2 source and capture possibilities, transportation and infrastructure, possible storage sites as well as legal aspects relating to the whole CCS chain. The shallow dipping aquifer is regionally exteded and mapped in the Norwegian-Danish Basin, the Fjerritslev trough, and onto the Skagerrak Kattegat platform, and is found deeper than 800 m below sea level. In the south the formation is affected by salt tectonics (salt pillows, diapirs), while forming gently dipping layer structures towards the north. The Gassum reservoir consists of mainly shallow marine shoreface sandstones with associated estuarine deposits possibly deposited during sea-level low stands. Thickness of Gassum Formation from Danish wells is 70 - 220 m with sand to shale ratios between 60 - 70%. Based on the study, an injection well is proposed 50 km offshore Norway. The proposed injection depth is 2070 m with the reservoir pinch-out 38 km away towards north where the top reservoir is 117 m below the Quaternary sediments. The southern portion of the reservoir located in Denmark can be characterized from wells drilled for hydrocarbons and geothermal energy. In order to predict the reservoir facies/parameters and to make a realistic geologic model comprising the area closer to Norway, a regional geological model based on sequence stratigraphic interpretations is imperative. Using thicknesses from seismic data a

  20. Power, Prayers, and Protection: Comb Ridge as a Case Study in Navajo Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, a five-year survey of cultural resources began to unfold in southeastern Utah along a prominent sandstone rock formation known as Comb Ridge. This visually dramatic monocline stretches a considerable distance from the southwestern corner of Blue Mountain (Abajos) in Utah to Kayenta, Arizona, approximately one hundred miles to…

  1. A new carnivorous dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Solnhofen archipelago.

    PubMed

    Göhlich, Ursula B; Chiappe, Luis M

    2006-03-16

    Small Late Jurassic theropod dinosaurs are rare worldwide. In Europe these carnivorous dinosaurs are represented primarily by only two skeletons of Compsognathus, neither of which is well preserved. Here we describe a small new theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period of Schamhaupten in southern Germany. Being exquisitely preserved and complete from the snout to the distal third of the tail, the new fossil is the best-preserved predatory, non-avian dinosaur in Europe. It possesses a suite of characters that support its identification as a basal coelurosaur. A cladistic analysis indicates that the new taxon is closer to maniraptorans than to tyrannosauroids, grouping it with taxa often considered to be compsognathids. Large portions of integument are preserved along its tail. The absence of feathers or feather-like structures in a fossil phylogenetically nested within feathered theropods indicates that the evolution of these integumentary structures might be more complex than previously thought.

  2. A late Jurassic pterosaur (Reptilia, Pterodactyloidea) from northwestern Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codorniú, Laura; Gasparini, Zulma; Paulina-Carabajal, Ariana

    2006-03-01

    A small to medium-sized pterodactyloid pterosaur (wingspan approximately 1.10 m) from the Upper Jurassic (middle-late Tithonian) marine deposits of the Vaca Muerta Formation of Patagonia (Los Catutos area, central Neuquén Province, Argentina) is reported. The specimen lacks the skull but constitutes a nearly complete postcranial skeleton, which includes cervical and dorsal vertebrae; a few thoracic ribs; both pectoral girdles; the left pelvic girdle; a proximal right wing (humerus, ulna, and radius) and metacarpal IV; a left wing that lacks only wing phalanx four; and both hindlimbs, the right one without the foot. Ontogenetic features suggest that the new fossil corresponds to a relatively mature individual, probably a subadult. Observed characters support its assignment to the Archaeopteroactyloidea, a basal clade within the Pterodactyloidea. This specimen is the second pterosaur from Los Catutos and the most complete Jurassic pterosaur so far known from South America.

  3. Petroleum potential of Lower-Jurassic deposits in Nurolsk megadepression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, Lobova; E, Osipova; V, Isaev; D, Terre

    2015-02-01

    Based on reservoir temperature measurement data from twenty-three reference well cross-sections and paleotemperature modeling, the thermal history of Lower-Jurassic Togur source rock within Nurolsk megadepression and its framing structures have been reconstructed. Plotted maps showed the density distribution of initial accumulated oil resources for Lower J15-J16 formations. Based on performed zoning of reservoirs the areas for priority hydrocarbon prospecting were proposed.

  4. Magnetostratigraphy of the Lower Jurassic (Hettangian-Sinemurian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüsing, Silja Katherine; Abels, Hemmo; Deenen, Martijn; Ruhl, Micha; Krijgsman, Wout

    2013-04-01

    Magnetostratigraphy and correlation to the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) constitute a standard dating tool in Earth Sciences. When integrated with biostratigraphy and especially cyclostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy allows high-resolution correlations all over the world, because paleomagnetic polarity reversals can geologically be seen as globally synchronous events. It is therefore the stratigraphic tool of choice to perform correlations between continental and marine realms. An integrated astronomical time scale, which has been achieved for most of the Neogene and is in progress for the Palaeogene and Mesozoic, provides high resolution and accuracy. The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) for the Early Jurassic is far less robust (Gradstein et al., 2004, 2012) because magnetostratigraphic records of marine Hettangian and Sinemurian successions are rare and equivocal (Gallet et al., 1990; Yang et al., 1996). Consequently, the Global Stratotype Section and Points (GSSP's) for the Hettangian (Kuhjoch; Austria) and Sinemurian (East Quantoxhead; UK) are mainly defined on biostratigraphic (ammonite) arguments (Hillebrandt et al., 2007; Bloos and Page, 2002). Cyclostratigraphic analyses from the Lower Jurassic marine successions at St. Audrie's Bay and East Quantoxhead located on the west Somerset coast on the southern side of the Bristol Channel Basin (UK) resulted in an independent astronomical framework for the Hettangian Stage, allowing to locate the stratigraphic position of the marine defined Triassic-Jurassic and Hettangian-Sinemurian boundary in the continental realm (Ruhl et al., 2010). We will present the magnetostratigraphy of the Hettangian and lower Sinemurian successions of St. Audrie's Bay and East Quantoxhead, which will be used to evaluate the marine-continental correlations in the recovery interval following the end-Triassic mass extinction and to develop a more robust GPTS for the Lower Jurassic.

  5. Jurassic sedimentary basins in the Central Asian orogenic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Bebeshev, I.I.

    1995-05-01

    The principal stages of development of Jurassic sedimentary basins (from their origin to the end of their existence) in the Central Asian orogenic belt are considered. The interrelations of the basins with the surrounding paleorises are investigated. Paleogeographic maps are compiled representing the evolution of paleolandscapes and revealing their interrelations in space and time for each stage. Areas with the highest prospects for coal are found.

  6. Jurassic and triassic hydrocarbon exploration of southern Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell-Tapping, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Triassic and Jurassic of South Florida have been overlooked as a viable exploration target because of lack of data and plate tectonics application. In Florida {open_quotes}basement{close_quotes} is defined as crystalline, igneous, metamorphic and unmetamorphosed sediments of Paleozoic age. Age-dating of zircons has shown that the Florida lower Paleozoic terrain is not akin to that of North America but is part of the West African Guinean Shield. Pre-Atlantic reconstruction of the Gulf of Mexico in this study suggests that there was a Florida connection to Yucatan-Cuba-Africa during the Triassic. This reconstruction also shows that Jurassic rocks that are well known in the Northern Gulf Coast should have been deposited in similar depositional environments in southern Florida. Deep drilling on the Florida peninsula has confirmed this hypothesis. By using plate tectonic reconstruction based on the rifting of the North Atlantic Ocean and evidence from petrology of basement samples from deep wells, together with petrographic analyses of Jurassic sedimentary rocks, a Smackover-equivalent exploration play can be developed. Petrographic and petrophysical analysis of wells that have encountered Jurassic marine shales, anhydrite, dolomite, carbonate, and clastic sedimentary rocks has determined that they were deposited in shallow-water subtidal to supratidal environments. Excellent gas shows, oil stain in pores, and high TOC values in marine shales indicate that there are accumulations of hydrocarbon present. Application of analogous Gulf Coast Smackover stratigraphic models to this area, based on petrology and hydrogeology, should reduce risk and help define productive oil and gas reservoirs.

  7. Qingshankou-Putaohua/Shaertu and Jurassic Coal-Denglouku/Nongan total petroleum systems in the Songliao Basin, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Qiang, Jin; McCabe, Peter J.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Persits, Felix

    2003-01-01

    The Qingshankou-Putaohua/Shaertu petroleum system involves the generation of oil and gas from a mature pod of lacustrine source rock near the center of the Songliao Basin in northeastern China. The primary source rock is the Lower Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation, and a secondary source rock is Member 1 of the Lower Cretaceous Nenjiang Formation. The most productive of six sandstone reservoirs are the Putaohua reservoir (Member 1 of the Lower Cretaceous Yaojia Formation) and the Shaertu reservoir (Members 2 and 3 of the Yaojia Formation and Member 1 of the Nenjiang Formation). Most oil and associated gas generated from the Qingshankou Formation and Nenjiang Formation (Member 1) are trapped in large faulted anticlines, fault blocks, and faulted anticlinal noses in combination with facies-change and (or) diagenetic stratigraphic traps. Two assessment units are defined in the petroleum system: (1) an anticlinal assessment unit; and (2) a subtle-traps assessment unit consisting of (a) anticlinal noses in combination with fault or stratigraphic traps, (b) stratigraphic traps, and (c) unconventional reservoirs. Undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources are expected in both assessment units in small (5?10 million barrels of oil; 30?60 billion ft3 gas) and medium (10?25 million barrels of oil; 60?150 billion ft3 of gas) fields. Also, undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources are expected in several large fields (25?73 million barrels of oil; 150?173 billion ft3 of gas). The Jurassic coal?Dengloukou/Nongan petroleum system involves the generation of natural gas from multiple pods of mature source rock in graben structures at the base of the Songliao Basin. Sandstone and conglomeratic sandstone in the Lower Cretaceous Denglouku Formation and the Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation are the major reservoir rocks. Most of the known natural gas is trapped in anticlines, anticlinal noses, and fault blocks. This petroleum system is largely unexplored in comparison to

  8. Effective Thermal Conductivity Modeling of Sandstones: SVM Framework Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Alireza; Masoudi, Mohammad; Ghaderi-Ardakani, Alireza; Arabloo, Milad; Amani, Mahmood

    2016-06-01

    Among the most significant physical characteristics of porous media, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is used for estimating the thermal enhanced oil recovery process efficiency, hydrocarbon reservoir thermal design, and numerical simulation. This paper reports the implementation of an innovative least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm for the development of enhanced model capable of predicting the ETCs of dry sandstones. By means of several statistical parameters, the validity of the presented model was evaluated. The prediction of the developed model for determining the ETCs of dry sandstones was in excellent agreement with the reported data with a coefficient of determination value ({R}2) of 0.983 and an average absolute relative deviation of 0.35 %. Results from present research show that the proposed LS-SVM model is robust, reliable, and efficient in calculating the ETCs of sandstones.

  9. Optical coherence tomography for vulnerability assessment of sandstone.

    PubMed

    Bemand, Elizabeth; Liang, Haida

    2013-05-10

    Sandstone is an important cultural heritage material, in both architectural and natural settings, such as neolithic rock art panels. The majority of deterioration effects in porous materials such as sandstone are influenced by the presence and movement of water through the material. The presence of water within the porous network of a material results in changes in the optical coherence tomography signal intensity that can be used to monitor the wetting front of water penetration of dry porous materials at various depths. The technique is able to detect wetting front velocities from 1 cm s(-1) to 10(-6) cm s(-1), covering the full range of hydraulic conductivities likely to occur in natural sandstones from pervious to impervious.

  10. Map of Water Infrastructure and Homes Without Access to Safe Drinking Water and Basic Sanitation on the Navajo Nation - October 2010

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document presents the results of completed work using existing geographic information system (GIS) data to map existing water and sewer infrastructure and homes without access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation on the Navajo Nation.

  11. Cleanup of inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites in the Navajo Nation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978 to address potential and significant radiation health hazards to the public from active and inactive mill operations. Title I to the UMTRCA identified sites to be designated for remedial action. These include four uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) sites in the Navajo Nation. These sites are located in Shiprock, New Mexico; Tuba City, Arizona; Cane Valley, Arizona; and Halchita, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was directed to select and execute a plan of remedial action that provides long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials and satisfies the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards and other applicable laws and regulations.

  12. HLA-B alleles of the Navajo: no evidence for rapid evolution in the Nadene.

    PubMed

    Garber, T L; McAdam, S N; Butler, L M; Crocker, P; Piekarczyk, M; Troup, G M; Milford, E L; Watkins, D I

    1996-02-01

    New HLA-B locus alleles have been found in South American Amerindian populations but were largely absent in North American Amerindian tribes also descended from this first Paleo-Indian migration. We have now extended these studies to the Navajo, descendants of the second Nadene migration. No new functional alleles were found at the B locus of this tribe. This limited study supports the notion that while new B locus variants are common in South American Amerindians, it is more difficult to find new B locus alleles in North American native peoples. Whether this dichotomy is due to differences in pathogen environment and/or population structures between North and South America remains a subject of speculation.

  13. Depositional and diagenetic processes involved in the development of mudstone successions: a multi proxy study of the Lower Jurassic Cleveland Basin (The North Yorkshire coast, England).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadeer, S.; Macquaker, J. H. S.; Hughes, C. R.

    2009-04-01

    Mud and mudstones are the most abundant (>60%) sediment and sedimentary rock type preserved at and close to the surface of the Earth. They have formed commonly throughout the Phanerozoic and are found in many environments including present-day soils, lake basins, continental shelves, and ocean basins. Mudstones deposited in ancient shelf seas are particularly important as they are very common and significant components of many petroleum systems as sources and seals. In spite of their importance the variability that they exhibit is usually not incorporated into basin-scale facies models as they are assumed to contain little information that is useful in predicting the distribution of reservoir facies. The fundamental mechanisms (physical, chemical and biological) that control the origin of fine-grained sediments in ancient shelf seas is less studied in comparison with other sediments types (e.g. limestones and sandstones). The Middle Jurassic aged succession from the Staithes Sandstone through to the Mulgrave Shale Member (Jet Rock), which is largely continuous and very well-exposed in two locations in the Cleveland Basin, North Yorkshire Coast, England is an ideal natural laboratory to investigate how marginal marine processes evolve into deep marine processes. In the literature, the fundamental controls on lithofacies variability in mudstone-dominated successions preserved in distal shelf environments have been mainly interpreted in terms of varying bottom water oxygen concentrations, primary production and suspension settling. In proximal muddy environments researchers have broadly interpreted lithofacies variability in terms of storm events, tidal currents, etc. These are very different mechanisms. Moreover, these rocks are rarely studied as a whole system; the basinal mudstones are rarely connected up-dip to muddy sandstones and mudstones deposited in the offshore transition and offshore zones. In order to determine the processes responsible for the formation

  14. Upper Jurassic depositional systems and hydrocarbon potential of southeast Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Meendsen, F.C.; Moore, C.H.; Heydari, E.; Sassen, R.

    1987-09-01

    Upper Jurassic sedimentation in southeast Mississippi was controlled by eustatic sea level fluctuations and locally modified by salt tectonism and basement structure. This study, using conventional core data and geophysical logs, indicates that a stable carbonate platform developed along the updip margin of the Mississippi interior salt basin. The basin was partially barred from the main Gulf of Mexico water mass by the Wiggins uplift, and became evaporitic during the Late Jurassic. Moldic, intercrystalline, and vuggy dolomite porosity is developed on the crests of intermediate and high-amplitude salt highs and on the Wiggins uplift. Jurassic source rocks are lower Smackover laminated lime mudstones. Migration into adjacent reservoirs postdated formation of porosity and the growth of salt anticlines, the most common trap type. A large potential Norphlet-Smackover gas play extends along the southern flank of the Wiggins uplift. Salt anticlines within the interior basin remain viable targets. Small oil discoveries should continue in stratigraphic traps, subtle salt structures, and basement blocks on the platform.

  15. A perfect flower from the Jurassic of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Xin

    2016-07-03

    Flower, enclosed ovule and tetrasporangiate anther are three major characters distinguishing angiosperms from other seed plants. Morphologically, typical flowers are characterised by an organisation with gynoecium and androecium surrounded by corolla and calyx. Theoretically, flowers are derived from their counterparts in ancient ancestral gymnosperms. However, as for when, how and from which groups, there is no consensus among botanists yet. Although angiosperm-like pollen and angiosperms have been claimed in the Triassic and Jurassic, typical flowers with the aforesaid three key characters are still missing in the pre-Cretaceous age, making many interpretations of flower evolution tentative. Thus searching for flower in the pre-Cretaceous has been a tantalising task for palaeobotanists for a long time. Here, we report a typical flower, Euanthus paniigen. et sp. nov., from the Middle-Late Jurassic of Liaoning, China. Euanthus has sepals, petals, androecium with tetrasporangiate dithecate anthers and gynoecium with enclosed ovules, organised just like in perfect flowers of extant angiosperms. The discovery of Euanthus implies that typical angiosperm flowers have already been in place in the Jurassic, and provides a new insight unavailable otherwise for the evolution of flowers.

  16. A perfect flower from the Jurassic of China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Flower, enclosed ovule and tetrasporangiate anther are three major characters distinguishing angiosperms from other seed plants. Morphologically, typical flowers are characterised by an organisation with gynoecium and androecium surrounded by corolla and calyx. Theoretically, flowers are derived from their counterparts in ancient ancestral gymnosperms. However, as for when, how and from which groups, there is no consensus among botanists yet. Although angiosperm-like pollen and angiosperms have been claimed in the Triassic and Jurassic, typical flowers with the aforesaid three key characters are still missing in the pre-Cretaceous age, making many interpretations of flower evolution tentative. Thus searching for flower in the pre-Cretaceous has been a tantalising task for palaeobotanists for a long time. Here, we report a typical flower, Euanthus panii gen. et sp. nov., from the Middle–Late Jurassic of Liaoning, China. Euanthus has sepals, petals, androecium with tetrasporangiate dithecate anthers and gynoecium with enclosed ovules, organised just like in perfect flowers of extant angiosperms. The discovery of Euanthus implies that typical angiosperm flowers have already been in place in the Jurassic, and provides a new insight unavailable otherwise for the evolution of flowers. PMID:27134345

  17. Carbon cycle history through the Middle Jurassic of Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Fozy, Istvan; Galacz, Andras

    2016-04-01

    A carbonate carbon isotope curve from the Aalenian-Bathonian interval is presented from the Obanya valley, of the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary. This interval is less well constrained and studied that other Jurassic time slices. The Obanya valley lies in the eastern part of the Mecsek Mountains, between Obanya and Kisujbanya and provides excellent exposures of a near continuous Aalenian to Lower Cretaceous sequence. It is not strongly affected by tectonics, as compared to other sections of eastern Mecsek of the same age. In parts, a rich fossil assemblage has been collected; the Bathonian ammonites are especially valuable as this locality. The pelagic Middle Jurassic is represented by thin-bedded limestones (the Obanya Limestone) and is overlain by Upper Jurassic siliceous limestones and radiolarites (the Fonyaszo Limestone). The new data indicates a series of positive anomalies within the late Aalenian and early-middle Bajocian. These data are comparable with carbonate carbon isotope recorded from other Tethyan margin sediments. Our integrated biostratigraphy and carbon isotope stratigraphy enables us to improve stratigraphic correlation and age determination of the examined strata.

  18. Microbial contamination of two urban sandstone aquifers in the UK.

    PubMed

    Powell, Karen L; Taylor, Richard G; Cronin, Aidan A; Barrett, Mike H; Pedley, Steve; Sellwood, Jane; Trowsdale, Sam A; Lerner, David N

    2003-01-01

    Development of urban groundwater has historically been constrained by concerns about its quality. Rising urban water tables and overabstraction from rural aquifers in the UK have led to a renewed interest in urban groundwater, particularly the possibility of finding water of acceptable quality at depth. This study assessed the microbial quality of groundwater collected from depth-specific intervals over a 15-month period within the Permo-Triassic Sherwood Sandstone aquifers underlying the cities of Nottingham and Birmingham. Sewage-derived bacteria (thermotolerant coliforms, faecal streptococci and sulphite-reducing clostridia) and viruses (enteroviruses, Norwalk-like viruses, coliphage) were regularly detected to depths of 60 m in the unconfined sandstone and to a depth of 91 m in the confined sandstone. Microbial concentrations varied temporally and spatially but increased frequency of contamination with depth coincided with geological heterogeneities such as fissures and mudstone bands. Significantly, detection of Norwalk-like viruses and Coxsackievirus B4 in groundwater corresponded with seasonal variations in virus discharge to the sewer system. The observation of low levels of sewage-derived microbial contaminants at depth in the Triassic Sandstone aquifer is explained by the movement of infinitesimal proportions of bulk (macroscopic) groundwater flow along preferential pathways (e.g., fissures, bedding planes). The existence of very high microbial populations at source (raw sewage) and their extremely low detection limits at the receptor (multilevel piezometer) enable these statistically extreme (microscopic) flows to be traced. Rapid penetration of microbial contaminants into sandstone aquifers, not previously reported, highlights the vulnerability of sandstone aquifers to microbial contamination.

  19. Triassic-Jurassic sediments and multiple volcanic events in North Victoria Land, Antarctica: A revised stratigraphic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schöner, R.; Viereck-Goette, L.; Schneider, J.; Bomfleur, B.

    2007-01-01

    Field investigations in North Victoria Land, Antarctica during GANOVEX IX (2005/2006) allow the revision of the Triassic-Jurassic stratigraphy of ~300 m thick continental deposits in between the crystalline basement and the Kirkpatrick lava flows of the Ferrar Group. The lower stratigraphic unit (Section Peak Formation) is characterised by braided river-type quartzose sandstone deposits with intercalations of shale and coal occurring at the top. It is overlain by a homogeneous unit of reworked tuffs composed of fine-grained silicic shards, quartz and feldspar (new name: "Shafer Peak Formation"). These deposits can be correlated with parts of the Hanson Formation in the Central Transantarctic Mountains and require a distal yet unknown source of massive silicic volcanism. Clastic products of mafic volcanic eruptions, formerly described as a separate stratigraphic formation (Exposure Hill Formation), occur within local diatreme structures as well as intercalated at various stratigraphic levels within the sedimentary succession. These dominantly hydroclastic eruptions are the first subaerial expression of Ferrar magmatism. The initial Kirkpatrick lavas/pillow lavas were generated from local eruptive centres and again may be overlain by thin sediments, which are covered by the thick plateau lava succession known throughout the Transantarctic Mountain Range.

  20. Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg: depositional model for northeastern De Soto salt basin, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kemmer, D.A.; Reagan, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    Available well control, seismic reflection geometries, and seismic modeling suggest the interpretation of a Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg in the northeastern De Soto salt basin. Ranging in thickness from less than 100 ft to nearly 1000 ft, the Norphlet erg encompasses an area of approximately 700 mi/sup 2/. Separated from the major gas accumulation in the Norphlet in the Mobile Bay area by the offshore extension of the Pensacola arch, the Norphlet erg appears to be oriented transverse to the axis of the De Soto salt basin. Seismic signatures for the Smackover carbonate, Norphlet sand, and Louann Salt intervals are investigated using synthetic seismograms generated from six wells in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. General characteristics about the reflection coefficients from the major units in the interval are noted. The reflection coefficient information and synthetic seismograms are used to interpret seismic data on a regional basis. Two-dimensional, vertical-incidence, ray-trace modeling of the seismic data is done to aid the interpretation on a detailed basis. Interpreted Norphlet sandstone thicknesses and Louann Salt structures are combined to support the Norphlet Formation sand erg hypothesis.

  1. Vegetation of semi-stable rangeland dunes of the Navajo Nation, Southwestern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Redsteer, Margaret H.

    2016-01-01

    Dune destabilization and increased mobility is a worldwide issue causing ecological, economic, and health problems for the inhabitants of areas with extensive dune fields. Dunes cover nearly a third of the Navajo Nation within the Colorado Plateau of southwestern USA. There, higher temperatures and prolonged drought beginning in 1996 have produced significant increases in dune mobility. Vegetation plays an important role in dune stabilization, but there are few studies of the plants of the aeolian surfaces of this region. We examined plant species and their attributes within a moderately vegetated dune field of the Navajo Nation to understand the types and characteristics of plants that stabilize rangeland dunes. These dunes supported a low cover of mixed grass-scrubland with fifty-two perennial and annual species including extensive occurrence of non-native annual Salsola spp. Perennial grass richness and shrub cover were positively associated with increased soil sand composition. Taprooted shrubs were more common on sandier substrates. Most dominant grasses had C4 photosynthesis, suggestive of higher water-use efficiencies and growth advantage in warm arid environments. Plant cover was commonly below the threshold of dune stabilization. Increasing sand movement with continued aridity will select for plants adapted to burial, deflation, and abrasion. The study indicates plants tolerant of increased sand mobility and burial but more investigation is needed to identify the plants adapted to establish and regenerate under these conditions. In addition, the role of Salsola spp. in promoting decline of perennial grasses and shrubs needs clarification.

  2. Vegetation, substrate, and eolian sediment transport at Teesto Wash, Navajo Nation, 2009-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Redsteer, Margaret Hiza; Amoroso, Lee

    2012-01-01

    On the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States, warming temperatures and recent drought have increased eolian (windblown) sediment mobility such that large, migrating sand dunes affect grazing lands, housing, and road access. We present an assessment of seasonal variations in sand transport, mobility, and ground cover (vegetation and substrate) within a 0.2-km2 study area near Teesto Wash, southern Navajo Nation, as part of a multiyear study measuring the effects of drought on landscape stability. Sand mobility in the study area decreased substantially as one year (2010) with near-normal monsoon rainfall somewhat abated a decade-long drought, temporarily doubling vegetation cover. The invasive annual plant Russian thistle (Salsola sp.), in particular, thrived after the monsoon rains of 2010. Vegetation that grew during that year with adequate rain died off rapidly during drier conditions in 2011 and 2012, and the proportion of bare, open sand area increased steadily after summer 2010. We infer that isolated seasonal increases in rainfall will not improve landscape stability in the long term because sustained increase in perennial plants, which are more effective than annual plants at stabilizing sand against wind erosion, requires multiple consecutive seasons of adequate rain. On the basis of climate projections, a warmer, drier climate and potentially enhanced sediment supply from ephemeral washes may further increase eolian sediment transport and dune activity, worsening the present challenges to people living in this region. Connections between climate, vegetation cover, and eolian sediment erodibility in this region also are highly relevant for studies in other regions worldwide with similar environmental characteristics.

  3. Hydrogeology of the Potsdam Sandstone in northern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Franzi, David A.; Romanowicz, Edwin A.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2010-01-01

    The Potsdam Sandstone of Cambrian age forms a transboundary aquifer that extends across northern New York and into southern Quebec. The Potsdam Sandstone is a gently dipping sequence of arkose, subarkose, and orthoquartzite that unconformably overlies Precambrian metamorphic bedrock. The Potsdam irregularly grades upward over a thickness of 450 m from a heterogeneous feldspathic and argillaceous rock to a homogeneous, quartz-rich and matrix-poor rock. The hydrogeological framework of the Potsdam Sandstone was investigated through an analysis of records from 1,500 wells and geophysical logs from 40 wells, and through compilation of GIS coverages of bedrock and surficial geology, examination of bedrock cores, and construction of hydrogeological sections. The upper several metres of the sandstone typically is weathered and fractured and, where saturated, readily transmits groundwater. Bedding-related fractures in the sandstone commonly form sub-horizontal flow zones of relatively high transmissivity. The vertical distribution of sub-horizontal flow zones is variable; spacings of less than 10 m are common. Transmissivity of individual flow zones may be more than 100 m2/d but typically is less than 10 m2/d. High angle fractures, including joints and faults, locally provide vertical hydraulic connection between flow zones. Hydraulic head gradients in the aquifer commonly are downward; a laterally extensive series of sub-horizontal flow zones serve as drains for the groundwater flow system. Vertical hydraulic head differences between shallow and deep flow zones range from 1 m to more than 20 m. The maximum head differences are in recharge areas upgradient from the area where the Chateauguay and Chazy Rivers, and their tributaries, have cut into till and bedrock. Till overlies the sandstone in much of the study area; its thickness is generally greatest in the western part, where it may exceed 50 m. A discontinuous belt of bedrock pavements stripped of glacial drift extends

  4. Elevated Uranium in Aquifers of the Jacobsville Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, H.; Gierke, J.

    2003-12-01

    The EPA has announced a new standard for uranium in drinking water of 30 parts per billion (ppb). This maximum contaminant level (MCL) takes effect for community water supplies December 2003. The EPA's ruling has heightened awareness among residential well owners that uranium in drinking water may increase the risk of kidney disease and cancer and has created a need for a quantified, scientific understanding of the occurrence and distribution of uranium isotopes in aquifers. The authors are investigating the occurrence of elevated uranium in northern Michigan aquifers of the Middle Proterozoic Jacobsville sandstone, a red to mottled sequence of sandstones, conglomerates, siltstones and shales deposited as basin fill in the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift. Approximately 25% of 300 well water samples tested for isotopic uranium have concentrations above the MCL. Elevated uranium occurrences are distributed throughout the Jacobsville sandstone aquifers stretching across Michigan's Upper Peninsula. However, there is significant variation in well water uranium concentrations (from 0.01 to 190 ppb) and neighboring wells do not necessarily have similar concentrations. The authors are investigating hydrogeologic controls on ground water uranium concentrations in the Jacobsville sandstone, e.g. variations in lithology, mineralogy, groundwater residence time and geochemistry. Approximately 2000' of Jacobsville core from the Amoco St. Amour well was examined in conjunction with the spectral gamma ray log run in the borehole. Spikes in equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from the log are frequently associated with clay and heavy mineral layers in the sandstone core. The lithology and mineralogy of these layers will be determined by analysis of thin sections and x-ray diffraction. A portable spectrometer, model GRS-2000/BL, will be used on the sandstone cliffs along Lake Superior to characterize depositional and lithologic facies of the Jacobsville sandstone in terms of

  5. Fluvial-deltaic sedimentation and stratigraphy of the ferron sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, P.B.; Chidsey, T.C.; Ryer, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    East-central Utah has world-class outcrops of dominantly fluvial-deltaic Turonian to Coniacian aged strata deposited in the Cretaceous foreland basin. The Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale records the influences of both tidal and wave energy on fluvial-dominated deltas on the western margin of the Cretaceous western interior seaway. Revisions of the stratigraphy are proposed for the Ferron Sandstone. Facies representing a variety of environments of deposition are well exposed, including delta-front, strandline, marginal marine, and coastal-plain. Some of these facies are described in detail for use in petroleum reservoir characterization and include permeability structure.

  6. Jurassic plutons in the Desolation wilderness, northern Sierra Nevada batholith, California: A new segment in the Jurassic magmatic arc

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine, C. . Quaternary Sciences Center)

    1993-04-01

    A 164[+-]7 Ma U-P zircon date establishes a Middle- to Late-Jurassic age for the Pyramid Peak granite and synplutonic dioritoids and hybrid rocks that comprise the Crystal Range suite, located southwest of Lake Tahoe. A Jurassic age is also assigned to the Keiths Dome quartz monzonite and the Desolation Valley and Camper Flat granodiorites (Loomis', 1983, Early Granitic Group) which are distinctly older than surrounding Cretaceous granitoids. The Keiths Dome quartz monzonite, the oldest pluton of the group, may be as old as 180 Ma and is distinguished by ductile shear zones and recrystallization textures which indicate an episode of deformation not undergone by other plutons. The Camper flat and Desolation Valley granodiorites are the youngest plutons of the group. ENE-trending microdiorite dikes filled extensional fractures, perpendicular to the direction of shortening, in all Jurassic plutons but on none of the Cretaceous bodies. Jurassic plutons may help constrain ages of metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks and associated structures in the Mount Tallac roof pendant. The Pyramid Peak granite intrudes the Sailor Canyon Formation which bears Late Pliensbachian ammonites (Fisher, 1990), and the Keiths Dome quartz monzonite intrudes the overlying Tuttle Lake Formation and transects faults and shear zones in the pendant. Initial Sr isotope ratios for the Pyramid Peak granite range between 0.705427 and 0.706874, spanning the 0.706 value taken by some to mark the western limit of sialic lower crust. Data suggest an isotopically mixed source containing mantle and crustal components. Such an environment is not inconsistent with a passive continental margin where mafic magma invades rifted continental crust.

  7. Unusual occurrence of some sedimentary structures and their significance in Jurassic transgressive clastic successions of Northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, N.; Bheemalingeswara, K.

    2009-04-01

    a well developed lithostratigraphic unit of northern Ethiopia and represents the Jurassic transgressive clastic succession of Mekelle basin. The physical and biogenic sedimentary structures reported in this paper are observed from the terminal part of ASF. Their occurrence is unusual, rare, unknown so far and unreported. It includes (i) mud cracks (including their casts filled with overlying lithology) representing subaerial exposure which is unusual during transgressive phase, (ii) vertical traces of Skolithos burrows in ASF2 produced by suspension feeders in high energy environment of deposition (Dubey et al., 2007), (iii) tiny bivalve moulds and casts (external- and internal-moulds) of body fossils, and (iv) elliptical negative epirelief (potato shaped empty depressions - external moulds of eggs or nodules?). Fifty two such randomly oriented external moulds are noticed within 2 m2 area on an upper bedding plane of thin, white and fine- grained sandstone. Their in- fills are missing/removed as they are present on a gently dipping bed. Therefore, it is difficult to ascertain their biogenic (egg) or abiogenic (nodule) origin. Their detail investigation is under progress. Since ASF developed during marine transgression, presence of mud cracks in its terminal part indicates subaerial exposure. This provides suitable sites for nesting eggs (reptile?) in wet sands. Removal of such preserved eggs can provide potato depressions. Though it is difficult to relate these moulds to the eggs because of the missing in-fills, their shape, size and restricted occurrence supports biogenic origin. Reference Dubey, N., Bheemalingeswara, K. and Tadesse, N. (2007). Sedimentology and lithostratigraphy of the Mesozoic successions of Mekelle Basin, Ethiopia, Norteastern Africa. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol.9, 11471. (SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-11471).

  8. Geochemistry evidence for depositional settings and provenance of Jurassic argillaceous rocks of Jiyuan Basin, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yao; Zheng, Deshun; Li, Minglong

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to discuss the depositional settings and provenances for the Jurassic in Jiyuan basin, North China, based on the rare earth element (REE) and trace element features of 16 Jurassic argillaceous rock samples from the Anyao, Yangshuzhuang and Ma'ao Formations, respectively. Generally, geochemical analysis results show that chondrite-normalised REE distribution patterns of all the three formations are characterised by light-REE (LREE) enrichment, moderately negative Eu anomalies, slightly negative Ce anomalies, and strong fractionation between LREE and heavy-REE (HREE). Trace element proxies V/(V + Ni), Ce anom index, Ce/La, Sr/Ba, and Sr/Cu indicate a weak oxidation-reduction environment, progressively decreasing reducibility and water depth from the bottom up during Jurassic in Jiyuan basin. Palaeoclimate varied from humid in the Early Jurassic to arid in the Middle Jurassic, corresponding with the variations of palaeoredox and palaeosalinity. The provenances of Jurassic rocks in Jiyuan basin are mainly from felsic sources related to active continental margin and continental island arc. The Early-Middle Jurassic (Anyao and Yangshuzhuang Formations) provenances are mainly derived from North Qinling and partially from the eroded recycled felsic sedimentary covers of Taihang Mountain. In the late stage of Middle Jurassic (Ma'ao Formation), Taihang Mountain has been the primary source to Jiyuan basin. We conclude that the Jurassic rocks of Jiyuan basin reveal the progressive uplift and denudation processes of the Taihang Mountain.

  9. Cross-bedding related anisotropy and its interplay with various boundary conditions in the formation and orientation of joints in an aeolian sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shang; Cilona, Antonino; Morrow, Carolyn; Mapeli, Cesar; Liu, Chun; Lockner, David; Prasad, Manika; Aydin, Atilla

    2015-08-01

    Previous research revealed that the cross-bedding related anisotropy in Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone cropping out in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, affects the orientation of compaction bands, also known as anti-cracks or closing mode structures. We hypothesize that cross-bedding should have a similar influence on the orientation of the opening mode joints within the same rock at the same location. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between the orientation of cross-beds and the orientation of different categories of joint sets including cross-bed package confined joints and joint zones in the Aztec Sandstone. The field data show that the cross-bed package confined joints occur at high-angle to bedding and trend roughly parallel to the dip direction of the cross-beds. In comparison, the roughly N-S trending joint zones appear not to be influenced by the cross-beds in any significant way but frequently truncate against the dune boundaries. To characterize the anisotropy due to cross-bedding in the Aztec Sandstone, we measured the P-wave velocities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from 11 samples and determined an average P-wave anisotropy to be slightly larger than 13%. From these results, a model based on the generalized Hooke's law for anisotropic materials is used to analyze deformation of cross-bedded sandstone as a transversely isotropic material. In the analysis, the dip angle of cross-beds is assumed to be constant and the strike orientation varying from 0° to 359° in the east (x), north (y), and up (z) coordinate system. We find qualitative agreement between most of the model results and the observed field relations between cross-beds and the corresponding joint sets. The results also suggest that uniaxial extension (εzz > εxx = εyy = 0) and axisymmetric extension (εxx = εyy < εzz and εxx = εyy > εzz) would amplify the influence of cross-bedding associated anisotropy on the joint orientation whereas a

  10. Central Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province Cenozoic igneous activity and its relation in space and time with the Late Jurassic rift-to-drift-related alkalic dikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, R.; Schultz, L.; Hendriks, B. W.; Harbor, D. J.; Connors, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    A Swarm of Late Jurassic alkalic intrusions, geographically limited mainly to the Augusta County in western Virginia has been studied geochemically. These dykes were emplaced along a northwest-southeast cross-strike basement fracture zone during Mesozoic extension. However, not all igneous rocks in Virginia are Jurassic; published K-Ar ages already suggested an Eocene age activity around Monterey, VA. We systematically sampled and studied these rocks geochemically and used the Ar-Ar dating technique to define a more precise age for this youngest volcanic activity East of the Mississippi. The younger igneous bodies have traditionally been interpreted as intrusive bodies representing old plumbing systems of eroded volcanic centers. This hypothesis is based on studies of aphanitic to porphyritic and occasionally vesicular hard rocks from quarries and road cuts. Pyroclastic deposits have mainly been neglected during theses earlier studies. However additional petrographic studies of volcanic sediments are able to shed light not only on the volcanic nature of these pyroclastic rocks but also on eruption mechanisms and magma crust interactions. Our petrographic studies indicate that these volcanic sediments contain different clasts of igneous and sedimentary country rocks (sandstones and limestones of different formations), fresh glass shards and crystals of predominantly pyroxene, hornblende and micas. A previously unmapped, massive, m-thick andesitic pyroclastic deposit has been studied in detail to shed light on the formation of theses volcanic sediments. Field relations and observations (e.g. denser rock fragments are enriched in the lower part of the sequence and bedding is largely parallel to the present topography) are consistent with a massive welded ignimbrite. As a result, surface erosion after the eruption must be less significant than previously believed and some rocks are clearly volcanic in nature. Petrogenetically the Jurassic magmas are much more alkalic

  11. A new bee species that excavates sandstone nests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many wonder why animals act in seemingly injurious ways. Understanding the behavior of pollinators such as bees is especially important because of the necessary ecosystem service they provide. The new species Anthophora pueblo, discovered excavating sandstone nests, provides a model system for addre...

  12. Epilithic lichens in the Beacon sandstone formation, Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, M. E.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The epilithic lichen flora on the Beacon sandstone formation in Victoria Land consists of seven species: Acarospora gwynnii Dodge & Rudolph, Buellia grisea Dodge & Baker, B. pallida Dodge & Baker, Carbonea capsulata (Dodge & Baker) Hale comb. nov., Lecanora fuscobrunnea Dodge & Baker, Lecidea cancriformis Dodge & Baker, and L. siplei Dodge & Baker. The typification of the species is given along with descriptions and distribution in Antarctica.

  13. Ferron sandstone - stratigraphy and reservoir analogs, East-Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.B.; Ryer, T.A.; Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The Ferron Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous) crops out along the west flank of the San Rafael Swell of east-central Utah. Exposures were described on photomosaics to better define the stratigraphy, to enhance facies prediction, and establish rules for reservoir modeling within fluvial-deltaic rocks. Major regressive cycles are recognized as parasequence sets composed of several to many parasequences. Each of the seaward-stepping parasequence sets recognized in the Ferron begins with a rapidly thickening and stratigraphically climbing, wave-modified shoreface. In later stages of progradation, deposition is dominated by river influences. Continued regression of the seaway is recorded in outcrop and shows a complex history of delta lobe progradation, switching, and abandonment. Onlapping and stacking of parasequences creates a collage of potential reservoir sweet spots, baffles, and barriers within a parasequence set. Shoreface and delta-front deposits of the older parasequences are commonly eroded by younger distributary and meanderbelt systems that fed younger parasequences of the parasequence sets. The result is numerous and locally thick channel sandstone bodies incised into shoreface and delta-front deposits. Published studies and recently completed work show that upper shoreface, stream mouth-bar, and channel sandstones constitute the best potential reservoir rocks within the Ferron Sandstone.

  14. Evidence for preferential flow through sandstone aquifers in Southern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, S.K.; Bahr, J.M.; Bradbury, K.R.; Anderson, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Sandstones often escape extensive hydrogeologic characterization due to their high primary porosity and perceived homogeneity of permeability. This study provides evidence for laterally extensive, high permeability zones in the Tunnel City Group, an undeformed, Cambrian-aged sandstone unit that exists in the subsurface throughout much of central and southern Wisconsin, USA. Several discrete high-permeability zones were identified in boreholes using flow logging and slug tests, and the interconnectedness of the features was tested using a site-specific numerical model for springs in the region. Explicit incorporation of a high-permeability layer leads to improvements in the flux calibration over simulations that lack the features, thus supporting the hydraulic continuity of high-permeability zones in the sandstone aquifer over tens of kilometers. The results suggest that stratigraphically controlled heterogeneities like contrasts in lithology or bedding-plane fractures, which have been shown to strongly influence the flow of groundwater in more heterogeneous sedimentary rocks, may also deserve close examination in sandstone aquifers. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A complex investigation of building sandstones from Saxony (Germany)

    SciTech Connect

    Goetze, Jens Siedel, Heiner

    2007-11-15

    The present paper provides a methodology for the investigation and characterization of building sandstones. This analytical scheme was designed for distinguishing mature arenites, which in general show very similar properties and are difficult to distinguish. This is shown for Cretaceous sandstones from various occurrences in Saxony (Germany), which have been used for centuries as building materials. The procedure is mainly based on the combination of macroscopic rock description, thin section polarizing microscopy (phase composition, texture, grain-size distribution) and cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy (quartz types, feldspar and kaolinite content) coupled with image analysis, scanning electron microscopy (accessories, pore cement, diagenetic grain surface features), and analysis of pore space data. Sometimes, additional data from X-ray diffraction or chemical analyses (major and trace elements) can be used. Especially in the case of quartz rich arenites, CL is a powerful tool for provenance analysis. The detailed analysis of sandstone material in most cases allows us to assign historically used building material to a specific sandstone occurrence. These results are important for both interpreting the weathering behaviour of the building material and the conservation, reconstruction and stone replacement of historical monuments.

  16. Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N.

    1983-01-01

    The intrinsic properties of the genetic sandstone units that typify many geopressured geothermal aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Gulf Coast region were systematically investigated classified, and differentiated. The following topics are coverd: structural and stratigraphic limits of sandstone reservoirs, characteristics and dimensions of Gulf Coast sandstones; fault-compartment areas; comparison of production and geologic estimates of aquifer fluid volume; geologic setting and reservoir characteristics, Wells of Opportunity; internal properties of sandstones; and implications for geopressured fluid production. (MHR)

  17. Lessons Learned: Tribal Community Engagement, Remediation and Restoration of a Uranium Mine Tailings Site, Navajo Nation - 12484

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, Donald K.; Hicks, Allison H.

    2012-07-01

    In May, 2011 New World Environmental Inc. was awarded a contract by the Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency to remediate an illegal radioactive waste disposal site located in the Navajo Nation. The initial scope included the excavation and shipment of an estimated 3,000 cubic yards of Uranium mine tailings and associated industrial waste. In this instance Stakeholders were supportive of the project, remediation and restoration, yet the movement of residual radioactive materials through tribal communities was a controversial issue. Other Stakeholder issues included site security, water sources for remediation activities, local residents' temporary re-location and care of livestock, right of way permissions and local workforce development. This presentation recaps the technical and non-technical issues encountered in the remediation and restoration the seven acre site and the outreach to surrounding communities. Cultural and equity issues resulting from historical problems associated with this and other sites in the immediate area and education and training. (authors)

  18. Development and Pilot Evaluation of Native CREST – a Cancer Research Experience and Student Training Program for Navajo Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Christine A.; Bauer, Mark C.; Horazdovsky, Bruce F.; Garrison, Edward R.; Patten, Christi A.; Petersen, Wesley O.; Bowman, Clarissa N.; Vierkant, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and Diné College received funding for a 4-year collaborative P20 planning grant from the National Cancer Institute in 2006. The goal of the partnership was to increase Navajo undergraduates’ interest in and commitment to biomedical coursework and careers, especially in cancer research. This paper describes the development, pilot testing and evaluation of Native CREST (Cancer Research Experience & Student Training), a 10-week cancer research training program providing mentorship in a Mayo Clinic basic science or behavioral cancer research lab for Navajo undergraduate students. Seven Native American undergraduate students (5 females, 2 males) were enrolled during the summers of 2008 - 2011. Students reported the program influenced their career goals and was valuable to their education and development. These efforts may increase the number of Native American career scientists developing and implementing cancer research, which will ultimately benefit the health of Native American people. PMID:23001889

  19. An experimental study of iron release from red sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purser, Gemma; Rochelle, Christopher; Rushton, Jeremy; Pearce, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to better understand the features of a natural CO2 -rich system at Saltwash Graben, Utah, USA. This site is associated with numerous CO2 rich springs linked to faults and fractures. In this area, a key feature of the red Entrada sandstone formation is the presence of significant rock bleaching (iron reduction and mobilisation) that occurs subparallel to bedding, typically at the base of large sandstone units and adjacent to some subvertical fractures. The difference in total iron content between the bleached and unbleached sandstones is very small, with the bleached sandstone containing slightly less total iron. In contrast to widely-reported regional bleaching, attributed to hydrocarbon accumulations towards structural crests, it has been suggested that the bleaching may be associated with the presence of modern day CO2 in the area and we sought to test this. Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess reaction processes that may have caused the observed iron reduction and mobilisation. Fixed volume batch reactors, containing either small cores of red or bleached sandstone were exposed to representative local ground waters (a dilute or a saline fluid), which were pressurised with either CO2 or N2 (the latter as a control) to 50 bar and placed inside an oven at 40° C to simulate subsurface conditions . The experiments ran for up to nine months with fluids being sampled periodically, though solids were only analysed once experiments were completed. Very little reaction was found to occur in the presence of CO2. It seems possible therefore that the modern CO2 rich fluids were not the cause of the sandstone bleaching. The study therefore assessed how the presence of reducing agents such as methane (CH4) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) may result in the bleaching of the bulk sandstone. H2S was introduced into the experiments as a breakdown product of thioacetamide (0.1% v/v fluid containing thioacetamide was added to the

  20. Concurrent and longitudinal effects of ethnic identity and experiences of discrimination on psychosocial adjustment of Navajo adolescents.

    PubMed

    Galliher, Renee V; Jones, Matthew D; Dahl, Angie

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we examined concurrent and longitudinal relations among Navajo adolescents' ethnic identity, experiences of discrimination, and psychosocial outcomes (i.e., self-esteem, substance use, and social functioning). At Time 1, 137 Navajo adolescents (67 male, 70 female), primarily in Grades 9 and 10, completed a written survey assessing ethnic identity, discrimination experiences, and a range of internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Two years later, 92 participants completed the same survey again. Ethnic and cultural identification was assessed via the Multiethnic Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM; Phinney, 1992) and the Orthogonal Cultural Identification Scale (OCIS; Oetting & Beauvais, 1990). At Time 1, MEIM Affirmation and Belonging, MEIM Exploration, and OCIS White American identification all demonstrated strong, positive associations with adaptive functioning for male and female adolescents, whereas discrimination experiences were linked to lower self-esteem and social functioning for male adolescents. By Time 2, fewer significant concurrent associations between ethnic identity and psychosocial functioning scores remained, and discrimination experiences emerged as the most consistent correlate of poorer psychosocial functioning for male adolescents. Controlling for Time 1 psychosocial functioning, relatively few direct effects of ethnic and cultural identification variables predicted psychosocial functioning longitudinally, but discrimination experiences demonstrated strong and consistent longitudinal links with boys' substance use. Finally, interaction effects assessing the moderating influence of ethnic and cultural identification on negative links between discrimination and psychosocial functioning suggested that embeddedness in and connection to Navajo culture and, in some cases, connection to White American culture, served as a buffer to the negative effects of discrimination experiences.