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Sample records for juris lavendelis gints

  1. Lavender.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peggy A; James, William D

    2011-01-01

    Lavender is a commonly used product in personal and household care items as well as for aromatherapy. It is increasing in popularity as a fragrance. Additionally, multiple recent publications attest to its antimicrobial activity. Whereas lavender has been associated with irritant dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and photodermatitis, it is anticipated that with increasing exposure, more patients will experience these complications. Most cases of allergic contact dermatitis have been reported as being due to occupational exposures through massage and aromatherapy. One study of the Japanese population demonstrated an increased incidence of contact dermatitis from lavender (from 1.1% to 13.9% over 8 years). It is important that clinicians recognize lavender as a potential allergen.

  2. Lavender oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... an oil made from the flowers of lavender plants. Lavender poisoning occurs when someone swallows lavender oil. ... Graeme KA. Toxic plant ingestions. In: Auerbach PS, ed. Wilderness Medicine . ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 64. Maypole J, Woolf, ...

  3. Lavender and the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Koulivand, Peir Hossein; Khaleghi Ghadiri, Maryam; Gorji, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Lavender is traditionally alleged to have a variety of therapeutic and curative properties, ranging from inducing relaxation to treating parasitic infections, burns, insect bites, and spasm. There is growing evidence suggesting that lavender oil may be an effective medicament in treatment of several neurological disorders. Several animal and human investigations suggest anxiolytic, mood stabilizer, sedative, analgesic, and anticonvulsive and neuroprotective properties for lavender. These studies raised the possibility of revival of lavender therapeutic efficacy in neurological disorders. In this paper, a survey on current experimental and clinical state of knowledge about the effect of lavender on the nervous system is given. PMID:23573142

  4. Legal Reasoning and Jury Deliberations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Ken J.; Hurlbert, Mike J.

    1992-01-01

    Presents results of a study examining the relationship of legal reasoning abilities and dominance in jury deliberations. Explains that the study considered both reasoning scores and verbal behavior during deliberations. Concludes that jury deliberations reflect the talking and opinions of members holding the most advanced legal reasoning possible.…

  5. GintAMT3 - a Low-Affinity Ammonium Transporter of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Silvia; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ellerbeck, Matthias; Arnould, Christine; Chatagnier, Odile; Boller, Thomas; Schüßler, Arthur; Brachmann, Andreas; Wipf, Daniel; Ferrol, Nuria; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient acquisition and transfer are essential steps in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which is formed by the majority of land plants. Mineral nutrients are taken up by AM fungi from the soil and transferred to the plant partner. Within the cortical plant root cells the fungal hyphae form tree-like structures (arbuscules) where the nutrients are released to the plant-fungal interface, i.e., to the periarbuscular space, before being taken up by the plant. In exchange, the AM fungi receive carbohydrates from the plant host. Besides the well-studied uptake of phosphorus (P), the uptake and transfer of nitrogen (N) plays a crucial role in this mutualistic interaction. In the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly called Glomus intraradices), two ammonium transporters (AMT) were previously described, namely GintAMT1 and GintAMT2. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a newly identified R. irregularis AMT, GintAMT3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high sequence similarity to previously identified AM fungal AMTs and a clear separation from other fungal AMTs. Topological analysis indicated GintAMT3 to be a membrane bound pore forming protein, and GFP tagging showed it to be highly expressed in the intraradical mycelium of a fully established AM symbiosis. Expression of GintAMT3 in yeast successfully complemented the yeast AMT triple deletion mutant (MATa ura3 mep1Δ mep2Δ::LEU2 mep3Δ::KanMX2). GintAMT3 is characterized as a low affinity transport system with an apparent Km of 1.8 mM and a V max of 240 nmol(-1) min(-1) 10(8) cells(-1), which is regulated by substrate concentration and carbon supply.

  6. GintAMT3 - a Low-Affinity Ammonium Transporter of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Silvia; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ellerbeck, Matthias; Arnould, Christine; Chatagnier, Odile; Boller, Thomas; Schüßler, Arthur; Brachmann, Andreas; Wipf, Daniel; Ferrol, Nuria; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient acquisition and transfer are essential steps in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which is formed by the majority of land plants. Mineral nutrients are taken up by AM fungi from the soil and transferred to the plant partner. Within the cortical plant root cells the fungal hyphae form tree-like structures (arbuscules) where the nutrients are released to the plant-fungal interface, i.e., to the periarbuscular space, before being taken up by the plant. In exchange, the AM fungi receive carbohydrates from the plant host. Besides the well-studied uptake of phosphorus (P), the uptake and transfer of nitrogen (N) plays a crucial role in this mutualistic interaction. In the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly called Glomus intraradices), two ammonium transporters (AMT) were previously described, namely GintAMT1 and GintAMT2. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a newly identified R. irregularis AMT, GintAMT3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high sequence similarity to previously identified AM fungal AMTs and a clear separation from other fungal AMTs. Topological analysis indicated GintAMT3 to be a membrane bound pore forming protein, and GFP tagging showed it to be highly expressed in the intraradical mycelium of a fully established AM symbiosis. Expression of GintAMT3 in yeast successfully complemented the yeast AMT triple deletion mutant (MATa ura3 mep1Δ mep2Δ::LEU2 mep3Δ::KanMX2). GintAMT3 is characterized as a low affinity transport system with an apparent Km of 1.8 mM and a V max of 240 nmol(-1) min(-1) 10(8) cells(-1), which is regulated by substrate concentration and carbon supply. PMID:27252708

  7. Jury Selection as Political Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowlkes, Diane L.; And Others

    Three political scientists diagnose the current state of political influence on jury selection in political trials, based upon personal experience, upon the literature of political theory, justice, and law, and upon recent action of lawyers, judges, defense committees, and some defendants. Political trials are interpreted as formal examinations of…

  8. JurisLIT Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacramento County Probation Dept., Sacramento, CA.

    JurisLIT was a literacy training effort operated jointly by the Sacramento County Probation Department, the Sacramento County Office of Education, the Los Rios Community College District, and the Superior and Municipal Courts of Sacramento County from March 1990 to March 1994. The program required selected probationers aged 18-30 to participate in…

  9. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient Gint can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T2 in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of Gint2D and T2 by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between Gint and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz 1H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint2D-T2 maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity.

  10. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient G(int) can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T(2) in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of G(int)(2)D and T(2) by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between G(int) and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz (1)H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint(2)D-T(2) maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity. PMID:25723135

  11. 25 CFR 11.314 - Jury trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Jury trials. 11.314 Section 11.314 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Procedure § 11.314 Jury trials. (a) A defendant has a right, upon demand, to a jury trial in any criminal case: (1) That is punishable by...

  12. Method and ethics in advancing jury research.

    PubMed

    Robertshaw, P

    1998-10-01

    In this article the contemporary problems of the jury and jury research are considered. This is timely, in view of the current Home Office Consultation Paper on the future of, and alternatives to, the jury in serious fraud trials, to which the author has submitted representations on its jury aspects. The research position is dominated by the prohibitions in the Contempt of Court Act 1981. The types of indirect research on jury deliberation which have been achieved within this stricture are outlined. In the USA, direct research of the jury is possible but, for historical reasons, it has been in television documentaries that direct observation of the deliberation process has been achieved. The first issue is discussed and the problems of inauthenticity, 'the observer effect', and of existential invalidity in 'mock' or 'shadow' juries are noted. Finally, the kinds of issues that could be addressed if licensed jury deliberation research was legalized, are proposed. It is also suggested that there are methods available to transcend the problems associated with American direct research. PMID:9808945

  13. Debating the Jury System; A Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinzinger, Richard A., Comp.

    This handbook contains basic resource material for debating significant changes in the United States jury system. Chapter 1 outlines available sources of information for preliminary research. Chapters 2 and 3 present background information on the federal and state court systems and the jury system. Chapter 4 discusses an interpretation of the…

  14. GintAMT3 – a Low-Affinity Ammonium Transporter of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Silvia; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ellerbeck, Matthias; Arnould, Christine; Chatagnier, Odile; Boller, Thomas; Schüßler, Arthur; Brachmann, Andreas; Wipf, Daniel; Ferrol, Nuria; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient acquisition and transfer are essential steps in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which is formed by the majority of land plants. Mineral nutrients are taken up by AM fungi from the soil and transferred to the plant partner. Within the cortical plant root cells the fungal hyphae form tree-like structures (arbuscules) where the nutrients are released to the plant-fungal interface, i.e., to the periarbuscular space, before being taken up by the plant. In exchange, the AM fungi receive carbohydrates from the plant host. Besides the well-studied uptake of phosphorus (P), the uptake and transfer of nitrogen (N) plays a crucial role in this mutualistic interaction. In the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly called Glomus intraradices), two ammonium transporters (AMT) were previously described, namely GintAMT1 and GintAMT2. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a newly identified R. irregularis AMT, GintAMT3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high sequence similarity to previously identified AM fungal AMTs and a clear separation from other fungal AMTs. Topological analysis indicated GintAMT3 to be a membrane bound pore forming protein, and GFP tagging showed it to be highly expressed in the intraradical mycelium of a fully established AM symbiosis. Expression of GintAMT3 in yeast successfully complemented the yeast AMT triple deletion mutant (MATa ura3 mep1Δ mep2Δ::LEU2 mep3Δ::KanMX2). GintAMT3 is characterized as a low affinity transport system with an apparent Km of 1.8 mM and a Vmax of 240 nmol-1 min-1 108 cells-1, which is regulated by substrate concentration and carbon supply. PMID:27252708

  15. Reduction of mental stress with lavender odorant.

    PubMed

    Motomura, N; Sakurai, A; Yotsuya, Y

    2001-12-01

    The effect of the lavender odorant on a Japanese version of Cox and Mackay's stress/arousal adjective checklist for three groups was studied. One group of 14 was placed into a (2 x 2- x 3 m) sound protected room for 20 min without the presentation of an odor, an analogous group of 15 received the odor oil, and one group of 13 received a nonstressful condition. Analysis suggested that lavender odorants were associated with reduced mental stress and increased arousal rate.

  16. GintABC1 encodes a putative ABC transporter of the MRP subfamily induced by Cu, Cd, and oxidative stress in Glomus intraradices.

    PubMed

    González-Guerrero, Manuel; Benabdellah, Karim; Valderas, Ascensión; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción; Ferrol, Nuria

    2010-02-01

    A full-length cDNA sequence putatively encoding an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (GintABC1) was isolated from the extraradical mycelia of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequence indicated that GintABC1 encodes a 1513 amino acid polypeptide, containing two six-transmembrane clusters (TMD) intercalated with sequences characteristics of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and an extra N-terminus extension (TMD0). GintABC1 presents a predicted TMD0-(TMD-NBD)(2) topology, typical of the multidrug resistance-associated protein subfamily of ABC transporters. Gene expression analyses revealed no difference in the expression levels of GintABC1 in the extra- vs the intraradical mycelia. GintABC1 was up-regulated by Cd and Cu, but not by Zn, suggesting that this transporter might be involved in Cu and Cd detoxification. Paraquat, an oxidative agent, also induced the transcription of GintABC1. These data suggest that redox changes may be involved in the transcriptional regulation of GintABC1 by Cd and Cu.

  17. Distillation time effect on lavender essential oil yield and composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.) is one of the most widely grown essential oil crops in the world. Commercial extraction of lavender oil is done using steam distillation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the length of the distillation time (DT) on lavender essential o...

  18. The expression of GintPT, the phosphate transporter of Rhizophagus irregularis, depends on the symbiotic status and phosphate availability.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, Valentina; Lanfranco, Luisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2013-05-01

    The development of mutualistic interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is one of the most important adaptation of terrestrial plants to face mineral nutrition requirements. As an essential plant nutrient, phosphorus uptake is acknowledged as a major benefit of the AM symbiosis, but the molecular mechanisms of its transport as inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the soil to root cells via AM fungi remain poorly known. Here we monitored the expression profile of the high-affinity phosphate transporter (PT) gene (GintPT) of Rhizophagus irregularis (DAOM 197198) in fungal structures (spores, extraradical mycelium and arbuscules), under different Pi availability, and in respect to plant connection. GintPT resulted constitutively expressed along the major steps of the fungal life cycle and the connection with the host plant was crucial to warrant GintPT high expression levels in the extraradical mycelium. The influence of Pi availability on gene expression of the fungal GintPT and the Medicago truncatula symbiosis-specific Pi transporter (MtPT4) was examined by qRT-PCR assay on microdissected arbusculated cells. The expression profiles of both genes revealed that these transporters are sensitive to changing Pi conditions: we observed that MtPT4 mRNA abundance is higher at 320 than at 32 μM suggesting that the flow towards the plant requires high concentrations. Taken on the whole, the findings highlight novel traits for the functioning of the GintPT gene and offer a molecular scenario to the models describing nutrient transfers as a cooperation between the mycorrhizal partners.

  19. The effects of juror anonymity on jury verdicts.

    PubMed

    Hazelwood, D L; Brigham, J C

    1998-12-01

    This study examined the effects of anonymity on jurors' verdicts and on jurors' feelings of accountability for their jury's verdicts. Twenty four-person anonymous juries and 20 four-person nonanonymous juries rendered individual and group verdicts for three student defendants charged with selling drugs on a school campus. When unanimous guilty verdicts were reached, juries imposed one of five punishments. Finally, jurors completed postdeliberation opinion and accountability questionnaires. As predicted, anonymous juries showed a higher rate of conviction (70%) than did nonanonymous juries (40%) when the evidence against the defendant was strong, supporting the hypothesis that anonymity would have a greater effect for situations in which there was relatively strong evidence of the defendant's guilt. Anonymous juries imposed the harshest punishment (expulsion) significantly more often than did nonanonymous juries. Contrary to predictions from differential self-awareness theory, anonymous juries did not report feeling less accountable than did nonanonymous juries. However, anonymous juries did see the process as significantly more fair than did identifiable juries.

  20. Teaching Students about Their Civic Obligation--Jury Duty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Leah T.; Steinbrink, John E.

    2001-01-01

    Contends that early adolescents need to learn how the jury trial system works. Provides background information on the topic for teachers. Includes a two-day lesson plan on jury duty as a civic obligation, background information for students, and extension activities relating to jury trials in the appendix. (CMK)

  1. Citizen Participation in Politics: The Role of the Jury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsohn, Gary J.

    1977-01-01

    Investigates the manner in which petit juries participate in the formulation of public policy. Of central concern is the nature of jury policy-making, involving analysis of ways in which such policy-making is manifested, and the description of a conceptual framework for political analysis of the jury. For journal availability, see SO 505 536.…

  2. Results of patch testing with lavender oil in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, M; Hayakawa, R; Kato, Y; Sugiura, K; Hashimoto, R

    2000-09-01

    We report the annual results of patch testing with lavender oil for a 9-year period from 1990 to 1998 in Japan. Using Finn Chambers and Scanpor tape, we performed 2-day closed patch testing with lavender oil 20% pet. on the upper back of each patient suspected of having cosmetic contact dermatitis. We compared the frequency of positive patch tests to lavender oil each year with those to other fragrances. We diagnosed contact allergy when patch test reactions were + or <+ at 1 day after removal. The positivity rate of lavender oil was 3.7% (0-13.9%) during the 9-year period from 1990 to 1998. The positivity rate of lavender oil increased suddenly in 1997. Recently, in Japan, there has been a trend for aromatherapy using lavender oil. With this trend, placing dried lavender flowers in pillows, drawers, cabinets, or rooms has become a new fashion. We asked patients who showed a positive reaction to lavender oil about their use of dried lavender flowers. We confirmed the use of dried lavender flowers in 5 cases out of 11 positive cases in 1997 and 8 out of 15 positive cases in 1998. We concluded that the increase in patch test positivity rates to lavender oil in 1997 and 1998 was due to the above fashion, rather than due to fragrances in cosmetic products.

  3. Lavender fragrance cleansing gel effects on relaxation.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Cisneros, Wendy; Feijo, Larissa; Vera, Yanexy; Gil, Karla; Grina, Diana; Claire He, Qing

    2005-02-01

    Alertness, mood, and math computations were assessed in 11 healthy adults who sniffed a cosmetic cleansing gel with lavender floral blend aroma, developed to be relaxing using Mood Mapping. EEG patterns and heart rate were also recorded before, during, and after the aroma session. The lavender fragrance blend had a significant transient effect of improving mood, making people feel more relaxed, and performing the math computation faster. The self-report and physiological data are consistent with relaxation profiles during other sensory stimuli such as massage and music, as reported in the literature. The data suggest that a specific cosmetic fragrance can have a significant role in enhancing relaxation.

  4. Lavender aromatherapy in recovery from exercise.

    PubMed

    Romine, I J; Bush, A M; Geist, C R

    1999-06-01

    20 men were randomly assigned to a control or an experimental group. After baseline screening, all subjects performed moderate physical exercise for 2 min., then rested for 10 min., during which the experimental group was exposed to lavender aromatherapy. Recovery measures included diastolic and systolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, and heart rate. As the mean difference in diastolic blood pressure fell just short of statistical significance, further study with larger groups is required.

  5. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30...

  6. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30...

  7. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30...

  8. Dental patient anxiety: Possible deal with Lavender fragrance

    PubMed Central

    Zabirunnisa, Md.; Gadagi, Jayaprakash S.; Gadde, Praveen; Myla, Nagamalleshwari; Koneru, Jyothirmai; Thatimatla, Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The pure essence of plants (essential oils) provides both psychological and physiological benefits when used accurately and safely. Conventionally, Lavender oil is known for relaxing, carminative, and sedative effects. Hence, an attempt was made to know the effect of Lavender essential oil on dental patient anxiety. Methods: The present study included two comparison groups (Lavender and control group), each comprising five dental clinics. In Lavender group, the ambient odor of Lavender essential oil was maintained with the help of a candle warmer in the reception area and in the control group, candle warmer with normal water was used. A total of 597 patients, aged above 18 years were included. A questionnaire comprising demographic information, and a modified dental anxiety scale was given to the patients in waiting room, and data regarding anxiety levels was recorded. Findings: Student's t-test (unpaired) showed a significant reduction in anxiety scores of Lavender group compared with the control group. Analysis of variances test showed reduction in anxiety scores as age increased in Lavender group. Conclusion: Fragrance of Lavender oil at reception area may effectively reduce the patient's state or current anxiety. This practice on routine usage can improve the quality of dental treatments. PMID:25328900

  9. Jury Selection in Child Sex Abuse Trials: A Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Robert J.; Adams, Desiree D.; Brodsky, Stanley L.

    2009-01-01

    Child sex abuse cases have been the target of considerable psycho-legal research. The present paper offers an analysis of psychological constructs for jury selection in child sex abuse cases from the defense perspective. The authors specifically delineate general and case-specific jury selection variables. General variables include…

  10. How Juries Assess Universal Design in Norwegian Architectural School Competitions.

    PubMed

    Houck, Leif D

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how architectural school competition juries assess Universal Design. The method used is a case study of 18 recent architectural school competitions in Norway. The results show that most competition briefs ask for Universal Designed buildings. In 8 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is mentioned as an assessment criterion. In 11 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is commented on by the juries in the jury reports, but only in 3 of the cases, do the juries assess this aspect consistently on every competition project. The overall impression is that some amount of uncertainty looms concerning how Universal Design should be assessed in the competition stage. Based on the findings, future juries should concentrate on orientation and overview prior to technicalities and details. PMID:27534308

  11. How Juries Assess Universal Design in Norwegian Architectural School Competitions.

    PubMed

    Houck, Leif D

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how architectural school competition juries assess Universal Design. The method used is a case study of 18 recent architectural school competitions in Norway. The results show that most competition briefs ask for Universal Designed buildings. In 8 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is mentioned as an assessment criterion. In 11 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is commented on by the juries in the jury reports, but only in 3 of the cases, do the juries assess this aspect consistently on every competition project. The overall impression is that some amount of uncertainty looms concerning how Universal Design should be assessed in the competition stage. Based on the findings, future juries should concentrate on orientation and overview prior to technicalities and details.

  12. Lavender essence for post-cesarean pain.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Niaz; Hanid, Ali Akbar

    2011-06-01

    Post cesarean (CS) pain is a challenging problem for the obstetricians, because it may interfere with mother and baby's well-being. Many approaches have been ever proposed to diminish this pain, each one with particular benefits and limitations. Aromatherapy is a complementary therapy especially for controlling pain. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of lavender essence on post CS pain. In a single-blind clinical trial, 200 term pregnant women with planned elective CS were recruited in a 12 month period of time. They were randomized in two 100-patient groups; received either lavender essence (the case group) or a similar clinically neutral aromatic material (the control group) thorough oxygen mask for 3 min 3 h after receiving similar intravenous analgesics. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was employed to determine the level of post CS pain. The VAS was documented half hour after first intervention. Eight and 16 h later, the aromatherapy was repeated and half hour after each intervention, corresponding VAS was documented. The two groups were matched for demographics and obstetrical history. The baseline VAS was comparable between the two groups. The mean VAS decreased significantly by 16 h after the first intervention in both groups (p < 0.001). However, this amelioration of pain was significantly more prominent in the cases group comparing with that in the controls in all documented stages half hour, 8 and 16 h after the first intervention (p < 0.001 for all measurements). In conclusion, aromatherapy by using lavender essence is a successful and safe complementary therapy in reducing pain after CS.

  13. Juries and Medical Malpractice Claims: Empirical Facts versus Myths

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Juries in medical malpractice trials are viewed as incompetent, antidoctor, irresponsible in awarding damages to patients, and casting a threatening shadow over the settlement process. Several decades of systematic empirical research yields little support for these claims. This article summarizes those findings. Doctors win about three cases of four that go to trial. Juries are skeptical about inflated claims. Jury verdicts on negligence are roughly similar to assessments made by medical experts and judges. Damage awards tend to correlate positively with the severity of injury. There are defensible reasons for large damage awards. Moreover, the largest awards are typically settled for much less than the verdicts. PMID:19002541

  14. Distillation time effect on lavender essential oil yield and composition.

    PubMed

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Cantrell, Charles L; Astatkie, Tess; Jeliazkova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.) is one of the most widely grown essential oil crops in the world. Commercial extraction of lavender oil is done using steam distillation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the length of the distillation time (DT) on lavender essential oil yield and composition when extracted from dried flowers. Therefore, the following distillation times (DT) were tested in this experiment: 1.5 min, 3 min, 3.75 min, 7.5 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, 90 min, 120 min, 150 min, 180 min, and 240 min. The essential oil yield (range 0.5-6.8%) reached a maximum at 60 min DT. The concentrations of cineole (range 6.4-35%) and fenchol (range 1.7-2.9%) were highest at the 1.5 min DT and decreased with increasing length of the DT. The concentration of camphor (range 6.6-9.2%) reached a maximum at 7.5-15 min DT, while the concentration of linalool acetate (range 15-38%) reached a maximum at 30 min DT. Results suggest that lavender essential oil yield may not increase after 60 min DT. The change in essential oil yield, and the concentrations of cineole, fenchol and linalool acetate as DT changes were modeled very well by the asymptotic nonlinear regression model. DT may be used to modify the chemical profile of lavender oil and to obtain oils with differential chemical profiles from the same lavender flowers. DT must be taken into consideration when citing or comparing reports on lavender essential oil yield and composition.

  15. PlanJury: probabilistic plan evaluation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Sonke, J.-J.; van Herk, M.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Over a decade ago, the 'Van Herk margin recipe paper' introduced plan evaluation through DVH statistics based on population distributions of systematic and random errors. We extended this work for structures with correlated uncertainties (e.g. lymph nodes or parotid glands), and considered treatment plans containing multiple (overlapping) dose distributions (e.g. conventional lymph node and hypo-fractionated tumor doses) for which different image guidance protocols may lead to correlated errors. Methods: A command-line software tool 'PlanJury' was developed which reads 3D dose and structure data exported from a treatment planning system. Uncertainties are specified by standard deviations and correlation coefficients. Parameters control the DVH statistics to be computed: e.g. the probability of reaching a DVH constraint, or the dose absorbed at given confidence in a (combined) volume. Code was written in C++ and parallelized using OpenMP. Testing geometries were constructed using idealized spherical volumes and dose distributions. Results: Negligible stochastic noise could be attained within two minutes computation time for a single target. The confidence to properly cover both of two targets was 90% for two synchronously moving targets, but decreased by 7% if the targets moved independently. For two partially covered organs at risk the confidence of at least one organ below the mean dose threshold was 40% for synchronous motion, 36% for uncorrelated motion, but only 20% for either of the organs separately. Two abutting dose distributions ensuring 91% confidence of proper target dose for correlated motions led to 28% lower confidence for uncorrelated motions as relative displacements between the doses resulted in cold spots near the target. Conclusions: Probabilistic plan evaluation can efficiently be performed for complicated treatment planning situations, thus providing important plan quality information unavailable in conventional PTV based evaluations.

  16. Capital jury deliberation: effects on death sentencing, comprehension, and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Mona; Haney, Craig

    2009-12-01

    This study focused on whether and how deliberations affected the comprehension of capital penalty phase jury instructions and patterns of racially discriminatory death sentencing. Jury-eligible subjects were randomly assigned to view one of four versions of a simulated capital penalty trial in which the race of defendant (Black or White) and the race of victim (Black or White) were varied orthogonally. The participants provided their initial "straw" sentencing verdicts individually and then deliberated in simulated 4-7 person "juries." Results indicated that deliberation created a punitive rather than lenient shift in the jurors' death sentencing behavior, failed to improve characteristically poor instructional comprehension, did not reduce the tendency for jurors to misuse penalty phase evidence (especially, mitigation), and exacerbated the tendency among White mock jurors to sentence Black defendants to death more often than White defendants.

  17. Order of Verdict Consideration and Decision Rule Effects on Mock Jury Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaye, Imafidon M.

    A study investigated the effects of order verdict consideration and decision rule on jury verdicts. After reading the summary of an actual trial, 240 mock jurors drawn from undergraduate communications classes were randomly assigned to six-member juries. Jury assignments were made under two verdict orders (ascending and descending order of…

  18. The Origin of a Jury in Ancient Greece and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumanov, Dmitriy Yu.; Sakhapov, Rinat R.; Faizrahmanov, Damir I.; Safin, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the implementation of the democratic principles in the court and judicial process in the trial by jury by the example of the history and development of this institution in Russia. The authors used different methods and approaches, in particular, historical, systemic and Aristotelian method, concrete…

  19. Volatile fraction of lavender and bitter fennel infusion extracts.

    PubMed

    Tschiggerl, Christine; Bucar, Franz

    2010-09-01

    The relative proportions of chemical classes (hydrocarbons, oxides, alcohols/ethers, aldehydes/ketones, acids/esters/lactones) in the essential oil of lavender (Lavendula angustifolia Mill., family Lamiaceae) and bitter fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. vulgare var. vulgare (Mill.) Thellung, family Apiaceae) and in the volatile fraction of infusion extracts were examined and showed remarkable differences. The volatile compounds of infusions were isolated by hydrodistillation and solid phase extraction (SPE). Their qualitative and semiquantitative compositions were compared with the essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation directly from the plant material and analyzed by GC-MS. Furthermore, quantification of the major constituents of lavender oil and of the volatile fraction obtained by hydrodistillation of the infusion was performed. Comparison of the total essential oil yield quantified by hydrodistillation of the lavender infusion (0.7% v/w, corresponding to plant material) with the essential oil yield of the blossoms (5.1% v/w) revealed that only 13.9% of the initial oil could be extracted by infusion. The main constituents of the volatile fraction of the lavender infusion were (hydrodistillation/SPE): linalool (39.3%/28.2%), 1,8 cineole (24.8%/18.9%), cis-linalool oxide (furanoid) (5.8%/8.0%), trans-linalool oxide (furanoid) (4.1%/7.1%), camphor (5.3%/4.0%) and alpha-terpineol (4.0%/3.0%). The major constituents of lavender essential oil were linalool (28.8%), 1,8-cineole (18.05%), linalyl acetate (13.9%) and alpha-terpineol (4.0%). Most intriguing, in the volatile fraction of lavender infusion a significant proportional decrease of linalyl acetate and an increase of linalool oxides was recognized. The essential oil yield of fennel fruits was 12.5% v/w, whereas 1.8% v/w volatile fraction (corresponding to plant material) was obtained by hydrodistillation of the fennel infusion, which is equivalent to 14.5% of the initial fennel essential oil. The main

  20. Jury faults police for forcing defendant to undergo testing.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    A Federal jury in Philadelphia awarded five thousand dollars to a defendant whose constitutional rights were violated when police forced him to undergo an HIV-antibody test. During an arrest for car theft in Upper Merion Township, PA, the defendant bled on several officers. Police obtained a warrant to test the defendant, [name removed], for HIV. The jury was convinced that the policemen lacked probable cause to suspect that the defendant was HIV-positive. A consultant for the defense stated that in the fourteen years since the AIDS epidemic was detected, there has not been one reported case of a police officer becoming infected in the line of duty. The judge was asked to order HIV training for the town's police officers.

  1. Proteomics analysis of MKN45 cell line before and after treatment with Lavender aqueous extract

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Heydari-Kashal, Saeid; Kalantari, Shiva; Dailian, Sona; Zali, Hakimeh

    2012-01-01

    Aim In this study the anticancer activity of Lavender aqueous extract against MKN45 cell line was evaluated. Background Plant-based drugs are regarded as promising therapies. Lavender is a plant that has been cultivated from ancient times. An aqueous extract of Lavender has shown therapeutic effects on the nervous system in the high doses based on in-vivo studies. Gastric cancer is one of the frequent cancers in Iranian population. We therefore assessed the effect of Lavender upon a gastric cancer cell line. Patients and methods The MKN45 cancer cell line was selected for treatment with aqueous extract of Lavender. Survival of MKN45 cell line was studied in the presence of various concentrations of Lavender extract by MTT assay method. Morphological studies were performed via microscopic analyses. Flow cytometry and proteomics techniques were applied to determining pharmaceutical mechanism of lavender cytotoxic effects. Results The survival and morphological studies revealed anticancer characteristics of extract. Flow cytometry findings indicate that Lavender extract had a cytotoxic effect upon the cell line. Proteomics analysis identified a significant alternation in gastric cellular proteome expression after treating with the extract. Among 1000 spots, more than 700 spots showed changes in protein expression levels by informatics analysis. Of these proteins, expression of three cancer biomarkers, Annexin1, Anolase1 and HSP70 were suppressed by extract. Conclusion This study suggests that Lavender extract is cytotoxic and alter protein expression in a gastric cancer cell line. PMID:24834196

  2. The biological activities of cinnamon, geranium and lavender essential oils.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Głowacka, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edward; Wiktorowska-Owczarek, Anna; Jóźwiak-Bębenista, Marta; Łysakowska, Monika

    2014-12-12

    Acinetobacter sp. represent an important cause of nosocomial infections. Their resistance to some antibiotics, their ability to survive on inanimate surfaces in the hospital environment and their ability to produce biofilms contributes to their virulence. The aim of the study was to determine the antibacterial properties of cinnamon, lavender and geranium essential oils against bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter isolated from several clinical materials and from the hospital environment. A comprehensive evaluation of the susceptibility of Acinetobacter sp. clinical strains to recommended antibiotics was performed. The constituents of cinnamon, lavender and geranium essential oils were identified by GC-FID-MS analysis, and their Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) against tested clinical strains were determined by the micro-dilution broth method. In addition, the effects of essential oils on the viability of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) and glioblastoma cell line (T98G) were evaluated. Cinnamon bark oil was the most active against clinical and environmental strains of Acinetobacter baumannii with MIC values ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 µL/mL. The MIC values for geranium oil were between 7.5 and 9.5 µL/mL, and between 10.5 and 13.0 µL/mL for lavender oil. These essential oils can be best employed in the fight against infections caused by bacteria from Acinetobacter genus as components of formulations for hygiene and disinfection of hospital environment.

  3. The biological activities of cinnamon, geranium and lavender essential oils.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Głowacka, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edward; Wiktorowska-Owczarek, Anna; Jóźwiak-Bębenista, Marta; Łysakowska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. represent an important cause of nosocomial infections. Their resistance to some antibiotics, their ability to survive on inanimate surfaces in the hospital environment and their ability to produce biofilms contributes to their virulence. The aim of the study was to determine the antibacterial properties of cinnamon, lavender and geranium essential oils against bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter isolated from several clinical materials and from the hospital environment. A comprehensive evaluation of the susceptibility of Acinetobacter sp. clinical strains to recommended antibiotics was performed. The constituents of cinnamon, lavender and geranium essential oils were identified by GC-FID-MS analysis, and their Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) against tested clinical strains were determined by the micro-dilution broth method. In addition, the effects of essential oils on the viability of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) and glioblastoma cell line (T98G) were evaluated. Cinnamon bark oil was the most active against clinical and environmental strains of Acinetobacter baumannii with MIC values ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 µL/mL. The MIC values for geranium oil were between 7.5 and 9.5 µL/mL, and between 10.5 and 13.0 µL/mL for lavender oil. These essential oils can be best employed in the fight against infections caused by bacteria from Acinetobacter genus as components of formulations for hygiene and disinfection of hospital environment. PMID:25514231

  4. A question of scent: lavender aroma promotes interpersonal trust

    PubMed Central

    Sellaro, Roberta; van Dijk, Wilco W.; Paccani, Claudia Rossi; Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    A previous study has shown that the degree of trust into others might be biased by inducing either a more “inclusive” or a more “exclusive” cognitive-control mode. Here, we investigated whether the degree of interpersonal trust can be biased by environmental factors, such as odors, that are likely to impact cognitive-control states. Arousing olfactory fragrances (e.g., peppermint) are supposed to induce a more exclusive, and calming olfactory fragrances (e.g., lavender) a more inclusive state. Participants performed the Trust Game, which provides an index of interpersonal trust by assessing the money units one participant (the trustor) transfers to another participant (the trustee), while being exposed to either peppermint or lavender aroma. All participants played the role of trustor. As expected, participants transferred significantly more money to the alleged trustee in the lavender as compared to the peppermint and control (no aroma) conditions. This observation might have various serious implications for a broad range of situations in which interpersonal trust is an essential element, such as cooperation (e.g., mixed-motives situations), bargaining and negotiation, consumer behavior, and group performance. PMID:25628577

  5. Studies on the mode of action of the essential oil of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia P. Miller).

    PubMed

    Lis-Balchin, M; Hart, S

    1999-09-01

    Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia, P. Miller) is used in aromatherapy as a holistic relaxant and is said to have carminative, antiflatulence and anticolic properties. Its sedative nature, on inhalation, has been shown both in animals and man. Lavender has a spasmolytic activity on guineapig ileum and rat uterus in vitro and it also decreases the tone in the skeletal muscle preparation of the phrenic nerve-diaphragm of rats. As the mechanism of action has not been studied previously, the spasmolytic activity was studied in vitro using a guinea-pig ileum smooth muscle preparation. The mechanism of action was postsynaptic and not atropine-like. The spasmolytic effect of lavender oil was most likely to be mediated through cAMP, and not through cGMP. The mode of action of linalool, one of lavender's major components, reflected that of the whole oil. The mode of action of lavender oil resembled that of geranium and peppermint oils.

  6. Effects of lavender aroma on sleep quality in healthy Japanese students.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Kumi; Nishimoto, Takashi; Taniguchi, Toshiyo

    2012-02-01

    This single-blind randomized study investigated the effectiveness of lavender aroma on quality of sleep in healthy Japanese students. The data of seven participants (2 men, 5 women) in the intervention group and eight participants (3 men, 5 women) in the control group were analyzed (M age = 19.0 yr., SD = 0.9). The total procedure comprised 3 days for pre-intervention assessment, 5 days for the intervention, and 3 days for post-intervention assessment. Lavender exposure was compared with the absence of lavender (control). Information regarding the relaxing effect of aromas was provided to examine expectancy effects. Results showed that lavender aroma improved sleepiness at awakening after the intervention. Sex differences and daily variation in quality of sleep during the intervention period were not observed. The findings suggest that nighttime exposure to lavender aroma relieves sleepiness at awakening.

  7. The use of citizens' juries in health policy decision-making: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Street, Jackie; Duszynski, Katherine; Krawczyk, Stephanie; Braunack-Mayer, Annette

    2014-05-01

    Deliberative inclusive approaches, such as citizen juries, have been used to engage citizens on a range of issues in health care and public health. Researchers engaging with the public to inform policy and practice have adapted the citizen jury method in a variety of ways. The nature and impact of these adaptations has not been evaluated. We systematically searched Medline (PubMED), CINAHL and Scopus databases to identify deliberative inclusive methods, particularly citizens' juries and their adaptations, deployed in health research. Identified studies were evaluated focussing on principles associated with deliberative democracy: inclusivity, deliberation and active citizenship. We examined overall process, recruitment, evidence presentation, documentation and outputs in empirical studies, and the relationship of these elements to theoretical explications of deliberative inclusive methods. The search yielded 37 papers describing 66 citizens' juries. The review demonstrated that the citizens' jury model has been extensively adapted. Inclusivity has been operationalised with sampling strategies that aim to recruit representative juries, although these efforts have produced mixed results. Deliberation has been supported through use of steering committees and facilitators to promote fair interaction between jurors. Many juries were shorter duration than originally recommended, limiting opportunity for constructive dialogue. With respect to citizenship, few juries' rulings were considered by decision-making bodies thereby limiting transfer into policy and practice. Constraints in public policy process may preclude use of the 'ideal' citizens' jury with potential loss of an effective method for informed community engagement. Adapted citizens' jury models provide an alternative: however, this review demonstrates that special attention should be paid to recruitment, independent oversight, jury duration and moderation.

  8. An Analysis of the Verdicts and Decision-Making Variables of Simulated Juries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anapol, Malthon M.

    In order to examine jury deliberations, researchers simulated and videotaped court proceedings and jury deliberations based upon an actual civil court case. Special care was taken to make the simulated trial as authentic as the original trial. College students and the general public provided the jurors, which were then divided into twelve separate…

  9. Argumentation in Science Teacher Education: The Simulated Jury as a Resource for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieira, Rodrigo Drumond; da Rocha Bernardo, José Roberto; Evagorou, Maria; de Melo, Viviane Florentino

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we focus on the contributions that a simulated jury-based activity might have for pre-service teachers, especially for their active participation and learning in teacher education. We observed a teacher educator using a series of simulated juries as teaching resources to help pre-service teachers develop their pedagogical…

  10. DNA evidence in jury trials: the "CSI effect".

    PubMed

    Scott, Russ; Skellern, Catherine

    2010-12-01

    In Murdoch v The Queen (2007) 167 A Crim R 329, Hillier v The Queen (2007) 228 CLR 618 and Forbes v The Queen (2009) 167ACTR 1, Australian appellate courts considered the interpretation of DNA evidence and the possibility of secondary transfer of DNA samples and questions about the statistical calculations used to produce probabilities of DNA matches. Following the 2010 Victorian case of Farrah Jama, whose conviction for rape was quashed 16 months into his prison sentence after it was discovered that the incriminating DNA sample was contaminated, Mr FRH Vincent QC, in his report to the Victorian Attorney-General, was scathing of the conduct of the case and made a number of recommendations, all of which were immediately adopted by the Victorian Government. Following the release of the Vincent Report, Australia's Attorneys-General have established a working party to examine national standards for the use and collection of DNA evidence. The use and interpretation of DNA evidence in jury trials is considered and factors that improve jury understanding of DNA evidence are discussed.

  11. Patch Testing with Main Sensitizers Does Not Detect All Cases of Contact Allergy to Oxidized Lavender Oil.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Lina; Christensson, Johanna Bråred

    2016-06-15

    Lavender oil is an essential oil obtained from lavender (Lavendula angustifolia). The main components linalool and linalyl acetate have been shown to autoxidize in contact with oxygen in the air, forming sensitizing hydroperoxides. Patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis were consecutively patch-tested with oxidized lavender oil 6% pet., oxidized linalyl acetate 6% pet., and oxidized linalool 6% pet. to investigate the frequency of contact allergy to oxidized lavender oil, and the pattern of concomitant reactions to oxidized linalool and oxidized linalyl acetate. Positive reactions to oxidized lavender oil were found in 2.8% of the patients. Among those, 56% reacted to oxidized linalool and/or oxidized linalyl acetate, while 52% reacted to the fragrance markers of the baseline series. Oxidized lavender oil showed among the highest frequencies of contact allergy to studied essential oils. A well-standardized preparation of oxidized lavender oil could be a useful tool for diagnosis of contact allergy to fragrances. PMID:26671837

  12. Evaluating the use of citizens’ juries in food policy: a case study of food regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deliberative engagement techniques and citizens’ juries are touted as means of incorporating the public into policy decision-making, managing community expectations and increasing commitment to public health policy. This paper reports a study to examine the feasibility of citizens’ juries as a means of collecting data to inform public health policy related to food regulation through evaluation of the conduct of a citizens’ jury. Methods A citizens’ jury was conducted with a representative sample of 17 South Australians to explore their willingness to consider the proposition that food and drink advertising and/or sponsorship should be banned at children’s sporting events. Results The results showed that, in relation to the central proposition and evaluation data from the jury, opinion on the proposition remained comparatively stable. Most jurors indicated that they thought that food and drink sponsorship and/or advertising at children’s sporting events would have little or no effect on altering children’s diet and eating habits, with the proportion increasing during the jury process. Jurors were given evaluation sheets about the content of the jury and the process of the citizens’ jury to complete at the end of the session. The evaluation of the citizens’ jury process revealed positive perceptions. The majority of jurors agreed that their knowledge of the issues of food and drink sponsorship in children’s sport had increased as a result of participation in the citizens’ jury. The majority also viewed the decision-making process as fair and felt that their views were listened to. One important response in the evaluation was that all jurors indicated that, if given the opportunity, they would participate in another citizens’ jury. Conclusions The findings suggest that the citizens’ jury increased participant knowledge of the issue and facilitated reflective discussion of the proposition. Citizens’ juries are an effective means

  13. Engaging the public in healthcare decision-making: quantifying preferences for healthcare through citizens’ juries

    PubMed Central

    Scuffham, Paul A; Ratcliffe, Julie; Kendall, Elizabeth; Burton, Paul; Wilson, Andrew; Chalkidou, Kalipso; Littlejohns, Peter; Whitty, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The optimal approach to engage the public in healthcare decision-making is unclear. Approaches range from deliberative citizens’ juries to large population surveys using discrete choice experiments. This study promotes public engagement and quantifies preferences in two key areas of relevance to the industry partners to identify which approach is most informative for informing healthcare policy. Methods and analysis The key areas identified are optimising appropriate use of emergency care and prioritising patients for bariatric surgery. Three citizens’ juries will be undertaken—two in Queensland to address each key issue and one in Adelaide to repeat the bariatric surgery deliberations with a different sample. Jurors will be given a choice experiment before the jury, immediately following the jury and at approximately 1 month following the jury. Control groups for each jury will be given the choice experiment at the same time points to test for convergence. Samples of healthcare decision-makers will be given the choice experiment as will two large samples of the population. Jury and control group participants will be recruited from the Queensland electoral roll and newspaper advertisements in Adelaide. Population samples will be recruited from a large research panel. Jury processes will be analysed qualitatively and choice experiments will be analysed using multinomial logit models and its more generalised forms. Comparisons between preferences across jurors predeliberation and postdeliberation, control participants, healthcare decision-makers and the general public will be undertaken for each key issue. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by Griffith University Human Research Ethics Committee (MED/10/12/HREC). Findings of the juries and the choice experiments will be reported at a workshop of stakeholders to be held in 2015, in reports and in peer reviewed journals. PMID:24793259

  14. In vitro culture of lavenders (Lavandula spp.) and the production of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Sandra; Romano, Anabela

    2013-01-01

    Lavenders (Lavandula spp., Lamiaceae) are aromatic ornamental plants that are used widely in the food, perfume and pharmaceutical industries. The large-scale production of lavenders requires efficient in vitro propagation techniques to avoid the overexploitation of natural populations and to allow the application of biotechnology-based approaches for plant improvement and the production of valuable secondary metabolites. In this review we discuss micropropagation methods that have been developed in several lavender species, mainly based on meristem proliferation and organogenesis. Specific requirements during stages of micropropagation (establishment, shoot multiplication, root induction and acclimatization) and requisites for plant regeneration trough organogenesis, as an important step for the implementation of plant improvement programs, were revised. We also discuss different methods for the in vitro production of valuable secondary metabolites, focusing on the prospects for highly scalable cultures to meet the market demand for lavender-derived products.

  15. Effects of lavender oil inhalation on improving scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Hritcu, Lucian; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica

    2012-04-15

    Lavender is reported to be an effective medical plant in treating inflammation, depression, stress and mild anxiety in Europe and the USA. The present study investigated the effects of two different lavender essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia ssp. angustifolia Mill. (Lamiaceae) and Lavandula hybrida Rev. (Lamiaceae) on neurological capacity of male Wistar rats subjected to scopolamine (0.7mg/kg)-induced dementia rat model. Chronic exposures to lavender essential oils (daily, for 7 continuous days) significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior and inhibited depression in elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests, suggesting anxiolytic and antidepressant activity. Also, spatial memory performance in Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks was improved, suggesting positive effects on memory formation. Taken together, multiple exposures to lavender essential oils could effectively reverse spatial memory deficits induced by dysfunction of the cholinergic system in the rat brain and might provide an opportunity for management neurological abnormalities in dementia conditions.

  16. Lavender oil-potent anxiolytic properties via modulating voltage dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Schuwald, Anita M; Nöldner, Michael; Wilmes, Thomas; Klugbauer, Norbert; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical data support the clinical use of oral lavender oil in patients suffering from subsyndromal anxiety. We identified the molecular mechanism of action that will alter the perception of lavender oil as a nonspecific ingredient of aromatherapy to a potent anxiolytic inhibiting voltage dependent calcium channels (VOCCs) as highly selective drug target. In contrast to previous publications where exorbitant high concentrations were used, the effects of lavender oil in behavioral, biochemical, and electrophysiological experiments were investigated in physiological concentrations in the nanomolar range, which correlate to a single dosage of 80 mg/d in humans that was used in clinical trials. We show for the first time that lavender oil bears some similarities with the established anxiolytic pregabalin. Lavender oil inhibits VOCCs in synaptosomes, primary hippocampal neurons and stably overexpressing cell lines in the same range such as pregabalin. Interestingly, Silexan does not primarily bind to P/Q type calcium channels such as pregabalin and does not interact with the binding site of pregabalin, the α2δ subunit of VOCCs. Lavender oil reduces non-selectively the calcium influx through several different types of VOCCs such as the N-type, P/Q-type and T-type VOCCs. In the hippocampus, one brain region important for anxiety disorders, we show that inhibition by lavender oil is mainly mediated via N-type and P/Q-type VOCCs. Taken together, we provide a pharmacological and molecular rationale for the clinical use of the oral application of lavender oil in patients suffering from anxiety.

  17. [Discriminant Analysis of Lavender Essential Oil by Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Wang, Qing; Tong, Hong; Liao, Xiang; Zhang, Zheng-fang

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to use attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to identify the lavender essential oil by establishing a Lavender variety and quality analysis model. So, 96 samples were tested. For all samples, the raw spectra were pretreated as second derivative, and to determine the 1 750-900 cm(-1) wavelengths for pattern recognition analysis on the basis of the variance calculation. The results showed that principal component analysis (PCA) can basically discriminate lavender oil cultivar and the first three principal components mainly represent the ester, alcohol and terpenoid substances. When the orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) model was established, the 68 samples were used for the calibration set. Determination coefficients of OPLS-DA regression curve were 0.959 2, 0.976 4, and 0.958 8 respectively for three varieties of lavender essential oil. Three varieties of essential oil's the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) in validation set were 0.142 9, 0.127 3, and 0.124 9, respectively. The discriminant rate of calibration set and the prediction rate of validation set had reached 100%. The model has the very good recognition capability to detect the variety and quality of lavender essential oil. The result indicated that a model which provides a quick, intuitive and feasible method had been built to discriminate lavender oils. PMID:27400512

  18. Aqueous Extract of Lavender Angustifolia Inhibits Lymphocytes Proliferation of Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dalilan, Sona; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Zali, Hakimeh

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several types of cancer, which cause millions of deaths worldwide every year. Many studies have confirmed that plants are adequate natural sources to be examined as anti-cancer drugs with fewer side effects than chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this study the anti-cancer properties of Lavender aqueous extract on lymphocytes derived from patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma has been studied. Methods In order to determine the cytotoxic effects of the extract on lymphocytes of patients in stages III and IV of Hodgkin's lymphoma and two different cell lines in the presence of different concentrations of aqueous extract of Lavender, MTT colorimetric assay and flow cytometry analysis were used. Results Findings indicated that Lavender inhibited cell proliferation in both lymphocytes and cell lines with different effects. The effective concentration of Lavender that decreased viability of Hodgkin's lymphoma cells below Lethal Concentration 50 (LC50) value was 100 µg/ml and this was half of the therapeutic dose. In addition, apoptosis was the main mechanism the Hodgkin's lymphoma cell encountered when exposed to the aqueous extract of Lavender. Conclusion This experiment proposes that aqueous Lavender extract can be regarded as a potential anti-cancer agent in future studies. PMID:25250135

  19. Lavender-thymol as a new topical aromatherapy preparation for episiotomy: A randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, T; Barakat, R; Ragab, A; Badria, F; Badawy, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of topical lavender-thymol in promoting episiotomy healing. This placebo-controlled, single-blinded, randomised clinical trial involved 60 primiparous women. REEDA score was used to evaluate the outcome of the trial. On the 7th post-partum day, women in Placebo-treated group had worse Redness, Edema, Ecchymosis, Discharge and Approximation (REEDA) score of 3.93 ± 3.65 compared with those in Lavender-thymol-treated group (2.03 ± 1.7) with significant difference (P = 0.013). Visual analogue Scale (VAS) score for pain at episiotomy in Lavender-thymol-treated group was 3.5 ± 1.9, whereas in Placebo-treated group it was 2.1 ± 2.2 (p = 0.011) for dyschezia, 3.8 ± 1.7 and 2.8 ± 1.6 in Placebo- and Lavender-thymol-treated women, respectively (p = 0.023). At 7th post-partum week, dyspareunia was more severe in Placebo-treated group compared with that in Lavender-thymol-treated group (5.3 ± 2.7 vs 2.7 ± 1.5 and p < 0.001). Topical aromatherapy using lavender-thymol was highly effective, suitable and safe for episiotomy wound care with little or no expected side effects compared with that using placebo. PMID:25384116

  20. The antimutagenic activity of Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) essential oil in the bacterial reverse mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Evandri, M G; Battinelli, L; Daniele, C; Mastrangelo, S; Bolle, P; Mazzanti, G

    2005-09-01

    Essential oils from Melaleuca alternifolia (tea-tree oil) and Lavandula angustifolia (lavender oil) are commonly used to treat minor health problems. Tea-tree oil possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and is increasingly used for skin problems. Lavender oil, traditionally used as an antiseptic agent, is now predominantly used as a relaxant, carminative, and sedative in aromatherapy. Despite their growing use no data are available on their mutagenic potential. In this study, after determining the chemical composition of tea-tree oil and lavender oil, by gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry, we investigated their mutagenic and antimutagenic activities by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains and in Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain, with and without an extrinsic metabolic activation system. Neither essential oil had mutagenic activity on the two tested Salmonella strains or on E. coli, with or without the metabolic activation system. Conversely, lavender oil exerted strong antimutagenic activity, reducing mutant colonies in the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 2-nitrofluorene. Antimutagenicity was concentration-dependent: the maximal concentration (0.80 mg/plate) reduced the number of histidine-independent revertant colonies by 66.4%. Lavender oil (0.80 mg/plate) also showed moderate antimutagenicity against the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 1-nitropyrene. Its antimutagenic property makes lavender oil a promising candidate for new applications in human healthcare. PMID:15907354

  1. Lavender-thymol as a new topical aromatherapy preparation for episiotomy: A randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, T; Barakat, R; Ragab, A; Badria, F; Badawy, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of topical lavender-thymol in promoting episiotomy healing. This placebo-controlled, single-blinded, randomised clinical trial involved 60 primiparous women. REEDA score was used to evaluate the outcome of the trial. On the 7th post-partum day, women in Placebo-treated group had worse Redness, Edema, Ecchymosis, Discharge and Approximation (REEDA) score of 3.93 ± 3.65 compared with those in Lavender-thymol-treated group (2.03 ± 1.7) with significant difference (P = 0.013). Visual analogue Scale (VAS) score for pain at episiotomy in Lavender-thymol-treated group was 3.5 ± 1.9, whereas in Placebo-treated group it was 2.1 ± 2.2 (p = 0.011) for dyschezia, 3.8 ± 1.7 and 2.8 ± 1.6 in Placebo- and Lavender-thymol-treated women, respectively (p = 0.023). At 7th post-partum week, dyspareunia was more severe in Placebo-treated group compared with that in Lavender-thymol-treated group (5.3 ± 2.7 vs 2.7 ± 1.5 and p < 0.001). Topical aromatherapy using lavender-thymol was highly effective, suitable and safe for episiotomy wound care with little or no expected side effects compared with that using placebo.

  2. The antimutagenic activity of Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) essential oil in the bacterial reverse mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Evandri, M G; Battinelli, L; Daniele, C; Mastrangelo, S; Bolle, P; Mazzanti, G

    2005-09-01

    Essential oils from Melaleuca alternifolia (tea-tree oil) and Lavandula angustifolia (lavender oil) are commonly used to treat minor health problems. Tea-tree oil possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and is increasingly used for skin problems. Lavender oil, traditionally used as an antiseptic agent, is now predominantly used as a relaxant, carminative, and sedative in aromatherapy. Despite their growing use no data are available on their mutagenic potential. In this study, after determining the chemical composition of tea-tree oil and lavender oil, by gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry, we investigated their mutagenic and antimutagenic activities by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains and in Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain, with and without an extrinsic metabolic activation system. Neither essential oil had mutagenic activity on the two tested Salmonella strains or on E. coli, with or without the metabolic activation system. Conversely, lavender oil exerted strong antimutagenic activity, reducing mutant colonies in the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 2-nitrofluorene. Antimutagenicity was concentration-dependent: the maximal concentration (0.80 mg/plate) reduced the number of histidine-independent revertant colonies by 66.4%. Lavender oil (0.80 mg/plate) also showed moderate antimutagenicity against the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 1-nitropyrene. Its antimutagenic property makes lavender oil a promising candidate for new applications in human healthcare.

  3. The CSI effect and the Canadian and the Australian Jury.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Janne A; Fordham, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Television shows, such as CBS's CSI and its spin-offs CSI: Miami; CSI: Las Vegas; and CSI: New York, have sparked the imagination of thousands of viewers who want to become forensic scientists. The shows' fictional portrayals of crime scene investigations have prompted fears that jurors will demand DNA and other forensic evidence before they will convict, and have unrealistic expectations of that evidence. This has been dubbed the "CSI effect." This phenomenon was explored using results from a Canadian study based on 605 surveys of Canadian college students who would be considered jury-eligible and Australian quantitative and qualitative findings from a study that surveyed and interviewed real posttrial jurors. Information about the way jurors deal with forensic evidence in the context of other evidence and feedback about the way in which understanding such evidence could be increased were gained from both these studies. The comparison provides insights into the knowledge base of jurors, permitting adaptation of methods of presenting forensic information by lawyers and experts in court, based on evidence rather than folklore. While the Canadian juror data showed statistically significant findings that jurors are clearly influenced in their treatment of some forensic evidence by their television-viewing habits, reassuringly, no support was found in either study for the operation of a detrimental CSI effect as defined above. In the Australian study, in fact, support was found for the proposition that jurors assess forensic evidence in a balanced and thoughtful manner.

  4. Argumentation in Science Teacher Education: The simulated jury as a resource for teaching and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumond Vieira, Rodrigo; da Rocha Bernardo, José Roberto; Evagorou, Maria; Florentino de Melo, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we focus on the contributions that a simulated jury-based activity might have for pre-service teachers, especially for their active participation and learning in teacher education. We observed a teacher educator using a series of simulated juries as teaching resources to help pre-service teachers develop their pedagogical knowledge and their argumentation abilities in a physics teacher methods course. For the purposes of this article, we have selected one simulated jury-based activity, comprising two opposed groups of pre-service teachers that presented aspects that hinder the teachers' development of professional knowledge (against group) and aspects that allow this development (favor group). After the groups' presentations, a group of judges was formed to evaluate the discussion. We applied a multi-level method for discourse analysis and the results showed that (1) the simulated jury afforded the pre-service teachers to position themselves as active knowledge producers; (2) the teacher acted as 'animator' of the pre-service teachers' actions, showing responsiveness to the emergence of circumstantial teaching and learning opportunities and (3) the simulated jury culminated in the judges' identification of the pattern 'concrete/obstacles-ideological/possibilities' in the groups' responses, which was elaborated by the teacher for the whole class. Implications from this study include using simulated juries for teaching and learning and for the development of the pre-service teachers' argumentative abilities. The potential of simulated juries to improve teaching and learning needs to be further explored in order to inform the uses and reflections of this resource in science education.

  5. Facial Comparison from CCTV footage: The competence and confidence of the jury.

    PubMed

    Walker, Heather; Tough, Ann

    2015-12-01

    CCTV footage is commonly used in the court room to help visualise the crime in question and to help identify the offender. Unfortunately the majority of surveillance cameras produce such poor quality images that the task of identifying individuals can be extremely difficult. This study aimed at determining whether the task of identifying the offender in CCTV footage was one which a jury should be competent to do, or whether expert evidence would be beneficial in such cases. The ability of potential jury members, the general public, was tested by asking participants to play the role of a jury member by means of an online survey. Potential jury members viewed CCTV in which a simulated offence took place, and were subsequently asked to compare still images of a defendant to the offender to try to determine if they were competent and confident about making a judgement as to whether the defendant committed the crime. Factors such as age, gender and profession of the potential jury members were considered, as well as the type of crime committed, in order to establish if these play any role in the decision made by potential jury members. These factors did not appear to play a significant role; however confidence was also investigated and it became very evident that this was a factor that must be taken into consideration when determining the requirement for expert contribution in facial comparisons. Jury members may well be willing and competent to a basic level in carrying out a facial comparison but if they lack a certain level of confidence in their ability and decision making then this task is more suitable for an expert with experience and skills in this field. PMID:26654085

  6. Facial Comparison from CCTV footage: The competence and confidence of the jury.

    PubMed

    Walker, Heather; Tough, Ann

    2015-12-01

    CCTV footage is commonly used in the court room to help visualise the crime in question and to help identify the offender. Unfortunately the majority of surveillance cameras produce such poor quality images that the task of identifying individuals can be extremely difficult. This study aimed at determining whether the task of identifying the offender in CCTV footage was one which a jury should be competent to do, or whether expert evidence would be beneficial in such cases. The ability of potential jury members, the general public, was tested by asking participants to play the role of a jury member by means of an online survey. Potential jury members viewed CCTV in which a simulated offence took place, and were subsequently asked to compare still images of a defendant to the offender to try to determine if they were competent and confident about making a judgement as to whether the defendant committed the crime. Factors such as age, gender and profession of the potential jury members were considered, as well as the type of crime committed, in order to establish if these play any role in the decision made by potential jury members. These factors did not appear to play a significant role; however confidence was also investigated and it became very evident that this was a factor that must be taken into consideration when determining the requirement for expert contribution in facial comparisons. Jury members may well be willing and competent to a basic level in carrying out a facial comparison but if they lack a certain level of confidence in their ability and decision making then this task is more suitable for an expert with experience and skills in this field.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    'I know very well that my theory rests on a shaky foundation. What attracts me to it is that it leads to consequences that seem to be accessible to experiment, and it provides a starting point for the theoretical understanding of gravitation', wrote Einstein in 1911. Einstein's Jury by Jeffrey Crelinsten—well documented, well written, and fascinating to read—describes how, from 1909 on, Einstein's two theories of relativity became known to astronomers, and how the predictions made between 1907 and 1915 were received as challenges to observers. The author gives a non-technical account of the efforts made until 1930 to test these predictions; he focuses on two of the three classical tests, namely gravitational redshift and bending of light; the 'jury' consists mainly of American observers—Adams, Campbell, Curtis, Hale, Perrin, St John, Trumpler and others—working with newly built large telescopes, and the Britons Eddington and Evershed. The major steps which, after a long struggle, convinced the majority of astronomers that Einstein was right, are narrated chronologically in rather great detail, especially the work at Lick Observatory, before and after the famous British observation of 1919, on solar eclipses, and the work at Mount Wilson and the Indian Kodaikanal Observatories to extract the gravitational redshift from the complicated spectrum of the sun. The account of the eclipse work which was carried out between 1918 and 1923 by Lick astronomers corrects the impression suggested by many historical accounts that the British expedition alone settled the light-bending question. Apart from these main topics, the anomalous perihelion advance of Mercury and the ether problem are covered. By concentrating on astronomy rather than on physics this book complements the rich but repetitive literature on Einstein and relativity which appeared in connection with the commemoration of Einstein's annus mirabilis, 2005. The well told stories include curiosities such as

  8. Healing advantages of lavender essential oil during episiotomy recovery: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Vakilian, Katayon; Atarha, Mahtab; Bekhradi, Reza; Chaman, Reza

    2011-02-01

    Episiotomy is the most common perineal incision in obstetric and midwifery. Nowadays alternative and complementary methods such as Aromatherapy using essential oils are established as an alternative therapy. This research was carried out to assess the effect of lavender oil in wound healing. This randomized control trial was conducted on 120 primiparous women with singleton pregnancy, without any acute and chronic disease and allergy who had undergone normal spontaneous vaginal delivery and episiotomy. They were randomly allocated in case and control groups. Case group received lavender oil and controls received povidone-iodine. Incision sites were assessed on the 10th day postpartum. 25 out of 60 women in lavender group and 17 mothers in control group had no pain (p = 0.06). There was no significant difference between two groups in surgery site complications. However, redness in lavender group was significantly less than controls (p < 0.001). This study suggests application of lavender essential oil instead of povidone-iodine for episiotomy wound care.

  9. The effect of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil on severity of primary dysmenorrhea in Arsanjan students

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtshirin, Froozan; Abedi, Sara; YusefiZoj, Parisa; Razmjooee, Damoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Presently, using complementary therapy such as lavender oil has specific application in medicine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage on the severity of primary dysmenorrhea in nursing and midwifery students of Islamic Azad University of Arsanjan, Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was performed using clinical trial method on 80 eligible students whose level of pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) before the intervention. Each participant, in the first days of menstruation, randomly received two types of massage with lavender and placebo oil in two consecutive cycles of menstruation. Their level of pain was measured before and 30 min after the intervention. In this study, each group was considered as their self-control group in the next cycle. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: A significant decrease in VAS score after lavender massage was detected in comparison with placebo massage. There was a statistically significant difference between VAS scores after and before placebo massage. In addition, statistically the effect of lavender massage on the severity of primary dysmenorrhea was higher than that of placebo massage (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Findings of this study showed that lavender oil massage decreases primary dysmenorrhea and it can be used as an effective herbal drug. PMID:25709705

  10. Social Justice and Environmental Awareness Developed through a Citizens' Jury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J.

    2014-12-01

    A Citizens' Jury (CJ) is a discussion forum in which managers, policymakers or politicians are able to present their case to the general public ('citizens') to whom they are accountable, and for these citizens to critically ask questions of the managers/policymakers/politicians in order to better understand issues surrounding local development, planning and policy, impacts and adaptive measures, and to highlight their concerns. A CJ can be useful with respect to developing social justice and environmental awareness issues because it can empower community action and present different viewpoints. A practical CJ exercise is used in a second-year undergraduate course entitled Climate Change and Society, at University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. The CJ is used to consider some of the impacts of management policies used for climate change and sustainable development adaption, based on a hypothetical scenario. This scenario is that a major energy company wants to build a dam with hydroelectric power station in a developing country. This will provide low-carbon renewable energy to the country, investment in electricity infrastructure, and the company is committed to help economic development in the country, including in jobs and education. However, building and flooding of the dam will involve displacing 10,000 people from rural communities, flooding agricultural areas and areas of high biodiversity, and archaeological sites. The exercise is based on students, in groups, assuming different 'identities' which may include a local business person, resident, politician, member of an NGO, tourist, engineer, farmer etc, from which viewpoint they must argue for/against the proposal and to question other peoples' viewpoints. This exercise is useful because it allows students to develop understandings of different viewpoints, evaluate risk and impacts on different communities, and highlights the complexity of real-world decision-making.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    'I know very well that my theory rests on a shaky foundation. What attracts me to it is that it leads to consequences that seem to be accessible to experiment, and it provides a starting point for the theoretical understanding of gravitation', wrote Einstein in 1911. Einstein's Jury by Jeffrey Crelinsten—well documented, well written, and fascinating to read—describes how, from 1909 on, Einstein's two theories of relativity became known to astronomers, and how the predictions made between 1907 and 1915 were received as challenges to observers. The author gives a non-technical account of the efforts made until 1930 to test these predictions; he focuses on two of the three classical tests, namely gravitational redshift and bending of light; the 'jury' consists mainly of American observers—Adams, Campbell, Curtis, Hale, Perrin, St John, Trumpler and others—working with newly built large telescopes, and the Britons Eddington and Evershed. The major steps which, after a long struggle, convinced the majority of astronomers that Einstein was right, are narrated chronologically in rather great detail, especially the work at Lick Observatory, before and after the famous British observation of 1919, on solar eclipses, and the work at Mount Wilson and the Indian Kodaikanal Observatories to extract the gravitational redshift from the complicated spectrum of the sun. The account of the eclipse work which was carried out between 1918 and 1923 by Lick astronomers corrects the impression suggested by many historical accounts that the British expedition alone settled the light-bending question. Apart from these main topics, the anomalous perihelion advance of Mercury and the ether problem are covered. By concentrating on astronomy rather than on physics this book complements the rich but repetitive literature on Einstein and relativity which appeared in connection with the commemoration of Einstein's annus mirabilis, 2005. The well told stories include curiosities such as

  12. Ambient odors of orange and lavender reduce anxiety and improve mood in a dental office.

    PubMed

    Lehrner, J; Marwinski, G; Lehr, S; Johren, P; Deecke, L

    2005-09-15

    The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of the essential oils of orange and lavender on anxiety, mood, alertness and calmness in dental patients. Two hundred patients between the ages of 18 and 77 years (half women, half men) were assigned to one of four independent groups. While waiting for dental procedures patients were either stimulated with ambient odor of orange or ambient odor of lavender. These conditions were compared to a music condition and a control condition (no odor, no music). Anxiety, mood, alertness and calmness were assessed while patients waited for dental treatment. Statistical analyses revealed that compared to control condition both ambient odors of orange and lavender reduced anxiety and improved mood in patients waiting for dental treatment. These findings support the previous opinion that odors are capable of altering emotional states and may indicate that the use of odors is helpful in reducing anxiety in dental patients.

  13. The effectiveness of aromatherapy massage using lavender oil as a treatment for infantile colic.

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Bengü; Başbakkal, Zümrüt

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage using lavender oil as a possible treatment for this condition. This research was carried out on a group of 40 infants between 2 and 6 weeks of age with a gestational age of 38-42 weeks and normal development and growth. All the infants weighed between 2500 and 4000 g at birth and all exhibited the signs of colic. Infants in the treatment group received abdominal massage by their mothers using lavender oil, while those in the control group were not subject to an intervention. The infants in both control and treatment groups were monitored once a week by the researchers, in total five times. The effect of the massage was measured in terms of changes in the length of time the infants cried per week. The use of aromatherapy massage using lavender oil was found to be effective in reducing the symptoms of colic.

  14. On racial diversity and group decision making: identifying multiple effects of racial composition on jury deliberations.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Samuel R

    2006-04-01

    This research examines the multiple effects of racial diversity on group decision making. Participants deliberated on the trial of a Black defendant as members of racially homogeneous or heterogeneous mock juries. Half of the groups were exposed to pretrial jury selection questions about racism and half were not. Deliberation analyses supported the prediction that diverse groups would exchange a wider range of information than all-White groups. This finding was not wholly attributable to the performance of Black participants, as Whites cited more case facts, made fewer errors, and were more amenable to discussion of racism when in diverse versus all-White groups. Even before discussion, Whites in diverse groups were more lenient toward the Black defendant, demonstrating that the effects of diversity do not occur solely through information exchange. The influence of jury selection questions extended previous findings that blatant racial issues at trial increase leniency toward a Black defendant.

  15. [Main Components of Xinjiang Lavender Essential Oil Determined by Partial Least Squares and Near Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiang; Wang, Qing; Fu, Ji-hong; Tang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work was undertaken to establish a quantitative analysis model which can rapid determinate the content of linalool, linalyl acetate of Xinjiang lavender essential oil. Totally 165 lavender essential oil samples were measured by using near infrared absorption spectrum (NIR), after analyzing the near infrared spectral absorption peaks of all samples, lavender essential oil have abundant chemical information and the interference of random noise may be relatively low on the spectral intervals of 7100~4500 cm(-1). Thus, the PLS models was constructed by using this interval for further analysis. 8 abnormal samples were eliminated. Through the clustering method, 157 lavender essential oil samples were divided into 105 calibration set samples and 52 validation set samples. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used as a tool to determine the content of linalool and linalyl acetate in lavender essential oil. Then the matrix was established with the GC-MS raw data of two compounds in combination with the original NIR data. In order to optimize the model, different pretreatment methods were used to preprocess the raw NIR spectral to contrast the spectral filtering effect, after analysizing the quantitative model results of linalool and linalyl acetate, the root mean square error prediction (RMSEP) of orthogonal signal transformation (OSC) was 0.226, 0.558, spectrally, it was the optimum pretreatment method. In addition, forward interval partial least squares (FiPLS) method was used to exclude the wavelength points which has nothing to do with determination composition or present nonlinear correlation, finally 8 spectral intervals totally 160 wavelength points were obtained as the dataset. Combining the data sets which have optimized by OSC-FiPLS with partial least squares (PLS) to establish a rapid quantitative analysis model for determining the content of linalool and linalyl acetate in Xinjiang lavender essential oil, numbers of hidden variables of two

  16. [Main Components of Xinjiang Lavender Essential Oil Determined by Partial Least Squares and Near Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiang; Wang, Qing; Fu, Ji-hong; Tang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work was undertaken to establish a quantitative analysis model which can rapid determinate the content of linalool, linalyl acetate of Xinjiang lavender essential oil. Totally 165 lavender essential oil samples were measured by using near infrared absorption spectrum (NIR), after analyzing the near infrared spectral absorption peaks of all samples, lavender essential oil have abundant chemical information and the interference of random noise may be relatively low on the spectral intervals of 7100~4500 cm(-1). Thus, the PLS models was constructed by using this interval for further analysis. 8 abnormal samples were eliminated. Through the clustering method, 157 lavender essential oil samples were divided into 105 calibration set samples and 52 validation set samples. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used as a tool to determine the content of linalool and linalyl acetate in lavender essential oil. Then the matrix was established with the GC-MS raw data of two compounds in combination with the original NIR data. In order to optimize the model, different pretreatment methods were used to preprocess the raw NIR spectral to contrast the spectral filtering effect, after analysizing the quantitative model results of linalool and linalyl acetate, the root mean square error prediction (RMSEP) of orthogonal signal transformation (OSC) was 0.226, 0.558, spectrally, it was the optimum pretreatment method. In addition, forward interval partial least squares (FiPLS) method was used to exclude the wavelength points which has nothing to do with determination composition or present nonlinear correlation, finally 8 spectral intervals totally 160 wavelength points were obtained as the dataset. Combining the data sets which have optimized by OSC-FiPLS with partial least squares (PLS) to establish a rapid quantitative analysis model for determining the content of linalool and linalyl acetate in Xinjiang lavender essential oil, numbers of hidden variables of two

  17. An attributional sequence model of jury decision making in civil torts.

    PubMed

    Spievak, Elizabeth R; Bettler, Robert F

    2009-08-01

    A jury simulation study was designed to replicate and extend prior research on attributional decision-making sequences in a litigation context. Although previous studies implicated injury severity, causality, responsibility, and punishment, a maximum of three stages in various combinations were tested, and only occasionally in the context of civil litigation. The present effort integrated all four stages into a more inclusive model focused on civil jury decision making. Undergraduate participants (N=91) read six case vignettes and responded to attribution questions in each of four categories. Path analyses supported the hypothesized 4-stage attributional sequence.

  18. Lavender Graduation: Acknowledging the Lives and Achievement of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sano, Ronni

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the origins and practices of Lavender Graduations, events in which the lives and achievements of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender college students are celebrated. Examines results of an evaluation survey, reviews implications for practice, and provides suggestions for future research. (Contains 19 references.) (GCP)

  19. Cloning and functional characterization of three terpene synthases from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia).

    PubMed

    Landmann, Christian; Fink, Barbara; Festner, Maria; Dregus, Márta; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Schwab, Wilfried

    2007-09-15

    The essential oil of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is mainly composed of mono- and sesquiterpenes. Using a homology-based PCR strategy, two monoterpene synthases (LaLIMS and LaLINS) and one sesquiterpene synthase (LaBERS) were cloned from lavender leaves and flowers. LaLIMS catalyzed the formation of (R)-(+)-limonene, terpinolene, (1R,5S)-(+)-camphene, (1R,5R)-(+)-alpha-pinene, beta-myrcene and traces of alpha-phellandrene. The proportions of these products changed significantly when Mn(2+) was supplied as the cofactor instead of Mg(2+). The second enzyme LaLINS produced exclusively (R)-(-)-linalool, the main component of lavender essential oil. LaBERS transformed farnesyl diphosphate and represents the first reported trans-alpha-bergamotene synthase. It accepted geranyl diphosphate with higher affinity than farnesyl diphosphate and also produced monoterpenes, albeit at low rates. LaBERS is probably derived from a parental monoterpene synthase by the loss of the plastidial signal peptide and by broadening its substrate acceptance spectrum. The identification and description of the first terpene synthases from L. angustifolia forms the basis for the biotechnological modification of essential oil composition in lavender. PMID:17662687

  20. Effects of Inhalation of Lavender Essential Oil on Open-heart Surgery Pain.

    PubMed

    Salamati, Armaiti; Mashouf, Soheyla; Sahbaei, Faezeh; Mojab, Faraz

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of inhalation of lavender essential oil on the pain of open-heart surgery. The main complaint of patients after open-heart surgery is chest pain. Due to the side effects of opioids, it is important to use a non-invasive way to effectively relieve pain including aromatherapy with analgesics. This study was a clinical single-blind trial and was conducted on 40 patients who had open-heart surgery in the cardiac ICU of 2 Hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 2012. Criteria included: full consciousness, spontaneous breathing ability and not using synthetic opioids within 2 hours before extubation. After extubation, the patients were asked to mark the intensity of their pain using the visual analogue scale. Then, a cotton swab which was impregnated with 2 drops of lavender essential oil 2% was placed in their oxygen mask, and they got breath for 10 minutes. 30 minutes after aromatherapy, they were asked to re-mark their pain intensity. The level of patient's pain before and after aroma therapy were compared. The pain mean level before and after inhaling lavender essential oil was 5.60 (SD = 2.262) and 4.98 (SD = 2.293), respectively (p-value>0.05). Therefore, there is no significant difference and the result of study proves that lavender essential oil inhalation has no effect on reducing the pain of open-heart surgery. PMID:25587315

  1. Autonomic nervous function and localization of cerebral activity during lavender aromatic immersion.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xudong; Tashiro, Manabu; Wu, Di; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Wang, Qingtian; Sasaki, Takehisa; Kumagai, Kazuaki; Luo, Yun; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Itoh, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the autonomic nervous activity can be induced by various sensory and emotional stimuli. The authors examined whether the power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) could detect changes in autonomic tone following a lavender aroma treatment or not. Healthy young women (n=10, 23+/-3 years old) underwent continuous electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring before and after (10, 20, 30 minutes) the lavender fragrance stimuli. HRV was expressed by three indices: low (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high (0.15-0.40 Hz) frequency components (nLF and nHF, respectively) as well as LF/HF ratio. Increases in the parasympathetic tone were observed after the lavender fragrance stimulus as seen as increases in the HF component and decreases in the LF/HF. Additional measurement with positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated the regional metabolic activation in the orbitofrontal, posterior cingulate gyrus, brainstem, thalamus and cerebellum, as well as the reductions in the pre/post-central gyrus and frontal eye field. These results suggested that lavender aromatic treatment induced not only relaxation but also increased arousal level in these subjects. PMID:17361051

  2. Smelling lavender and rosemary increases free radical scavenging activity and decreases cortisol level in saliva.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Toshiko; Tonosaki, Keiichi

    2007-02-28

    Free radicals/reactive oxygen species are related to many biological phenomena such as inflammation, aging, and carcinogenesis. The body possesses various antioxidative systems (free radical scavenging activity, FRSA) for preventing oxidative stress, and saliva contains such activity. In the present study, we measured the total salivary FRSA induced after the smelling of lavender and rosemary essential oils that are widely used in aromatherapy. Various physiologically active substances in saliva such as cortisol, secretory IgA, and alpha-amylase activity were found to be correlated with aroma-induced FRSA. The subjects (22 healthy volunteers) sniffed aroma for 5 min, and each subject's saliva was collected immediately. FRSA was measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl. The FRSA values were increased by stimulation with low concentrations (1000 times dilution) of lavender or by high-concentrations (10 times dilution) of rosemary. In contrast, both lavender and rosemary stimulations decreased cortisol levels. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the FRSA values and the cortisol levels with each concentration of rosemary stimulation. No significant changes were noted in sIgA or alpha-amylase. These findings clarify that lavender and rosemary enhance FRSA and decrease the stress hormone, cortisol, which protects the body from oxidative stress. PMID:17291597

  3. Effects of Inhalation of Lavender Essential Oil on Open-heart Surgery Pain

    PubMed Central

    Salamati, Armaiti; Mashouf, Soheyla; Sahbaei, Faezeh; Mojab, Faraz

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of inhalation of lavender essential oil on the pain of open-heart surgery. The main complaint of patients after open-heart surgery is chest pain. Due to the side effects of opioids, it is important to use a non-invasive way to effectively relieve pain including aromatherapy with analgesics. This study was a clinical single-blind trial and was conducted on 40 patients who had open-heart surgery in the cardiac ICU of 2 Hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 2012. Criteria included: full consciousness, spontaneous breathing ability and not using synthetic opioids within 2 hours before extubation. After extubation, the patients were asked to mark the intensity of their pain using the visual analogue scale. Then, a cotton swab which was impregnated with 2 drops of lavender essential oil 2% was placed in their oxygen mask, and they got breath for 10 minutes. 30 minutes after aromatherapy, they were asked to re-mark their pain intensity. The level of patient’s pain before and after aroma therapy were compared. The pain mean level before and after inhaling lavender essential oil was 5.60 (SD = 2.262) and 4.98 (SD = 2.293), respectively (p-value>0.05). Therefore, there is no significant difference and the result of study proves that lavender essential oil inhalation has no effect on reducing the pain of open-heart surgery. PMID:25587315

  4. Effects of Inhalation of Lavender Essential Oil on Open-heart Surgery Pain.

    PubMed

    Salamati, Armaiti; Mashouf, Soheyla; Sahbaei, Faezeh; Mojab, Faraz

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of inhalation of lavender essential oil on the pain of open-heart surgery. The main complaint of patients after open-heart surgery is chest pain. Due to the side effects of opioids, it is important to use a non-invasive way to effectively relieve pain including aromatherapy with analgesics. This study was a clinical single-blind trial and was conducted on 40 patients who had open-heart surgery in the cardiac ICU of 2 Hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 2012. Criteria included: full consciousness, spontaneous breathing ability and not using synthetic opioids within 2 hours before extubation. After extubation, the patients were asked to mark the intensity of their pain using the visual analogue scale. Then, a cotton swab which was impregnated with 2 drops of lavender essential oil 2% was placed in their oxygen mask, and they got breath for 10 minutes. 30 minutes after aromatherapy, they were asked to re-mark their pain intensity. The level of patient's pain before and after aroma therapy were compared. The pain mean level before and after inhaling lavender essential oil was 5.60 (SD = 2.262) and 4.98 (SD = 2.293), respectively (p-value>0.05). Therefore, there is no significant difference and the result of study proves that lavender essential oil inhalation has no effect on reducing the pain of open-heart surgery.

  5. Autonomic nervous function and localization of cerebral activity during lavender aromatic immersion.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xudong; Tashiro, Manabu; Wu, Di; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Wang, Qingtian; Sasaki, Takehisa; Kumagai, Kazuaki; Luo, Yun; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Itoh, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the autonomic nervous activity can be induced by various sensory and emotional stimuli. The authors examined whether the power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) could detect changes in autonomic tone following a lavender aroma treatment or not. Healthy young women (n=10, 23+/-3 years old) underwent continuous electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring before and after (10, 20, 30 minutes) the lavender fragrance stimuli. HRV was expressed by three indices: low (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high (0.15-0.40 Hz) frequency components (nLF and nHF, respectively) as well as LF/HF ratio. Increases in the parasympathetic tone were observed after the lavender fragrance stimulus as seen as increases in the HF component and decreases in the LF/HF. Additional measurement with positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated the regional metabolic activation in the orbitofrontal, posterior cingulate gyrus, brainstem, thalamus and cerebellum, as well as the reductions in the pre/post-central gyrus and frontal eye field. These results suggested that lavender aromatic treatment induced not only relaxation but also increased arousal level in these subjects.

  6. Genetic differences in temperament determine whether lavender oil alleviates or exacerbates anxiety in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hawken, P A R; Fiol, C; Blache, D

    2012-03-20

    Growing concerns about the risk of addiction to benzodiazepines have led to increasing interest in alternative therapies to treat anxiety and depression. Lavender oil (Lavendula augustifolia) is reportedly anxiolytic in a number of species but little is known about how it affects individuals that are more or less anxious when faced with a stressor. In this study, we used changes in locomotor activity and the plasma concentrations of cortisol to test whether lavender oil would reduce behavioral and endocrine correlates of anxiety in calm and nervous sheep exposed to an isolation stressor. During the non-breeding season, 'calm' or 'nervous' female sheep from the UWA temperament flock were exposed to a mask containing either 1 mL of 10% lavender oil (calm: n=8; nervous: n=8) or peanut oil (calm: n=8; nervous: n=8). After 30 min, each sheep was isolated for 5 min and then returned to the group. Blood was sampled prior to the mask, prior to isolation, 1 min and 30 min after isolation to profile changes in the plasma concentrations of cortisol. Agitation score, locomotor activity and vocalizations were recorded as correlates of anxiety associated with the isolation stressor. Irrespective of whether they were exposed to lavender oil, calm sheep had a lower agitation score (P<0.001), crossed the central lines of the isolation box less frequently (P<0.001), expressed fewer vocalizations (P<0.001) and had lower plasma concentrations of cortisol immediately after isolation (P<0.001) than nervous sheep. Exposure of calm sheep to lavender oil decreased the agitation score (P<0.001), frequency of vocalizations (P<0.05), decreased the number of crosses of the central lines of the isolation box (P<0.05), and the plasma concentrations of cortisol prior to isolation (P<0.05) (after mask application) compared to calm control sheep. Exposure of nervous sheep to lavender oil increased the frequency of vocalizations (P<0.05), the number of sheep attempting to escape (P<0.05) and the

  7. From Blood Freud to Jury System: The Metamorphosis of Cherokee Law from 1750 to 1840.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Michelle

    1987-01-01

    Examines the Cherokees' deliberate adoption of the laws of the white man, focusing on the blood feud--a retaliation system designed to deal with homicide. Discusses cultural bases of Cherokee law and factors influencing the change to a jury system and noted key events of the adoption period (1797 to 1840). (JHZ)

  8. Race and Jury Selection: Psychological Perspectives on the Peremptory Challenge Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Samuel R.; Norton, Michael I.

    2008-01-01

    The legal system is a domain of potential relevance for psychologists, whether in the capacity of expert witness or citizen juror. In this article, the authors apply a psychological framework to legal debate surrounding the impact of race on the process of jury selection. More specifically, the authors consider race and the peremptory challenge,…

  9. (Almost) Everything I Need to Know about Multiculturalism I Learned on Jury Duty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shaunna

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author states that during her experience on jury duty--spent with a melting pot of socially-conscious citizens--she reflected upon the implications for education and her own teaching practice. Three major themes centering around her understanding of multiculturalism surfaced: (1) Defining multiculturalism; (2) The cult of…

  10. The Effect of Lavender Aromatherapy on Autonomic Nervous System in Midlife Women with Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Li-Wei; Cheng, Su Li; Liu, Chi Feng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of 12 weeks of lavender aromatherapy on self-reported sleep and heart rate variability (HRV) in the midlife women with insomnia. Sixty-seven women aged 45–55 years, with a CPSQI (Chinese version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) greater than 5, were recruited from communities in Taiwan. The experimental group (n = 34) received lavender inhalation, 20 min each time, twice per week, for 12 weeks, with a total of 24 times. The control group (n = 33) received health education program for sleep hygiene with no intervention. The study of HRV was analyzed by time- and frequency-domain methods. Significant decrease in mean heart rate (HR) and increases in SDNN (standard deviation of the normal-to-normal (NN) intervals), RMSDD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive NN intervals), and HF (high frequency) of spectral powers analysis after lavender inhalation were observed in the 4th and 12th weeks of aromatherapy. The total CPSQI score of study subjects was significantly decreased in the experimental group (P < 0.001), while no significant difference was observed across the same time period (P = 0.776) in the control group. Resting HR and HRV measurements at baseline 1 month and 3 months after allocation showed no significant difference between the experimental and control groups. The study demonstrated that lavender inhalation may have a persistent short-term effect on HRV with an increase in parasympathetic modulation. Women receiving aromatherapy experienced a significant improvement in sleep quality after intervention. However, lavender aromatherapy does not appear to confer benefit on HRV in the long-term followup. PMID:21869900

  11. The effect of lavender aromatherapy on autonomic nervous system in midlife women with insomnia.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Wei; Cheng, Su Li; Liu, Chi Feng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of 12 weeks of lavender aromatherapy on self-reported sleep and heart rate variability (HRV) in the midlife women with insomnia. Sixty-seven women aged 45-55 years, with a CPSQI (Chinese version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) greater than 5, were recruited from communities in Taiwan. The experimental group (n = 34) received lavender inhalation, 20 min each time, twice per week, for 12 weeks, with a total of 24 times. The control group (n = 33) received health education program for sleep hygiene with no intervention. The study of HRV was analyzed by time- and frequency-domain methods. Significant decrease in mean heart rate (HR) and increases in SDNN (standard deviation of the normal-to-normal (NN) intervals), RMSDD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive NN intervals), and HF (high frequency) of spectral powers analysis after lavender inhalation were observed in the 4th and 12th weeks of aromatherapy. The total CPSQI score of study subjects was significantly decreased in the experimental group (P < 0.001), while no significant difference was observed across the same time period (P = 0.776) in the control group. Resting HR and HRV measurements at baseline 1 month and 3 months after allocation showed no significant difference between the experimental and control groups. The study demonstrated that lavender inhalation may have a persistent short-term effect on HRV with an increase in parasympathetic modulation. Women receiving aromatherapy experienced a significant improvement in sleep quality after intervention. However, lavender aromatherapy does not appear to confer benefit on HRV in the long-term followup.

  12. Antifungal Effect of Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) and Clotrimazole on Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Pasha, Hajar; Sefidgar, Ali Asghar; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Adib Rad, Hajar; Shirkhani, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of candidiasis infections is an important problem in the health care system. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro effect of lavender essential oil and clotrimazole on isolated C. albicans from vaginal candidiasis. Materials and Methods. In this clinical trial, C. albicans isolated from the vaginal discharge samples was obtained. Results. The pairwise comparison showed that lavender and clotrimazole had a significant difference; this difference in the lavender group was lower than clotrimazole. But, after 48 hours, there was no difference seen between groups. There was a significant difference between clotrimazole and DMSO groups. Comparing the changes between groups based on the same dilution, at 24 h and 48 h in clotrimazole group, showed a significant difference two times in the fungal cell count that its average during 48 h was less than 24 h. A significant difference was observed between the two periods in lavender group, only at the dilutions of 1/20 and 1/80. The average fungal cell count after 48 h was also lower in lavender group. Conclusions. Given that the lavender has antifungal activity, this can be used as an antifungal agent. However, more clinical studies are necessary to validate its use in candida infection. PMID:26550521

  13. Antifungal Effect of Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) and Clotrimazole on Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Pasha, Hajar; Sefidgar, Ali Asghar; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Adib Rad, Hajar; Shirkhani, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of candidiasis infections is an important problem in the health care system. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro effect of lavender essential oil and clotrimazole on isolated C. albicans from vaginal candidiasis. Materials and Methods. In this clinical trial, C. albicans isolated from the vaginal discharge samples was obtained. Results. The pairwise comparison showed that lavender and clotrimazole had a significant difference; this difference in the lavender group was lower than clotrimazole. But, after 48 hours, there was no difference seen between groups. There was a significant difference between clotrimazole and DMSO groups. Comparing the changes between groups based on the same dilution, at 24 h and 48 h in clotrimazole group, showed a significant difference two times in the fungal cell count that its average during 48 h was less than 24 h. A significant difference was observed between the two periods in lavender group, only at the dilutions of 1/20 and 1/80. The average fungal cell count after 48 h was also lower in lavender group. Conclusions. Given that the lavender has antifungal activity, this can be used as an antifungal agent. However, more clinical studies are necessary to validate its use in candida infection. PMID:26550521

  14. Does lavender aromatherapy alleviate premenstrual emotional symptoms?: a randomized crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A majority of reproductive-age women experience a constellation of various symptoms in the premenstrual phase, commonly known as premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Despite its prevalence, however, no single treatment is universally recognized as effective, and many women turn to alternative approaches, including aromatherapy, a holistic mind and body treatment. The present study investigated the soothing effects of aromatherapy on premenstrual symptoms using lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), a relaxing essential oil, from the perspective of autonomic nervous system function. Methods Seventeen women (20.6 ± 0.2 years) with mild to moderate subjective premenstrual symptoms participated in a randomized crossover study. Subjects were examined on two separate occasions (aroma and control trials) in the late-luteal phases. Two kinds of aromatic stimulation (lavender and water as a control) were used. This experiment measured heart rate variability (HRV) reflecting autonomic nerve activity and the Profile of Mood States (POMS) as a psychological index before and after the aromatic stimulation. Results Only a 10-min inhalation of the lavender scent significantly increased the high frequency (HF) power reflecting parasympathetic nervous system activity in comparison with water (aroma effect: F = 4.50, p = 0.050; time effect: F = 5.59, p = 0.017; aroma x time effect: F = 3.17, p = 0.047). The rate of increase in HF power was greater at 10–15 min (p = 0.051) and 20–25 min (p = 0.023) in the lavender trial than in the control trial with water. In addition, POMS tests revealed that inhalation of the aromatic lavender oil significantly decreased two POMS subscales—depression–dejection (p = 0.045) and confusion (p = 0.049)—common premenstrual symptoms, in the late-luteal phase, as long as 35 min after the aroma stimulation. Conclusions The present study indicated that lavender aromatherapy as a potential therapeutic

  15. Stacking the Jury: Legal Professionals' Peremptory Challenges Reflect Jurors' Levels of Implicit Race Bias.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Mike; DeVaul-Fetters, Amanda; Gawronski, Bertram

    2016-08-01

    Most legal systems are based on the premise that defendants are treated as innocent until proven guilty and that decisions will be unbiased and solely based on the facts of the case. The validity of this assumption has been questioned for cases involving racial minority members, in that racial bias among jury members may influence jury decisions. The current research shows that legal professionals are adept at identifying jurors with levels of implicit race bias that are consistent with their legal interests. Using a simulated voir dire, professionals assigned to the role of defense lawyer for a Black defendant were more likely to exclude jurors with high levels of implicit race bias, whereas prosecutors of a Black defendant did the opposite. There was no relation between professionals' peremptory challenges and jurors' levels of explicit race bias. Implications for the role of racial bias in legal decision making are discussed.

  16. Measuring damages for lost enjoyment of life: the view from the bench and the jury box.

    PubMed

    Poser, Susan; Bornstein, Brian H; McGorty, E Kiernan

    2003-02-01

    Civil jury instructions are inconsistent in defining what constitutes noneconomic damages, which may include pain, suffering, disability, disfigurement, and loss of enjoyment of life (LEL), among other injury sequelae. This inconsistency has been manifested recently in court decisions that have considered whether LEL should be treated as a separate element of noneconomic damages, distinct from pain and suffering. This paper reviews the case law on this issue and also describes a jury simulation experiment. Mock jurors awarded damages after they received instructions on noneconomic damages in which LEL was (1) not identified as a distinct element of damages; (2) defined as an element of damages distinct from pain and suffering, but participants awarded a single amount for noneconomic damages; or (3) defined as a distinct element of damages, and participants awarded separate amounts for LEL and pain and suffering. Instructions about LEL resulted in larger awards, but only when mock jurors also made a separate award for that element of damages.

  17. Stacking the Jury: Legal Professionals' Peremptory Challenges Reflect Jurors' Levels of Implicit Race Bias.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Mike; DeVaul-Fetters, Amanda; Gawronski, Bertram

    2016-08-01

    Most legal systems are based on the premise that defendants are treated as innocent until proven guilty and that decisions will be unbiased and solely based on the facts of the case. The validity of this assumption has been questioned for cases involving racial minority members, in that racial bias among jury members may influence jury decisions. The current research shows that legal professionals are adept at identifying jurors with levels of implicit race bias that are consistent with their legal interests. Using a simulated voir dire, professionals assigned to the role of defense lawyer for a Black defendant were more likely to exclude jurors with high levels of implicit race bias, whereas prosecutors of a Black defendant did the opposite. There was no relation between professionals' peremptory challenges and jurors' levels of explicit race bias. Implications for the role of racial bias in legal decision making are discussed. PMID:27354112

  18. Justins v The Queen: assisted suicide, juries and the discretion to prosecute.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas; Townsend, Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Juries are often a crucial protection for citizens against unjust or highly controversial laws. The decision whether to proceed with a prosecution rests on the discretionary powers of prosecutors. In cases where the community is deeply divided over right and wrong, it appears that there is, at times, a transference from the public of thwarted law reform aspirations which can create difficult tensions and expectations. This case commentary considers an appeal by Shirley Justins following her conviction for manslaughter by gross criminal negligence as a result of her involvement in the mercy killing of her partner, Mr Graeme Wylie. The morally unsettled nature of the charges brought against her, her own initial plea, the directions given to the jury by the trial judge and even the basis of her appeal resulted in a convoluted and complicated legal case. Spigelman CJ and Johnson J ordered a new trial, Spigelman CJ stating that it was open for a new jury to consider (a) if Mr Wylie lacked capacity; and (b) whether there was criminal involvement by one person in another's death. Simpson J found that further prosecution on the count of manslaughter would amount to an abuse of process and that an acquittal should be entered. This case highlights how fundamentally unsettled are the publicly much debated and persistently contentious issues of euthanasia, assisted suicide, the right of a person to die a dignified death and the way their capacity in that respect should be assessed. It perhaps asks us to reconsider the role of juries and the exercise of discretion by Directors of Public Prosecutions in areas of law where the community and law-makers are deeply and intractably divided. PMID:21774267

  19. Yes, the government should tax soft drinks: findings from a citizens' jury in Australia.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Nicole; Kendall, Elizabeth; Whitty, Jennifer; Byrnes, Joshua; Hills, Andrew P; Gordon, Louisa; Turkstra, Erika; Scuffham, Paul; Comans, Tracy

    2014-03-01

    Taxation has been suggested as a possible preventive strategy to address the serious public health concern of childhood obesity. Understanding the public's viewpoint on the potential role of taxation is vital to inform policy decisions if they are to be acceptable to the wider community. A Citizens' Jury is a deliberative method for engaging the public in decision making and can assist in setting policy agendas. A Citizens' Jury was conducted in Brisbane, Australia in May 2013 to answer the question: Is taxation on food and drinks an acceptable strategy to the public in order to reduce rates of childhood obesity? Citizens were randomly selected from the electoral roll and invited to participate. Thirteen members were purposively sampled from those expressing interest to broadly reflect the diversity of the Australian public. Over two days, participants were presented with evidence on the topic by experts, were able to question witnesses and deliberate on the evidence. The jurors unanimously supported taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks but generally did not support taxation on processed meats, snack foods and foods eaten/ purchased outside the home. They also supported taxation on snack foods on the condition that traffic light labelling was also introduced. Though they were not specifically asked to deliberate strategies outside of taxation, the jurors strongly recommended more nutritional information on all food packaging using the traffic light and teaspoon labelling systems for sugar, salt and fat content. The Citizens' Jury suggests that the general public may support taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks to reduce rates of obesity in children. Regulatory reforms of taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks and improved labelling of nutritional information on product packaging were strongly supported by all members of the jury. These reforms should be considered by governments to prevent childhood obesity and the future burden on society from the consequences of obesity

  20. Yes, the government should tax soft drinks: findings from a citizens' jury in Australia.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Nicole; Kendall, Elizabeth; Whitty, Jennifer; Byrnes, Joshua; Hills, Andrew P; Gordon, Louisa; Turkstra, Erika; Scuffham, Paul; Comans, Tracy

    2014-02-27

    Taxation has been suggested as a possible preventive strategy to address the serious public health concern of childhood obesity. Understanding the public's viewpoint on the potential role of taxation is vital to inform policy decisions if they are to be acceptable to the wider community. A Citizens' Jury is a deliberative method for engaging the public in decision making and can assist in setting policy agendas. A Citizens' Jury was conducted in Brisbane, Australia in May 2013 to answer the question: Is taxation on food and drinks an acceptable strategy to the public in order to reduce rates of childhood obesity? Citizens were randomly selected from the electoral roll and invited to participate. Thirteen members were purposively sampled from those expressing interest to broadly reflect the diversity of the Australian public. Over two days, participants were presented with evidence on the topic by experts, were able to question witnesses and deliberate on the evidence. The jurors unanimously supported taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks but generally did not support taxation on processed meats, snack foods and foods eaten/ purchased outside the home. They also supported taxation on snack foods on the condition that traffic light labelling was also introduced. Though they were not specifically asked to deliberate strategies outside of taxation, the jurors strongly recommended more nutritional information on all food packaging using the traffic light and teaspoon labelling systems for sugar, salt and fat content. The Citizens' Jury suggests that the general public may support taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks to reduce rates of obesity in children. Regulatory reforms of taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks and improved labelling of nutritional information on product packaging were strongly supported by all members of the jury. These reforms should be considered by governments to prevent childhood obesity and the future burden on society from the consequences of obesity.

  1. Yes, The Government Should Tax Soft Drinks: Findings from a Citizens’ Jury in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, Nicole; Kendall, Elizabeth; Whitty, Jennifer; Byrnes, Joshua; Hills, Andrew P.; Gordon, Louisa; Turkstra, Erika; Scuffham, Paul; Comans, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Taxation has been suggested as a possible preventive strategy to address the serious public health concern of childhood obesity. Understanding the public’s viewpoint on the potential role of taxation is vital to inform policy decisions if they are to be acceptable to the wider community. A Citizens’ Jury is a deliberative method for engaging the public in decision making and can assist in setting policy agendas. A Citizens’ Jury was conducted in Brisbane, Australia in May 2013 to answer the question: Is taxation on food and drinks an acceptable strategy to the public in order to reduce rates of childhood obesity? Citizens were randomly selected from the electoral roll and invited to participate. Thirteen members were purposively sampled from those expressing interest to broadly reflect the diversity of the Australian public. Over two days, participants were presented with evidence on the topic by experts, were able to question witnesses and deliberate on the evidence. The jurors unanimously supported taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks but generally did not support taxation on processed meats, snack foods and foods eaten/ purchased outside the home. They also supported taxation on snack foods on the condition that traffic light labelling was also introduced. Though they were not specifically asked to deliberate strategies outside of taxation, the jurors strongly recommended more nutritional information on all food packaging using the traffic light and teaspoon labelling systems for sugar, salt and fat content. The Citizens’ Jury suggests that the general public may support taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks to reduce rates of obesity in children. Regulatory reforms of taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks and improved labelling of nutritional information on product packaging were strongly supported by all members of the jury. These reforms should be considered by governments to prevent childhood obesity and the future burden on society from the consequences of

  2. Jury awards $6,000 in firing of hair stylist with AIDS.

    PubMed

    1996-12-27

    A Federal jury in New Mexico awarded $6,000 to the estate of a hairdresser after deciding that his employer retaliated against him for filing a discrimination complaint. The employer, MTS Corp., fired [name removed] after other workers refused to work with him. MTS Corp. also denied his request to work at his primary salon, denied his attendance at the company Christmas party, and claimed that he worked fewer hours than required. Outstanding legal costs are still being disputed.

  3. Metabolic cross-talk between pathways of terpenoid backbone biosynthesis in spike lavender.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Kutzner, Erika; Huber, Claudia; Segura, Juan; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Arrillaga, Isabel

    2015-10-01

    The metabolic cross-talk between the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in developing spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia Med) was analyzed using specific inhibitors and on the basis of (13)C-labeling experiments. The presence of mevinolin (MEV), an inhibitor of the MVA pathway, at concentrations higher than 0.5 μM significantly reduced plant development, but not the synthesis of chlorophylls and carotenoids. On the other hand, fosmidomycin (FSM), an inhibitor of the MEP pathway, at concentrations higher than 20 μM blocked the synthesis of chlorophyll, carotenoids and essential oils, and significantly reduced stem development. Notably, 1.2 mM MVA could recover the phenotype of MEV-treated plants, including the normal growth and development of roots, and could partially restore the biosynthesis of photosynthetic pigments and, to a lesser extent, of the essential oils in plantlets treated with FSM. Spike lavender shoot apices were also used in (13)C-labeling experiments, where the plantlets were grown in the presence of [U-(13)C6]glucose. GC-MS-analysis of 1,8-cineole and camphor indicated that the C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) of both monoterpenes are predominantly biosynthesized via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. However, on the basis of the isotopologue profiles, a minor contribution of the MVA pathway was evident that was increased in transgenic spike lavender plants overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), the first enzyme of the MVA pathway. Together, these findings provide evidence for a transport of MVA-derived precursors from the cytosol to the plastids in leaves of spike lavender. PMID:26254184

  4. EEG asymmetry responses to lavender and rosemary aromas in adults and infants.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Chris; Diego, Miguel; Fernandez, Mercedes; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Roca, Amparo

    2002-11-01

    Frontal EEG asymmetry shifting from baseline was examined in adults and infants exposed to lavender and rosemary by reanalyzing previously published data, using techniques different from those utilized in the original two studies. Results from Study 1 on 39 adults revealed significant EEG shifting in the lavender group, with greater relative left frontal EEG activation (associated with greater approach behavior and less depressed affect). The participants in the two aroma groups were further grouped by those with greater baseline, relative to left frontal EEG activation, versus those with a greater baseline, relative to right frontal activation. Collapsing across aroma groups, those with greater baseline, relative to right frontal activation, shifted left during the aroma. Those with greater baseline relative to left frontal activation did not change. In the rosemary group, those with greater baseline relative to right frontal EEG activation shifted left during the aroma, while those with greater baselines relative to left frontal EEG activation shifted right. In the lavender group, those with greater baselines relative to right frontal baseline EEG activation shifted left, but those with greater baselines relative to left baseline did not shift. Study 2 on 27 full-term newborns revealed no significant shifts in asymmetry in either aroma group. However, when the aroma groups were collapsed, the right frontal EEG group exhibited significant shifting relative to left frontal EEG activation. This finding was similar to the adult findings, suggesting that either lavender or rosemary may induce left frontal EEG shifting in adults and infants who show greater baselines relative to right frontal EEG activation. PMID:12625191

  5. Aromas of rosemary and lavender essential oils differentially affect cognition and mood in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Moss, Mark; Cook, Jenny; Wesnes, Keith; Duckett, Paul

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the olfactory impact of the essential oils of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and rosemary (Rosmarlnus officinalis) on cognitive performance and mood in healthy volunteers. One hundred and forty-four participants were randomly assigned to one of three independent groups, and subsequently performed the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) computerized cognitive assessment battery in a cubicle containing either one of the two odors or no odor (control). Visual analogue mood questionnaires were completed prior to exposure to the odor, and subsequently after completion of the test battery. The participants were deceived as to the genuine aim of the study until the completion of testing to prevent expectancy effects from possibly influencing the data. The outcome variables from the nine tasks that constitute the CDR core battery feed into six factors that represent different aspects of cognitive functioning. Analysis of performance revealed that lavender produced a significant decrement in performance of working memory, and impaired reaction times for both memory and attention based tasks compared to controls. In contrast, rosemary produced a significant enhancement of performance for overall quality of memory and secondary memory factors, but also produced an impairment of speed of memory compared to controls. With regard to mood, comparisons of the change in ratings from baseline to post-test revealed that following the completion of the cognitive assessment battery, both the control and lavender groups were significantly less alert than the rosemary condition; however, the control group was significantly less content than both rosemary and lavender conditions. These findings indicate that the olfactory properties of these essential oils can produce objective effects on cognitive performance, as well as subjective effects on mood.

  6. Antifungal effect of lavender honey against Candida albicans , Candida krusei and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Estevinho, Maria Leticia; Afonso, Sílvia Esteves; Feás, Xesús

    2011-10-01

    Monofloral lavender honey samples (n = 30), were analyzed to test antifungal effect against Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The specific growth rates (μ) showed that all the yeast growths were reduced in the presence of honey. The honey concentration (% w/v) that inhibited 10% of the yeasts growth (X min) ranged from 31.0% (C. albicans), 16.8% (C. krusei) and 23.0% (C. neoformans). A synthetic honey solution was also tested to determine antifungal activity attributable to sugars. The presence of synthetic honey in the C. krusei culture medium at concentrations above 58.0% (w/v) was established as X min, while C. albicans and C. neoformans were more resistant, since X min values were not reached over the ranged tested (10-60%, w/v). What the data suggests is that the component in the lavender honey responsible for the observed antifungal in vitro properties is not sugar based. Honey might be tapped as a natural resource to look for new medicines for the treatment of mycotic infections. This could be very useful, onsidering the increasing resistance of antifungals. It should be noticed that this is the first study concerning the effect of lavender honey on the growth of pathogenic yeasts.

  7. Production of a transparent lavender flavour nanocapsule aqueous solution and pyrolysis characteristics of flavour nanocapsule.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangyong; Xiao, Zuobing; Zhou, Rujun; Feng, Nienie

    2015-07-01

    Flavour plays an important role and has been widely used in many products. Usually, the components of flavour are volatile and the sensory perception can be changed as a result of volatilization, heating, oxidation and chemical interactions. Encapsulation can prevent the loss of volatile aromatic ingredients, provide protection and enhance the stability of the core materials. This work concentrated on production of a transparent lavender flavour nanocapsule aqueous solution. The results showed that a transparent lavender flavour microcapsule aqueous solution can be produced using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) as wall material. The combination and interaction of flavour and wall materials were investigated by pyrolysis. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic parameters of the flavour nanocapsule were determined. During thermal degradation of blank HP-β-CD and flavour-HP-β-CD inclusion complex, three main stages can be distinguished. Due to the vaporization of lavender flavour encapsulated in HP-β-CD, the thermogravimetric (TG) curve of blank HP-β-CD shows a leveling-off from room temperature to 269 °C, while the TG curve of flavour-HP-β-CD inclusion complex is downward sloping in this temperature range. The kinetic parameters are helpful in understanding the mechanism of molecular recognition between hosts and guests. PMID:26139932

  8. Deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase is not a rate-determining enzyme for essential oil production in spike lavender.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2014-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) is an economically important aromatic plant producing essential oils, whose components (mostly monoterpenes) are mainly synthesized through the plastidial methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) synthase (DXS), that catalyzes the first step of the MEP pathway, plays a crucial role in monoterpene precursors biosynthesis in spike lavender. To date, however, it is not known whether the DXP reductoisomerase (DXR), that catalyzes the conversion of DXP into MEP, is also a rate-limiting enzyme for the biosynthesis of monoterpenes in spike lavender. To investigate it, we generated transgenic spike lavender plants constitutively expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana DXR gene. Although two out of the seven transgenic T0 plants analyzed accumulated more essential oils than the controls, this is hardly imputable to the DXR transgene effect since a clear correlation between transcript accumulation and monoterpene production could not be established. Furthermore, these increased essential oil phenotypes were not maintained in their respective T1 progenies. Similar results were obtained when total chlorophyll and carotenoid content in both T0 transgenic plants and their progenies were analyzed. Our results then demonstrate that DXR enzyme does not play a crucial role in the synthesis of plastidial monoterpene precursors, suggesting that the control flux of the MEP pathway in spike lavender is primarily exerted by the DXS enzyme. PMID:25151124

  9. Are damages caps regressive? A study of malpractice jury verdicts in California.

    PubMed

    Studdert, David M; Yang, Y Tony; Mello, Michelle M

    2004-01-01

    Caps on damages have emerged as the most controversial legislative response to the new malpractice crisis. We analyzed a sample of high-end jury verdicts in California that were subjected to the state's dollars 250,000 cap on noneconomic damages. We found strong evidence that the cap's fiscal impact was distributed inequitably across different types of injuries. In absolute dollar terms, the reductions imposed on grave injury were seven times larger than those for minor injury; the largest proportional reductions were for injuries that centered on pain and disfigurement. Use of sliding scales of damages instead of or in conjunction with caps would mitigate their adverse impacts on fairness. PMID:15318567

  10. The insanity defense for sex offenders: jury decisions after repeal of Wisconsin's Sex Crimes Law.

    PubMed

    Miller, R D; Stava, L J; Miller, R K

    1988-02-01

    After repeal of a Wisconsin statute permitting hospitalization of defendants convicted of sexual crimes, the authors noted an increase in the percentage of sex offenders among persons hospitalized after being found not guilty by reason of insanity. They also found that a greater proportion of hospitalized sex offenders than of other kinds of offenders were diagnosed as nonpsychotic. Illustrating with three case studies, the authors argue that despite trends away from the therapeutic model of corrections, juries continue to make decisions that provide treatment for defendants perceived to need it, even if the legal criteria for those decisions do not appear to be met.

  11. Hydrolates from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)--their chemical composition as well as aromatic, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Renata; Śmigielski, Krzysztof; Stobiecka, Agnieszka; Kunicka-Styczyńska, Alina

    2016-01-01

    It was shown that the method for obtaining hydrolates from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) influences the content of active compounds and the aromatic, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of the hydrolates. The content of volatile organic compounds ranged from 9.12 to 97.23 mg/100 mL of hydrolate. Lavender hydrolate variants showed low antimicrobial activity (from 0% to 0.05%). The radical scavenging activity of DPPH was from 3.6 ± 0.5% to 3.8 ± 0.6% and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC(FL)) results were from 0 to 266 μM Trolox equivalent, depending on the hydrolate variant. PMID:25738904

  12. Effect of lavender scent inhalation on prevention of stress, anxiety and depression in the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Kianpour, Maryam; Mansouri, Akram; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Asghari, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress, anxiety, and postpartum depression are the most common problems among women in their childbearing age. Research has shown that aromatherapy administered during labor reduces anxiety in mothers. With regard to the specific biological conditions in postpartum period and the subsequent drop in hormone levels, this study investigated the effect of lavender on prevention of stress, anxiety, and postpartum depression in women. Materials and Methods: In a clinical trial, 140 women admitted to the obstetric and gynecological unit were randomly divided into aromatherapy and non-aromatherapy groups immediately after delivery. Intervention with aromatherapy consisted of inhaling three drops of lavender essential oil every 8 h with for 4 weeks. The control group received routine care after discharge and was followed up by telephone only. After 2 weeks, 1 and 3 months of delivery, women were assessed by the 21-item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale and the Edinburgh stress, anxiety, and depression scale in the two groups. Data analysis was performed by Mann-Whitney, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and post hoc tests. Level of significance was set as 0.05 for all tests. Results: The results showed that the mean stress, anxiety, and depression at time point of 2 weeks (P = 0.012, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.003, respectively) and stress, anxiety, and depression scores at time points of 1 month (P < 0.0001) and 3 months after delivery (P < 0.0001) were significantly lower in the study group compared with the control group. Conclusions: Inhaling the scent of lavender for 4 weeks can prevent stress, anxiety, and depression after childbirth. PMID:27095995

  13. In the aftermath of State v. Becker: a review of state and federal jury instructions on insanity acquittal disposition.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    An important topic related to the insanity defense is what jurors should be told about the disposition of a defendant found not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI). In the federal court system, jurors are not instructed about the consequences of an NGRI verdict. State courts, however, are divided on the question. The federal precedent, Shannon v. United States, and the most recent state case to rule on NGRI juror instructions, State v. Becker, are reviewed in detail. What follows is the author's critique of the principal arguments for and against a jury instruction on NGRI disposition. The author argues in favor of a jury instruction on the consequences of an NGRI verdict.

  14. Olfactory stimulatory with grapefruit and lavender oils change autonomic nerve activity and physiological function.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuya; Niijima, Akira; Horii, Yuko; Shen, Jiao; Tanida, Mamoru

    2014-10-01

    This review summarizes the effects of olfactory stimulation with grapefruit and lavender oils on autonomic nerve activity and physiological function. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of grapefruit oil (GFO) increases the activity of sympathetic nerves that innervate white and brown adipose tissues, the adrenal glands, and the kidneys, decreases the activity of the gastric vagal nerve in rats and mice. This results in an increase in lipolysis, thermogenesis, and blood pressure, and a decrease in food intake. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of lavender oil (LVO) elicits the opposite changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. Olfactory stimulation with scent of limonene, a component of GFO, and linalool, a component of LVO, has similar effects to stimulation with GFO and LVO, respectively. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist, diphenhydramine, abolishes all GFO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables, and the hitstamine H3-receptor antagonist, thioperamide, eliminates all LVO-induced changes. Lesions to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and anosmic treatment with ZnSO4 also abolish all GFO- and LVO-induced changes. These findings indicate that limonene and linalool might be the active substances in GFO and LVO, and suggest that the suprachiasmatic nucleus and histamine are involved in mediating the GFO- and LVO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. PMID:25002406

  15. Functional characterization of terpene synthases and chemotypic variation in three lavender species of section Stoechas.

    PubMed

    Benabdelkader, Tarek; Guitton, Yann; Pasquier, Bernard; Magnard, Jean Louis; Jullien, Frédéric; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Legendre, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Lavandula pedunculata (Mill.) Cav. subsp. lusitanica, Lavandula stoechas L. subsp. stoechas and Lavandula viridis l'Hér. are three lavender taxa that belong to the botanical section Stoechas and are widely used as aromatherapy, culinary herb or folk medicine in many Mediterranean regions. The analysis of their bioactive volatile constituents revealed the presence of 124 substances, the most abundant being the bicyclic monoterpenes fenchone, camphor and 1,8-cineole that give these three species their respective chemotypes. Most noteworthy was fenchone which, with its reduced form fenchol, made 48% of the total volatile constituents of L. pedunculata while present at 2.9% in L. stoechas and undetectable in L. viridis. In order to provide a molecular explanation to the differences in volatile compounds of these three species, two monoterpene synthases (monoTPS) and one sesquiterpene synthase (sesquiTPS) were cloned in L. pedunculata and functionally characterized as fenchol synthase (LpFENS), α-pinene synthase (LpPINS) and germacrene A synthase (LpGEAS). The two other lavender species contained a single orthologous gene for each of these three classes of TPS with similar enzyme product specificities. Expression profiles of FENS and PINS genes matched the accumulation profile of the enzyme products unlike GEAS. This study provides one of the rare documented cases of chemotype modification during plant speciation via changes in the level of plant TPS gene expression, and not functionality. PMID:24943828

  16. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of lavender essential oil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriela L da; Luft, Carolina; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Amaral, Robson H; Melo, Denizar A da Silva; Donadio, Márcio V F; Nunes, Fernanda B; de Azambuja, Marcos S; Santana, João C; Moraes, Cristina M B; Mello, Ricardo O; Cassel, Eduardo; Pereira, Marcos Aurélio de Almeida; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have investigated the antinociceptive, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of compounds found in the lavender essential oil (LEO), however to date, there is still lack of substantial data. The objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of lavender essential oil. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical decolorization assay was used for antioxidant activity evaluation. The anti-inflammatory activity was tested using two models of acute inflammation: carrageenan-induced pleurisy and croton oil-induced ear edema. The antinociceptive activity was tested using the pain model induced by formalin. LEO has antioxidant activity, which is dose-dependent response. The inflammatory response evoked by carrageenan and by croton oil was reduced through the pre-treatment of animals with LEO. In the pleurisy model, the drug used as positive control, dexamethasone, was more efficacious. However, in the ear swelling, the antiedematogenic effect of the oil was similar to that observed for dexamethasone. In the formalin test, LEO consistently inhibited spontaneous nociception and presented a similar effect to that of tramadol. The results of this study reveal (in vivo) the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of LEO and demonstrates its important therapeutic potential. PMID:26247152

  17. Functional characterization of terpene synthases and chemotypic variation in three lavender species of section Stoechas.

    PubMed

    Benabdelkader, Tarek; Guitton, Yann; Pasquier, Bernard; Magnard, Jean Louis; Jullien, Frédéric; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Legendre, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Lavandula pedunculata (Mill.) Cav. subsp. lusitanica, Lavandula stoechas L. subsp. stoechas and Lavandula viridis l'Hér. are three lavender taxa that belong to the botanical section Stoechas and are widely used as aromatherapy, culinary herb or folk medicine in many Mediterranean regions. The analysis of their bioactive volatile constituents revealed the presence of 124 substances, the most abundant being the bicyclic monoterpenes fenchone, camphor and 1,8-cineole that give these three species their respective chemotypes. Most noteworthy was fenchone which, with its reduced form fenchol, made 48% of the total volatile constituents of L. pedunculata while present at 2.9% in L. stoechas and undetectable in L. viridis. In order to provide a molecular explanation to the differences in volatile compounds of these three species, two monoterpene synthases (monoTPS) and one sesquiterpene synthase (sesquiTPS) were cloned in L. pedunculata and functionally characterized as fenchol synthase (LpFENS), α-pinene synthase (LpPINS) and germacrene A synthase (LpGEAS). The two other lavender species contained a single orthologous gene for each of these three classes of TPS with similar enzyme product specificities. Expression profiles of FENS and PINS genes matched the accumulation profile of the enzyme products unlike GEAS. This study provides one of the rare documented cases of chemotype modification during plant speciation via changes in the level of plant TPS gene expression, and not functionality.

  18. The effectiveness of lavender essence on strernotomy related pain intensity after coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Heidari Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Ashrastaghi, Om Golsum; Habibi, Valiollah; Charati, Jamshid Yazdani; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Ayasi, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the side effects of pharmacological methods, there has been a suggestion to use nonpharmacological methods such Aromatherapy following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of lavender 2% aromatherapy on sternotomy pain intensity after coronary artery bypass graft surgery in patients who have undergone surgery. Materials and Methods: During this clinical trial, 50 patients who were candidates for CABG, were randomly divided into two equal groups, that is, the control group (n = 25) and the case group (n = 25). Following CABG, the case group received two drops of 2% lavender oil every 15 minutes with supplemental oxygen and the control group received only supplemental oxygen through a face mask. The data collection tools comprised of the demographic check list and visual analog scale (VAS) for evaluating the pain intensity. The pain intensity were assessed pre- and five, 30, and 60 minutes post aromatherapy. The final data were analyzed by the t-test and chi-squared test. Results: The findings showed that the pain perception intensity in the case group was lower than that in the control group at the 30- and 60-minute phases after intervention (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The result indicated that aromatherapy can be used as a complementary method in postoperative pain reduction, as it reduced pain. The patients require two sedative drugs, and moreover, it avoids expenses of treatment. PMID:26261829

  19. Olfactory stimulatory with grapefruit and lavender oils change autonomic nerve activity and physiological function.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuya; Niijima, Akira; Horii, Yuko; Shen, Jiao; Tanida, Mamoru

    2014-10-01

    This review summarizes the effects of olfactory stimulation with grapefruit and lavender oils on autonomic nerve activity and physiological function. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of grapefruit oil (GFO) increases the activity of sympathetic nerves that innervate white and brown adipose tissues, the adrenal glands, and the kidneys, decreases the activity of the gastric vagal nerve in rats and mice. This results in an increase in lipolysis, thermogenesis, and blood pressure, and a decrease in food intake. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of lavender oil (LVO) elicits the opposite changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. Olfactory stimulation with scent of limonene, a component of GFO, and linalool, a component of LVO, has similar effects to stimulation with GFO and LVO, respectively. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist, diphenhydramine, abolishes all GFO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables, and the hitstamine H3-receptor antagonist, thioperamide, eliminates all LVO-induced changes. Lesions to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and anosmic treatment with ZnSO4 also abolish all GFO- and LVO-induced changes. These findings indicate that limonene and linalool might be the active substances in GFO and LVO, and suggest that the suprachiasmatic nucleus and histamine are involved in mediating the GFO- and LVO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables.

  20. The effects of lavender and rosemary essential oils on test-taking anxiety among graduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Ruth; Thomas, Debra J; Kinzelman, Ann Orth

    2009-01-01

    Test taking in nursing school can produce stress that affects the ability of students to realize their goals of graduation. In this study, the use of lavender and rosemary essential oil sachets reduced test-taking stress in graduate nursing students as evidenced by lower scores on test anxiety measure, personal statements, and pulse rates. PMID:19258850

  1. Essential oils and distilled straws of lavender and lavandin: a review of current use and potential application in white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lesage-Meessen, Laurence; Bou, Marine; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude; Faulds, Craig B; Lomascolo, Anne

    2015-04-01

    The Lavandula genus, which includes lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lavandin (L. angustifolia × Lavandula latifolia), is cultivated worldwide for its essential oils, which find applications in perfumes, cosmetics, food processing and, more recently, in aromatherapy products. The chemical composition of lavender and lavandin essential oils, usually produced by steam distillation from the flowering stems, is characterized by the presence of terpenes (e.g. linalool and linalyl acetate) and terpenoids (e.g. 1,8-cineole), which are mainly responsible for their characteristic flavour and their biological and therapeutic properties. Lavender and lavandin distilled straws, the by-products of oil extraction, were traditionally used for soil replenishment or converted to a fuel source. They are mineral- and carbon-rich plant residues and, therefore, a cheap, readily available source of valuable substances of industrial interest, especially aroma and antioxidants (e.g. terpenoids, lactones and phenolic compounds including coumarin, herniarin, α-bisabolol, rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids). Accordingly, recent studies have emphasized the possible uses of lavender and lavandin straws in fermentative or enzymatic processes involving various microorganisms, especially filamentous fungi, for the production of antimicrobials, antioxidants and other bioproducts with pharmaceutical and cosmetic activities, opening up new challenging perspectives in white biotechnology applications. PMID:25761625

  2. Essential oils and distilled straws of lavender and lavandin: a review of current use and potential application in white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lesage-Meessen, Laurence; Bou, Marine; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude; Faulds, Craig B; Lomascolo, Anne

    2015-04-01

    The Lavandula genus, which includes lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lavandin (L. angustifolia × Lavandula latifolia), is cultivated worldwide for its essential oils, which find applications in perfumes, cosmetics, food processing and, more recently, in aromatherapy products. The chemical composition of lavender and lavandin essential oils, usually produced by steam distillation from the flowering stems, is characterized by the presence of terpenes (e.g. linalool and linalyl acetate) and terpenoids (e.g. 1,8-cineole), which are mainly responsible for their characteristic flavour and their biological and therapeutic properties. Lavender and lavandin distilled straws, the by-products of oil extraction, were traditionally used for soil replenishment or converted to a fuel source. They are mineral- and carbon-rich plant residues and, therefore, a cheap, readily available source of valuable substances of industrial interest, especially aroma and antioxidants (e.g. terpenoids, lactones and phenolic compounds including coumarin, herniarin, α-bisabolol, rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids). Accordingly, recent studies have emphasized the possible uses of lavender and lavandin straws in fermentative or enzymatic processes involving various microorganisms, especially filamentous fungi, for the production of antimicrobials, antioxidants and other bioproducts with pharmaceutical and cosmetic activities, opening up new challenging perspectives in white biotechnology applications.

  3. Effect of Inhaled Lavender and Sleep Hygiene on Self-Reported Sleep Issues: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lillehei, Angela Smith; Savik, Kay; Reis, Reilly

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and sleep hygiene versus sleep hygiene alone on sleep quantity and sleep quality and to determine sustained effect at two-week follow-up. Design: A randomized controlled trial with investigator blinding and steps taken to blind the participants. Setting: Participants' usual sleep setting. Subjects: Seventy-nine college students with self-reported sleep issues. Interventions: The intervention took place over five nights with baseline, postintervention, and two-week follow-up assessments. Both groups practiced good sleep hygiene and wore an inhalation patch on their chest at night. One group wore a patch with 55 μl of lavender essential oil and the other group wore a blank patch. Outcome measures: Sleep quantity was measured using a Fitbit® tracker and a sleep diary, and sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) sleep disturbance short form. Results: The lavender and sleep hygiene group demonstrated better sleep quality at postintervention and two-week follow-up (PSQI p=0 .01, <0.001 and PROMIS p=0.04, 0.007, respectively). The sleep-hygiene-only group also demonstrated better sleep quality but to a lesser extent (PSQI p=0.02, 0.06 and PROMIS p=0.03, 0.03, respectively). Additionally, a clinical effect was found for the lavender group at postintervention, along with a significant finding for waking feeling refreshed (p=0.01). Sleep quantity did not differ between groups. Conclusions: Lavender and sleep hygiene together, and sleep hygiene alone to a lesser degree, improved sleep quality for college students with self-reported sleep issues, with an effect remaining at follow-up. PMID:26133206

  4. Effect of lavender essence inhalation on the level of anxiety and blood cortisol in candidates for open-heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, SeyedAbedin; Heydari, Alemeh; Vakili, MohammadAli; Moghadam, Shahram; Tazyky, SadeghAli

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery, as a treatment, is a stressful experience. The anxiety is more severe in open-heart surgery patients due to its risk and complications. The present study aimed to determine the effect of lavender essence on the levels of anxiety and blood cortisol in candidates for open-heart surgery. Materials and Methods: This was a single-blind clinical trial, a random allocation study with a control group conducted on 90 candidates for open-heart surgery in two groups of study and control. The study and control groups inhaled two drops of lavender and distilled water for 20 min, respectively. Spielberger questionnaire was filled by the patients. A 2 ml blood sample was taken to measure the cortisol level and patients’ vital signs were recorded before and after intervention. Data were analyzed by chi-square in the form of mean, SD, and frequency distribution, independent t-test, paired t-test, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), with a significance level of P = 0.05 to modify the pre-test scores. Results: Results showed a significant reduction in mean anxiety score from 56.73 (5.67) to 54.73 (5.42) after intervention in the study group, compared to the control group [1.11 (1.17)] (P < 0.001). There was also a higher difference in cortisol level in the study group compared to the control group [1.88 (0.56) vs. 0.42 (0.45)]. ANCOVA test showed that the 10.8% variance in anxiety score and 69.6% decrease in blood cortisol resulted from inhalation of lavender. Conclusions: Results showed the positive effect of lavender essence on anxiety and blood cortisol level among the patients. Aromatherapy with lavender is suggested to be considered as a nursing intervention in clinical settings. PMID:27563324

  5. Harnessing the potential to quantify public preferences for healthcare priorities through citizens’ juries

    PubMed Central

    Whitty, Jennifer A; Burton, Paul; Kendall, Elizabeth; Ratcliffe, Julie; Wilson, Andrew; Littlejohns, Peter; Scuffham, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress towards greater public engagement, questions about the optimal approach to access public preferences remain unanswered. We review two increasingly popular methods for engaging the public in healthcare priority-setting and determining their preferences; the Citizens’ Jury (CJ) and Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE). We discuss the theoretical framework from which each method is derived, its application in healthcare, and critique the information it can provide for decision-makers. We conclude that combining deliberation of an informed public via CJs and quantification of preferences using DCE methods, whilst it remains to be tested as an approach to engaging the public in priority-setting, could potentially achieve much richer information than the application of either method in isolation PMID:25114943

  6. N.C. Supreme Court upholds exclusion of HIV in jury selection.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The North Carolina Supreme Court sustained the first-degree murder conviction of a defendant found guilty of the murder and mutilation of an HIV-positive gay man. The defense counsel asked for a new trial because the county judge, who convicted the defendant but disagreed with the death penalty recommendation made by the prosecution, prevented the defense from questioning potential jurors about their attitudes towards AIDS. The judge also denied the prosecutors' request to have evidence of the victim's homosexuality and HIV status excluded from the trial. However, the judge did bar questioning of prospective jurors about their attitudes towards AIDS, unless a potential juror raised the issue during jury selection process. The Supreme Court ruled that the defense failed to prove that the county judge's decision had any impact on the trial's outcome.

  7. Probability of criminal acts of violence: a test of jury predictive accuracy.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Thomas J; Sorensen, Jon R; Cunningham, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The ability of capital juries to accurately predict future prison violence at the sentencing phase of aggravated murder trials was examined through retrospective review of the disciplinary records of 115 male inmates sentenced to either life (n = 65) or death (n = 50) in Oregon from 1985 through 2008, with a mean post-conviction time at risk of 15.3 years. Violent prison behavior was completely unrelated to predictions made by capital jurors, with bidirectional accuracy simply reflecting the base rate of assaultive misconduct in the group. Rejection of the special issue predicting future violence enjoyed 90% accuracy. Conversely, predictions that future violence was probable had 90% error rates. More than 90% of the assaultive rule violations committed by these offenders resulted in no harm or only minor injuries.

  8. Probability of criminal acts of violence: a test of jury predictive accuracy.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Thomas J; Sorensen, Jon R; Cunningham, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The ability of capital juries to accurately predict future prison violence at the sentencing phase of aggravated murder trials was examined through retrospective review of the disciplinary records of 115 male inmates sentenced to either life (n = 65) or death (n = 50) in Oregon from 1985 through 2008, with a mean post-conviction time at risk of 15.3 years. Violent prison behavior was completely unrelated to predictions made by capital jurors, with bidirectional accuracy simply reflecting the base rate of assaultive misconduct in the group. Rejection of the special issue predicting future violence enjoyed 90% accuracy. Conversely, predictions that future violence was probable had 90% error rates. More than 90% of the assaultive rule violations committed by these offenders resulted in no harm or only minor injuries. PMID:23613146

  9. Involving a Citizens’ Jury in Decisions on Individual Screening for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mosconi, Paola; Colombo, Cinzia; Satolli, Roberto; Carzaniga, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Aims Most public health agencies and learned societies agree that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test in asymptomatic men should not be recommended, on account of its potential for harm. Yet PSA is still widely used as a screening test and is not being abandoned. This remains a significant public health issue, and citizens’ engagement is needed. This study was designed to produce a deliberation on the PSA screening test by a citizens’ jury. Methods Fifteen citizens were selected and balanced for sex, age, and education. They received an information booklet and participated in a two-day meeting with experts to reach a deliberation on the question “Should the National Health Service discourage or recommend PSA as an individual screening test for prostate cancer in men 55–69 years old?”. A facilitator ran the jurors’ discussion. Results All except three of the jurors decided that the National Health Service should discourage the use of PSA as an individual screening test for prostate cancer in 55–69 year-old men. The jury was particularly convinced by the uncertainty of the test outcomes, the utility of the test, and its cost/benefit ratio. Before the meeting 60% of jurors would have recommended the test to a relative, and all the male jurors would have done so. After the meeting these percentages fell to 15% and 12%. Conclusions This experience confirms the feasibility and effectiveness of delegating to a group of citizens the responsibility to decide on public health issues on behalf of the community. Public health authorities should invest in information campaigns aimed at the public and in educational initiatives for physicians. This also provided an opportunity to disseminate information on screening, over-diagnosis, and over-treatment. PMID:26751212

  10. Effectiveness of the essential oils lavender and ginger in promoting children's comfort in a perianesthesia setting.

    PubMed

    Nord, DeeAnn; Belew, John

    2009-10-01

    This randomized, controlled, blinded study examined the effectiveness of an aromatherapy intervention on the reduction of children's distress in a perianesthesia setting. The sample included children with and without developmental disabilities (n = 94). Subjects in the intervention group received an aromatherapy intervention of lavender and ginger essential oils. The control group received a placebo intervention of jojoba oil. Distress was measured at two times: before induction and in the PACU, using the Faces, Legs, Arms, Cry and Consolability (FLACC) scale. The mean distress level was lower for the children in the essential oil group, but the effect was not statistically significant (P = .055). Parents' responses to survey questions about satisfaction with aromatherapy did not differ between groups, although open-ended comments indicated a more positive opinion of the benefits of the intervention in the aromatherapy group.

  11. Inhaled Lavender Effect on Anxiety and Pain Caused From Intrauterine Device Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Nikjoo, Roya; Yavarikia, Parisa; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Intrauterine device (IUD) is the most common reliable, effective and reversible contraceptive method used worldwide and in areas with high growth rate is of particular importance. IUD insertion is associated with high anxiety in most people that causes pain and discomfort. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of aromatherapy on anxiety and pain caused by IUD insertion. Methods: This study was conducted on 106 women in a health care center located in Ardebil, Iran. Participants were divided into two groups by randomized blocks of 4 and 6. In the experimental group lavender scent was inhaled and in the control group the placebo was inhaled 30 minutes before IUD insertion. The anxiety of the participants was measured by Spielberger questionnaire, and the pain of IUD insertion was measured immediately after the insertion using visual analog scale (range 0-10). Results: The mean score (standard deviation) of anxiety before intervention was 43.2 (9.2) in the experimental group that decreased after intervention to 39.0 (10.5) (p < 0.001), while this score was 42.2 (9.0) and 41.5 (8.4) before and after the intervention in the control group (p = 0.21). Mean differences of anxiety in both groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The pain score after intervention did not show significant difference between two groups (p = 0.51). Conclusion: Aromatherapy with lavender inhalation was effective in decreasing anxiety in IUD procedure, and this method can be used in health care centers as complementary treatments. PMID:25276703

  12. [Effect of cinnamon and lavender oils on FtsZ gene expression in the Staphylococus aureus ATCC 29213].

    PubMed

    Herman, A; Bochenek, J; Herman, A P

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of lavender and cinnamon oils on FtsZ gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213. The cinnamon and lavender oils at least partially results from the inhibition of FtsZ transcription and disruption of cell division process at the level of the septum synthesis, what is similar to mechanisms of drug action used in anti-staphylococcal therapies. The presented results could be an important background for the further detailed research, which is needed to clarify the effect of essential oils on FtsZ synthesis at the posttranscriptional level and other stages of cell division process of S. aureus and other pathogenic bacteria.

  13. The effect of cold application and lavender oil inhalation in cardiac surgery patients undergoing chest tube removal.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Farzaneh; Kashouk, Narges Mohammadi; Amini, Shahram; Asili, Javad; Emami, Seyed Ahmad; Vashani, Hamidreza Behnam; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Post-surgical chest tube removal (CTR) is associated with a significant pain and discomfort for patients. Current treatment strategies for reducing CTR-associated pain and anxiety are limited and partially efficacious. To determine the effects of cold application, inhalation of lavender essential oil, and their combination on pain and anxiety during CTR was investigated. This randomized controlled open-label trial was conducted with 80 patients in the cardiac surgery intensive care unit who had a chest tube for duration of at least 24 hours after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Patients were randomized (n=20 in each group) to receive cold application, aromatherapy with lavender oil, cold application in combination with lavender oil inhalation, or none of the above interventions (control group). The intensity and quality of pain and anxiety were evaluated using the visual analogue scale, short form and modified-McGill pain questionnaire (SFM-MPQ) and the Spielberger situational anxiety level inventory (STAII) scale, respectively. Patients in all treatment groups had significantly lower pain intensity and anxiety compared with the control group immediately, 5, 10 and 15 min after CTR. There was no statistically significant difference in the SFM-MPQ total scores between the intervention groups. With respect to anxiety score, there was a significantly reduced anxiety level immediately after CTR in the aromatherapy and cold-aromatherapy combination groups versus the cold application group. The present results suggested the efficacy of cold application and aromatherapy with lavender oil in reducing pain and anxiety associated with post-CABG CTR. PMID:27047319

  14. The effect of cold application and lavender oil inhalation in cardiac surgery patients undergoing chest tube removal

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzadeh, Farzaneh; Kashouk, Narges Mohammadi; Amini, Shahram; Asili, Javad; Emami, Seyed Ahmad; Vashani, Hamidreza Behnam; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Post-surgical chest tube removal (CTR) is associated with a significant pain and discomfort for patients. Current treatment strategies for reducing CTR-associated pain and anxiety are limited and partially efficacious. To determine the effects of cold application, inhalation of lavender essential oil, and their combination on pain and anxiety during CTR was investigated. This randomized controlled open-label trial was conducted with 80 patients in the cardiac surgery intensive care unit who had a chest tube for duration of at least 24 hours after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Patients were randomized (n=20 in each group) to receive cold application, aromatherapy with lavender oil, cold application in combination with lavender oil inhalation, or none of the above interventions (control group). The intensity and quality of pain and anxiety were evaluated using the visual analogue scale, short form and modified-McGill pain questionnaire (SFM-MPQ) and the Spielberger situational anxiety level inventory (STAII) scale, respectively. Patients in all treatment groups had significantly lower pain intensity and anxiety compared with the control group immediately, 5, 10 and 15 min after CTR. There was no statistically significant difference in the SFM-MPQ total scores between the intervention groups. With respect to anxiety score, there was a significantly reduced anxiety level immediately after CTR in the aromatherapy and cold-aromatherapy combination groups versus the cold application group. The present results suggested the efficacy of cold application and aromatherapy with lavender oil in reducing pain and anxiety associated with post-CABG CTR. PMID:27047319

  15. The effect of cold application and lavender oil inhalation in cardiac surgery patients undergoing chest tube removal.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Farzaneh; Kashouk, Narges Mohammadi; Amini, Shahram; Asili, Javad; Emami, Seyed Ahmad; Vashani, Hamidreza Behnam; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Post-surgical chest tube removal (CTR) is associated with a significant pain and discomfort for patients. Current treatment strategies for reducing CTR-associated pain and anxiety are limited and partially efficacious. To determine the effects of cold application, inhalation of lavender essential oil, and their combination on pain and anxiety during CTR was investigated. This randomized controlled open-label trial was conducted with 80 patients in the cardiac surgery intensive care unit who had a chest tube for duration of at least 24 hours after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Patients were randomized (n=20 in each group) to receive cold application, aromatherapy with lavender oil, cold application in combination with lavender oil inhalation, or none of the above interventions (control group). The intensity and quality of pain and anxiety were evaluated using the visual analogue scale, short form and modified-McGill pain questionnaire (SFM-MPQ) and the Spielberger situational anxiety level inventory (STAII) scale, respectively. Patients in all treatment groups had significantly lower pain intensity and anxiety compared with the control group immediately, 5, 10 and 15 min after CTR. There was no statistically significant difference in the SFM-MPQ total scores between the intervention groups. With respect to anxiety score, there was a significantly reduced anxiety level immediately after CTR in the aromatherapy and cold-aromatherapy combination groups versus the cold application group. The present results suggested the efficacy of cold application and aromatherapy with lavender oil in reducing pain and anxiety associated with post-CABG CTR.

  16. Effect of Lavender Cream with or without Foot-bath on Anxiety, Stress and Depression in Pregnancy: a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Effati-Daryani, Fatemeh; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Psychological disorders are associated with maternal and neonatal morbidities. We aimed to evaluate the effect of Lavender cream with or without foot-bath on depression, anxiety and stress of pregnant women. Methods: In this trial, 141 women at 25 to 28 weeks gestation were randomly assigned into three groups (47 at each group); receiving Lavender cream with foot-bath, only Lavender cream, or placebo, 2g every night for two months. Depression, anxiety and stress were assessed at baseline, and 4th and 8th weeks after intervention, using DASS-21. General linear model was used to compare the groups. Results: There were three losses to follow-up at the 4th and one more at the 8th week. Scores of all three outcomes in both Lavender and foot-bath and only Lavender groups were significantly lower than those in the placebo group at the 8th week; adjusted difference of depression score -3.3, 95% confidence interval -4.6 to -1.9;-2.4, -3.7 to -1.0, respectively, anxiety score -1.4, -2.6 to -0.2; -1.7,-2.9 to -0.5 and stress score -3.1, -4.7 to -1.5; -2.7, -4.3 to -1.1. At the 4th week, only score of anxiety in the lavender group (-2.3, -3.9 to -0.8) and stress in the both groups (-2.3, -4.1 to -0.5; -1.9, -3.7 to -0.1) were significantly less than those in the placebo group. There were not statistically significant differences between the two experimental groups in terms of the outcomes. Conclusion: Lavender cream with foot-bath or alone can be used for pregnant women for reducing their stress, anxiety and depression PMID:25821760

  17. Save the last dance for me: unwanted serial position effects in jury evaluations.

    PubMed

    Bruine de Bruin, Wändi

    2005-03-01

    Whenever competing options are considered in sequence, their evaluations may be affected by order of appearance. Such serial position effects would threaten the fairness of competitions using jury evaluations. Randomization cannot reduce potential order effects, but it does give candidates an equal chance of being assigned to preferred serial positions. Whether, or what, serial position effects emerge may depend on the cognitive demands of the judgment task. In end-of-sequence procedures, final scores are not given until all candidates have performed, possibly burdening judges' memory. If judges' evaluations are based on how well they remember performances, serial position effects may resemble those found with free recall. Candidates may also be evaluated step-by-step, immediately after each performance. This procedure should not burden memory, though it may produce different serial position effects. Yet, this paper reports similar serial position effects with end-of-sequence and step-by-step procedures used for the Eurovision Song Contest: Ratings increased with serial position. The linear order effect was replicated in the step-by-step judgments of World and European Figure Skating Contests. It is proposed that, independent of the evaluation procedure, judges' initial impressions of sequentially appearing candidates may be formed step-by-step, yielding serial position effects.

  18. Life and death in the Lone Star State: three decades of violence predictions by capital juries.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mark D; Sorensen, Jon R; Vigen, Mark P; Woods, S O

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of three decades of Texas jury predictions of future violence by capital defendants was tested through retrospective review of the disciplinary records of former death row (FDR) inmates in Texas (N = 111) who had been sentenced to death under this "special issue" and subsequently obtained relief from their death sentences between 1989 and 2008. FDR inmates typically had extended tenures on death row (M = 9.9 years) and post-relief in the general prison population (M = 8.4 years). FDR prevalence of serious assault was low, both on death row (3.6%) and upon entering the prison population (4.5%). None of the assaults resulted in life-threatening injuries to the victims. Violence among the FDR inmates was not disproportionate compared with life-sentenced capital offenders. Consistent with other research, juror expectations of serious prison violence by these offenders had high error (i.e., false positive) rates. The confidence of legislators and courts in the violence prediction capabilities of capital jurors is misplaced.

  19. A randomized, controlled cross-over trial of dermally-applied lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) oil as a treatment of agitated behaviour in dementia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lavender essential oil shows evidence of sedative properties in neurophysiological and animal studies but clinical trials of its effectiveness as a treatment of agitation in people with dementia have shown mixed results. Study methods have varied widely, however, making comparisons hazardous. To help remedy previous methodological shortcomings, we delivered high grade lavender oil in specified amounts to nursing home residents whose agitated behaviours were recorded objectively. Methods 64 nursing home residents with frequent physically agitated behaviours were entered into a randomized, single-blind cross-over trial of dermally-applied, neurophysiologically active, high purity 30% lavender oil versus an inactive control oil. A blinded observer counted the presence or absence of target behaviours and rated participants’ predominant affect during each minute for 30 minutes prior to exposure and for 60 minutes afterwards. Results Lavender oil did not prove superior to the control oil in reducing the frequency of physically agitated behaviours or in improving participants’ affect. Conclusions Studies of essential oils are constrained by their variable formulations and uncertain pharmacokinetics and so optimal dosing and delivery regimens remain speculative. Notwithstanding this, topically delivered, high strength, pure lavender oil had no discernible effect on affect and behaviour in a well-defined clinical sample. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN 12609000569202) PMID:24219098

  20. Lavender, tea tree and lemon oils as antimicrobials in washing liquids and soft body balms.

    PubMed

    Kunicka-Styczyńska, A; Sikora, M; Kalemba, D

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of commercial essential oils: lavender, tea tree and lemon, antimicrobials in washing liquid and O/W soft body balm. The inhibition efficacy of essential oils in washing liquid (1% alone or in mixtures), in soft body balm (0.5% alone), as well as combined with the synthetic preservative DMDM hydantoin and 3-iodo-2-propynyl butyl carbamate mixture (0.1 and 0.3%), was tested against S. aureus ATCC 6538, P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Candida sp. ŁOCK 0008 and A. niger ATCC 16404 in compliance with the European Pharmacopoeia standards. The components of the system preserving soft body balm were supplemented with a solubilizer. Washing liquids containing only essential oils met Criterion A E.P. only for S. aureus, Candida sp. and A. niger. In soft body balm formulations, oils at a concentration of 0.5% did not reveal any preserving activity. The introduction of a solubilizer to a system containing 0.5% tea tree oil led to a substantial increase in the bacteriostatic activity of the formulation, but did not significantly affect its fungistatic properties. A combination of 0.5% tea tree oil, 5% solubilizer and 0.3% synthetic preservative ensured the microbiological stability of soft body balm in accordance with Criterion A E.P. PMID:20572887

  1. Hair Growth-Promoting Effects of Lavender Oil in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boo Hyeong; Lee, Jae Soon; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hair growth effects of lavender oil (LO) in female C57BL/6 mice. The experimental animals were divided into a normal group (N: saline), a vehicle control group (VC: jojoba oil), a positive control group (PC: 3% minoxidil), experimental group 1 (E1: 3% LO), and experimental group 2 (E2: 5% LO). Test compound solutions were topically applied to the backs of the mice (100 μL per application), once per day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks. The changes in hair follicle number, dermal thickness, and hair follicle depth were observed in skin tissues stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the number of mast cells was measured in the dermal and hypodermal layers stained with toluidine blue. PC, E1, and E2 groups showed a significantly increased number of hair follicles, deepened hair follicle depth, and thickened dermal layer, along with a significantly decreased number of mast cells compared to the N group. These results indicated that LO has a marked hair growth-promoting effect, as observed morphologically and histologically. There was no significant difference in the weight of the thymus among the groups. However, both absolute and relative weights of the spleen were significantly higher in the PC group than in the N, VC, E1, or E2 group at week 4. Thus, LO could be practically applied as a hair growth-promoting agent. PMID:27123160

  2. Hair Growth-Promoting Effects of Lavender Oil in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boo Hyeong; Lee, Jae Soon; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hair growth effects of lavender oil (LO) in female C57BL/6 mice. The experimental animals were divided into a normal group (N: saline), a vehicle control group (VC: jojoba oil), a positive control group (PC: 3% minoxidil), experimental group 1 (E1: 3% LO), and experimental group 2 (E2: 5% LO). Test compound solutions were topically applied to the backs of the mice (100 μL per application), once per day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks. The changes in hair follicle number, dermal thickness, and hair follicle depth were observed in skin tissues stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the number of mast cells was measured in the dermal and hypodermal layers stained with toluidine blue. PC, E1, and E2 groups showed a significantly increased number of hair follicles, deepened hair follicle depth, and thickened dermal layer, along with a significantly decreased number of mast cells compared to the N group. These results indicated that LO has a marked hair growth-promoting effect, as observed morphologically and histologically. There was no significant difference in the weight of the thymus among the groups. However, both absolute and relative weights of the spleen were significantly higher in the PC group than in the N, VC, E1, or E2 group at week 4. Thus, LO could be practically applied as a hair growth-promoting agent.

  3. Hair Growth-Promoting Effects of Lavender Oil in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boo Hyeong; Lee, Jae Soon; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hair growth effects of lavender oil (LO) in female C57BL/6 mice. The experimental animals were divided into a normal group (N: saline), a vehicle control group (VC: jojoba oil), a positive control group (PC: 3% minoxidil), experimental group 1 (E1: 3% LO), and experimental group 2 (E2: 5% LO). Test compound solutions were topically applied to the backs of the mice (100 μL per application), once per day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks. The changes in hair follicle number, dermal thickness, and hair follicle depth were observed in skin tissues stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the number of mast cells was measured in the dermal and hypodermal layers stained with toluidine blue. PC, E1, and E2 groups showed a significantly increased number of hair follicles, deepened hair follicle depth, and thickened dermal layer, along with a significantly decreased number of mast cells compared to the N group. These results indicated that LO has a marked hair growth-promoting effect, as observed morphologically and histologically. There was no significant difference in the weight of the thymus among the groups. However, both absolute and relative weights of the spleen were significantly higher in the PC group than in the N, VC, E1, or E2 group at week 4. Thus, LO could be practically applied as a hair growth-promoting agent. PMID:27123160

  4. Lavender, tea tree and lemon oils as antimicrobials in washing liquids and soft body balms.

    PubMed

    Kunicka-Styczyńska, A; Sikora, M; Kalemba, D

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of commercial essential oils: lavender, tea tree and lemon, antimicrobials in washing liquid and O/W soft body balm. The inhibition efficacy of essential oils in washing liquid (1% alone or in mixtures), in soft body balm (0.5% alone), as well as combined with the synthetic preservative DMDM hydantoin and 3-iodo-2-propynyl butyl carbamate mixture (0.1 and 0.3%), was tested against S. aureus ATCC 6538, P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Candida sp. ŁOCK 0008 and A. niger ATCC 16404 in compliance with the European Pharmacopoeia standards. The components of the system preserving soft body balm were supplemented with a solubilizer. Washing liquids containing only essential oils met Criterion A E.P. only for S. aureus, Candida sp. and A. niger. In soft body balm formulations, oils at a concentration of 0.5% did not reveal any preserving activity. The introduction of a solubilizer to a system containing 0.5% tea tree oil led to a substantial increase in the bacteriostatic activity of the formulation, but did not significantly affect its fungistatic properties. A combination of 0.5% tea tree oil, 5% solubilizer and 0.3% synthetic preservative ensured the microbiological stability of soft body balm in accordance with Criterion A E.P.

  5. The Effect of Massage With Lavender Oil on Restless Leg Syndrome in Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Sayyed Hossein; Hajbagheri, Ali; Aghajani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure. It can reduce the quality of life and sleep disturbances. This disorder is usually treated pharmacologically. Recently, complementary medicine methods have been suggested because of chemical drugs adverse effects. There is not enough evidence about the effect of aromatherapy on RLS. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of massage with lavender oil on RLS symptoms in hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical trial study included 70 hemodialysis patients with RLS that were randomly assigned into two groups in 2014. The experimental group received effleurage massage using lavender oil and control group received routine care for three weeks. Data was collected with RLS questionnaire and analyzed using independent and paired t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The mean RLS scores were not significantly different in the two groups at the start of study (22.41 ± 7.67 vs. 22.90 ± 4.38, P = 0.76). At the end of study, the mean RLS score significantly decreased in the intervention group, while this score remained relatively un-changed in the control group (12.41 ± 5.49 vs. 23.23 ± 4.52, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Lavender oil massage was effective to improve RLS in hemodialysis patients. It has no adverse effects, is practical and cost-effective. It is suggested to be used along with routine treatment of RLS in hemodialysis patients. PMID:26835466

  6. Measuring Sexual Victimization: On What Fronts is the Jury Still Out and Do We Need it to Come In?

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christopher

    2014-01-30

    Rennison and Addington use National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) data to document the fact that college women experience violent victimization at a lower rate than women of the same age who do not attend college, which refutes the idea that women in college are at increased risk of being victimized. The measurement of victimization, especially sexual victimization, is, however, a topic that has be the source of much debate. Bureau of Justice Statistics is currently exploring what are the best methods for measuring sexual victimization within the NCVS, and recent methodological research, which is summarized in this article, could inform this process. Although consensus has seemingly been forming around come methods, such as using self-administered survey instruments and behaviorally specific questions when trying to measure sexual victimization, the jury is still out on some other design fronts. What is not clear is whether we need the jury to come in, so to speak. Some methodological variation might be acceptable, especially if the various methods being considered are producing similar results.

  7. Use of a Classroom Jury Trial To Increase Student Perception of Science as Part of Their Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marjorie A.

    1997-05-01

    The concept of a jury trial in the classroom setting was used to present and discuss a current, controversial topic, the drug mifepristone (RU486). This drug is used as an abortion inducing agent although it has other clinical uses. The major goal was for students to see that science is a very important part of their lives. The class project involved discussions of the scientific, sociological, moral, ethical, religious, legal, as well as financial aspects of a real trial which involved a major science issue. Students were involved in role playing which included obtaining information and then participating in the mock trial. Student roles in this activity were as judges, defendant, jury, witnesses, lawyers, and court reporters. This four week project involved both verbal and written participation. Grades were based on both their oral and written on this project. The students found this a very interesting activity as evidenced by their enthusiasm. This class activity could be adapted to a variety of timely topics.

  8. The study protocol of a blinded randomised-controlled cross-over trial of lavender oil as a treatment of behavioural symptoms in dementia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The agitated behaviours that accompany dementia (e.g. pacing, aggression, calling out) are stressful to both nursing home residents and their carers and are difficult to treat. Increasingly more attention is being paid to alternative interventions that are associated with fewer risks than pharmacology. Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) has been thought, for centuries, to have soothing properties, but the existing evidence is limited and shows mixed results. The aim of the current study is to test the effectiveness of topically applied pure lavender oil in reducing actual counts of challenging behaviours in nursing home residents. Methods/Design We will use a blinded repeated measures design with random cross-over between lavender oil and placebo oil. Persons with moderate to severe dementia and associated behavioural problems living in aged care facilities will be included in the study. Consented, willing participants will be assigned in random order to lavender or placebo blocks for one week then switched to the other condition for the following week. In each week the oils will be applied on three days with at least a two-day wash out period between conditions. Trained observers will note presence of target behaviours and predominant type of affect displayed during the 30 minutes before and the 60 minutes after application of the oil. Nursing staff will apply 1 ml of 30% high strength essential lavender oil to reduce the risk of missing a true effect through under-dosing. The placebo will comprise of jojoba oil only. The oils will be identical in appearance and texture, but can easily be identified by smell. For blinding purposes, all staff involved in applying the oil or observing the resident will apply a masking cream containing a mixture of lavender and other essential oils to their upper lip. In addition, nursing staff will wear a nose clip during the few minutes it takes to massage the oil to the resident's forearms. Discussion If our results show

  9. Lavender Fragrance Essential Oil and the Quality of Sleep in Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarz Afshar, Mahnaz; Behboodi Moghadam, Zahra; Taghizadeh, Ziba; Bekhradi, Reza; Montazeri, Ali; Mokhtari, Pouran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Labor and delivery is a stressful stage for mothers. During these periods, sleep-related disorders have been reported. The problems of inadequate sleep include decrease in concentration, judgment, difficulty in performing daily activities, and an increase in irritability. Even the effects of moderate sleep loss on life and health quality can be similar to sleep deprivation. some research aggravated by aromatherapy on sleep quality in different periods of life so might be useful for the improve of sleep quality in postpartum women. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of aromatherapy on the quality of sleep in postpartum women. The sample was recruited from medical health centers of Zanjan University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial with the control group. A total of 158 mothers in postpartum period (with certain inclusion criteria) were enrolled in the study and assigned randomly to two groups of control and intervention. Lavender fragrance (made by Barij Essence Pharmaceutical Co.) was used by participants in the intervention group nightly before sleeping. The fragrance was dropped on cotton balls, which were placed on a cylindrical container at mothers’ disposal. Keeping the container at a projected distance of 20 cm, the participants inhaled 10 deep breaths and then the container was placed beside their pillow until morning. This procedure was done 4 times a week for 8 weeks. For the control group, the same intervention was done with the placebo. The instrument for collecting data was Pittsburgh sleep quality index, which was completed at the baseline, fourth, and eighth weeks after the intervention. Data were analyzed using independent t test and repeated measures analysis of variance calculated by SPSS16. Results: Before the intervention, there were no significant differences between mothers in two groups (P > 0.05). After 8 weeks follow up, a significant improvement appeared in

  10. Antioxidant capacity and total phenolic contents of oregano (Origanum vulgare), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) from Romania.

    PubMed

    Spiridon, Iuliana; Colceru, Svetlana; Anghel, Narcis; Teaca, Carmen Alice; Bodirlau, Ruxanda; Armatu, Alice

    2011-10-01

    The study reported here presents a comparative screening of three medicinal plants including oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) having the same geographical origin, the Southeast region of Romania, and growing in the same natural conditions. The contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids for the extracts of these were determined. Furthermore, the total antioxidant capacity was also evaluated. It was found that Origanum vulgare and Melissa officinalis extracts present the most effective antioxidant capacity in scavenging DPPH radicals, while Lavandula angustifolia is less active. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify the components of extracts. Major phenolic acids identified in the analysed species were ferulic, rosmarinic, p-coumaric and caffeic, while predominant flavonoids were quercetin, apigenin kaempherol, which were present as glucosides. PMID:21707233

  11. Herbicidal activity of volatiles from coriander, winter savory, cotton lavender, and thyme isolated by hydrodistillation and supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Clara; Coelho, José A; Urieta, José S; Palavra, António M F; Barroso, José G

    2010-10-27

    The volatiles from Coriandrum sativum L., Satureja montana L., Santolina chamaecyparissus L., and Thymus vulgaris L. were isolated by hydrodistillation (essential oil) and supercritical fluid extraction (volatile oil). Their effect on seed germination and root and shoot growth of the surviving seedlings of four crops ( Zea mays L., Triticum durum L., Pisum sativum L., and Lactuca sativa L.) and two weeds ( Portulaca oleracea L. and Vicia sativa L.) was investigated and compared with those of two synthetic herbicides, Agrocide and Prowl. The volatile oils of thyme and cotton lavender seemed to be promising alternatives to the synthetic herbicides because they were the least injurious to the crop species. The essential oil of winter savory, on the other hand, affected both crop and weeds and can be appropriate for uncultivated fields.

  12. Antioxidant capacity and total phenolic contents of oregano (Origanum vulgare), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) from Romania.

    PubMed

    Spiridon, Iuliana; Colceru, Svetlana; Anghel, Narcis; Teaca, Carmen Alice; Bodirlau, Ruxanda; Armatu, Alice

    2011-10-01

    The study reported here presents a comparative screening of three medicinal plants including oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) having the same geographical origin, the Southeast region of Romania, and growing in the same natural conditions. The contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids for the extracts of these were determined. Furthermore, the total antioxidant capacity was also evaluated. It was found that Origanum vulgare and Melissa officinalis extracts present the most effective antioxidant capacity in scavenging DPPH radicals, while Lavandula angustifolia is less active. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify the components of extracts. Major phenolic acids identified in the analysed species were ferulic, rosmarinic, p-coumaric and caffeic, while predominant flavonoids were quercetin, apigenin kaempherol, which were present as glucosides.

  13. All care, but whose responsibility? Community juries reason about expert and patient responsibilities in prostate-specific antigen screening for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Chris; Carter, Stacy M; Rychetnik, Lucie

    2016-09-01

    General practitioners have implicitly been given responsibility for guiding men's decisions about prostate-specific antigen-based screening for prostate cancer, but patients' expectations of the bounds of this responsibility remain unclear. We sought to explore how well-informed members of the public allocate responsibilities in prostate-specific antigen screening decision-making. In 2014, we convened two Community juries in Sydney, Australia, to address questions related to the content and timing of information provision and respective roles of patients and general practitioners in screening decisions. Participants in the first jury were of mixed gender and of all ages (n = 15); the participants in the second jury were all male and of screening age (n = 12). Both juries were presented with balanced factual evidence on the harms and benefits of prostate-specific antigen screening and expert perspectives on ethico-legal aspects of consent in medical practice. In their deliberations, jurors agreed that general practitioners should take responsibility for informing men of the options, risks and benefits of prostate-specific antigen testing, but arrived at different positions on whether or not general practitioners should also guide screening decisions. Jurors also disagreed on how much and when general practitioners should provide detailed information about biopsies and treatments. These responses suggest that for prostate-specific antigen testing, there is a public expectation that both the allocation of responsibility between general practitioners and their male patients, and the level of information provided will be tailored to individual men. In the presence of expert uncertainty, a well-informed public may have reason to embrace or resist shared decision-making processes. PMID:27491944

  14. The Marching-Jury Backward Beam Equation and Quasi-Reversibility Inverse Methods for Contaminant Plume Spatial Distribution Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmadja, J.; Bagtzoglou, A. C.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a comparison between the Marching-Jury Backward Beam Equation (MJBBE) and the Quasi-Reversibility (QR) methods to reconstruct conservative contaminant plume spatial distributions is presented. The MJBBE, developed by Atmadja and Bagtzoglou [2001], was used to recover contaminant spatial distributions in heterogeneous porous media, while the QR method, first applied to groundwater contamination problems by Skaggs and Kabala [1995], was modified to incorporate heterogeneity and explicitly handle the advective term of the transport equation. Spatially uncorrelated and correlated, stationary and non-stationary, heterogeneous dispersion coefficient fields were generated using the Bayesian Nearest Neighbor Method (B-NNM). Homogeneous and deterministically heterogeneous cases are also presented for comparison. In addition, contaminant plume initial data with uncertainty were also analyzed using the MJBBE and QR methods. The MJBBE is found to be robust enough to handle highly heterogeneous parameters and is able to preserve the salient features of the initial input data. On the other hand, the QR method is superior in handling cases with homogeneous parameters and with initial data that are plagued by uncertainty but it performs very poorly in cases with heterogeneous media.

  15. Elimination of chromatographic and mass spectrometric problems in GC-MS analysis of Lavender essential oil by multivariate curve resolution techniques: Improving the peak purity assessment by variable size moving window-evolving factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Moazeni-Pourasil, Roudabeh Sadat; Sereshti, Hassan

    2015-03-01

    In analysis of complex natural matrices by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), many disturbing factors such as baseline drift, spectral background, homoscedastic and heteroscedastic noise, peak shape deformation (non-Gaussian peaks), low S/N ratio and co-elution (overlapped and/or embedded peaks) lead the researchers to handle them to serve time, money and experimental efforts. This study aimed to improve the GC-MS analysis of complex natural matrices utilizing multivariate curve resolution (MCR) methods. In addition, to assess the peak purity of the two-dimensional data, a method called variable size moving window-evolving factor analysis (VSMW-EFA) is introduced and examined. The proposed methodology was applied to the GC-MS analysis of Iranian Lavender essential oil, which resulted in extending the number of identified constituents from 56 to 143 components. It was found that the most abundant constituents of the Iranian Lavender essential oil are α-pinene (16.51%), camphor (10.20%), 1,8-cineole (9.50%), bornyl acetate (8.11%) and camphene (6.50%). This indicates that the Iranian type Lavender contains a relatively high percentage of α-pinene. Comparison of different types of Lavender essential oils showed the composition similarity between Iranian and Italian (Sardinia Island) Lavenders. PMID:25621436

  16. The lavender plumage colour in Japanese quail is associated with a complex mutation in the region of MLPH that is related to differences in growth, feed consumption and body temperature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The lavender phenotype in quail is a dilution of both eumelanin and phaeomelanin in feathers that produces a blue-grey colour on a wild-type feather pattern background. It has been previously demonstrated by intergeneric hybridization that the lavender mutation in quail is homologous to the same phenotype in chicken, which is caused by a single base-pair change in exon 1 of MLPH. Results In this study, we have shown that a mutation of MLPH is also associated with feather colour dilution in quail, but that the mutational event is extremely different. In this species, the lavender phenotype is associated with a non-lethal complex mutation involving three consecutive overlapping chromosomal changes (two inversions and one deletion) that have consequences on the genomic organization of four genes (MLPH and the neighbouring PRLH, RAB17 and LRRFIP1). The deletion of PRLH has no effect on the level of circulating prolactin. Lavender birds have lighter body weight, lower body temperature and increased feed consumption and residual feed intake than wild-type plumage quail, indicating that this complex mutation is affecting the metabolism and the regulation of homeothermy. Conclusions An extensive overlapping chromosome rearrangement was associated with a non-pathological Mendelian trait and minor, non deleterious effects in the lavender Japanese quail which is a natural knockout for PRLH. PMID:22937744

  17. Complex coacervation of collagen hydrolysate extracted from leather solid wastes and chitosan for controlled release of lavender oil.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Buğra

    2012-06-15

    In the world, approximately 600,000 metric tonnes of chromium-containing solid wastes are generated by the leather industry each year. Environmental concerns and escalating landfill costs are becoming increasingly serious problems to the leather industry and seeking solutions to these problems is a prime concern in much research today. In this study, solid collagen-based protein hydrolysate was isolated from chromium-tanned leather wastes and its chemical properties were determined. Microcapsules of collagen hydrolysate (CH) - chitosan (C) crosslinked with glutaraldehyde (GA) containing Lavender oil (LO) were prepared by complex coacervation method. The effects of various processing parameters, including the CH to C ratio, LO content, and GA, on the oil load (%), oil content (%), encapsulation efficiency (%) and release rate of LO from microcapsules were investigated. As the ratio of C present in the CH/C mixture and crosslinking density increased, the release rate of LO from microcapsules slowed down. Optical and scanning electron microscopy images illustrated that the LO microcapsules were spherical in shape. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies confirmed that there was no significant interaction between CH/C complex and LO.

  18. Enhanced levels of S-linalool by metabolic engineering of the terpenoid pathway in spike lavender leaves.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Navarro, Alicia; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2014-05-01

    Transgenic Lavandula latifolia plants overexpressing the linalool synthase (LIS) gene from Clarkia breweri, encoding the LIS enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of linalool were generated. Most of these plants increased significantly their linalool content as compared to controls, especially in the youngest leaves, where a linalool increase up to a 1000% was observed. The phenotype of increased linalool content observed in young leaves was maintained in those T1 progenies that inherit the LIS transgene, although this phenotype was less evident in the flower essential oil. Cross-pollination of transgenic spike lavender plants allowed the generation of double transgenic plants containing the DXS (1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-P synthase), coding for the first enzyme of the methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway, and LIS genes. Both essential oil yield and linalool content in double DXS-LIS transgenic plants were lower than that of their parentals, which could be due to co-suppression effects linked to the structures of the constructs used.

  19. A multi-center, double-blind, randomised study of the Lavender oil preparation Silexan in comparison to Lorazepam for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Woelk, H; Schläfke, S

    2010-02-01

    Generalized and persistent anxiety, accompanied by nervousness and other symptoms (Generalised Anxiety Disorder, GAD) is frequent in the general population and leads to benzodiazepine usage. Unfortunately, these substances induce sedation and have a high potential for drug abuse, and there is thus a need for alternatives. As the anxiolytic properties of lavender have already been demonstrated in pharmacological studies and small-scale clinical trials, it was postulated that lavender has a positive effect in GAD. A controlled clinical study was then performed to evaluate the efficacy of silexan, a new oral lavender oil capsule preparation, versus a benzodiazepine. In this study, the efficacy of a 6-week-intake of silexan compared to lorazepam was investigated in adults with GAD. The primary target variable was the change in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A-total score) as an objective measurement of the severity of anxiety between baseline and week 6. The results suggest that silexan effectively ameliorates generalized anxiety comparable to a common benzodiazepine (lorazepam). The mean of the HAM-A-total score decreased clearly and to a similar extent in both groups (by 11.3+/-6.7 points (45%) in the silexan group and by 11.6+/-6.6 points (46%) in the lorazepam group, from 25+/-4 points at baseline in both groups). During the active treatment period, the two HAM-A subscores "somatic anxiety" (HAM-A subscore I) and "psychic anxiety" (HAM-A subscore II) also decreased clearly and to a similar extent in both groups. The changes in other subscores measured during the study, such as the SAS (Self-rating Anxiety Scale), PSWQ-PW (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), SF 36 Health survey Questionnaire and Clinical Global Impressions of severity of disorder (CGI item 1, CGI item 2, CGI item 3), and the results of the sleep diary demonstrated comparable positive effects of the two compounds. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that silexan is as effective as lorazepam

  20. The effect of lavender essential oil on anxiety level in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery: A double-blinded randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Zahra; Beikmoradi, Ali; Oshvandi, Khodayar; Poorolajal, Jalal; Araghchian, Malihe; Safiaryan, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Open heart surgery can cause high levels of anxiety in patients. Nowadays, lavender essential oil is widely used in medical research. This study was conducted with an aim to investigate the effects of lavender essential oil to reduce the anxiety of patients after coronary artery bypass surgery. Materials and Methods: This research is double-blinded randomized controlled trial on 60 patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery in a 2-day intervention targeting reduction of anxiety. This study was conducted in Ekbatan Therapeutic and Educational Center, Hamadan city, Iran, in 2013. The patients in the inhalation aromatherapy group inhaled two drops of 2% lavender essential oil and those in the control group inhaled two drops of distilled water as placebo for 20 min on the 2nd and 3rd days after surgery. The level of anxiety was evaluated by Spielberger's State Anxiety questionnaire before and after intervention and the vital signs were documented as well. Data were analyzed using Stata 11 (Stata Corp., College Station, TX, USA) by independent t-test for continuous variables and Chi-square test for categorical variables. Results: The mean score of anxiety in the aromatherapy group was 48.73 ± 5.08 and in the control group was 48 ± 6.98 before the intervention (P = 0.64), which reduced after the intervention to 42.6 ± 5.44 and 42.73 ± 7.30, respectively. On the 3rd day after surgery, the mean score of anxiety in the aromatherapy group was 46.76 ± 4.07 and in the control group was 46.53 ± 7.05 before the intervention, which reduced to 41.33 ± 3.65 and 41.56 ± 6.18, respectively, after the intervention. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the mean scores of anxiety between the aromatherapy and control groups. Conclusions: Lavender essential oil has no significant effect on anxiety in patients after coronary artery bypass surgery, although it decreased the level of anxiety in the patients. PMID:25558253

  1. Whole-Genome SNP Association in the Horse: Identification of a Deletion in Myosin Va Responsible for Lavender Foal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Samantha A.; Gabreski, Nicole; Miller, Donald; Brisbin, Abra; Brown, Helen E.; Streeter, Cassandra; Mezey, Jason; Cook, Deborah; Antczak, Douglas F.

    2010-01-01

    Lavender Foal Syndrome (LFS) is a lethal inherited disease of horses with a suspected autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. LFS has been primarily diagnosed in a subgroup of the Arabian breed, the Egyptian Arabian horse. The condition is characterized by multiple neurological abnormalities and a dilute coat color. Candidate genes based on comparative phenotypes in mice and humans include the ras-associated protein RAB27a (RAB27A) and myosin Va (MYO5A). Here we report mapping of the locus responsible for LFS using a small set of 36 horses segregating for LFS. These horses were genotyped using a newly available single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip containing 56,402 discriminatory elements. The whole genome scan identified an associated region containing these two functional candidate genes. Exon sequencing of the MYO5A gene from an affected foal revealed a single base deletion in exon 30 that changes the reading frame and introduces a premature stop codon. A PCR–based Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) assay was designed and used to investigate the frequency of the mutant gene. All affected horses tested were homozygous for this mutation. Heterozygous carriers were detected in high frequency in families segregating for this trait, and the frequency of carriers in unrelated Egyptian Arabians was 10.3%. The mapping and discovery of the LFS mutation represents the first successful use of whole-genome SNP scanning in the horse for any trait. The RFLP assay can be used to assist breeders in avoiding carrier-to-carrier matings and thus in preventing the birth of affected foals. PMID:20419149

  2. Effects of lozenge containing lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemon balm and oat on electrical brain activity of volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dimpfel, W; Pischel, I; Lehnfeld, R

    2004-09-29

    Within a randomized double blind, placebo controlled trial the electrical activity of the human brain has been monitored using charge mode technology (Laplacian estimates) after exposure to a lozenge containing 4 different herbal preparations (lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemon balm and oat) or a matching placebo without any active ingredients. Sixteen healthy volunteers (8 males and 8 females) were tested within a crossover design. After baseline recording each subject sucked a lozenge and 2 hours later a second one. Recording was performed immediately after finishing the lozenge and in hourly intervals thereafter. Comparison to reference periods of 10 min eyes open and 5 min eyes closed, respectively, revealed increases in alpha 1, alpha 2 and beta 1 electrical power at the electrode positions Cz, P3, T3 and T5 which were even more pronounced after a second application two hours later. Since alpha 1 changes repeatedly have been attributed to attentional states, increases of this electrical activity must be seen as indicator of a relaxational psychophysiological state. Changes in the alpha2 frequencies have been related to working memory indicating that an increase can be seen as a correlate for attenuating this circuit. Increases of beta1 activity have been seen in the presence of anxiolytic drugs including major and minor tranquilizers. The changes as observed after the application of this herbal composition are therefore in line with the idea of having induced a state of relaxation and regeneration. This interpretation suggests that one could expect from the ingestion of this lozenge to better cope with psychological and emotional stress. The data are further proof that recording computer aided quantitative EEG is a very fruitful and promising approach in psychophysiology.

  3. Effects of lozenge containing lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemon balm and oat on electrical brain activity of volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dimpfel, W; Pischel, I; Lehnfeld, R

    2004-09-29

    Within a randomized double blind, placebo controlled trial the electrical activity of the human brain has been monitored using charge mode technology (Laplacian estimates) after exposure to a lozenge containing 4 different herbal preparations (lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemon balm and oat) or a matching placebo without any active ingredients. Sixteen healthy volunteers (8 males and 8 females) were tested within a crossover design. After baseline recording each subject sucked a lozenge and 2 hours later a second one. Recording was performed immediately after finishing the lozenge and in hourly intervals thereafter. Comparison to reference periods of 10 min eyes open and 5 min eyes closed, respectively, revealed increases in alpha 1, alpha 2 and beta 1 electrical power at the electrode positions Cz, P3, T3 and T5 which were even more pronounced after a second application two hours later. Since alpha 1 changes repeatedly have been attributed to attentional states, increases of this electrical activity must be seen as indicator of a relaxational psychophysiological state. Changes in the alpha2 frequencies have been related to working memory indicating that an increase can be seen as a correlate for attenuating this circuit. Increases of beta1 activity have been seen in the presence of anxiolytic drugs including major and minor tranquilizers. The changes as observed after the application of this herbal composition are therefore in line with the idea of having induced a state of relaxation and regeneration. This interpretation suggests that one could expect from the ingestion of this lozenge to better cope with psychological and emotional stress. The data are further proof that recording computer aided quantitative EEG is a very fruitful and promising approach in psychophysiology. PMID:15546807

  4. The vapor activity of oregano, perilla, tea tree, lavender, clove, and geranium oils against a Trichophyton mentagrophytes in a closed box.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Shigeharu; Nishiyama, Yayoi; Uchida, Katsuhisa; Hasumi, Yayoi; Yamaguchi, Hideyo; Abe, Shigeru

    2006-12-01

    The vapor activity of six essential oils against a Trichophyton mentagrophytes was examined using a closed box. The antifungal activity was determined from colony size, which was correlated with the inoculum size. As judged from the minimum inhibitory dose and the minimum fungicidal dose determined after vapor exposure for 24 h, the vapor activity of the six essential oils was ranked in the following order: oregano > clove, perilla > geranium, lavender, tea tree. The vapors of oregano, perilla, tea tree, and lavender oils killed the mycelia by short exposure, for 3 h, but the vapors of clove and geranium oils were only active after overnight exposure. The vapor of oregano and other oils induced lysis of the mycelia. Morphological examination by scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that the cell membrane and cell wall were damaged in a dose- and time-dependent manner by the action of oregano vapor, causing rupture and peeling of the cell wall, with small bulges coming from the cell membrane. The vapor activity increased after 24 h, but mycelial accumulation of the active oil constituents was maximized around 15 h, and then decreased in parallel with the decrease of vapor concentration. This suggested that the active constituent accumulated on the fungal cells around 15 h caused irreversible damage, which eventually led to cellular death. PMID:17235639

  5. Repellency of oils of lemon eucalyptus, geranium, and lavender and the mosquito repellent MyggA natural to Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the laboratory and field.

    PubMed

    Jaenson, Thomas G T; Garboui, Samira; Palsson, Katinka

    2006-07-01

    MyggA Natural (Bioglan, Lund, Sweden) is a commercially available repellent against blood-feeding arthropods. It contains 30% of lemon-scented eucalyptus, Corymbia citriodora (Hook.) K. D. Hill & L. A. S. Johnson (Myrtaceae), oil with a minimum of 50% p-menthane-3,8-diol. MyggA Natural also contains small amounts of the essential oils of lavender, Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (Lamiaceae), and geranium, Pelargonium graveolens L'Her. (Geraniaceae). In laboratory bioassays, MyggA Natural and C. citriodora oil exhibited 100% repellency against host-seeking nymphs of Ixodes ricinus (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae). Lavender oil and geranium oil, when diluted to 1% in 1,2-propanediol, had weak repellent activities on I. ricinus nymphs, but when diluted to 30% in 1,2-propanediol had 100% repellencies. 1,2-Propanediol (100%) had no significant repellent activity in comparison with that of the control. In field tests in tick-infested areas in central Sweden, tick repellency of MyggA Natural and C. citriodora oil was tested by the blanket-dragging technique for 4 d during a 6-d period. The repellencies (74 and 85%, respectively) on day 1 are similar (89%) to that of blankets treated in a similar manner with 19% diethyl-methyl-benzamide, based on previous work. Repellencies declined significantly from day 1 to day 6 (74 to 45% for MyggA Natural; 85 to 42% for C. citriodora oil). PMID:16892632

  6. Influence of spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia Med.) essential oil in the quality, stability and composition of soybean oil during microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Nuno; Malheiro, Ricardo; Casal, Susana; Asensio-S-Manzanera, M Carmen; Bento, Albino; Pereira, José Alberto

    2012-08-01

    Lipids oxidation is one of the main factors leading to quality losses in foods. Its prevention or delay could be obtained by the addition of antioxidants. In this sense the present work intend to monitor the protective effects of Lavandula latifolia essential oil during soybean oil microwave heating. To achieve the proposed goal quality parameters (free acidity, peroxide value, specific coefficients of extinction and ΔK), fatty acids profile, tocopherols and tocotrienols composition, antioxidant activity and oxidative stability were evaluated in soybean oil with and without spike lavender essential oils (EO) submitted to different microwave heating exposure times (1, 3, 5, 10 and 15 min; 1000 Watt) with a standard domestic microwave equipment. Microwave heating induced severe quality and composition losses, mainly above 3 min of microwave heating, regardless the sample tested. However, spike lavender EO addition counteracts the oxidation comparatively to control oils, by presenting enhanced values in quality parameters. A higher protection in unsaturated fatty acids loss was also observed as well as a higher antioxidant activity and oxidative stability. The microwave heating effects were clearly different in the samples with essential oils addition, allowing discrimination from plain soybean oils by a principal component analysis, being also capable to discriminate the different heating times tested within each sample.

  7. [Psychiatry and criminology in Criminal Justice: Jury Trial Courts and Appellate Courts in the Federal District of Rio de Janeiro, during the 1930s].

    PubMed

    Dias, Allister Andrew Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    As part of a research study on the 1930s and 1940s medical-criminological debate in Brazil, this research paper analyzes some of the uses and criticisms of arguments of a psychiatric and criminological nature, among certain jurists who carried out important work in the city of Rio de Janeiro during the 1930s. In this context, these magistrates, tended to have significant psychiatric and criminological knowledge, in spite of all the heterogeneity, plurality and differences in perspectives that existed among them. We selected two principal areas to conduct an analysis of the activities of these jurists: the Appellate Court of the Federal District of Rio de Janeiro and Jury Trial Courts.

  8. Chemical compositions and antibacterial effects of essential oils of Turkish oregano (Origanum minutiflorum), bay laurel (Laurus nobilis), Spanish lavender (Lavandula stoechas L.), and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) on common foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Dadalioglu, Itir; Evrendilek, Gulsun Akdemir

    2004-12-29

    Chemical compositions and inhibitory effects of essential oils of Turkish oregano (Origanum minutiflorum O. Schwarz & P. H. Davis), bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.), Spanish lavender (Lavandula stoechas subsp. stoechas L.), and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) on Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus were determined. After the essential oils were applied on the foodborne pathogens at doses of 0 (control), 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 80 microL/mL, the resultant numbers of cells surviving were counted. Results revealed that all essential oils exhibited a very strong antibacterial activity against the tested bacteria (P < 0.05). Gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry analyses revealed that carvacrol (68.23%), 1,8-cineole (60.72%), fenchone (55.79%), and trans-anethole (85.63%) were the predominant constituents in Turkish oregano, bay laurel, Spanish lavender, and fennel essential oils, respectively.

  9. Jury panel member perceptions of interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy predict support for execution in a capital murder trial simulation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer; Clark, John C; Edens, John F; Smith, Shannon Toney; Magyar, Melissa S

    2013-01-01

    Recent research with college undergraduate mock jurors suggests that how psychopathic they perceive a criminal defendant to be is a powerful predictor of whether they will support a death verdict in simulated capital murder trials. Perceived affective and interpersonal traits of psychopathy are especially predictive of support for capital punishment, with perceived remorselessness explaining a disproportionate amount of variance in these attitudes. The present study attempted to extend these findings with a more representative sample of community members called for jury duty (N = 304). Jurors reviewed a case vignette based on an actual capital murder trial, provided sentencing verdicts, and rated the defendant on several characteristics historically associated with the construct of psychopathy. Consistent with prior findings, remorselessness predicted death verdicts, as did the affective and interpersonal features of psychopathy - though the latter effect was more pronounced among jurors who were Caucasian and/or who described their political beliefs as moderate rather than conservative or liberal. Results are discussed in terms of the potentially stigmatizing effects of psychopathy evidence in capital cases.

  10. Marching-jury backward beam equation and quasi-reversibility methods for hydrologic inversion: Application to contaminant plume spatial distribution recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Atmadja, Juliana

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, a comparison between the marching-jury backward beam equation (MJBBE) and the quasi-reversibility (QR) methods to perform hydrologic inversion and, more specifically, to reconstruct conservative contaminant plume spatial distributions is presented. The MJBBE, developed by Atmadja and Bagtzoglou [2000, 2001a], was used to recover contaminant spatial distributions in heterogeneous porous media, while the QR method, first applied to groundwater contamination problems by Skaggs and Kabala [1995], was modified to incorporate heterogeneity and explicitly handle the advective term of the transport equation. Spatially uncorrelated and correlated, stationary and nonstationary, heterogeneous dispersion coefficient fields were generated using the Bayesian nearest neighbor method (BNNM). Homogeneous and deterministically heterogeneous cases are also presented for comparison. In addition, contaminant plume initial data with uncertainty were also analyzed using the MJBBE and QR methods. The MJBBE is found to be robust enough to handle highly heterogeneous parameters and is able to preserve the salient features of the initial input data. On the other hand, the QR method is superior in handling cases with homogeneous parameters and with initial data that are plagued by uncertainty but it performs very poorly in cases with heterogeneous media.

  11. Trial by jury; a pilot study of juror perception of mental health professional testimony in NGRI pleas for first degree international homicide.

    PubMed

    Palermo, G B; Smith, M B; Gram, L C; Zier, W; Kohler, M E

    1996-01-01

    The authors present a pilot statistical study of the way in which jurors perceived psychiatric/psychological expert testimony in ten court trials for first degree intentional homicide in which a plea of not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect had been entered. The reader is offered a short history of the insanity defense, of the trial by jury, and a discussion of the desired professional and personality prerequisites looked for in choosing a mental health expert. The study is based on a detailed protocol devised by two of the authors--a forensic psychiatrist and a psychologist--assessing various parameters of the professionality and demeanor of the experts on the basis of a statistically valid number of juror responses to the questionnaire. The results show that the jurors perceived the expert testimony as a useful, but not determinant factor when reaching their verdict. This is consonant with the definition of the rationale for using expert testimony as given by the Federal Rules of Evidence.

  12. Jury panel member perceptions of interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy predict support for execution in a capital murder trial simulation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer; Clark, John C; Edens, John F; Smith, Shannon Toney; Magyar, Melissa S

    2013-01-01

    Recent research with college undergraduate mock jurors suggests that how psychopathic they perceive a criminal defendant to be is a powerful predictor of whether they will support a death verdict in simulated capital murder trials. Perceived affective and interpersonal traits of psychopathy are especially predictive of support for capital punishment, with perceived remorselessness explaining a disproportionate amount of variance in these attitudes. The present study attempted to extend these findings with a more representative sample of community members called for jury duty (N = 304). Jurors reviewed a case vignette based on an actual capital murder trial, provided sentencing verdicts, and rated the defendant on several characteristics historically associated with the construct of psychopathy. Consistent with prior findings, remorselessness predicted death verdicts, as did the affective and interpersonal features of psychopathy - though the latter effect was more pronounced among jurors who were Caucasian and/or who described their political beliefs as moderate rather than conservative or liberal. Results are discussed in terms of the potentially stigmatizing effects of psychopathy evidence in capital cases. PMID:23754472

  13. Unraveling the rat blood genome-wide transcriptome after oral administration of lavender oil by a two-color dye-swap DNA microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Hori, Motohide; Kubo, Hiroko; Shibato, Junko; Saito, Tomomi; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Wakamori, Minoru; Masuo, Yoshinori; Shioda, Seiji; Rakwal, Randeep

    2016-06-01

    Lavender oil (LO) is a commonly used essential oil in aromatherapy as non-traditional medicine. With an aim to demonstrate LO effects on the body, we have recently established an animal model investigating the influence of orally administered LO in rat tissues, genome-wide. In this brief, we investigate the effect of LO ingestion in the blood of rat. Rats were administered LO at usual therapeutic dose (5 mg/kg) in humans, and following collection of the venous blood from the heart and extraction of total RNA, the differentially expressed genes were screened using a 4 × 44-K whole-genome rat chip (Agilent microarray platform; Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA, USA) in conjunction with a two-color dye-swap approach. A total of 834 differentially expressed genes in the blood were identified: 362 up-regulated and 472 down-regulated. These genes were functionally categorized using bioinformatics tools. The gene expression inventory of rat blood transcriptome under LO, a first report, has been deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GSE67499. The data will be a valuable resource in examining the effects of natural products, and which could also serve as a human model for further functional analysis and investigation. PMID:27330992

  14. Differential accumulation of volatile terpene and terpene synthase mRNAs during lavender (Lavandula angustifolia and L. x intermedia) inflorescence development.

    PubMed

    Guitton, Yann; Nicolè, Florence; Moja, Sandrine; Valot, Nadine; Legrand, Sylvain; Jullien, Frédéric; Legendre, Laurent

    2010-02-01

    Despite the commercial importance of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. and L. x intermedia Emeric ex Loisel floral essential oils (EOs), no information is currently available on potential changes in individual volatile organic compound (VOC) content during inflorescence development. Calyces were found to be the main sites of VOC accumulation. The 20 most abundant VOCs could be separated into three sub-groups according to their patterns of change in concentration The three groups of VOCs sequentially dominated the global scent bouquet of inflorescences, the transition between the first and second groups occurring around the opening of the first flower of the inflorescence and the one between the second and third groups at the start of seed set. Changes in calyx VOC accumulation were linked to the developmental stage of individual flowers. Leaves accumulated a smaller number of VOCs which were a subset of those seen in preflowering inflorescences. Their nature and content remained constant during the growing season. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assessments of the expression of two terpene synthase (TPS) genes, LaLIMS and LaLINS, revealed similar trends between their patterns of expression and those of their VOC products. Molecular and chemical analyses suggest that changes in TPS expression occur during lavender inflorescence development and lead to changes in EO composition. Both molecular data and terpene analysis support the findings that changes in biosynthesis of terpene occurred during inflorescence development.

  15. Unraveling the rat blood genome-wide transcriptome after oral administration of lavender oil by a two-color dye-swap DNA microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Hori, Motohide; Kubo, Hiroko; Shibato, Junko; Saito, Tomomi; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Wakamori, Minoru; Masuo, Yoshinori; Shioda, Seiji; Rakwal, Randeep

    2016-06-01

    Lavender oil (LO) is a commonly used essential oil in aromatherapy as non-traditional medicine. With an aim to demonstrate LO effects on the body, we have recently established an animal model investigating the influence of orally administered LO in rat tissues, genome-wide. In this brief, we investigate the effect of LO ingestion in the blood of rat. Rats were administered LO at usual therapeutic dose (5 mg/kg) in humans, and following collection of the venous blood from the heart and extraction of total RNA, the differentially expressed genes were screened using a 4 × 44-K whole-genome rat chip (Agilent microarray platform; Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA, USA) in conjunction with a two-color dye-swap approach. A total of 834 differentially expressed genes in the blood were identified: 362 up-regulated and 472 down-regulated. These genes were functionally categorized using bioinformatics tools. The gene expression inventory of rat blood transcriptome under LO, a first report, has been deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GSE67499. The data will be a valuable resource in examining the effects of natural products, and which could also serve as a human model for further functional analysis and investigation.

  16. Olestra? The Jury's Still Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-04-01

    Although it has been more than a year since the FDA approved the use of olestra in certain foods, this fat substitute, a mixture of sucrose polyesters, is still controversial. It would seem that a fat substitute that is heat stable and has an acceptable flavor and texture would be welcomed enthusiastically in a country where increasing numbers of people, young and old, exceed their ideal body weight. Obesity and diets containing high levels of fat have been linked to numerous health problems, including cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancer, and adult-onset diabetes; they may also exacerbate some chronic problems such as arthritis in joints of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some scientists and consumer groups question olestra's safety and usefulness.

  17. Einstein's Jury: Trial by Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crelinsten, Jeffrey

    2007-03-01

    While Einstein's theory of relativity ultimately laid the foundation for modern studies of the universe, it took a long time to be accepted. Between 1905 and 1930, relativity was poorly understood and Einstein worked hard to try to make it more accessible to scientists and scientifically literate laypeople. Its acceptance was largely due to the astronomy community, which undertook precise measurements to test Einstein's astronomical predictions. The well-known 1919 British eclipse expeditions that made Einstein famous did not convince most scientists to accept relativity. The 1920s saw numerous attempts to measure light-bending, as well as solar line displacements and even ether-drift. How astronomers approached the ``Einstein problem'' in these early years before and after the First World War, and how the public reacted to what they reported, helped to shape attitudes we hold today about Einstein and his ideas.

  18. Lavender oil preparation Silexan is effective in generalized anxiety disorder--a randomized, double-blind comparison to placebo and paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried; Gastpar, Markus; Müller, Walter E; Volz, Hans-Peter; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Schläfke, Sandra; Dienel, Angelika

    2014-06-01

    The anxiolytic efficacy of the orally administered lavender oil preparation Silexan was investigated in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in comparison to placebo and paroxetine. In this randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial 539 adults with GAD according to DSM-5 criteria and a Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) total score ⩾ 18 points participated and received 160 or 80 mg Silexan, 20 mg paroxetine, or placebo once daily for 10 wk. The primary efficacy endpoint was the HAMA total score reduction between baseline and treatment end. The HAMA total score decreased by 14.1 ± 9.3 points for Silexan 160 mg/d, 12.8 ± 8.7 points for Silexan 80 mg/d, 11.3 ± 8.0 points for paroxetine, and 9.5 ± 9.0 points for placebo (mean ± s.d.). Silexan 160 and 80 mg/d were superior to placebo in reducing the HAMA total score (p < 0.01) whereas paroxetine showed a trend towards significance (p = 0.10) in the full analysis set. The difference between paroxetine and placebo was more pronounced in the analysis of observed cases (HAMA total score reduction: p < 0.01). In the Silexan 160 mg/d group 73/121 patients (60.3%) showed a HAMA total score reduction ⩾ 50% of the baseline value and 56 (46.3%) had a total score <10 points at treatment end, compared to 70/135 (51.9%) and 45 (33.3%) for Silexan 80 mg/d, 57/132 (43.2%) and 45 (34.1%) for paroxetine, and 51/135 (37.8%) and 40 (29.6%) for placebo. In addition, Silexan showed a pronounced antidepressant effect and improved general mental health and health-related quality of life. Incidence densities of adverse events (AEs) were 0.006 AEs/d for Silexan 160 mg/d, 0.008 AEs/d for 80 mg/d, 0.011 AEs/d for paroxetine, and 0.008 AEs/d for placebo. In GAD Silexan is more efficacious than placebo. AE rates for Silexan were comparable to placebo and lower than for the active control paroxetine.

  19. Unraveling the Rat Intestine, Spleen and Liver Genome-Wide Transcriptome after the Oral Administration of Lavender Oil by a Two-Color Dye-Swap DNA Microarray Approach.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hiroko; Shibato, Junko; Saito, Tomomi; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The use of lavender oil (LO)--a commonly, used oil in aromatherapy, with well-defined volatile components linalool and linalyl acetate--in non-traditional medicine is increasing globally. To understand and demonstrate the potential positive effects of LO on the body, we have established an animal model in this current study, investigating the orally administered LO effects genome wide in the rat small intestine, spleen, and liver. The rats were administered LO at 5 mg/kg (usual therapeutic dose in humans) followed by the screening of differentially expressed genes in the tissues, using a 4×44-K whole-genome rat chip (Agilent microarray platform; Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA, USA) in conjunction with a dye-swap approach, a novelty of this study. Fourteen days after LO treatment and compared with a control group (sham), a total of 156 and 154 up (≧ 1.5-fold)- and down (≦ 0.75-fold)-regulated genes, 174 and 66 up- (≧ 1.5-fold)- and down (≦ 0.75-fold)-regulated genes, and 222 and 322 up- (≧ 1.5-fold)- and down (≦ 0.75-fold)-regulated genes showed differential expression at the mRNA level in the small intestine, spleen and liver, respectively. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validation of highly up- and down-regulated genes confirmed the regulation of the Papd4, Lrp1b, Alb, Cyr61, Cyp2c, and Cxcl1 genes by LO as examples in these tissues. Using bioinformatics, including Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes were functionally categorized by their Gene Ontology (GO) and biological function and network analysis, revealing their diverse functions and potential roles in LO-mediated effects in rat. Further IPA analysis in particular unraveled the presence of novel genes, such as Papd4, Or8k5, Gprc5b, Taar5, Trpc6, Pld2 and Onecut3 (up-regulated top molecules) and Tnf, Slc45a4, Slc25a23 and Samt4 (down-regulated top molecules), to be influenced by LO treatment in the small intestine, spleen and liver

  20. Unraveling the Rat Intestine, Spleen and Liver Genome-Wide Transcriptome after the Oral Administration of Lavender Oil by a Two-Color Dye-Swap DNA Microarray Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Hiroko; Shibato, Junko; Saito, Tomomi; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The use of lavender oil (LO) – a commonly, used oil in aromatherapy, with well-defined volatile components linalool and linalyl acetate – in non-traditional medicine is increasing globally. To understand and demonstrate the potential positive effects of LO on the body, we have established an animal model in this current study, investigating the orally administered LO effects genome wide in the rat small intestine, spleen, and liver. The rats were administered LO at 5 mg/kg (usual therapeutic dose in humans) followed by the screening of differentially expressed genes in the tissues, using a 4×44-K whole-genome rat chip (Agilent microarray platform; Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA, USA) in conjunction with a dye-swap approach, a novelty of this study. Fourteen days after LO treatment and compared with a control group (sham), a total of 156 and 154 up (≧ 1.5-fold)- and down (≦ 0.75-fold)-regulated genes, 174 and 66 up- (≧ 1.5-fold)- and down (≦ 0.75-fold)-regulated genes, and 222 and 322 up- (≧ 1.5-fold)- and down (≦ 0.75-fold)-regulated genes showed differential expression at the mRNA level in the small intestine, spleen and liver, respectively. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validation of highly up- and down-regulated genes confirmed the regulation of the Papd4, Lrp1b, Alb, Cyr61, Cyp2c, and Cxcl1 genes by LO as examples in these tissues. Using bioinformatics, including Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes were functionally categorized by their Gene Ontology (GO) and biological function and network analysis, revealing their diverse functions and potential roles in LO-mediated effects in rat. Further IPA analysis in particular unraveled the presence of novel genes, such as Papd4, Or8k5, Gprc5b, Taar5, Trpc6, Pld2 and Onecut3 (up-regulated top molecules) and Tnf, Slc45a4, Slc25a23 and Samt4 (down-regulated top molecules), to be influenced by LO treatment in the small intestine, spleen and

  1. Unraveling the Rat Intestine, Spleen and Liver Genome-Wide Transcriptome after the Oral Administration of Lavender Oil by a Two-Color Dye-Swap DNA Microarray Approach.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hiroko; Shibato, Junko; Saito, Tomomi; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The use of lavender oil (LO)--a commonly, used oil in aromatherapy, with well-defined volatile components linalool and linalyl acetate--in non-traditional medicine is increasing globally. To understand and demonstrate the potential positive effects of LO on the body, we have established an animal model in this current study, investigating the orally administered LO effects genome wide in the rat small intestine, spleen, and liver. The rats were administered LO at 5 mg/kg (usual therapeutic dose in humans) followed by the screening of differentially expressed genes in the tissues, using a 4×44-K whole-genome rat chip (Agilent microarray platform; Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA, USA) in conjunction with a dye-swap approach, a novelty of this study. Fourteen days after LO treatment and compared with a control group (sham), a total of 156 and 154 up (≧ 1.5-fold)- and down (≦ 0.75-fold)-regulated genes, 174 and 66 up- (≧ 1.5-fold)- and down (≦ 0.75-fold)-regulated genes, and 222 and 322 up- (≧ 1.5-fold)- and down (≦ 0.75-fold)-regulated genes showed differential expression at the mRNA level in the small intestine, spleen and liver, respectively. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validation of highly up- and down-regulated genes confirmed the regulation of the Papd4, Lrp1b, Alb, Cyr61, Cyp2c, and Cxcl1 genes by LO as examples in these tissues. Using bioinformatics, including Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes were functionally categorized by their Gene Ontology (GO) and biological function and network analysis, revealing their diverse functions and potential roles in LO-mediated effects in rat. Further IPA analysis in particular unraveled the presence of novel genes, such as Papd4, Or8k5, Gprc5b, Taar5, Trpc6, Pld2 and Onecut3 (up-regulated top molecules) and Tnf, Slc45a4, Slc25a23 and Samt4 (down-regulated top molecules), to be influenced by LO treatment in the small intestine, spleen and liver

  2. [Copyright, Jury Selection, and Sexual Harassment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolowiec, Jack, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    "Update on the Courts," a resource for civic education, helps teach secondary school students about today's important Supreme Court and other judicial decisions, the legal issues involved, and the impact of the decisions on the students' lives. This issue features a lesson on copyright laws, a case overview and lesson on sexual harassment, and an…

  3. Meditation and epilepsy: a still hung jury.

    PubMed

    St Louis, Erik K; Lansky, Ephraim Philip

    2006-01-01

    Meditation has been advocated as a treatment for several medical problems, including epilepsy. Conversely, concern has been raised that meditation may aggravate or even precipitate epilepsy. We present a case of new onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in a young woman meditator lacking other apparent risk factors for epilepsy as a springboard for a balanced discussion concerning the potential relationship between meditation and epilepsy, and a criticism of the current literature in this field. Prospective clinical studies of meditators with video-electroencephalography and clinical trials of meditation in refractory epilepsy patients are needed to resolve current controversies concerning meditation and epilepsy.

  4. Einstein's Jury -The Race to Test Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crelinsten, Jeffrey

    2006-12-01

    It is common belief that Einstein’s general theory of relativity won worldwide acceptance after British astronomers announced in November 1919 that the sun’s gravitational field bends starlight by an amount predicted by Einstein. This paper demonstrates that the case for Einstein was not settled until much later and that there was considerable confusion and debate about relativity during this period. Most astronomers considered Einstein’s general theory too metaphysical and abstruse, and many tried to find more conventional explanations of the astronomical observations. Two American announcements before the British results appeared had been contrary to Einstein’s prediction. They came from Lick and Mt. Wilson observatories, which enjoyed international reputations as two of the most advanced astrophysical research establishments in the world. Astronomers at these renowned institutions were instrumental in swaying the court of scientific opinion during the decade of the 1920s, which saw numerous attempts to measure light-bending, as well as solar line displacements and even ether-drift. How astronomers approached the “Einstein problem” in these early years before and after the First World War, and how the public reacted to what they reported, helped to shape attitudes we hold today about Einstein and his ideas.

  5. Assessing Racial Attitudes in Jury Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Clara; Bromley, Stephanie

    This paper examines the current state of voir dire procedures (the process in which prospective jurors are questioned about possible prejudgment or bias) used to detect racial attitudes in court cases involving black defendants and compares voir dire questions allowed and disallowed by the court. Data based upon an assessment of racial attitudes…

  6. Trials by Juries: Suggested Practices for Database Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritterbush, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Librarians frequently utilize product trials to assess the content and usability of a database prior to committing funds to a new subscription or purchase. At the 2012 Electronic Resources and Libraries Conference in Austin, Texas, three librarians presented a panel discussion on their institutions' policies and practices regarding database…

  7. The Historical Importance of Jury to Press Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olasky, Marvin N.

    Staggered by some recent libel verdicts, many journalists are neglecting lessons about press freedom learned at great cost during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Journalists then learned that state power over the press, residing in the hands of either censors or judges, leads to a decrease in press freedom. In 1986, though, many media…

  8. Shattering the Lavender Ceiling: Sexual Minorities in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey-Musolf, Michael

    2012-02-01

    I will discuss some of the challenges experienced by sexual minorities in physics, from both a personal and broader perspective. I will also comment on the opportunities for the field to become more inclusive, supportive, and scientifically stronger by addressing these challenges.

  9. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for... by weight. (b) Esters (as bornyl acetate). Not less than 1.5 percent by weight. (c) Refractive...

  10. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for... by weight. (b) Esters (as bornyl acetate). Not less than 1.5 percent by weight. (c) Refractive...

  11. Do health care delivery system reforms improve value? The jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Korenstein, Deborah; Duan, Kevin; Diaz, Manuel Jose; Ahn, Rosa; Keyhani, Salomeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Widespread restructuring of health delivery systems is underway in the US to reduce costs and improve the quality of healthcare. Objective To describe studies evaluating the impact of system-level interventions (incentives and delivery structures) on the value of US healthcare, defined as the balance between quality and cost. Research Design We identified articles in PubMed (2003 to July 2014) using keywords identified through an iterative process, with reference and author tracking. We searched tables of contents of relevant journals from August 2014 through 11 August 2015 to update our sample. Subjects We included prospective or retrospective studies of system-level changes, with a control, reporting both quality and either cost or utilization of resources. Measures Data about study design, study quality, and outcomes was extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second. Results Thirty reports of 28 interventions were included. Interventions included patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementations (n=12), pay-for-performance programs (n=10), and mixed interventions (n=6); no other intervention types were identified. Most reports (n=19) described both cost and utilization outcomes. Quality, cost, and utilization outcomes varied widely; many improvements were small and process outcomes predominated. Improved value (improved quality with stable or lower cost/utilization or stable quality with lower cost/utilization) was seen in 23 reports; 1 showed decreased value, and 6 showed unchanged, unclear or mixed results. Study limitations included variability among specific endpoints reported, inconsistent methodologies, and lack of full adjustment in some observational trials. Lack of standardized MeSH terms was also a challenge in the search. Conclusions On balance the literature suggests that health system reforms can improve value. However, this finding is tempered by the varying outcomes evaluated across studies with little documented improvement in outcome quality measures. Standardized measures of value would facilitate assessment of the impact of interventions across studies and better estimates of the broad impact of system change. PMID:26492216

  12. Change over Time in Obedience: The Jury's Still out, but It Might Be Decreasing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twenge, Jean M.

    2009-01-01

    Jerry M. Burger's (see record 2008-19206-001) partial replication of Stanley Milgram's (1974) obedience study shows both the influence of culture and generations on behavior and the power of the situation. In Burger's data, disobedience has nearly doubled among male participants since the 1960s, a shift just as large as the increase in Americans'…

  13. The Effect of Cross-Examination Tactics on Simulated Jury Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Margaret; And Others

    Past research has demonstrated the negative effects of leading questions by attorneys on eyewitness testimony and has found that adversary lawyers produced less accurate testimony from eyewitnesses. This study was conducted to examine the effects of lawyer's hostile versus non-hostile behavior and lawyer's leading versus non-leading questions on…

  14. Change over time in obedience: The jury's still out, but it might be decreasing.

    PubMed

    Twenge, Jean M

    2009-01-01

    Jerry M. Burger's partial replication of Stanley Milgram's (1974) obedience study shows both the influence of culture and generations on behavior and the power of the situation. In Burger's data, disobedience has nearly doubled among male participants since the 1960s, a shift just as large as the increase in Americans' body mass index that has been labeled the "obesity epidemic." Differences in the ethnic composition of the two studies' samples, particularly the large numbers of Asian Americans in Burger's sample, may have suppressed what might have been an even larger increase in disobedience. Halting the experiment at 150 volts may also have suppressed change. Nevertheless, situations have a strong influence on behavior; thus generational shifts would not be expected to completely eliminate the effect. Burger's results are consistent with documented changes in personality traits over the generations, including increases in nonconformist traits such as assertiveness, self-esteem, and narcissism.

  15. Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges: The Jury Is Still Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael

    This paper examines a number of issues associated with part-time faculty in community colleges. In the area of part-time faculty integration, the author surveyed 28 Florida colleges using an online survey, and received responses from 20, for a response rate of 71.4%. The survey contained five questions: (1) Are adjunct/part-time faculty listed in…

  16. Fostering Organizational Change through Deliberations: The Deliberative Jury in a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindell, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Universities in Europe face a variety of reform initiatives, and university reform can be seen as a wicked problem that should be resolved through collaborative efforts. In Finland, there has been considerable resistance to proposed reforms, with university personnel complaining that they have not been heard. Students, on the other hand, seem…

  17. Visual Spatial Attention to Multiple Locations At Once: The Jury Is Still Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jans, Bert; Peters, Judith C.; De Weerd, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Although in traditional attention research the focus of visual spatial attention has been considered as indivisible, many studies in the last 15 years have claimed the contrary. These studies suggest that humans can direct their attention simultaneously to multiple noncontiguous regions of the visual field upon mere instruction. The notion that…

  18. Attorney Questions Predict Jury-eligible Adult Assessments of Attorneys, Child Witnesses, and Defendant Guilt.

    PubMed

    Mugno, Allison P; Klemfuss, J Zoe; Lyon, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Children are often the primary source of evidence in maltreatment cases, particularly cases of child sexual abuse, and may be asked to testify in court. Although best-practice protocols for interviewing children suggest that interviewers ask open-ended questions to elicit detailed responses from children, during in-court testimony, attorneys tend to rely on closed-ended questions that elicit simple (often "yes" or "no") responses (e.g., Andrews, Lamb, & Lyon, ; Klemfuss, Quas, & Lyon, ). How then are jurors making decisions about children's credibility and ultimately the case outcome? The present study examined the effect of two attorney-specific factors (e.g., temporal structure and questioning phase) on mock jurors' perceptions of attorney performance, child witness credibility, storyline clarity, and defendant guilt. Participants were randomly assigned to read a trial excerpt from one of eight conditions and were then asked to evaluate the attorney, child witness, and the case. Selected excerpts were from criminal court case transcripts and contained either high attorney temporal structure (e.g., use of temporal markers) or low temporal structure (e.g., frequent topic switching), involved direct or cross-examination, and represented cases resulting in a conviction or acquittal. Child responses were kept consistent across all excerpts. Results showed that participants perceived the attorney's performance and child's credibility more favorably and thought the storyline was clearer when attorneys provided high rather than low temporal structure and when the excerpt contained direct rather than cross-examination. Participants who read a direct rather than cross-examination excerpt were also more likely to think the defendant was guilty. The study highlights the impact of attorney questioning style on mock jurors' perceptions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26932420

  19. Rooting the tree of life: the phylogenetic jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Gouy, Richard; Baurain, Denis; Philippe, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to shed light on difficulties in rooting the tree of life (ToL) and to explore the (sociological) reasons underlying the limited interest in accurately addressing this fundamental issue. First, we briefly review the difficulties plaguing phylogenetic inference and the ways to improve the modelling of the substitution process, which is highly heterogeneous, both across sites and over time. We further observe that enriched taxon samplings, better gene samplings and clever data removal strategies have led to numerous revisions of the ToL, and that these improved shallow phylogenies nearly always relocate simple organisms higher in the ToL provided that long-branch attraction artefacts are kept at bay. Then, we note that, despite the flood of genomic data available since 2000, there has been a surprisingly low interest in inferring the root of the ToL. Furthermore, the rare studies dealing with this question were almost always based on methods dating from the 1990s that have been shown to be inaccurate for much more shallow issues! This leads us to argue that the current consensus about a bacterial root for the ToL can be traced back to the prejudice of Aristotle's Great Chain of Beings, in which simple organisms are ancestors of more complex life forms. Finally, we demonstrate that even the best models cannot yet handle the complexity of the evolutionary process encountered both at shallow depth, when the outgroup is too distant, and at the level of the inter-domain relationships. Altogether, we conclude that the commonly accepted bacterial root is still unproven and that the root of the ToL should be revisited using phylogenomic supermatrices to ensure that new evidence for eukaryogenesis, such as the recently described Lokiarcheota, is interpreted in a sound phylogenetic framework. PMID:26323760

  20. The Jury Is Still Out: Psychoemotional Support in Peer E-Mentoring for Transition to University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risquez, Angelica; Sanchez-Garcia, Marife

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how computer mediated communication (CMC) can sustain nourishing and emotionally enriching peer mentoring relations. A peer electronic mentoring program was implemented in an Irish university to facilitate freshmen's transition to college. A sample of 123 participants (42 mentors and 81 mentees) was evaluated with a…

  1. Applying the revenge system to the criminal justice system and jury decision-making.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S Craig; Murray, Jennifer

    2013-02-01

    McCullough et al. propose an evolved cognitive revenge system which imposes retaliatory costs on aggressors. They distinguish between this and other forms of punishment (e.g., those administered by judges) which are not underpinned by a specifically designed evolutionary mechanism. Here we outline mechanisms and circumstances through which the revenge system might nonetheless infiltrate decision-making within the criminal justice system.

  2. A Jury of Their Peers. Connect for Kids: Guidance for Grown-Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newberger, Julee

    This article describes the use of youth courts, or teen courts, a growing trend in juvenile justice. Youth courts are generally used for younger teens with no prior arrest records, and those charged with less serious violations, like shoplifting, vandalism, and disorderly conduct. The goal is to hold young people accountable for their actions with…

  3. A new species of Dysmicoccus damaging lavender in French Provence (Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha, Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Germain, J-F; Matile-Ferrero, D; Kaydan, M B; Malausa, T; Williams, D J

    2015-01-01

    Une nouvelle espèce de Dysmicoccus nuisible à la lavande en Provence (France) (Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha, Pseudococcidae). Dysmicoccus lavandulae Germain, Matile-Ferrero & Williams n. sp. est décrite et illustrée. Ses séquences ADN sont présentées. L'espèce vit sur Lavandula x intermedia cultivée pour la production d'essence de lavande en Provence. La liste des espèces de pseudococcines vivant sur les lavandes spontanées en France est dressée. Le statut des 2 genres voisins Trionymus Berg et Dysmicoccus Ferris est discuté. PMID:26249973

  4. Purple Is to Lavender: Womanism, Resistance, and the Politics of Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Dimpal; Turner, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    We explore the politics of naming for non-White women faculty in higher education as it relates to womanist theory. A discussion of these faculty experiences in general, and women faculty in particular are provided to illuminate the many challenges we face in the academy. One such challenge is how we come to identify our scholarship and align…

  5. 76 FR 48897 - Sheryl Lavender, D.O. Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... appropriate authority under the laws of the state in which she does business. See Scott Sandarg, D.M.D., 74 FR 17,528 (DEA 2009); David W. Wang, M.D., 72 FR 54,297 (DEA 2007); Sheran Arden Yeates, M.D., 71 FR 39,130 (DEA 2006); Dominick A. Ricci, M.D., 58 FR 51,104 (DEA 1993); Bobby Watts M.D., 53 FR 11,919...

  6. A new species of Dysmicoccus damaging lavender in French Provence (Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha, Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Germain, J-F; Matile-Ferrero, D; Kaydan, M B; Malausa, T; Williams, D J

    2015-07-01

    Une nouvelle espèce de Dysmicoccus nuisible à la lavande en Provence (France) (Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha, Pseudococcidae). Dysmicoccus lavandulae Germain, Matile-Ferrero & Williams n. sp. est décrite et illustrée. Ses séquences ADN sont présentées. L'espèce vit sur Lavandula x intermedia cultivée pour la production d'essence de lavande en Provence. La liste des espèces de pseudococcines vivant sur les lavandes spontanées en France est dressée. Le statut des 2 genres voisins Trionymus Berg et Dysmicoccus Ferris est discuté.

  7. 'Lavender retirement': a questionnaire survey of lesbian, gay and bisexual people's accommodation plans for old age.

    PubMed

    Neville, Stephen; Henrickson, Mark

    2010-12-01

    A global increase in older people will also mean an increase in the numbers of lesbian, gay and bisexual people requiring residential support. All health practitioners working with older people need to be aware of the existence of older lesbian, gay and bisexual people in order to provide health care that is appropriate. This study describes lesbian, gay and bisexual people's accommodation plans for old age through a cross-sectional quantitative survey design. Participants were recruited through mainstream and lesbian, gay and bisexual media and venues. A total of 2269 participants completed the 133-item survey. When asked about what accommodation plans they had for their older years lesbian, gay and bisexual people identified that they were least likely to choose living in a retirement community/facility. However, if unable to live independently the majority of respondents identified they would prefer to live in a retirement facility that specifically catered for people who did not identify as heterosexual. This study has found that the residential support sector needs to be prepared to provide a health service that is person-centred, free from discriminatory practices and meets the needs of all health consumers regardless of sexual orientation.

  8. The Lavender Ceiling atop the Global Closet: Human Resource Development and Lesbian Expatriates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedro, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This literature review will examine international assignments as career development opportunities and uncover multiple issues and considerations with respect to lesbians and international assignments. There is a clear interest in the fields of management and human resource management in the privileges, challenges, and opportunities of…

  9. How hepatitis C virus counteracts the interferon response: the jury is still out on NS5A.

    PubMed

    Tan, S L; Katze, M G

    2001-05-25

    Interferons (IFNs) induce an antiviral state in the cell through complex and indirect mechanisms, which culminate in a direct inhibition of viral replication and stimulation of the host adaptive responses. Viruses often counteract with elaborate strategies to interfere with the induction as well as action of IFN effector molecules. This evolutionary battle between viruses and IFN components is a subject of intense research aimed at understanding the immunopathogenesis of viruses and the molecular basis of IFN signaling and action. In the case with hepatitis C virus (HCV), this may have profound implications for the therapeutic use of recombinant IFN in treating chronic hepatitis C. Depending on the subtype of HCV, current IFN-based treatment regimens are effective for only a small subset of chronic hepatitis C patients. Thus, one of the Holy Grails in HCV research is to understand the mechanisms by which the virus may evade IFN antiviral surveillance and establish persistent infection, which may eventually provide insights into new avenues for better antiviral therapy. Despite the lack of an efficient tissue culture system and an appropriate animal model for HCV infection, several mechanisms have been proposed based on clinical studies and in vitro experiments. This minireview focuses on the HCV NS5A nonstructural protein, which is implicated in playing a role in HCV tolerance to IFN treatment, possibly in part through its ability to inhibit the cellular IFN-induced PKR protein kinase.

  10. How justice can affect jury: training abstract words promotes generalisation to concrete words in patients with aphasia.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Chaleece; Kiran, Swathi

    2014-01-01

    Developing language treatments that not only improve trained items but also promote generalisation to untrained items is a major focus in aphasia research. This study is a replication and extension of previous work which found that training abstract words in a particular context-category promotes generalisation to concrete words but not vice versa (Kiran, Sandberg, & Abbott, 2009 ). Twelve persons with aphasia (five female) with varying types and degrees of severity participated in a generative naming treatment based on the Complexity Account of Treatment Efficacy (CATE; Thompson, Shapiro, Kiran, & Sobecks, 2003 ). All participants were trained to generate abstract words in a particular context-category by analysing the semantic features of the target words. Two other context-categories were used as controls. Ten of the twelve participants improved on the trained abstract words in the trained context-category. Eight of the ten participants who responded to treatment also generalised to concrete words in the same context-category. These results suggest that this treatment is both efficacious and efficient. We discuss possible mechanisms of training and generalisation effects.

  11. Student Teaching Behaviors Identified by a National Jury of Cooperating Teachers as Indicators of Success in Sixteen Competency Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Sarah J.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what behaviors would be accepted by cooperating teachers in the public schools as indications of success in sixteen broad areas of teaching competence. In order to determine the behaviors most appropriate for judging effectiveness, a modified Delphi survey involving two contacts with the survey population…

  12. A touch of lavender: gas-phase structure and dynamics of the monoterpene linalool validated by microwave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Mouhib, Halima; Klahm, Sebastian; Stahl, Wolfgang; Kleiner, Isabelle

    2013-07-01

    The microwave spectrum of linalool, an acyclic monoterpene, was recorded for the first time in the range from 9 to 16 GHz. The only conformer observed under molecular beam conditions was assigned. Fitting the rotational spectrum with two different programs treating internal rotation yielded the rotational constants A = 1.64674020(46) GHz, B = 0.68219862(16) GHz, C = 0.61875100(20) GHz, and the centrifugal distortion constants. The standard deviation of the fit was close to experimental accuracy. A-E splittings due to the internal rotation of one methyl group could be resolved and the internal rotation barrier was determined to be 400.20(64) cm(-1). The results from microwave spectroscopy were used to validate the molecular geometry obtained from quantum chemical calculations.

  13. Cracking the Lavender Ceiling: Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Student Affairs Professionals and Their Personal Perspectives on Career Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James Capshaw

    2013-01-01

    In higher education, the people working in student affairs are as diverse as the students who are served by these professionals. Those who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual are often faced with challenges to moving up the career ladder. Many who seek senior-level administrative positions, such as director, dean of students, vice president or…

  14. Site descriptions: Cypress Creek, Davis Canyon, Deaf Smith, Hanford Reference, Lavender Canyon, Richton Dome, Swisher, Vacherie Dome, Yucca Mountain. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    1986-04-01

    The following information is given about the various sites: location (state and county), terrain, climate, weather, endangered plants and animals; nearest town, population, nearest railway, nearest interstate highway, economy, density within 50 miles, owners, and historical sites. (LM)

  15. Antifungal Screening of Lavender Essential oils and Essential Oil Constituents on three Post-harvest Fungal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Erland, Lauren A E; Bitcon, Christopher R; Lemke, Ashley D; Mahmoud, Soheil S

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that many synthetic pesticides have adverse effects on human, animal, and environmental health. As a result, plant-derived natural products are quickly gaining momentum as safer and less ecologically damaging alternatives due to their low toxicity, high biodegradability, and good specificity. Essential oils of Lavandula angustifolia, Lavandula x intermedia cv Grosso, and Lavandida x intermedia cv Provence as well as various mono- and sesquiterpene essential oil constituents were tested in order to assess their antifungal potential on three important agricultural pathogens: Botrytis cinerea, Mucor piriformis, and Penicillium expansum. Fungal susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion assays. The majority of essential oil constituents tested did not have a significant effect; however, 3-carene, carvacrol, geraniol, nerol and perillyl alcohol demonstrated significant inhibition at concentrations as low as 1 µ/mL. In vivo testing using strawberry fruit as a model system supported in vitro results and revealed that perillyl alcohol, carvacrol and 3-carene were effective in limiting infection by postharvest pathogens.

  16. Antifungal Screening of Lavender Essential oils and Essential Oil Constituents on three Post-harvest Fungal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Erland, Lauren A E; Bitcon, Christopher R; Lemke, Ashley D; Mahmoud, Soheil S

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that many synthetic pesticides have adverse effects on human, animal, and environmental health. As a result, plant-derived natural products are quickly gaining momentum as safer and less ecologically damaging alternatives due to their low toxicity, high biodegradability, and good specificity. Essential oils of Lavandula angustifolia, Lavandula x intermedia cv Grosso, and Lavandida x intermedia cv Provence as well as various mono- and sesquiterpene essential oil constituents were tested in order to assess their antifungal potential on three important agricultural pathogens: Botrytis cinerea, Mucor piriformis, and Penicillium expansum. Fungal susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion assays. The majority of essential oil constituents tested did not have a significant effect; however, 3-carene, carvacrol, geraniol, nerol and perillyl alcohol demonstrated significant inhibition at concentrations as low as 1 µ/mL. In vivo testing using strawberry fruit as a model system supported in vitro results and revealed that perillyl alcohol, carvacrol and 3-carene were effective in limiting infection by postharvest pathogens. PMID:27396210

  17. Evaluation of the Effect of Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor Agent Use on Rheumatoid Arthritis Work Disability: The Jury Is Still Out

    PubMed Central

    ALLAIRE, SARALYNN; WOLFE, FREDERICK; NIU, JINGBO; ZHANG, YUQING; ZHANG, BIN; LAVALLEY, MICHAEL

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the role of anti–tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents in predicting work disability in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We studied 953 subjects with rheumatologist-diagnosed RA from a US cohort using a nested, matched, case–control approach. Subjects provided data on medication usage and employment every 6 months for 18 months, were employed at baseline, and were age <65 years at last followup. Cases were subjects who were not employed at followup (n = 231) and were matched ~3:1 by time of entry into the cohort to 722 controls who were employed at followup. Risk of any employment loss, or loss attributed to RA, at followup as predicted by use of an anti-TNF agent at baseline was computed using conditional logistic regression. Stratification on possible confounding factors and recursive partitioning analyses were also conducted. Results Subjects’ mean age was 51 years, 82% were female, 92% were white, and 72% had more than a high school education. Nearly half (48%) used an anti-TNF agent at baseline; characteristics of anti-TNF agent users were similar to nonusers. In the main analyses, anti-TNF use did not protect against any or RA-attributed employment loss (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 1.1 [0.7–1.6] versus 0.9 [0.5–1.5]). However, a protective effect was found for users with disease duration <11 years (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.5 [0.2–0.9]). In recursive partitioning analyses, age, RA global severity, and functional limitation played a much greater role in determining employment loss than anti-TNF agent use. Conclusion Anti-TNF agent use did not protect against work disability in the main analyses. In stratified analyses, their use was protective among subjects with shorter RA duration, whereas in nonparametric analyses, age and disease factors were the prominent predictors of work disability. PMID:18668597

  18. Hepatoprotective and Renoprotective Effects of Lavender (Lavandula stoechas L.) Essential Oils Against Malathion-Induced Oxidative Stress in Young Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Slimen; Jallouli, Manel; Gharbi, Najoua; Marzouki, Lamjed

    2015-10-01

    We aimed in the present study to investigate the hepato- and nephroprotective effects of Lavandula stoechas essential oils (LSEO) against malathion-induced oxidative stress in young male mice as well as the possible mechanism implicated in such protection. Animals were divided into eight groups of 12 each: Control, malathion (200 mg/kg b.w.); Various doses of LSEO (10, 30, and 50 mg/kg b.w.), malathion+various doses of LSEO. Malathion and LSEO were daily per orally (p.o.) administered by intragastric gavage during 30 days. We initially found that malathion treatment induced body weight gain decrease as well as a clear nephro- and hepatotoxicity as assessed by significant relative liver and kidney weight increase and related hemodynamic parameters deregulation. Malathion exposure of mice also induced a considerable perturbation of metabolic parameters. On the other hand, we showed that malathion administration was accompanied by an oxidative stress status assessed by an increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels as well as a depletion of sulfhydril group content (-SH) and antioxidant enzyme activities such as catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), total superoxide dismutase (SOD), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, and Fe-SOD in the kidney and liver. More importantly, LSEO treatment abolished all malathion-induced body gain loss, liver and kidney relative weight increase, hemodynamic and metabolic disorders, as well as hepatic and renal oxidative stress. In conclusion, our data suggest that LSEO exerted potential hepato- and nephroprotective effects against malathion-induced oxidative stress in mice. The beneficial effect of LSEO might be related, in part, to its antioxidant properties. PMID:25835641

  19. Stratigraphic and structural configuration of the Navajo (Jurassic) through Ouray (Mississippian-Devonian) formations in the vicinity of Davis and Lavender Canyons, southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    McCleary, J.R.; Romie, J.E.

    1986-04-01

    This study developed a three-dimensional computer model of stratigraphic and structural relationships within a 3497-km/sup 2/ (1350-mi/sup 2/) study area centered on the proposed site for a high-level nuclear waste repository in southeastern Utah. The model consists of a sequence of internally reconciled isopach and structure contour maps horizontally registered and stored in stratigraphic order. This model can be used to display cross sections, perspective block diagrams, or fence diagrams at any orientation; estimate depth of formation contacts and thicknesses for any new stratigraphic or hydrologic boreholes; facilitate ground-water modeling studies; and evaluate the structural and stratigraphic evolution of the study area. This study also includes limited evaluations of aquifer continuity in the Elephant Canyon and Honaker Trail Formations, and of salt dissolution and flowage features as interpreted from geophysical logs. The study identified a long history of movement in the fault system in the north-central part of the study area and a major salt flowage feature in the northeastern part. It describes the Elephant Canyon Formation aquifer as laterally limited, the Honaker Trail Formation aquifer as fairly continuous over the area, and Beef Basin in the southern part of the area as a probable dissolution feature. It also concludes that the Shay-Bridger Jack-Salt Creek Graben system is apparently a vertically continuous feature between the basement and ground surface. No stratigraphic or structural discontinuities were detected in the vicinity of Davis Canyon that appear to be detrimental to the siting of a waste repository.

  20. Managing the nation`s nuclear waste. Site descriptions: Cypress Creek, Davis Canyon, Deaf Smith, Hanford Reference, Lavender Canyon, Richton Dome, Swisher, Vacherie Dome, and Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    1985-12-31

    In 1982, the Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Public Law 97-425), which established a comprehensive national program directed toward siting, constructing, and operating geologic repositories for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In February 1983, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) identified the nine referenced repository locations as potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository. These sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. The DOE findings and determinations are based on the evaluations contained in the draft Environmental Assessments (EA). A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received on the draft EA. The purpose of this document is to provide the public with specific site information on each potential repository location.

  1. Male fertility versus sterility, cytotype, and DNA quantitative variation in seed production in diploid and tetraploid sea lavenders (Limonium sp., Plumbaginaceae) reveal diversity in reproduction modes.

    PubMed

    Róis, Ana Sofia; Teixeira, Generosa; Sharbel, Timothy F; Fuchs, Jörg; Martins, Sérgio; Espírito-Santo, Dalila; Caperta, Ana D

    2012-12-01

    The genus Limonium Miller, a complex taxonomic group, comprises annuals and perennials that can produce sexual and/or asexual seeds (apomixis). In this study, we used diverse cytogenetic and cytometric approaches to analyze male sporogenesis and gametogenesis for characterizing male reproductive output on seed production in Limonium ovalifolium and Limonium multiflorum. We showed here that the first species is mostly composed of diploid cytotypes with 2n = 16 chromosomes and the latter species by tetraploid cytotypes with 2n = 32, 34, 35, 36 chromosomes and had a genome roughly twice as big as the former one. In both species, euploid and aneuploid cytotypes with large metacentric chromosomes having decondensed interstitial sites were found within and among populations, possibly involved in chromosomal reconstructions. L. ovalifolium diploids showed regular meiosis resulting in normal tetrads, while diverse chromosome pairing and segregation irregularities leading to the formation of abnormal meiotic products are found in balanced and non-balanced L. multiflorum tetraploids. Before anther dehiscence, the characteristic unicellular, bicellular, or tricellular pollen grains showing the typical Limonium micro- or macro-reticulate exine ornamentation patterns were observed in L. ovalifolium using scanning electron microscopy. Most of these grains were viable and able to produce pollen tubes in vitro. In both balanced and unbalanced L. multiflorum tetraploids, microspores only developed until the "ring-vacuolate stage" with a collapsed morphology without the typical exine patterns, pointing to a sporophytic defect. These microspores were unviable and therefore never germinated in vitro. L. ovalifolium individuals presented larger pollen grains than those of L. multiflorum, indicating that pollen size and ploidy levels are not correlated in the Limonium system. Cytohistological studies in mature seeds from both species revealed that an embryo and a residual endosperm were present in each seed. Flow cytometric seed screens using such mature seeds showed quantitative variations in seeds ploidy level. It is concluded that male function seems to play an important role in the reproduction modes of Limonium diploids and tetraploids.

  2. Inhibition of Receptor Signaling and of Glioblastoma-derived Tumor Growth by a Novel PDGFRβ Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Camorani, Simona; Esposito, Carla L; Rienzo, Anna; Catuogno, Silvia; Iaboni, Margherita; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Cerchia, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) is a cell-surface tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. It represents a compelling therapeutic target in many human tumors, including glioma. A number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors under development as antitumor agents have been found to inhibit PDGFRβ. However, they are not selective as they present multiple tyrosine kinase targets. Here, we report a novel PDGFRβ-specific antagonist represented by a nuclease-resistant RNA-aptamer, named Gint4.T. This aptamer is able to specifically bind to the human PDGFRβ ectodomain (Kd: 9.6 nmol/l) causing a strong inhibition of ligand-dependent receptor activation and of downstream signaling in cell lines and primary cultures of human glioblastoma cells. Moreover, Gint4.T aptamer drastically inhibits cell migration and proliferation, induces differentiation, and blocks tumor growth in vivo. In addition, Gint4.T aptamer prevents PDGFRβ heterodimerization with and resultant transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. As a result, the combination of Gint4.T and an epidermal growth factor receptor–targeted aptamer is better at slowing tumor growth than either single aptamer alone. These findings reveal Gint4.T as a PDGFRβ-drug candidate with translational potential. PMID:24566984

  3. Has the Jury Reached a Verdict? States' Early Experiences with Crowd Out under SCHIP. Occasional Paper Number 47. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutzky, Amy Westpfahl; Hill, Ian

    Prior to the enactment of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), policymakers examined the need to safeguard the private insurance market from "crowd out," the substitution of public health insurance coverage for private health insurance coverage. This qualitative study examined how 18 states are addressing crowd out, the degree to…

  4. Juror stress: symptoms, syndromes, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    As civic duties go, jury service can be among the most stressful experiences that a citizen can undergo. This article describes the common sources of juror stress, including jury summons, jury selection, understanding and coping with complex or disturbing evidence and testimony, jury deliberation, and the pressure to arrive at a just verdict. The article then goes on to delineate a number of intervention models for helping jurors manage stress reactions and prevent the development of more serious traumatic stress syndromes. Finally, some recommendations are offered for professionalizing jury service that would act in the interests of civil and criminal justice.

  5. 27 CFR 21.54 - Formula No. 27-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 100 pounds of green soap, U.S.P. Note. The requirements of this formula may be met by adding 1 gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 66.5 pounds of U.S.P. quality soap... other biocides. (2) Miscellaneous uses: 812.Product development and pilot plant uses (own use only)....

  6. 27 CFR 21.54 - Formula No. 27-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 100 pounds of green soap, U.S.P. Note. The requirements of this formula may be met by adding 1 gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 66.5 pounds of U.S.P. quality soap... other biocides. (2) Miscellaneous uses: 812.Product development and pilot plant uses (own use only)....

  7. 27 CFR 21.54 - Formula No. 27-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 100 pounds of green soap, U.S.P. Note. The requirements of this formula may be met by adding 1 gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 66.5 pounds of U.S.P. quality soap... other biocides. (2) Miscellaneous uses: 812.Product development and pilot plant uses (own use only)....

  8. 27 CFR 21.54 - Formula No. 27-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 100 pounds of green soap, U.S.P. Note. The requirements of this formula may be met by adding 1 gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 66.5 pounds of U.S.P. quality soap... other biocides. (2) Miscellaneous uses: 812.Product development and pilot plant uses (own use only)....

  9. 27 CFR 21.54 - Formula No. 27-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 100 pounds of green soap, U.S.P. Note. The requirements of this formula may be met by adding 1 gallon of lavender oil, N.F., and 66.5 pounds of U.S.P. quality soap... other biocides. (2) Miscellaneous uses: 812.Product development and pilot plant uses (own use only)....

  10. 48 CFR 9904.408-30 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING..., holidays, jury duty or military training, or personal activities, for which an employer pays...

  11. 48 CFR 9904.408-30 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING..., holidays, jury duty or military training, or personal activities, for which an employer pays...

  12. Controlling the thermal conductance of graphene/h -BN lateral interface with strain and structure engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-02-01

    Although phonon-mediated thermal conduction in pristine graphene and hexagonal boron nitride is well understood, less is known about phonon transport in single-sheet graphene-hexagonal boron nitride (Gr /h -BN ) lateral heterostructures, where the thermal resistance of the interfaces plays an important role in the overall thermal conductivity. We apply the newly developed extended atomistic Green's function method to analyze with detail the effect of strain and structure engineering on the thermal conductance Gint of the Gr /h -BN interface. Our calculations show that longitudinal tensile strain leads to significant Gint enhancement (up to 25 % at 300 K) primarily through the improved alignment of the flexural acoustic phonon bands, despite the reduction in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) and transverse acoustic phonon velocities. In addition, we find that alternating C-N zigzag bonds along the zigzag interface lead to a greater Gint than C-B bonds through more effective transmission of high-frequency LA and transverse optical phonons, especially at high strain levels. We also demonstrate how the interfacial structure dramatically affects the orientation of the transmitted optical phonons, a phenomenon that is neither seen for acoustic phonons nor predictable from conventional acoustic wave scattering theory. Insights from our paper can provide the basis for manipulating the interfacial thermal conductance in other two-dimensional heterostructures.

  13. Fixed and pulsed gradient diffusion methods in low-field core analysis.

    PubMed

    Leu, Gabriela; Fordham, Edmund J; Hürlimann, Martin D; Frulla, Phil

    2005-02-01

    We review diffusion-weighted relaxation protocols for two-dimensional diffusion/relaxation time (D, T(2)) distributions and their application to fluid-saturated sedimentary rocks at low fields typical of oil-well logging tools (< or = 2 MHz for 1H). Fixed field gradient (FFG) protocols may be implemented in logging tools and in the laboratory; there, pulsed field gradient (PFG) protocols are also available. In either category, direct or stimulated echoes may be used for the diffusion evolution periods. We compare the results of several variant FFG and PFG protocols obtained on liquids and two contrasting sedimentary rocks. For liquids and rocks of negligible internal gradients (g(int)), results are comparable, as expected, for all the studied protocols. For rocks of strong g(int), protocol-dependent artifacts are seen in the joint (D, T2) distributions, consistent with the effects of the internal fields. For laboratory petrophysics, the PFG methods offer several advantages: (a) significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio and acquisition times for repetitions over many samples; (b) freedom from heteronuclear contamination when fluorinated liquids are used in core holders; and (c) a palette of variants--one comparable with the FFG--for the study of rocks of significant g(int). Given suitable hardware, both PFG and FFG methods can be implemented in the same bench-top apparatus, providing a versatile test bed for application in a petrophysical laboratory. PMID:15833632

  14. Fixed and pulsed gradient diffusion methods in low-field core analysis.

    PubMed

    Leu, Gabriela; Fordham, Edmund J; Hürlimann, Martin D; Frulla, Phil

    2005-02-01

    We review diffusion-weighted relaxation protocols for two-dimensional diffusion/relaxation time (D, T(2)) distributions and their application to fluid-saturated sedimentary rocks at low fields typical of oil-well logging tools (< or = 2 MHz for 1H). Fixed field gradient (FFG) protocols may be implemented in logging tools and in the laboratory; there, pulsed field gradient (PFG) protocols are also available. In either category, direct or stimulated echoes may be used for the diffusion evolution periods. We compare the results of several variant FFG and PFG protocols obtained on liquids and two contrasting sedimentary rocks. For liquids and rocks of negligible internal gradients (g(int)), results are comparable, as expected, for all the studied protocols. For rocks of strong g(int), protocol-dependent artifacts are seen in the joint (D, T2) distributions, consistent with the effects of the internal fields. For laboratory petrophysics, the PFG methods offer several advantages: (a) significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio and acquisition times for repetitions over many samples; (b) freedom from heteronuclear contamination when fluorinated liquids are used in core holders; and (c) a palette of variants--one comparable with the FFG--for the study of rocks of significant g(int). Given suitable hardware, both PFG and FFG methods can be implemented in the same bench-top apparatus, providing a versatile test bed for application in a petrophysical laboratory.

  15. Analgesia Is Enhanced by Providing Information regarding Good Outcomes Associated with an Odor: Placebo Effects in Aromatherapy?

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Yuri; Takayama, Miho; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Kawase, Akiko; Takakura, Nobuari; Homma, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    No previous report has described whether information regarding an odor used in aromatherapy has placebo effects. We investigated whether placebo analgesia was engendered by verbal information regarding the analgesic effects of an odor. Twelve of 24 subjects were provided with the information that a lavender odor would reduce pain (informed), whereas the other 12 subjects were not (not-informed). Concurrent with respiration recording, the subjects were administered a lavender-odor or no-odor treatment during application of painful stimulation to the forefinger. The subjects reported their experience of pain and its unpleasantness on a visual analogue scale after the painful stimulation. The lavender-odor treatment significantly alleviated pain and unpleasantness compared with the no-odor treatment in the informed (P < 0.01) and not-informed groups (P < 0.05). The no-odor treatment in the informed group significantly alleviated pain and unpleasantness compared with both the no-odor and lavender-odor treatments in the not-informed group (P < 0.05). Rapid and shallow breathing induced by the painful stimulation became slow and deep during the lavender-odor and no-odor treatments in both groups. Information regarding a lavender odor, the lavender odor itself, and slower breathing contributed to reduced perceptions of pain and unpleasantness during painful stimulation, suggesting that placebo effects significantly contribute to analgesia in aromatherapy.

  16. Campus Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Susan

    2009-01-01

    In this annual Architectural Portfolio issue, the author presents the main winners that impressed the jury as facilities that will excite and challenge students in dramatic ways. The Children's School, Stamford, Connecticut, the Caudill winner, is "reminiscent of the Crow Island School," according to this year's jury. The Kahn winner, Peninsula…

  17. Justice by the People. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Diane; Alderson, Jan, Ed.

    This interactive curriculum has been developed to teach students about one of their most important rights as citizens, trial by jury. Knowledge about this right is critical since most of today's students will be called to serve on juries at some point in their lives. The curriculum's goal is to help students understand the history and value of…

  18. Eckmann v. Board of Education of Hawthorn School District: Bad Management Makes Bad Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacken, Donal M.

    1988-01-01

    A school board's dismissal of a teacher who was an unwed mother resulted in the jury granting a large award. The judge grounded the legal justification for the jury's decision in the teacher's constitutionally protected decision to bear a child, irrespective of marriage. Criticizes court's constitutional intrepretation. (MLF)

  19. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau" (Barcelona,…

  20. The influence of essential oils on the process of wound healing: a review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Woollard, A C; Tatham, K C; Barker, S

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports on a literature review of evidence on the influence of essential oils on wound healing and their potential application in clinical practice. It focuses mainly on tea tree, lavender, chamomile, thyme and ocimum oils. PMID:17722522

  1. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... blood grouping reagents only: Anti-C Pink. Anti-D Gray. Anti-E Brown. Anti-CDE Orange. Anti-c Lavender... CAN OFFER ASSURANCE THAT PRODUCTS DERIVED FROM HUMAN BLOOD WILL NOT TRANSMIT INFECTIOUS AGENTS.”...

  2. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cola nut) (see Weight Loss ) Vitamin K L Lavender Licorice Root M Magnesium Melatonin Milk Thistle ... Weight Loss ) Red Clover Riboflavin S Sage SAMe (S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine) Saw Palmetto Selenium Soy St. John's Wort ...

  3. Biosynthesis and therapeutic properties of Lavandula essential oil constituents.

    PubMed

    Woronuk, Grant; Demissie, Zerihun; Rheault, Mark; Mahmoud, Soheil

    2011-01-01

    Lavenders and their essential oils have been used in alternative medicine for several centuries. The volatile compounds that comprise lavender essential oils, including linalool and linalyl acetate, have demonstrative therapeutic properties, and the relative abundance of these metabolites is greatly influenced by the genetics and environment of the developing plants. With the rapid progress of molecular biology and the genomic sciences, our understanding of essential oil biosynthesis has greatly improved over the past few decades. At the same time, there is a recent surge of interest in the use of natural remedies, including lavender essential oils, in alternative medicine and aromatherapy. This article provides a review of recent developments related to the biosynthesis and medicinal properties of lavender essential oils.

  4. Application of Dst Interpretation Results by Log - Log Method in the Pore Space Type Estimation for the Upper Jurassic Carbonate Reservoir Rocks of the Carpathian Foredeep Basement / Interpretacja Testów Wykonywanych Rurowymi Próbnikami Złoża - Rpz w Skałach Węglanowych Górnej Jury Podłoża Zapadliska Przedkarpackiego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubiel, Stanisław; Zubrzycki, Adam; Rybicki, Czesław; Maruta, Michał

    2012-11-01

    In the south part of the Carpathian Foredeep basement, between Bochnia and Ropczyce, the Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian, Kimmeridian and Tithonian) carbonate complex plays important role as a hydrocarbon bearing formation. It consists of shallow marine carbonates deposited in environments of the outer carbonate ramp as reef limestones (dolomites), microbial - sponge or coral biostromes and marly or micrite limestones as well. The inner pore space system of these rocks was affected by different diagenetic processes as calcite cementation, dissolution, dolomitization and most probably by tectonic fracturing as well. These phenomena have modified pore space systems within limestone / dolomite series forming more or less developed reservoir zones (horizons). According to the interpretation of DST results (analysis of pressure build up curves by log - log method) for 11 intervals (marked out previously by well logging due to porosity increase readings) within the Upper Jurassic formation 3 types of pore/fracture space systems were distinguished: - type I - fracture - vuggy porosity system in which fractures connecting voids and vugs within organogenic carbonates are of great importance for medium flow; - type II - vuggy - fracture porosity system where a pore space consists of weak connected voids and intergranular/intercrystalline pores with minor influence of fractures; - type III - cavern porosity system in which a secondary porosity is developed due to dolomitization and cement/grain dissolution processes.

  5. To require the United States attorney to bring the matter of an individual's contempt of Congress before a grand jury not later than 30 days after receiving a certification from the Speaker of the House of Representatives or the President of the Senate that the individual is in contempt.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jordan, Jim [R-OH-4

    2014-07-29

    09/26/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. On finding for defendants who plead insanity: the crucial impact of dispositional instructions and opportunity to deliberate.

    PubMed

    Wheatman, S R; Shaffer, D R

    2001-04-01

    One hundred twenty participants functioned as mock-jurors and as members of deliberating juries in an experiment designed to assess the impact of dispositional instruction on verdicts rendered in an insanity trial. Consistent with prior research (K. E. Whittemore & J. R. Ogloff, 1995), dispositional instruction had no effect on the verdict preferences of individual jurors prior to deliberating. Yet, as expected, the instruction manipulation had a major impact on postdeliberative decisions (i.e., group verdicts; individual juror verdict preferences). Content analyses of jury deliberations revealed that postdeliberative shifts toward harsh verdicts in uninstructed juries and toward lenient verdicts in instructed juries were mediated by the impact of the Instruction manipulation on the content of jury deliberations: uninstructed juries feared that an acquitted-insane defendant would be freed to act again, whereas instructed juries recognized that finding for an insane defendant implied his retention and treatment. Implications of these results for both legal policy and the conduct of mock-trial research are discussed.

  7. Bioactive Constituents and Antioxidant Activity of Some Carpathian Basin honeys.

    PubMed

    Gyergyák, Kinga; Boros, Borbála; Marton, Krisztina; Felinger, Attila; Papp, Nóra; Farkas, Ágnes

    2016-02-01

    Unifloral honeys have a high commercial value and should undergo a strict quality control before marketing. This study aimed at determining floral origin, polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in 7 samples marketed as lavender and thyme honeys. The samples were subjected to pollen analysis to confirm their botanical origin. Coupled chromatographic techniques (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS) were optimized for the separation and identification of polyphenolic compounds. The antioxidant properties of the samples were determined by spectrophotometric methods. Pollen profile analysis revealed that only 3 out of 5 alleged lavender honeys contained a low percentage (0.6-1.5) of lavender pollen; and there were only traces (0.1-0.6%) of thyme pollen in the alleged thyme honeys. Polyphenolic constituents did not allow for the clear separation of honey samples, revealing no marker compounds previously associated with lavender and thyme honeys. All samples contained large amounts of chlorogenic acid, chrysin, hesperetin, kaempferol and p-coumaric acid; as well as abscisic acid, a plant hormone known to be present in floral nectar and honey. Our results suggest that only one of five alleged lavender honeys and neither of the two alleged thyme honeys are true unifloral honeys. However, they can still provide various health benefits, such as being good sources of antioxidants. There was no relationship between the antioxidant activity and the uni- or multifloral character of the honey samples. Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity was the lowest in the honey sample with lavender and the highest in one of the alleged lavender honeys. Our findings highlight the importance of microscopical and phytochemical analyses of honeys before marketing, to ensure satisfactory quality for customers. PMID:27032212

  8. Bioactive Constituents and Antioxidant Activity of Some Carpathian Basin honeys.

    PubMed

    Gyergyák, Kinga; Boros, Borbála; Marton, Krisztina; Felinger, Attila; Papp, Nóra; Farkas, Ágnes

    2016-02-01

    Unifloral honeys have a high commercial value and should undergo a strict quality control before marketing. This study aimed at determining floral origin, polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in 7 samples marketed as lavender and thyme honeys. The samples were subjected to pollen analysis to confirm their botanical origin. Coupled chromatographic techniques (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS) were optimized for the separation and identification of polyphenolic compounds. The antioxidant properties of the samples were determined by spectrophotometric methods. Pollen profile analysis revealed that only 3 out of 5 alleged lavender honeys contained a low percentage (0.6-1.5) of lavender pollen; and there were only traces (0.1-0.6%) of thyme pollen in the alleged thyme honeys. Polyphenolic constituents did not allow for the clear separation of honey samples, revealing no marker compounds previously associated with lavender and thyme honeys. All samples contained large amounts of chlorogenic acid, chrysin, hesperetin, kaempferol and p-coumaric acid; as well as abscisic acid, a plant hormone known to be present in floral nectar and honey. Our results suggest that only one of five alleged lavender honeys and neither of the two alleged thyme honeys are true unifloral honeys. However, they can still provide various health benefits, such as being good sources of antioxidants. There was no relationship between the antioxidant activity and the uni- or multifloral character of the honey samples. Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity was the lowest in the honey sample with lavender and the highest in one of the alleged lavender honeys. Our findings highlight the importance of microscopical and phytochemical analyses of honeys before marketing, to ensure satisfactory quality for customers.

  9. Randomized Controlled Trial for Salvia sclarea or Lavandula angustifolia: Differential Effects on Blood Pressure in Female Patients with Urinary Incontinence Undergoing Urodynamic Examination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun Hee; Kang, Purum; You, Ji Hye; Park, Mira; Min, Sun Seek

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inhalation of Salvia sclarea (clary sage; clary) or Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) essential oil vapors on autonomic nervous system activity in female patients with urinary incontinence undergoing urodynamic assessment. Study design, location, and subjects This study was a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial carried out in 34 female patients with urinary incontinence. Outcome measure The subjects were randomized to inhale lavender, clary, or almond (control) oil at concentrations of 5% (vol/vol) each. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, and salivary cortisol were measured before and after inhalation of these odors for 60 minutes. Results The clary oil group experienced a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure compared with the control (p=0.048) and lavender oil (p=0.026) groups, a significant decrease in diastolic blood pressure compared with the lavender oil group (p=0.034) and a significant decrease in respiratory rate compared with the control group (p<0.001). In contrast, the lavender oil group tended to increase systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared with the control group. Compared with the control group, inhalation of lavender oil (p=0.045) and clary oil (p<0.001) resulted in statistically significant reductions in respiratory rate. Conclusions These results suggest that lavender oil inhalation may be inappropriate in lowering stress during urodynamic examinations, despite its antistress effects, while clary oil inhalation may be useful in inducing relaxation in female urinary incontinence patients undergoing urodynamic assessments. PMID:23360656

  10. Oily omen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A jury found that the Exxon Corp. was indeed reckless in allowing a captain with a track record of alcohol abuse to pilot the Valdez supertanker, which ran aground in March 1989, causing North America's worst oil spill ever. The Alaskan jury also found the captain negligent and reckless for drinking on the job the afternoon of the incident. The jury is yet to decide just how much Exxon should pay in liability in the civil suit, but the figure could easily come out in the billions.

  11. With peppermints you're not my prince: aroma modulates self-other integration.

    PubMed

    Sellaro, Roberta; Hommel, Bernhard; Rossi Paccani, Claudia; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies showed that self-other integration, as indexed by the joint Simon effect (JSE), can be modulated by biasing participants towards particular (integrative vs. exclusive) cognitive-control states. Interestingly, there is evidence suggesting that such control states can be induced by particular odors: stimulating odors (e.g., peppermint aroma) seem to induce a more focused, exclusive state; relaxing odors (e.g., lavender aroma) are thought to induce a broader, more integrative state. In the present study, we tested the possible impact of peppermint and lavender aromas on self-other integration. Pairs of participants performed the joint Simon task in an either peppermint- or lavender-scented testing room. Results showed that both aromas modulated the size of the JSE, although they had a dissociable effect on reaction times (RTs) and percentage of errors (PEs). Whilst the JSE in RTs was found to be less pronounced in the peppermint group, compared to the lavender and no-aroma groups, the JSE in PEs was significantly more pronounced in the lavender group, compared to the peppermint and no-aroma group. These results are consistent with the emerging literature suggesting that the degree of self-other integration does not reflect a trait but a particular cognitive state, which can be biased towards excluding or integrating the other in one's self-representation. PMID:26174477

  12. Anxiolytic effects of Lavandula angustifolia odour on the Mongolian gerbil elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Bradley, B F; Starkey, N J; Brown, S L; Lea, R W

    2007-05-22

    Lavender is a popular treatment for stress and mild anxiety in Europe and the USA. The present study investigated the effects of (Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (Lamiaceae)) lavender odour inhalation over 2 weeks or 24 h periods, on gerbil behaviour in the elevated plus maze in mature male and female gerbils, and compared results with the effects of diazepam (1 mg/kg) i.p. after 30 min and 2-week administration. Traditional measures of open entries showed an increasing trend over the 2 weeks exposure, whereas ethological measures indicative of anxiety; stretch-attend frequency and percentage protected head-dips, were significantly lower. Exploratory behaviour, total head-dip frequency, increased after 24 h lavender and 2 weeks exposure. These results are comparable with diazepam administration. There were sex differences in protected head-dip an ethological indicator of anxiety: females showed a significant decrease in protected head-dips compared to both males and to female controls. In conclusion exposure to lavender odour may have an anxiolytic profile in gerbils similar to that of the anxiolytic diazepam. In addition, prolonged, 2-week lavender odour exposure increased exploratory behaviour in females indicating a further decrease in anxiety in this sex.

  13. A Short History of the International Physics Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunfalvi, R.

    1984-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the International Physics Competition (IPC). IPC rules, aims, organization, participants, leaders, finance, language, duration, international jury, problems, evaluation, prizes, and organizers' responsibilities are discussed. Typical problems used and problem solving methods are also discussed. (JN)

  14. Environmental Response: Strawberry Hill Campus, Bar Harbor, Maine. The 21st Awards Program: A Year of Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Progressive Architecture Awards Jury gave citations to three projects grouped as "the response by architects to environmental problems." One citation was awarded to a college campus design utilizing solar energy, recycled materials, and wind power. (MF)

  15. Mid-Term Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplan, Carol

    1987-01-01

    Offers a midterm report on United States Supreme Court Cases. The cases dealt with voting rights, affirmative action, jury bias, the handicapped status of AIDS victims, religious holidays for teachers, and political spending of nonprofit corporations. (JDH)

  16. How common is "common knowledge" about child witnesses among legal professionals? Comparing interviewers, public defenders, and forensic psychologists with laypeople.

    PubMed

    Buck, Julie A; Warren, Amye R; Bruck, Maggie; Kuehnle, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluates the knowledge of jury-eligible college students (n = 192), investigative interviewers (n = 44), forensic psychologists (n = 39), and public defenders (n = 137) in regard to the research on interviewing children. These groups' knowledge was compared with the scientific research on the impact of interview techniques and practices on the accuracy of child witnesses. Jury-eligible students were the least knowledgeable, but their accuracy varied widely across items. Both interviewers and public defenders performed better than jury-eligible students, but they lacked substantial knowledge about the research on interviewing children on certain topics (e.g., using anatomically detailed dolls); forensic psychologists were the most knowledgeable. These findings suggest that professionals in the legal system need substantial professional development regarding the research on interviewing strategies with child witnesses. They also highlight the need for experts to provide case-relevant information to juries who lack basic information about the validity and reliability of children's reports.

  17. 16 CFR 1115.6 - Reporting of unreasonable risk of serious injury or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... shall attach considerable significance if such firm learns that a court or jury has determined that one... term includes not only the concept of “grievous bodily injury,” defined at § 1115.12(d), but also...

  18. Vacuum stability and radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in an SO(10) dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.; Zheng, Jiaming

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum stability in the Standard Model is problematic as the Higgs quartic self-coupling runs negative at a renormalization scale of about 1010 GeV . We consider a nonsupersymmetric SO(10) grand unification model for which gauge coupling unification is made possible through an intermediate scale gauge group, Gint=SU (3 )C⊗SU (2 )L⊗SU (2 )R⊗U (1 )B -L . Gint is broken by the vacuum expectation value of a 126 of SO(10) which not only provides for neutrino masses through the seesaw mechanism but also preserves a discrete Z2 that can account for the stability of a dark matter candidate, here taken to be the Standard Model singlet component of a bosonic 16 . We show that in addition to these features the model insures the positivity of the Higgs quartic coupling through its interactions to the dark matter multiplet and 126 . We also show that the Higgs mass squared runs negative, triggering electroweak symmetry breaking. Thus, the vacuum stability is achieved along with radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and captures two more important elements of supersymmetric models without low-energy supersymmetry. The conditions for perturbativity of quartic couplings and for radiative electroweak symmetry breaking lead to tight upper and lower limits on the dark matter mass, respectively, and this dark matter mass region (1.35-2 TeV) can be probed in future direct detection experiments.

  19. Effect of aromatherapy massage on dysmenorrhea in Turkish students.

    PubMed

    Apay, Serap Ejder; Arslan, Sevban; Akpinar, Reva Balci; Celebioglu, Ayda

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage on dysmenorrhea. The study used a quasiexperimental design with the subjects as their own control. Every participant applied both aromatherapy massage with lavender oil and placebo massage with odorless liquid petrolatum [soft paraffin]. The population comprised 438 midwifery and nursing students. The 150 students who had declared that they had suffered from dysmenorrhea used a visual analog scale to indicate their level of pain. Higher scores reflected a greater severity of dysmenorrhea. Forty-four students volunteered to participate in the study. When the lavender massage and the placebo massage were compared, the visual analog scale score of the lavender massage was found to decrease at a statistically significant rate. This study showed that massage was effective in reducing dysmenorrhea. In addition, this study showed that the effect of aromatherapy massage on pain was higher than that of placebo massage.

  20. Use of aromatherapy with hospice patients to decrease pain, anxiety, and depression and to promote an increased sense of well-being.

    PubMed

    Louis, Margaret; Kowalski, Susan D

    2002-01-01

    This study measured the responses of 17 cancer hospice patients to humidified essential lavender oil aromatherapy. Vital signs as well as levels of pain, anxiety, depression, and sense of well-being were measured (using 11-point verbal analogs). Each subject was measured on three different days before and after a 60-minute session consisting of (1) no treatment (control); (2) water humidification (control); or (3) 3-percent lavender aromatherapy. Results reflected a positive, yet small, change in blood pressure and pulse, pain, anxiety, depression, and sense of well-being after both the humidified water treatment and the lavender treatment. Following the control session (no treatment), there was also slight improvement in vital signs, depression, and sense of well-being, but not in pain or anxiety levels.

  1. Thin section of rock brought back to earth by Apollo 12 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    An idea of the mineralogy and texture of a lunar sample can be achieved by use of color microphotos. This thin section is Apollo 12 lunar sample number 12057.27, under polarized light. The lavender minerals are pyrexene; the black mineral is ilmenite; the white and brown, feldspar; and the remainder, olivine.

  2. Outcomes of Adult Learning: Taking the Debate Forward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Huw, Ed.; Mace, Jackie, Ed.

    The four papers in this collection are intended to stimulate debate in the adult education sector and to set the agenda for further development work. "Learning Outcomes: Towards a Synthesis of Progress" (Peter Lavender) provides a summary of recent efforts to identify, record, and value learning that does not lead to qualifications. "Learning…

  3. What Would Liz and Larry Say? Performing Critical Approaches to Choreographic Mentorship in American Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Ali

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues that Liz Lerman's and Larry Lavender's approaches to mentoring student choreographers denote a shift in the philosophy of choreographic mentorship in higher education, because they reflect current concerns in critical pedagogy. My particular interest is in the relationship established between student artist and educator when a…

  4. Control of the chewing louse Bovicola (Werneckiella) ocellatus in donkeys, using essential oils.

    PubMed

    Ellse, L; Burden, F A; Wall, R

    2013-12-01

    Infestations by lice can be a significant clinical and welfare issue in the management of large animals. The limited range of commercial pediculicides available and the development of resistance have led to the need to explore alternative louse management approaches. The results of in vitro and in vivo trials undertaken to control populations of the donkey chewing louse, Bovicola ocellatus (Piaget) (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae) using the essential oils of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) are reported here. Results of contact and vapour bioassays showed that 5% (v/v) tea tree and lavender oils resulted in > 80% louse mortality after 2 h of exposure. On farms, separate groups of 10 donkeys sprayed with 5% (v/v) tea tree and lavender oil as part of their usual grooming regime showed significant reductions in louse numbers compared with a control group (0.2% polysorbate 80 in water). These findings indicate that tea tree and lavender essential oils can provide clinically useful levels of control of B. ocellatus when used as part of a grooming routine and suggest that with further development could form the basis of an easy to apply and valuable component of a louse management programme for donkeys. PMID:23414090

  5. Olfactory Influences on Mood and Autonomic, Endocrine, and Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.; Graham, Jennifer E.; Malarkey, William B.; Porter, Kyle; Lemeshow, Stanley; Glaser, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Despite aromatherapy’s popularity, efficacy data are scant, and potential mechanisms are controversial. This randomized controlled trial examined the psychological, autonomic, endocrine, and immune consequences of one purported relaxant odor (lavender), one stimulant odor (lemon), and a no-odor control (water), before and after a stressor (cold pressor); 56 healthy men and women were exposed to each of the odors during three separate visits. To assess the effects of expectancies, participants randomized to the “blind” condition were given no information about the odors they would smell; “primed” individuals were told what odors they would smell during the session, and what changes to expect. Experimenters were blind. Self-report and unobtrusive mood measures provided robust evidence that lemon oil reliably enhances positive mood compared to water and lavender regardless of expectancies or previous use of aromatherapy. Moreover, norepinephrine levels following the cold pressor remained elevated when subjects smelled lemon, compared to water or lavender. DTH responses to Candida were larger following inhalation of water than lemon or lavender. Odors did not reliably alter IL-6 and IL-10 production, salivary cortisol, heart rate or blood pressure, skin barrier repair following tape stripping, or pain ratings following the cold pressor. PMID:18178322

  6. [Quality evaluation of essential oils].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norikazu; Kato, Yoshiko; Minamino, Miki; Watabe, Kazuhito

    2002-03-01

    Essential oils on the market were analyzed using GC-MS and the main ingredients of each essential oil were quantified. Analysis of the essential oil of Lavandula officinalis (lavender oil) showed that each sample had a different ratio of the contents of main ingredients, such as linalool, linalyl acetate, and camphor. In addition, some commercial lavender oils were analyzed by GC-MS for comparison with the Lavandula flagrans (lavandin oil) and the reference standard. As a result of this analysis, although the components of almost all commercial lavender oils were approximately the same as those of the reference standard, there were a few products that contained more than 0.5% of the amount of camphor in lavandin oil. This suggests that some lavender oil samples are mixed with lavandin oil to lower the price. Commercial essential oils of Melaleuca alternifolia (teatree oil) and Mentha piperita (peppermint oil) were also analyzed by GC-MS. Each of the peppermint oil samples had a different ratio in the content of its main ingredient. With respect to teatree oils, the amount of terpinens in each sample differed. These results led to concern about the efficacy of essential oils. For achieve the expected efficacy of essential oils, correct information on their ingredients should be available and quality control using instrumental analysis should be introduced. PMID:11905050

  7. Karla jay.

    PubMed

    Jay, K

    2000-01-01

    SUMMARY Karla Jay discusses Tales of the Lavender Menace: A Memoir of Liberation (published in 1999). She engages the connections between the personal and the political in her memoir. The reception by readers, family relations, the history of the feminist movement, racism, and homophobia are also deliberated in relation to the writing "process" and the motivations to write.

  8. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  9. ESF (Exploratory Shaft Facility) impact evaluation report: Volume 3, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    This document contains seven appendices to Volumes 1 and 2 of this series. Each appendix contains site location and design data for one of the seven potential sites (Deaf Smith County and Swisher County, Texas; Davis Canyon and Lavender Canyon, Utah; Cypress Creek Dome and Richton Dome, Mississippi; and Vacherie Dome, Louisiana). (TEM)

  10. Monet's Water Lilies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroni, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Students love the colors of Monet prints. The sunny yellows, misty blues, soft lavenders, and outrageous oranges. Using this as inspiration, Michelle Maroni wanted her students to discover new painting techniques and ways of planning a composition with more spontaneity. In this article, she describes how she introduced Claude Monet to her students…

  11. Control of the chewing louse Bovicola (Werneckiella) ocellatus in donkeys, using essential oils.

    PubMed

    Ellse, L; Burden, F A; Wall, R

    2013-12-01

    Infestations by lice can be a significant clinical and welfare issue in the management of large animals. The limited range of commercial pediculicides available and the development of resistance have led to the need to explore alternative louse management approaches. The results of in vitro and in vivo trials undertaken to control populations of the donkey chewing louse, Bovicola ocellatus (Piaget) (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae) using the essential oils of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) are reported here. Results of contact and vapour bioassays showed that 5% (v/v) tea tree and lavender oils resulted in > 80% louse mortality after 2 h of exposure. On farms, separate groups of 10 donkeys sprayed with 5% (v/v) tea tree and lavender oil as part of their usual grooming regime showed significant reductions in louse numbers compared with a control group (0.2% polysorbate 80 in water). These findings indicate that tea tree and lavender essential oils can provide clinically useful levels of control of B. ocellatus when used as part of a grooming routine and suggest that with further development could form the basis of an easy to apply and valuable component of a louse management programme for donkeys.

  12. Lavandula angustifolia extract improves deteriorated synaptic plasticity in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Soheili, Masoud; Tavirani, Mostafa Rezaei; Salami, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Neurodegenerative Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with profound deficits in synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Long-term potentiation (LTP), an experimental form of synaptic plasticity, is intensively examined in hippocampus. In this study we evaluated the effect of aqueous extract of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) on induction of LTP in the CA1 area of hippocampus. In response to stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals the baseline or tetanized field extracellular postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded in the CA1 area. Materials and Methods: The electrophysiological recordings were carried out in four groups of rats; two control groups including the vehicle (CON) and lavender (CE) treated rats and two Alzheimeric groups including the vehicle (ALZ) and lavender (AE) treated animals. Results: The extract inefficiently affected the baseline responses in the four testing groups. While the fEPSPs displayed a considerable LTP in the CON animals, no potentiation was evident in the tetanized responses in the ALZ rats. The herbal medicine effectively restored LTP in the AE group and further potentiated fEPSPs in the CE group. Conclusion: The positive effect of the lavender extract on the plasticity of synaptic transmission supports its previously reported behavioral effects on improvement of impaired spatial memory in the Alzheimeric animals. PMID:26949505

  13. Anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and apoptotic activities of four plant species used in folk medicine in the Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Amira, Smain; Dade, Martin; Schinella, Guillemo; Ríos, José-Luis

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the potential anti-inflammatory activity of myrtle (Myrtus communis), sarsaparilla (Smilax aspera), Arabian or French lavender (Lavandula stoechas), and calamint (Calamintha nepeta) along with their apoptotic effects on the pro-inflammatory cells, and the correlation of these effects with the plants' potential anti-oxidant activity. Myrtle extract exhibited the highest inhibitory activity in the paw oedema induced by carrageenan (60% at 3 h), whereas calamint, lavender, and sarsaparilla produced inhibitions of 49%, 38%, and 47%, respectively. None of them had an effect on the TPA-induced ear oedema. Moreover, all the extracts except sarsaparilla showed different degrees of anti-oxidant activity. Lavender and myrtle at 200 μg/mL decreased cell viability by 63% and 59%, respectively, after 3 h of incubation. Neutrophil elimination through apoptosis could be implicated in the resolution of acute inflammation in the case of lavender, whereas the reduction of reactive oxygen species produced by neutrophils, such as the superoxide anion and the hydroxyl radical, could be implicated in the overall reduction of inflammation. These results may support the traditional use of these plants. PMID:22186311

  14. Revisiting the insanity defense: contested or consensus?

    PubMed

    Cirincione, C

    1996-01-01

    The author assesses the accuracy of both the public's opinion and researchers' conclusions regarding the method of adjudication of insanity cases and investigates the impact of the various types of reforms enacted in the 1980s on the degree to which insanity cases are contested. Data from seven states are analyzed. The public's view that insanity cases are typically resolved by a jury trial is inaccurate. Only 14.4 percent of the 7,299 insanity cases involved a jury trial. Likewise, scholars' views that most cases are resolved through plea-bargained insanity acquittals are inaccurate. Only 42.9 percent of all insanity cases are plea bargains, and 87.9 percent of all plea bargains are to a conviction. Jury trials are most likely to occur when the case involves a violent crime such as murder and the defendant has not been diagnosed with a major mental illness. Public fears that defendants easily "fool" juries into an inappropriate insanity acquittal are also unfounded. Only 16.1 percent of all jury trials result in an insanity acquittal. In three states, the figure is 10 percent or less. Contrary to the conclusions drawn by some scholars, this author finds that several types of reforms enacted in the 1980s affected the processing of insanity cases.

  15. When domestic goes capital: Juror decision making in capital murder trials involving domestic homicide.

    PubMed

    Richards, Tara N; Smith, M Dwayne; Fogel, Sondra J; Bjerregaard, Beth

    2015-08-01

    Prior research suggests that homicide cases involving familial offenders and victims are subject to a "domestic discount" that reduces sentencing severity. However, the operation of a domestic discount in regard to death penalty sentencing has been rarely examined. The current research uses a near-population of jury decisions in capital murder trials conducted in North Carolina from 1991 to 2009 (n = 800), and a series of logistic regression analyses to determine whether there is (a) a direct effect between offender-victim relationship (e.g., domestic, friend/acquaintance, and stranger) and jury decision making, and/or (b) whether domestic offender-victim relationship (as well as other offender-victim relationships) moderates the effect of legal and extralegal case characteristics on jury assessment of the death penalty. Our findings revealed no empirical support for a "domestic discount" whereby juries are less likely to impose death sentences in cases involving domestic homicides. However, substantial differences in predictors of death sentencing were found across offender-victim dyads; most notably, domestic homicide cases demonstrated the most legalistic model of jury decisions to impose death sentences.

  16. When domestic goes capital: Juror decision making in capital murder trials involving domestic homicide.

    PubMed

    Richards, Tara N; Smith, M Dwayne; Fogel, Sondra J; Bjerregaard, Beth

    2015-08-01

    Prior research suggests that homicide cases involving familial offenders and victims are subject to a "domestic discount" that reduces sentencing severity. However, the operation of a domestic discount in regard to death penalty sentencing has been rarely examined. The current research uses a near-population of jury decisions in capital murder trials conducted in North Carolina from 1991 to 2009 (n = 800), and a series of logistic regression analyses to determine whether there is (a) a direct effect between offender-victim relationship (e.g., domestic, friend/acquaintance, and stranger) and jury decision making, and/or (b) whether domestic offender-victim relationship (as well as other offender-victim relationships) moderates the effect of legal and extralegal case characteristics on jury assessment of the death penalty. Our findings revealed no empirical support for a "domestic discount" whereby juries are less likely to impose death sentences in cases involving domestic homicides. However, substantial differences in predictors of death sentencing were found across offender-victim dyads; most notably, domestic homicide cases demonstrated the most legalistic model of jury decisions to impose death sentences. PMID:25844513

  17. The repellent and persistent toxic effects of essential oils against the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Nechita, I S; Poirel, M T; Cozma, V; Zenner, L

    2015-12-15

    The economic impact of the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, the lack of new acaricides, the occurrence of resistance and tighter legislation have all led to the need to find new ways to control this pest. One promising alternative method of control focuses on employing repellent and/or toxic effects of selected plant essential oils against D. gallinae. Ten essential oils (basil, thyme, coriander, eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, fir tree, oregano, mint, and juniper) were tested for the persistence of toxic and repellent effects. In filter-paper toxicity bioassays against D. gallinae, the best results were observed for lavender (more than 97% mortality after 48 and 72 h) and thyme (84% at 72 h) at a dose of 0.12 mg/cm(2). In addition, two oils showed significant persistent toxic effects 15 and 30 days post application to filter papers. Thyme was the most effective (100% mortality at 72 h), followed by lavender (nearly 80% mortality after 72 h). Out of the ten oils tested for their repellent effect, thyme was the strongest, with nearly 80% of the tested area avoided by mites; oregano caused a 60% avoidance and lavender exhibited an effect close to 40%. All other oils exhibited a repellent effect of less than 30%. None of the experiments showed a repellent effect for HM (commercial alimentary oil) or negative controls. We found that the thyme and lavender essential oils exhibited promising results when tested in vitro for toxic and repellent effects against D. gallinae; thus, we suggest that future experiments focus on in vivo tests using these oils in farm units.

  18. The repellent and persistent toxic effects of essential oils against the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Nechita, I S; Poirel, M T; Cozma, V; Zenner, L

    2015-12-15

    The economic impact of the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, the lack of new acaricides, the occurrence of resistance and tighter legislation have all led to the need to find new ways to control this pest. One promising alternative method of control focuses on employing repellent and/or toxic effects of selected plant essential oils against D. gallinae. Ten essential oils (basil, thyme, coriander, eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, fir tree, oregano, mint, and juniper) were tested for the persistence of toxic and repellent effects. In filter-paper toxicity bioassays against D. gallinae, the best results were observed for lavender (more than 97% mortality after 48 and 72 h) and thyme (84% at 72 h) at a dose of 0.12 mg/cm(2). In addition, two oils showed significant persistent toxic effects 15 and 30 days post application to filter papers. Thyme was the most effective (100% mortality at 72 h), followed by lavender (nearly 80% mortality after 72 h). Out of the ten oils tested for their repellent effect, thyme was the strongest, with nearly 80% of the tested area avoided by mites; oregano caused a 60% avoidance and lavender exhibited an effect close to 40%. All other oils exhibited a repellent effect of less than 30%. None of the experiments showed a repellent effect for HM (commercial alimentary oil) or negative controls. We found that the thyme and lavender essential oils exhibited promising results when tested in vitro for toxic and repellent effects against D. gallinae; thus, we suggest that future experiments focus on in vivo tests using these oils in farm units. PMID:26548812

  19. Individualizing justice after Atkins.

    PubMed

    Brakel, S Jan

    2006-01-01

    On August 6, 2005, newspapers and other media outlets reported that Daryl Atkins had been determined by a Virginia jury not to be retarded and therefore was mentally competent to receive the death penalty. A judge immediately scheduled his execution for December. Atkins, of course, is the convicted murderer whose case three years earlier had led the U.S. Supreme Court, in a landmark ruling, to declare that mentally retarded offenders are constitutionally exempt from the death penalty. While a bitter irony for Atkins, his family, and supporters, the Virginia jury's finding suggests that the practical effects of the Supreme Court's decision are less dramatic than many had anticipated. It shows that mere labels need not be determinative and that judges and juries as well as mental health experts called to assist them in capital cases can continue to work toward an individualized brand of justice.

  20. Anchoring in the courtroom: the effects of caps on punitive damages.

    PubMed

    Robbennolt, J K; Studebaker, C A

    1999-06-01

    Responding to the perception that civil damage awards are out of control, courts and legislatures have pursued tort reform efforts largely aimed at reigning in damage awards by juries. One proposed method for reigning in civil juries is to limit, or cap, the amount that can be awarded for punitive damages. Despite significant controversy over damage awards and the civil litigation system, there has been little research focusing on the process by which juries determine damages. In particular, there is a paucity of research on the possible effects of placing caps on punitive damages. The present research examines punitive damage caps and reveals an anchoring effect of the caps on both compensatory and punitive damages. A second experiment replicates this effect and examines the moderating effect of bifurcating the compensatory and punitive damage decisions.

  1. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    less are invited to present their research and results as a paper, in the style typically published by scientific journals. The student is allowed to choose a topic within the broad scope of physics, including cross-over fields such as astro- or biophysics. In 2008 over 2000 papers were submitted and 25 awards were given. In line with 'First Step' is the International Conference for Young Scientists (ICYS) [7]. The conference started in 1994 in Viségrad, Hungary. Here too, the participants present the results of their research, not by submitting a research paper but by giving a presentation to an audience of peers and a jury of specialists. The subjects of the presentations are in physics, mathematics, computer science, environmental sciences, engineering or life sciences. The jury awards the presentations according to the level of the content and the presentation. The last three competitions presented here are younger and did not start within Eastern European countries. The International Olympics of Astrophysics and Astronomy (IOAA) was organized for the second time in Bandung, Indonesia in 2008 and 24 countries participated [8]. As the title of the competition indicates, problems are directed towards theoretical and experimental aspects of astronomy. A little bit older is the European Union Science Olympiad (EUSO) [9]. This started in 2001, but the first competition took place in Dublin, Ireland, in 2003. The last competition was organized in March-April 2009 in Murcia, Spain. This competition addresses younger students, aged 17 years or less. It tries to combine biology, chemistry and physics. Although the problems are formulated in an interdisciplinary way, the students remain specialists, one in physics and the others in biology and chemistry. For even younger students, there is the International Junior Science Olympiad (IJSO) [10]. This competition started in December 2004 on the initiative of Professor Masno Ginting from Indonesia. The last competition took

  2. Aptamer targeting EGFRvIII mutant hampers its constitutive autophosphorylation and affects migration, invasion and proliferation of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Camorani, Simona; Crescenzi, Elvira; Colecchia, David; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Fedele, Monica; Chiariello, Mario; Cerchia, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive human brain tumor, associated with very poor survival despite surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) are hallmarks in GBM with driving roles in tumor progression. In approximately half of the tumors with amplified EGFR, the EGFRvIII truncated extracellular mutant is detected. EGFRvIII does not bind ligands, is highly oncogenic and its expression confers resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). It has been demonstrated that EGFRvIII-dependent cancers may escape targeted therapy by developing dependence on PDGFRβ signaling, thus providing a strong rationale for combination therapy aimed at blocking both EGFRvIII and PDGFRβ signaling. We have recently generated two nuclease resistant RNA aptamers, CL4 and Gint4.T, as high affinity ligands and inhibitors of the human wild-type EGFR (EGFRwt) and PDGFRβ, respectively. Herein, by different approaches, we demonstrate that CL4 aptamer binds to the EGFRvIII mutant even though it lacks most of the extracellular domain. As a consequence of binding, the aptamer inhibits EGFRvIII autophosphorylation and downstream signaling pathways, thus affecting migration, invasion and proliferation of EGFRvIII-expressing GBM cell lines. Further, we show that targeting EGFRvIII by CL4, as well as by EGFR-TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib, causes upregulation of PDGFRβ. Importantly, CL4 and gefitinib cooperate with the anti-PDGFRβ Gint4.T aptamer in inhibiting cell proliferation. The proposed aptamer-based strategy could have impact on targeted molecular cancer therapies and may result in progresses against GBMs. PMID:26461476

  3. A blitz fails. [Court case concerning health effects of electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, E.G. )

    1993-07-01

    An insider tells how the Zuidema jury sided with SDG E...despite unprecedented media pressure. In this court case, San Diego Gas and Electric was sued by plaintiffs alleging their childs rare kidney cancer was caused by electromagnetic fields (EMF) from power lines surrounding their house. After hearing all scientific evidence available up to the time of trial, the jury deliberated less than four hours in siding with SDG E. Jurors wanted to find for plaintiff but in interviews stated plaintiff did not present compelling evidence of cancer being caused by EMF. The jurors also found no need for warnings for the effects of EMF.

  4. A study of automobile exhaust noise preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haire, Jay B.; Carney, Melinda J.; Cheenne, Dominique J.

    2005-04-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between preferences in automobile exhaust noise and the demographic factors of a listening jury. Noise samples of four different vehicles were recorded at idle as well as at 3000 RPM, and 1/3 octave sound spectra were acquired simultaneously. The recordings were presented to the jury using headphones and a preference survey was administered. Zwicker loudness was computed for all samples. Demographic factors such as gender, age, current and future vehicle ownership, were correlated to listening preferences, and unforeseen results were found, especially in regards to sport utility vehicles (SUV).

  5. Effects of sentencing options and strict / lenient instructions on convicting suicide attempters.

    PubMed

    Range, Lillian M; Berman, Mitchell; Embry, Tippins

    2003-11-01

    Sentence and strictness of instructions influence juries' willingness to convict. To see whether this result holds for suicide attempters, 240 undergraduates read jury instructions for a suicide attempt that varied sentence (jail term, fine, community service, or mandatory counseling) and instructions, voted guilty / not guilty, and rated their certainty and effectiveness. With sentences of 25 hours mandatory counseling, or strict instructions, more respondents voted guilty. Sentence did not impact certainty or effectiveness, but strictness enhanced certainty. Overall, respondents were neutral that convicting a suicide attempter would reduce future attempts. Consistent with terror management theory, present students were willing to punish regardless of whether they thought that the punishment was preventive.

  6. The psychiatric expert in court.

    PubMed

    Kenny, A

    1984-05-01

    The law about expert evidence is unsatisfactory: it gives scope for the expert to usurp the role of judge, jury and parliament; it brings the professions of the experts into disrepute; and it sets juries the impossible task of sorting pseudo sciences from genuine ones. The law should be reformed by changing statutes which force expert witnesses to testify beyond their science, by taking the provision of expert evidence out of the adversarial context, and by removing from the courts the decision whether a nascent discipline is or is not a science.

  7. Conviction upheld in case that hinged on victim's credibility.

    PubMed

    1999-08-20

    The Idaho Court of Appeals upheld the conviction of [name removed], a former college basketball star, for exposing [name removed], a transsexual, to HIV through unprotected sex. The court refused to overturn a jury's verdict against [name removed] because the case turned on issues of credibility that only a jury could evaluate. [Name removed], who has been HIV-positive since 1990, had a previous conviction for exposing a sex partner to the virus. [name removed]'s credibility was undermined by her poor memory, her alcohol use prior to the encounter, and to her deceptive practices in living as a member of the opposite sex. PMID:11366625

  8. Conviction upheld in case that hinged on victim's credibility.

    PubMed

    1999-08-20

    The Idaho Court of Appeals upheld the conviction of [name removed], a former college basketball star, for exposing [name removed], a transsexual, to HIV through unprotected sex. The court refused to overturn a jury's verdict against [name removed] because the case turned on issues of credibility that only a jury could evaluate. [Name removed], who has been HIV-positive since 1990, had a previous conviction for exposing a sex partner to the virus. [name removed]'s credibility was undermined by her poor memory, her alcohol use prior to the encounter, and to her deceptive practices in living as a member of the opposite sex.

  9. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  10. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  11. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  12. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  13. A Report on a Survey of Artists/Craftspersons' Attitudes Toward Competitive Exhibitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinale, Robert L.; Arch, Adria B.

    Results of a survey to determine the attitudes of artists and craftspersons toward entering competitive juried exhibitions are reported. Questionnaires were sent to people entering the national Copper, Brass, and Bronze Exhibition for 1977 along with notices of acceptance or rejection. One hundred-ninety artists (38%) responded. The questionnaire…

  14. Community Development as an Approach to Community Engagement in Rural-Based Higher Education Institutions in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netshandama, V. O.

    2010-01-01

    The premise of this article is that the "jury is still out" to describe what effective Community Engagement entails in South African higher education institutions. The current discussions about community engagement and service learning do not cover the primary objective of adding value to the community, particularly of the rural-based universities…

  15. Beyond the Schoolhouse Door: Educating the Political Animal in Jefferson's Little Republics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotts, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Jefferson believed that citizenship must exhibit republican virtue. While education was necessary in a republican polity, it alone was insufficient in sustaining a revolutionary civic spirit. This paper examines Jefferson's expectations for citizen virtue, specifically related to militia and jury service in his "little republics."…

  16. By Unanimous Decision? A Second Look at Consensus in the Film Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Erwin; Popik, Zuzanna

    2014-01-01

    This article reports analyses of the verdicts of various film organizations that annually present awards to motion pictures and investigates whether they award/nominate the same movies in a given year. This research disputes previous findings that reported a high level of agreement between those juries, by the means of reliability analysis and the…

  17. Litigating Grades: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lionel S.

    2005-01-01

    This account of an academic lawsuit qualifies as a horror story. A mediocre minority student abuses civil rights and ADA protections to win a massive monetary award against his school on the flimsiest of evidence. Jaded lawyers for the state university represent powerless faculty defendants in court, torpidly allowing the jury to throw 50 years of…

  18. The New Face of Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole D.; Doyle, Joey

    2009-01-01

    As the nation's first standards-based art event, the Visual Arts Scholastic Event (VASE) is opening doors and creating opportunities for art students. VASE is the brainchild of passionate art educators who believe that high-school artists have potential far beyond the basic juried art exhibition. They believe that students should be able to create…

  19. Global Research in an Age of Export Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    When a jury convicted a Tennessee professor this month of illegally exporting information to foreign countries via his graduate students and a trip to China, it sent a message to colleges that they need to scrupulously monitor their faculty members' research and their compliance with the often confusing universe of export-control regulations. In…

  20. College Students' Conceptualizations of Deficits Involved in Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musso, Mandi W.; Barker, Alyse A.; Proto, Daniel A.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2012-01-01

    Precedential rulings in recent capital murder trials may, in some cases, leave it up to a jury to determine whether or not an individual meets criteria for an intellectual disability (ID) and should be spared from the death penalty. Despite the potential for misconceptions about ID to bias decisions, few empirical studies have examined the…

  1. Balancing Act: First and Sixth Amendment Rights in High-Profile Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, James H.

    2005-01-01

    We often hear that democracy is not a spectator sport. This is certainly true of trial by jury, a cornerstone of our democracy, which depends on the willingness of Americans from all walks of life to devote themselves to the difficult work of determining another person's guilt or innocence of a crime. But the work of those citizens selected to…

  2. Effects of an Evidence-Based Text on Scepticism, Methodological Reasoning, Values and Juror Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leshowitz, Barry; Okun, Morris

    2011-01-01

    Research in social cognition laboratories and in simulated legal settings demonstrates that people often do not understand the statistical properties of evidence and are unable to detect scientifically flawed studies. In a mock jury study, we examined the effects of an evidence-based transcript on scepticism towards evidence obtained in flawed…

  3. 32 CFR 144.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Responsibilities. 144.5 Section 144.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SERVICE BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.5 Responsibilities. The Secretaries...

  4. 32 CFR 144.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibilities. 144.5 Section 144.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SERVICE BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.5 Responsibilities. The Secretaries...

  5. Youth Court: A Community Solution for Embracing At-Risk Youth. A National Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Sarah S.; Jurich, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    Youth court, also called teen court, peer jury, or student court, is an alternative to the traditional juvenile justice system and school disciplinary proceedings that empower youth and communities to take an active role in addressing the early stages of youth delinquency. The program provides communities with an opportunity to ensure immediate…

  6. Kentucky's Unified Court of Justice. Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort. Div. of Program Development.

    Resource materials and learning activities to help secondary students in Kentucky learn about their state's court system are provided. The guide begins by providing a history of the Kentucky Court of Justice. Discussed are the qualification of judges, the Retirement and Removal Commission, the Judicial Nominating Commission, and juries. Background…

  7. The Florida High School Mock Trial Competition Case Materials, 1997. State of Florida v. Lee Appleman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Law Related Education Association, Tallahassee.

    This material provides students with information to prepare for a mock trial. The defendant in this case has been accused of the crime of driving under the influence of alcoholic beverages causing severe bodily injury. Case materials include stipulated facts, jury instructions, depositions, and other related materials. (EH)

  8. Examination of Capital Murder Jurors' Deliberations: Methods and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Keith; Coleman, Susan; Byrd, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    The study of capital juries remains a subject of critical interest for the public and for legislative and judicial policy makers as well as legal scholars and social scientists. Cowan, Thompson, and Ellsworth established one of the standard methodologies for examination of this topic in their 1984 seminal study by observing the subjects' debate…

  9. Selected Papers from the International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (12th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection contains the 20 best papers from a conference at which nearly 300 faculty members presented papers. Those that were selected by juried review include: (1) "Where Have You Been? A Case Study of Successful Implementation of Undergraduate Online Learning Communities" (John Barnett); (2) "A Strange Sense of Disquietude: Understanding…

  10. The Authority of Truth: Religion and the John Peter Zenger Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, David Paul

    1985-01-01

    Argues that an appreciation of the religious milieu of the Zenger case can help to explain the nature of the defense, the meaning of the jury's verdict, and the ambiguous legacy of the trial for freedom of expression in the United States. (FL)

  11. The Authority of Truth: Religion and the John Peter Zenger Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, David Paul

    An appreciation of the religious milieu of the John Peter Zenger libel case of 1735 can help explain the nature of the Zenger defense as prepared by Alexander Hamilton, the meaning of the jury's verdict, and the ambiguous legacy of the trial for freedom of expression in the United States. In essence, the case was a disputation on "truth" and on…

  12. Texas inmate who spat on guard loses habeas appeal.

    PubMed

    1995-07-28

    The Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has rejected [name removed]' petition for a writ of habeas corpus after concluding that [name removed] could have killed a prison guard by infecting him with saliva. [Name removed], a prisoner with HIV, will spend the rest of his life behind bars for spitting in the prison guard's face in June 1988. However, the prosecution never established that virus was present in [name removed]' saliva, and the guard tested negative for HIV antibodies. The appeals court decided to uphold the jury's decision to believe the witnesses who testified that HIV could be transmitted through saliva. Although the appeals court found that the defense presented enough scientific evidence to show that HIV cannot be transmitted by saliva, the court decided that as long as some evidence existed for the jury to draw its conclusions, they could not disturb the jury's assessment. The defense also contended that the trial judge gave improper instructions to the jury in how to evaluate whether an act tends to but fails to effect the commission of murder. The appeals court found the judge's instructions to be flawed, but not so much as to harm [name removed]' due process rights. PMID:11362693

  13. 24 CFR 884.215 - Lease requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... changes in the Lessee's family income, family composition, or extent of exceptional medical or other... waive the tenant's right to a trial by jury. (7) Waiver of right to appeal judicial error in legal... judicial error in any suit or the tenant's right to file a suit in equity to prevent the execution of...

  14. 24 CFR 884.215 - Lease requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... changes in the Lessee's family income, family composition, or extent of exceptional medical or other... waive the tenant's right to a trial by jury. (7) Waiver of right to appeal judicial error in legal... judicial error in any suit or the tenant's right to file a suit in equity to prevent the execution of...

  15. Cutting Edge Books: The Impact of Digital Books on Public Library Acquisitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The book has made the transition to the digital age; that much is certain. However, the jury is still out on what form or forms the book of the future will take and how libraries will adapt. This article is a look at the impact of digital books on public library acquisitions, including available formats, purchasing considerations, functional…

  16. Remembering Amadou Diallo: The Response of the New Teachers Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, S. Maxwell; Murphy, Maureen; Singer, Alan; Stacki, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes email excerpts of teachers' views about racial violence stimulated by the remembrance of a February 2002 jury verdict wherein four white New City police officers were acquitted of the wrongful death of Amadou Diallo, a black African immigrant. The exchanges occurred among members of the Hofstra University New Teachers Network. (PKP)

  17. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  18. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  19. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  20. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  1. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  2. American military dentists as prisoners-of-war in the Pacific theatre during World War II.

    PubMed

    Bober-Moken, I G

    1994-03-01

    Fifty-three American Military dentists were held by the Japanese as Prisoners-of-War during World War II. Throughout 40 months of captivity these men served their fellow prisoners providing dental treatment in an austere environment with "jury-rigged" equipment and supplies. A brief overview of their experiences is presented in this paper. PMID:8061507

  3. "Francine, Kerplunk, and the Golden Nugget" -- Conducting Mock Trials and Debates in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Charles R.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process for creating a mock trial based on the fable "Francine, Kerplunk, and the Golden Nugget." Explains that during the jury deliberations the jurors utilize chart structures to assess the credibility of the witness' testimony and the attorney's arguments. Maintains that chart structures can also be adapted to classroom debates.…

  4. From Theory to Data: The Process of Refining Learning Progressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Nicole A.; Duncan, Ravit Golan

    2013-01-01

    Learning progressions (LPs) are theoretical models of how learners develop expertise in a domain over extended periods of time. Recent policy reports have touted LPs as a promising approach to aligning standards, curriculum, and assessment. However, the scholarship on LPs is relatively sparse, and the jury is still out on the theoretical and…

  5. The Status of Graphical Presentation in Interior/Architectural Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurel, Meltem O.; Basa, Inci

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that interior/architectural design education favours a dominance of final presentation over the design process in the studio environment, particularly in the evaluation of a project. It suggests that the appeal of design juries for pleasant drawings, which may shift the emphasis from the project itself to its representation,…

  6. Interiors That Stand Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "It's what's on the inside that counts"--at least when it comes to "American School & University's" (AS&U's) annual Educational Interiors Showcase competition. Each May, "AS&U" assembles at its Overland Park, Kansas headquarters a jury made up of education and architectural professionals from across the country to pore over an array of exceptional…

  7. Student Speech--The First Amendment and Qualified Immunity Under 42 U.S.C. Section 983: Conduct Implications for School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araux, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the conduct implications of qualified immunity in allegations of deprivation of civil rights by public school administrators regarding the First Amendment-student speech. Methodology: Data were collected using the LexisNexis and JuriSearch online legal research systems, which…

  8. The Effect of Using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on Developing English Majors' Oral Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdallah, Mahmoud Mohammad Sayed

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on developing first-year English majors' oral communication skills. Based on literature review and related studies, a list of 20 oral communication skills was prepared and displayed over a panel of jury members to select…

  9. Classic and Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, John M.

    Through an analysis of several stories, this paper defines the similarities and differences between classic and hard-boiled detective fiction. The characters and plots of three stories are discussed: "The Red House" by A. A. Milne; "I, The Jury" by Mickey Spillane; and "League of Frightened Men" by Rex Stout. The classic detective story is defined…

  10. The Effectiveness of Guided Induction versus Deductive Instruction on the Development of Complex Spanish "Gustar" Structures: An Analysis of Learning Outcomes and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerezo, Luis; Caras, Allison; Leow, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analytic research suggests an edge of explicit over implicit instruction for the development of complex L2 grammatical structures, but the jury is still out as to which type of explicit instruction--"deductive" or "inductive," where rules are respectively provided or elicited--proves more effective. Avoiding this…

  11. 42 CFR 137.309 - How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... may only be filed in Federal court under the provisions of the APA, 5 U.S.C. 701-706. Under the APA, a... the court's views for those of the agency. Jury trials and civil discovery are not permitted in APA... injunctive relief to the interested party. No money damages or fines are permitted in APA proceedings....

  12. Ucebnoe posobie dlja studentov pedagogiceskih institutov (Manual for Students of Teacher Training Institutes).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogorodnikov, I. T.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a book recommended for publication by the jury of the open competition for educational manuals to be used in teacher training institutes; it is designed for the Soviet educational theory course for general secondary school teachers. The five chapters deal with the subject…

  13. The Theory of Distributed Practice as Related to Acquisition of Psychomotor Skills by Adolescents in a Selected Curricular Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, James Bob

    1981-01-01

    From results on the tensile strength and nick-break average jury evaluations test, it was concluded that with the same total practice time, different distributions of welding practice time intervals (15, 30, and 45 minutes) influence the quality of butt welds made by ninth-grade vocational agriculture students. (Author/SJL)

  14. Blackboard Wins Payment from Competitor in Patent Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    A federal jury in Texas awarded Blackboard Inc. $3.1-million last month, saying that a smaller Canadian competitor, Desire2Learn Inc., had infringed Blackboard's patent for a system of delivering course materials online. The case has been closely watched by campus-technology officials, many of whom feared that a Blackboard win could stifle…

  15. A Guide for Developing Comprehensive Community College Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlo, Frank P.

    Heretofore community colleges have adopted the facility standards of high schools or other colleges, or have devised their own. To establish flexible specifications especially for the junior college, based on the educational program, architectural feasibility, safety, student and faculty use, and possible future needs, a 6-man jury prepared a…

  16. The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education: Ten Years of Learning for Peace. Peace Education Miniprints, No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Unku Abdul; Reardon, Betty A.

    The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education was established in 1981. The purpose of the award is to honor outstanding contributions to the field of peace education in its most broadly defined sense. In this paper, two members of the international jury for the prize review the recipients of the awards from 1981 to 1991, and thus demonstrate the variety of…

  17. Anti-Bullying Practices in American Schools: Perspectives of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Yiping C.; Nickerson, Amanda B.

    2010-01-01

    A random sample of 213 school psychologists working in a school setting completed a survey on their schools' current anti-bullying practices. Talking with bullies following bullying incidents, disciplinary consequences for bullies, and increasing adult supervision were the three most frequently used strategies. Peer juries/court, an anti-bullying…

  18. 41 CFR 105-60.602 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... General Services Administration Employees in Response to Subpoenas or Similar Demands in Judicial or... because of that person's official status. (c) Demand means any subpoena, order, or similar demand for the... subpoenas or demands in Federal grand jury proceedings, and served upon a present or former GSA employee....

  19. 41 CFR 105-60.601 - Purpose and scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the General Services Administration in response to subpoenas or similar demands issued in judicial or... instructions applies to responses to subpoenas or demands issued by the Congress or in Federal grand jury... by Present or Former General Services Administration Employees in Response to Subpoenas or...

  20. 42 CFR 137.309 - How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... may only be filed in Federal court under the provisions of the APA, 5 U.S.C. 701-706. Under the APA, a... the court's views for those of the agency. Jury trials and civil discovery are not permitted in APA... injunctive relief to the interested party. No money damages or fines are permitted in APA proceedings....

  1. Selected Papers from the 13th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    The papers in this collection are the 15 best papers from the thirteenth International Conference on College Teaching and Learning. They represent a cross-section of nearly 300 presentations, selected by juried review from 40 submitted for consideration. The papers are: (1) The Use of Hybrid Type Educational Digital Entities in University…

  2. A Correlation Study of Exemplary Exurban African American Achievement in Standardized Testing and the Relationship of Parental Household Size in a Southeastern Public School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, David H.

    2012-01-01

    This study included a literature review of juried research studies of student achievement factors that affect African American achievements tracked in the No Child Left Behind Legislative Act. Statistical correlation analyses were performed to determine if the absence or presence of one or two-parents in the household affected student achievement…

  3. Fait A La Main: A Source Book of Louisiana Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Maida, Ed.

    The Louisiana Crafts Program is an economic development program that strives to stimulate several markets for Louisiana craftsmen. This publication is a directory of juried Louisiana craftsmen of various types; it is intended as a source book for anyone interested in handmade crafts. It is divided into two sections: "Folk Craftsmen" and…

  4. Applications of Computer Conferencing to Teacher Education and Human Resource Development. Proceedings from an International Symposium on Computer Conferencing (Columbus, Ohio, June 13-15, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Aaron J., Ed.

    This document contains the texts of seven invited presentations and six juried papers from a symposium on the uses of computer conferencing in teacher education and human resource development. The invited presentations include the following: "Computer Conferencing in the Context of Theory and Practice of Distance Education" (Michael G. Moore); "An…

  5. Employing a Mock Trial in a Criminology Course: An Applied Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepelak, Norma J.

    1996-01-01

    Recounts a criminology class exercise that consisted of staging a mock trial using the murders from Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" as source material. Students research the case and role play various lawyers, jury members, and witnesses. Identifies and discusses four educational objectives attainable through the staging of mock trials. (MJP)

  6. Teaching Law to Online Law Students at RMIT University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babacan, Alperhan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the online Juris Doctor Program (JD Program) at RMIT University. The first part of the paper provides a brief overview of the JD Program, the graduate capabilities of the Program and key principles associated with the teaching of law to online postgraduate students. In line with the literature in the area of online teaching…

  7. 12 CFR 219.5 - Conditions for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... payment. (a) Direct costs. Payment shall be made only for costs that are both directly incurred and... or delivery costs shall be considered separately when determining whether the costs are reasonably... customer successfully challenges disclosure to a grand jury or government authority, the...

  8. 26 CFR 301.9000-6 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... refers the matter to the United States Department of Justice, requesting the institution of a Federal grand jury to investigate further potential criminal tax violations. The United States Department of... IRS special agent was acting under the direction and control of the United States Attorney's Office...

  9. The Importance of Nonverbal Communication in the Courtroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remland, Martin S.

    Although a relatively new area of scientific study, theory and research on nonverbal communication in the courtroom has produced important findings for students and practitioners in five key areas: voire dire and jury analysis; opening and closing statements; client demeanor and direct examination; cross-examination; and judge demeanor and…

  10. 28 CFR 16.89 - Exemption of Civil Division Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subject of a criminal or civil matter or case under investigation with an accounting of disclosures of... prosecution of grand jury, civil fraud, and other law enforcement matters, disclosure could compromise matters...) Subsection (e)(1). In the course of criminal or civil investigations, cases, or matters, the Civil...

  11. 28 CFR 16.92 - Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... investigations, and/or law enforcement matters, the exemption does not apply. In addition, where compliance would... individual. To provide the subject of a criminal or civil matter or case under investigation with an... investigation and/or prosecution of grand jury, civil fraud, and other law enforcement matters, disclosure...

  12. iMAGiNE! YELLOWSTONE: Art Education and the Reinhabitation of Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Doug; Cowan, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes an art education program that connects children and youth to the historical and contemporary issues associated with Yellowstone National Park. Originally conceived as a one-year celebration, the project has grown into a juried exhibit showcasing student art and writing which responds to Yellowstone resource themes and issues. (MJP)

  13. Beyond the Debate: Perspectives on the Preparation of Vocational Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Council for Vocational Education.

    This monograph examines issues central to a number of education reform proposals for secondary and postsecondary vocational education. Nine papers, chosen by a jury of the University Council for Vocational Education, are included: "Changing Workplace--Changing Education" (Douglas C. Smith); "Vocational Teacher Education: Emerging Patterns for…

  14. 5 CFR 300.503 - Conditions for using private sector temporaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... appointment recruiting requirements, including veterans' preference found in 5 CFR part 316 to determine... displaced Federal employee as required by 5 CFR part 330, subpart F (Agency Career Transition Assistance... emergency, accident, illness, parental or family responsibilities, or mandatory jury service, but...

  15. People with Mental Retardation Are Dying, Legally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Denis; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Criticizes the institution of the death penalty for convicted criminals with mental retardation. Examples are given of cases in which juries were not told of the defendant's mental retardation before sentencing, and a list of defendants with mental retardation that have been executed since 1976 is provided. (CR)

  16. Expert Testimony, "Regular People," and Public Values: Arguing Common Sense at a Death Penalty Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Virginia A.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a case study of a particular courtroom case dealing with the death penalty. Analyzes the processes and communications of the trial jury. Discusses the interplay of common-sense and expert claims at three crucial stages of the trial. (HB)

  17. Swan Song for the Burger Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Robert L., Jr.; Ramarui, Cornelis O.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews a collection of decisions rendered by the Burger Court during its waning months. The decisions involve (1) criminal procedures, (2) racial bias in jury selection, (3) search and seizure, and (4) the exclusion of jurors who have reservations about the death penalty. (JDH)

  18. Score Calculation in Informatics Contests Using Multiple Criteria Decision Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skupiene, Jurate

    2011-01-01

    The Lithuanian Informatics Olympiad is a problem solving contest for high school students. The work of each contestant is evaluated in terms of several criteria, where each criterion is measured according to its own scale (but the same scale for each contestant). Several jury members are involved in the evaluation. This paper analyses the problem…

  19. HeinOnline: An Online Archive of Law Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marisa, Richard J.

    Law is grounded in the past, in the decisions and reasoning of generations of lawyers, judges, juries, and professors. Ready access to this history is vital to solid legal research, and yet, until 2000, much of it was buried in vast collections of aging paper journals. HeinOnline is a new online archive of law journals. Development of HeinOnline…

  20. Exercises for Keeping Pianists' Hands in Top Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Some pianists have idiosyncratic ways of keeping their hands and fingers relaxed. Glenn Gould, for example, religiously soaked his digits in hot water before performing or recording. While the jury is still out on the effectiveness of Gould's routine, there are plenty of other exercises and practices that will keep a pianist's fingers limber.…

  1. Sociologist Jailed Because He "Wouldn't Snitch" Ponders the Way Research Ought to Be Done.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A Washington doctoral candidate in sociology is jailed for contempt of court for not revealing conversations with animal-rights activists in a grand jury investigation of a research laboratory raid at his institution. The graduate student refused to breach an American Sociological Association pledge of scholarly confidentiality. (MSE)

  2. Adapted Verbal Feedback, Instructor Interaction and Student Emotions in the Landscape Architecture Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl A.; Boyer, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    In light of concerns with architectural students' emotional jeopardy during traditional desk and final-jury critiques, the authors pursue alternative approaches intended to provide more supportive and mentoring verbal assessment in landscape architecture studios. In addition to traditional studio-based critiques throughout a semester, we provide…

  3. Equality v. Liberty v. Pluralism: Latinos in American Constitutional Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltero, Carlos R.

    This paper examines how U.S. courts, particularly the Supreme Court, have applied constitutional law principles to Latino communities and individuals in three areas: public education, the status of Puerto Rico, and jury selection. Consistent with traditional views of American society as biracial (black and white), constitutional law discussions…

  4. 28 CFR 0.13 - Legal proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Legal proceedings. 0.13 Section 0.13... Attorney General § 0.13 Legal proceedings. (a) Each Assistant Attorney General and Deputy Assistant... to conduct any legal proceeding, civil or criminal, including grand jury proceedings and...

  5. 28 CFR 0.13 - Legal proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Legal proceedings. 0.13 Section 0.13... Attorney General § 0.13 Legal proceedings. (a) Each Assistant Attorney General and Deputy Assistant... to conduct any legal proceeding, civil or criminal, including grand jury proceedings and...

  6. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of......

  7. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of......

  8. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of......

  9. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of......

  10. Will Female Kicker's Legal Victory Reshape Gender Roles in Athletics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Welch

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes implications of a $2-million judgment awarded to a female football player by a federal jury who found that Duke University (North Carolina) engaged in illegal discrimination by keeping her off its football team. Considers the tradition of football as a decidedly male activity, Title IX requirements, and the large degree of variance in…

  11. The Effect of Using a Program Based on Cooperative Learning Strategy on Developing some Oral Communication Skills of Students, at English Department, Faculty of Education, Sana'a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuheer, Khaled Mohsen Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of study is to investigate the effective of using a cooperative learning strategy STAD-based program on developing some oral communication skills of second level students, English Department, Faculty of Education, Sana'a University. Based on literature review, related studies and a panel of jury members' point of view, a list of 5 oral…

  12. Cost Utility: An Aid to Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Crist H.

    A set of procedures were developed which assist in structuring tasks and objectives in a manner to permit rational decision making. The model uses a jury of experts to rank various objectives and program processes in terms of their importance. Values are generated which relate to costs in the form of a utility-cost ratio. The model was tested in a…

  13. The Wasps in Court: Argument and Audience in the Athenian Dikasteries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Raymond S.

    In an attempt to explain why Aristotle devotes a substantial part of Book Two of "The Rhetoric" to methods for arousing jurors' emotions, despite stating previously that such emotional appeal is nonessential and unethical, this paper examines the nature of the Athenian jury courts, or dikasteries. It first discusses the historical development and…

  14. Reading the Riot Act: Rhetoric, Psychology, and Counter-Revolutionary Discourse in Shays's Rebellion, 1786-1787

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engels, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    In 1786, backcountry Massachusetts farmers, fed up with government policies favoring aristocratic elites, marched on courts to bar the entry of judges and juries. Enacting a long-standing tradition known to colonists as a "Regulation," the farmers' movement became known as Shays's Rebellion. Erupting in the turbulent days following the War for…

  15. Supreme Court's New Term. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the issues addressed in the 2002 U.S. Supreme Court term, such as the First, Fourth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments, cruel and unusual punishment, sex offender registries, fair housing, cross burning, jury selection, affirmative action, abortion protests, and copyrights and the public domain. (CMK)

  16. Representation of Legal Knowledge for Conceptual Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, George R.; deBessonet, Cary G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes traditional legal information retrieval systems--Juris, Lexis, Westlaw--and several new rule-based, knowledge-based, legal knowledge reasoning, and analytical legal information systems--Waterman and Peterson's Legal Decisionmaking System, Hafner's Legal Information Retrieval System, McCarty's TAXMAN, and the deBessonet representation of…

  17. MOOCs for High School: Unlocking Opportunities or Substandard Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    If 2012 was the year of the MOOC--massive open online course--then 2013 was the year the MOOC hype returned to Earth. Largely lost in the coverage in both years, however, was the impact MOOCs might have in high schools. Although the jury is still out on that question, high schools around the country are experimenting with adding MOOCs to their…

  18. Secondary School Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Joseph; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents five complete lesson plans for activities that teach high school students about search and seizure, due process, freedom of assembly, right to counsel, and other individual liberties, through the use of case study techniques, a jury simulation, the analysis of historical material, and discussions. (JDH)

  19. Curriculum Materials for Teaching Students the Competencies Needed for Employment in Nonfarm Agricultural Business. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L.; And Others

    Developed by means of a research project, this teaching guide includes five instructional modules in which competencies for agribusiness occupations are stressed. These competencies were identified from a review of the literature and evaluated by a jury of teachers and agribusinessmen in terms of qualifications needed for entry-level employment.…

  20. 76 FR 60519 - Privacy Act of 1974; as Amended; Notice To Amend an Existing System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... (42 FR 19014). The system was last revised on August 18, 1983 (48 FR 37536). DATES: Comments must be...-grantees, lessees, licensees, and other persons engaged in business with the DOI or having contact with the... the purpose of its introduction to a grand jury. (19) To the Office of Personnel Management...

  1. The Double Helix Takes the Witness Stand: Behavioral and Neuropsychiatric Genetics in Court

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Data on neuropsychiatric and behavioral genetics have attracted legal interest, as attorneys explore their use in criminal and civil cases. These developments may assist judges and juries in making difficult judgments—but they bring substantial risk of misinterpretation and misuse. PMID:24908480

  2. The potential inhalation hazard posed by dioxin contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Paustenbach, D.J.; Sarlos, T.T.; Lau, V.; Finley, B.L.; Jeffrey, D.A.; Ungs, M.J. )

    1991-10-01

    Mathematical models and field data were used to estimate the airborne concentrations of 2,3,7,8 tetratchlorodibenxo-p-dioxin (TCDD) vapor and particulates which could originate from soil containing 100 ppb TCDD. The model of Jury et al. (1983) and the box approach were used to predict the concentration of TCDD vapor from soil. These results indicate that the concentration predicted by the Jury et al. model are about 1,000 fold greater than which actually occur. The inability of the Jury model to accurately estimate the rate of violation of TCDD from soil is probably because the TCDD was applied to the sol in a formulated state where it could easily migrate below the surface. A recent modification of the Jury model (1990) suggests that a 5-50 mm layer of clean soil will significantly retard (or eliminate) the vapor hazard posed by TCDD contaminated soil. The risks due to fugitive dust will always be greater than the vapor hazard, but for soil concentrations of 100 ppb the cancer risk should be less than 10{sup {minus}6}. Since few sites have average soil concentrations as high as 100 ppb, this nearly worst case analysis indicates that inhalation will rarely, if ever, be a significant route of exposure to TCDD-contaminated soil.

  3. WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO SELL FEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALBRACHT, JAMES J.

    TO DETERMINE THE VOCATIONAL COMPETENCIES NECESSARY FOR THE PERFORMANCE OF NINE ESSENTIAL SALES ACTIVITIES IN THE FEED INDUSTRY, A JURY OF 24 FEED DEALERS, SALES TRAINING DIRECTORS, AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION RESEARCHERS, AND BUSINESS EDUCATION RESEARCHERS MADE "YES" AND "NO" DETERMINATIONS FOR 40 COMPETENCIES. THE NUMBER OF COMPETENCIES CONSIDERED…

  4. Free Press and Fair Trial: Some Dimensions of the Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Ed.

    This volume presents the findings of several research studies related to jury verdicts in felony cases and pretrial publicity. The studies include: "Trial Judges' Opinions on Prejudicial Publicity" by Fred Siebert, an attempt to learn whether or not judges thought that pretrial publicity had ever resulted in miscarriage of justice in their courts;…

  5. THE CONTRIBUTION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION TO THE RURAL DEVELOPMENT OF ETHIOPIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KERBRET, MAKONNEN

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE PRESENT SITUATION IN ETHIOPIA AND A REVIEW OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT IN THE WORLD WAS MADE THROUGH INTENSIVE LIBRARY RESEARCH. GUIDELINES AND OBJECTIVES WERE BASED ON THE REVIEW SUBMITTED TO A JURY OF EXPERTS FOR VERIFICATION. REVISED GUIDELINES AND OBJECTIVES WERE THEN DEVELOPED FOR GUIDING AND IMPLEMENTING THE…

  6. A GUIDE FOR SELF-EVALUATION OF STATE SUPERVISORY PROGRAMS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LINSON, MARVIN G.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DEVELOP A GUIDE FOR THE SELF-EVALUATION OF STATE SUPERVISORY PROGRAMS OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE AND TO DESIGN AN INSTRUMENT TO ASSIST IN THIS EVALUATION. TWO NATIONAL JURIES OF EXPERTS IN EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION ASSISTED IN REFINING A SET OF STATEMENTS, DEVELOPED TO SERVE AS INDICATORS OF SUCCESSFUL…

  7. THE ROLE OF PREVOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS OF NEW YORK STATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AL-SALMAN, MUHSIN HUSSAIN

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DESCRIBE EXISTING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PREVOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE COURSES AND DETERMINE WHAT SELECTED EDUCATORS IN AGRICULTURE BELIEVE THE OBJECTIVES AND COURSE CONTENT SHOULD BE. LISTS OF 17 OBJECTIVES AND 103 COURSE CONTENT ITEMS IN NINE SUBJECT AREAS WERE ASSEMBLED. A JURY OF 17 MEMBERS RANKED THE OBJECTIVES AND…

  8. Journal of College Reading and Learning, Volume XVIII, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hear, Michael F., Ed.; Knowles, Ramona, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Drawn from the proceedings of the 1985 Western College Reading and Learning Association, as well as articles submitted for juried selection, the papers in this journal issue focus on reading, learning assistance, developmental education, and tutorial services at the college level. Titles and authors of the papers include (1) "Reaching New Heights:…

  9. The analgesic effect of odour and music upon dressing change.

    PubMed

    Kane, F M A; Brodie, E E; Coull, A; Coyne, L; Howd, A; Milne, A; Niven, C C; Robbins, R

    Vascular wounds may require frequent dressing changes over a long period of time, often involving pain, which may not be adequately controlled with conventional analgesia. Complementary analgesia may be beneficial as an adjunctive therapy. This pilot study presented eight patients with two odour therapies, lavender and lemon, two music therapies, relaxing and preferred music and a control condition, during vascular wound dressing changes. Although the therapies did not reduce the pain intensity during the dressing change there was a significant reduction in pain intensity for the lavender therapy and a reduction in pain intensity for the relaxing music therapy after the dressing change. This supports the use of these complementary therapies, which are inexpensive, easy to administer and have no known side effects, as adjunctive analgesia in this patient population. Earlier administration before dressing change may enhance these effects. Further research is required to ascertain why certain complementary therapies are more effective than others at relieving pain.

  10. Insecticidal effects of essential oils from various plants against larvae of pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa Schiff) (Lepidoptera: Thaumetopoeidae).

    PubMed

    Kanat, Mehmet; Alma, M Hakki

    2004-02-01

    Along with sulfate turpentine, the essential oils obtained by steam distillation from nine plant species naturally grown in Turkish forests were tested at three different concentrations to evaluate their effectiveness against the larvae of pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa Schiff). The results indicated that the essential oils from the nine species and sulfate turpentine were effective against the larvae of T pityocampa. The most effective essential oil in the control of the larvae was steam-distilled wood turpentine, followed by thyme herb oil, juniper berry oil, laurel leaf oil, lavender flower oil, eucalyptus leaf oil, lavender leaf oil, cypress berry oil, essential oil of styrax and sulfate turpentine, respectively, in terms of mean mortality time. It is therefore feasible to use these essential oils as environment-friendly insecticides in the control of T pityocampa. PMID:14971685

  11. Aromatherapy positively affects mood, EEG patterns of alertness and math computations.

    PubMed

    Diego, M A; Jones, N A; Field, T; Hernandez-Reif, M; Schanberg, S; Kuhn, C; McAdam, V; Galamaga, R; Galamaga, M

    1998-12-01

    EEG activity, alertness, and mood were assessed in 40 adults given 3 minutes of aromatherapy using two aromas, lavender (considered a relaxing odor) or rosemary (considered a stimulating odor). Participants were also given simple math computations before and after the therapy. The lavender group showed increased beta power, suggesting increased drowsiness, they had less depressed mood (POMS) and reported feeling more relaxed and performed the math computations faster and more accurately following aromatherapy. The rosemary group, on the other hand, showed decreased frontal alpha and beta power, suggesting increased alertness. They also had lower state anxiety scores, reported feeling more relaxed and alert and they were only faster, not more accurate, at completing the math computations after the aromatherapy session. PMID:10069621

  12. The effect on staff of essential oil burners in extended care settings.

    PubMed

    Tysoe, P

    2000-04-01

    Because hospital wards may be associated with smells, such as chemicals, food, and people and their produce, essential oils in burners were considered a way of improving the ward atmosphere for staff. A study was conducted in three parts. A questionnaire covering a period of 1 month; lavender oil in burners for a 3-month period; and a second questionnaire. A significant number of respondents (88%) indicated in the first questionnaire their belief that the use of essential oil would have a positive effect on the workplace. Eighty-five per cent of respondents to the second questionnaire believed that there had been an improvement in the work environment following the use of the lavender oil burners. PMID:11111496

  13. Efficacy of herbal essential oils as insecticides against the housefly, Musca domestica L.

    PubMed

    Sinthusiri, Jirisuda; Soonwera, Mayura

    2013-03-01

    The insecticidal effects of 20 essential oils derived from herbs, were tested against the housefly species Musca domestica L. using a susceptibility test. Each was applied in ethyl alcohol at concentrations of 1, 5 and 10% (v/v). Ten percent concentrations of Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass), Mentha piperita (peppermint) and Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) oils were the most effective, showing 100% knockdown at 30 and 60 minutes. The KT50 values for C. citratus, M. piperita and L. angustifolia were 5.14, 5.36 and 8.23 minutes, respectively. These essential oils caused 100% mortality among houseflies 24 hours after exposure. The LC50 values for C. citratus, M. piperita and L. angustifolia were 2.22, 2.62 and 3.26 minutes, respectively. This study reveals lemongrass, peppermint and lavender essential oils have the potential to control housefly populations and should be further studied for field applications.

  14. Big Bend National Park, TX, USA, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Sierra del Carmen of Mexico, across the Rio Grande River from Big Bend National Park, TX, (28.5N, 104.0W) is centered in this photo. The Rio Grande River bisects the scene; Mexico to the east, USA to the west. The thousand ft. Boquillas limestone cliff on the Mexican side of the river changes colors from white to pink to lavender at sunset. This severely eroded sedimentary landscape was once an ancient seabed later overlaid with volcanic activity.

  15. Insecticidal Activity of Plant Essential Oils Against the Vine Mealybug, Planococcus ficus

    PubMed Central

    Karamaouna, Filitsa; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Michaelakis, Αntonios; Papachristos, Dimitrios; Polissiou, Moschos

    2013-01-01

    The vine mealybug, Planococcus ficus (Signoret) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), is a pest in grape vine growing areas worldwide. The essential oils from the following aromatic plants were tested for their insecticidal activity against P. ficus: peppermint, Mentha piperita L. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), thyme-leaved savory, Satureja thymbra L., lavender, Lavandula angustifolia Mill, and basil, Ocimum basilicum L. Essential oils from peels of the following fruits were also tested: lemon, Citrus limon L. (Sapindales: Rutaceae), and orange, C. sinensis L. The reference product was paraffin oil. Bioassays were conducted in the laboratory by using spray applications on grape leaves bearing clusters of P. ficus of one size class, which mainly represented either 3rd instar nymphs or pre-ovipositing adult females. The LC50 values for each essential oil varied depending on the P. ficus life stage but did not significantly differ between 3rd instar nymphs and adult females. The LC50 values of the citrus, peppermint, and thyme-leaved savory essential oils ranged from 2.7 to 8.1 mg/mL, and the LC50 values of lavender and basil oil ranged from 19.8 to 22.5 and 44.1 to 46.8 mg/mL, respectively. The essential oils from citrus, peppermint and thymeleaved savory were more or equally toxic compared to the reference product, whereas the lavender and basil essential oils were less toxic than the paraffin oil. No phytotoxic symptoms were observed on grape leaves treated with the citrus essential oils, and low phytotoxicity was caused by the essential oils of lavender, thyme-leaved savory, and mint, whereas the highest phytotoxicity was observed when basil oil was used. PMID:24766523

  16. Synthesis and properties of cholesteryl 4-(Alkanoylamino)benzoates: liquid crystals and organogelators.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Kanji; Tsuji, Kazuki; Mori, Akira; Ujiie, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    As a new liquid crystal and organogelator, cholesteryl 4-(alkanoylamino)benzoates were prepared. Cholesteryl 4-(alkanoylamino)benzoates had enantiotropic cholesteric and chiral smectic C phases. Furthermore cholesteryl 4-(alkanoylamino)benzoates gelled organic liquid such as 1-decanol, linalool, geraniol, nerol, citronellol, linalyl acetate, lavender oil, orange oil, and rose oil. The terpene and perfume gels show good release characteristics of the volatile components for a long period.

  17. Diplycosia platyphylla (Ericaceae), a new species from Mindanao, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Peter W.; Amoroso, Victor B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diplycosia platyphylla P.W.Fritsch, a new species from Mindanao Island, Philippines, is described and illustrated. This species is most similar to the Bornean Diplycosia urceolata but differs by its green or slightly flushed pink petioles 4–7 mm long, wider leaf blades, acute calyx lobe apices, and lavender mature fruiting calyx. The new species is known only from a single collection made from Mount Apo in North Cotabato Province, southern Mindanao. PMID:27698582

  18. A Case of Psoriasis Replaced by Allergic Contact Dermatitis in a 12-Year-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Margaret E; Browning, John C

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a significant clinical problem in children and one that the use of essential oils and natural remedies probably exacerbates. We report a case of chronic plaque psoriasis replaced by allergic contact dermatitis in a 12-year-old boy. We suspect that the immunologic response to a hapten in lavender oil disrupted the pathogenesis of psoriasis, causing the psoriasis to temporarily "disappear." PMID:26646574

  19. Diplycosia platyphylla (Ericaceae), a new species from Mindanao, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Peter W.; Amoroso, Victor B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diplycosia platyphylla P.W.Fritsch, a new species from Mindanao Island, Philippines, is described and illustrated. This species is most similar to the Bornean Diplycosia urceolata but differs by its green or slightly flushed pink petioles 4–7 mm long, wider leaf blades, acute calyx lobe apices, and lavender mature fruiting calyx. The new species is known only from a single collection made from Mount Apo in North Cotabato Province, southern Mindanao.

  20. [Effects of essential oil on lipid peroxidation and lipid metabolism in patients with chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A

    1997-01-01

    Natural concentrations of some essential oils were examined for effects on the system lipid peroxidation-antioxidant defense and lipid metabolism in 150 patients with chronic bronchitis. Lowering of plasm levels of dienic conjugates and ketons, activation of catalase in red cells characteristic of antioxidant effect were observed in exposure to essential oils of rosemary, basil, fir, eucalyptus. Lavender essential oil promotes normalization of the level of total lipids, ratio of total cholesterol to its alpha-fraction. PMID:9490339

  1. Death Penalty Decisions: Instruction Comprehension, Attitudes, and Decision Mediators.

    PubMed

    Patry, Marc W; Penrod, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of this research was to empirically evaluate a set of assumptions, advanced in the Supreme Court's ruling in Buchanan v. Angelone (1998), about jury comprehension of death penalty instructions. Further, this research examined the use of evidence in capital punishment decision making by exploring underlying mediating factors upon which death penalty decisions may be based. Manipulated variables included the type of instructions and several variations of evidence. Study 1 was a paper and pencil study of 245 undergraduate mock jurors. The experimental design was an incomplete 4×2×2×2×2 factorial model resulting in 56 possible conditions. Manipulations included four different types of instructions, presence of a list of case-specific mitigators to accompany the instructions, and three variations in the case facts: age of the defendant, bad prior record, and defendant history of emotional abuse. Study 2 was a fully-crossed 2×2×2×2×2 experiment with four deliberating mock juries per cell. Manipulations included jury instructions (original or revised), presence of a list of case-specific mitigators, defendant history of emotional abuse, bad prior record, and heinousness of the crime. The sample of 735 jury-eligible participants included 130 individuals who identified themselves as students. Participants watched one of 32 stimulus videotapes based on a replication of a capital sentencing hearing. The present findings support previous research showing low comprehension of capital penalty instructions. Further, we found that higher instruction comprehension was associated with higher likelihood of issuing life sentence decisions. The importance of instruction comprehension is emphasized in a social cognitive model of jury decision making at the sentencing phase of capital cases.

  2. Death Penalty Decisions: Instruction Comprehension, Attitudes, and Decision Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Patry, Marc W.; Penrod, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of this research was to empirically evaluate a set of assumptions, advanced in the Supreme Court’s ruling in Buchanan v. Angelone (1998), about jury comprehension of death penalty instructions. Further, this research examined the use of evidence in capital punishment decision making by exploring underlying mediating factors upon which death penalty decisions may be based. Manipulated variables included the type of instructions and several variations of evidence. Study 1 was a paper and pencil study of 245 undergraduate mock jurors. The experimental design was an incomplete 4×2×2×2×2 factorial model resulting in 56 possible conditions. Manipulations included four different types of instructions, presence of a list of case-specific mitigators to accompany the instructions, and three variations in the case facts: age of the defendant, bad prior record, and defendant history of emotional abuse. Study 2 was a fully-crossed 2×2×2×2×2 experiment with four deliberating mock juries per cell. Manipulations included jury instructions (original or revised), presence of a list of case-specific mitigators, defendant history of emotional abuse, bad prior record, and heinousness of the crime. The sample of 735 jury-eligible participants included 130 individuals who identified themselves as students. Participants watched one of 32 stimulus videotapes based on a replication of a capital sentencing hearing. The present findings support previous research showing low comprehension of capital penalty instructions. Further, we found that higher instruction comprehension was associated with higher likelihood of issuing life sentence decisions. The importance of instruction comprehension is emphasized in a social cognitive model of jury decision making at the sentencing phase of capital cases. PMID:24072981

  3. Death Penalty Decisions: Instruction Comprehension, Attitudes, and Decision Mediators.

    PubMed

    Patry, Marc W; Penrod, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of this research was to empirically evaluate a set of assumptions, advanced in the Supreme Court's ruling in Buchanan v. Angelone (1998), about jury comprehension of death penalty instructions. Further, this research examined the use of evidence in capital punishment decision making by exploring underlying mediating factors upon which death penalty decisions may be based. Manipulated variables included the type of instructions and several variations of evidence. Study 1 was a paper and pencil study of 245 undergraduate mock jurors. The experimental design was an incomplete 4×2×2×2×2 factorial model resulting in 56 possible conditions. Manipulations included four different types of instructions, presence of a list of case-specific mitigators to accompany the instructions, and three variations in the case facts: age of the defendant, bad prior record, and defendant history of emotional abuse. Study 2 was a fully-crossed 2×2×2×2×2 experiment with four deliberating mock juries per cell. Manipulations included jury instructions (original or revised), presence of a list of case-specific mitigators, defendant history of emotional abuse, bad prior record, and heinousness of the crime. The sample of 735 jury-eligible participants included 130 individuals who identified themselves as students. Participants watched one of 32 stimulus videotapes based on a replication of a capital sentencing hearing. The present findings support previous research showing low comprehension of capital penalty instructions. Further, we found that higher instruction comprehension was associated with higher likelihood of issuing life sentence decisions. The importance of instruction comprehension is emphasized in a social cognitive model of jury decision making at the sentencing phase of capital cases. PMID:24072981

  4. Effect of Dietary Ethanolic Extract of Lavandula officinalis on Serum Lipids Profile in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Zahra; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Mokhtari, Shiva; Shahrani, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidants are effective in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Lavandula officinalis possesses antioxidant activity, therefore, in this study; the effects of Lavandula officinalis extract were investigated on serum lipids levels of rats. Experimental mature male Wistar rats were treated with 100, 200 or 400 mg/Kg/day of lavender ethanolic extract or distilled water for 25 days via gastric gavage (n=8 each group). At the end of 25(th) day, the serum cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, LDL and VLDL levels, as well as atherogenic indices were determined in rats' serum. The ethanolic extract of lavender decreased serum cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and VLDL levels in 100 mg/Kg group (p=0.03, p=0.001, p=0.001, p=0.001, respectively). Serum HDL level increased in 100 mg/Kg/day group (p=0.01). Lavender extract decreased LDL/HDL level at doses of 100 and 200 mg/Kg/day (p=0.001, p=0.001, respectively). The TG/HDL levels decreased in experimental groups with doses of 100 and 200 mg/Kg/day (p=0.001, p=0.001, respectively). Lavandula officinalis extract exerts hypolipidemic effect in rats and might be beneficial in hyperlipidemic patients. PMID:25587318

  5. Acaricidal and insecticidal activity of essential oils on Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) and Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Damiani, Natalia; Gende, Liesel B; Bailac, Pedro; Marcangeli, Jorge A; Eguaras, Martín J

    2009-12-01

    Varroa destructor is an external parasitic mite that is a serious pest of honeybees and has caused severe losses of colonies worldwide. One of the feasible alternative treatments being used for their control is essential oils. The aim of this work was to evaluate the bioactivity of some essential oils on V. destructor and Apis mellifera in relation with their chemical composition and physicochemical properties. Lavender, lavendin and laurel essential oils showed linalool as main compound in their composition. 1,8-Cineole was also present as a predominant component in the laurel essential oil. However, thyme oil was characterized by a high concentration of thymol. Mites and bees toxicity was tested by means of complete exposure method. For mites, LC(50) values for laurel, lavender and lavendin essential oil did not show significant variation throughout all observation times. However, the LC(50) values for thyme oil at 48 and 72 h were lower than at 24 h. Bee mortality was evident only in treatment with thyme oil. At 48 and 72 h, lavender essential oil presented better selectivity indexes. In this research, all essential oils caused mite mortality without severe harmful effects on adult bees. The simultaneous evaluation of the physicochemical analysis of the essential oils, the characterization of the dosage response relationships among them, and the mortality effects on mite and bees, give us the possibility to obtain comparative results for future research in Varroa control.

  6. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species.

  7. Combination of essential oils and antibiotics reduce antibiotic resistance in plasmid-conferred multidrug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Lim, Swee Hua Erin; Hu, Cai Ping; Yiap, Beow Chin

    2013-06-15

    In this study we investigated the relationship between several selected commercially available essential oils and beta-lactam antibiotics on their antibacterial effect against multidrug resistant bacteria. The antibacterial activity of essential oils and antibiotics was assessed using broth microdilution. The combined effects between essential oils of cinnamon bark, lavender, marjoram, tea tree, peppermint and ampicillin, piperacillin, cefazolin, cefuroxime, carbenicillin, ceftazidime, meropenem, were evaluated by means of the checkerboard method against beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. In the latter assays, fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) values were calculated to characterize interaction between the combinations. Substantial susceptibility of the bacteria toward natural antibiotics and a considerable reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the antibiotics were noted in some paired combinations of antibiotics and essential oils. Out of 35 antibiotic-essential oil pairs tested, four of them showed synergistic effect (FIC≤0.5) and 31 pairs showed no interaction (FIC>0.5-4.0). The preliminary results obtained highlighted the occurrence of a pronounced synergistic relationship between piperacillin/cinnamon bark oil, piperacillin/lavender oil, piperacillin/peppermint oil as well as meropenem/peppermint oil against two of the three bacteria under study with a FIC index in the range 0.26-0.5. The finding highlighted the potential of peppermint, cinnamon bark and lavender essential oils being as antibiotic resistance modifying agent. Reduced usage of antibiotics could be employed as a treatment strategy to decrease the adverse effects and possibly to reverse the beta-lactam antibiotic resistance.

  8. Broken Heart Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Therkleson, Tessa; Stronach, Shona

    2015-01-01

    This case describes a combination external treatment for “Broken Heart Syndrome” that includes a lavender footbath, massage using moor extract, and oxalis ointment to the abdomen applied by an Anthroposophic nurse for a specific personality type. Lavender footbaths have been used since ancient times for relaxation and calming, while moor extract has been used medicinally in Europe since the middle ages for warmth and environmental protection. Rhythmical massage using moor extract and oxalis ointment poultice to the abdomen are part of the tradition of Anthroposophic nursing when managing stress induced by emotional and physical trauma. An elderly lady with specific characteristics diagnosed as Broken Heart Syndrome received one treatment a week for 4 weeks given by an Anthroposophic nurse at an integrative medical center. Between treatments, education was given to enable self-treatment in the home. The nursing treatments, each using lavender footbaths, moor extract massage, and oxalis ointment poultice to the abdomen, proved very effect, and no negative effects were reported. External applications need to be considered by nurses caring for specific personality types with Broken Heart Syndrome. PMID:25673580

  9. The effects of aromatherapy in relieving symptoms related to job stress among nurses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao-Chuan; Fang, Shu-Hui; Fang, Li

    2015-02-01

    Workplace-related stress has become today's most serious occupational hazard. Aromatherapy is a simple, convenient and non-invasive method of stress relief. There is little research regarding the efficacy of aromatherapy by means of inhaling essential oil in reducing workplace stress-related symptoms among nurses. Therefore, this study was to examine the effectiveness of lavender oil inhalation in reducing job stress-related symptoms among nurses. The 53 nurses in the experimental group pinned small bottles containing 3% lavender oil on the clothes of their right chests, whereas 57 participants in the control group pinned bottles with no lavender oil. Aromatherapy was shown to be effective in the reduction of the number of stress symptoms for 3 or 4 days. The stress symptoms of the experimental group decreased from 6.1 to 2.8 after aromatherapy was carried out (P = 0.126, 0.159, 0.035 and 0.026). This represented a significant decrease in stress, whereas the stress symptoms in the control group increased from 5.6 to 5.8. Hospital staff managers are still encouraged to include aromatherapy concepts and techniques in the continuing education of nursing staff. Concurrently, future research should focus on the possible side effects of aromatherapy to assure safety. PMID:24238073

  10. Broken Heart Syndrome: A Typical Case.

    PubMed

    Therkleson, Tessa; Stronach, Shona

    2015-12-01

    This case describes a combination external treatment for "Broken Heart Syndrome" that includes a lavender footbath, massage using moor extract, and oxalis ointment to the abdomen applied by an Anthroposophic nurse for a specific personality type. Lavender footbaths have been used since ancient times for relaxation and calming, while moor extract has been used medicinally in Europe since the middle ages for warmth and environmental protection. Rhythmical massage using moor extract and oxalis ointment poultice to the abdomen are part of the tradition of Anthroposophic nursing when managing stress induced by emotional and physical trauma. An elderly lady with specific characteristics diagnosed as Broken Heart Syndrome received one treatment a week for 4 weeks given by an Anthroposophic nurse at an integrative medical center. Between treatments, education was given to enable self-treatment in the home. The nursing treatments, each using lavender footbaths, moor extract massage, and oxalis ointment poultice to the abdomen, proved very effect, and no negative effects were reported. External applications need to be considered by nurses caring for specific personality types with Broken Heart Syndrome. PMID:25673580

  11. Effect of Dietary Ethanolic Extract of Lavandula officinalis on Serum Lipids Profile in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rabiei, Zahra; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Mokhtari, Shiva; Shahrani, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidants are effective in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Lavandula officinalis possesses antioxidant activity, therefore, in this study; the effects of Lavandula officinalis extract were investigated on serum lipids levels of rats. Experimental mature male Wistar rats were treated with 100, 200 or 400 mg/Kg/day of lavender ethanolic extract or distilled water for 25 days via gastric gavage (n=8 each group). At the end of 25th day, the serum cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, LDL and VLDL levels, as well as atherogenic indices were determined in rats’ serum. The ethanolic extract of lavender decreased serum cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and VLDL levels in 100 mg/Kg group (p=0.03, p=0.001, p=0.001, p=0.001, respectively). Serum HDL level increased in 100 mg/Kg/day group (p=0.01). Lavender extract decreased LDL/HDL level at doses of 100 and 200 mg/Kg/day (p=0.001, p=0.001, respectively). The TG/HDL levels decreased in experimental groups with doses of 100 and 200 mg/Kg/day (p=0.001, p=0.001, respectively). Lavandula officinalis extract exerts hypolipidemic effect in rats and might be beneficial in hyperlipidemic patients. PMID:25587318

  12. Patch size has no effect on insect visitation rate per unit area in garden-scale flower patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuzov, Mihail; Madsen, Andy; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the effect of flower patch size on insect flower visitation rate have compared relatively large patches (10-1000s m2) and have generally found a negative relationship per unit area or per flower. Here, we investigate the effects of patch size on insect visitation in patches of smaller area (range c. 0.1-3.1 m2), which are of particular relevance to ornamental flower beds in parks and gardens. We studied two common garden plant species in full bloom with 6 patch sizes each: borage (Borago officinalis) and lavender (Lavandula × intermedia 'Grosso'). We quantified flower visitation by insects by making repeated counts of the insects foraging at each patch. On borage, all insects were honey bees (Apis mellifera, n = 5506 counts). On lavender, insects (n = 737 counts) were bumble bees (Bombus spp., 76.9%), flies (Diptera, 22.4%), and butterflies (Lepidoptera, 0.7%). On both plant species we found positive linear effects of patch size on insect numbers. However, there was no effect of patch size on the number of insects per unit area or per flower and, on lavender, for all insects combined or only bumble bees. The results show that it is possible to make unbiased comparisons of the attractiveness of plant species or varieties to flower-visiting insects using patches of different size within the small scale range studied and make possible projects aimed at comparing ornamental plant varieties using existing garden flower patches of variable area.

  13. Odor source identification by grounding linguistic descriptions in an artificial nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutfi, Amy; Coradeschi, Silvia; Duckett, Tom; Wide, Peter

    2001-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of enabling autonomous agents (e.g., robots) to carry out human oriented tasks using an electronic nose. The nose consists of a combination of passive gas sensors with different selectivity, the outputs of which are fused together with an artificial neural network in order to recognize various human-determined odors. The basic idea is to ground human-provided linguistic descriptions of these odors in the actual sensory perceptions of the nose through a process of supervised learning. Analogous to the human nose, the paper explains a method by which an electronic nose can be used for substance identification. First, the receptors of the nose are exposed to a substance by means of inhalation with an electric pump. Then a chemical reaction takes place in the gas sensors over a period of time and an artificial neural network processes the resulting sensor patterns. This network was trained to recognize a basic set of pure substances such as vanilla, lavender and yogurt under controlled laboratory conditions. The complete system was then validated through a series of experiments on various combinations of the basic substances. First, we showed that the nose was able to consistently recognize unseen samples of the same substances on which it had been trained. In addition, we presented some first results where the nose was tested on novel combinations of substances on which it had not been trained by combining the learned descriptions - for example, it could distinguish lavender yogurt as a combination of lavender and yogurt.

  14. The effects of aromatherapy in relieving symptoms related to job stress among nurses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao-Chuan; Fang, Shu-Hui; Fang, Li

    2015-02-01

    Workplace-related stress has become today's most serious occupational hazard. Aromatherapy is a simple, convenient and non-invasive method of stress relief. There is little research regarding the efficacy of aromatherapy by means of inhaling essential oil in reducing workplace stress-related symptoms among nurses. Therefore, this study was to examine the effectiveness of lavender oil inhalation in reducing job stress-related symptoms among nurses. The 53 nurses in the experimental group pinned small bottles containing 3% lavender oil on the clothes of their right chests, whereas 57 participants in the control group pinned bottles with no lavender oil. Aromatherapy was shown to be effective in the reduction of the number of stress symptoms for 3 or 4 days. The stress symptoms of the experimental group decreased from 6.1 to 2.8 after aromatherapy was carried out (P = 0.126, 0.159, 0.035 and 0.026). This represented a significant decrease in stress, whereas the stress symptoms in the control group increased from 5.6 to 5.8. Hospital staff managers are still encouraged to include aromatherapy concepts and techniques in the continuing education of nursing staff. Concurrently, future research should focus on the possible side effects of aromatherapy to assure safety.

  15. Investigation of the chemical composition-antibacterial activity relationship of essential oils by chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Miladinović, Dragoljub L; Ilić, Budimir S; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana M; Nikolić, Nikola D; Miladinović, Ljiljana C; Cvetković, Olga G

    2012-05-01

    The antibacterial effects of Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae), Lavandula angustifolia (Lamiaceae), and Calamintha nepeta (Lamiaceae) Savi subsp. nepeta var. subisodonda (Borb.) Hayek essential oils on five different bacteria were estimated. Laboratory control strain and clinical isolates from different pathogenic media were researched by broth microdilution method, with an emphasis on a chemical composition-antibacterial activity relationship. The main constituents of thyme oil were thymol (59.95%) and p-cymene (18.34%). Linalool acetate (38.23%) and β-linalool (35.01%) were main compounds in lavender oil. C. nepeta essential oil was characterized by a high percentage of piperitone oxide (59.07%) and limonene (9.05%). Essential oils have been found to have antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. Classification and comparison of essential oils on the basis of their chemical composition and antibacterial activity were made by utilization of appropriate chemometric methods. The chemical principal component analysis (PCA) and hierachical cluster analysis (HCA) separated essential oils into two groups and two sub-groups. Thyme essential oil forms separate chemical HCA group and exhibits highest antibacterial activity, similar to tetracycline. Essential oils of lavender and C. nepeta in the same chemical HCA group were classified in different groups, within antibacterial PCA and HCA analyses. Lavender oil exhibits higher antibacterial ability in comparison with C. nepeta essential oil, probably based on the concept of synergistic activity of essential oil components. PMID:22389175

  16. Reducing racial bias in the penalty phase of capital trials.

    PubMed

    Shaked-Schroer, Netta; Costanzo, Mark; Marcus-Newhall, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Past research (e.g. Lynch & Haney, 2000) has shown that race plays a significant role in juror decision making in the penalty phase of capital murder trials. This study investigates the possibility of reducing juror bias towards Blacks by altering the content of jury instructions. White and non-White participants received trial information and jury instructions in which the defendant's race (Black or White) and the instruction type (standard or simplified) were manipulated. Participants rendered a sentence recommendation, identified factors they considered to be aggravating or mitigating, and responded to instruction comprehension questions. Bias against the Black defendant was significantly reduced when simplified instructions were used and when the defendant was judged by racially diverse jurors. Simplification also led to better comprehension of sentencing instructions. Implications for capital trials are discussed.

  17. I like me if you like me: on the interpersonal modulation and regulation of preadolescents' state self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Thomaes, Sander; Reijntjes, Albert; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Bushman, Brad J; Poorthuis, Astrid; Telch, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    This experiment tested whether peer approval and disapproval experiences can cause immediate change in children's state self-esteem. Children's narcissistic traits and evaluator perceived popularity were examined as potential moderators. A total of 333 preadolescents (M = 10.8 years) completed personal profiles on the Internet that were ostensibly judged by a jury consisting of popular and unpopular peers. Participants randomly received negative, neutral, or positive feedback from the jury. Next, they could examine the feedback that each individual judge gave them. As expected, peer disapproval decreased self-esteem, especially in children high in narcissism. In contrast, peer approval increased self-esteem. Moreover, disapproved children's self-esteem recovery was dependent on the extent to which they subsequently viewed positive feedback from popular judges. These findings support sociometer theory.

  18. A mock juror investigation of blame attribution in the punishment of hate crime perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Robert J; Clark, John W; Kehn, Andre; Burks, Alixandra C; Wechsler, Hayley J

    2014-01-01

    We examined blame attribution as a moderator of perceptions of hate crimes against gay, African American, and transgender victims. Participants were 510 Texas jury panel members. Results of vignette-based crime scenarios showed that victim blame displayed significant negative, and perpetrator blame significant positive, effects on sentencing recommendations. Also as hypothesized, victim and perpetrator blame moderated the effect of support for hate crime legislation. Interaction patterns suggested that both types of blame attribution influence sentencing recommendations, but only for participants disagreeing with hate crime legislation. Three-way interactions with victim type also emerged, indicating that the effects of both types of blame attribution show particular influences when the victim is gay, as opposed to transgender or African American. Implications for attribution theory, hate crime policy, and jury selection are discussed. PMID:24666730

  19. "Typical Clinton: brazen it out".

    PubMed

    Upchurch, C M; O'Connell, D C

    2000-07-01

    Ten excerpts of both President Clinton's Grand Jury Testimony of August 17, 1998 and of each of two interviews with Hillary Rodham Clinton (Today Show, January 27, 1998; Good Morning America, January 28, 1998) were analyzed. In all of them, the topic under discussion was the President's insistence on his innocence in the Lewinsky case. Comparisons between the President and First Lady revealed long and short within-speaker pauses, respectively. His replies to questions average more than twice the length of hers. Comparisons were also made with other speech genres, including modern presidential inaugural rhetoric. In particular, President Clinton's statement of his innocence at the conclusion of an educational press conference on January 26, 1998 and his prepared statement at the beginning of his Grand Jury Testimony were found to vary notably from all the other corpora. Both are characterized by several of Ekman's (1985, p. 286) behavioral cues for the detection of deception.

  20. A mock juror investigation of blame attribution in the punishment of hate crime perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Robert J; Clark, John W; Kehn, Andre; Burks, Alixandra C; Wechsler, Hayley J

    2014-01-01

    We examined blame attribution as a moderator of perceptions of hate crimes against gay, African American, and transgender victims. Participants were 510 Texas jury panel members. Results of vignette-based crime scenarios showed that victim blame displayed significant negative, and perpetrator blame significant positive, effects on sentencing recommendations. Also as hypothesized, victim and perpetrator blame moderated the effect of support for hate crime legislation. Interaction patterns suggested that both types of blame attribution influence sentencing recommendations, but only for participants disagreeing with hate crime legislation. Three-way interactions with victim type also emerged, indicating that the effects of both types of blame attribution show particular influences when the victim is gay, as opposed to transgender or African American. Implications for attribution theory, hate crime policy, and jury selection are discussed.

  1. Separating compensatory and punitive damage award decisions by trial bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Shea Adams, Christine M; Bourgeois, Martin J

    2006-02-01

    In a simulated products liability trial, we tested the effects of bifurcating decisions regarding compensatory and punitive damage awards. Fifty-nine groups of 5-7 jurors heard evidence in a unitary or bifurcated format, deliberated about the case to a unanimous decision, and awarded damages. Trial bifurcation decreased variability in compensatory damage awards across juries hearing the same case, and also decreased the tendency for juries to award extremely high compensatory damages. In addition, deliberation led to lower compensatory awards in the low injury severity condition and higher awards in the high injury severity condition. Jurors reported that they were using evidence more appropriately when the decisions were bifurcated. Implications of evidence bifurcation in civil trials are discussed.

  2. "Typical Clinton: brazen it out".

    PubMed

    Upchurch, C M; O'Connell, D C

    2000-07-01

    Ten excerpts of both President Clinton's Grand Jury Testimony of August 17, 1998 and of each of two interviews with Hillary Rodham Clinton (Today Show, January 27, 1998; Good Morning America, January 28, 1998) were analyzed. In all of them, the topic under discussion was the President's insistence on his innocence in the Lewinsky case. Comparisons between the President and First Lady revealed long and short within-speaker pauses, respectively. His replies to questions average more than twice the length of hers. Comparisons were also made with other speech genres, including modern presidential inaugural rhetoric. In particular, President Clinton's statement of his innocence at the conclusion of an educational press conference on January 26, 1998 and his prepared statement at the beginning of his Grand Jury Testimony were found to vary notably from all the other corpora. Both are characterized by several of Ekman's (1985, p. 286) behavioral cues for the detection of deception. PMID:10953827

  3. Present State Iof Holography In Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masane; Hayashi, Yuzo; Yamamoto, Y.

    1983-07-01

    In 1948,Dr. Dennis Gabor introduced the theory of holography as "the optical recording of the object wave formed by the resulting interference pattern of two mutually coherent, component light beams." Through the studies of enumerous practical applications, the theory of holography was further advanced to be used in conjunction with the laser beam to better serve a more practical minded industry. Such developments were introduced and engineered by Dr. Emmett Leith and Dr. Juris Upatnieks in 1962.

  4. Physicist falls foul of US export law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-10-01

    A retired US plasma physicist is seeking to overturn his conviction last month of offences under the American Arms Export Control Act, which prohibits the export, without a government licence, of technology and data to foreign nationals or nations. A jury in Knoxville, Tennessee, found JReece Roth, 70, guilty of illegally exporting technical information about a military project to develop plasma technology for guiding spyplanes that operate as weapons or surveillance devices.

  5. A quick screening test of competency to stand trial for defendants with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Smith, S A; Hudson, R L

    1995-02-01

    19 terms and concepts from evaluations of competency to stand trial of 55 defendants with mental retardation were rated to examine whether a quick screening test could be devised that would differentiate those who were judged competent or not competent. A multiple regression and discriminant analysis gave four items that yielded maximum predictability (R = .84): court strategy, plead, testify, and jury. Guilty, trial, and prosecutor were also significantly more difficult for those who were not competent than those who were.

  6. Guilty but mentally ill: the South Carolina experience.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D W; McCullough, T M; Jenkins, P L; White, W M

    1988-01-01

    Thirty of the first 45 individuals to receive guilty but mentally ill (GBMI) verdicts in South Carolina were interviewed using a structured interview schedule for diagnosis. The relationship of diagnosis to pretrial evaluation and posttrial conviction treatment are discussed. No person received GBMI in a jury trial. Suggestions to improve the operation of the GBMI verdict are made, as well as a brief review of these data with data from other states.

  7. Law Schools Customize Degrees to Students' Taste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Going to law school to get a law degree has become a little like going to an ice-cream parlor for a scoop of vanilla. Plenty of people still do it, but many schools' brochures--like the elaborate flavor-and-topping menus on ice-cream parlor walls--now tempt them with something different, something more. Law students can have their "juris doctor"…

  8. A federalist strategy for nuclear waste management.

    PubMed

    Lee, K N

    1980-05-16

    The federal government plans to rely on a policy of "consultation and concurrence" with state governments in developing nuclear waste repositories. The weaknesses of the concurrence approach are analyzed, and an alternative institutional framework for locating a waste repository is proposed: a siting jury that provides representation for state and local interests, while maintaining a high level of technical review. The proposal could be tested in the siting of away-from-reactor storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel.

  9. [Beauty judgment: review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Faure, Jacques; Bolender, Yves

    2014-03-01

    Esthetic judgments are surely subjective, but as surely, that does not preclude them being studied objectively through rigorous scientific methods. The factual basis of a science of esthetics is not to settle whether some person or image is "objectively beautiful" but rather to determine whether some representative set or sets of individuals judge or experience him/her/it as beautiful or unattractive. The aim of this paper is to review the definitional, theoretical and methodological aspects pertaining to the perception of facial/dental attractiveness by a group of representative individuals. The first part lays down the basic principles of the perception of facial/dental attractiveness: the perception involves a jury, a field of investigation and a test providing quantitative data; the following general determinants of beauty perception are reviewed: the average morphology, the judge's cultural background, the numerology, the judge's ethnical origin. Indirect determinants are the dentition, the osseous architecture and the muscular envelope. Some disruptive factors might alter the judges' facial perception. They might be qualified as either peripheral to the face or psycho-social factors. Peripheral factors include hair style and color, skin hue, wrinkles, lips color... Psycho-social factors cover the personality of the subject being evaluated, his/her intelligence or behavior. The second part deals specifically with the methodology used to determine facial attractiveness and to correlate this latter with a specific morphology. Typically such a study aims to determine average esthetic preferences for some set of visual displays among a particular jury, given a specific task to judge esthetic quality or qualities. The sample being studied, the displays, the jury or jurys, the rating procedure must all be specified prior to collecting data. A specific emphasis will be given to the rating process and the associated morphometrics, the ultimate goal being to

  10. Using a Mock Trial Method to Enhance Effectiveness of Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing.

    PubMed

    White, Cindy T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional teaching methodologies may deter adult learning because of passive the exchange of knowledge. Teaching to the "evidence" substantiating best practice requires a systematic approach to transfer knowledge into clinical inquiry. A mock trial simulated role-play activity was selected to show the value of learning through active engagement. The nurse "defendant" was challenged to substantiate practice based on the evidence. Seminar participants (the jury) scrutinized testimony through deliberation before delivering the final verdict. PMID:26580469

  11. Metrical expectations from preceding prosody influence perception of lexical stress.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith; Salverda, Anne Pier; Dilley, Laura C; Tanenhaus, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    Two visual-world experiments tested the hypothesis that expectations based on preceding prosody influence the perception of suprasegmental cues to lexical stress. The results demonstrate that listeners' consideration of competing alternatives with different stress patterns (e.g., 'jury/gi'raffe) can be influenced by the fundamental frequency and syllable timing patterns across material preceding a target word. When preceding stressed syllables distal to the target word shared pitch and timing characteristics with the first syllable of the target word, pictures of alternatives with primary lexical stress on the first syllable (e.g., jury) initially attracted more looks than alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe). This effect was modulated when preceding unstressed syllables had pitch and timing characteristics similar to the initial syllable of the target word, with more looks to alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe) than to those with stressed initial syllables (e.g., jury). These findings suggest that expectations about the acoustic realization of upcoming speech include information about metrical organization and lexical stress and that these expectations constrain the initial interpretation of suprasegmental stress cues. These distal prosody effects implicate online probabilistic inferences about the sources of acoustic-phonetic variation during spoken-word recognition.

  12. Thin slice expert testimony and mock trial deliberations.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Caroline Titcomb; Brodsky, Stanley L; Wilson, Jennifer Kelly

    2015-01-01

    This study examined impressions of expert witness testimony in a not guilty by reason of insanity defense on two outcomes: witness's credibility and verdict. Borrowing in part from the "thin slice" methodology, we assessed outcomes in a 2 (deliberating vs. non-deliberating jurors) × 3 (length of videotaped testimony) between-subjects design. In 30 mock juries, 188 participants viewed the testimony by a forensic psychologist; then half of the juries deliberated. Thinner slices of the testimony were defined by the lower (30s long) and upper (5 min long) temporal bounds in the literature. The third, fuller testimony condition was 10 min long and served as the accuracy marker for the shorter sliced exposures. We aimed to explore potential consequences to jurors relying on impressions of the expert, and his or her opinion, and to test that effect post deliberation. Accounting for deliberation, brief impressions of expert credibility generally exerted a similar influence on credibility to fuller considerations. The essential finding was that a two-way interaction emerged from time slice and deliberation on verdict for jurors in the 30s condition. Overall, predictive accuracy was found in the 5 min slice, yet accuracy was not supported in the predictions based on the shortest slice. Individually-formed impressions are not likely to translate to the verdict ballot post-deliberation. Instead, brief impressions are likely to be heavily influenced by deliberation. Implications for understanding how impression-based testimony evaluations translate from the jury box to the deliberation room are discussed.

  13. "So, what is a psychopath?" Venireperson perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes about psychopathic personality.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon Toney; Edens, John F; Clark, John; Rulseh, Allison

    2014-10-01

    This study surveyed over 400 individuals attending jury duty regarding various perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs they had concerning psychopathic personality (psychopathy). The protocol included (a) prototype ratings of what participants considered to be core features, using the Comprehensive Assessment of Psychopathic Personality (CAPP) prototype rating scale; (b) questions concerning knowledge and beliefs about psychopathy (e.g., prevalence in society); and (c) attitudinal scales concerning potential associated features (e.g., criminality, rehabilitation potential), etiological underpinnings, and moral judgments and legal sanctions. Consistent with results of earlier studies using expert raters, jury panel members rated most of the 33 individual CAPP items and all 6 CAPP scales as at least moderately prototypical, with Self and Dominance domains obtaining the highest mean ratings. Many participants also strongly endorsed symptoms of psychosis (e.g., delusions) as prototypical of psychopathy. Despite this, they viewed psychopaths as responsible for their own actions, as capable of determining right from wrong, and as generally not "insane." Our findings indicate that jury panel members view the prototypical psychopath as highly dominant, self-focused, and lacking in remorse and empathy and reinforce the need for expert witnesses to clearly differentiate between psychopathy and psychotic-spectrum disorders. PMID:24933174

  14. One angry woman: Anger expression increases influence for men, but decreases influence for women, during group deliberation.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Jessica M; Peter-Hagene, Liana C

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether expressing anger increases social influence for men, but diminishes social influence for women, during group deliberation. In a deception paradigm, participants believed they were engaged in a computer-mediated mock jury deliberation about a murder case. In actuality, the interaction was scripted. The script included 5 other mock jurors who provided verdicts and comments in support of the verdicts; 4 agreed with the participant and 1 was a "holdout" dissenter. Holdouts expressed their opinions with no emotion, anger, or fear and had either male or female names. Holdouts exerted no influence on participants' opinions when they expressed no emotion or fear. Participants' confidence in their own verdict dropped significantly, however, after male holdouts expressed anger. Yet, anger expression undermined female holdouts: Participants became significantly more confident in their original verdicts after female holdouts expressed anger-even though they were expressing the exact same opinion and emotion as the male holdouts. Mediation analyses revealed that participants drew different inferences from male versus female anger, which created a gender gap in influence during group deliberation. The current study has implications for group decisions in general, and jury deliberations in particular, by suggesting that expressing anger might lead men to gain influence, but women to lose influence over others (even when making identical arguments). These diverging consequences might result in women potentially having less influence on societally important decisions than men, such as jury verdicts.

  15. Metrical expectations from preceding prosody influence perception of lexical stress.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith; Salverda, Anne Pier; Dilley, Laura C; Tanenhaus, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    Two visual-world experiments tested the hypothesis that expectations based on preceding prosody influence the perception of suprasegmental cues to lexical stress. The results demonstrate that listeners' consideration of competing alternatives with different stress patterns (e.g., 'jury/gi'raffe) can be influenced by the fundamental frequency and syllable timing patterns across material preceding a target word. When preceding stressed syllables distal to the target word shared pitch and timing characteristics with the first syllable of the target word, pictures of alternatives with primary lexical stress on the first syllable (e.g., jury) initially attracted more looks than alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe). This effect was modulated when preceding unstressed syllables had pitch and timing characteristics similar to the initial syllable of the target word, with more looks to alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe) than to those with stressed initial syllables (e.g., jury). These findings suggest that expectations about the acoustic realization of upcoming speech include information about metrical organization and lexical stress and that these expectations constrain the initial interpretation of suprasegmental stress cues. These distal prosody effects implicate online probabilistic inferences about the sources of acoustic-phonetic variation during spoken-word recognition. PMID:25621583

  16. [Preliminary study of acoustic and aerodynamic parameters after Tucker frontal anterior laryngectomy].

    PubMed

    Giovanni, A; Robert, D; Teston, B; Guarella, M D; Zanaret, M

    1996-01-01

    Currently, not objective method has been demonstrated to be reliable for the evaluation of vocal handicap after partial laryngectomy. Such a tool would allow objective assessment of the post-operative voice and its clinical course as well as a comparison of different surgical techniques in terms of voice quality. We used a EVA device to measure simultaneously acoustic and aerodynamic parameters. We included 23 normal subjects and 34 patients who had undergone a Tucker laryngectomy. All subjects were males. At sustained voice production, acoustic measures of vibration stability (jitter, coefficient of variation in the fundamental frequency, shimmer, coefficient of variation in intensity) and air leak from the glottis (buccal air flow over intensity). The quality of voice in operated patients was judged by a jury of listeners who assigned a global score to voice quality. Results were analyzed to verify the correlation between objective measurements and the jury's score, taken as the reference measurement. The pertinence of the objective measurements was demonstrated for the stability of the frequency and the glottal air leak. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that total variance of the objective measurements accounted for 84.7% of the scores provided by the jury (R2 = 0.847, p < 0.0001). These satisfactory results emphasize the interest of multiparametric analysis including aerodynamic measurements. These preliminary results led to the hypothesis that objective and subjective measurements could be useful in techniques aimed at improving voice quality (temporal organization of vibratory instability, work on intralaryngeal pressures).

  17. Innocent until Primed: Mock Jurors' Racially Biased Response to the Presumption of Innocence

    PubMed Central

    Young, Danielle M.; Levinson, Justin D.; Sinnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that crime concepts can activate attentional bias to Black faces. This study investigates the possibility that some legal concepts hold similar implicit racial cues. Presumption of innocence instructions, a core legal principle specifically designed to eliminate bias, may instead serve as an implicit racial cue resulting in attentional bias. Methodology/Principal findings The experiment was conducted in a courtroom with participants seated in the jury box. Participants first watched a video of a federal judge reading jury instructions that contained presumption of innocence instructions, or matched length alternative instructions. Immediately following this video a dot-probe task was administered to assess the priming effect of the jury instructions. Presumption of innocence instructions, but not the alternative instructions, led to significantly faster response times to Black faces when compared with White faces. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that the core principle designed to ensure fairness in the legal system actually primes attention for Black faces, indicating that this supposedly fundamental protection could trigger racial stereotypes. PMID:24643050

  18. Metrical expectations from preceding prosody influence perception of lexical stress

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meredith; Salverda, Anne Pier; Dilley, Laura C.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Two visual-world experiments tested the hypothesis that expectations based on preceding prosody influence the perception of suprasegmental cues to lexical stress. The results demonstrate that listeners’ consideration of competing alternatives with different stress patterns (e.g., ‘jury/gi’raffe) can be influenced by the fundamental frequency and syllable timing patterns across material preceding a target word. When preceding stressed syllables distal to the target word shared pitch and timing characteristics with the first syllable of the target word, pictures of alternatives with primary lexical stress on the first syllable (e.g., jury) initially attracted more looks than alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe). This effect was modulated when preceding unstressed syllables had pitch and timing characteristics similar to the initial syllable of the target word, with more looks to alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe) than to those with stressed initial syllables (e.g., jury). These findings suggest that expectations about the acoustic realization of upcoming speech include information about metrical organization and lexical stress, and that these expectations constrain the initial interpretation of suprasegmental stress cues. These distal prosody effects implicate on-line probabilistic inferences about the sources of acoustic-phonetic variation during spoken-word recognition. PMID:25621583

  19. An evaluation of computer aided design of below-knee prosthetic sockets.

    PubMed

    Topper, A K; Fernie, G R

    1990-12-01

    Forty-eight below-knee amputees compared sockets designed using CANFIT computer aided design (CAD) software with sockets designed using conventional methods. Each subject was fitted by one prosthetist who used conventional techniques and one who used the CANFIT system to design the socket. Prosthetists alternated design methods for each new subject. The prosthetist using the conventional techniques was allowed up to 2 design attempts and the prosthetist using the CANFIT system was allowed up to 5 design attempts. After 2 design attempts with each method 21% of the subjects preferred the CANFIT design socket. Following up to 5 attempts 54% preferred the CANFIT designed socket. A jury of experts made an assessment of the CANFIT system and of CAD in prosthetics. The jury did not think that the version of the system tested was cost effective but that at the rate that it was improving it would become such within 3 to 5 years. The jury noted that, as well as monetary benefits, CAD presents the possibility of benefits in other areas such as research and teaching. A number of specific suggestions regarding the use and development of CAD in prosthetics were also made.

  20. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging.

  1. The symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis drives root water transport in flooded tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Polanco, Monica; Molina, Sonia; Zamarreño, Angel María; García-Mina, Jose María; Aroca, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    It is known that the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi within the plant roots enhances the tolerance of the host plant to different environmental stresses, although the positive effect of the fungi in plants under waterlogged conditions has not been well studied. Tolerance of plants to flooding can be achieved through different molecular, physiological and anatomical adaptations, which will affect their water uptake capacity and therefore their root hydraulic properties. Here, we investigated the root hydraulic properties under non-flooded and flooded conditions in non-mycorrhizal tomato plants and plants inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. Only flooded mycorrhizal plants increased their root hydraulic conductivity, and this effect was correlated with a higher expression of the plant aquaporin SlPIP1;7 and the fungal aquaporin GintAQP1. There was also a higher abundance of the PIP2 protein phoshorylated at Ser280 in mycorrhizal flooded plants. The role of plant hormones (ethylene, ABA and IAA) in root hydraulic properties was also taken into consideration, and it was concluded that, in mycorrhizal flooded plants, ethylene has a secondary role regulating root hydraulic conductivity whereas IAA may be the key hormone that allows the enhancement of root hydraulic conductivity in mycorrhizal plants under low oxygen conditions.

  2. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging.

  3. A hypomorphic mutation in the Gfi1 transcriptional repressor results in a novel form of neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez-Rueda, Diana; Jönsson, Friederike; Mancardi, David A; Zhao, Weidong; Malzac, Aurélie; Liang, Yinming; Bertosio, Elodie; Grenot, Pierre; Blanquet, Véronique; Sabrautzki, Sybille; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Méresse, Stéphane; Duprez, Estelle; Bruhns, Pierre; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie

    2012-09-01

    Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutagenesis, we established a mouse model with a novel form of neutropenia resulting from a point mutation in the transcriptional repressor Growth Factor Independence 1 (Gfi1). These mice, called Genista, had normal viability and no weight loss, in contrast to mice expressing null alleles of the Gfi1 gene. Furthermore, the Genista mutation had a very limited impact on lymphopoiesis or on T- and B-cell function. Within the bone marrow (BM), the Genista mutation resulted in a slight increase of monopoiesis and in a block of terminal granulopoiesis. This block occurred just after the metamyelocytic stage and resulted in the generation of small numbers of atypical CD11b(+) Ly-6G(int) neutrophils, the nuclear morphology of which resembled that of mature WT neutrophils. Unexpectedly, once released from the BM, these atypical neutrophils contributed to induce mild forms of autoantibody-induced arthritis and of immune complex-mediated lung alveolitis. They additionally failed to provide resistance to acute bacterial infection. Our study demonstrates that a hypomorphic mutation in the Gfi1 transcriptional repressor results in a novel form of neutropenia characterized by a split pattern of functional responses, reflecting the distinct thresholds required for eliciting neutrophil-mediated inflammatory and anti-infectious responses.

  4. Polyaromatic hydrocarbons impair phosphorus transport by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis.

    PubMed

    Calonne, Maryline; Fontaine, Joël; Tisserant, Benoît; Dupré de Boulois, Hervé; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne; Declerck, Stéphane; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2014-06-01

    Phosphate uptake by plant roots is mainly mediated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). However, the impact on phosphorus (P) transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), persistent organic pollutants widely found in altered soils, is not known up today. Here, we monitored the Rhizophagus irregularis fungal growth and the fungal P transport ability from the extraradical mycelium to the host transformed chicory roots in the presence of anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and the combination of both PAH, under in vitro conditions. Firstly, our findings showed that PAH have detrimental effect on the fungal growth. The combination of both PAH was more toxic than each of the PAH individually due to synergistic effects. Secondly, PAH affected the P transport by the fungus from the medium to the roots. This was evidenced by either the decrease in (33)P quantity transported in the roots as well as the decrease in acid phosphatase activity in the mycorrhizal roots. Moreover, the fungal alkaline phosphatase activities remained constant in the extraradical mycelium as well as in the roots in the absence and in the presence of PAH. The GintPT and GiALP (encoding a P transporter and an alkaline phosphatase respectively) gene expressions were also found to be similar in the extraradical mycelium treated with PAH or not (control). These findings suggested that the P uptake by R. irregularis was not affected by PAH but probably the transport from the extraradical mycelium to the intraradical mycelium. PMID:24287265

  5. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging. PMID:27111138

  6. [Repellent activity against Aedes aegypti (L.) of formulas based on natural vegetable extracts or synthetic active agents].

    PubMed

    Girgenti, P; Suss, L

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of 5 commercial mosquito repellents was made on adult male and female volunteers in laboratory trials. The products tested in forms of cream or lotion included 4 natural oil formulations (containing citronella, clover, eucalyptus, geranium, lavender, peppermint, sandalwood, thyme, etc.) and 1 synthetic chemical repellent containing 10% KBR 3023). Natural oil products showed essentially poor or no repellency against Ae, aegypti: the protection times were less than or equal to 1 hour. Only the synthetic repellent based on KBR 3023 provided satisfactory defence to human volunteers. PMID:12162118

  7. [Repellent activity against Aedes aegypti (L.) of formulas based on natural vegetable extracts or synthetic active agents].

    PubMed

    Girgenti, P; Suss, L

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of 5 commercial mosquito repellents was made on adult male and female volunteers in laboratory trials. The products tested in forms of cream or lotion included 4 natural oil formulations (containing citronella, clover, eucalyptus, geranium, lavender, peppermint, sandalwood, thyme, etc.) and 1 synthetic chemical repellent containing 10% KBR 3023). Natural oil products showed essentially poor or no repellency against Ae, aegypti: the protection times were less than or equal to 1 hour. Only the synthetic repellent based on KBR 3023 provided satisfactory defence to human volunteers.

  8. Nurses experience of aromatherapy use with dementia patients experiencing disturbed sleep patterns. An action research project.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Berit

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an insight into nurses' experiences of incorporating aromatherapy into the care of residents suffering from dementia, anxiety and disturbed sleep patterns. Twenty-four residents and twelve nurses from four nursing homes participated in an action research study. The use of lavender augustofolia essential oil diffused nightly was perceived as an effective care modality reducing insomnia and anxiety in this patient cohort. Nurses experienced some negative attitudes among colleagues because they considered aromatherapy as not evidence based. Nurses require greater access to evidence based use of Aromatherapy. Further research is needed to study how smell can enhance dementia care. PMID:24199975

  9. Preliminary study of Lake Pontchartrain and vicinity using remotely sensed data from the ERTS-A satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hidalgo, J. U. (Principal Investigator); Smalley, A. E.; Faller, K. H.; Irvin, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During the summer of 1972, huge mats of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) appeared on Lake Pontchartrain, a shallow estuary in southeastern Louisiana. In color infrared photography, duckweeds show a characteristic light lavender color, unlike algal mats or water hyacinth, as observed in low level aerial photography. Although at least five species are present in the area, most water coverage is by Lemna minor and Spirodela oligorrhiza. ERTS-1 imagery shows many areas of bayous, swamps, and marginal waters of Lake Pontchartrain covered with duckweeds. Subsequent passes show a seasonal decreases in duckweeds.

  10. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals.

    PubMed

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)(2-) units were observed. PMID:25956330

  11. Disseminated infection by Fusarium moniliforme during treatment for malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Young, N A; Kwon-Chung, K J; Kubota, T T; Jennings, A E; Fisher, R I

    1978-01-01

    Disseminated infection caused by Fusarium moniliforme is described in a 32-year-old granulocytopenic man with malignant lymphoma being treated with cytotoxic drugs and corticosteroids. Infected skin denuded by antecedent severe varicella-zoster infection was the probable source of fungemia. F. moniliforme grows rapidly on common mycological media as a lavender- to violet-colored mold at 25 to 37 degrees C. Its aerial hyphae produce fusoid macroconidia and characteristic fusiform microconidia in chains. The morphology of hyphae in tissue closely resembles species of Aspergillus and is not diagnostically specific. Morphological characteristics which distinguish cultures of F. moniliforme from other medically important species of Fusarium are discussed. Images PMID:670381

  12. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L.

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)2- units were observed.

  13. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals.

    PubMed

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)(2-) units were observed.

  14. Nurses experience of aromatherapy use with dementia patients experiencing disturbed sleep patterns. An action research project.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Berit

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an insight into nurses' experiences of incorporating aromatherapy into the care of residents suffering from dementia, anxiety and disturbed sleep patterns. Twenty-four residents and twelve nurses from four nursing homes participated in an action research study. The use of lavender augustofolia essential oil diffused nightly was perceived as an effective care modality reducing insomnia and anxiety in this patient cohort. Nurses experienced some negative attitudes among colleagues because they considered aromatherapy as not evidence based. Nurses require greater access to evidence based use of Aromatherapy. Further research is needed to study how smell can enhance dementia care.

  15. Characterization of honey amino acid profiles using high-pressure liquid chromatography to control authenticity.

    PubMed

    Cotte, J F; Casabianca, H; Giroud, B; Albert, M; Lheritier, J; Grenier-Loustalot, M F

    2004-03-01

    Amino acid analysis of honey by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used first to discriminate different botanical origins and then to combat adulteration. Pure honeys of seven selected floral varieties were examined. A principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on the results after selection of the most discriminating parameters. Lavender honeys were thus perfectly characterized, but complete satisfaction was not obtained with the six other varieties. This method (analysis by HPLC and statistical processing by PCA) enabled us to detect the addition of sugar syrup to rape and fir honeys. PMID:14740139

  16. Intelligent Systems Approaches to Product Sound Quality Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietila, Glenn M.

    As a product market becomes more competitive, consumers become more discriminating in the way in which they differentiate between engineered products. The consumer often makes a purchasing decision based on the sound emitted from the product during operation by using the sound to judge quality or annoyance. Therefore, in recent years, many sound quality analysis tools have been developed to evaluate the consumer preference as it relates to a product sound and to quantify this preference based on objective measurements. This understanding can be used to direct a product design process in order to help differentiate the product from competitive products or to establish an impression on consumers regarding a product's quality or robustness. The sound quality process is typically a statistical tool that is used to model subjective preference, or merit score, based on objective measurements, or metrics. In this way, new product developments can be evaluated in an objective manner without the laborious process of gathering a sample population of consumers for subjective studies each time. The most common model used today is the Multiple Linear Regression (MLR), although recently non-linear Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approaches are gaining popularity. This dissertation will review publicly available published literature and present additional intelligent systems approaches that can be used to improve on the current sound quality process. The focus of this work is to address shortcomings in the current paired comparison approach to sound quality analysis. This research will propose a framework for an adaptive jury analysis approach as an alternative to the current Bradley-Terry model. The adaptive jury framework uses statistical hypothesis testing to focus on sound pairings that are most interesting and is expected to address some of the restrictions required by the Bradley-Terry model. It will also provide a more amicable framework for an intelligent systems approach

  17. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Other Aroma-Therapeutic Oils

    PubMed Central

    de Rapper, Stephanie; Kamatou, Guy; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia essential oil was assessed in combination with 45 other oils to establish possible interactive properties. The composition of the selected essential oils was confirmed using GC-MS with a flame ionization detector. The microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay was undertaken, whereby the fractional inhibitory concentration (ΣFIC) was calculated for the oil combinations. When lavender oil was assayed in 1 : 1 ratios with other oils, synergistic (26.7%), additive (48.9%), non-interactive (23.7%), and antagonistic (0.7%) interactions were observed. When investigating different ratios of the two oils in combination, the most favourable interactions were when L. angustifolia was combined with Cinnamomum zeylanicum or with Citrus sinensis, against C. albicans and S. aureus, respectively. In 1 : 1 ratios, 75.6% of the essential oils investigated showed either synergistic or additive results, lending in vitro credibility to the use of essential oil blends in aroma-therapeutic practices. Within the field of aromatherapy, essential oils are commonly employed in mixtures for the treatment of infectious diseases; however, very little evidence exists to support the use in combination. This study lends some credence to the concomitant use of essential oils blended with lavender. PMID:23737850

  18. GC-MS analysis of essential oils from some Greek aromatic plants and their fungitoxicity on Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Daferera, D J; Ziogas, B N; Polissiou, M G

    2000-06-01

    The isolated essential oils from seven air-dried plant species were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thymus vulgaris (thyme), Origanum vulgare (oregano), and Origanumdictamus (dictamus) essential oils were found to be rich in phenolic compounds representing 65.8, 71.1, and 78.0% of the total oil, respectively. Origanum majorana (marjoram) oil was constituted of hydrocarbons (42.1%), alcohols (24.3%), and phenols (14.2%). The essential oil from Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (lavender) was characterized by the presence of alcohols (58.8%) and esters (32.7%). Ethers predominated in Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) and Salvia fruticosa (sage) essential oils, constituting 88.9 and 78.0%, respectively. The radial growth, conidial germination, and production of Penicillium digitatum were inhibited completely by oregano, thyme, dictamus, and marjoram essential oils at relatively low concentrations (250-400 microg/mL). Lavender, rosemary, and sage essential oils presented less inhibitory effect on the radial growth and conidial germination of P. digitatum. Conidial production of P. digitatum was not affected by the above oils at concentrations up to 1000 microg/mL. Apart from oregano oil, all essential oils were more effective in the inhibition of conidial germination than of radial growth. The monoterpene components, which participate in essential oils in different compositions, seem to have more than an additive effect in fungal inhibition. PMID:10888587

  19. Minasgeraisite, a new member of the gadolinite group from Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Gaines, R.V.; Crock, J.G.; Simmons, W.B.; Barbosa, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    Minasgeraisite, Y2CaBe2Si2O10, a 9.833(2), b 7.562(1), c 4.702(1) A, beta 90.46(6)o, P21/a, Z = 2, is a new member of the gadolinite group. Found in quantities of only several hundred mg in the Jaguaracu pegmatite, Minas Gerais, Brazil, it occurs as 0.2 to 1.0 mm-diameter rosettes, coating and intergrown with milarite, albite, quartz and muscovite. The mineral is lavender to lilac purple and has a sheaf-like habit, with a grain size of 4.25, D(calc.) 4.90 g/cm3, lustre is earthy to subvitreous and the streak is pale purple. Minasgeraisite is slowly soluble in common acids. The mineral has one excellent cleavage, (100) by analogy with gadolinite, and another good cleavage (001). Minasgeraisite is biaxial positive with alpha (colourless) 1.740(4), beta (pale greyish yellow) 1.754(4), gamma (lavender purple) 1.786(4), 2Vgamma 68o. Strongest powder XRD lines include 3.11(100), 2.830(100), 2.540(90), 1.768(35) A.-J.A.Z.

  20. Presumptive identification of Candida species other than C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis with the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Beckius, Miriam L; Floyd, Karon L; Horvath, Lynn L; Murray, Clinton K

    2006-01-01

    Background CHROMagar Candida (CaC) is increasingly being reported as a medium used to differentiate Candida albicans from non-albicans Candida (NAC) species. Rapid identification of NAC can assist the clinician in selecting appropriate antifungal therapy. CaC is a differential chromogenic medium designed to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis based on colony color and morphology. Some reports have proposed that CaC can also reliably identify C. dubliniensis and C. glabrata. Methods We evaluated the usefulness of CaC in the identification of C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. firmetaria, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. inconspicua, C. kefyr, C. lipolytica, C. lusitaniae, C. norvegensis, C. parapsilosis, and C. rugosa. Results Most NAC produced colonies that were shades of pink, lavender, or ivory. Several isolates of C. firmetaria and all C. inconspicua produced colonies difficult to differentiate from C. krusei. Most C. rugosa isolates produced unique colonies with morphology like C. krusei except in a light blue-green color. C. glabrata isolates produced small dark violet colonies that could be differentiated from the pink and lavender colors produced by other species. All seventeen isolates of C. dubliniensis produced green colonies similar to those produced by C. albicans. Conclusion C. glabrata and C. rugosa appear distinguishable from other species using CaC. Some NAC, including C. firmetaria and C. inconspicua, could be confused with C. krusei using this medium. PMID:16390552

  1. Repellent effectiveness of seven plant essential oils, sunflower oil and natural insecticides against horn flies on pastured dairy cows and heifers.

    PubMed

    Lachance, S; Grange, G

    2014-06-01

    Plant essential oils (basil, geranium, balsam fir, lavender, lemongrass, peppermint, pine and tea tree), mixed with either sunflower oil or ethyl alcohol, were applied at 5% concentrations to the sides of Holstein cattle. Pastured cattle treated with essential oils diluted in sunflower oil had less flies than the untreated control for a 24-h period. However, the essential oil treatments were not significantly different than the carrier oil alone. Barn-held heifers treated with essential oils and sunflower oil alone had significantly less flies than the untreated control for up to 8 h after treatment. Basil, geranium, lavender, lemongrass and peppermint repelled more flies than sunflower oil alone for a period ranging from 1.5 to 4 h after treatments applied to heifers. All essential oils repelled > 75% of the flies on the treated area for 6 and 8 h on pastured cows and indoor heifers, respectively. Geranium, lemongrass and peppermint stayed effective for a longer duration. Essential oils mixed with ethyl alcohol demonstrated less repellence than when mixed with the carrier oil. Safer's soap, natural pyrethrins without piperonyl butoxide and ethyl alcohol alone were not efficient at repelling flies. Essential oils could be formulated for use as fly repellents in livestock production.

  2. Evaluation of biological and chemical insect repellents and their potential adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Semmler, Margit; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Schmidt, Jürgen; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Plant extracts, particularly plant oils, had been used and were still in use as repellents against mosquitoes. Some of them (e.g., lavender, geraniol, and citriodiol) have been notified by the European Commission as active substances to be used in repellents, which are categorized as biocides in product type 19. In the literature, it is known that these substances must be added to repellent products in high concentrations (e.g., 20% and more) in order to reach repellent efficacy. Therefore, the question arose whether they also have repellent effects if they were added as fragrances at low concentrations of 0.25 or 1% to registered active substances in order to obtain a better scent of this product. In the present study, the repellent effects of 0.25 and 1% additions of 15 plant extracts (citronellol, cinerol, citral, menthol, linalyl acetate, Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Cymbopogon nardus, lilac, sandalwood, Vitex agnus castus, rosewood, lavender, geraniol, and paramenthan diol) when exposed on skin to hungry Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. These experiments showed that there was no repellent effect in any of these compounds even when the test was done already 10 min after distributing any of the compounds onto the hands of volunteers. These experiments have proven that these 15 compounds do not produce repellent effects as long as they are used in low concentrations of 0.25 or 1% as fragrances to ameliorate the odor of a notified repellent that is brought onto the skin. PMID:24142288

  3. Lavandula angustifolia and Lavandula latifolia Essential Oils from Spain: Aromatic Profile and Bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Alejandro; Martinez-Gutierrez, Ramiro; Tomas, Virginia; Tudela, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Compositions of true lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oils, cultivated and extracted in the Southeast of Spain, were determined by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry detection, obtaining both relative (peak area) and absolute (using standard curves) concentrations. Linalool (37-54 %), linalyl acetate (21-36 %) and (E)-β-caryophyllene (1-3 %) were the most abundant components for L. angustifolia. Linalool (35-51 %), eucalyptol (26-32 %), camphor (10-18 %), α-pinene (1-2 %), α-terpineol (1-2 %) and α-bisabolene (1-2 %) were the most abundant components for L. latifolia. The characterization was completed with enantioselective gas chromatography, in which the determined main molecules were (-)-linalool, (-)-linalyl acetate and (+)-camphor. (S)-(-)-camphene, (R)-(+)-limonene, (1R, 9S)-(-)-(E)-β-caryophyllene and (1R, 4R, 6R, 10S)-(-)-caryophyllene oxide were found in this study as the predominant enantiomers in Spanish L. angustifolia. The characterised essential oils were tested for their antioxidant activity against free radicals ABTS, DPPH, ORAC, chelating, and reducing power. Inhibitory activity on lipoxygenase was observed indicating a possible anti-inflammatory activity, mainly due to linalool, camphor, p-cymene and limonene. These results can be the starting point for a future study of the potential use of L. angustifolia and L. latifolia essential oils as natural cosmetic and natural pharmaceutical ingredients for several skin diseases. PMID:26441063

  4. Evaluation of biological and chemical insect repellents and their potential adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Semmler, Margit; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Schmidt, Jürgen; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Plant extracts, particularly plant oils, had been used and were still in use as repellents against mosquitoes. Some of them (e.g., lavender, geraniol, and citriodiol) have been notified by the European Commission as active substances to be used in repellents, which are categorized as biocides in product type 19. In the literature, it is known that these substances must be added to repellent products in high concentrations (e.g., 20% and more) in order to reach repellent efficacy. Therefore, the question arose whether they also have repellent effects if they were added as fragrances at low concentrations of 0.25 or 1% to registered active substances in order to obtain a better scent of this product. In the present study, the repellent effects of 0.25 and 1% additions of 15 plant extracts (citronellol, cinerol, citral, menthol, linalyl acetate, Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Cymbopogon nardus, lilac, sandalwood, Vitex agnus castus, rosewood, lavender, geraniol, and paramenthan diol) when exposed on skin to hungry Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. These experiments showed that there was no repellent effect in any of these compounds even when the test was done already 10 min after distributing any of the compounds onto the hands of volunteers. These experiments have proven that these 15 compounds do not produce repellent effects as long as they are used in low concentrations of 0.25 or 1% as fragrances to ameliorate the odor of a notified repellent that is brought onto the skin.

  5. Analysis of enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in plant emissions using portable dynamic air sampling/solid-phase microextraction (PDAS-SPME) and chiral gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Williams, Jonathan

    A portable dynamic air sampler (PDAS) using a porous polymer solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibre has been validated for the determination of biogenic enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in air. These compounds were adsorbed in the field, and then thermally desorbed at 250 °C in a gas chromatograph injector port connected via a β-cyclodextrin capillary separating column to a mass spectrometer. The optimized method has been applied for investigating the emissions of enantiomeric monoterpenes from Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir), Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) and Lavandula lanata (Lavender) which were selected as representative of coniferous trees and aromatic plants, respectively. The enantiomers of α-pinene, sabinene, camphene, δ-3-carene, β-pinene, limonene, β-phellandrene, 4-carene and camphor were successfully determined in the emissions from the three plants. While Douglas-fir showed a strong predominance toward (-)-enantiomers, Rosemary and Lavender demonstrated a large variation in enantiomeric distribution of monoterpenes. The simplicity, rapidity and sensitivity of dynamic sampling with porous polymer coated SPME fibres coupled to chiral capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) makes this method potentially useful for in-field investigations of atmosphere-biosphere interactions and studies of optically explicit atmospheric chemistry.

  6. Role of expectations and pleasantness of essential oils in their acute effects.

    PubMed

    Köteles, F; Babulka, P

    2014-09-01

    Effects of inhaled essential oils (EOs) cannot be explained by pharmacological mechanisms alone. The study aimed to investigate the effects of pleasantness of and expectancies evoked by EOs. A double-blind experiment with a within-subject design was carried out with the participation of 33 volunteering adults (15.2% male; mean age 37.7 ± 10.90 years). Participants were exposed to three EOs (rosemary, lavender, and eucalyptus) for three minutes in a quasi-random order, expectations were simply assessed prior to exposure. Subjective (perceived) changes in alertness, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP), and objective changes in HR, BP, and indices of heart rate variability were recorded. Significant group-level differences in changes in alertness and no differences for the cardiovascular variables were found. Participants' expectations predicted changes in alertness in the case of rosemary and lavender oils but had no impact on cardiovascular variables. EOs' pleasantness had no effect on any assessed variable. Perceived changes in BP and HR were not related to the respective objective changes but were connected to perceived changes in alertness. Expectancies play an important role in the subjective effects of inhaled EOs. Perceived subjective changes are used to estimate changes in non-conscious (e.g., visceral) states. PMID:25183507

  7. Biodegradable gelatin-chitosan films incorporated with essential oils as antimicrobial agents for fish preservation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Estaca, J; López de Lacey, A; López-Caballero, M E; Gómez-Guillén, M C; Montero, P

    2010-10-01

    Essential oils of clove (Syzygium aromaticum L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Miller), cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), herb-of-the-cross (Verbena officinalis L.), pine (Pinus sylvestris) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) were tested for their antimicrobial activity on 18 genera of bacteria, which included some important food pathogen and spoilage bacteria. Clove essential oil showed the highest inhibitory effect, followed by rosemary and lavender. In an attempt to evaluate the usefulness of these essential oils as food preservatives, they were also tested on an extract made of fish, where clove and thyme essential oils were the most effective. Then, gelatin-chitosan-based edible films incorporated with clove essential oil were elaborated and their antimicrobial activity tested against six selected microorganisms: Pseudomonas fluorescens, Shewanella putrefaciens, Photobacterium phosphoreum, Listeria innocua, Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus acidophilus. The clove-containing films inhibited all these microorganisms irrespectively of the film matrix or type of microorganism. In a further experiment, when the complex gelatin-chitosan film incorporating clove essential oil was applied to fish during chilled storage, the growth of microorganisms was drastically reduced in gram-negative bacteria, especially enterobacteria, while lactic acid bacteria remained practically constant for much of the storage period. The effect on the microorganisms during this period was in accordance with biochemical indexes of quality, indicating the viability of these films for fish preservation. PMID:20688230

  8. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization.

  9. Lavandula angustifolia and Lavandula latifolia Essential Oils from Spain: Aromatic Profile and Bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Alejandro; Martinez-Gutierrez, Ramiro; Tomas, Virginia; Tudela, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Compositions of true lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oils, cultivated and extracted in the Southeast of Spain, were determined by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry detection, obtaining both relative (peak area) and absolute (using standard curves) concentrations. Linalool (37-54 %), linalyl acetate (21-36 %) and (E)-β-caryophyllene (1-3 %) were the most abundant components for L. angustifolia. Linalool (35-51 %), eucalyptol (26-32 %), camphor (10-18 %), α-pinene (1-2 %), α-terpineol (1-2 %) and α-bisabolene (1-2 %) were the most abundant components for L. latifolia. The characterization was completed with enantioselective gas chromatography, in which the determined main molecules were (-)-linalool, (-)-linalyl acetate and (+)-camphor. (S)-(-)-camphene, (R)-(+)-limonene, (1R, 9S)-(-)-(E)-β-caryophyllene and (1R, 4R, 6R, 10S)-(-)-caryophyllene oxide were found in this study as the predominant enantiomers in Spanish L. angustifolia. The characterised essential oils were tested for their antioxidant activity against free radicals ABTS, DPPH, ORAC, chelating, and reducing power. Inhibitory activity on lipoxygenase was observed indicating a possible anti-inflammatory activity, mainly due to linalool, camphor, p-cymene and limonene. These results can be the starting point for a future study of the potential use of L. angustifolia and L. latifolia essential oils as natural cosmetic and natural pharmaceutical ingredients for several skin diseases.

  10. Technical Note: Methionine, a precursor of methane in living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, K.; Althoff, F.; Greule, M.; Keppler, F.

    2015-03-01

    When terrestrial plants were identified as producers of the greenhouse gas methane, much discussion and debate ensued not only about their contribution to the global methane budget but also with regard to the validity of the observation itself. Although the phenomenon has now become more accepted for both living and dead plants, the mechanism of methane formation in living plants remains to be elucidated and its precursor compounds to be identified. We made use of stable isotope techniques to verify the in vivo formation of methane, and, in order to identify the carbon precursor, 13C positionally labeled organic compounds were employed. Here we show that the amino acid L-methionine acts as a methane precursor in living plants. Employing 13C-labeled methionine clearly identified the sulfur-bound methyl group of methionine as a carbon precursor of methane released from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Furthermore, when lavender plants were stressed physically, methane release rates and the stable carbon isotope values of the emitted methane greatly increased. Our results provide additional support that plants possess a mechanism for methane production and suggest that methionine might play an important role in the formation of methane in living plants, particularly under stress conditions.

  11. Technical note: Methionine, a precursor of methane in living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, K.; Althoff, F.; Greule, M.; Keppler, F.

    2014-11-01

    When terrestrial plants were identified as producers of the greenhouse gas methane, much discussion and debate ensued, not only about their contribution to the global methane budget, but also with regard to the validity of the observation itself. Although the phenomenon has now become more accepted for both living and dead plants, the mechanism of methane formation in living plants remains to be elucidated and its precursor compounds identified. We made use of stable isotope techniques to verify in vivo formation of methane and, in order to identify the carbon precursor, 13C-positionally labelled organic compounds were employed. Here we show that the amino acid L-methionine acts as a methane precursor in living plants. Employing 13C-labelled methionine clearly identified the sulphur-bound methyl group of methionine as a carbon precursor of methane released from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Furthermore, when lavender plants were stressed physically, methane release rates and the stable carbon isotope values of the emitted methane greatly increased. Our results provide additional support that plants possess a mechanism for methane production and suggest that methionine might play an important role in the formation of methane in living plants, particularly under stress conditions.

  12. Residual and ovicidal efficacy of essential oil-based formulations in vitro against the donkey chewing louse Bovicola ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Sands, B; Ellse, L; Wall, R

    2016-03-01

    Essential oils have shown good experimental potential as novel veterinary ectoparasiticides. However, if they are to be used as veterinary products, they must be available in formulations that are suitable for practical application against specific ectoparasites. Here, the efficacies of formulations containing 5% (v/v) lavender or tea tree oil, in combination with two emulsifiers [a surfactant, 5% (w/v) N-lauroylsarcosine sodium salt (SLS), and a soluble polymer, 5% (w/v) polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)], with or without 10% coconut oil, were tested in contact bioassays against the donkey chewing louse Bovicola ocellatus (Piaget) (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae). Residual activity was quantified in open and closed containers; ovicidal efficacy was also examined. Exposure to either of 5% (v/v) lavender or tea tree oils with SLS or PVP resulted in louse mortality of 100%, but when coconut oil was included as an excipient, significantly lower efficacy was recorded. However, the formulations became significantly less effective after 2 h in open containers and 40 h in closed containers. The results confirm that the residual activity of essential oils is relatively transitory and the addition of 10% coconut oil does not prolong the period of insecticidal activity by slowing essential oil evaporation. Too short a period of residual activity is likely to be a significant impediment to the effective practical use of essential oils. However, unlike many synthetic pediculicides, the essential oils tested here were highly ovicidal, which suggests that prolonged residual activity may not be essential to kill newly hatched nymphs after treatment. PMID:26522385

  13. Data fusion between high resolution (1)H-NMR and mass spectrometry: a synergetic approach to honey botanical origin characterization.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Marc; Dubin, Elodie; Cotton, Jérôme; Poirel, Marion; Corman, Bruno; Jamin, Eric; Lees, Michèle; Rutledge, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    A data fusion approach was applied to a commercial honey data set analysed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) 400 MHz and liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The latter was performed using two types of mass spectrometers: an Orbitrap-MS and a time of flight (TOF)-MS. Fifty-six honey samples from four monofloral origins (acacia, orange blossom, lavender and eucalyptus) and multifloral sources from various geographical origins were analysed using the three instruments. The discriminating power of the results was examined by PCA first considering each technique separately, and then combining NMR and LC-HRMS together with or without variable selection. It was shown that the discriminating potential is increased through the data fusion, allowing for a better separation of eucalyptus, orange blossom and lavender. The NMR-Orbitrap-MS and NMR-TOF-MS mid-level fusion models with variable selection were preferred as a good discrimination was obtained with no misclassification observed for the latter. This study opens the path to new comprehensive food profiling approaches combining more than one technique in order to benefit from the advantages of several technologies. Graphical Abstract Data fusion between high resolution 1H-NMR and mass spectrometry.

  14. Repellent effectiveness of seven plant essential oils, sunflower oil and natural insecticides against horn flies on pastured dairy cows and heifers.

    PubMed

    Lachance, S; Grange, G

    2014-06-01

    Plant essential oils (basil, geranium, balsam fir, lavender, lemongrass, peppermint, pine and tea tree), mixed with either sunflower oil or ethyl alcohol, were applied at 5% concentrations to the sides of Holstein cattle. Pastured cattle treated with essential oils diluted in sunflower oil had less flies than the untreated control for a 24-h period. However, the essential oil treatments were not significantly different than the carrier oil alone. Barn-held heifers treated with essential oils and sunflower oil alone had significantly less flies than the untreated control for up to 8 h after treatment. Basil, geranium, lavender, lemongrass and peppermint repelled more flies than sunflower oil alone for a period ranging from 1.5 to 4 h after treatments applied to heifers. All essential oils repelled > 75% of the flies on the treated area for 6 and 8 h on pastured cows and indoor heifers, respectively. Geranium, lemongrass and peppermint stayed effective for a longer duration. Essential oils mixed with ethyl alcohol demonstrated less repellence than when mixed with the carrier oil. Safer's soap, natural pyrethrins without piperonyl butoxide and ethyl alcohol alone were not efficient at repelling flies. Essential oils could be formulated for use as fly repellents in livestock production. PMID:24382265

  15. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considering for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  16. [Bioactive Effect of the Preparation Biostyl on the Reproductive Function of Different Genotypes of American Mink].

    PubMed

    Trapezov, O V; Zemljanitskajia, E I; Rasputina, O V; Naumkin, I V; Trapezova, L I

    2016-01-01

    The different role of coat color mutations in the American mink on the per os effect of the biologically active preparation Biostyl was shown. The number of kits per female was the same in all control genotypes, including Standard (+/+ +/+), sapphire (a/a p/p), and lavender (a/a m/m): 4.4 ± 0.4, 4.4 ± 0.5, and 4.3 ± 0.5, respectively. Experimental groups of these genotypes have shown a great contrast among each other: stimulation of the reproductive function was 5.2 ± 0.3 in Standard minks, while suppression of the reproductive function was 3.8 ± 0.6, and 2.3 ± 0.5 in the double recessive mutants sapphire and lavender, respectively. The differentiation in body mass between experimental and control newborn Standard kits was not revealed. A significant decrease in the body mass of newborn experimental sapphire kits as compared to control group in a sex-specific manner was registered. PMID:27183801

  17. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Other Aroma-Therapeutic Oils.

    PubMed

    de Rapper, Stephanie; Kamatou, Guy; Viljoen, Alvaro; van Vuuren, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia essential oil was assessed in combination with 45 other oils to establish possible interactive properties. The composition of the selected essential oils was confirmed using GC-MS with a flame ionization detector. The microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay was undertaken, whereby the fractional inhibitory concentration (ΣFIC) was calculated for the oil combinations. When lavender oil was assayed in 1 : 1 ratios with other oils, synergistic (26.7%), additive (48.9%), non-interactive (23.7%), and antagonistic (0.7%) interactions were observed. When investigating different ratios of the two oils in combination, the most favourable interactions were when L. angustifolia was combined with Cinnamomum zeylanicum or with Citrus sinensis, against C. albicans and S. aureus, respectively. In 1 : 1 ratios, 75.6% of the essential oils investigated showed either synergistic or additive results, lending in vitro credibility to the use of essential oil blends in aroma-therapeutic practices. Within the field of aromatherapy, essential oils are commonly employed in mixtures for the treatment of infectious diseases; however, very little evidence exists to support the use in combination. This study lends some credence to the concomitant use of essential oils blended with lavender.

  18. The Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Zahra; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Farrokhian, Alireza; Tagharrobi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an important mental health problem in patients with cardiac disease. Anxiety reduces patients’ quality of life and increases the risk of different cardiac complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial conduced on 68 patients with myocardial infarction hospitalized in coronary care units of a large-scale teaching hospital affiliated to Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran in 2013. By using the block randomization technique, patients were randomly assigned to experimental (33 patients receiving inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma twice a day for two subsequent days) and control (35 patients receiving routine care of study setting including no aromatherapy) groups. At the beginning of study and twenty minutes after each aromatherapy session, anxiety state of patients was assessed using the Spielberger’s State Anxiety Inventory. Data was analyzed using SPSS v. 16.0. We used Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, independent-samples T-test and repeated measures analysis of variance to analyze the study data. Results: The study groups did not differ significantly regarding baseline anxiety mean and demographic characteristics. However, after the administration of aromatherapy, anxiety mean in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma can reduce anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Consequently, healthcare providers, particularly nurses, can use this strategy to improve postmyocardial infarction anxiety management. PMID:25389481

  19. Antimicrobial efficacy of five essential oils against oral pathogens: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Thosar, Nilima; Basak, Silpi; Bahadure, Rakesh N.; Rajurkar, Monali

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study was aimed to find out the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of five essential oils against oral pathogens and to find out the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of five essential oils against oral pathogens. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activities by detecting MIC and MBC/MFC of five essential oils such as tea tree oil, lavender oil, thyme oil, peppermint oil and eugenol oil were evaluated against four common oral pathogens by broth dilution method. The strains used for the study were Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus fecalis ATCC 29212, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Candida albicans ATCC 90028. Results: Out of five essential oils, eugenol oil, peppermint oil, tea tree oil exhibited significant inhibitory effect with mean MIC of 0.62 ± 0.45, 9.00 ± 15.34, 17.12 ± 31.25 subsequently. Mean MBC/MFC for tea tree oil was 17.12 ± 31.25, for lavender oil 151.00 ± 241.82, for thyme oil 22.00 ± 12.00, for peppermint oil 9.75 ± 14.88 and for eugenol oil 0.62 ± 0.45. E. fecalis exhibited low degree of sensitivity compared with all essential oils. Conclusion: Peppermint, tea tree and thyme oil can act as an effective intracanal antiseptic solution against oral pathogens. PMID:24966732

  20. Data fusion between high resolution (1)H-NMR and mass spectrometry: a synergetic approach to honey botanical origin characterization.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Marc; Dubin, Elodie; Cotton, Jérôme; Poirel, Marion; Corman, Bruno; Jamin, Eric; Lees, Michèle; Rutledge, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    A data fusion approach was applied to a commercial honey data set analysed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) 400 MHz and liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The latter was performed using two types of mass spectrometers: an Orbitrap-MS and a time of flight (TOF)-MS. Fifty-six honey samples from four monofloral origins (acacia, orange blossom, lavender and eucalyptus) and multifloral sources from various geographical origins were analysed using the three instruments. The discriminating power of the results was examined by PCA first considering each technique separately, and then combining NMR and LC-HRMS together with or without variable selection. It was shown that the discriminating potential is increased through the data fusion, allowing for a better separation of eucalyptus, orange blossom and lavender. The NMR-Orbitrap-MS and NMR-TOF-MS mid-level fusion models with variable selection were preferred as a good discrimination was obtained with no misclassification observed for the latter. This study opens the path to new comprehensive food profiling approaches combining more than one technique in order to benefit from the advantages of several technologies. Graphical Abstract Data fusion between high resolution 1H-NMR and mass spectrometry. PMID:27086012

  1. IUD litigation: the Planned Parenthood experience.

    PubMed

    York, S S

    1989-01-01

    This review of the IUD litigation experience of Planned Parenthood in the U.S. from 1977-1988 involved 18 injuries allegedly caused by the plaintiff's use of an IUD. These 18 IUD cases represent 9.8% of the total malpractice lawsuits involving Planned Parenthood in the period. 7 were dismissed, 8 were settled, 1 was decided in favor of the defense, and 2 were decided in favor of the plaintiff. While the disposition of these cases is similar to the overall malpractice experience nationally, it is unusual in that twice as many verdicts were for the plaintiff. It is likely that the public perception that IUDs are dangerous made it difficult to select an impartial jury. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) was the most common alleged injury, 15 of 18. Even though the scientific evidence predicts otherwise, 15 of the 16 cases of PID occurred over 4 months after insertion. 8 of 15 cases involves Copper-7 IUDs, 4 Dalkon shields, 1 a Progestasert, and 2 Saf-T-Coils. The other 2 cases were 1 uterine perforation and 1 pregnancy. Of the 8 cases that were settles, the mean payment was $20,912, and the median $10,000. These payments are about 25% higher than average non-IUD cases. Payments by insurance companies averaged $21,644 in the late 1970s for IUD claims. In jury cases involving IUDs and Planned Parenthood, the average jury award was $50,000. It is recommended that providers take care especially to comply fully with an IUD manufacturer's protocol, and obtain full and complete informed consent with documentary proof to decrease the possibility of an adverse outcome in potential litigation.

  2. Sound quality of low-frequency and car engine noises after active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, A.; Ferrer, M.; de Diego, M.; Piñero, G.; Garcia-Bonito, J. J.

    2003-08-01

    The ability of active noise control (ANC) systems to achieve a more pleasant sound has been evaluated by means of sound quality analysis of a real multi-channel active noise controller. Recordings of real car engine noises had been carried out using a Head acoustics TM binaural head simulator seated in a typical car seat, and these signals together with synthesized noise have been actively controlled in an enclosed room. The sound quality study has focused on the estimation of noise quality changes through the evaluation of the sense of comfort. Two methods have been developed: firstly, a predictive method based on psychoacoustic parameters (loudness, roughness, tonality and sharpness); and secondly, a subjective method using a jury test. Both results have been related to the spectral characteristics of the sounds before and after active control. It can be concluded from both analyses that ANC positively affects acoustic comfort. The engine noise mathematical comfort predictor is based on loudness and roughness (two psychoacoustic parameters directly influenced by ANC), and has satisfactorily predicted the improvements in the pleasantness of the sounds. As far as the subjective evaluation method is concerned, the jury test has showed that acoustic comfort is, in most cases, directly related to the sense of quietness. However, ANC has also been assessed negatively by the jury in the cases that it was unable to reduce the loudness, perhaps because of the low amplitudes of the original sounds. Finally, from what has been shown, it can be said that the subjective improvements strongly depends on the attenuation level achieved by the ANC system operation, as well as the spectral characteristics of the sounds before and after control.

  3. Thin slice expert testimony and mock trial deliberations.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Caroline Titcomb; Brodsky, Stanley L; Wilson, Jennifer Kelly

    2015-01-01

    This study examined impressions of expert witness testimony in a not guilty by reason of insanity defense on two outcomes: witness's credibility and verdict. Borrowing in part from the "thin slice" methodology, we assessed outcomes in a 2 (deliberating vs. non-deliberating jurors) × 3 (length of videotaped testimony) between-subjects design. In 30 mock juries, 188 participants viewed the testimony by a forensic psychologist; then half of the juries deliberated. Thinner slices of the testimony were defined by the lower (30s long) and upper (5 min long) temporal bounds in the literature. The third, fuller testimony condition was 10 min long and served as the accuracy marker for the shorter sliced exposures. We aimed to explore potential consequences to jurors relying on impressions of the expert, and his or her opinion, and to test that effect post deliberation. Accounting for deliberation, brief impressions of expert credibility generally exerted a similar influence on credibility to fuller considerations. The essential finding was that a two-way interaction emerged from time slice and deliberation on verdict for jurors in the 30s condition. Overall, predictive accuracy was found in the 5 min slice, yet accuracy was not supported in the predictions based on the shortest slice. Individually-formed impressions are not likely to translate to the verdict ballot post-deliberation. Instead, brief impressions are likely to be heavily influenced by deliberation. Implications for understanding how impression-based testimony evaluations translate from the jury box to the deliberation room are discussed. PMID:26346686

  4. Characterization of Three New Glutaredoxin Genes in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis: Putative Role of RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 in Iron Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Elisabeth; Benabdellah, Karim; Ferrol, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in the regulation of the redox state in living cells. In an attempt to identify the full complement of GRXs in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, three additional GRX homologs, besides the formerly characterized GintGRX1 (renamed here as RiGRX1), were identified. The three new GRXs (RiGRX4, RiGRX5 and RiGRX6) contain the CXXS domain of monothiol GRXs, but whereas RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 belong to class II GRXs, RiGRX6 belongs to class I together with RiGRX1. By using a yeast expression system, we observed that the newly identified homologs partially reverted sensitivity of the GRX deletion yeast strains to external oxidants. Furthermore, our results indicated that RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 play a role in iron homeostasis in yeast. Gene expression analyses revealed that RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 were more highly expressed in the intraradical (IRM) than in the extraradical mycelium (ERM). Exposure of the ERM to hydrogen peroxide induced up-regulation of RiGRX1, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 gene expression. RiGRX4 expression was also up-regulated in the ERM when the fungus was grown in media supplemented with a high iron concentration. These data indicate the two monothiol class II GRXs, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5, might be involved in oxidative stress protection and in the regulation of fungal iron homeostasis. Increased expression of RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 in the IRM suggests that these GRXs should play a key role in oxidative stress protection of R. irregularis during its in planta phase.

  5. Characterization of Three New Glutaredoxin Genes in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis: Putative Role of RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 in Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, Elisabeth; Benabdellah, Karim; Ferrol, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in the regulation of the redox state in living cells. In an attempt to identify the full complement of GRXs in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, three additional GRX homologs, besides the formerly characterized GintGRX1 (renamed here as RiGRX1), were identified. The three new GRXs (RiGRX4, RiGRX5 and RiGRX6) contain the CXXS domain of monothiol GRXs, but whereas RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 belong to class II GRXs, RiGRX6 belongs to class I together with RiGRX1. By using a yeast expression system, we observed that the newly identified homologs partially reverted sensitivity of the GRX deletion yeast strains to external oxidants. Furthermore, our results indicated that RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 play a role in iron homeostasis in yeast. Gene expression analyses revealed that RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 were more highly expressed in the intraradical (IRM) than in the extraradical mycelium (ERM). Exposure of the ERM to hydrogen peroxide induced up-regulation of RiGRX1, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 gene expression. RiGRX4 expression was also up-regulated in the ERM when the fungus was grown in media supplemented with a high iron concentration. These data indicate the two monothiol class II GRXs, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5, might be involved in oxidative stress protection and in the regulation of fungal iron homeostasis. Increased expression of RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 in the IRM suggests that these GRXs should play a key role in oxidative stress protection of R. irregularis during its in planta phase. PMID:26900849

  6. Characterization of Three New Glutaredoxin Genes in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis: Putative Role of RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 in Iron Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Elisabeth; Benabdellah, Karim; Ferrol, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in the regulation of the redox state in living cells. In an attempt to identify the full complement of GRXs in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, three additional GRX homologs, besides the formerly characterized GintGRX1 (renamed here as RiGRX1), were identified. The three new GRXs (RiGRX4, RiGRX5 and RiGRX6) contain the CXXS domain of monothiol GRXs, but whereas RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 belong to class II GRXs, RiGRX6 belongs to class I together with RiGRX1. By using a yeast expression system, we observed that the newly identified homologs partially reverted sensitivity of the GRX deletion yeast strains to external oxidants. Furthermore, our results indicated that RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 play a role in iron homeostasis in yeast. Gene expression analyses revealed that RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 were more highly expressed in the intraradical (IRM) than in the extraradical mycelium (ERM). Exposure of the ERM to hydrogen peroxide induced up-regulation of RiGRX1, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 gene expression. RiGRX4 expression was also up-regulated in the ERM when the fungus was grown in media supplemented with a high iron concentration. These data indicate the two monothiol class II GRXs, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5, might be involved in oxidative stress protection and in the regulation of fungal iron homeostasis. Increased expression of RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 in the IRM suggests that these GRXs should play a key role in oxidative stress protection of R. irregularis during its in planta phase. PMID:26900849

  7. Methodological variables in Web-based research that may affect results: sample type, monetary incentives, and personal information.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, K M; Penrod, S D

    2001-05-01

    There are many methodological differences between Web-based studies, differences that could substantially affect the results. The present study investigated whether sample type, offering payment through a lottery, and requiring participants to enter personal information would affect dropout rates and/or the substantive results in a study of jury decision making in capital cases. Asking participants to enter their e-mail addresses increased dropout rates, and offering payment through a lottery tended to do so as well. Participants offered payment tended to be less likely to give death sentences, and sample type moderated the influence of attitudes toward the death penalty on verdicts.

  8. The Welfare Effects of Medical Malpractice Liability

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawalla, Darius N.; Seabury, Seth A.

    2013-01-01

    We use variation in the generosity of local juries to identify the causal impact of medical malpractice liability on social welfare. Growth in malpractice payments contributed at most 5 percentage points to the 33% total real growth in medical expenditures from 1990-2003. On the other hand, malpractice leads to modest mortality reductions; the value of these more than likely exceeds the costs of malpractice liability. Therefore, reducing malpractice liability is unlikely to have a major impact on health care spending, and unlikely to be cost-effective over conventionally accepted values of a statistical life. PMID:23526860

  9. An Examination of the Causes and Solutions to Eyewitness Error

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Richard A.; Sartori, Giuseppe; Magnussen, Svein; Safer, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Eyewitness error is one of the leading causes of wrongful convictions. In fact, the American Psychological Association estimates that one in three eyewitnesses make an erroneous identification. In this review, we look briefly at some of the causes of eyewitness error. We examine what jurors, judges, attorneys, law officers, and experts from various countries know about eyewitness testimony and memory, and if they have the requisite knowledge and skills to accurately assess eyewitness testimony. We evaluate whether legal safeguards such as voir dire, motion-to-suppress an identification, cross-examination, jury instructions, and eyewitness expert testimony are effective in identifying eyewitness errors. Lastly, we discuss solutions to eyewitness error. PMID:25165459

  10. An examination of the causes and solutions to eyewitness error.

    PubMed

    Wise, Richard A; Sartori, Giuseppe; Magnussen, Svein; Safer, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Eyewitness error is one of the leading causes of wrongful convictions. In fact, the American Psychological Association estimates that one in three eyewitnesses make an erroneous identification. In this review, we look briefly at some of the causes of eyewitness error. We examine what jurors, judges, attorneys, law officers, and experts from various countries know about eyewitness testimony and memory, and if they have the requisite knowledge and skills to accurately assess eyewitness testimony. We evaluate whether legal safeguards such as voir dire, motion-to-suppress an identification, cross-examination, jury instructions, and eyewitness expert testimony are effective in identifying eyewitness errors. Lastly, we discuss solutions to eyewitness error. PMID:25165459

  11. The Technologist As An Expert Witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, R. E. K.; Hall, Morse

    1985-03-01

    Decisions in our legal system are made by laymen. Even the most technical and complex cases are heard and decided by a judge or jury who may very well have no expertise on the questions which confront them. As a result, our legal system permits experts to explain complex phenomena to the fact finder and even to express his opinion on the issue which the fact finder ultimately has to decide. For example, an expert may explain not only how an airplane accident occurred, but also may testify that someone was at fault.

  12. Memory and law: what can cognitive neuroscience contribute?

    PubMed

    Schacter, Daniel L; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2013-02-01

    A recent decision in the United States by the New Jersey Supreme Court has led to improved jury instructions that incorporate psychological research showing that memory does not operate like a video recording. Here we consider how cognitive neuroscience could contribute to addressing memory in the courtroom. We discuss conditions in which neuroimaging can distinguish true and false memories in the laboratory and note reasons to be skeptical about its use in courtroom cases. We also discuss neuroscience research concerning false and imagined memories, misinformation effects and reconsolidation phenomena that may enhance understanding of why memory does not operate like a video recording.

  13. Prohibiting psychiatric diagnosis in insanity trials. With special reference to John W. Hinckley, Jr.

    PubMed

    Miller, G H

    1986-05-01

    Over 12 different diagnoses were offered in expert testimony during the Hinckley insanity trial. This multitude of diagnoses, many of them overlapping, served to focus attention on the labels themselves rather than on the psychological processes of the defendant. As a result, differences in opinion among the experts were exaggerated; more important, the testimony confused the jury. I believe that stating--or even explaining--a diagnosis is not only unnecessary but also misleading in courtroom testimony. In an application of Roy Schafer's "action language" approach (1976; Miller 1979, 1983) and consistent with the law, I recommend that diagnoses be excluded from insanity trials.

  14. Anomalies of Section 2 of the Homicide Act 1957.

    PubMed

    Kenny, A

    1986-03-01

    Section 2 of the 1957 Homicide Act is indefensible: the concept of 'mental responsibility' is a hybrid which turns the psychiatrist witness either into a thirteenth juryman or a spare barrister. But reform does not lie along the lines suggested by the Butler Committee or the Criminal Law Revision Committee. The latter leaves the jury with insufficient guidance; the former returns to the bad eighteenth century policy of treating mental illness not as a factor in determining responsibility but as a status exempting from responsibility. The much criticised McNaughton rules provide a sounder basis for deciding where responsibility should be assigned in criminal cases.

  15. Reducing murder to manslaughter: whose job?

    PubMed

    Griew, E

    1986-03-01

    This paper compares two versions of the diminished responsibility defence, which reduces murder to manslaughter: the present statutory formulation and a proposed reformulation. The comparison confirms that evidence such as psychiatrists are commonly invited to give in murder cases takes them beyond their proper role. Paradoxically, although the two formulations mean essentially the same thing, the proposed change of wording must have the practical effect of subduing the psychiatrist's evidence. This conclusion leads to speculation about why psychiatrists are at present allowed so large a function in diminished responsibility cases and to some general observations about the role of the expert in relation to those of judge and jury.

  16. The use and reliability of psychiatric diagnosis in forensic settings.

    PubMed

    Reid, W H; Wise, M; Sutton, B

    1992-09-01

    The clinical professional encounters conflict whenever he or she enters the courtroom. The psychiatrist's approach must not be simply diagnostic or simply legal. We cannot shed our clinical identity; indeed, the court depends on our clinical identity and expertise in its search for the truth. The psychiatric expert must be able to translate his or her findings for the court, but these findings must come from clinical experience, not some solely legal perspective. The legal system needs our knowledge about the interfaces of mental illness, function, and behavior. After we provide our opinions, however, the legal issues must be left to the lawyers and the final determinations left to the judge or jury.

  17. Depression, homicide and diminished responsibility: new Scottish directions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Philip; White, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    In a recent Scottish Appeal Court opinion (Kim Louise Scarsbrook or Galbraith v. Her Majesty's Advocate, 2001) it was successfully argued by the appellant that her conviction of murder was unsound inter-alia on the basis of overly restrictive pre-existing definitions of diminished responsibility in Scottish law resulting in unduly narrow directions being given by the trial judge to the jury in her case. We felt it timely to present a revised overview of the defence of diminished responsibility in Scotland and to consider the issues surrounding its applicability in cases of clinical depression. The psychiatric literature regarding depression and homicide is reviewed.

  18. The insanity plea in early nineteenth century America.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D; Spiegel, M B

    1998-06-01

    In 1846, former New York State Governor William H. Seward defended two murderers using the insanity plea in both cases. Seward contended that the accused became insane due to brutal beatings administered while they were in the Auburn penitentiary. In the William Freeman trial, nine physicians testified that the murderer was insane while eight said he was sane. Juries convicted both prisoners; one was hanged and the other died in prison awaiting a new trial. Seward's legal defense attracted much attention to the jurisprudence of insanity and to insanity in general.

  19. Induction therapy for lung cancer: sailing across the pillars of Hercules.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Morabito, Alessandro; Muto, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    In spite of numerous clinical trials, the jury is still out on the value of induction therapy for locally advanced lung cancer. We elected to address this topic from the multifaceted views of the clinicians often involved in lung cancer management and according the most recent views on locally advanced NSCLC. The concept of a prognostic stratification of N2 disease subsets, especially single vs multiple zone, has been introduced and this may lead to a new interpretation of locally advanced NSCLC. Ten crucial issues were identified that may have an impact on the approach to patients with locally advanced lung cancer in everyday practice.

  20. The consolidation of plaintiffs: the effects of number of plaintiffs on jurors' liability decisions, damage awards, and cognitive processing of evidence.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, I A; Bordens, K S

    2000-12-01

    In this study, 135 jury-eligible adults were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 aggregations of plaintiffs involving 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 claimants. Jurors were shown a 5- to 6-hr trial involving claims of differential repetitive stress injuries by each plaintiff. Measures concerning liability, damages, and various cognitive and attributional factors were collected. The defendant was more likely to be judged as liable as the number of plaintiffs increased. Awards reached a zenith at 4 plaintiffs and then began to decrease. Increases in the number of plaintiffs who were aggregated degraded information processing. Limits of juror competence in complex trials and juror aids were discussed.