Science.gov

Sample records for juris priekulis aivars

  1. Meet the Jury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the profiles of the jury of this year's Educational Interiors Showcase competition. David Magida has served as Chief Administrator at Norwich University for 15 years. Frank Sever is currently serving as the supervisor of buildings, grounds & equipment department of the Mayfield City School District. Charles A. Wilson III, a…

  2. Meet the Jury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the profiles of the jury of this year's Educational Interiors Showcase competition. David Magida has served as Chief Administrator at Norwich University for 15 years. Frank Sever is currently serving as the supervisor of buildings, grounds & equipment department of the Mayfield City School District. Charles A. Wilson III, a…

  3. Legal Reasoning and Jury Deliberations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Ken J.; Hurlbert, Mike J.

    1992-01-01

    Presents results of a study examining the relationship of legal reasoning abilities and dominance in jury deliberations. Explains that the study considered both reasoning scores and verbal behavior during deliberations. Concludes that jury deliberations reflect the talking and opinions of members holding the most advanced legal reasoning possible.…

  4. Public Participation Guide: Citizen Juries

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Citizen juries involve creating a “jury” a representative sample of citizens (usually selected in a random or stratified manner) who are briefed in detail on the background and current thinking relating to a particular issue or project.

  5. 25 CFR 11.314 - Jury trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... criminal case: (1) That is punishable by a maximum sentence of one year incarceration; or (2) In which the... prosecutor informs the court that no sentence of incarceration will be sought, the court may not impose a sentence of incarceration for the offense. (c) A jury must consist of not less than six residents of...

  6. 25 CFR 11.314 - Jury trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... criminal case: (1) That is punishable by a maximum sentence of one year incarceration; or (2) In which the... prosecutor informs the court that no sentence of incarceration will be sought, the court may not impose a sentence of incarceration for the offense. (c) A jury must consist of not less than six residents of...

  7. 25 CFR 11.314 - Jury trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... criminal case: (1) That is punishable by a maximum sentence of one year incarceration; or (2) In which the... prosecutor informs the court that no sentence of incarceration will be sought, the court may not impose a sentence of incarceration for the offense. (c) A jury must consist of not less than six residents of...

  8. 25 CFR 11.314 - Jury trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... criminal case: (1) That is punishable by a maximum sentence of one year incarceration; or (2) In which the... prosecutor informs the court that no sentence of incarceration will be sought, the court may not impose a sentence of incarceration for the offense. (c) A jury must consist of not less than six residents of...

  9. 25 CFR 11.314 - Jury trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... criminal case: (1) That is punishable by a maximum sentence of one year incarceration; or (2) In which the... prosecutor informs the court that no sentence of incarceration will be sought, the court may not impose a sentence of incarceration for the offense. (c) A jury must consist of not less than six residents of...

  10. Jury Selection in Child Sex Abuse Trials: A Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Robert J.; Adams, Desiree D.; Brodsky, Stanley L.

    2009-01-01

    Child sex abuse cases have been the target of considerable psycho-legal research. The present paper offers an analysis of psychological constructs for jury selection in child sex abuse cases from the defense perspective. The authors specifically delineate general and case-specific jury selection variables. General variables include…

  11. Jury Selection in Child Sex Abuse Trials: A Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Robert J.; Adams, Desiree D.; Brodsky, Stanley L.

    2009-01-01

    Child sex abuse cases have been the target of considerable psycho-legal research. The present paper offers an analysis of psychological constructs for jury selection in child sex abuse cases from the defense perspective. The authors specifically delineate general and case-specific jury selection variables. General variables include…

  12. How Juries Assess Universal Design in Norwegian Architectural School Competitions.

    PubMed

    Houck, Leif D

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how architectural school competition juries assess Universal Design. The method used is a case study of 18 recent architectural school competitions in Norway. The results show that most competition briefs ask for Universal Designed buildings. In 8 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is mentioned as an assessment criterion. In 11 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is commented on by the juries in the jury reports, but only in 3 of the cases, do the juries assess this aspect consistently on every competition project. The overall impression is that some amount of uncertainty looms concerning how Universal Design should be assessed in the competition stage. Based on the findings, future juries should concentrate on orientation and overview prior to technicalities and details.

  13. Do consumer voices in health-care citizens' juries matter?

    PubMed

    Krinks, Rachael; Kendall, Elizabeth; Whitty, Jennifer A; Scuffham, Paul A

    2016-10-01

    There is widespread agreement that the public should be engaged in health-care decision making. One method of engagement that is gaining prominence is the citizens' jury, which places citizens at the centre of the deliberative process. However, little is known about how the jury process works in a health-care context. There is even less clarity about how consumer perspectives are heard within citizens' juries and with what consequences. This paper focuses on what is known about the role of consumer voices within health-care citizens' juries, how these voices are heard by jurors and whether and in what ways the inclusion or exclusion of such voices may matter. Consumer voices are not always included in health-care citizens' juries. There is a dearth of research on the conditions under which consumer voices emerge (or not), from which sources and why. As a result, little is known about what stories are voiced or silenced, and how such stories are heard by jurors, with what consequences for jurors, deliberation, decision-makers, policy and practice. The potential role of consumer voices in influencing deliberations and recommendations of citizens' juries requires greater attention. Much needed knowledge about the nuances of deliberative processes will contribute to an assessment of the usefulness of citizens' juries as a public engagement mechanism. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The American Trial Jury: Current Issues and Controversies. Looking at the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John Paul

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the controversial issues involved in the jury systems, such as jury selection, jury service, civic participation, and the role of the mass media. Stresses the importance of maintaining the public courtroom as a means for encouraging fair trials and not allowing closed courtrooms. Provides an accompanying article, "The Citizen's Jury," by…

  15. Trial by Jury: A New Evaluation Method. I. The Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Robert L.

    1975-01-01

    The judicial evaluation approach adapts and modifies certain concepts from both jury trials and administrative hearings in the field of law and relies on the law's acceptance of human testimony to clarify and, subsequently, to judge complex events. (Author)

  16. PlanJury: probabilistic plan evaluation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Sonke, J.-J.; van Herk, M.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Over a decade ago, the 'Van Herk margin recipe paper' introduced plan evaluation through DVH statistics based on population distributions of systematic and random errors. We extended this work for structures with correlated uncertainties (e.g. lymph nodes or parotid glands), and considered treatment plans containing multiple (overlapping) dose distributions (e.g. conventional lymph node and hypo-fractionated tumor doses) for which different image guidance protocols may lead to correlated errors. Methods: A command-line software tool 'PlanJury' was developed which reads 3D dose and structure data exported from a treatment planning system. Uncertainties are specified by standard deviations and correlation coefficients. Parameters control the DVH statistics to be computed: e.g. the probability of reaching a DVH constraint, or the dose absorbed at given confidence in a (combined) volume. Code was written in C++ and parallelized using OpenMP. Testing geometries were constructed using idealized spherical volumes and dose distributions. Results: Negligible stochastic noise could be attained within two minutes computation time for a single target. The confidence to properly cover both of two targets was 90% for two synchronously moving targets, but decreased by 7% if the targets moved independently. For two partially covered organs at risk the confidence of at least one organ below the mean dose threshold was 40% for synchronous motion, 36% for uncorrelated motion, but only 20% for either of the organs separately. Two abutting dose distributions ensuring 91% confidence of proper target dose for correlated motions led to 28% lower confidence for uncorrelated motions as relative displacements between the doses resulted in cold spots near the target. Conclusions: Probabilistic plan evaluation can efficiently be performed for complicated treatment planning situations, thus providing important plan quality information unavailable in conventional PTV based evaluations.

  17. Expert evidence, the adversary system, and the jury.

    PubMed

    Vidmar, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Many assertions have been made about the competence of juries in dealing with expert evidence. I review the types of expert evidence that jurors hear and the impact of adversary legal procedure on the form and manner in which evidence is presented. Empirical research indicates that jurors understand the adversary process, that they do not automatically defer to the opinions of experts, and that their verdicts appear to be generally consistent with external criteria of performance. Conflicts between the American adversary system and changes in trial procedures that might assist the jury in its task are also considered here.

  18. When Justice Is Up to You. Celebrating America's Guarantee of Trial by Jury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Featuring a mock trial tested in the District of Columbia, the objective of this manual is to help students learn more about the constitutional guarantee of trial by jury. Prepared as five separate lessons, the manual examines one alternative to the jury system--trial by ordeal; traces the development of the guarantee of trial by jury; explores…

  19. Investigating Comprehension in Real World Tasks: Understanding Jury Instructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charrow, Veda R.; Charrow, Robert

    This paper discusses the results of part of an ongoing project studying an aspect of real world language usage, the comprehension of standard jury instructions. Problems in the comprehension of these instructions include the memory load that they impose, the fact that most instructions are read only once, and the fact that instructions are written…

  20. The Origin of a Jury in Ancient Greece and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumanov, Dmitriy Yu.; Sakhapov, Rinat R.; Faizrahmanov, Damir I.; Safin, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the implementation of the democratic principles in the court and judicial process in the trial by jury by the example of the history and development of this institution in Russia. The authors used different methods and approaches, in particular, historical, systemic and Aristotelian method, concrete…

  1. Judge upholds jury award over employer's HIV disclosure.

    PubMed

    1995-06-30

    A Federal judge has refused to overturn or reduce a jury's $125,000 award to a Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) employee who said his privacy was invaded when his superiors learned he was taking an AIDS medication. The employee, known as John Doe, charged that Judith Pierce, the chief administrative officer of SEPTA, looked at the records of the agency's prescription drug plan to confirm her suspicions that he had HIV. Pierce, who claimed drug report review was part of her job in controlling costs, contended that she wanted to make sure the plan's new administrator, Rite-Aid Corp., was charging the right prices for prescriptions. The judge agreed with the jury that Pierce went far beyond her role as auditor of the drug plan when she asked Rite-Aid to link individuals' names to specific prescriptions and then informed Doe's supervisor, associate, and another employee about Doe's AIDS medication.

  2. Grounded citizens’ juries: a tool for health activism?

    PubMed Central

    Kashefi, Elham; Mort, Maggie

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Involving the public in decision‐making has become a bureaucratic pre‐occupation for every health agency in the UK. In this paper we offer an innovative approach for local participation in health decision‐making through the development of a ‘grounded’ citizens’ jury. We describe the process of one such jury commissioned by a Primary Care Group in the north‐west of England, which was located in an area suffering intractable health inequalities. Twelve local people aged between 17 and 70 were recruited to come together for a week to hear evidence, ask questions and debate what they felt would improve the health and well‐being of people living in the area. The jury process acted effectively as a grass‐roots health needs assessment and amongst other outcomes, resulted in the setting up of a community health centre run by a board consisting of members of the community (including two jurors) together with local agencies. The methodology described here contrasts with that practiced by what we term ‘the consultation industry’, which is primarily interested in the use of fixed models to generate the public view as a standardized output, a product, developed to serve the needs of an established policy process, with little interest in effecting change. We outline four principles underpinning our approach: deliberation, integration, sustainability and accountability. We argue that citizens’ juries and other consultation initiatives need to be reclaimed from that which merely serves the policy process and become ‘grounded’, a tool for activism, in which local people are agents in the development of policies affecting their lives. PMID:15544682

  3. Judge cuts jury award against former AIDS director.

    PubMed

    1997-10-31

    [Name removed], former director of Philadelphia's AIDS Activities Coordinating Office, was sued by eight African American employees who claimed they were discriminated against in favor of white employees. [Name removed] maintained innocence and in December 1996 several claims against him were dismissed. In April 1997 a jury found in favor of four of the employees and awarded them $5,000 each for emotional distress. [Name removed] appealed to the court to set aside the verdict and both sides sought attorney's fees from the other. The judged denied most of [name removed]'s motion and repudiated [name removed]'s and the city's requests for the plaintiffs to pay their attorney's fees.

  4. Jury rejects plea that AIDS dementia prompted murder plot.

    PubMed

    1998-06-12

    [Name removed], a defendant with AIDS-related dementia, was found legally sane by a Contra Costa County jury when he plotted to have his ex-lover killed for $860,000 in insurance money. No testimony was presented showing that the defendant was insane at the time he plotted the murder. A videotape showed the defendant giving $2,500 to an undercover police officer to hire the officer for the murder. The defendant was convicted and sentenced to 25 years to life in prison. He is currently refusing all AIDS medications, and is not expected to live longer than 18 months.

  5. Argumentation in Science Teacher Education: The Simulated Jury as a Resource for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieira, Rodrigo Drumond; da Rocha Bernardo, José Roberto; Evagorou, Maria; de Melo, Viviane Florentino

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we focus on the contributions that a simulated jury-based activity might have for pre-service teachers, especially for their active participation and learning in teacher education. We observed a teacher educator using a series of simulated juries as teaching resources to help pre-service teachers develop their pedagogical…

  6. DNA evidence in jury trials: the "CSI effect".

    PubMed

    Scott, Russ; Skellern, Catherine

    2010-12-01

    In Murdoch v The Queen (2007) 167 A Crim R 329, Hillier v The Queen (2007) 228 CLR 618 and Forbes v The Queen (2009) 167ACTR 1, Australian appellate courts considered the interpretation of DNA evidence and the possibility of secondary transfer of DNA samples and questions about the statistical calculations used to produce probabilities of DNA matches. Following the 2010 Victorian case of Farrah Jama, whose conviction for rape was quashed 16 months into his prison sentence after it was discovered that the incriminating DNA sample was contaminated, Mr FRH Vincent QC, in his report to the Victorian Attorney-General, was scathing of the conduct of the case and made a number of recommendations, all of which were immediately adopted by the Victorian Government. Following the release of the Vincent Report, Australia's Attorneys-General have established a working party to examine national standards for the use and collection of DNA evidence. The use and interpretation of DNA evidence in jury trials is considered and factors that improve jury understanding of DNA evidence are discussed.

  7. Evaluating the use of citizens' juries in food policy: a case study of food regulation.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Julie; House, Elizabeth; Coveney, John; Meyer, Samantha; Ankeny, Rachel; Ward, Paul; Calnan, Michael

    2013-06-19

    Deliberative engagement techniques and citizens' juries are touted as means of incorporating the public into policy decision-making, managing community expectations and increasing commitment to public health policy. This paper reports a study to examine the feasibility of citizens' juries as a means of collecting data to inform public health policy related to food regulation through evaluation of the conduct of a citizens' jury. A citizens' jury was conducted with a representative sample of 17 South Australians to explore their willingness to consider the proposition that food and drink advertising and/or sponsorship should be banned at children's sporting events. The results showed that, in relation to the central proposition and evaluation data from the jury, opinion on the proposition remained comparatively stable. Most jurors indicated that they thought that food and drink sponsorship and/or advertising at children's sporting events would have little or no effect on altering children's diet and eating habits, with the proportion increasing during the jury process. Jurors were given evaluation sheets about the content of the jury and the process of the citizens' jury to complete at the end of the session. The evaluation of the citizens' jury process revealed positive perceptions. The majority of jurors agreed that their knowledge of the issues of food and drink sponsorship in children's sport had increased as a result of participation in the citizens' jury. The majority also viewed the decision-making process as fair and felt that their views were listened to. One important response in the evaluation was that all jurors indicated that, if given the opportunity, they would participate in another citizens' jury. The findings suggest that the citizens' jury increased participant knowledge of the issue and facilitated reflective discussion of the proposition. Citizens' juries are an effective means of gaining insight into public views of policy and the circumstances

  8. Engaging the public in healthcare decision-making: quantifying preferences for healthcare through citizens' juries.

    PubMed

    Scuffham, Paul A; Ratcliffe, Julie; Kendall, Elizabeth; Burton, Paul; Wilson, Andrew; Chalkidou, Kalipso; Littlejohns, Peter; Whitty, Jennifer A

    2014-05-02

    The optimal approach to engage the public in healthcare decision-making is unclear. Approaches range from deliberative citizens' juries to large population surveys using discrete choice experiments. This study promotes public engagement and quantifies preferences in two key areas of relevance to the industry partners to identify which approach is most informative for informing healthcare policy. The key areas identified are optimising appropriate use of emergency care and prioritising patients for bariatric surgery. Three citizens' juries will be undertaken-two in Queensland to address each key issue and one in Adelaide to repeat the bariatric surgery deliberations with a different sample. Jurors will be given a choice experiment before the jury, immediately following the jury and at approximately 1 month following the jury. Control groups for each jury will be given the choice experiment at the same time points to test for convergence. Samples of healthcare decision-makers will be given the choice experiment as will two large samples of the population. Jury and control group participants will be recruited from the Queensland electoral roll and newspaper advertisements in Adelaide. Population samples will be recruited from a large research panel. Jury processes will be analysed qualitatively and choice experiments will be analysed using multinomial logit models and its more generalised forms. Comparisons between preferences across jurors predeliberation and postdeliberation, control participants, healthcare decision-makers and the general public will be undertaken for each key issue. The study is approved by Griffith University Human Research Ethics Committee (MED/10/12/HREC). Findings of the juries and the choice experiments will be reported at a workshop of stakeholders to be held in 2015, in reports and in peer reviewed journals.

  9. Eliciting youth and adult recommendations through citizens' juries to improve school based adolescent immunisation programs.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Helen S; Proeve, Claudia; Collins, Joanne; Tooher, Rebecca; O'Keefe, Maree; Burgess, Teresa; Skinner, S Rachel; Watson, Maureen; Ashmeade, Heather; Braunack-Mayer, Annette

    2014-05-01

    Completion of adolescent immunisation schedules in Australia is sub-optimal despite a well-established school based delivery program. The aim of this study was to seek adolescent and adult views on how existing adolescent school based immunisation policy and program delivery could be improved to increase adolescent immunisation uptake. Two citizens' juries held separately, one with adolescent participants and one with adult participants deliberated on recommendations for public policy. Jury members were selected using a stratified sampling technique and recruited from a standing panel of community research participants through a market research company in South Australia. Juries were conducted in Metropolitan South Australia over two days and used university facilities with all meals and refreshments provided. Fifteen adults and 16 adolescents participated in the adult and youth juries respectively. Similar recommendations were made by both juries including increased ensuring the accuracy of information provided to adolescents and parents; employing a variety of formats for information delivery; and greater consideration of students' physical and emotional comfort in order to improve the experience for adolescents. While the youth jury recommended that it should be compulsory for adolescents to receive vaccines through the school based immunisation program, the adult jury recommended an 'opt-out' system of consent. Both juries also recommended the use of incentives to improve immunisation uptake and immunisation course completion. Eliciting adolescent views and including the perspectives of adolescents in discussions and development of strategies to improve engagement in the school based immunisation program provided valuable insight from the group most impacted by these policies and practices. Specifically, incorporation of adolescent and community views using citizens' juries may lead to greater overall support from the community as their values and needs are

  10. Jury Still Out on Whether to Screen All Adults for Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Jury Still Out on Whether to Screen All Adults for Sleep Apnea Not enough data to ... Jan. 24, 2017 HealthDay Copyright (c) 2017 HealthDay . All rights reserved. News stories are written and provided ...

  11. The CSI effect and the Canadian and the Australian Jury.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Janne A; Fordham, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Television shows, such as CBS's CSI and its spin-offs CSI: Miami; CSI: Las Vegas; and CSI: New York, have sparked the imagination of thousands of viewers who want to become forensic scientists. The shows' fictional portrayals of crime scene investigations have prompted fears that jurors will demand DNA and other forensic evidence before they will convict, and have unrealistic expectations of that evidence. This has been dubbed the "CSI effect." This phenomenon was explored using results from a Canadian study based on 605 surveys of Canadian college students who would be considered jury-eligible and Australian quantitative and qualitative findings from a study that surveyed and interviewed real posttrial jurors. Information about the way jurors deal with forensic evidence in the context of other evidence and feedback about the way in which understanding such evidence could be increased were gained from both these studies. The comparison provides insights into the knowledge base of jurors, permitting adaptation of methods of presenting forensic information by lawyers and experts in court, based on evidence rather than folklore. While the Canadian juror data showed statistically significant findings that jurors are clearly influenced in their treatment of some forensic evidence by their television-viewing habits, reassuringly, no support was found in either study for the operation of a detrimental CSI effect as defined above. In the Australian study, in fact, support was found for the proposition that jurors assess forensic evidence in a balanced and thoughtful manner. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Argumentation in Science Teacher Education: The simulated jury as a resource for teaching and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumond Vieira, Rodrigo; da Rocha Bernardo, José Roberto; Evagorou, Maria; Florentino de Melo, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we focus on the contributions that a simulated jury-based activity might have for pre-service teachers, especially for their active participation and learning in teacher education. We observed a teacher educator using a series of simulated juries as teaching resources to help pre-service teachers develop their pedagogical knowledge and their argumentation abilities in a physics teacher methods course. For the purposes of this article, we have selected one simulated jury-based activity, comprising two opposed groups of pre-service teachers that presented aspects that hinder the teachers' development of professional knowledge (against group) and aspects that allow this development (favor group). After the groups' presentations, a group of judges was formed to evaluate the discussion. We applied a multi-level method for discourse analysis and the results showed that (1) the simulated jury afforded the pre-service teachers to position themselves as active knowledge producers; (2) the teacher acted as 'animator' of the pre-service teachers' actions, showing responsiveness to the emergence of circumstantial teaching and learning opportunities and (3) the simulated jury culminated in the judges' identification of the pattern 'concrete/obstacles-ideological/possibilities' in the groups' responses, which was elaborated by the teacher for the whole class. Implications from this study include using simulated juries for teaching and learning and for the development of the pre-service teachers' argumentative abilities. The potential of simulated juries to improve teaching and learning needs to be further explored in order to inform the uses and reflections of this resource in science education.

  13. Social Justice and Environmental Awareness Developed through a Citizens' Jury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J.

    2014-12-01

    A Citizens' Jury (CJ) is a discussion forum in which managers, policymakers or politicians are able to present their case to the general public ('citizens') to whom they are accountable, and for these citizens to critically ask questions of the managers/policymakers/politicians in order to better understand issues surrounding local development, planning and policy, impacts and adaptive measures, and to highlight their concerns. A CJ can be useful with respect to developing social justice and environmental awareness issues because it can empower community action and present different viewpoints. A practical CJ exercise is used in a second-year undergraduate course entitled Climate Change and Society, at University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. The CJ is used to consider some of the impacts of management policies used for climate change and sustainable development adaption, based on a hypothetical scenario. This scenario is that a major energy company wants to build a dam with hydroelectric power station in a developing country. This will provide low-carbon renewable energy to the country, investment in electricity infrastructure, and the company is committed to help economic development in the country, including in jobs and education. However, building and flooding of the dam will involve displacing 10,000 people from rural communities, flooding agricultural areas and areas of high biodiversity, and archaeological sites. The exercise is based on students, in groups, assuming different 'identities' which may include a local business person, resident, politician, member of an NGO, tourist, engineer, farmer etc, from which viewpoint they must argue for/against the proposal and to question other peoples' viewpoints. This exercise is useful because it allows students to develop understandings of different viewpoints, evaluate risk and impacts on different communities, and highlights the complexity of real-world decision-making.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    'I know very well that my theory rests on a shaky foundation. What attracts me to it is that it leads to consequences that seem to be accessible to experiment, and it provides a starting point for the theoretical understanding of gravitation', wrote Einstein in 1911. Einstein's Jury by Jeffrey Crelinsten—well documented, well written, and fascinating to read—describes how, from 1909 on, Einstein's two theories of relativity became known to astronomers, and how the predictions made between 1907 and 1915 were received as challenges to observers. The author gives a non-technical account of the efforts made until 1930 to test these predictions; he focuses on two of the three classical tests, namely gravitational redshift and bending of light; the 'jury' consists mainly of American observers—Adams, Campbell, Curtis, Hale, Perrin, St John, Trumpler and others—working with newly built large telescopes, and the Britons Eddington and Evershed. The major steps which, after a long struggle, convinced the majority of astronomers that Einstein was right, are narrated chronologically in rather great detail, especially the work at Lick Observatory, before and after the famous British observation of 1919, on solar eclipses, and the work at Mount Wilson and the Indian Kodaikanal Observatories to extract the gravitational redshift from the complicated spectrum of the sun. The account of the eclipse work which was carried out between 1918 and 1923 by Lick astronomers corrects the impression suggested by many historical accounts that the British expedition alone settled the light-bending question. Apart from these main topics, the anomalous perihelion advance of Mercury and the ether problem are covered. By concentrating on astronomy rather than on physics this book complements the rich but repetitive literature on Einstein and relativity which appeared in connection with the commemoration of Einstein's annus mirabilis, 2005. The well told stories include curiosities such as

  15. From passive subject to active agent: the potential of Citizens' Juries for nursing research.

    PubMed

    Iredale, Rachel; Longley, Marcus

    2007-10-01

    The nursing profession needs to have a greater appreciation of how techniques such as Citizens' Juries can be used in nursing research. This paper explains the concept of Citizens' Juries and how it is being used as a form of social research, that can simultaneously increase public participation in policy making. Participation has become a key component of the discourse in policy making, and public participation initiatives can be one way of bridging the democratic deficit. For nursing, Citizens' Juries offer a way of discovering lay people's considered judgment on key policy issues, while also providing a potentially powerful platform for citizens to express their concerns and priorities, thereby influencing the services they receive. A Citizens' Jury brings together a small group of people over a period of time and presents them with a policy question. The jurors listen to expert witnesses, examine the evidence, deliberate on the issues and arrive at a policy decision or set of recommendations. In this paper we argue that any ordinary person given the opportunity, enough time and the necessary resources can make decisions about complex policy matters. Key findings from two Citizens' Juries on genetics in Wales are offered as case studies.

  16. Goffman on the jury: real jurors' attention to the "offstage" of trials.

    PubMed

    Rose, Mary R; Diamond, Shari Seidman; Baker, Kimberly M

    2010-08-01

    Social psychologist Erving Goffman, in his classic work The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, provides a framework that explains why jurors may turn their attention at the courthouse to information not formally presented from the witness stand. We dub this "offstage observation," a type of juror behavior that has not been systematically examined empirically. Analyzing a unique data source of 50 actual jury deliberations in civil trials, we find that jurors do look to the offstage in evaluating the claims of the parties. However, in contrast to predictions, these observations played a surprisingly minor role in the jury deliberation process.

  17. Whistle-blower Walks: Jury Acquits Nurse Who Reported Physician to TMB.

    PubMed

    Conde, Crystal

    2010-05-01

    A West Texas jury acquitted a nurse on trial for misuse of official information. She and another nurse had reported a physician to the Texas Medical Board for improperly prescribing herbal medicines that he sold on the side and for performing unauthorized surgical procedures.

  18. The verdict on jury trials for juveniles: the effects of defendant's age on trial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Warling, Diane; Peterson-Badali, Michele

    2003-01-01

    With the progression to more adult-like policies and procedures for youth in the justice system, the right to a jury trial has been extended to young offenders. These youth would not be tried by a jury of their peers, however, but by a jury of adults. The concern is that adult jurors may hold negative attitudes about youth that might influence their decision making in a case involving a young defendant. Two studies examined whether and under what conditions defendant's age affects jurors' decisions about the guilt and sentencing of an accused. In study 1, data were gathered from two samples of jury eligible adults: one university sample and one public sample. Mock jurors read written transcripts of a trial involving a defendant who was presented as either 13, 17, or 25 years of age. Results indicated that the defendant's age had no effect on mock jurors' verdict or their ratings of defendant guilt. However, younger defendants were granted shorter sentences than the adult defendants. In study 2, mock jurors read the same trial presented in study 1 but were asked to deliberate about the case and render group verdicts. These group verdicts did not differ significantly by defendant's age. Age-related themes that emerged from group deliberations were identified, and results indicated that age tended to be used as a mitigating factor in favor of youth rather than against them. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for youth justice policy and practice.

  19. Race and Jury Selection: Psychological Perspectives on the Peremptory Challenge Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Samuel R.; Norton, Michael I.

    2008-01-01

    The legal system is a domain of potential relevance for psychologists, whether in the capacity of expert witness or citizen juror. In this article, the authors apply a psychological framework to legal debate surrounding the impact of race on the process of jury selection. More specifically, the authors consider race and the peremptory challenge,…

  20. Mock juror sampling issues in jury simulation research: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Brian H; Golding, Jonathan M; Neuschatz, Jeffrey; Kimbrough, Christopher; Reed, Krystia; Magyarics, Casey; Luecht, Katherine

    2017-02-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of jury simulation research have often been debated in the literature. Critics chiefly argue that jury simulations lack verisimilitude, particularly through their use of student mock jurors, and that this limits the generalizabilty of the findings. In the present article, the question of sample differences (student v. nonstudent) in jury research was meta-analyzed for 6 dependent variables: 3 criminal (guilty verdicts, culpability, and sentencing) and 3 civil (liability verdicts, continuous liability, and damages). In total, 53 studies (N = 17,716) were included in the analysis (40 criminal and 13 civil). The results revealed that guilty verdicts, culpability ratings, and damage awards did not vary with sample. Furthermore, the variables that revealed significant or marginally significant differences, sentencing and liability judgments, had small or contradictory effect sizes (e.g., effects on dichotomous and continuous liability judgments were in opposite directions). In addition, with the exception of trial presentation medium, moderator effects were small and inconsistent. These results may help to alleviate concerns regarding the use of student samples in jury simulation research. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. (Almost) Everything I Need to Know about Multiculturalism I Learned on Jury Duty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shaunna

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author states that during her experience on jury duty--spent with a melting pot of socially-conscious citizens--she reflected upon the implications for education and her own teaching practice. Three major themes centering around her understanding of multiculturalism surfaced: (1) Defining multiculturalism; (2) The cult of…

  2. (Almost) Everything I Need to Know about Multiculturalism I Learned on Jury Duty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shaunna

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author states that during her experience on jury duty--spent with a melting pot of socially-conscious citizens--she reflected upon the implications for education and her own teaching practice. Three major themes centering around her understanding of multiculturalism surfaced: (1) Defining multiculturalism; (2) The cult of…

  3. "Ain't Misbehavin'": Bench Conduct and Nonverbal Expectancy Effects in Criminal Jury Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Wayne

    The possibility that judges' expectancy effects may adversely affect the results of jury trials is a problem that needs careful theoretical analysis and innovative methods of resolution. Traditional efforts by the legal community to counteract the threat of verbal/nonverbal bias by judges include the "Code of Judicial Conduct," curative…

  4. Exploring public perspectives on e‐health: findings from two citizen juries

    PubMed Central

    King, Gerry; Heaney, David J.; Boddy, David; O’Donnell, Catherine A.; Clark, Julia S.; Mair, Frances S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background  Interest and investment in e‐health continue to grow world‐wide, but there remains relatively little engagement with the public on this subject, despite calls for more public involvement in health‐care planning. Design  This study used two modified citizen juries to explore barriers and facilitators to e‐health implementation and the priorities for future e‐health research from the perspective of health service users and lay representatives. Citizen juries bring together a group of people to deliberate over a specific issue. They are given information and invited to ‘cross‐examine’ witnesses during the process. Results  Jurors were very keen for lay views to be included in e‐health development and embraced the citizen jury approach. They agreed unanimously that e‐health should be developed and thought it was in many ways inevitable. Although there was much enthusiasm for a health‐care system which offered e‐health as an option, there was as much concern about what it might mean for patients if implemented inappropriately. E‐health was preferred as an enhancement rather than substitute for, existing services. Lack of universal access was seen as a potential barrier to implementation but problems such as lack of computer literacy were seen as a temporary issue. Participants emphasized that e‐health research needed to demonstrate both clinical and economic benefits. Conclusion  There was broad support from the citizen juries for the development of e‐health, although participants stressed that e‐health should enhance, rather than substitute, face‐to‐face services. One‐day citizen juries proved a practical method of public engagement on this subject. PMID:21029283

  5. Science in the jury box: jurors' comprehension of mitochondrial DNA evidence.

    PubMed

    Hans, Valerie P; Kaye, David H; Dann, B Michael; Farley, Erin J; Albertson, Stephanie

    2011-02-01

    Questions about how jurors understand and apply scientific evidence were addressed in a mock jury study in which 480 jury pool members watched a videotaped mock trial that included expert testimony about mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evidence purportedly linking a defendant to a crime. Collectively, jurors showed moderately good comprehension of the mtDNA evidence, although some made definitional and inferential errors. Comprehension was better among jurors with higher educational attainment and more mathematics and science courses. Lower comprehension was associated with jurors' reservations about science and concerns about the contamination of mtDNA evidence. The results suggest that most jurors are capable of comprehending and employing scientific evidence presented during trial, although errors and doubts about the evidence should be anticipated.

  6. Applying the Capital Jury Project Findings to Court-Martial Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-11

    holdout juror then slowly and deliberately, through the use of reason, is able to change the minds of the other jurors until the jury reaches a...Marla Sandys, “Cross Overs--Capital Jurors Who Change Their Minds About the Punishment: A Litmus Test for Sentencing Guidelines,” Indiana Law...murder case, the defense counsel might introduce mental health evidence with two goals in mind . The first would be for a finding of not guilty by lack

  7. Yes, the government should tax soft drinks: findings from a citizens' jury in Australia.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Nicole; Kendall, Elizabeth; Whitty, Jennifer; Byrnes, Joshua; Hills, Andrew P; Gordon, Louisa; Turkstra, Erika; Scuffham, Paul; Comans, Tracy

    2014-02-27

    Taxation has been suggested as a possible preventive strategy to address the serious public health concern of childhood obesity. Understanding the public's viewpoint on the potential role of taxation is vital to inform policy decisions if they are to be acceptable to the wider community. A Citizens' Jury is a deliberative method for engaging the public in decision making and can assist in setting policy agendas. A Citizens' Jury was conducted in Brisbane, Australia in May 2013 to answer the question: Is taxation on food and drinks an acceptable strategy to the public in order to reduce rates of childhood obesity? Citizens were randomly selected from the electoral roll and invited to participate. Thirteen members were purposively sampled from those expressing interest to broadly reflect the diversity of the Australian public. Over two days, participants were presented with evidence on the topic by experts, were able to question witnesses and deliberate on the evidence. The jurors unanimously supported taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks but generally did not support taxation on processed meats, snack foods and foods eaten/ purchased outside the home. They also supported taxation on snack foods on the condition that traffic light labelling was also introduced. Though they were not specifically asked to deliberate strategies outside of taxation, the jurors strongly recommended more nutritional information on all food packaging using the traffic light and teaspoon labelling systems for sugar, salt and fat content. The Citizens' Jury suggests that the general public may support taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks to reduce rates of obesity in children. Regulatory reforms of taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks and improved labelling of nutritional information on product packaging were strongly supported by all members of the jury. These reforms should be considered by governments to prevent childhood obesity and the future burden on society from the consequences of obesity.

  8. Justins v The Queen: assisted suicide, juries and the discretion to prosecute.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas; Townsend, Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Juries are often a crucial protection for citizens against unjust or highly controversial laws. The decision whether to proceed with a prosecution rests on the discretionary powers of prosecutors. In cases where the community is deeply divided over right and wrong, it appears that there is, at times, a transference from the public of thwarted law reform aspirations which can create difficult tensions and expectations. This case commentary considers an appeal by Shirley Justins following her conviction for manslaughter by gross criminal negligence as a result of her involvement in the mercy killing of her partner, Mr Graeme Wylie. The morally unsettled nature of the charges brought against her, her own initial plea, the directions given to the jury by the trial judge and even the basis of her appeal resulted in a convoluted and complicated legal case. Spigelman CJ and Johnson J ordered a new trial, Spigelman CJ stating that it was open for a new jury to consider (a) if Mr Wylie lacked capacity; and (b) whether there was criminal involvement by one person in another's death. Simpson J found that further prosecution on the count of manslaughter would amount to an abuse of process and that an acquittal should be entered. This case highlights how fundamentally unsettled are the publicly much debated and persistently contentious issues of euthanasia, assisted suicide, the right of a person to die a dignified death and the way their capacity in that respect should be assessed. It perhaps asks us to reconsider the role of juries and the exercise of discretion by Directors of Public Prosecutions in areas of law where the community and law-makers are deeply and intractably divided.

  9. Yes, The Government Should Tax Soft Drinks: Findings from a Citizens’ Jury in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, Nicole; Kendall, Elizabeth; Whitty, Jennifer; Byrnes, Joshua; Hills, Andrew P.; Gordon, Louisa; Turkstra, Erika; Scuffham, Paul; Comans, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Taxation has been suggested as a possible preventive strategy to address the serious public health concern of childhood obesity. Understanding the public’s viewpoint on the potential role of taxation is vital to inform policy decisions if they are to be acceptable to the wider community. A Citizens’ Jury is a deliberative method for engaging the public in decision making and can assist in setting policy agendas. A Citizens’ Jury was conducted in Brisbane, Australia in May 2013 to answer the question: Is taxation on food and drinks an acceptable strategy to the public in order to reduce rates of childhood obesity? Citizens were randomly selected from the electoral roll and invited to participate. Thirteen members were purposively sampled from those expressing interest to broadly reflect the diversity of the Australian public. Over two days, participants were presented with evidence on the topic by experts, were able to question witnesses and deliberate on the evidence. The jurors unanimously supported taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks but generally did not support taxation on processed meats, snack foods and foods eaten/ purchased outside the home. They also supported taxation on snack foods on the condition that traffic light labelling was also introduced. Though they were not specifically asked to deliberate strategies outside of taxation, the jurors strongly recommended more nutritional information on all food packaging using the traffic light and teaspoon labelling systems for sugar, salt and fat content. The Citizens’ Jury suggests that the general public may support taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks to reduce rates of obesity in children. Regulatory reforms of taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks and improved labelling of nutritional information on product packaging were strongly supported by all members of the jury. These reforms should be considered by governments to prevent childhood obesity and the future burden on society from the consequences of

  10. The insanity defense for sex offenders: jury decisions after repeal of Wisconsin's Sex Crimes Law.

    PubMed

    Miller, R D; Stava, L J; Miller, R K

    1988-02-01

    After repeal of a Wisconsin statute permitting hospitalization of defendants convicted of sexual crimes, the authors noted an increase in the percentage of sex offenders among persons hospitalized after being found not guilty by reason of insanity. They also found that a greater proportion of hospitalized sex offenders than of other kinds of offenders were diagnosed as nonpsychotic. Illustrating with three case studies, the authors argue that despite trends away from the therapeutic model of corrections, juries continue to make decisions that provide treatment for defendants perceived to need it, even if the legal criteria for those decisions do not appear to be met.

  11. Are damages caps regressive? A study of malpractice jury verdicts in California.

    PubMed

    Studdert, David M; Yang, Y Tony; Mello, Michelle M

    2004-01-01

    Caps on damages have emerged as the most controversial legislative response to the new malpractice crisis. We analyzed a sample of high-end jury verdicts in California that were subjected to the state's dollars 250,000 cap on noneconomic damages. We found strong evidence that the cap's fiscal impact was distributed inequitably across different types of injuries. In absolute dollar terms, the reductions imposed on grave injury were seven times larger than those for minor injury; the largest proportional reductions were for injuries that centered on pain and disfigurement. Use of sliding scales of damages instead of or in conjunction with caps would mitigate their adverse impacts on fairness.

  12. A Community Jury on PSA screening: what do well-informed men want the government to do about prostate cancer screening--a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Rychetnik, Lucie; Doust, Jenny; Thomas, Rae; Gardiner, Robert; Mackenzie, Geraldine; Glasziou, Paul

    2014-04-30

    Cancer screening policies and programmes should take account of public values and concerns. This study sought to determine the priorities, values and concerns of men who were 'fully informed' about the benefits and harms of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening; and empirically examine the value of a community jury in eliciting public values on PSA screening. Community jury was convened on the Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia) to consider PSA screening benefits and harms, and whether government campaigns on PSA screening should be conducted. 27 men (volunteers) aged 50-70 with no personal history of prostate cancer and willing to attend jury 6-7 April 2013: 12 were randomly allocated to jury (11 attended). A qualitative analysis was conducted of the jury deliberations (audio-recorded and transcribed) to elicit the jury's views and recommendations. A survey determined the impact of the jury process on participants' individual testing decisions compared with control group. The jury concluded governments should not invest in programmes focused on PSA screening directed at the public because the PSA test did not offer sufficient reassurance or benefit and could raise unnecessary alarm. It recommended an alternative programme to support general practitioners to provide patients with better quality and more consistent information about PSA screening. After the jury, participants were less likely to be tested in the future compared with the controls, but around half said they would still consider doing so. The jury's unanimous verdict about government programmes was notable in the light of their divergent views on whether or not they would be screened themselves in the future. Community juries provide valuable insights into the priorities and concerns of men weighing up the benefits and harms of PSA screening. It will be important to assess the degree to which the findings are generalisable to other settings.

  13. In the aftermath of State v. Becker: a review of state and federal jury instructions on insanity acquittal disposition.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    An important topic related to the insanity defense is what jurors should be told about the disposition of a defendant found not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI). In the federal court system, jurors are not instructed about the consequences of an NGRI verdict. State courts, however, are divided on the question. The federal precedent, Shannon v. United States, and the most recent state case to rule on NGRI juror instructions, State v. Becker, are reviewed in detail. What follows is the author's critique of the principal arguments for and against a jury instruction on NGRI disposition. The author argues in favor of a jury instruction on the consequences of an NGRI verdict.

  14. Examining pretrial publicity in a shadow jury paradigm: issues of slant, quantity, persistence and generalizability.

    PubMed

    Daftary-Kapur, Tarika; Penrod, Steven D; O'Connor, Maureen; Wallace, Brian

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of pretrial publicity (PTP) on mock juror decision making. Specifically, we examined the influence of quantity and slant of the PTP (proprosecution vs. prodefense), the persistence of PTP effects over time, and whether the PTP effects demonstrated in research laboratories would also occur in more naturalistic settings (generalizability). Using a shadow jury paradigm we examined these effects using a real trial as stimulus. Mock jurors included 115 jury-eligible community members who were naturally exposed to PTP in the venue in which the actual case occurred and 156 who were experimentally exposed. We found mock jurors were significantly influenced by both the slant and quantity of the PTP to which they were exposed, such that those exposed to proprosecution or prodefense PTP tended to render decision in support of the party favored in the PTP, and those exposed to greater quantities of PTP tended to be more biased. Additionally, PTP effects persisted throughout the course of the trial and continued to influence judgments in face of trial evidence and arguments. A finding of no significant difference in the effect of exposure slant between the naturally exposed and experimentally exposed samples provides support for the external validity of laboratory studies examining PTP effects. This research helps address some of the concerns raised by courts with regard to the durability of PTP effects and the application of laboratory findings to real world settings.

  15. The Applicability of the Sixth or Seventh Amendment Right to a Jury Trial in OSHA Penalty Proceedings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Gina A.

    1976-01-01

    Two recent decisions by federal courts of appeals bring into focus the competing policy considerations underlying administrative adjudication and the right to a jury trial. In both cases the safety regulations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act were violated. (LBH)

  16. Use of a Classroom Jury Trial To Enhance Students' Perception of Science as Part of Their Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marjorie A.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to increase students awareness of the relevance of science. Involves a classroom jury trial to probe a current controversial drug, mifepristone (RU486). Reports that students perceived this to be an enjoyable as well as educational activity which made science more relevant in their lives. (JRH)

  17. Probability of criminal acts of violence: a test of jury predictive accuracy.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Thomas J; Sorensen, Jon R; Cunningham, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The ability of capital juries to accurately predict future prison violence at the sentencing phase of aggravated murder trials was examined through retrospective review of the disciplinary records of 115 male inmates sentenced to either life (n = 65) or death (n = 50) in Oregon from 1985 through 2008, with a mean post-conviction time at risk of 15.3 years. Violent prison behavior was completely unrelated to predictions made by capital jurors, with bidirectional accuracy simply reflecting the base rate of assaultive misconduct in the group. Rejection of the special issue predicting future violence enjoyed 90% accuracy. Conversely, predictions that future violence was probable had 90% error rates. More than 90% of the assaultive rule violations committed by these offenders resulted in no harm or only minor injuries.

  18. A trap for the unwary: jury decision making in cases involving the entrapment defense.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christopher S; Lampinen, James Michael; Malesky, L Alvin

    2013-02-01

    This article examines the opinions of jury-eligible participants regarding entrapment-related issues in online sex offender sting operations. Participants provided lower guilt ratings when the undercover officer initiated the online sexual solicitation than when the defendant initiated the online sexual solicitation. This effect was mediated by the causal attributions (situational vs. dispositional) made by mock jurors for the defendant's actions. The results also suggested that the entrapment defense was less successful for participants with a crime control orientation than for participants with a due process orientation. Based on the results, it is implied that law enforcement should exercise caution when performing these types of sting operations. Furthermore, defense and prosecuting attorneys should take into account the originators of the sexual solicitation when deciding whether to plea bargain or take a case to trial.

  19. Teaching about Our Jury System. Unit 2. Our Right to an Impartial Jury of Our Peers, Our Role to Serve as an Impartial Factfinder When Called for Jury Service, Our Responsibility as Global Citizens to Understand the Judicial Systems of Other Countries. Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Camp, Julie

    Designed for use in the high school curriculum, two lessons introduce students to contemporary issues surrounding the American jury system and to political, legal, and economic systems of other countries. Although intended for use with a filmstrip, cassette, computer software, and a computer instructional manual, activities in the teaching guide…

  20. Involving a Citizens' Jury in Decisions on Individual Screening for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Paola; Colombo, Cinzia; Satolli, Roberto; Carzaniga, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Most public health agencies and learned societies agree that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test in asymptomatic men should not be recommended, on account of its potential for harm. Yet PSA is still widely used as a screening test and is not being abandoned. This remains a significant public health issue, and citizens' engagement is needed. This study was designed to produce a deliberation on the PSA screening test by a citizens' jury. Fifteen citizens were selected and balanced for sex, age, and education. They received an information booklet and participated in a two-day meeting with experts to reach a deliberation on the question "Should the National Health Service discourage or recommend PSA as an individual screening test for prostate cancer in men 55-69 years old?". A facilitator ran the jurors' discussion. All except three of the jurors decided that the National Health Service should discourage the use of PSA as an individual screening test for prostate cancer in 55-69 year-old men. The jury was particularly convinced by the uncertainty of the test outcomes, the utility of the test, and its cost/benefit ratio. Before the meeting 60% of jurors would have recommended the test to a relative, and all the male jurors would have done so. After the meeting these percentages fell to 15% and 12%. This experience confirms the feasibility and effectiveness of delegating to a group of citizens the responsibility to decide on public health issues on behalf of the community. Public health authorities should invest in information campaigns aimed at the public and in educational initiatives for physicians. This also provided an opportunity to disseminate information on screening, over-diagnosis, and over-treatment.

  1. Involving a Citizens’ Jury in Decisions on Individual Screening for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mosconi, Paola; Colombo, Cinzia; Satolli, Roberto; Carzaniga, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Aims Most public health agencies and learned societies agree that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test in asymptomatic men should not be recommended, on account of its potential for harm. Yet PSA is still widely used as a screening test and is not being abandoned. This remains a significant public health issue, and citizens’ engagement is needed. This study was designed to produce a deliberation on the PSA screening test by a citizens’ jury. Methods Fifteen citizens were selected and balanced for sex, age, and education. They received an information booklet and participated in a two-day meeting with experts to reach a deliberation on the question “Should the National Health Service discourage or recommend PSA as an individual screening test for prostate cancer in men 55–69 years old?”. A facilitator ran the jurors’ discussion. Results All except three of the jurors decided that the National Health Service should discourage the use of PSA as an individual screening test for prostate cancer in 55–69 year-old men. The jury was particularly convinced by the uncertainty of the test outcomes, the utility of the test, and its cost/benefit ratio. Before the meeting 60% of jurors would have recommended the test to a relative, and all the male jurors would have done so. After the meeting these percentages fell to 15% and 12%. Conclusions This experience confirms the feasibility and effectiveness of delegating to a group of citizens the responsibility to decide on public health issues on behalf of the community. Public health authorities should invest in information campaigns aimed at the public and in educational initiatives for physicians. This also provided an opportunity to disseminate information on screening, over-diagnosis, and over-treatment. PMID:26751212

  2. Influencing health policy through public deliberation: Lessons learned from two decades of Citizens'/community juries.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Chris; Rychetnik, Lucie; Street, Jackie; Thomas, Rae; Carter, Stacy M

    2017-04-01

    Citizens'/community juries [CJs] engage members of the public in policy decision-making processes. CJs can be employed to develop policy responses to health problems that require the consideration of both community values and scientific evidence. Based on the principles of deliberative democracy, recent reviews indicate that findings from CJs have successfully been used to influence health policy decision-making. Despite this evidence of success, there appears to be a gap between the goals of health researchers who organize CJs and the needs of policy actors and decision makers. Drawing on our experiences working with CJs and recent research on CJ methods, we describe a synopsis of the current state of the art organized around four key questions, and informed by insights from deliberative theory and critical policy studies. Our intention is to stimulate further discussion as to the types of health policy questions that can be usefully addressed through public deliberation, and provide guidance on the methodological and political dimensions that need to be considered in deciding whether a CJ is an appropriate approach for informing a policy decision-making process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Crime and Punishment: the Impact of Skin Color and Socioeconomic Status of Defendants and Victims in Jury Trials in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rogério Ferreira; Oliveira Lima, Marcus Eugênio

    2016-11-14

    Social judgments are often influenced by racism. Voluntary crimes against life, and in particular the crime of homicide, may be the most critical situations of the impact of racism in social judgments. We analyzed 114 homicide trials conducted by the 1st Jury Court, in a Brazilian judicial capital, concluded between 2003 and 2007, for the purpose of investigating the effects of skin color and the socioeconomic status of the defendant and the victim of homicides in the jury trial court's decision. The results indicate that the social and economic profile of defendants and victims of homicide is identical. They are almost all poor (more than 70%), with low education (more than 73%) and frequently non-Whites (more than 88%). We found that judges assign longer sentences to black (β = .34, p = .01) and poor defendants (β = .23, p < .05). We even verified that the poorer the defendant, the higher was the corresponding conviction rate (Wald's Test = 5.90, p < .05). The results are discussed based on theories of social psychology and criminological sociology, which consider the relationship between skin color and socioeconomic status in social judgments and in discrimination.

  4. What choices should we be able to make about designer babies? A Citizens' Jury of young people in South Wales.

    PubMed

    Iredale, Rachel; Longley, Marcus; Thomas, Christian; Shaw, Anita

    2006-09-01

    Young people will increasingly have the option of using new technologies for reproductive decision making but their voices are rarely heard in debates about acceptable public policy in this area. Capturing the views of young people about potentially esoteric topics, such as genetics, is difficult and methodologically challenging. A Citizens' Jury is a deliberative process that presents a question to a group of ordinary people, allows them to examine evidence given by expert witnesses and personal testimonies and arrive at a verdict. This Citizens' Jury explored designer babies in relation to inherited conditions, saviour siblings and sex selection with young people. Fourteen young people aged 16-19 in Wales. Acceptance of designer baby technology was purpose-specific; it was perceived by participants to be acceptable for preventing inherited conditions and to create a child to save a sibling, but was not recommended for sex selection. Jurors stated that permission should not depend on parents' age, although some measure of suitability should be assessed. Preventing potential parents from going abroad was considered impractical. These young people felt the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority should have members under 20 and that the term 'designer baby' was not useful. Perspectives on the acceptability of this technology were nuanced, and based on implicit value judgements about the extent of individual benefit derived. Young people have valuable and interesting contributions to make to the debate about genetics and reproductive decision making and a variety of innovative methods must be used to secure their involvement in decision-making processes.

  5. Use of a Classroom Jury Trial To Increase Student Perception of Science as Part of Their Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marjorie A.

    1997-05-01

    The concept of a jury trial in the classroom setting was used to present and discuss a current, controversial topic, the drug mifepristone (RU486). This drug is used as an abortion inducing agent although it has other clinical uses. The major goal was for students to see that science is a very important part of their lives. The class project involved discussions of the scientific, sociological, moral, ethical, religious, legal, as well as financial aspects of a real trial which involved a major science issue. Students were involved in role playing which included obtaining information and then participating in the mock trial. Student roles in this activity were as judges, defendant, jury, witnesses, lawyers, and court reporters. This four week project involved both verbal and written participation. Grades were based on both their oral and written on this project. The students found this a very interesting activity as evidenced by their enthusiasm. This class activity could be adapted to a variety of timely topics.

  6. What choices should we be able to make about designer babies? A Citizens’ Jury of young people in South Wales

    PubMed Central

    Iredale, Rachel; Longley, Marcus; Thomas, Christian; Shaw, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background  Young people will increasingly have the option of using new technologies for reproductive decision making but their voices are rarely heard in debates about acceptable public policy in this area. Capturing the views of young people about potentially esoteric topics, such as genetics, is difficult and methodologically challenging. Design  A Citizens’ Jury is a deliberative process that presents a question to a group of ordinary people, allows them to examine evidence given by expert witnesses and personal testimonies and arrive at a verdict. This Citizens’ Jury explored designer babies in relation to inherited conditions, saviour siblings and sex selection with young people. Participants  Fourteen young people aged 16–19 in Wales. Results  Acceptance of designer baby technology was purpose‐specific; it was perceived by participants to be acceptable for preventing inherited conditions and to create a child to save a sibling, but was not recommended for sex selection. Jurors stated that permission should not depend on parents’ age, although some measure of suitability should be assessed. Preventing potential parents from going abroad was considered impractical. These young people felt the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority should have members under 20 and that the term ‘designer baby’ was not useful. Conclusions  Perspectives on the acceptability of this technology were nuanced, and based on implicit value judgements about the extent of individual benefit derived. Young people have valuable and interesting contributions to make to the debate about genetics and reproductive decision making and a variety of innovative methods must be used to secure their involvement in decision‐making processes. PMID:16911135

  7. Ira C. Ritter and The Kroger Co., v. Jerry and Ruth Stanton. "Trial by Jury." Lesson Plans for Secondary Teachers on the Constitutional Protections of Trial by Jury. Courts in the Classroom: Curriculum Concepts and Other Information on Indiana's Courts for the K-12 Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Elizabeth

    In the case of Ritter v. Stanton, the attorneys for Ira Ritter and Kroger alleged that the amount of damages awarded by the jury were excessive and asked the Indiana Supreme Court to review the matter. This set of three lesson plans for secondary educators uses the Ritter v. Stanton case to examine the concept of the U.S. constitutional right to…

  8. Analysis of the Criminal Jury Trial Scheduling System in Use at the Monterey Branch of the Monterey County, California Municipal Court.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    24 G . SU4ARY --------------------------------------------------- 27 III. MONTEREY BRANCH MUNICIPAL COURT OPERATIONAL aiARACTERISTICS...Albert G . Pickerell and Michel Lipman. The material on the Monterey County court system is taken from records maintained by the Monterey Branch...scheduled for jury trial at the pre-trial stage. G . SU4ARY The Monterey Branch of the Monterey County Municipal Court District operates at the foundation of

  9. Obtaining consumer perspectives using a citizens' jury: does the current country of origin labelling in Australia allow for informed food choices?

    PubMed

    Withall, Elizabeth; Wilson, Annabelle M; Henderson, Julie; Tonkin, Emma; Coveney, John; Meyer, Samantha B; Clark, Jacinta; McCullum, Dean; Ankeny, Rachel; Ward, Paul R

    2016-12-09

    Contemporary food systems are vast and complex, creating greater distance between consumers and their food. Consequently, consumers are required to put faith in a system of which they have limited knowledge or control. Country of origin labelling (CoOL) is one mechanism that theoretically enables consumer knowledge of provenance of food products. However, this labelling system has recently come under Australian Government review and recommendations for improvements have been proposed. Consumer engagement in this process has been limited. Therefore this study sought to obtain further consumer opinion on the issue of CoOL and to identify the extent to which Australian consumers agree with Australian Government recommendations for improvements. A citizens' jury was conducted with a sample of 14 South Australian consumers to explore their perceptions on whether the CoOL system allows them to make informed food choices, as well as what changes (if any) need to be made to enable informed food choices (recommendations). Overall, jurors' perception of usefulness of CoOL, including its ability to enable consumers to make informed food choices, fluctuated throughout the Citizens' Jury. Initially, the majority of the jurors indicated that the labels allowed informed food choice, however by the end of the session the majority disagreed with this statement. Inconsistencies within jurors' opinions were observed, particularly following delivery of information from expert witnesses and jury deliberation. Jurors provided recommendations for changes to be made to CoOL, which were similar to those provided in the Australian Government inquiry. Consumers in this study engaged with the topical issue of CoOL and provided their opinions. Overall, consumers do not think that the current CoOL system in Australia enables consumers to make informed choices. Recommendations for changes, including increasing the size of the label and the label's font, and standardising its position, were made.

  10. Development of a Base for the Re-evaluation of the Professional Segment of the Master of Science Degree Program in Industrial Education at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. Part VIII: Importance of Industrial Education Teacher's Professional Tasks as Seen by a Jury of Selected Leaders in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lawrence S.

    This study was conducted a) to determine the importance that a jury of selected national leaders in education attaches to each of the professional tasks for secondary school industrial education teachers and b) to find out what differences, if any, exist between the importance judgments of the jury and those of each of four industrial education…

  11. [Psychiatry and criminology in Criminal Justice: Jury Trial Courts and Appellate Courts in the Federal District of Rio de Janeiro, during the 1930s].

    PubMed

    Dias, Allister Andrew Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    As part of a research study on the 1930s and 1940s medical-criminological debate in Brazil, this research paper analyzes some of the uses and criticisms of arguments of a psychiatric and criminological nature, among certain jurists who carried out important work in the city of Rio de Janeiro during the 1930s. In this context, these magistrates, tended to have significant psychiatric and criminological knowledge, in spite of all the heterogeneity, plurality and differences in perspectives that existed among them. We selected two principal areas to conduct an analysis of the activities of these jurists: the Appellate Court of the Federal District of Rio de Janeiro and Jury Trial Courts.

  12. He Called for His Pipe, and He Called for His Bowl, and He Called for His Members Three--Selection of Military Juries by the Sovereign: Impediment to Military Justice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    jury selection spawns the reality and appearance of unlawful command influence. "Court-stacking" and subjugation of juror independence infect or appear...to infect the Article 25 process. This thesis proposes to replace Article 25 with random selection from installation-wide venire pools, generated and...commanders (lieutenant colonels) are special court-martial convening authorities. In the Air Force, Group Commanders (Colonels) hold the position. All

  13. Jury panel member perceptions of interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy predict support for execution in a capital murder trial simulation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer; Clark, John C; Edens, John F; Smith, Shannon Toney; Magyar, Melissa S

    2013-01-01

    Recent research with college undergraduate mock jurors suggests that how psychopathic they perceive a criminal defendant to be is a powerful predictor of whether they will support a death verdict in simulated capital murder trials. Perceived affective and interpersonal traits of psychopathy are especially predictive of support for capital punishment, with perceived remorselessness explaining a disproportionate amount of variance in these attitudes. The present study attempted to extend these findings with a more representative sample of community members called for jury duty (N = 304). Jurors reviewed a case vignette based on an actual capital murder trial, provided sentencing verdicts, and rated the defendant on several characteristics historically associated with the construct of psychopathy. Consistent with prior findings, remorselessness predicted death verdicts, as did the affective and interpersonal features of psychopathy - though the latter effect was more pronounced among jurors who were Caucasian and/or who described their political beliefs as moderate rather than conservative or liberal. Results are discussed in terms of the potentially stigmatizing effects of psychopathy evidence in capital cases.

  14. CJCheck Stage 1: development and testing of a checklist for reporting community juries - Delphi process and analysis of studies published in 1996-2015.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rae; Sims, Rebecca; Degeling, Chris; Street, Jackie M; Carter, Stacy M; Rychetnik, Lucie; Whitty, Jennifer A; Wilson, Andrew; Ward, Paul; Glasziou, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Opportunities for community members to actively participate in policy development are increasing. Community/citizen's juries (CJs) are a deliberative democratic process aimed to illicit informed community perspectives on difficult topics. But how comprehensive these processes are reported in peer-reviewed literature is unknown. Adequate reporting of methodology enables others to judge process quality, compare outcomes, facilitate critical reflection and potentially repeat a process. We aimed to identify important elements for reporting CJs, to develop an initial checklist and to review published health and health policy CJs to examine reporting standards. Using the literature and expertise from CJ researchers and policy advisors, a list of important CJ reporting items was suggested and further refined. We then reviewed published CJs within the health literature and used the checklist to assess the comprehensiveness of reporting. CJCheck was developed and examined reporting of CJ planning, juror information, procedures and scheduling. We screened 1711 studies and extracted data from 38. No studies fully reported the checklist items. The item most consistently reported was juror numbers (92%, 35/38), while least reported was the availability of expert presentations (5%, 2/38). Recruitment strategies were described in 66% of studies (25/38); however, the frequency and timing of deliberations was inadequately described (29%, 11/38). Currently CJ publications in health and health policy literature are inadequately reported, hampering their use in policy making. We propose broadening the CJCheck by creating a reporting standards template in collaboration with international CJ researchers, policy advisors and consumer representatives to ensure standardized, systematic and transparent reporting. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Olestra? The Jury's Still Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-04-01

    Although it has been more than a year since the FDA approved the use of olestra in certain foods, this fat substitute, a mixture of sucrose polyesters, is still controversial. It would seem that a fat substitute that is heat stable and has an acceptable flavor and texture would be welcomed enthusiastically in a country where increasing numbers of people, young and old, exceed their ideal body weight. Obesity and diets containing high levels of fat have been linked to numerous health problems, including cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancer, and adult-onset diabetes; they may also exacerbate some chronic problems such as arthritis in joints of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some scientists and consumer groups question olestra's safety and usefulness.

  16. Tort Law and the Civil Jury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Keith A.

    1997-01-01

    Briefly reviews the historical developments of tort law and identifies some of its main component. Tort law concerns wrongful acts (not involving a breach of contract) that may result in a civil action. Major areas include personal injury and wrongful death, intentional torts, negligence, professional malpractice, misrepresentation, and libel.…

  17. Is the jury still out on PFI contracts?

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2012-02-01

    Last September Andrew Lansley claimed that some NHS Trusts occupying PFI healthcare facilities had been 'landed with deals they could not afford', seemingly attributing much of the blame for a scenario where the Department of Health said 22 Trusts in England alone could be at significant financial risk to Labour, which, in the 1990s, greatly expanded a public/private funding partnership originally introduced by the Tories a decade earlier. Two key factors critics claim have put such Trusts 'at risk' are the 'inflexibility' of some PFI contracts, which makes varying terms difficult mid-contract, and the fact that many of the earlier deals were inexpertly negotiated by the 'public sector side'. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie sought the views of Malcolm Austwick, a partner at top commercial law firm, DAC Beachcroft (see panel below), with extensive experience in the legal complexities of PFI, on whether or not the initiative's 'pros' do indeed outweigh the 'cons'.

  18. Zika mosquito vectors: the jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    After a 40-year hiatus, the International Congress of Entomology (ICE 2016) convened in Orlando, Florida (September 25-30, 2016). One of the symposia at ICE 2016, the Zika Symposium, covered multiple aspects of the Zika epidemic, including epidemiology, sexual transmission, genetic tools for reducing transmission, and particularly vector competence. While there was a consensus among participants that the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is a vector of the Zika virus, there is growing evidence indicating that the range of mosquito vectors might be wider than anticipated. In particular, three independent groups from Canada, China, and Brazil presented and discussed laboratory and field data strongly suggesting that the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, also known as the common mosquito, is highly likely to be a vector in certain environments. PMID:27853521

  19. Trials by Juries: Suggested Practices for Database Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritterbush, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Librarians frequently utilize product trials to assess the content and usability of a database prior to committing funds to a new subscription or purchase. At the 2012 Electronic Resources and Libraries Conference in Austin, Texas, three librarians presented a panel discussion on their institutions' policies and practices regarding database…

  20. Zika mosquito vectors: the jury is still out.

    PubMed

    Leal, Walter S

    2016-01-01

    After a 40-year hiatus, the International Congress of Entomology (ICE 2016) convened in Orlando, Florida (September 25-30, 2016). One of the symposia at ICE 2016, the Zika Symposium, covered multiple aspects of the Zika epidemic, including epidemiology, sexual transmission, genetic tools for reducing transmission, and particularly vector competence. While there was a consensus among participants that the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is a vector of the Zika virus, there is growing evidence indicating that the range of mosquito vectors might be wider than anticipated. In particular, three independent groups from Canada, China, and Brazil presented and discussed laboratory and field data strongly suggesting that the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, also known as the common mosquito, is highly likely to be a vector in certain environments.

  1. A Model of Information Integration for Jury Deliberation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Martin F.

    Several factors are included in judgment formation by a juror during a trial, including evaluating each piece of information received with respect to the judgment in question, weighting each piece of information according to its validity for the particular judgment and its reliability, and integrating the weighted scale values into a single…

  2. The values jury to aid natural resource decisions

    Treesearch

    Thomas C. Brown; George L. Peterson; Bruce E. Tonn

    1995-01-01

    Congressional legislation emphasizes that public resource allocation should reflect the values citizens assign to those resources. Yet, information about assigned values and preferences of members of the public, including economic measures of value, required by decision makers is often incomplete or unavailable. Existing sources of information about the public's...

  3. Trials by Juries: Suggested Practices for Database Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritterbush, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Librarians frequently utilize product trials to assess the content and usability of a database prior to committing funds to a new subscription or purchase. At the 2012 Electronic Resources and Libraries Conference in Austin, Texas, three librarians presented a panel discussion on their institutions' policies and practices regarding database…

  4. Is Individual Therapy Process Really Different from Group Therapy Process? The Jury Is Still Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Clara E.

    1990-01-01

    Recognizes the efforts of Fuhriman and Burlingame in "Consistency of Matter" (1990) in undertaking the task of comparing individual and group therapy process literatures. Questions whether group therapy process is different from individual therapy process. Criticizes article for using reviews of reviews of individual therapy literature…

  5. An Unexpected Wait before Testifying Increases Nervousness in Witnesses: A Jury Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookstaber-Smith, Ruth Anne

    1992-01-01

    Conducted two experiments to study effects of waiting conditions on court witnesses in relation to degree of honesty, attractiveness, intelligence, and credibility as perceived by those who watched videotaped subjects who waited. Witnesses who had to wait reported significantly greater nervousness before testifying than did those who did not wait.…

  6. The Jury Is In: Use of a Modified Legal Model for School Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Kit C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This article examines the use of a modified judiciary model, called the Advocacy-Judiciary model, by the Mesa Public School System in Arizona. The method was used to investigate programs specifically directed toward the academic needs of the gifted and talented student population. (Author/JAZ)

  7. The Jury Is Still Out: Psychoemotional Support in Peer E-Mentoring for Transition to University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risquez, Angelica; Sanchez-Garcia, Marife

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how computer mediated communication (CMC) can sustain nourishing and emotionally enriching peer mentoring relations. A peer electronic mentoring program was implemented in an Irish university to facilitate freshmen's transition to college. A sample of 123 participants (42 mentors and 81 mentees) was evaluated with a…

  8. Visual Spatial Attention to Multiple Locations At Once: The Jury Is Still Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jans, Bert; Peters, Judith C.; De Weerd, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Although in traditional attention research the focus of visual spatial attention has been considered as indivisible, many studies in the last 15 years have claimed the contrary. These studies suggest that humans can direct their attention simultaneously to multiple noncontiguous regions of the visual field upon mere instruction. The notion that…

  9. Effects of organic food consumption on human health; the jury is still out!

    PubMed Central

    Barański, Marcin; Rempelos, Leonidas; Iversen, Per Ole; Leifert, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The most recent systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses have indicated significant and nutritionally-relevant composition differences between organic and conventional foods. This included higher antioxidant, but lower cadmium and pesticide levels in organic crops, and higher omega-3 fatty acids concentrations in organic meat and dairy products. Also, results from a small number of human cohort studies indicate that there are positive associations between organic food consumption and reduced risk/incidence of certain acute diseases (e.g. pre-eclampsia, hypospadias) and obesity. Concerns about potential negative health impacts of organic food consumption (e.g. risks linked to lower iodine levels in organic milk) have also been raised, but are not currently supported by evidence from human cohort studies. However, there is virtually no published data from (1) long-term cohort studies focusing on chronic diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative conditions) and (2) controlled human dietary intervention studies comparing effects of organic and conventional diets. It is therefore currently not possible to quantify to what extent organic food consumption may affect human health. PMID:28326003

  10. Jury acquits seven prison guards in beating of HIV-positive inmate.

    PubMed

    1999-03-19

    Seven guards from the Charlotte Correctional Institution were acquitted of beating and harassing an HIV-positive inmate, [name removed] was transferred to that prison because he bit a guard in the face at another prison. He later attempted suicide and slowly bled to death while shackled to a bed. Prosecutor Doug Molloy said [name removed] was harassed from the moment he arrived, and slashed his own wrist after 3 days of abuse. The jurors found insufficient evidence to convict the seven with conspiring to deny [name removed] his civil rights. Three other corrections officers, who also faced charges, testified for the prosecution.

  11. Beyond the 2008 Justice Reforms: Establishing a Legitimate Rule of Law in Mexico with Jury Trials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-28

    the 2007 Emmy-winning documentary film Presunto Culpable , this model attributes to a widespread opinion in Mexico that a suspect is presumed guilty...until proven innocent. Produced by University of California-Berkeley graduate students, Presunto Culpable chronicles a mild-mannered videogame street...Overview,” Mexican Law Review Vol. III no. 2 (2010): 205. 32 Marquez-Carrasquillo, “State Level Justice Reform,” 3. 33 Presunto Culpable , directed by

  12. Rooting the tree of life: the phylogenetic jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Gouy, Richard; Baurain, Denis; Philippe, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to shed light on difficulties in rooting the tree of life (ToL) and to explore the (sociological) reasons underlying the limited interest in accurately addressing this fundamental issue. First, we briefly review the difficulties plaguing phylogenetic inference and the ways to improve the modelling of the substitution process, which is highly heterogeneous, both across sites and over time. We further observe that enriched taxon samplings, better gene samplings and clever data removal strategies have led to numerous revisions of the ToL, and that these improved shallow phylogenies nearly always relocate simple organisms higher in the ToL provided that long-branch attraction artefacts are kept at bay. Then, we note that, despite the flood of genomic data available since 2000, there has been a surprisingly low interest in inferring the root of the ToL. Furthermore, the rare studies dealing with this question were almost always based on methods dating from the 1990s that have been shown to be inaccurate for much more shallow issues! This leads us to argue that the current consensus about a bacterial root for the ToL can be traced back to the prejudice of Aristotle's Great Chain of Beings, in which simple organisms are ancestors of more complex life forms. Finally, we demonstrate that even the best models cannot yet handle the complexity of the evolutionary process encountered both at shallow depth, when the outgroup is too distant, and at the level of the inter-domain relationships. Altogether, we conclude that the commonly accepted bacterial root is still unproven and that the root of the ToL should be revisited using phylogenomic supermatrices to ensure that new evidence for eukaryogenesis, such as the recently described Lokiarcheota, is interpreted in a sound phylogenetic framework. PMID:26323760

  13. Carbon Sequestration by Perennial Energy Crops: Is the Jury Still Out?

    PubMed

    Agostini, Francesco; Gregory, Andrew S; Richter, Goetz M

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) changes associated with land conversion to energy crops are central to the debate on bioenergy and their potential carbon neutrality. Here, the experimental evidence on SOC under perennial energy crops (PECs) is synthesised to parameterise a whole systems model and to identify uncertainties and knowledge gaps determining PECs being a sink or source of greenhouse gas (GHG). For Miscanthus and willow (Salix spp.) and their analogues (switchgrass, poplar), we examine carbon (C) allocation to above- and belowground residue inputs, turnover rates and retention in the soil. A meta-analysis showed that studies on dry matter partitioning and C inputs to soils are plentiful, whilst data on turnover are rare and rely on few isotopic C tracer studies. Comprehensive studies on SOC dynamics and GHG emissions under PECs are limited and subsoil processes and C losses through leaching remain unknown. Data showed dynamic changes of gross C inputs and SOC stocks depending on stand age. C inputs and turnover can now be specifically parameterised in whole PEC system models, whilst dependencies on soil texture, moisture and temperature remain empirical. In conclusion, the annual net SOC storage change exceeds the minimum mitigation requirement (0.25 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1)) under herbaceous and woody perennials by far (1.14 to 1.88 and 0.63 to 0.72 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1), respectively). However, long-term time series of field data are needed to verify sustainable SOC enrichment, as the physical and chemical stabilities of SOC pools remain uncertain, although they are essential in defining the sustainability of C sequestration (half-life >25 years).

  14. Change over Time in Obedience: The Jury's Still out, but It Might Be Decreasing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twenge, Jean M.

    2009-01-01

    Jerry M. Burger's (see record 2008-19206-001) partial replication of Stanley Milgram's (1974) obedience study shows both the influence of culture and generations on behavior and the power of the situation. In Burger's data, disobedience has nearly doubled among male participants since the 1960s, a shift just as large as the increase in Americans'…

  15. Attorney Questions Predict Jury-eligible Adult Assessments of Attorneys, Child Witnesses, and Defendant Guilt.

    PubMed

    Mugno, Allison P; Klemfuss, J Zoe; Lyon, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Children are often the primary source of evidence in maltreatment cases, particularly cases of child sexual abuse, and may be asked to testify in court. Although best-practice protocols for interviewing children suggest that interviewers ask open-ended questions to elicit detailed responses from children, during in-court testimony, attorneys tend to rely on closed-ended questions that elicit simple (often "yes" or "no") responses (e.g., Andrews, Lamb, & Lyon, ; Klemfuss, Quas, & Lyon, ). How then are jurors making decisions about children's credibility and ultimately the case outcome? The present study examined the effect of two attorney-specific factors (e.g., temporal structure and questioning phase) on mock jurors' perceptions of attorney performance, child witness credibility, storyline clarity, and defendant guilt. Participants were randomly assigned to read a trial excerpt from one of eight conditions and were then asked to evaluate the attorney, child witness, and the case. Selected excerpts were from criminal court case transcripts and contained either high attorney temporal structure (e.g., use of temporal markers) or low temporal structure (e.g., frequent topic switching), involved direct or cross-examination, and represented cases resulting in a conviction or acquittal. Child responses were kept consistent across all excerpts. Results showed that participants perceived the attorney's performance and child's credibility more favorably and thought the storyline was clearer when attorneys provided high rather than low temporal structure and when the excerpt contained direct rather than cross-examination. Participants who read a direct rather than cross-examination excerpt were also more likely to think the defendant was guilty. The study highlights the impact of attorney questioning style on mock jurors' perceptions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Effects of organic food consumption on human health; the jury is still out!

    PubMed

    Barański, Marcin; Rempelos, Leonidas; Iversen, Per Ole; Leifert, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The most recent systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses have indicated significant and nutritionally-relevant composition differences between organic and conventional foods. This included higher antioxidant, but lower cadmium and pesticide levels in organic crops, and higher omega-3 fatty acids concentrations in organic meat and dairy products. Also, results from a small number of human cohort studies indicate that there are positive associations between organic food consumption and reduced risk/incidence of certain acute diseases (e.g. pre-eclampsia, hypospadias) and obesity. Concerns about potential negative health impacts of organic food consumption (e.g. risks linked to lower iodine levels in organic milk) have also been raised, but are not currently supported by evidence from human cohort studies. However, there is virtually no published data from (1) long-term cohort studies focusing on chronic diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative conditions) and (2) controlled human dietary intervention studies comparing effects of organic and conventional diets. It is therefore currently not possible to quantify to what extent organic food consumption may affect human health.

  17. Fostering Organizational Change through Deliberations: The Deliberative Jury in a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindell, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Universities in Europe face a variety of reform initiatives, and university reform can be seen as a wicked problem that should be resolved through collaborative efforts. In Finland, there has been considerable resistance to proposed reforms, with university personnel complaining that they have not been heard. Students, on the other hand, seem…

  18. Determining Catch-Up Time of Demographic Subgroups in Jury, Educational, or Work Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winick, Charles; Swanson, Eric

    1985-01-01

    Presents a formula for determining catch-up time in cases of alleged discrimination in education, work, and other situations. Defines "catch-up time" as the number of years that would be required for a specific subgroup in the general population to assume a desired proportion of the total composition of the targeted group. (KH)

  19. Student Teaching Behaviors Identified by a National Jury as Indicators of Success in Sixteen Competency Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Sarah J.; Butefish, William L.

    This study identified specific student teacher behaviors which could indicate success in 16 teaching competency areas. Part 1 of the study, completed by student teaching supervisors, resulted in the identification of the student teaching behaviors considered to be indications of success in each of the 16 competency areas. Part 2 resulted in the…

  20. Is idiopathic granulomatous mastitis a surgical disease? The jury is still out.

    PubMed

    Moris, Demetrios; Damaskos, Christos; Davakis, Spyridon; Vailas, Michail; Garmpis, Nikolaos; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Kontos, Michael; Kontzoglou, Konstantinos

    2017-08-01

    Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM), is a rare entity of chronic inflammatory disorder of the breast of unknown etiology. Very few cases have been described so far, almost exclusively in women. Here we describe a case of IGM in a 53-year-old man presented with a right breast mass, progressively enlarging during the last 6 months. Due to the findings of clinical examination and CT-scan, the suspicion for a potentially malignant lesion was given and the decision for surgical resection was made. Microscopic analysis of the specimen showed non-caseating granulomas around mammary lobules, findings compatible with IGM. The patient is recurrence-free at 18-month follow-up. IGM is a rare benign inflammatory breast disease, usually seen in females of reproductive age. Establishing a diagnosis can be challenging for a surgeon and requires a high index of suspicion as most patients are initially misdiagnosed by their primary care physicians. Steroids and immunosuppressive drugs are considered as fundamental treatment modalities but they are correlated with increased rates of disease response and recurrence. On the contrary, surgical resection demonstrated significantly superior results compared to steroid-alone treatment in terms of recurrence and post-treatment recovery.

  1. Fostering Organizational Change through Deliberations: The Deliberative Jury in a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindell, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Universities in Europe face a variety of reform initiatives, and university reform can be seen as a wicked problem that should be resolved through collaborative efforts. In Finland, there has been considerable resistance to proposed reforms, with university personnel complaining that they have not been heard. Students, on the other hand, seem…

  2. Does knee replacement surgery for osteoarthritis improve survival? The jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Devyani; Lu, Na; Felson, David; Choi, Hyon K; Seeger, John; Einhorn, Thomas; Neogi, Tuhina; Zhang, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The relation of knee replacement (KR) surgery to all-cause mortality has not been well established owing to potential biases in previous studies. Thus, we aimed to examine the relation of KR to mortality risk among patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) focusing on identifying biases that may threaten the validity of prior studies. Methods We included knee OA subjects (ages 50–89 years) from The Health Improvement Network, an electronic medical records database in the UK. Risk of mortality among KR subjects was compared with propensity score-matched non-KR subjects. To explore residual confounding bias, subgroup analyses stratified by age and propensity scores were performed. Results Subjects with KR had 28% lower risk of mortality than non-KR subjects (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.78). However, when stratified by age, protective effect was noted only in older age groups (>63 years) but not in younger subjects (≤63 years). Further, the mortality rate among KR subjects decreased as candidacy (propensity score) for KR increased among subjects with KR, but no such consistent trend was noted among non-KR subjects. Conclusions While a protective effect of KR on mortality cannot be ruled out, findings of lower mortality among older KR subjects and those with higher propensity scores suggest that prognosis-based selection for KR may lead to intractable confounding by indication; hence, the protective effect of KR on all-cause mortality may be overestimated. PMID:27190096

  3. A Jury of Their Peers. Connect for Kids: Guidance for Grown-Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newberger, Julee

    This article describes the use of youth courts, or teen courts, a growing trend in juvenile justice. Youth courts are generally used for younger teens with no prior arrest records, and those charged with less serious violations, like shoplifting, vandalism, and disorderly conduct. The goal is to hold young people accountable for their actions with…

  4. Change over Time in Obedience: The Jury's Still out, but It Might Be Decreasing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twenge, Jean M.

    2009-01-01

    Jerry M. Burger's (see record 2008-19206-001) partial replication of Stanley Milgram's (1974) obedience study shows both the influence of culture and generations on behavior and the power of the situation. In Burger's data, disobedience has nearly doubled among male participants since the 1960s, a shift just as large as the increase in Americans'…

  5. The Jury Is Still Out: Psychoemotional Support in Peer E-Mentoring for Transition to University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risquez, Angelica; Sanchez-Garcia, Marife

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how computer mediated communication (CMC) can sustain nourishing and emotionally enriching peer mentoring relations. A peer electronic mentoring program was implemented in an Irish university to facilitate freshmen's transition to college. A sample of 123 participants (42 mentors and 81 mentees) was evaluated with a…

  6. It is easier to confuse a jury than convince a judge: the crisis in medical malpractice.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2002-11-15

    A study of cervical spine malpractice cases was conducted. Identifying tort reform models may help to resolve a crisis in medical malpractice. To identify tort reform models that may help to resolve a crisis in medical malpractice. Medical malpractice faces a crisis. Insurance rates are exorbitant, yet many injured patients go uncompensated. Physicians practice defensive medicine for fear of suits, and society pays the price. Using, 36 malpractice cases involving cervical spine surgery were identified: 20 from California ($250,000 cap on pain and suffering) and 16 from New York ("the sky's the limit"). Queries included who sued, who was sued, who won, who lost, and why? Six different tort reform models also were identified and explored. Common bases for suits included failure to diagnose and treatment (56%), lack of informed consent (64%), new neurologic deficits (64%), and pain and suffering (72%). All of the six plaintiff verdicts (average, $4.42 million) and four of the nine settlements (average, $1.6 million) involving surgery that resulted in new postoperative quadriplegia appeared to be appropriate. However, the author could discern "no fault" in cases five defendants had settled, and the surgeons did not deserve to lose. On the other hand, the author found "fault" in five defense verdicts rendered to three newly quadriplegic patients and two with new postoperative root injuries. These patients deserved monetary awards, but received no compensation whatsoever. There currently are two models that would work better than the system in place in most states. These include the American Medical Association National Specialty Societies Medical Liability Project with the Alternative Dispute Resolution Model (SSMLP), and the Selective No Fault Models. Among the advantages shared by one or more of these models is their ability to reimburse injured patients while eliminating physician liability, to use malpractice panels rather than trials, and to put a cap on damages. To solve the medical malpractice crisis, Congress, the individual states, or both should adopt tort reform. Two tort reform models compensating injured patients and eliminating physician liability appear to be not only effective but also fair to all concerned parties.

  7. A resolution to authorize testimony of Senate employees in a grand jury proceeding in the District of Columbia.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2010-07-29

    07/29/2010 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. A resolution to authorize testimony of Senate employees in a grand jury proceeding in the District of Columbia.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2010-07-29

    07/29/2010 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S6539; text as passed Senate: CR S6538-6539; text of measure as introduced: CR S6528) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Editorial Commentary: The Jury Remains Out on Hybrid Autograft-Plus-Allograft for Diminutive Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Autografts.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Aman

    2016-11-01

    In a Level III, single center, retrospective, nonrandomized observational study, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction revision rates and patient-reported outcomes were found to be similar at 2-year follow-up when using autograft hamstrings versus a hybrid graft (autograft and nonirradiated allograft), with both groups reporting low levels of revisions and excellent outcomes. Despite previous published data that were cause for concern, a study in this issue provides support for use of a hybrid graft technique when encountering the challenging situation of a diminutive hamstring autograft when performing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Jury of Their Peers: A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Teen Court on Criminal Recidivism.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Jessica; Wong, Jennifer S

    2017-07-01

    Juvenile delinquency has been on the decline for a number of years, yet, juvenile courts continue to assess more than 1 million cases per year. Involvement with the juvenile justice system has been linked to a number of risk factors and consequences that may impact positive youth development; however, evidence-based correctional programs that divert juvenile offenders away from formal processing are limited. Teen Court is a specialized diversion intervention that offers an alternative to traditional court processing for juvenile offenders. Despite the rapid expansion of Teen Courts, there is little comprehensive and systematic evidence available to justify this expansion. This meta-analytic study examines the effects of Teen Court on the recidivism of juvenile offenders. The literature search resulted in the selection of 14 studies, which contributed 18 unique effect sizes with a total sample of 2125 treatment group and 979 comparison group youth. The findings suggest that Teen Court is no more effective at reducing recidivism than (a) formal processing or (b) other diversion programs. Implications of formal and informal court processing for low-risk, first-time young offenders are discussed. The authors draw on the Risk-Need-Responsivity model to provide recommendations for policies and practices.

  11. Attenuation of airway inflammation by simvastatin and the implications for asthma treatment: is the jury still out?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing-Nan; Suh, Dong-Hyeon; Yang, Eun-Mi; Lee, Seung-Ihm; Park, Hae-Sim; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2014-01-01

    Although some studies have explained the immunomodulatory effects of statins, the exact mechanisms and the therapeutic significance of these molecules remain to be elucidated. This study not only evaluated the therapeutic potential and inhibitory mechanism of simvastatin in an ovalbumin (OVA)-specific asthma model in mice but also sought to clarify the future directions indicated by previous studies through a thorough review of the literature. BALB/c mice were sensitized to OVA and then administered three OVA challenges. On each challenge day, 40 mg kg−1 simvastatin was injected before the challenge. The airway responsiveness, inflammatory cell composition, and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were assessed after the final challenge, and the T cell composition and adhesion molecule expression in lung homogenates were determined. The administration of simvastatin decreased the airway responsiveness, the number of airway inflammatory cells, and the interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations in BAL fluid compared with vehicle-treated mice (P<0.05). Histologically, the number of inflammatory cells and mucus-containing goblet cells in lung tissues also decreased in the simvastatin-treated mice. Flow cytometry showed that simvastatin treatment significantly reduced the percentage of pulmonary CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ T-cell ratio (P<0.05). Simvastatin treatment also decreased the expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 proteins, as measured in homogenized lung tissues (P<0.05) and human epithelial cells. The reduction in the T cell influx as a result of the decreased expression of cell adhesion molecules is one of the mechanisms by which simvastatin attenuates airway responsiveness and allergic inflammation. Rigorous review of the literature together with our findings suggested that simvastatin should be further developed as a potential therapeutic strategy for allergic asthma. PMID:25213768

  12. A resolution to authorize testimony of Senate employees in a grand jury proceeding in the District of Columbia.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2010-07-29

    Senate - 07/29/2010 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. How justice can affect jury: training abstract words promotes generalisation to concrete words in patients with aphasia.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Chaleece; Kiran, Swathi

    2014-01-01

    Developing language treatments that not only improve trained items but also promote generalisation to untrained items is a major focus in aphasia research. This study is a replication and extension of previous work which found that training abstract words in a particular context-category promotes generalisation to concrete words but not vice versa (Kiran, Sandberg, & Abbott, 2009 ). Twelve persons with aphasia (five female) with varying types and degrees of severity participated in a generative naming treatment based on the Complexity Account of Treatment Efficacy (CATE; Thompson, Shapiro, Kiran, & Sobecks, 2003 ). All participants were trained to generate abstract words in a particular context-category by analysing the semantic features of the target words. Two other context-categories were used as controls. Ten of the twelve participants improved on the trained abstract words in the trained context-category. Eight of the ten participants who responded to treatment also generalised to concrete words in the same context-category. These results suggest that this treatment is both efficacious and efficient. We discuss possible mechanisms of training and generalisation effects.

  14. How Justice Can Affect Jury Training Abstract Words Promotes Generalization to Concrete Words in Patients with Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Chaleece; Kiran, Swathi

    2014-01-01

    Developing language treatments that not only improve trained items but also promote generalization to untrained items is a major focus in aphasia research. This study is a replication and extension of previous work that found that training abstract words in a particular context-category promotes generalization to concrete words but not vice versa (Kiran, Sandberg, & Abbott, 2009). Twelve persons with aphasia (5 female) with varying types and degrees of severity participated in a generative naming treatment based on the complexity account of treatment efficacy (CATE; Thompson, Shapiro, Kiran, & Sobecks, 2003). All participants were trained to generate abstract words in a particular context-category by analyzing the semantic features of the target words. Two other context-categories were used as controls. Ten of the twelve participants improved on the trained abstract words in the trained context-category. Eight of the ten participants who responded to treatment also generalized to concrete words in the same context-category. These results suggest that this treatment is both efficacious and efficient. We discuss possible mechanisms of training and generalization effects. PMID:24805853

  15. Chasing the reflected wave back into the heart: a new hypothesis while the jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Codreanu, Ion; Robson, Matthew D; Rider, Oliver J; Pegg, Tammy J; Jung, Bernd A; Dasanu, Constantin A; Clarke, Kieran; Holloway, Cameron J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Arterial stiffness directly influences cardiac function and is independently associated with cardiovascular risk. However, the influence of the aortic reflected pulse pressure wave on left ventricular function has not been well characterized. The aim of this study was to obtain detailed information on regional ventricular wall motion patterns corresponding to the propagation of the reflected aortic wave on ventricular segments. Methods: Left ventricular wall motion was investigated in a group of healthy volunteers (n = 14, age 23 ± 3 years), using cardiac magnetic resonance navigator-gated tissue phase mapping. The left ventricle was divided into 16 segments and regional wall motion was studied in high temporal detail. Results: Corresponding to the expected timing of the reflected aortic wave reaching the left ventricle, a characteristic “notch” of regional myocardial motion was seen in all radial, circumferential, and longitudinal velocity graphs. This notch was particularly prominent in septal segments adjacent to the left ventricular outflow tract on radial velocity graphs and in anterior and posterior left ventricular segments on circumferential velocity graphs. Similarly, longitudinal velocity graphs demonstrated a brief deceleration in the upward recoil motion of the entire ventricle at the beginning of diastole. Conclusion: These results provide new insights into the possible influence of the reflected aortic waves on ventricular segments. Although the association with the reflected wave appears to us to be unambiguous, it represents a novel research concept, and further studies enabling the actual recording of the pulse wave are required. PMID:21731888

  16. Juror Judgments and Discussion: Effect of Presentation and Memory Factors on Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Martin F.; Miller, Charles E.

    Mock juries of six females each listened to a tape-recording of facts in a courtroom trial. Twelve juries heard guilt-appearing facts, and twelve heard innocent-appearing facts. In half the juries hearing each type of trial, jurors heard the facts in the same (Homogeneous) order; in the remaining juries, each of the six jurors heard the facts in a…

  17. People Power in the Courts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes seven activities for teaching secondary social studies students about court juries. Students observe and discuss the actual selection of a jury, play shadow-jury in an actual court case, interview jurors, research student courts, and survey and discuss student opinions on jury-related issues and court decisions. (AM)

  18. Feasibility of Cosmic-Ray Muon Intensity Measurements for Tunnel Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    BUR-’TR-3110 TECHNICAL REPORT BRL-TR-3110 mBRL I• FEASIBILITY OF COSMIC - RAY MUON INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR TUNNEL DETECTION AIVARS CELIN. , JUNE...Feasibility of Cosmic - Ray Muon Intensity Measurements f or Tunnel Detection 612786H20001 4.AUTNOR(S) Aivars Celmins 7. PERORMING ORGANIZATION NAMe(S) AND... cosmic - ray muon intensity depends on the amount, of material above the point of reference and is therefore influenced by anomalies in rock density

  19. "It puts a human face on the researched"--A qualitative evaluation of an Indigenous health research governance model.

    PubMed

    Bond, Chelsea; Foley, Wendy; Askew, Deborah

    2016-04-01

    To describe the Inala Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Jury for Health Research, and evaluate its usefulness as a model of Indigenous research governance within an urban Indigenous primary health care service from the perspectives of jury members and researchers. Informed by a phenomenological approach and using narrative inquiry, a focus group was conducted with jury members and key informant interviews were undertaken with researchers who had presented to the Community Jury in its first year of operation. The jury was a site of identity work for researchers and jury members, providing an opportunity to observe and affirm community cultural protocols. Although researchers and jury members had differing levels of research literacy, the jury processes enabled respectful communication and relationships to form, which positively influenced research practice, community aspirations and clinical care. The jury processes facilitated transformative research practice among researchers and resulted in transference of power from researchers to the jury members, to the mutual benefit of both. Ethical Indigenous health research practice requires an engagement with Indigenous peoples and knowledge at the research governance level, not simply as subjects or objects of research. © 2015 The Authors.

  20. 48 CFR 9904.408-30 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING..., holidays, jury duty or military training, or personal activities, for which an employer pays compensation...

  1. Fuzzy Modeling of Armor Plate Bending by Blast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Ishibuchi, "Identification of Possibilistic Linear Systems by Quadratic Membership Functions of Fuzzy Parameters", Proc. 3rd IFSA Congress, Seattle 1989, pp...TIC -ILE Copy TECHNICAL REPORT BRL-TR-3130 BRL co 00 FUZZY MODELING OF ARMOR PLATE BENDING BY BLAST < DTIC eDETIC AIVARS K.R. CELMI1 SEP 13 1990 U...SUBTMTE L. PUNDWDIG NUMBERS Fuzzy Modeling of Armor Plate Bending by Blast Aivars K. R. Celmins 7. P EFORMING ORGANIZATION NAM E(S) AND A ORSS ES

  2. Eckmann v. Board of Education of Hawthorn School District: Bad Management Makes Bad Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacken, Donal M.

    1988-01-01

    A school board's dismissal of a teacher who was an unwed mother resulted in the jury granting a large award. The judge grounded the legal justification for the jury's decision in the teacher's constitutionally protected decision to bear a child, irrespective of marriage. Criticizes court's constitutional intrepretation. (MLF)

  3. Teen Courts and Law-Related Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nessel, Paula A.

    Teen courts have gained in popularity in the 1990s. These courts include youth courts, peer juries, peer courts, student courts, and other courts using juveniles to determine the sentences of juvenile offenders. The courts issue sentences that are carried out in a school or community setting and generally involve community service, jury duty,…

  4. Justice by the People. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Diane; Alderson, Jan, Ed.

    This interactive curriculum has been developed to teach students about one of their most important rights as citizens, trial by jury. Knowledge about this right is critical since most of today's students will be called to serve on juries at some point in their lives. The curriculum's goal is to help students understand the history and value of…

  5. Campus Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Susan

    2009-01-01

    In this annual Architectural Portfolio issue, the author presents the main winners that impressed the jury as facilities that will excite and challenge students in dramatic ways. The Children's School, Stamford, Connecticut, the Caudill winner, is "reminiscent of the Crow Island School," according to this year's jury. The Kahn winner,…

  6. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau"…

  7. Perception of Rape Victims: The Impact of Evidentiary Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgida, Eugene; And Others

    A simulated jury deliberation with experienced and inexperienced jurors sampled from the jury population of Hennepin County, Minnesota, was investigated. The purpose was to assess the impact of recent reforms in evidentiary rules pertaining to the admissibility of prior sexual history evidence in rape trials. Specific questions included: (1)…

  8. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau"…

  9. Defendants' Rights in Criminal Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ralph C., II; Keeley, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the protections afforded by the Constitution for defendants in criminal trials. These include the right to a jury trial (in cases of possible incarceration), an impartial jury, and the requirement of a unanimous verdict. Defends the use of plea bargaining as essential to an efficient criminal justice system. (MJP)

  10. Total Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2007

    2007-01-01

    For 25 years, "American School & University" has been publishing a special issue dedicated to the best in education design. Although design has changed dramatically over the years, one will find that the jury criteria for award-winning projects has remained consistent. The first jury was looking for technical innovation, and 1986's…

  11. 32 CFR 144.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.1 Purpose. This part implements 10 U.S.C. 982 to establish uniform DoD policies for jury service by members of the Armed Forces on active duty....

  12. To require the United States attorney to bring the matter of an individual's contempt of Congress before a grand jury not later than 30 days after receiving a certification from the Speaker of the House of Representatives or the President of the Senate that the individual is in contempt.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jordan, Jim [R-OH-4

    2014-07-29

    House - 09/26/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. To require the United States attorney to bring the matter of an individual's contempt of Congress before a grand jury not later than 30 days after receiving a certification from the Speaker of the House of Representatives or the President of the Senate that the individual is in contempt.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jordan, Jim [R-OH-4

    2014-07-29

    09/26/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. To require the United States attorney to bring the matter of an individual's contempt of Congress before a grand jury not later than 30 days after receiving a certification from the Speaker of the House of Representatives or the President of the Senate that the individual is in contempt.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jordan, Jim [R-OH-4

    2014-07-29

    09/26/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. From the shadows into the light: How pretrial publicity and deliberation affect mock jurors' decisions, impressions, and memory.

    PubMed

    Ruva, Christine L; Guenther, Christina C

    2015-06-01

    This 2-part study explored how exposure to negative pretrial publicity (Neg-PTP) influences the jury process, as well as possible mechanisms responsible for its biasing effects on decisions. Study Part A explored how PTP and jury deliberations affect juror/jury verdicts, memory, and impressions of the defendant and attorneys. One week before viewing a criminal trial mock-jurors (N = 320 university students) were exposed to Neg-PTP or unrelated crime stories (No-PTP). Two days later deliberating jurors came to a group decision, whereas nondeliberating jurors completed an unrelated task before making an individual decision. Neg-PTP jurors were more likely to vote guilty, make memory errors, and rate the defendant lower in credibility. Deliberation reduced Neg-PTP jurors' memory accuracy and No-PTP jurors' guilty verdicts (leniency bias). Jurors' memory and ratings of the defendant and prosecuting attorney significantly mediated the effect of PTP on guilt ratings. Study Part B content analyzed 30 mock-jury deliberations and explored how PTP influenced deliberations and ultimately jury decisions. Neg-PTP juries were more likely than No-PTP juries to discuss ambiguous trial evidence in a proprosecution manner and less likely to discuss judicial instructions and lack of evidence. All Neg-PTP juries mentioned PTP, after instructed otherwise, and rarely corrected jury members who mentioned PTP. Discussion of ambiguous trial evidence in a proprosecution manner and lack of evidence significantly mediated the effect of PTP on jury-level guilt ratings. Together the findings suggest that judicial admonishments and deliberations may not be sufficient to reduce PTP bias, because of memory errors, biased impressions, and predecisional distortion.

  16. Oily omen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A jury found that the Exxon Corp. was indeed reckless in allowing a captain with a track record of alcohol abuse to pilot the Valdez supertanker, which ran aground in March 1989, causing North America's worst oil spill ever. The Alaskan jury also found the captain negligent and reckless for drinking on the job the afternoon of the incident. The jury is yet to decide just how much Exxon should pay in liability in the civil suit, but the figure could easily come out in the billions.

  17. 12 CFR 704.15 - Audit and reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accepted auditing standards. The scope of the audit engagement must be sufficient to permit such accountant... jury trial waiver provisions provided that the letters do not incorporate any limitation of liability...

  18. 20 CFR 615.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... work, or which involves an unreasonable risk to the individual's health, safety or morals; and such... disqualification begins, as determined under the applicable State law; (11) Jury duty, for purposes of section 202...

  19. 20 CFR 615.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... work, or which involves an unreasonable risk to the individual's health, safety or morals; and such... disqualification begins, as determined under the applicable State law; (11) Jury duty, for purposes of section 202...

  20. Developing Your Employee Handbook: Leave Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger; Perreault, Joe

    1988-01-01

    Examines issues and problems related to leave policies in day care centers. Offers recommendations on the formulation and implementation of vacation, sick, and personal leave, leave without pay, jury duty, military leave, and bereavement leave. (RWB)

  1. A Short History of the International Physics Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunfalvi, R.

    1984-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the International Physics Competition (IPC). IPC rules, aims, organization, participants, leaders, finance, language, duration, international jury, problems, evaluation, prizes, and organizers' responsibilities are discussed. Typical problems used and problem solving methods are also discussed. (JN)

  2. A Science Center that Is Also a 'Street'.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AIA Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The Undergraduate Science Center at Harvard University provides interiors that are an "appropriate science environment, attractive to students," the jury said in selecting it for one of the 1979 AIA Honor Awards. (Author/MLF)

  3. Environmental Response: Strawberry Hill Campus, Bar Harbor, Maine. The 21st Awards Program: A Year of Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Progressive Architecture Awards Jury gave citations to three projects grouped as "the response by architects to environmental problems." One citation was awarded to a college campus design utilizing solar energy, recycled materials, and wind power. (MF)

  4. Environmental Response: Strawberry Hill Campus, Bar Harbor, Maine. The 21st Awards Program: A Year of Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Progressive Architecture Awards Jury gave citations to three projects grouped as "the response by architects to environmental problems." One citation was awarded to a college campus design utilizing solar energy, recycled materials, and wind power. (MF)

  5. Why winners win: decision making in medical malpractice cases.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Linda S

    2007-01-01

    A high percentage of physicians will, at some time in their careers, face a lawsuit, possibly finding themselves in the courtroom even when they have not made a medical mistake. Despite the presumption that juries are biased in favor of injured plaintiffs, physicians win most of their trials. Why this occurs and how juries make their decisions are topics of ongoing interest. Research has been done on jury decision making, including what, if any, the roles of race and sex play in the process. It is essential that those who enter the courtroom understand both the power they have to influence the outcome of their own trials and why it is that issues of character continue to be so important to juries.

  6. Anticipated and Experienced Problems in Implementing a Flexible-Modular Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, A. W.; Mrdjenovich, Donald

    1973-01-01

    Successful implementation of a modular-flexible schedule was found to facilitate subsequent school structure changes by principals; questionnaires were sent to school principals and a national jury'' to provide both practical and theoretical answers. (Editor/SP)

  7. 24 CFR 236.750 - Form of lease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... jury trial. Authorization to the landlord's lawyer to appear in court on behalf of the tenant and waive.... Authorization to the landlord's lawyer to waive the tenant's right: (i) To appeal for judicial error in any...

  8. 18 CFR 1308.38 - Reconsideration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... served not later than 10 days after issuance of the Hearing Officer's decision. This time period cannot... Federal Rules of Civil Procedure for motions for new trial in actions tried without a jury. ...

  9. 18 CFR 1308.38 - Reconsideration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... served not later than 10 days after issuance of the Hearing Officer's decision. This time period cannot... Federal Rules of Civil Procedure for motions for new trial in actions tried without a jury. ...

  10. Providing Greater Protection for Environmental Audits: A Proposal for a Self-Evaluative Privilege

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    manufacture any of its own drugs. Dotterweich and his company were both brought to trial for shipping misbranded and adulterated drugs in violation of the... misbranding or adulteration . The cases of both defendants * 36 went to the jury. The jury returned a guilty verdict only against . Dotterweich. The court...34can hardly be compared to . .the selling of adulterated drugs." ,175 43 D. Federal Environmental Laws Environmental laws are public welfare laws. They

  11. Journalists’ Privilege: Overview of the Law and Legislation in the 109th and 110th Congresses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-18

    deterred from furnishing publishable information, all to the detriment of the free flow of information protected by the First Amendment . The Court held...nonetheless, that the First Amendment did not provide even a qualified privilege for journalists to refuse to appear and testify before state or federal...grand juries. The only situation it mentioned in which the First Amendment would allow a reporter to refuse to testify was in the case of grand jury

  12. Thoracic Injuries in US Combat Casualties: A 10-Year Review of Operation Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    SD) age was 26 (6.6) years, and mean (SD) chest AIS score was 2.9 (0.9). Penetrating trauma was the most common mechanism of injury (61.5%), and...Registry The Joint Theater Trauma Registry (JTTR) is a database established in 2001 to accumulate information on combat in- juries, such as mechanism of...database included basic demographics, mechanism of injury, total blood products received in theater, additional in- juries, Injury Severity Score (ISS

  13. "Bad law" argument in Morgentaler v. The Queen.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, E M

    The issues raised by the Crown on appeal in Morgentaler v. The Queen from the acquittal of the accused were rendered moot when the Supreme Court of Canada declared the abortion statute (section 251 of the Criminal Code) to be unconstitutional. There was no need for the Court to discuss either the issue of the use of the "defence of necessity" or defence counsel's "bad law" argument. Nevertheless, Chief Justice Dickson found the "bad law" argument of defence counsel, Morris Manning, Q.C., "so troubling," he felt "compelled to comment" on it. Mr. Manning argued that, although the jury was to take its instructions in the law from the judge, it had a right not to apply the law in the case to the facts because the abortion statute was "bad law." In his decision, Chief Justice Dickson reiterated that it is the duty of the judge to instruct the jury in the law and the function of the jury to apply the facts to the law, and that Mr. Manning was wrong to tell the jury otherwise. Among other things, the Chief Justice used a "racist jury" example to demonstrate Mr. Manning's error. The author argues in this comment that the Chief Justice's example was ill-conceived and inapposite, and concludes that the jury and Mr. Manning should be commended for helping to rid Canada of an oppressive abortion law.

  14. Revisiting the Decision of Death in Hurst v. Florida.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Brian K; Ginory, Almari; Zedalis, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    The United States Supreme Court has considered the question of whether a judge or a jury must make the findings necessary to support imposition of the death penalty in several notable cases, including Spaziano v. Florida (1984), Hildwin v. Florida (1989), and Ring v. Arizona (2002). In 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court revisited the subject in Hurst v. Florida Florida Statute § 921.141 allows the judge, after weighing aggravating and mitigating circumstances, to enter a sentence of life imprisonment or death. Before Hurst, Florida's bifurcated sentencing proceedings included an advisory sentence from jurors and a separate judicial hearing without juror involvement. In Hurst, the Court revisited the question of whether Florida's capital sentencing scheme violates the Sixth Amendment, which requires a jury, not a judge, to find each fact necessary to impose a sentence of death in light of Ring In an eight-to-one decision, the Court reversed the judgment of the Florida Supreme Court, holding that the Sixth Amendment requires a jury to find the aggravating factors necessary for imposing the death penalty. The role of Florida juries in capital sentencing proceedings was thereby elevated from advisory to determinative. We examine the Court's decision and offer commentary regarding this shift from judge to jury in the final imposition of the death penalty and the overall effect of this landmark case. © 2016 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  15. When domestic goes capital: Juror decision making in capital murder trials involving domestic homicide.

    PubMed

    Richards, Tara N; Smith, M Dwayne; Fogel, Sondra J; Bjerregaard, Beth

    2015-08-01

    Prior research suggests that homicide cases involving familial offenders and victims are subject to a "domestic discount" that reduces sentencing severity. However, the operation of a domestic discount in regard to death penalty sentencing has been rarely examined. The current research uses a near-population of jury decisions in capital murder trials conducted in North Carolina from 1991 to 2009 (n = 800), and a series of logistic regression analyses to determine whether there is (a) a direct effect between offender-victim relationship (e.g., domestic, friend/acquaintance, and stranger) and jury decision making, and/or (b) whether domestic offender-victim relationship (as well as other offender-victim relationships) moderates the effect of legal and extralegal case characteristics on jury assessment of the death penalty. Our findings revealed no empirical support for a "domestic discount" whereby juries are less likely to impose death sentences in cases involving domestic homicides. However, substantial differences in predictors of death sentencing were found across offender-victim dyads; most notably, domestic homicide cases demonstrated the most legalistic model of jury decisions to impose death sentences.

  16. Sound-quality analysis of sewing machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterley, James; Boone, Andrew; Blotter, Jonathan; Sommerfeldt, Scott

    2005-04-01

    Sound quality analysis procedure and results for six sewing machines ranging from entry level to professional grade will be presented. The procedure consisted of jury-based listening tests and quantification of sound quality using standard metrics. The procedures and analysis of the jury testing will be presented and discussed. The correlation between the quantitative metrics and the qualitative jury results will be presented. Sound localization scans, using near field acoustic holography techniques with accompanying results, performed in order to determine machine sound hot spots and possible sources for undesired sounds, will also be presented. Proposed modifications to machine structure in order to alter machine sound signature into a more sensory pleasant sound will also be presented.

  17. Anchoring in the courtroom: the effects of caps on punitive damages.

    PubMed

    Robbennolt, J K; Studebaker, C A

    1999-06-01

    Responding to the perception that civil damage awards are out of control, courts and legislatures have pursued tort reform efforts largely aimed at reigning in damage awards by juries. One proposed method for reigning in civil juries is to limit, or cap, the amount that can be awarded for punitive damages. Despite significant controversy over damage awards and the civil litigation system, there has been little research focusing on the process by which juries determine damages. In particular, there is a paucity of research on the possible effects of placing caps on punitive damages. The present research examines punitive damage caps and reveals an anchoring effect of the caps on both compensatory and punitive damages. A second experiment replicates this effect and examines the moderating effect of bifurcating the compensatory and punitive damage decisions.

  18. Criminal Prohibitions on the Publication of Classified Defense Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-09

    concrete evidence that a grand jury is considering charges against Assange. Justin Elliot , Assange grand jury report “purely speculation”, WAR ROOM...i]f the offense is regarded by the requested State as a political offense or as an offense connected with a political offense.”). 120 Quinn v...Ireland, 60 MARQ. L. REV. 777, 780 (1977). 121 Quinn , 783 F.2d at 791 (internal citations omitted). 122 See, e.g., Quinn , 783 F.2d at 791 (citing

  19. A new version of the helicopter aural detection program, ICHIN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. W.; Smith, C. D.; Shepherd, K. P.; Sullivan, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center personnel have conducted an evaluation of the helicopter aural detection program I Can Hear It Now (ICHIN version-5). This was accomplished using flight noise data of five helicopters, obtained from a joint NASA and U.S. Army acoustics measurement program. The evaluation consisted of presenting the noise data to a jury of 20 subjects and to the ICHIN-5 program. A comparative study was then made of the detection distances determined by the jury and predicted by ICHIN-5. This report presents the changes made in the ICHIN-5 program as a result of this comparative study. The changes represent current psychoacoustics and propagation knowledge.

  20. Use of Hearsay in Military Commissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-20

    124 See Boumediene, 553 U.S. at 754-60. 125 Verdugo-Urquidez, 494 U.S. at 268 (citing Balzac v. Porto Rico, 258 U.S. 298 (1922) (Sixth...Constitution inapplicable to Puerto Rico)). 126 Verdugo-Urquidez, 494 U.S. at 268 (citing Dorr, 195 U.S. at 148; Balzac , 258 U.S. at 312-13) 127 See... Balzac v. Porto Rico, 258 U.S. 298 (1922) (Sixth Amendment right to jury trial); Ocampo v. United States, 234 U.S. 91 (1914) (Fifth Amendment grand jury

  1. Improving the medical malpractice litigation process.

    PubMed

    Struve, Catherine T

    2004-01-01

    Critics charge that judges and juries are incompetent to address medical liability issues. Some advocate shifting authority away from ordinary judges and juries, either by appointing "expert" decisionmakers, such as "medical screening panels" or specialized "medical courts," or by instituting caps on damages. Problems with the tort liability system may weigh in favor of a shift to a no-fault administrative compensation system. If the current fault-based system is retained, however, policymakers should not adopt half-measures by creating "expert" panels or "expert" courts. Rather, they should better equip the existing decisionmakers to deal with liability and damages questions.

  2. A study of automobile exhaust noise preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haire, Jay B.; Carney, Melinda J.; Cheenne, Dominique J.

    2005-04-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between preferences in automobile exhaust noise and the demographic factors of a listening jury. Noise samples of four different vehicles were recorded at idle as well as at 3000 RPM, and 1/3 octave sound spectra were acquired simultaneously. The recordings were presented to the jury using headphones and a preference survey was administered. Zwicker loudness was computed for all samples. Demographic factors such as gender, age, current and future vehicle ownership, were correlated to listening preferences, and unforeseen results were found, especially in regards to sport utility vehicles (SUV).

  3. Agreement Between Franklin Pierce College and Rindge Faculty Federation (AFT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklyn Pierce Coll., Rindge, NH.

    This agreement was made on October 15, 1974 and is effective until September 1, 1975. Articles of the agreement cover: board-federation relationships; academic freedom; library collection; management rights; jury duty; union leave; temporary department chairman; teaching loads; faculty evaluation; grievance procedures; faculty appointment and…

  4. Aspects of Student Assessment. Proceedings of a Conference Held at the University of New South Wales, 18-20 July 1978. Tertiary Education Research Centre Occasional Publication No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, L. W., Ed.; Boud, D. J., Ed.

    A conference was held by the University of New South Wales, Australia, to enable staff and students to examine the purposes of student assessment, implications of various forms of assessment, and ways in which assessment might be most effectively conducted. Eric Daniels spoke on the jury system of assessment in architecture, Raja Bandaranayake…

  5. The Florida High School Mock Trial Competition Case Materials, 1997. State of Florida v. Lee Appleman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Law Related Education Association, Tallahassee.

    This material provides students with information to prepare for a mock trial. The defendant in this case has been accused of the crime of driving under the influence of alcoholic beverages causing severe bodily injury. Case materials include stipulated facts, jury instructions, depositions, and other related materials. (EH)

  6. How common is "common knowledge" about child witnesses among legal professionals? Comparing interviewers, public defenders, and forensic psychologists with laypeople.

    PubMed

    Buck, Julie A; Warren, Amye R; Bruck, Maggie; Kuehnle, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluates the knowledge of jury-eligible college students (n = 192), investigative interviewers (n = 44), forensic psychologists (n = 39), and public defenders (n = 137) in regard to the research on interviewing children. These groups' knowledge was compared with the scientific research on the impact of interview techniques and practices on the accuracy of child witnesses. Jury-eligible students were the least knowledgeable, but their accuracy varied widely across items. Both interviewers and public defenders performed better than jury-eligible students, but they lacked substantial knowledge about the research on interviewing children on certain topics (e.g., using anatomically detailed dolls); forensic psychologists were the most knowledgeable. These findings suggest that professionals in the legal system need substantial professional development regarding the research on interviewing strategies with child witnesses. They also highlight the need for experts to provide case-relevant information to juries who lack basic information about the validity and reliability of children's reports. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Voir Dire Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Camp, Julie

    1986-01-01

    This article provides background on the voir dire (jury selection) process, explaining its importance to the outcome of a trial. Offers a simulation experience which has students take the role of lawyers interviewing 29 prospective jurors for an alcohol-related traffic accident involving a 20-year-old driver. Profiles for prospective jurors and…

  8. Representation of Legal Knowledge for Conceptual Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, George R.; deBessonet, Cary G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes traditional legal information retrieval systems--Juris, Lexis, Westlaw--and several new rule-based, knowledge-based, legal knowledge reasoning, and analytical legal information systems--Waterman and Peterson's Legal Decisionmaking System, Hafner's Legal Information Retrieval System, McCarty's TAXMAN, and the deBessonet representation of…

  9. Public good, personal privacy: a citizens' deliberation about using medical information for pharmacoepidemiological research.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Lianne; Paul, Charlotte

    2011-02-01

    Epidemiologists have long argued for access to personal medical information in order to undertake research in the public interest, while legislation and ethical guidelines have increasingly focused on protecting the privacy of individuals. How the public weighs up these public interest and privacy arguments is unclear. A citizens' jury was held to explore public views about the use of medical information for the post-marketing surveillance of medicine safety. A steering group of stakeholders oversaw the process, including the framing of the question for the jury and the selection of expert witnesses and jurors. An independent chair and facilitator managed the 3-day hearing. The jury unanimously concluded that researchers contracted by a public body should be permitted to use medical information about identifiable people, without their consent, to study the safety of medicines--providing existing ethical guidelines and relevant laws are followed. Jurors who were initially uncomfortable about the use of information without their express consent all became more comfortable after obtaining further information and deliberating with other jurors. This outcome suggests that an informed public does not place personal privacy above societal benefits in the particular circumstance of medicines' safety research, given appropriate privacy safeguards. The specificity of the example, the framing of the public interest and privacy considerations--in the context of scientific, legal, ethical, clinical and consumer input--and the opportunity to deliberate, may explain why the conclusions of the jury differ from public opinion surveys about secondary uses of medical information.

  10. Balancing Act: First and Sixth Amendment Rights in High-Profile Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, James H.

    2005-01-01

    We often hear that democracy is not a spectator sport. This is certainly true of trial by jury, a cornerstone of our democracy, which depends on the willingness of Americans from all walks of life to devote themselves to the difficult work of determining another person's guilt or innocence of a crime. But the work of those citizens selected to…

  11. Fait A La Main: A Source Book of Louisiana Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Maida, Ed.

    The Louisiana Crafts Program is an economic development program that strives to stimulate several markets for Louisiana craftsmen. This publication is a directory of juried Louisiana craftsmen of various types; it is intended as a source book for anyone interested in handmade crafts. It is divided into two sections: "Folk Craftsmen" and…

  12. Litigating Grades: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lionel S.

    2005-01-01

    This account of an academic lawsuit qualifies as a horror story. A mediocre minority student abuses civil rights and ADA protections to win a massive monetary award against his school on the flimsiest of evidence. Jaded lawyers for the state university represent powerless faculty defendants in court, torpidly allowing the jury to throw 50 years of…

  13. Ucebnoe posobie dlja studentov pedagogiceskih institutov (Manual for Students of Teacher Training Institutes).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogorodnikov, I. T.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a book recommended for publication by the jury of the open competition for educational manuals to be used in teacher training institutes; it is designed for the Soviet educational theory course for general secondary school teachers. The five chapters deal with the subject…

  14. A Study to Determine Competencies Needed by ABE/APL Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocker, Donald W.; Spear, George E.

    The research was conducted to identify competencies appropriate for adult basic education (ABE) teachers who use the adult performance level (APL) approach, and to determine which are critical for ABE/APL teachers. A jury of APL authorities was impaneled to: (1) validate that all ABE competencies established by Mocker in 1974 were appropriate for…

  15. Clothing Construction Performance Assessment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Betty A.

    The goal of the project was to validate, refine, and develop plans for implementation of a performance-based challenge test in the cognitive and psychomotor aspects of basic clothing construction skills that could be utilized for grades 7-14. An advisory board and a jury panel representing the three instructional levels provided assistance in…

  16. Sociologist Jailed Because He "Wouldn't Snitch" Ponders the Way Research Ought to Be Done.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A Washington doctoral candidate in sociology is jailed for contempt of court for not revealing conversations with animal-rights activists in a grand jury investigation of a research laboratory raid at his institution. The graduate student refused to breach an American Sociological Association pledge of scholarly confidentiality. (MSE)

  17. 19 CFR 103.23 - Factors in determining whether to disclose information pursuant to a demand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Factors in determining whether to disclose information pursuant to a demand. 103.23 Section 103.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... income tax laws, 26 U.S.C. 6103 and 7213), or a rule of procedure, such as the grand jury secrecy rule...

  18. The Wasps in Court: Argument and Audience in the Athenian Dikasteries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Raymond S.

    In an attempt to explain why Aristotle devotes a substantial part of Book Two of "The Rhetoric" to methods for arousing jurors' emotions, despite stating previously that such emotional appeal is nonessential and unethical, this paper examines the nature of the Athenian jury courts, or dikasteries. It first discusses the historical…

  19. Developing EFL Teachers' Performance at Sana'a Secondary Schools in the Light of Their Professional and Specialist Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuheer, Khaled Mohsen Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to develop EFL teachers' performance at Sana'a secondary schools in the light of their professional and specialist needs. Based on literature review, related studies and a panel of jury members' points of view and English teachers' interview, a list of four needs was proposed and used as the most necessary…

  20. 42 CFR 137.309 - How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... may only be filed in Federal court under the provisions of the APA, 5 U.S.C. 701-706. Under the APA, a... the court's views for those of the agency. Jury trials and civil discovery are not permitted in APA... injunctive relief to the interested party. No money damages or fines are permitted in APA proceedings. ...

  1. Score Calculation in Informatics Contests Using Multiple Criteria Decision Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skupiene, Jurate

    2011-01-01

    The Lithuanian Informatics Olympiad is a problem solving contest for high school students. The work of each contestant is evaluated in terms of several criteria, where each criterion is measured according to its own scale (but the same scale for each contestant). Several jury members are involved in the evaluation. This paper analyses the problem…

  2. Exercises for Keeping Pianists' Hands in Top Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Some pianists have idiosyncratic ways of keeping their hands and fingers relaxed. Glenn Gould, for example, religiously soaked his digits in hot water before performing or recording. While the jury is still out on the effectiveness of Gould's routine, there are plenty of other exercises and practices that will keep a pianist's fingers limber.…

  3. Adapted Verbal Feedback, Instructor Interaction and Student Emotions in the Landscape Architecture Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl A.; Boyer, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    In light of concerns with architectural students' emotional jeopardy during traditional desk and final-jury critiques, the authors pursue alternative approaches intended to provide more supportive and mentoring verbal assessment in landscape architecture studios. In addition to traditional studio-based critiques throughout a semester, we provide…

  4. Remembering Amadou Diallo: The Response of the New Teachers Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, S. Maxwell; Murphy, Maureen; Singer, Alan; Stacki, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes email excerpts of teachers' views about racial violence stimulated by the remembrance of a February 2002 jury verdict wherein four white New City police officers were acquitted of the wrongful death of Amadou Diallo, a black African immigrant. The exchanges occurred among members of the Hofstra University New Teachers Network. (PKP)

  5. The Double Helix Takes the Witness Stand: Behavioral and Neuropsychiatric Genetics in Court

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Data on neuropsychiatric and behavioral genetics have attracted legal interest, as attorneys explore their use in criminal and civil cases. These developments may assist judges and juries in making difficult judgments—but they bring substantial risk of misinterpretation and misuse. PMID:24908480

  6. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... Process § 137.311 Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines. (b...

  7. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... Process § 137.311 Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines. (b...

  8. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... Process § 137.311 Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines. (b...

  9. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... Process § 137.311 Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines. (b...

  10. Teaching Law to Online Law Students at RMIT University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babacan, Alperhan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the online Juris Doctor Program (JD Program) at RMIT University. The first part of the paper provides a brief overview of the JD Program, the graduate capabilities of the Program and key principles associated with the teaching of law to online postgraduate students. In line with the literature in the area of online teaching…

  11. Forcible Rape: A Manual for Filing and Trial Prosecutors. Prosecutors' Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battelle Memorial Inst., Seattle, WA. Law and Justice Study Center.

    The report begins with a discussion of rape and its victims. It proceeds to more technical information about the filing, preliminary hearings and grand juries, plea bargaining, trial preparation, trial and sentencing information which is geared towards the prosecutor. Finally, the report concludes with appendices presenting sample forms for…

  12. Student Speech--The First Amendment and Qualified Immunity Under 42 U.S.C. Section 983: Conduct Implications for School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araux, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the conduct implications of qualified immunity in allegations of deprivation of civil rights by public school administrators regarding the First Amendment-student speech. Methodology: Data were collected using the LexisNexis and JuriSearch online legal research systems, which…

  13. A Cognitive Semiotic Study of Students' Reading a Textless Image versus a Verbal Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Roaa Hasan; Aslaadi, Shatha

    2016-01-01

    This study explores fourth year college students' content retrieval from reading textless versus verbal images. Furthermore, it examines the extent to which the respondents comprehend and understand them. The procedures include selecting an image from the internet, designing a written test with its rubrics and exposing it to jury members to…

  14. Student Speech--The First Amendment and Qualified Immunity Under 42 U.S.C. Section 983: Conduct Implications for School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araux, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the conduct implications of qualified immunity in allegations of deprivation of civil rights by public school administrators regarding the First Amendment-student speech. Methodology: Data were collected using the LexisNexis and JuriSearch online legal research systems, which…

  15. iMAGiNE! YELLOWSTONE: Art Education and the Reinhabitation of Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Doug; Cowan, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes an art education program that connects children and youth to the historical and contemporary issues associated with Yellowstone National Park. Originally conceived as a one-year celebration, the project has grown into a juried exhibit showcasing student art and writing which responds to Yellowstone resource themes and issues. (MJP)

  16. Sociologist Jailed Because He "Wouldn't Snitch" Ponders the Way Research Ought to Be Done.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A Washington doctoral candidate in sociology is jailed for contempt of court for not revealing conversations with animal-rights activists in a grand jury investigation of a research laboratory raid at his institution. The graduate student refused to breach an American Sociological Association pledge of scholarly confidentiality. (MSE)

  17. 32 CFR 516.75 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Policy. 516.75 Section 516.75 National Defense... LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.75 Policy. (a) Active duty soldiers... the Virgin Islands. (4) Active duty soldiers in a training status. (5) Active duty soldiers...

  18. The Importance of Statistical Power in Educational Research. Occasional Paper 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Knapp, Thomas R.

    The testing of research hypotheses is directly comparable to the dichotomous decision-making of medical diagnosis or jury trials--not ill/ill, or innocent/guilty decisions. There are costs in both kinds of error, type I errors of falsely rejecting a null hypothesis or type II errors of falsely rejecting an alternative hypothesis. It is important…

  19. The Effectiveness of Guided Induction versus Deductive Instruction on the Development of Complex Spanish "Gustar" Structures: An Analysis of Learning Outcomes and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerezo, Luis; Caras, Allison; Leow, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analytic research suggests an edge of explicit over implicit instruction for the development of complex L2 grammatical structures, but the jury is still out as to which type of explicit instruction--"deductive" or "inductive," where rules are respectively provided or elicited--proves more effective. Avoiding this…

  20. National Dam Inspection Program. Elk Lake Dam (NDI ID Number PA-01102, DER ID Number 64-4), Delaware River Basin, Elk Lake Run, Wayne County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    about 3 feet of the surface of the water." According to the PWSC, the lake was acquired circa 1898 by the Lake Lodore Improvement Company, along with...lake was in dispute. The dispute was apparently settled by jury trial in 1962. As described by the present Owner, the Lake Lodore Improvement Company

  1. The Effectiveness of Guided Induction versus Deductive Instruction on the Development of Complex Spanish "Gustar" Structures: An Analysis of Learning Outcomes and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerezo, Luis; Caras, Allison; Leow, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analytic research suggests an edge of explicit over implicit instruction for the development of complex L2 grammatical structures, but the jury is still out as to which type of explicit instruction--"deductive" or "inductive," where rules are respectively provided or elicited--proves more effective. Avoiding this…

  2. Effects of an Evidence-Based Text on Scepticism, Methodological Reasoning, Values and Juror Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leshowitz, Barry; Okun, Morris

    2011-01-01

    Research in social cognition laboratories and in simulated legal settings demonstrates that people often do not understand the statistical properties of evidence and are unable to detect scientifically flawed studies. In a mock jury study, we examined the effects of an evidence-based transcript on scepticism towards evidence obtained in flawed…

  3. 32 CFR 516.76 - Exemption determination authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.76... (SPCMCA) over a unit has the authority to determine whether a soldier of that unit, who has been served... a unit or soldier assigned to one command to be attached or detailed to another command for...

  4. 32 CFR 516.74 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Guard soldiers in an annual training or full-time AGR (Active Guard Reserve) status under Title 32... LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.74 General. (a) This subpart implements 10 U.S.C. § 982 and DOD Directive 5525.8. It establishes Army policy concerning soldiers on active...

  5. 32 CFR 516.74 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Guard soldiers in an annual training or full-time AGR (Active Guard Reserve) status under Title 32... LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.74 General. (a) This subpart implements 10 U.S.C. § 982 and DOD Directive 5525.8. It establishes Army policy concerning soldiers on active...

  6. 32 CFR 516.74 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Guard soldiers in an annual training or full-time AGR (Active Guard Reserve) status under Title 32... LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.74 General. (a) This subpart implements 10 U.S.C. § 982 and DOD Directive 5525.8. It establishes Army policy concerning soldiers on active...

  7. 32 CFR 516.76 - Exemption determination authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.76... (SPCMCA) over a unit has the authority to determine whether a soldier of that unit, who has been served... a unit or soldier assigned to one command to be attached or detailed to another command for...

  8. 32 CFR 516.76 - Exemption determination authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.76... (SPCMCA) over a unit has the authority to determine whether a soldier of that unit, who has been served... a unit or soldier assigned to one command to be attached or detailed to another command for...

  9. 32 CFR 516.74 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Guard soldiers in an annual training or full-time AGR (Active Guard Reserve) status under Title 32... LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.74 General. (a) This subpart implements 10 U.S.C. § 982 and DOD Directive 5525.8. It establishes Army policy concerning soldiers on active...

  10. 32 CFR 516.76 - Exemption determination authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.76... (SPCMCA) over a unit has the authority to determine whether a soldier of that unit, who has been served... a unit or soldier assigned to one command to be attached or detailed to another command for...

  11. 32 CFR 516.76 - Exemption determination authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Soldiers Summoned To Serve on State and Local Juries § 516.76... (SPCMCA) over a unit has the authority to determine whether a soldier of that unit, who has been served... a unit or soldier assigned to one command to be attached or detailed to another command for...

  12. 32 CFR 144.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 144.5 Section 144.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SERVICE BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.5 Responsibilities. The Secretaries...

  13. Washington State Juvenile Justice Code: An Experiment in Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    In the Washington State juvenile justice system, serious or repeat offenders receive the full panoply of due process rights and procedures, with the exception of jury trials; minor offenders are diverted to community boards that require community service or victim restitution; and status offenders are removed from the courts' jurisdiction and…

  14. Youth Court: A Community Solution for Embracing At-Risk Youth. A National Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Sarah S.; Jurich, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    Youth court, also called teen court, peer jury, or student court, is an alternative to the traditional juvenile justice system and school disciplinary proceedings that empower youth and communities to take an active role in addressing the early stages of youth delinquency. The program provides communities with an opportunity to ensure immediate…

  15. The Status of Graphical Presentation in Interior/Architectural Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurel, Meltem O.; Basa, Inci

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that interior/architectural design education favours a dominance of final presentation over the design process in the studio environment, particularly in the evaluation of a project. It suggests that the appeal of design juries for pleasant drawings, which may shift the emphasis from the project itself to its representation,…

  16. A Report on a Survey of Artists/Craftspersons' Attitudes Toward Competitive Exhibitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinale, Robert L.; Arch, Adria B.

    Results of a survey to determine the attitudes of artists and craftspersons toward entering competitive juried exhibitions are reported. Questionnaires were sent to people entering the national Copper, Brass, and Bronze Exhibition for 1977 along with notices of acceptance or rejection. One hundred-ninety artists (38%) responded. The questionnaire…

  17. College Students' Conceptualizations of Deficits Involved in Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musso, Mandi W.; Barker, Alyse A.; Proto, Daniel A.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2012-01-01

    Precedential rulings in recent capital murder trials may, in some cases, leave it up to a jury to determine whether or not an individual meets criteria for an intellectual disability (ID) and should be spared from the death penalty. Despite the potential for misconceptions about ID to bias decisions, few empirical studies have examined the…

  18. Swan Song for the Burger Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Robert L., Jr.; Ramarui, Cornelis O.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews a collection of decisions rendered by the Burger Court during its waning months. The decisions involve (1) criminal procedures, (2) racial bias in jury selection, (3) search and seizure, and (4) the exclusion of jurors who have reservations about the death penalty. (JDH)

  19. Examination of Capital Murder Jurors' Deliberations: Methods and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Keith; Coleman, Susan; Byrd, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    The study of capital juries remains a subject of critical interest for the public and for legislative and judicial policy makers as well as legal scholars and social scientists. Cowan, Thompson, and Ellsworth established one of the standard methodologies for examination of this topic in their 1984 seminal study by observing the subjects' debate…

  20. Expert Testimony, "Regular People," and Public Values: Arguing Common Sense at a Death Penalty Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Virginia A.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a case study of a particular courtroom case dealing with the death penalty. Analyzes the processes and communications of the trial jury. Discusses the interplay of common-sense and expert claims at three crucial stages of the trial. (HB)

  1. People with Mental Retardation Are Dying, Legally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Denis; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Criticizes the institution of the death penalty for convicted criminals with mental retardation. Examples are given of cases in which juries were not told of the defendant's mental retardation before sentencing, and a list of defendants with mental retardation that have been executed since 1976 is provided. (CR)

  2. 32 CFR 144.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Responsibilities. 144.5 Section 144.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SERVICE BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.5 Responsibilities. The Secretaries...

  3. 32 CFR 144.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibilities. 144.5 Section 144.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SERVICE BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.5 Responsibilities. The Secretaries...

  4. Out of Sight, Out of Mind/Out of Mind, Out of Site: Schooling and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a diagnostic term now indelibly scored on the public psyche. In some quarters, a diagnosis of ADHD is regarded with derision. In others it is welcomed with relief. Despite intense multidisciplinary research, the jury is still out with regard to the "truth" of ADHD. Not surprisingly, the…

  5. People with Mental Retardation Are Dying, Legally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Denis; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Criticizes the institution of the death penalty for convicted criminals with mental retardation. Examples are given of cases in which juries were not told of the defendant's mental retardation before sentencing, and a list of defendants with mental retardation that have been executed since 1976 is provided. (CR)

  6. Swan Song for the Burger Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Robert L., Jr.; Ramarui, Cornelis O.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews a collection of decisions rendered by the Burger Court during its waning months. The decisions involve (1) criminal procedures, (2) racial bias in jury selection, (3) search and seizure, and (4) the exclusion of jurors who have reservations about the death penalty. (JDH)

  7. Expert Testimony, "Regular People," and Public Values: Arguing Common Sense at a Death Penalty Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Virginia A.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a case study of a particular courtroom case dealing with the death penalty. Analyzes the processes and communications of the trial jury. Discusses the interplay of common-sense and expert claims at three crucial stages of the trial. (HB)

  8. Selected Papers from the 13th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    The papers in this collection are the 15 best papers from the thirteenth International Conference on College Teaching and Learning. They represent a cross-section of nearly 300 presentations, selected by juried review from 40 submitted for consideration. The papers are: (1) The Use of Hybrid Type Educational Digital Entities in University…

  9. Exercises for Keeping Pianists' Hands in Top Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Some pianists have idiosyncratic ways of keeping their hands and fingers relaxed. Glenn Gould, for example, religiously soaked his digits in hot water before performing or recording. While the jury is still out on the effectiveness of Gould's routine, there are plenty of other exercises and practices that will keep a pianist's fingers limber.…

  10. Law School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Law School is a winner in the AS&U 1977 College & University Architectural Competition. The jury commented on the strong recognition of energy conservation and the skillful integration of the building with the existing campus. (Author/MLF)

  11. Adapted Verbal Feedback, Instructor Interaction and Student Emotions in the Landscape Architecture Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl A.; Boyer, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    In light of concerns with architectural students' emotional jeopardy during traditional desk and final-jury critiques, the authors pursue alternative approaches intended to provide more supportive and mentoring verbal assessment in landscape architecture studios. In addition to traditional studio-based critiques throughout a semester, we provide…

  12. 6 CFR 5.41 - Purpose and scope; definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... proceedings before courts, commissions, boards (including the Board of Appellate Review), grand juries, or... Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552, the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a, Executive Order 12958 on national security information (3 CFR, 1995 Comp., p. 333), the Government in the Sunshine Act, 5 U.S.C. 552b, the...

  13. A Guide for Developing Comprehensive Community College Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlo, Frank P.

    Heretofore community colleges have adopted the facility standards of high schools or other colleges, or have devised their own. To establish flexible specifications especially for the junior college, based on the educational program, architectural feasibility, safety, student and faculty use, and possible future needs, a 6-man jury prepared a…

  14. A Physical Education Evaluation for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Albert

    A physical education evaluation was constructed which was flexible enough to measure the varying degrees of retardation. Validity was determined by submitting the test to a jury of experts. Reliability was ascertained by administering the same test to the same students three times with two week intervals between testing. Objectivity was determined…

  15. 32 CFR 516.61 - Reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Remedies in Procurement Fraud and Corruption § 516.61 Reporting requirements... significant investigation of fraud or corruption related to Army procurement activities. Such notification... corruption that relates to DOD procurement activities, whenever possible without reliance on grand jury...

  16. 32 CFR 516.61 - Reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Remedies in Procurement Fraud and Corruption § 516.61 Reporting requirements... significant investigation of fraud or corruption related to Army procurement activities. Such notification... corruption that relates to DOD procurement activities, whenever possible without reliance on grand jury...

  17. The Theory of Distributed Practice as Related to Acquisition of Psychomotor Skills by Adolescents in a Selected Curricular Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, James Bob

    1981-01-01

    From results on the tensile strength and nick-break average jury evaluations test, it was concluded that with the same total practice time, different distributions of welding practice time intervals (15, 30, and 45 minutes) influence the quality of butt welds made by ninth-grade vocational agriculture students. (Author/SJL)

  18. Transport and Fate of Nitroaromatic and Nitramine Explosives in Soils from Open Burning/Open Detonation Operations: Milan Army Ammunition Plant (MAAP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    columns to eliminate photodegradation processes). Controlled tension (vacuum) was applied equally at the bottom of each soil column across the controlled...Environmental Science and Engineering; Gainesville, FL. (32) Ghodrati, M. and W.A. Jury. 1990. A field study using dyes to characterize preferential flow

  19. John Peter Zenger and the Freedom of the Press: 250th Anniversary, 1735-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Library, Albany.

    This booklet accompanies the New York State Library exhibit of material related to the trial of John Peter Zenger. This 1735 trial established the legal precedent giving juries the power to decide libel suits. Labeled "the germ of American freedom," the trial was an important step in the development of American concepts of free speech…

  20. Equality v. Liberty v. Pluralism: Latinos in American Constitutional Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltero, Carlos R.

    This paper examines how U.S. courts, particularly the Supreme Court, have applied constitutional law principles to Latino communities and individuals in three areas: public education, the status of Puerto Rico, and jury selection. Consistent with traditional views of American society as biracial (black and white), constitutional law discussions…

  1. Curriculum Materials for Teaching Students the Competencies Needed for Employment in Nonfarm Agricultural Business. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L.; And Others

    Developed by means of a research project, this teaching guide includes five instructional modules in which competencies for agribusiness occupations are stressed. These competencies were identified from a review of the literature and evaluated by a jury of teachers and agribusinessmen in terms of qualifications needed for entry-level employment.…

  2. The Effect of Using a Program Based on Cooperative Learning Strategy on Developing some Oral Communication Skills of Students, at English Department, Faculty of Education, Sana'a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuheer, Khaled Mohsen Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of study is to investigate the effective of using a cooperative learning strategy STAD-based program on developing some oral communication skills of second level students, English Department, Faculty of Education, Sana'a University. Based on literature review, related studies and a panel of jury members' point of view, a list of 5 oral…

  3. Selected Papers from the International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (12th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection contains the 20 best papers from a conference at which nearly 300 faculty members presented papers. Those that were selected by juried review include: (1) "Where Have You Been? A Case Study of Successful Implementation of Undergraduate Online Learning Communities" (John Barnett); (2) "A Strange Sense of Disquietude: Understanding…

  4. Blackboard Wins Payment from Competitor in Patent Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    A federal jury in Texas awarded Blackboard Inc. $3.1-million last month, saying that a smaller Canadian competitor, Desire2Learn Inc., had infringed Blackboard's patent for a system of delivering course materials online. The case has been closely watched by campus-technology officials, many of whom feared that a Blackboard win could stifle…

  5. Anti-Bullying Practices in American Schools: Perspectives of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Yiping C.; Nickerson, Amanda B.

    2010-01-01

    A random sample of 213 school psychologists working in a school setting completed a survey on their schools' current anti-bullying practices. Talking with bullies following bullying incidents, disciplinary consequences for bullies, and increasing adult supervision were the three most frequently used strategies. Peer juries/court, an anti-bullying…

  6. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of...

  7. 26 CFR 301.6103(h)(2)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., board, division, or bureau of such department (for example, the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the... personnel of the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration); (ii) Officers and... in Federal grand jury proceeding, or in preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of...

  9. THE ROLE OF PREVOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS OF NEW YORK STATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AL-SALMAN, MUHSIN HUSSAIN

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DESCRIBE EXISTING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PREVOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE COURSES AND DETERMINE WHAT SELECTED EDUCATORS IN AGRICULTURE BELIEVE THE OBJECTIVES AND COURSE CONTENT SHOULD BE. LISTS OF 17 OBJECTIVES AND 103 COURSE CONTENT ITEMS IN NINE SUBJECT AREAS WERE ASSEMBLED. A JURY OF 17 MEMBERS RANKED THE OBJECTIVES AND…

  10. Blackboard Wins Payment from Competitor in Patent Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    A federal jury in Texas awarded Blackboard Inc. $3.1-million last month, saying that a smaller Canadian competitor, Desire2Learn Inc., had infringed Blackboard's patent for a system of delivering course materials online. The case has been closely watched by campus-technology officials, many of whom feared that a Blackboard win could stifle…

  11. Supreme Court's New Term. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the issues addressed in the 2002 U.S. Supreme Court term, such as the First, Fourth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments, cruel and unusual punishment, sex offender registries, fair housing, cross burning, jury selection, affirmative action, abortion protests, and copyrights and the public domain. (CMK)

  12. A Report on a Survey of Artists/Craftspersons' Attitudes Toward Competitive Exhibitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinale, Robert L.; Arch, Adria B.

    Results of a survey to determine the attitudes of artists and craftspersons toward entering competitive juried exhibitions are reported. Questionnaires were sent to people entering the national Copper, Brass, and Bronze Exhibition for 1977 along with notices of acceptance or rejection. One hundred-ninety artists (38%) responded. The questionnaire…

  13. From Theory to Data: The Process of Refining Learning Progressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Nicole A.; Duncan, Ravit Golan

    2013-01-01

    Learning progressions (LPs) are theoretical models of how learners develop expertise in a domain over extended periods of time. Recent policy reports have touted LPs as a promising approach to aligning standards, curriculum, and assessment. However, the scholarship on LPs is relatively sparse, and the jury is still out on the theoretical and…

  14. Employing a Mock Trial in a Criminology Course: An Applied Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepelak, Norma J.

    1996-01-01

    Recounts a criminology class exercise that consisted of staging a mock trial using the murders from Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" as source material. Students research the case and role play various lawyers, jury members, and witnesses. Identifies and discusses four educational objectives attainable through the staging of mock trials. (MJP)

  15. The 1983 National Teacher Examinations Core Battery Louisiana Validation Study: Final Report. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvue, Robert; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the National Teacher Examinations (NTE) Core Battery for use in teacher certification in Louisiana. This information was produced to assist in the recommendation and establishment of a required score on the NTE. The jury judgment approach was used. Panels of faculty members were drawn from…

  16. John Peter Zenger and the Freedom of the Press: 250th Anniversary, 1735-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Library, Albany.

    This booklet accompanies the New York State Library exhibit of material related to the trial of John Peter Zenger. This 1735 trial established the legal precedent giving juries the power to decide libel suits. Labeled "the germ of American freedom," the trial was an important step in the development of American concepts of free speech…

  17. From Theory to Data: The Process of Refining Learning Progressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Nicole A.; Duncan, Ravit Golan

    2013-01-01

    Learning progressions (LPs) are theoretical models of how learners develop expertise in a domain over extended periods of time. Recent policy reports have touted LPs as a promising approach to aligning standards, curriculum, and assessment. However, the scholarship on LPs is relatively sparse, and the jury is still out on the theoretical and…

  18. Community Development as an Approach to Community Engagement in Rural-Based Higher Education Institutions in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netshandama, V. O.

    2010-01-01

    The premise of this article is that the "jury is still out" to describe what effective Community Engagement entails in South African higher education institutions. The current discussions about community engagement and service learning do not cover the primary objective of adding value to the community, particularly of the rural-based…

  19. iMAGiNE! YELLOWSTONE: Art Education and the Reinhabitation of Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Doug; Cowan, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes an art education program that connects children and youth to the historical and contemporary issues associated with Yellowstone National Park. Originally conceived as a one-year celebration, the project has grown into a juried exhibit showcasing student art and writing which responds to Yellowstone resource themes and issues. (MJP)

  20. Child Support Enforcement: A Framework for Evaluating Costs, Benefits, and Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Locator Services Domain Indicator Measure Program and Operating costs of providing SPLS service per case Operating and other overhead costs publicO ...cost of pretrial hearings and court hearings (may include a trial by jury) and expert testimony costs, and (4) transportation costs for witnesses

  1. A Correlation Study of Exemplary Exurban African American Achievement in Standardized Testing and the Relationship of Parental Household Size in a Southeastern Public School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, David H.

    2012-01-01

    This study included a literature review of juried research studies of student achievement factors that affect African American achievements tracked in the No Child Left Behind Legislative Act. Statistical correlation analyses were performed to determine if the absence or presence of one or two-parents in the household affected student achievement…

  2. Global Research in an Age of Export Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    When a jury convicted a Tennessee professor this month of illegally exporting information to foreign countries via his graduate students and a trip to China, it sent a message to colleges that they need to scrupulously monitor their faculty members' research and their compliance with the often confusing universe of export-control regulations. In…

  3. MOOCs for High School: Unlocking Opportunities or Substandard Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    If 2012 was the year of the MOOC--massive open online course--then 2013 was the year the MOOC hype returned to Earth. Largely lost in the coverage in both years, however, was the impact MOOCs might have in high schools. Although the jury is still out on that question, high schools around the country are experimenting with adding MOOCs to their…

  4. Interiors That Stand Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "It's what's on the inside that counts"--at least when it comes to "American School & University's" (AS&U's) annual Educational Interiors Showcase competition. Each May, "AS&U" assembles at its Overland Park, Kansas headquarters a jury made up of education and architectural professionals from across the country to pore over an array of exceptional…

  5. 38 CFR 3.211 - Death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Death. 3.211 Section 3..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Evidence Requirements § 3.211 Death. Death should be... community where death occurred. (2) A copy of a coroner's report of death or a verdict of a coroner's jury...

  6. 38 CFR 3.211 - Death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Death. 3.211 Section 3..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Evidence Requirements § 3.211 Death. Death should be... community where death occurred. (2) A copy of a coroner's report of death or a verdict of a coroner's jury...

  7. 38 CFR 3.211 - Death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Death. 3.211 Section 3..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Evidence Requirements § 3.211 Death. Death should be... community where death occurred. (2) A copy of a coroner's report of death or a verdict of a coroner's jury...

  8. 38 CFR 3.211 - Death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Death. 3.211 Section 3..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Evidence Requirements § 3.211 Death. Death should be... community where death occurred. (2) A copy of a coroner's report of death or a verdict of a coroner's jury...

  9. 38 CFR 3.211 - Death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Death. 3.211 Section 3..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Evidence Requirements § 3.211 Death. Death should be... community where death occurred. (2) A copy of a coroner's report of death or a verdict of a coroner's jury...

  10. New Materials for the New School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farwick, Diane; Terrell-Perkins, Faye E.

    1986-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of law-related education materials for grades K through 12. The annotations are divided into the following categories: (1) elementary law-related education, (2) juries, (3) opposing viewpoints, (4) practical law, and (5) supplementing law-related education. (JDH)

  11. Beyond the Schoolhouse Door: Educating the Political Animal in Jefferson's Little Republics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotts, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Jefferson believed that citizenship must exhibit republican virtue. While education was necessary in a republican polity, it alone was insufficient in sustaining a revolutionary civic spirit. This paper examines Jefferson's expectations for citizen virtue, specifically related to militia and jury service in his "little republics."…

  12. Kentucky's Unified Court of Justice. Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort. Div. of Program Development.

    Resource materials and learning activities to help secondary students in Kentucky learn about their state's court system are provided. The guide begins by providing a history of the Kentucky Court of Justice. Discussed are the qualification of judges, the Retirement and Removal Commission, the Judicial Nominating Commission, and juries. Background…

  13. Selected Papers from the International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (12th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection contains the 20 best papers from a conference at which nearly 300 faculty members presented papers. Those that were selected by juried review include: (1) "Where Have You Been? A Case Study of Successful Implementation of Undergraduate Online Learning Communities" (John Barnett); (2) "A Strange Sense of Disquietude: Understanding…

  14. Response to Professor Sacken.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frye, Mary Catherine

    1989-01-01

    Disagrees with Professor Donal M. Sacken's contention in Spring 1988 "Journal of Law and Education" that "Eckman" decision resulted in loss of school district autonomy. Agrees with jury that school board's dismissal of unmarried teacher, who became pregnant as a result of rape and chose to bear the child and raise him, was…

  15. Global Research in an Age of Export Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    When a jury convicted a Tennessee professor this month of illegally exporting information to foreign countries via his graduate students and a trip to China, it sent a message to colleges that they need to scrupulously monitor their faculty members' research and their compliance with the often confusing universe of export-control regulations. In…

  16. The Wasps in Court: Argument and Audience in the Athenian Dikasteries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Raymond S.

    In an attempt to explain why Aristotle devotes a substantial part of Book Two of "The Rhetoric" to methods for arousing jurors' emotions, despite stating previously that such emotional appeal is nonessential and unethical, this paper examines the nature of the Athenian jury courts, or dikasteries. It first discusses the historical…

  17. MOOCs for High School: Unlocking Opportunities or Substandard Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    If 2012 was the year of the MOOC--massive open online course--then 2013 was the year the MOOC hype returned to Earth. Largely lost in the coverage in both years, however, was the impact MOOCs might have in high schools. Although the jury is still out on that question, high schools around the country are experimenting with adding MOOCs to their…

  18. The Social Costs of Obesity: A Non-Reactive Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Peter L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The obese face severe discriminatory reactions, leading to low rates of prosocial intervention and devaluation of ability and potential. It is no surprise that the obese adopt negative self-images. Further research should explore how body build influences hiring, job advancement, salary, jury deliberations, and college admissions. (Author)

  19. Innovation That Sticks Case Study Report: Ottawa Catholic School Board. Leading and Learning for Innovation, A Framework for District-Wide Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Education Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    A Canadian Education Association (CEA) Selection Jury chose the Ottawa Catholic School Board (OCSB) out of 35 School District applicants from across Canada to participate in the 2015 "Innovation that Sticks" Case Study Program. From September to December 2015--through an Appreciative Inquiry interview process--the CEA researched how the…

  20. Supreme Court's New Term. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the issues addressed in the 2002 U.S. Supreme Court term, such as the First, Fourth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments, cruel and unusual punishment, sex offender registries, fair housing, cross burning, jury selection, affirmative action, abortion protests, and copyrights and the public domain. (CMK)

  1. The Authority of Truth: Religion and the John Peter Zenger Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, David Paul

    An appreciation of the religious milieu of the John Peter Zenger libel case of 1735 can help explain the nature of the Zenger defense as prepared by Alexander Hamilton, the meaning of the jury's verdict, and the ambiguous legacy of the trial for freedom of expression in the United States. In essence, the case was a disputation on "truth"…

  2. 32 CFR 935.105 - Trial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trial. 935.105 Section 935.105 National Defense... CODE Criminal Actions § 935.105 Trial. (a) If the accused pleads not guilty, he is entitled to a trial... Court considers practicable and necessary to the ends of justice. There is no trial by jury. (b) All...

  3. 32 CFR 935.105 - Trial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trial. 935.105 Section 935.105 National Defense... CODE Criminal Actions § 935.105 Trial. (a) If the accused pleads not guilty, he is entitled to a trial... Court considers practicable and necessary to the ends of justice. There is no trial by jury. (b) All...

  4. 32 CFR 935.105 - Trial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trial. 935.105 Section 935.105 National Defense... CODE Criminal Actions § 935.105 Trial. (a) If the accused pleads not guilty, he is entitled to a trial... Court considers practicable and necessary to the ends of justice. There is no trial by jury. (b) All...

  5. 32 CFR 935.105 - Trial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trial. 935.105 Section 935.105 National Defense... CODE Criminal Actions § 935.105 Trial. (a) If the accused pleads not guilty, he is entitled to a trial... Court considers practicable and necessary to the ends of justice. There is no trial by jury. (b) All...

  6. 32 CFR 935.105 - Trial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trial. 935.105 Section 935.105 National Defense... CODE Criminal Actions § 935.105 Trial. (a) If the accused pleads not guilty, he is entitled to a trial... Court considers practicable and necessary to the ends of justice. There is no trial by jury. (b) All...

  7. Federal Rule of Evidence 412 and Military Rule of Evidence 412: Are They Serving Their Purpose?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    victim’s prior extramarital, premarital or unconventional sexual activity distracts the jury to such a degree that the victim becomes the person on...asking witness who cohabited with complainant a general narrative question about a babysitting incident in which victim allegedly failed to carry out her

  8. Balancing Act: First and Sixth Amendment Rights in High-Profile Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, James H.

    2005-01-01

    We often hear that democracy is not a spectator sport. This is certainly true of trial by jury, a cornerstone of our democracy, which depends on the willingness of Americans from all walks of life to devote themselves to the difficult work of determining another person's guilt or innocence of a crime. But the work of those citizens selected to…

  9. Youth Court: A Community Solution for Embracing At-Risk Youth. A National Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Sarah S.; Jurich, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    Youth court, also called teen court, peer jury, or student court, is an alternative to the traditional juvenile justice system and school disciplinary proceedings that empower youth and communities to take an active role in addressing the early stages of youth delinquency. The program provides communities with an opportunity to ensure immediate…

  10. Journal of College Reading and Learning, Volume XVIII, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hear, Michael F., Ed.; Knowles, Ramona, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Drawn from the proceedings of the 1985 Western College Reading and Learning Association, as well as articles submitted for juried selection, the papers in this journal issue focus on reading, learning assistance, developmental education, and tutorial services at the college level. Titles and authors of the papers include (1) "Reaching New Heights:…

  11. Selected Papers from the 13th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    The papers in this collection are the 15 best papers from the thirteenth International Conference on College Teaching and Learning. They represent a cross-section of nearly 300 presentations, selected by juried review from 40 submitted for consideration. The papers are: (1) The Use of Hybrid Type Educational Digital Entities in University…

  12. Applications of Computer Conferencing to Teacher Education and Human Resource Development. Proceedings from an International Symposium on Computer Conferencing (Columbus, Ohio, June 13-15, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Aaron J., Ed.

    This document contains the texts of seven invited presentations and six juried papers from a symposium on the uses of computer conferencing in teacher education and human resource development. The invited presentations include the following: "Computer Conferencing in the Context of Theory and Practice of Distance Education" (Michael G. Moore); "An…

  13. An Empirical Study of Post-Branzburg Cases Involving Newsmen's Privilege.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehra, Achal

    Nine years after the 1972 Supreme Court ruling in *Branzburg v. Hayes" that journalists enjoy no constitutional privilege to withhold the names of sources and to conceal information from grand jury proceedings, a study was conducted to determine the courts' attitudes toward journalists' privilege and to test commonly held beliefs about its…

  14. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  15. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  16. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  17. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  18. An Application of the Poisson Race Model to Confidence Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkle, Edgar C.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2006-01-01

    In tasks as diverse as stock market predictions and jury deliberations, a person's feelings of confidence in the appropriateness of different choices often impact that person's final choice. The current study examines the mathematical modeling of confidence calibration in a simple dual-choice task. Experiments are motivated by an accumulator…

  19. Reading the Riot Act: Rhetoric, Psychology, and Counter-Revolutionary Discourse in Shays's Rebellion, 1786-1787

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engels, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    In 1786, backcountry Massachusetts farmers, fed up with government policies favoring aristocratic elites, marched on courts to bar the entry of judges and juries. Enacting a long-standing tradition known to colonists as a "Regulation," the farmers' movement became known as Shays's Rebellion. Erupting in the turbulent days following the…

  20. Cutting Edge Books: The Impact of Digital Books on Public Library Acquisitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The book has made the transition to the digital age; that much is certain. However, the jury is still out on what form or forms the book of the future will take and how libraries will adapt. This article is a look at the impact of digital books on public library acquisitions, including available formats, purchasing considerations, functional…

  1. WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO SELL FEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALBRACHT, JAMES J.

    TO DETERMINE THE VOCATIONAL COMPETENCIES NECESSARY FOR THE PERFORMANCE OF NINE ESSENTIAL SALES ACTIVITIES IN THE FEED INDUSTRY, A JURY OF 24 FEED DEALERS, SALES TRAINING DIRECTORS, AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION RESEARCHERS, AND BUSINESS EDUCATION RESEARCHERS MADE "YES" AND "NO" DETERMINATIONS FOR 40 COMPETENCIES. THE NUMBER OF COMPETENCIES CONSIDERED…

  2. College Students' Conceptualizations of Deficits Involved in Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musso, Mandi W.; Barker, Alyse A.; Proto, Daniel A.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2012-01-01

    Precedential rulings in recent capital murder trials may, in some cases, leave it up to a jury to determine whether or not an individual meets criteria for an intellectual disability (ID) and should be spared from the death penalty. Despite the potential for misconceptions about ID to bias decisions, few empirical studies have examined the…

  3. The Effect of Using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on Developing English Majors' Oral Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdallah, Mahmoud Mohammad Sayed

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on developing first-year English majors' oral communication skills. Based on literature review and related studies, a list of 20 oral communication skills was prepared and displayed over a panel of jury members to select…

  4. Cutting Edge Books: The Impact of Digital Books on Public Library Acquisitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The book has made the transition to the digital age; that much is certain. However, the jury is still out on what form or forms the book of the future will take and how libraries will adapt. This article is a look at the impact of digital books on public library acquisitions, including available formats, purchasing considerations, functional…

  5. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... statement correctly states his or her opinion or knowledge concerning the matters in question. ... UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO DEBARMENT AND..., the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the courts...

  6. 39 CFR 959.17 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE PRIVATE EXPRESS... governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the District courts of the United States shall govern. However, such rules may be relaxed to the extent that the presiding officer deems...

  7. United States Attorney Prosecutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Instruction - 3.04 Post Office Box 33695 30 Fort Lewia , Washington 98433-0695 (206) 967-4601 1 2 GOVERNMENT’S REQUESTED JURY INSTRUCTION NO. 3 4 The...33695 30 JQUASH BENCH WARRANT Fort Lewia , Washington 98433-0695 ,PAGE 1 (206) 967-4601 1 MAGISTRATE BURGESS 2 3 UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT WESTERN

  8. 41 CFR 105-60.601 - Purpose and scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the General Services Administration in response to subpoenas or similar demands issued in judicial or... instructions applies to responses to subpoenas or demands issued by the Congress or in Federal grand jury... by Present or Former General Services Administration Employees in Response to Subpoenas or...

  9. 41 CFR 105-60.602 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... General Services Administration Employees in Response to Subpoenas or Similar Demands in Judicial or... because of that person's official status. (c) Demand means any subpoena, order, or similar demand for the... subpoenas or demands in Federal grand jury proceedings, and served upon a present or former GSA employee....

  10. 32 CFR 144.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.3 Definitions. (a) Armed Forces. The Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Marine Corps. (b) State. Includes the 50 United States, U.S... Forces. Those forces whose primary missions are to participate in combat and the integral...

  11. HeinOnline: An Online Archive of Law Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marisa, Richard J.

    Law is grounded in the past, in the decisions and reasoning of generations of lawyers, judges, juries, and professors. Ready access to this history is vital to solid legal research, and yet, until 2000, much of it was buried in vast collections of aging paper journals. HeinOnline is a new online archive of law journals. Development of HeinOnline…

  12. The Communitarian Function of Court-Martial Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    the law through appropriate legislation. See Martin A. Kotler , Reappraising the Jury’s Role as Finder of Fact, 20 GA. L. REv. 123, 166-172 (1985). This...Military Appeals, inserted into the congressional record at the request of Congressman Philip J. Philbin. In his letter, Judge Ferguson states of the

  13. An Application of the Poisson Race Model to Confidence Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkle, Edgar C.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2006-01-01

    In tasks as diverse as stock market predictions and jury deliberations, a person's feelings of confidence in the appropriateness of different choices often impact that person's final choice. The current study examines the mathematical modeling of confidence calibration in a simple dual-choice task. Experiments are motivated by an accumulator…

  14. By Unanimous Decision? A Second Look at Consensus in the Film Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Erwin; Popik, Zuzanna

    2014-01-01

    This article reports analyses of the verdicts of various film organizations that annually present awards to motion pictures and investigates whether they award/nominate the same movies in a given year. This research disputes previous findings that reported a high level of agreement between those juries, by the means of reliability analysis and the…

  15. Army Science and Technology Master Plan, Fiscal Year 1997 - Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    mission and reduced pilot susceptibility to in- dual use potential. jury by laser , directed energy, or other sources in hostile electromagnetic...flame/thermal, chemical /biological, directed energy, surveillance, and environmental haz- The goal of soldier systems modernization is to ards. Combat...weapons (i.e., conventional, chemical , bio- logical, or directed energy systems). . Combat Health Support Medical research provides vaccines, pretreat

  16. Reading the Riot Act: Rhetoric, Psychology, and Counter-Revolutionary Discourse in Shays's Rebellion, 1786-1787

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engels, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    In 1786, backcountry Massachusetts farmers, fed up with government policies favoring aristocratic elites, marched on courts to bar the entry of judges and juries. Enacting a long-standing tradition known to colonists as a "Regulation," the farmers' movement became known as Shays's Rebellion. Erupting in the turbulent days following the…

  17. 32 CFR 144.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.3 Definitions. (a) Armed Forces. The Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Marine Corps. (b) State. Includes the 50 United States, U.S... active Military Service of the United States; Includes full-time training duty, annual training duty...

  18. 32 CFR 144.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.3 Definitions. (a) Armed Forces. The Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Marine Corps. (b) State. Includes the 50 United States, U.S... active Military Service of the United States; Includes full-time training duty, annual training duty...

  19. 16 CFR 1115.6 - Reporting of unreasonable risk of serious injury or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... While such information shall not trigger a per se reporting requirement, in its evaluation of whether a... shall attach considerable significance if such firm learns that a court or jury has determined that one... evaluation of whether a subject firm is required to file a report under the provisions of section 15 of the...

  20. Employing a Mock Trial in a Criminology Course: An Applied Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepelak, Norma J.

    1996-01-01

    Recounts a criminology class exercise that consisted of staging a mock trial using the murders from Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" as source material. Students research the case and role play various lawyers, jury members, and witnesses. Identifies and discusses four educational objectives attainable through the staging of mock trials. (MJP)

  1. 49 CFR 9.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Research and Special Programs Administration. (j) Any DOT operating administration established after the..., state, or local court (including grand jury proceedings), any administrative proceeding pending before any federal, state, or local agency, or any legislative proceeding pending before any state or local...

  2. Representation of Legal Knowledge for Conceptual Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, George R.; deBessonet, Cary G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes traditional legal information retrieval systems--Juris, Lexis, Westlaw--and several new rule-based, knowledge-based, legal knowledge reasoning, and analytical legal information systems--Waterman and Peterson's Legal Decisionmaking System, Hafner's Legal Information Retrieval System, McCarty's TAXMAN, and the deBessonet representation of…

  3. 39 CFR 954.16 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the courts of the... deposition, the time and the place, and the name and address of the witness whose deposition is desired, the... the deposition will specify the time and place thereof, the name of the witness, the person before...

  4. 39 CFR 954.16 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the courts of the... deposition, the time and the place, and the name and address of the witness whose deposition is desired, the... the deposition will specify the time and place thereof, the name of the witness, the person before...

  5. 28 CFR 21.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-trial conferences, depositions, and coroners' inquests. It does not include information or investigative... the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. (d) Pre-trial conference. A conference between the... trial, hearing or grand jury proceeding has been scheduled but prior to the witness' actual appearance...

  6. 32 CFR 750.32 - Suits under the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or omission complained of occurred. 28 U.S.C. 1402. (b) Jury trial. There is no right to trial by... time suit is filed shall be responsible for providing necessary assistance to the Department of Justice... period of time. Every effort shall be made to preserve files, documents, and other tangible evidence that...

  7. 39 CFR 954.16 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the courts of the... deposition, the time and the place, and the name and address of the witness whose deposition is desired, the... the deposition will specify the time and place thereof, the name of the witness, the person before...

  8. Effects of an Evidence-Based Text on Scepticism, Methodological Reasoning, Values and Juror Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leshowitz, Barry; Okun, Morris

    2011-01-01

    Research in social cognition laboratories and in simulated legal settings demonstrates that people often do not understand the statistical properties of evidence and are unable to detect scientifically flawed studies. In a mock jury study, we examined the effects of an evidence-based transcript on scepticism towards evidence obtained in flawed…

  9. 12 CFR 911.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; and information and documents created or obtained by, or in the memory of, a current or former Finance... AVAILABILITY OF UNPUBLISHED INFORMATION § 911.1 Definitions. As used in this part: Legal proceeding means any administrative, civil, or criminal proceeding, including a grand jury or discovery proceeding, in which neither...

  10. 12 CFR 911.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...; and information and documents created or obtained by, or in the memory of, a current or former Finance... AVAILABILITY OF UNPUBLISHED INFORMATION § 911.1 Definitions. As used in this part: Legal proceeding means any administrative, civil, or criminal proceeding, including a grand jury or discovery proceeding, in which neither...

  11. Research on Combat Selection and Special Forces Manpower Problems - Status Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1963-01-01

    c6aftellAtits ,of’" reactions which appeared to have potential for differentiating the pooe from the adequate fighter--malingering, lack of social ... responsibility , an attit:le of martyrdom, unauiti whdrawal, hostiity fear of •i.>Xni :.iJury., uzeasiness over the unknown, psychotic-like reactions

  12. Secondary School Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Joseph; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents five complete lesson plans for activities that teach high school students about search and seizure, due process, freedom of assembly, right to counsel, and other individual liberties, through the use of case study techniques, a jury simulation, the analysis of historical material, and discussions. (JDH)

  13. Out of Sight, Out of Mind/Out of Mind, Out of Site: Schooling and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a diagnostic term now indelibly scored on the public psyche. In some quarters, a diagnosis of ADHD is regarded with derision. In others it is welcomed with relief. Despite intense multidisciplinary research, the jury is still out with regard to the "truth" of ADHD. Not surprisingly, the…

  14. The Importance of Nonverbal Communication in the Courtroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remland, Martin S.

    Although a relatively new area of scientific study, theory and research on nonverbal communication in the courtroom has produced important findings for students and practitioners in five key areas: voire dire and jury analysis; opening and closing statements; client demeanor and direct examination; cross-examination; and judge demeanor and…

  15. Beyond the Schoolhouse Door: Educating the Political Animal in Jefferson's Little Republics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotts, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Jefferson believed that citizenship must exhibit republican virtue. While education was necessary in a republican polity, it alone was insufficient in sustaining a revolutionary civic spirit. This paper examines Jefferson's expectations for citizen virtue, specifically related to militia and jury service in his "little republics."…

  16. Journal of College Reading and Learning, Volume XVIII, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hear, Michael F., Ed.; Knowles, Ramona, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Drawn from the proceedings of the 1985 Western College Reading and Learning Association, as well as articles submitted for juried selection, the papers in this journal issue focus on reading, learning assistance, developmental education, and tutorial services at the college level. Titles and authors of the papers include (1) "Reaching New Heights:…

  17. Death Penalty Decisions: Instruction Comprehension, Attitudes, and Decision Mediators.

    PubMed

    Patry, Marc W; Penrod, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of this research was to empirically evaluate a set of assumptions, advanced in the Supreme Court's ruling in Buchanan v. Angelone (1998), about jury comprehension of death penalty instructions. Further, this research examined the use of evidence in capital punishment decision making by exploring underlying mediating factors upon which death penalty decisions may be based. Manipulated variables included the type of instructions and several variations of evidence. Study 1 was a paper and pencil study of 245 undergraduate mock jurors. The experimental design was an incomplete 4×2×2×2×2 factorial model resulting in 56 possible conditions. Manipulations included four different types of instructions, presence of a list of case-specific mitigators to accompany the instructions, and three variations in the case facts: age of the defendant, bad prior record, and defendant history of emotional abuse. Study 2 was a fully-crossed 2×2×2×2×2 experiment with four deliberating mock juries per cell. Manipulations included jury instructions (original or revised), presence of a list of case-specific mitigators, defendant history of emotional abuse, bad prior record, and heinousness of the crime. The sample of 735 jury-eligible participants included 130 individuals who identified themselves as students. Participants watched one of 32 stimulus videotapes based on a replication of a capital sentencing hearing. The present findings support previous research showing low comprehension of capital penalty instructions. Further, we found that higher instruction comprehension was associated with higher likelihood of issuing life sentence decisions. The importance of instruction comprehension is emphasized in a social cognitive model of jury decision making at the sentencing phase of capital cases.

  18. Death Penalty Decisions: Instruction Comprehension, Attitudes, and Decision Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Patry, Marc W.; Penrod, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of this research was to empirically evaluate a set of assumptions, advanced in the Supreme Court’s ruling in Buchanan v. Angelone (1998), about jury comprehension of death penalty instructions. Further, this research examined the use of evidence in capital punishment decision making by exploring underlying mediating factors upon which death penalty decisions may be based. Manipulated variables included the type of instructions and several variations of evidence. Study 1 was a paper and pencil study of 245 undergraduate mock jurors. The experimental design was an incomplete 4×2×2×2×2 factorial model resulting in 56 possible conditions. Manipulations included four different types of instructions, presence of a list of case-specific mitigators to accompany the instructions, and three variations in the case facts: age of the defendant, bad prior record, and defendant history of emotional abuse. Study 2 was a fully-crossed 2×2×2×2×2 experiment with four deliberating mock juries per cell. Manipulations included jury instructions (original or revised), presence of a list of case-specific mitigators, defendant history of emotional abuse, bad prior record, and heinousness of the crime. The sample of 735 jury-eligible participants included 130 individuals who identified themselves as students. Participants watched one of 32 stimulus videotapes based on a replication of a capital sentencing hearing. The present findings support previous research showing low comprehension of capital penalty instructions. Further, we found that higher instruction comprehension was associated with higher likelihood of issuing life sentence decisions. The importance of instruction comprehension is emphasized in a social cognitive model of jury decision making at the sentencing phase of capital cases. PMID:24072981

  19. "Typical Clinton: brazen it out".

    PubMed

    Upchurch, C M; O'Connell, D C

    2000-07-01

    Ten excerpts of both President Clinton's Grand Jury Testimony of August 17, 1998 and of each of two interviews with Hillary Rodham Clinton (Today Show, January 27, 1998; Good Morning America, January 28, 1998) were analyzed. In all of them, the topic under discussion was the President's insistence on his innocence in the Lewinsky case. Comparisons between the President and First Lady revealed long and short within-speaker pauses, respectively. His replies to questions average more than twice the length of hers. Comparisons were also made with other speech genres, including modern presidential inaugural rhetoric. In particular, President Clinton's statement of his innocence at the conclusion of an educational press conference on January 26, 1998 and his prepared statement at the beginning of his Grand Jury Testimony were found to vary notably from all the other corpora. Both are characterized by several of Ekman's (1985, p. 286) behavioral cues for the detection of deception.

  20. I like me if you like me: on the interpersonal modulation and regulation of preadolescents' state self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Thomaes, Sander; Reijntjes, Albert; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Bushman, Brad J; Poorthuis, Astrid; Telch, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    This experiment tested whether peer approval and disapproval experiences can cause immediate change in children's state self-esteem. Children's narcissistic traits and evaluator perceived popularity were examined as potential moderators. A total of 333 preadolescents (M = 10.8 years) completed personal profiles on the Internet that were ostensibly judged by a jury consisting of popular and unpopular peers. Participants randomly received negative, neutral, or positive feedback from the jury. Next, they could examine the feedback that each individual judge gave them. As expected, peer disapproval decreased self-esteem, especially in children high in narcissism. In contrast, peer approval increased self-esteem. Moreover, disapproved children's self-esteem recovery was dependent on the extent to which they subsequently viewed positive feedback from popular judges. These findings support sociometer theory.

  1. A mock juror investigation of blame attribution in the punishment of hate crime perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Robert J; Clark, John W; Kehn, Andre; Burks, Alixandra C; Wechsler, Hayley J

    2014-01-01

    We examined blame attribution as a moderator of perceptions of hate crimes against gay, African American, and transgender victims. Participants were 510 Texas jury panel members. Results of vignette-based crime scenarios showed that victim blame displayed significant negative, and perpetrator blame significant positive, effects on sentencing recommendations. Also as hypothesized, victim and perpetrator blame moderated the effect of support for hate crime legislation. Interaction patterns suggested that both types of blame attribution influence sentencing recommendations, but only for participants disagreeing with hate crime legislation. Three-way interactions with victim type also emerged, indicating that the effects of both types of blame attribution show particular influences when the victim is gay, as opposed to transgender or African American. Implications for attribution theory, hate crime policy, and jury selection are discussed.

  2. Quantitative risk assessments as evidence in civil litigation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, V.R.

    1988-12-01

    Those who prepare quantitative risk assessments do not always appreciate that those assessments might be used as evidence in civil litigation. This paper suggests that litigation attorneys, judges, and juries be regarded as audiences to whom the information in the risk assessment must be communicated. The way that a risk assessment is prepared can affect significantly whether litigation is brought at all, the resolution of evidentiary motions involving the risk assessment, as well as the ultimate outcome of the litigation. This paper discusses certain procedural and evidentiary aspects of the civil litigation process in the hope that a better understanding of that process might lead to the preparation of risk assessments that are more adequately understood by juries, judges, and litigants.

  3. [Beauty judgment: review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Faure, Jacques; Bolender, Yves

    2014-03-01

    Esthetic judgments are surely subjective, but as surely, that does not preclude them being studied objectively through rigorous scientific methods. The factual basis of a science of esthetics is not to settle whether some person or image is "objectively beautiful" but rather to determine whether some representative set or sets of individuals judge or experience him/her/it as beautiful or unattractive. The aim of this paper is to review the definitional, theoretical and methodological aspects pertaining to the perception of facial/dental attractiveness by a group of representative individuals. The first part lays down the basic principles of the perception of facial/dental attractiveness: the perception involves a jury, a field of investigation and a test providing quantitative data; the following general determinants of beauty perception are reviewed: the average morphology, the judge's cultural background, the numerology, the judge's ethnical origin. Indirect determinants are the dentition, the osseous architecture and the muscular envelope. Some disruptive factors might alter the judges' facial perception. They might be qualified as either peripheral to the face or psycho-social factors. Peripheral factors include hair style and color, skin hue, wrinkles, lips color... Psycho-social factors cover the personality of the subject being evaluated, his/her intelligence or behavior. The second part deals specifically with the methodology used to determine facial attractiveness and to correlate this latter with a specific morphology. Typically such a study aims to determine average esthetic preferences for some set of visual displays among a particular jury, given a specific task to judge esthetic quality or qualities. The sample being studied, the displays, the jury or jurys, the rating procedure must all be specified prior to collecting data. A specific emphasis will be given to the rating process and the associated morphometrics, the ultimate goal being to

  4. Use of Tourniquets and their Effects on Limb Function in the Modern Combat Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    hemorrhage. Perhaps genetics may affect tolerance to tourniquet ischemia -reperfusion, which is also widely variable. Also, environmental factors, such as...hemorrhage control possibly shortening ischemia time, one factor in decreasing tourniquet risk. Successful placement of a pressure dressing was common...jury medical history or peripheral vascular status of the casualty may be unknown. The ischemia -reperfusion effects on the injured limb caused by

  5. Law Schools Customize Degrees to Students' Taste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Going to law school to get a law degree has become a little like going to an ice-cream parlor for a scoop of vanilla. Plenty of people still do it, but many schools' brochures--like the elaborate flavor-and-topping menus on ice-cream parlor walls--now tempt them with something different, something more. Law students can have their "juris doctor"…

  6. Present State Iof Holography In Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masane; Hayashi, Yuzo; Yamamoto, Y.

    1983-07-01

    In 1948,Dr. Dennis Gabor introduced the theory of holography as "the optical recording of the object wave formed by the resulting interference pattern of two mutually coherent, component light beams." Through the studies of enumerous practical applications, the theory of holography was further advanced to be used in conjunction with the laser beam to better serve a more practical minded industry. Such developments were introduced and engineered by Dr. Emmett Leith and Dr. Juris Upatnieks in 1962.

  7. Physicist falls foul of US export law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-10-01

    A retired US plasma physicist is seeking to overturn his conviction last month of offences under the American Arms Export Control Act, which prohibits the export, without a government licence, of technology and data to foreign nationals or nations. A jury in Knoxville, Tennessee, found JReece Roth, 70, guilty of illegally exporting technical information about a military project to develop plasma technology for guiding spyplanes that operate as weapons or surveillance devices.

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Opinion Dynamics in Small Social Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    Socially cohesive groups can even escalate their commitment in response to failures, as has been witnessed in socially cohesive laboratory groups (Dietz... corporate committees, and juries [8, 4]. Mathematical mod- els of small group decision making have been proposed in social science disciplines such as...particular process or context. A better approach argues for the relevance of an analogy with a more developed context such as corporations , social

  9. Annual Report to Congress on Foreign Economic Collection and Industrial Espionage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    accused of stealing adhesive formulas and innovations from Avery Dennison Corporation with the help of an Avery Dennison employee. This case marks...United States. Avery Dennison : Target of Trade Secret Theft In April 1999, two Taiwan executives and a Taiwan company were found guilty of violating...jury verdict in US District Court, Cleveland awarded Avery Dennison at least $40 million in damages in a civil case against Four Pillars. The judge

  10. Effect of Human and Sheep Lung Orientation on Primary Blast Injury Induced by Single Blast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    may be injured by m ore than one of these mechanisms in any given event. Primary blast in juries ( PBI ) are exclusively caused by the blast...overpressure. A PBI usually affects air-containing organs such as t he lung, ears and gastrointestinal tract. Secon dary blast injuries are caused by...orientation on blast injuries predicted in human and sheep models. From th is study, it is predicted that the greatest reduction in lung PBI may be

  11. Pneumatosis Intestinalis in Patients With Severe Thermal Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    diagnosis ( lactate and base deficit levels, vasopressor use, and enteral feeding rate), intraoperative data (findings, extent and lo- cation of PI and...rate of tube feeding . Enteral nutrition was initiated at a median of 3 days (2.5–4.5 days) postin- jury in nonsurvivors and 3 days (2–5.25 days) in...PI associated with intestinal infarction. Nonsurvivors had lower base deficits (P .02), higher lactate levels (P .05), and required vasopressor

  12. Twenty First Century Space Propulsion Study Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    find the equipment and funding to replicate the original work. The jury is still ont on cold fusion , although hope is fading fast as attempts to...conclusively demonstrated that the "fifth force" doesn’t exist. That is the way scientific research should work. The announcement of possible " cold ... fusion " produced lots of initial skepticism and scorn from the scientific community, but at least a portion of the scientists were willing and able to

  13. Law Schools Customize Degrees to Students' Taste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Going to law school to get a law degree has become a little like going to an ice-cream parlor for a scoop of vanilla. Plenty of people still do it, but many schools' brochures--like the elaborate flavor-and-topping menus on ice-cream parlor walls--now tempt them with something different, something more. Law students can have their "juris doctor"…

  14. Absence of physician recourse in malpractice litigation--malicious prosecution.

    PubMed

    Spector, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    The courts are protective of the plaintiff's rights under law to seek redress in the court by placing the facts of their allegations before a judge or jury. Because the avenue to the court is through representation and advocacy, the courts equally are protective of the agent of that representation, the attorney. To date, no physician who has been sued for medical malpractice in Louisiana has brought a successful malicious prosecution claim against the plaintiff or his attorney.

  15. Advances in Surgical Care: Management of Severe Burn Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    tube is often initiated within 48 hrs after in- jury and is continued during flight using a paired nasogastric tube to ensure gas- tric decompression...Advances in surgical care : Management of severe burn injury Christopher E. White, MD, FACS; Evan M. Renz, MD, FACS I n the United States, 500,000 peo...States, most civilian burn patients can be transported from the site of injury to a definitive care facility within a few hours (4). In contrast to

  16. Using a Mock Trial Method to Enhance Effectiveness of Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing.

    PubMed

    White, Cindy T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional teaching methodologies may deter adult learning because of passive the exchange of knowledge. Teaching to the "evidence" substantiating best practice requires a systematic approach to transfer knowledge into clinical inquiry. A mock trial simulated role-play activity was selected to show the value of learning through active engagement. The nurse "defendant" was challenged to substantiate practice based on the evidence. Seminar participants (the jury) scrutinized testimony through deliberation before delivering the final verdict.

  17. Burn Treatment: Annual Research Progress Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-30

    have remained the mainstay of a strain-differentiating system . METHOD In two previous years, various experiments aimed at characterizing the increasing...indication of the magnitude and seriousness of thermal in- jury as a military medical problem. A severe burn adversely affects every organ system and presents...severe injury to which man is liable. In fact, recent inquiries suggesting that computer modeling can substitute for human or animal studies provide

  18. Robust Stability and Performance for Linear Systems with Structured and Unstructured Uncertainties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Pick Problem in Circuit and System Theory ," Circuir Theory and Appl., vol. 9, pp. 177-187, 1981. [59] E.I. Jury, "Inners and Stability of Dynamic Systems...unstructured uncertainty has been receiving attention much longer and has produced many interesting results, notably the H. theory and the LQG/LTR theory ...stability 6 robustness. It wilL be shown that the aforementioned synthesis task is closely related to singular perturbation theory . The next result

  19. Environmental Impact to the Chemical Signature Emanating from Buried Unexploded Ordnance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    from soil moisture content and precipitation/evaporation. The Behavior Assessment Model was modified for the case of buried chemicals (Jury et al...indicates that a Landmuir or Freundlich model probably better represents the sorption isotherm than a linear one. When fitted to a Freundlich , the DNT data...water partition coefficient must be modeled with a Freundlich isotherm rather than a linear one, and the soil- water partition coefficient must be

  20. Alcohol in Head-Injured Aircrew Evaluated by the Aeromedical Consult Service, 1982-2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-23

    Intoxication 15 Frequency of Alcohol Use Screening 16 Alcohol Treatment Program Referrals 16 Screening Recommendations 17 HEAD IN JURIES 18 Traumatic...46 xi BASELINE ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION 47 ALCOHOL USE AT THE TIME OF INJURY 48 Frequency of Alcohol Assessment by Date of Evaluation 49 BLOOD ALCOHOL... frequency /amount survey had a sensitivity of 80%, and a specificity of 82% for identifying individuals with alcohol dependence. In the same study, the

  1. Could the gunshot be heard?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomer, Paul

    2003-10-01

    Witnesses, friends and family of a man chased through a field by the police, said they heard gunshots. The man chased says that the police shot at him. The police say that no shots were fired. Could the witnesses have heard the gunshots? The main technical issues are source strength and directivity, weather effects on sound propagation, attenuation by forests, sound transmissions through walls, and signal detectability. This paper lays out the material much as the jury heard it.

  2. Pastor on trial for gay ceremony.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    A church jury will hear the case of Rev. Gregory Dell, who performed a "service of holy union" for two gay men at his Broadway United Methodist Church in Chicago. Dell was charged with disobeying the order and discipline of the church. If found guilty, he faces censure, suspension, or removal from his position. Dell, a minister for 28 years, hopes the trial will spur discussion about the church's views on gays.

  3. Delayed Partial Liquid Ventilation Shows no Efficacy in the Treatment of Smoke Inhalation Injury in Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    peak and mean airway pressures, oxygen- ation index, and rate-pressure product (a barotrauma index) and lower lung compliance and arterial partial... airway over alveolar disease in SII. barotrauma; perfluorocarbon; pigs SMOKE INHALATION INJURY (SII) accompanies thermal in- jury in up to 30% of...abnormalities by its damaging effect on airways and air spaces (alveoli and distal bronchioles). Within 2 h of injury, large areas of the airways can be denuded

  4. Notoriety for Profit Legislation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    equal to pay court costs, which shall include jury fees and expenses, court reporter fees, and reasonable per diem for the prosecuting attorneys for the...TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED L.. Notoriety For Profit Legislation THE SIS /IY~fA§W/ / 6. PERFORMING O-4G. REPORT NUMBER * .AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR...I NOV GS IS OBSOLETE SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE ("~en Dae. Entered) NOTORIETY FOR PROFIT LEGISLATION Author: David Alan Hazelip Captain

  5. Physical Performance Assessment in Military Service Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    minimal detectable change scores for the timed “up & go” test, the six-minute walk test, and gait speed in people with Alzheimer disease . Phys Ther...Physical Performance Assessment in Military Service Members Abstract Few established measures allow effective quantification of physical performance...time course of recov- ery associated with these combat in- juries is limited, and limited evidence specifically quantifies the effect of surgical and

  6. Prediction of Mortality and of the Need for Massive Transfusion in Casualties Arriving at Combat Support Hospitals in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    blood ) in casualties arriving at combat support hospitals in Iraq. Methods: Six hundred ninety-two cases were reviewed; 536 had complete data and were...prediction of MASS, RTS as well as the heart rate and blood pressure predominated. The advantage of FTS07 (or original FTS) over RTS is the former’s ease of...computation. Key Words: Triage, Wounds and in- juries, War, Military personnel, Blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale Score, Outcome and process

  7. Ten Years of War: A Characterization of Craniomaxillofacial Injuries Incurred During Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE J Trauma Acute Care Surg Volume 73, Number 6, Supplement 5 S453 From the Dental and Trauma Research Detachment (R.K.C., A.S.-J., J.W...injuries, corneal abrasions , tympanic mem- brane ruptures, and nonbattle-related injuries were also excluded. The study database was maintained under data...address intracranial in- juries or isolated tympanic membrane ruptures and corneal abrasions . Although these injuries are exceedingly common and deserve

  8. Cast Saw Burns: Evaluation of Simple Techniques for Reducing the Risk of Thermal Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    without risk of thermal and abrasive injury to patients. This study investigates the use of readily available supplies for reducing oscillating saw blade...these procedures. The frequency of thermal and abrasive in- juries related to cast saws has been evaluated in the lit- erature previously and occurred...rate of thermal and abrasive injuries from cast saws has been re- ported in the literature previously at 0.72% in a single in- stitution. Lawsuits in

  9. A Review of the Treatment of Underwater Blast Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    contents, abdominal distention, retention of bronchial secret -ons, sepsis or shock incident to hypo- volemia and serious wounds (56, 58). latrogenic factors... techniques (76). This paper will outline the lesions and clinical signs common to blast in- jury and present the therapeutic procedures that have been used...seen in acute blast deaths (12, 49). Injury to the bronchial wall is frequently evident even in milder forms of injury. The mucous membrane is

  10. Winning the War by Winning the Peace: Strategy for Conflict and Post-Conflict in the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Bosnia, Sierra Leone , Congo, and Haiti, as well as upcoming ones like Sudan, such interventions are overwhelming our national security apparatus. Unless...civilian counterparts is not a long-termstrategy for success." Mr. Jaque Grinberg . The UN, according to Mr. Grinberg , "has a crucial role to play in...leaders, a changing regional dynamic, and international commitment. Mr. Grinberg concludes, nonetheless, that "the jury is still out." The UN presence has

  11. One angry woman: Anger expression increases influence for men, but decreases influence for women, during group deliberation.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Jessica M; Peter-Hagene, Liana C

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether expressing anger increases social influence for men, but diminishes social influence for women, during group deliberation. In a deception paradigm, participants believed they were engaged in a computer-mediated mock jury deliberation about a murder case. In actuality, the interaction was scripted. The script included 5 other mock jurors who provided verdicts and comments in support of the verdicts; 4 agreed with the participant and 1 was a "holdout" dissenter. Holdouts expressed their opinions with no emotion, anger, or fear and had either male or female names. Holdouts exerted no influence on participants' opinions when they expressed no emotion or fear. Participants' confidence in their own verdict dropped significantly, however, after male holdouts expressed anger. Yet, anger expression undermined female holdouts: Participants became significantly more confident in their original verdicts after female holdouts expressed anger-even though they were expressing the exact same opinion and emotion as the male holdouts. Mediation analyses revealed that participants drew different inferences from male versus female anger, which created a gender gap in influence during group deliberation. The current study has implications for group decisions in general, and jury deliberations in particular, by suggesting that expressing anger might lead men to gain influence, but women to lose influence over others (even when making identical arguments). These diverging consequences might result in women potentially having less influence on societally important decisions than men, such as jury verdicts.

  12. Innocent until Primed: Mock Jurors' Racially Biased Response to the Presumption of Innocence

    PubMed Central

    Young, Danielle M.; Levinson, Justin D.; Sinnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that crime concepts can activate attentional bias to Black faces. This study investigates the possibility that some legal concepts hold similar implicit racial cues. Presumption of innocence instructions, a core legal principle specifically designed to eliminate bias, may instead serve as an implicit racial cue resulting in attentional bias. Methodology/Principal findings The experiment was conducted in a courtroom with participants seated in the jury box. Participants first watched a video of a federal judge reading jury instructions that contained presumption of innocence instructions, or matched length alternative instructions. Immediately following this video a dot-probe task was administered to assess the priming effect of the jury instructions. Presumption of innocence instructions, but not the alternative instructions, led to significantly faster response times to Black faces when compared with White faces. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that the core principle designed to ensure fairness in the legal system actually primes attention for Black faces, indicating that this supposedly fundamental protection could trigger racial stereotypes. PMID:24643050

  13. Comparison of different voice samples for perceptual analysis.

    PubMed

    Revis, J; Giovanni, A; Wuyts, F; Triglia, J

    1999-01-01

    Choice of voice sample material can influence perceptual judgments by a jury. The twofold purpose of this study was first to validate the pertinence of a sustained vowel for perceptual voice analysis in French speakers and second to test the hypothesis that use of only the stabilized portion of the vowel would lead to underestimation of dysphonia. Voice samples were recorded in 60 dysphonic patients and 20 normal controls. Three different sample materials were obtained for each subject, i.e. connected speech, a sustained vowel including both the initial and stable portion (complete sustained vowel), and a sustained vowel including only the stable portion (stabilized sustained vowel). The jury was composed of 7 experienced listeners. Jury consistency was measured as a percentage of agreeing judgments for the same subject. No difference in consistency was observed using the three sample materials. Judgments on stabilized sustained vowels were confirmed as less severe than judgments on connected speech. Judgments on complete sustained vowels were comparable to judgments on connected speech.

  14. Impact of biased scores on ranking in bipartite competition networks and inference of modular structure via generalized modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Gyuhyeon; Park, Juyong

    2017-02-01

    In the common jury-contestant competition format, a jury consisting of multiple judges grade contestants on their performances to determine their ranking. Unlike in another common competition format where two contestants play a head-to-head match to produce the winner such as in football or basketball, the objectivity of judges are often called into question, potentially undermining the public's trust in the fairness of the competition. In this work we show, by modeling the jury-contestant competition format as a weighted bipartite network, how one can identify biased scores and how they impact the competition and its structure. Analyzing the prestigious International Chopin Piano Competition of 2015 as an example with a well-publicized scoring controversy, we show that the presence of even a very small fraction of biased edges can gravely distort our inference of the network structure —in the example a single biased edge is shown to lead to an incorrect “solution” that also wrongly appears to be robust exclusively, dominating other reasonable solutions— highlighting the importance of bias detection and elimination in network inference. In the process our work also presents a modified modularity measure for the one-mode projection of weighted complete bipartite networks.

  15. Metrical expectations from preceding prosody influence perception of lexical stress

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meredith; Salverda, Anne Pier; Dilley, Laura C.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Two visual-world experiments tested the hypothesis that expectations based on preceding prosody influence the perception of suprasegmental cues to lexical stress. The results demonstrate that listeners’ consideration of competing alternatives with different stress patterns (e.g., ‘jury/gi’raffe) can be influenced by the fundamental frequency and syllable timing patterns across material preceding a target word. When preceding stressed syllables distal to the target word shared pitch and timing characteristics with the first syllable of the target word, pictures of alternatives with primary lexical stress on the first syllable (e.g., jury) initially attracted more looks than alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe). This effect was modulated when preceding unstressed syllables had pitch and timing characteristics similar to the initial syllable of the target word, with more looks to alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe) than to those with stressed initial syllables (e.g., jury). These findings suggest that expectations about the acoustic realization of upcoming speech include information about metrical organization and lexical stress, and that these expectations constrain the initial interpretation of suprasegmental stress cues. These distal prosody effects implicate on-line probabilistic inferences about the sources of acoustic-phonetic variation during spoken-word recognition. PMID:25621583

  16. Health care providers and facilities: medical malpractice and tort reform--2005. End of Year Issue Brief.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Andrew

    2005-12-31

    As health care professionals continue to feel the crunch of rising malpractice insurance rates and increased jury awards, medical malpractice remains a priority for acute care professionals. Medical associations claim that rapidly increasing premiums and the declining number of insurers often lead physicians to stop practicing medicine or to relocate. This may lead to a shortage of physicians, particularly physicians who practice high-risk specialties such as neurology. The pressure to retain an adequate supply of health care professionals is particularly acute in rural areas. It is difficult to pinpoint the origins of the escalating cost of medical malpractice coverage. Insurers and physicians claim excessive litigation and overly generous jury awards have hardened the market. Trial lawyers and consumer advocacy groups assert insurance premium rates have not reflected increasing medical inflation or the payouts of jury awards during the last 30 years. The majority of states have some form of basic coverage requirement that medical malpractice insurers must offer. However, because of the complexities and variety of coverage plans, physicians often are unaware that gaps in coverage exist. As of May 2005, the American Medical Association (AMA) has declared a state

  17. Flow Pattern Identification of Horizontal Two-Phase Refrigerant Flow Using Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-31

    averaged εðtÞ hεðtÞiKURT Kurtosis of time averaged εðtÞ hεðtÞiSKEW Skewness of time averaged εðtÞ εðtÞVAR Variance of time averaged εðtÞ ~x...In addition, the time average of εðtÞ and the associated variance, kurtosis , and skewness values are considered. εðtÞ is given by Eq. (2), where Ai...var- iance, hεðtÞiVAR, skewness , hεðtÞiSKEW , and kurtosis , hεðtÞiKURT of εðtÞ using values from the 500 tomograms. hεðtÞi provides a

  18. Intelligent Systems Approaches to Product Sound Quality Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietila, Glenn M.

    As a product market becomes more competitive, consumers become more discriminating in the way in which they differentiate between engineered products. The consumer often makes a purchasing decision based on the sound emitted from the product during operation by using the sound to judge quality or annoyance. Therefore, in recent years, many sound quality analysis tools have been developed to evaluate the consumer preference as it relates to a product sound and to quantify this preference based on objective measurements. This understanding can be used to direct a product design process in order to help differentiate the product from competitive products or to establish an impression on consumers regarding a product's quality or robustness. The sound quality process is typically a statistical tool that is used to model subjective preference, or merit score, based on objective measurements, or metrics. In this way, new product developments can be evaluated in an objective manner without the laborious process of gathering a sample population of consumers for subjective studies each time. The most common model used today is the Multiple Linear Regression (MLR), although recently non-linear Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approaches are gaining popularity. This dissertation will review publicly available published literature and present additional intelligent systems approaches that can be used to improve on the current sound quality process. The focus of this work is to address shortcomings in the current paired comparison approach to sound quality analysis. This research will propose a framework for an adaptive jury analysis approach as an alternative to the current Bradley-Terry model. The adaptive jury framework uses statistical hypothesis testing to focus on sound pairings that are most interesting and is expected to address some of the restrictions required by the Bradley-Terry model. It will also provide a more amicable framework for an intelligent systems approach

  19. Medicolegal Aspects of Iatrogenic Dysphonia and Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ta, Jennifer H; Liu, Yuan F; Krishna, Priya

    2016-01-01

    To examine aspects of litigation involving iatrogenic dysphonia and injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the adult population. Legal database review. Medicolegal judicial system. Jury verdicts and settlement reports listing voice impairment or recurrent laryngeal nerve dysfunction as a primary injury in adult patients were identified in the Westlaw Database. Reports were examined for plaintiff demographics, defendant specialty, procedure performed, rates of settlements and verdicts, monetary awards, primary plaintiff symptoms, and common allegations. A total of 123 jury verdict and settlement reports were identified. General surgeons (24%), otolaryngologists (20%), and anesthesiologists (18%) were involved in the majority of cases. The procedure causing the alleged injury was primarily thyroidectomy (34%), followed by intubation (18%) and spinal instrumentation (10%). The majority of cases (70%) were decided in favor of the defendant. Where monetary awards were recorded, settlements and jury verdicts in favor of the plaintiff ranged between $4250 and $3,000,000, with a mean of $788,713. In addition to voice disturbances, complaints of dyspnea and dysphagia were commonly listed alleged injuries. The only factors associated with plaintiff verdicts were general surgery specialty (odds ratio, 6.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-23.2) and claims of loss of consortium (odds ratio, 8.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-60.7). Dysphonia is a common complication in a number of procedures across multiple specialties. Although the majority of cases are decided in favor or the defendant, payments awarded can be considerable. Awareness of factors involved in these medical malpractice cases can help limit physician liability. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  20. Hearing loss resulting in malpractice litigation: what physicians need to know.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Brian K; Horn, Gayle M; Sewell, Ryan K

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between hearing loss and malpractice litigation. Retrospective study evaluating state and federal civil malpractice litigation pertaining to physician treatment and patient hearing loss in the United States during a 10-year period (2001-2011). A Westlaw search of the computer database Jury Verdicts-All for 2001-2011 was performed using the search terms "hearing loss" and "malpractice." This database includes jury verdicts, judgments, and settlements. Niney-four cases were analyzed. There were 53 verdicts favorable for the defense (56%), 28 verdicts favorable for the plaintiff (30%), and 12 settlements. One case resulted in a mistrial. Settlements ranged from $42,500 to $12,500,000, and verdicts ranged from $0 to $8,784,000. The average payout for adult plaintiffs was less ($549,157) than the payout for minors ($1,349,121). The average payout for a surgical case was $579,098, compared to $960,048 for medical etiology of hearing loss. Otolaryngologists were the most frequently sued treating physician for hearing loss; the second most common defendant was pediatricians (eight cases). In the 13 cases in which an otolaryngologist was sued, there were nine defense verdicts and four verdicts in plaintiffs' favor. The average indemnity for an otolaryngologist was $313,230. Otolaryngologists are successful in most (70%) hearing loss litigation brought against them. This is true regardless of whether the allegations are of medical error or include operative procedures. Pediatric patients received more favorable jury verdicts when litigating malpractice claims than their adult counterparts, and the payouts were highest when there was alleged birth trauma and/or meningitis. Finally, the severity and degree of hearing loss sustained correlate with higher payouts. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Determining legal responsibility in otolaryngology: a review of 44 trials since 2008.

    PubMed

    Svider, Peter F; Husain, Qasim; Kovalerchik, Olga; Mauro, Andrew C; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2013-01-01

    Medicolegal factors contribute to increasing healthcare costs through the direct costs of malpractice litigation, malpractice insurance premiums, and defensive medicine. Malpractice litigation trends are constantly changing as a result of technological innovations and changes in laws. In this study, we examine the most recent legal decisions related to Otolaryngology and characterize the factors responsible for determining legal responsibility. The Westlaw legal database (Thomson Reuters, New York, NY) was used to search for jury verdicts since 2008 in Otolaryngology malpractice cases. The 44 cases included in this analysis were studied to determine the procedures most commonly litigated and progressing to trial, as well as the year, location, alleged cause of malpractice, specialty of co-defendants, and case outcomes. Out of the 44 cases included in this analysis, physicians were not found liable in 36 (81.8%) cases. Rhinologic procedures comprised 38.6% of cases litigated, and rulings were in physicians' favor in 66.7% of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) cases and all non-ESS rhinologic cases. A perceived lack of informed consent was noted in 34.1% of cases. The 8 jury awards averaged $940,000 (range, $148,000-$3,600,000). Otolaryngologists were not found liable in the majority of cases reviewed. Rhinologic surgeries were the most common procedures resulting in litigation. Adenotonsillectomies, thyroidectomies, and airway management are also well-represented. Perceived deficits in informed consent and misdiagnosis were noted in a considerable proportion of otolaryngologic malpractice cases resulting in jury decisions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea: strategies for minimizing liability and enhancing patient safety.

    PubMed

    Svider, Peter F; Pashkova, Anna A; Folbe, Adam J; Eloy, Jean Daniel; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2013-12-01

    To characterize malpractice litigation regarding obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and educate physicians on frequently cited factors. Analysis of the Westlaw legal database. Jury verdict and settlement reports were examined for outcome, awards, patient demographic factors, defendant specialty, and alleged causes of malpractice. Out of 54 identified cases, 33 (61.1%) cases were resolved in favor of defendants, 12 (22.2%) via settlement, and 9 (16.7%) through jury award. Median settlement and jury awards did not significantly differ ($750,000 vs $550,000, P > .50). Age and gender did not affect outcome. Otolaryngologists and anesthesiologists were the most frequently named defendants. Forty-seven cases (87.1%) stemmed from OSA patients who underwent procedures with resultant perioperative adverse events. Common alleged factors included death (48.1%), permanent deficits (42.6%), intraoperative complications (35.2%), requiring additional surgery (25.9%), anoxic brain injury (24.1%), inadequate informed consent (24.1%), inappropriate medication administration (22.2%), and inadequate monitoring (20.4%). Litigation related to OSA is frequently associated with perioperative complications more than nonoperative issues such as a failure to diagnose this disorder. Nonetheless, OSA is considerably underdiagnosed, and special attention should be paid to at-risk patients, including close monitoring of their clinical status and the medications they receive. For patients with diagnosed or suspected OSA with planned operative intervention, whether for OSA or an unrelated issue, a comprehensive informed consent process detailing the factors outlined in this analysis is an effective strategy to increase communication and improve the physician-patient relationship, minimize liability, and ultimately improve patient safety.

  3. Case for the establishment of a code of ethics to govern the frivolous use of forensic biomechanical testimony to resolve legal issues involving alleged work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Schneck, Daniel J

    2007-01-01

    If the legal system is to be an effective means for resolving issues of medical causation, then it is imperative that scientific evidence be presented ethically, fairly, and objectively. This is especially true for cases involving alleged occupational illness and injury. In particular, for a number of years, the railroad industry has been plagued by such allegations, being forced to defend numerous baseless lawsuits claiming work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). These cases are litigated pursuant to the Federal Employers' Liability Act-a congressional act passed in 1908, long before today's workers' compensation statutes were enacted. Because the FELA has no compensatory damages cap, plaintiffs' lawyers, relying on the testimony of their expert witnesses, often roll the dice with poorly substantiated (or even unsubstantiated) scientific hypotheses, in hopes of convincing juries to award significant damages. Although good science does not support these causation hypotheses, all too often the science itself is not argued properly; or even worse, it is argued unethically (using junk science), such that juries are either deliberately misled or are certainly not provided with the information they need to make the right decisions. That is to say, expert witnesses are knowingly and unethically giving false (or at least naive) testimony on issues related to medical causation; and juries are being influenced by such testimony because of misleading presumptions of guilt unless innocence can be proven. In turn, these presumptions are derived from rather convincing default settings that are not challenged effectively, either in depositions or at trial. Contributing to this dilemma is the conspicuous absence of an enforceable code of ethics to govern the frivolous use of forensic biomechanical testimony in resolving legal issues involving alleged WMSDs.

  4. Thin slice expert testimony and mock trial deliberations.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Caroline Titcomb; Brodsky, Stanley L; Wilson, Jennifer Kelly

    2015-01-01

    This study examined impressions of expert witness testimony in a not guilty by reason of insanity defense on two outcomes: witness's credibility and verdict. Borrowing in part from the "thin slice" methodology, we assessed outcomes in a 2 (deliberating vs. non-deliberating jurors) × 3 (length of videotaped testimony) between-subjects design. In 30 mock juries, 188 participants viewed the testimony by a forensic psychologist; then half of the juries deliberated. Thinner slices of the testimony were defined by the lower (30s long) and upper (5 min long) temporal bounds in the literature. The third, fuller testimony condition was 10 min long and served as the accuracy marker for the shorter sliced exposures. We aimed to explore potential consequences to jurors relying on impressions of the expert, and his or her opinion, and to test that effect post deliberation. Accounting for deliberation, brief impressions of expert credibility generally exerted a similar influence on credibility to fuller considerations. The essential finding was that a two-way interaction emerged from time slice and deliberation on verdict for jurors in the 30s condition. Overall, predictive accuracy was found in the 5 min slice, yet accuracy was not supported in the predictions based on the shortest slice. Individually-formed impressions are not likely to translate to the verdict ballot post-deliberation. Instead, brief impressions are likely to be heavily influenced by deliberation. Implications for understanding how impression-based testimony evaluations translate from the jury box to the deliberation room are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pilot Overmyer eats on middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-11-16

    STS005-15-588 (13 Nov. 1982) --- Astronaut Robert F. Overmyer, STS-5 pilot, enjoys a meal from a jury-rigged set-up in the middeck area of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Columbia. He wears a T-shirt and the trouser portion of a multi-piece constant wear garment. His feet are positioned in recently-rigged foot restraints to avoid involuntary movement in the micro-gravity environment of space. Behind Overmyer are components of the suit, including helmet, worn during landing and takeoff for shuttle flights. The trousers he is presently wearing are part of that attire. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Perceptions of Interpersonal Versus Intergroup Violence: The Case of Sexual Assault

    PubMed Central

    Droogendyk, Lisa; Wright, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    The social identity approach makes a distinction between behavior motivated by intergroup versus interpersonal identities, which may be relevant to victim blaming in the case of rape. Using a mock jury paradigm, we examined the impact of defining rape as an act of interpersonal violence (personal assault) versus intergroup violence (a “hate crime”), crossed with a manipulation describing the attacker as either an acquaintance or stranger. Defining rape in intergroup terms led to less victim blame than when it was defined in interpersonal terms, and participants blamed the victim more when she was assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger. PMID:25419567

  7. Homicidal traumatic asphyxia associated with pebble impaction of the upper airway.

    PubMed

    Taff, M L; Boglioli, L R

    1992-09-01

    The news media tend to sensationalize murders involving multiple methods because of their inherent brutality. Similarly, when addressing a jury, prosecutors often emphasize the most grisly part of a murder to ensure a speedy conviction. This paper reports a case of a teenage boy who was murdered by the use of multiple methods of asphyxia. The methods of asphyxial death and the reconstruction of the sequence of events by the medical experts during the murder trial played an important role in the conviction and ultimate sentencing of the perpetrators.

  8. Robust root clustering for linear uncertain systems using generalized Lyapunov theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of matrix root clustering in subregions of a complex plane for linear state space models with real parameter uncertainty. The nominal matrix root clustering theory of Gutman & Jury (1981) using the generalized Liapunov equation is extended to the perturbed matrix case, and bounds are derived on the perturbation to maintain root clustering inside a given region. The theory makes it possible to obtain an explicit relationship between the parameters of the root clustering region and the uncertainty range of the parameter space.

  9. Robust root clustering for linear uncertain systems using generalized Lyapunov theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of matrix root clustering in subregions of a complex plane for linear state space models with real parameter uncertainty. The nominal matrix root clustering theory of Gutman & Jury (1981) using the generalized Liapunov equation is extended to the perturbed matrix case, and bounds are derived on the perturbation to maintain root clustering inside a given region. The theory makes it possible to obtain an explicit relationship between the parameters of the root clustering region and the uncertainty range of the parameter space.

  10. Criminal Prohibitions on the Publication of Classified Defense Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-24

    considering charges against Assange. Justin Elliot , Assange grand jury report “purely speculation”, WAR ROOM (December 14, 2010), http://www.salon.com/news...i]f the offense is regarded by the requested State as a political offense or as an offense connected with a political offense.”). 118 Quinn v...Ireland, 60 MARQ. L. REV. 777, 780 (1977). 119 Quinn , 783 F.2d at 791 (internal citations omitted). 120 See, e.g., Quinn , 783 F.2d at 791 (citing

  11. Physics in perspective: Recommendations and program emphases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Exerpted material from Physics in Perspective, Vol. 1, is presented on recommendations, priorities, and program emphases. The major recommendations are addressed to the Federal Government and support agencies, the physics community, and the educational community, including precollege, undergraduate, and graduate sectors. Approaches to the questions involved in establishing scientific priorities are discussed, and an approach is evolved which is based on the jury rating application of certain criteria to the program elements of a subfield. The question of national support level for the physics enterprise is also considered, and contingency alternatives are suggested such that whatever the level of available support, it may be used with maximum effectiveness.

  12. Perceptions of interpersonal versus intergroup violence: the case of sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Droogendyk, Lisa; Wright, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The social identity approach makes a distinction between behavior motivated by intergroup versus interpersonal identities, which may be relevant to victim blaming in the case of rape. Using a mock jury paradigm, we examined the impact of defining rape as an act of interpersonal violence (personal assault) versus intergroup violence (a "hate crime"), crossed with a manipulation describing the attacker as either an acquaintance or stranger. Defining rape in intergroup terms led to less victim blame than when it was defined in interpersonal terms, and participants blamed the victim more when she was assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger.

  13. The ethics of the Texas death penalty and its impact on a prolonged appeals process.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, T

    1998-01-01

    Society remains sharply divided as to the deterrent value of capital punishment. Following the reintroduction of the death penalty in the United States, Texas law mandates the affirmative predictability of future dangerousness beyond a reasonable doubt before a jury can impose the ultimate penalty for capital murder. The validity of prediction of dangerousness has been challenged in three Texas landmark cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. The case of Karla Faye Tucker highlights the moral controversy that occurs when execution follows an appeals process stretching over more than a decade, during which time personality growth and the effects of prison rehabilitation may have eliminated or curbed criminal tendencies.

  14. How lawyers view psychiatric experts.

    PubMed

    Reid, William H; Skip Simpson, J D

    2012-11-01

    Good lawyers look for integrity in their expert consultants and expert witnesses. They need truthful, accurate information to help them assess and frame cases, win or settle them favorably, and/or withdraw when the case has little merit. Experts should be well qualified to review, interpret, and eventually testify credibly about their portions of the case. They should be able to work with lawyers in the lawyers' own arenas (e.g., courts, hearings) and to convey their opinions to others, such as juries, clearly and without unnecessary distractions.

  15. STS-47 MS Davis and Pilot Brown repair ISAIAH humidity problem aboard OV-105

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-09-20

    STS047-35-022 (12 - 20 Sept 1992) --- Astronauts Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, and N. Jan Davis, mission specialist, team up to cure a high humidity problem in the hornet experiment in the Spacelab-J Science Module of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. Via a jury-rigged hose hook-up, the two were able to blow air from a spacesuit fan into the experiment, thus eliminating condensation that obscured the viewing of the Israeli hornet experiment. The experiment examined the effects of microgravity on the orientation, reproductive capability and social activity of 180 female Oriental Hornets.

  16. Improvement of the predicted aural detection code ICHIN (I Can Hear It Now)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Smith, Charles D.; Lemasurier, Phillip

    1993-01-01

    Acoustic tests were conducted to study the far-field sound pressure levels and aural detection ranges associated with a Sikorsky S-76A helicopter in straight and level flight at various advancing blade tip Mach numbers. The flight altitude was nominally 150 meters above ground level. This paper compares the normalized predicted aural detection distances, based on the measured far-field sound pressure levels, to the normalized measured aural detection distances obtained from sound jury response measurements obtained during the same test. Both unmodified and modified versions of the prediction code ICHIN-6 (I Can Hear It Now) were used to produce the results for this study.

  17. Visual communication of engineering and scientific data in the courtroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gerald W.; Henry, Andrew C.

    1993-01-01

    Presenting engineering and scientific information in the courtroom is challenging. Quite often the data is voluminous and, therefore, difficult to digest by engineering experts, let alone a lay judge, lawyer, or jury. This paper discusses computer visualization techniques designed to provide the court methods of communicating data in visual formats thus allowing a more accurate understanding of complicated concepts and results. Examples are presented that include accident reconstructions, technical concept illustration, and engineering data visualization. Also presented is the design of an electronic courtroom which facilitates the display and communication of information to the courtroom.

  18. The Technologist As An Expert Witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, R. E. K.; Hall, Morse

    1985-03-01

    Decisions in our legal system are made by laymen. Even the most technical and complex cases are heard and decided by a judge or jury who may very well have no expertise on the questions which confront them. As a result, our legal system permits experts to explain complex phenomena to the fact finder and even to express his opinion on the issue which the fact finder ultimately has to decide. For example, an expert may explain not only how an airplane accident occurred, but also may testify that someone was at fault.

  19. [Diabetic retinopathy complications--12-year retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Ignat, Florica; Davidescu, Livia

    2002-01-01

    It is analyzed, on a retrospective study on 12 years, the incidence of diabetus melitus cases, hospitalized in the Ophthalmologic Clinic from Craiova with special mention to the frequency of the diabetic retinopathy, of it's complications and in an accordance to other general diseases, especially cardiovascular's, which contributes to the aggravation of the diabetic ocular in juries evolution. The study underlines the high incidence of the new founded cases with diabetus melitus in complicated diabetes retinopathy stage; the high frequency of ocular complications is explained, according to our statistic facts and through an insufficient treatment, sometimes incorrect and many other cases total neglected by the patients.

  20. Germany - Focus on Scientific and Technical Information. Volume 4, Number 1. April 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    6 .. . . 0517 April 1988 3. Users who have both a FIZ Technik and a Konrad Zuse Medal DataStar user ID can change the host without having to set up...at the Systems 󈨛 in Otober in Munich, the " Konrad FIZ Technik currently offers over 40 databases Zuse Medal" was awarded to Professor Heinz which...Center for legal databases. GEN- applications. Konrad Zuse (78), after which the IOS users can now search in JURIS databases using award has been named

  1. Development of an Interactive Control Engineering Computer Analysis Package (ICECAP) for Discrete and Continuous Systems. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    and Full-State Feedback Controller Design via Pole-Placement Methods (3) 2.3.1.26 Z-Domain Stability Analysis (2) 2.3.1.26.1 Jury- Blanchard Test (2...0 0 C) tn EM- ’-I- raz E rzru I-iIV 0 4.1 0 02 Uz0 󈧭 $0 4 94a 00 E-4’ U 0LIII-4 C,0 M STRUCTURE CHARTS 0 H I 044 z 0 E-40 :0. 1.4 A-14 STRUCTURE...featuring AC analysis, transient analysis, DC, noise, sensitivity, driving point impedance, Fourier, temperature , distortion, transfer characteristics

  2. The Welfare Effects of Medical Malpractice Liability

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawalla, Darius N.; Seabury, Seth A.

    2013-01-01

    We use variation in the generosity of local juries to identify the causal impact of medical malpractice liability on social welfare. Growth in malpractice payments contributed at most 5 percentage points to the 33% total real growth in medical expenditures from 1990-2003. On the other hand, malpractice leads to modest mortality reductions; the value of these more than likely exceeds the costs of malpractice liability. Therefore, reducing malpractice liability is unlikely to have a major impact on health care spending, and unlikely to be cost-effective over conventionally accepted values of a statistical life. PMID:23526860

  3. The expert witness. Neither Frye nor Daubert solved the problem: what can be done?

    PubMed

    Kaufman, H H

    2001-01-01

    Flawed expert scientific testimony has compromised truth finding in American litigation, including in medical malpractice and in product liability cases. The Federal Rules of Evidence and the Supreme Court in Daubert and other cases have established standards for testimony that include reliability and relevance, and established judges as gatekeepers. However, because of lack of understanding of scientific issues, judges have problems with this role, and juries have difficulties with scientific evidence. Professionals and the judiciary have made some advances, but a better system involving the court's use of neutral experts and a mechanism to hold experts accountable for improprieties is needed.

  4. Observational Studies on Association between Eastward Equatorial Jet and Indian Ocean Dipole

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    School sponsored this re- search. References Chang, P., T. Yamagata, P. Schopf, S. K. Behera , J. Carton, W. S. Kessler, G. Meyers, T. Qu, F. Schott...J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 24, 688–701. Rao, A. S., S. K. Behera , Y. Masumoto and T. Yamagata (2002): Interannual variability in the subsurface...T., S. K. Behera , J.-J. Luo, S. Masson, M. Jury and S. A. Rao (2004): Coupled ocean-atmosphere variability in the tropical Indian Ocean. p. 189–212

  5. An Examination of the Causes and Solutions to Eyewitness Error

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Richard A.; Sartori, Giuseppe; Magnussen, Svein; Safer, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Eyewitness error is one of the leading causes of wrongful convictions. In fact, the American Psychological Association estimates that one in three eyewitnesses make an erroneous identification. In this review, we look briefly at some of the causes of eyewitness error. We examine what jurors, judges, attorneys, law officers, and experts from various countries know about eyewitness testimony and memory, and if they have the requisite knowledge and skills to accurately assess eyewitness testimony. We evaluate whether legal safeguards such as voir dire, motion-to-suppress an identification, cross-examination, jury instructions, and eyewitness expert testimony are effective in identifying eyewitness errors. Lastly, we discuss solutions to eyewitness error. PMID:25165459

  6. [Ethics code of the Chilean Biological Society].

    PubMed

    de Etica, C; Valenzuela, C; Cruz-Coke, R; Ureta, T; Bull, R

    1997-01-01

    The Chilean Biological Society has approved an ethics code for researchers, elaborated by its Ethic Committee. The text, with 16 articles, undertakes the main ethical problems that researchers must solve, such as institutional, professional or societal ethics, scientific fraud, breaches in collaborative work, relationships between researchers, participation in juries and committees, ethical breaches in scientific publications, scientific responsibility and punishments. This code declares its respect and valorization of all life forms and adheres to international biomedical ethical codes. It declares that all knowledge, created or obtained by researchers is mankind's heritage.

  7. Malpractice Litigation and Testicular Torsion: A Legal Database Review.

    PubMed

    Colaco, Marc; Heavner, Matthew; Sunaryo, Peter; Terlecki, Ryan

    2015-12-01

    The litigious nature of the American medical environment is a major concern for physicians, with an estimated annual cost of $10 billion. The purpose of this study is to identify causes of litigation in cases of testicular torsion and what factors contribute to verdicts or settlements resulting in indemnity payments. Publicly available jury verdict reports were retrieved from the Westlaw legal database (Thomson Reuters, New York, NY). In order to identify pertinent cases, we used the search terms "medical malpractice" and "testicular torsion" with date ranging from 2000 to 2013. Jury verdicts, depositions, and narrative summaries were evaluated for their medical basis, alleged malpractice, findings, and indemnity payment(s) (if any). Fifty-two cases were identified that were relevant to this study. Fifty-one percent of relevant cases were found in favor of the defendant physician, with the remaining 49% involving an indemnity payment (13% of which were settled). The most commonly sued medical providers were emergency physicians (48% of defendants), with urologists being second most common and making up 23% of the defendant pool. Emergency physicians were significantly more likely to make indemnity payments than urologists. Testicular torsion is a delicate condition and requires expertise in evaluation and treatment. When emergency physicians choose not to consult an urologist for possible torsion, they leave themselves open to litigation risk. When an urologist is involved in torsion litigation, they are rarely unsuccessful in their defense. Finally, ultrasound is no guarantee for success against litigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Current state of US breastfeeding laws.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu T; Hawkins, Summer Sherburne

    2013-07-01

    This study systematically examined state-level laws protecting breastfeeding, including their current status and historical development, as well as identified gaps across US states and regions. The National Conference of State Legislatures summarised breastfeeding laws for 50 states and DC as of September 2010, which we updated through May 2011. We then searched LexisNexis and Westlaw to find the full text of laws, recording enactment dates and definitions. Laws were coded into five categories: (1) employers are encouraged or required to provide break time and private space for breastfeeding employees; (2) employers are prohibited from discriminating against breastfeeding employees; (3) breastfeeding is permitted in any public or private location; (4) breastfeeding is exempt from public indecency laws; and (5) breastfeeding women are exempt from jury duty. By May 2011, 1 state had enacted zero breastfeeding laws, 10 had one, 22 had two, 12 had three, 5 had four and 1 state had laws across all five categories. While 92% of states allowed mothers to breastfeed in any location and 57% exempted breastfeeding from indecency laws, 37% of states encouraged or required employers to provide break time and accommodations, 24% offered breastfeeding women exemption from jury duty and 16% prohibited employment discrimination. The Northeast had the highest proportion of states with breastfeeding laws and the Midwest had the lowest. Breastfeeding outside the home is protected to varying degrees depending on where women live; this suggests that many women are not covered by comprehensive laws that promote breastfeeding. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Administrative "health courts" for medical injury claims: the federal constitutional issues.

    PubMed

    Elliott, E Donald; Narayan, Sanjay A; Nasmith, Moneen S

    2008-08-01

    Our article analyzes whether the federal government may constitutionally supplant a traditional system of common-law trials before state judges and juries with new federal institutions designed by statute for compensating victims of medical injuries. Specifically, this article examines the federal constitutional issues raised by various proposals to replace traditional medical malpractice litigation in state courts with a federal system of administrative "health courts." In doing so, we address the following constitutional issues: 1. Is there federal authority to preempt state law (the commerce clause and spending clause issues)? 2. May jurisdiction be created in non-article 3 tribunals, and may claims be decided without trial by jury (the separation of powers and Seventh Amendment issues)? 3. Would pilot programs that require some claims to be pursued in a federal administrative forum while other claimants are left to pursue traditional state tort law remedies be constitutional (the equal protection issue)? The article concludes that a federal compensation system through administrative health courts should be constitutional provided the statute is appropriately drafted and that appropriate factual findings are made concerning the benefits to patients and the public as well as to doctors and their insurers.

  10. Being an expert witness in geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Edward A.

    2015-02-01

    Gathering your own data and coming to your own conclusion through scientific research and discovery is the most important principle to remember when being an expert witness in geomorphology. You can only be questioned in deposition and trial in your area of expertise. You are qualified as an expert by education, knowledge, and experience. You will have absolutely nothing to fear from cross-examination if you are prepared and confident about your work. Being an expert witness requires good communication skills. When you make a presentation, speak clearly and avoid jargon, especially when addressing a jury. Keep in mind that when you take on a case that may eventually go to court as a lawsuit, the entire process, with appeals and so forth, can take several years. Therefore, being an expert may become a long-term commitment of your time and energy. You may be hired by either side in a dispute, but your job is the same - determine the scientific basis of the case and explain your scientific reasoning to the lawyers, the judge, and the jury. Your work, including pre-trial investigations, often determines what the case will be based on. The use of science in the discovery part of an investigation is demonstrated from a California case involving the Ventura River, where building of a flood control levee restricted flow to a narrower channel, increasing unit stream power as well as potential for bank erosion and landsliding.

  11. Sound transmission class (STC) is not a good predictor of performance of insulated wood frame gypsum walls used as interior partitions in most North American homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Richard D.; Alter, Harry; Berdan, Clarke

    2005-09-01

    Home owners say that insulating interior walls improves the acoustic environment. Based on STC alone, no perceptible difference is expected. To define ``improved,'' ethnographic and laboratory studies were conducted. Ethnographic studies in 33 homes, revealed owners want quieter, less reverberant environments, including rooms where added isolation is desired. Families lives are 24/7, leading to frustration that they cannot use their homes without disturbing others. Laboratory jury studies were conducted where 35 listeners rated the relative isolation of insulated and uninsulated walls. Noise sources included broadband and real home noises. Insulated walls were perceived to perform better than uninsulated walls in all cases. Noise control engineers know that STC is only a quick screening tool (actual sound transmission loss should be used to estimate noise reduction between rooms). This is what the jurors appeared to sense. Jury ratings and the midfrequency average SPL correlated reasonably well. The STC is determined by a structural resonance near 125 Hz. Above this band, insulation has a significant impact on transmission loss (perceptible, 6 dB average). A new rating system is needed that quantifies what actual listeners hear in quiet room environments. A model using some form of room criteria is suggested.

  12. Impact of Evidence Type and Judicial Warning on Juror Perceptions of Global and Specific Witness Evidence.

    PubMed

    Wheatcroft, Jacqueline M; Keogan, Hannah

    2017-04-03

    The Court of Appeal in England and Wales held (R. v. Sardar, 2012) there had been no exceptional circumstances that justified a jury retiring with a transcript of the complainant's interview. This paper reports an investigation into the impact multiple evidence forms and use of a judicial warning has on juror evaluations of a witness. The warning focuses juror attention on placing disproportionate weight on the evidence as opposed to their general impression of it. Sixty jury-eligible participants were presented with witness evidence in transcript, video, or transcript plus video format. Half the participants in each condition received the warning. All mock jurors completed a questionnaire which assessed perceptions of witness and task. Outcomes showed that transcript plus video evidence, when accompanied by a warning, did impact on mock jurors' global assessments of the witness. The warning made the task less clear for jurors and, in the video condition, led to higher ratings of how satisfactory and reliable the witness was. Findings support the provision of a judicial warning to jurors and show some initial support for judiciary opposition to the provision of an additional transcript only when jurors are asked to make the more usual global witness assessments.

  13. Roughness modelling based on human auditory perception for sound quality evaluation of vehicle interior noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; Shen, G. Q.; Guo, H.; Tang, X. L.; Hamade, T.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a roughness model, which is based on human auditory perception (HAP) and known as HAP-RM, is developed for the sound quality evaluation (SQE) of vehicle noise. First, the interior noise signals are measured for a sample vehicle and prepared for roughness modelling. The HAP-RM model is based on the process of sound transfer and perception in the human auditory system by combining the structural filtering function and nonlinear perception characteristics of the ear. The HAP-RM model is applied to the measured vehicle interior noise signals by considering the factors that affect hearing, such as the modulation and carrier frequencies, the time and frequency maskings and the correlations of the critical bands. The HAP-RM model is validated by jury tests. An anchor-scaled scoring method (ASM) is used for subjective evaluations in the jury tests. The verification results show that the novel developed model can accurately calculate vehicle noise roughness below 0.6 asper. Further investigation shows that the total roughness of the vehicle interior noise can mainly be attributed to frequency components below 12 Bark. The time masking effects of the modelling procedure enable the application of the HAP-RM model to stationary and nonstationary vehicle noise signals and the SQE of other sound-related signals in engineering problems.

  14. Discrimination and instructional comprehension: guided discretion, racial bias, and the death penalty.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M; Haney, C

    2000-06-01

    This study links two previously unrelated lines of research: the lack of comprehension of capital penalty-phase jury instructions and discriminatory death sentencing. Jury-eligible subjects were randomly assigned to view one of four versions of a simulated capital penalty trial in which the race of defendant (Black or White) and the race of victim (Black or White) were varied orthogonally. Dependent measures included a sentencing verdict (life without the possibility of parole or the death penalty), ratings of penalty phase evidence, and a test of instructional comprehension. Results indicated that instructional comprehension was poor overall and that, although Black defendants were treated only slightly more punitively than White defendants in general, discriminatory effects were concentrated among participants whose comprehension was poorest. In addition, the use of penalty phase evidence differed as a function of race of defendant and whether the participant sentenced the defendant to life or death. The study suggest that racially biased and capricious death sentencing may be in part caused or exacerbated by the inability to comprehend penalty phase instructions.

  15. Arbitrariness and the death penalty: how the defendant's appearance during trial influences capital jurors' punishment decision.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the defendant's appearance during the trial on capital jurors' punishment decision. The data used in this analysis were gathered by the Capital Jury Project (CJP), a national program of research on the decision-making of capital jurors. A series of multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted using four aggravating circumstances related to the killing and eight defendant appearance variables as predictors of jurors' punishment decision at three points during the capital trial: (1) after the punishment phase ended, but before formal deliberation began; (2) when the first vote was taken on punishment at jury deliberations; and (3) at the final vote on punishment. Results indicated that when the defendant appeared emotionally involved during the trial (i.e. sorry and sincere) jurors either favored a life sentence or were undecided about punishment; however, when the defendant appeared emotionally uninvolved during the trial (i.e. bored) jurors either sought a death sentence or remained undecided. Policy implications will be discussed.

  16. 1st Evidence-based Italian consensus conference on cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal carcinosis from ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Davide; Cirocchi, Roberto; Coccolini, Federico; Fagotti, Anna; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Federici, Orietta; Lorusso, Domenica; Vaira, Marco; Ceresoli, Marco; Delrio, Paolo; Garofalo, Alfredo; Pignata, Sandro; Scollo, Paolo; Trojano, Vito; Amadori, Andrea; Ansaloni, Luca; Cariti, Giuseppe; De Cian, Franco; De Iaco, Pierandrea; De Simone, Michele; Deraco, Marcello; Donini, Annibale; Fiorentini, Giammaria; Frigerio, Luigi; Greggi, Stefano; Macrì, Antonio; Pasqual, Enrico Maria; Roviello, Franco; Sammartino, Paolo; Sassaroli, Cinzia; Scambia, Giovanni; Staudacher, Carlo; Vici, Patrizia; Vizza, Enrico; Valle, Mario

    2017-04-20

    Ovarian cancer (OC) remains relatively rare, although it is among the top 4 causes of cancer death for women younger than 50. The aggressive nature of the disease and its often late diagnosis with peritoneal involvement have an impact on prognosis. The current scientific literature presents ambiguous or uncertain indications for management of peritoneal carcinosis (PC) from OC, both owing to the lack of sufficient scientific data and their heterogeneity or lack of consistency. Therefore, the Italian Society of Surgical Oncology (SICO), the Italian Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the Italian Association of Hospital Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, and the Italian Association of Medical Oncology conducted a multidisciplinary consensus conference (CC) on management of advanced OC presenting with PC during the SICO annual meeting in Naples, Italy, on September 10-11, 2015. An expert committee developed questions on diagnosis and staging work-up, indications, and procedural aspects for peritonectomy, systemic chemotherapy, and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for PC from OC. These questions were provided to 6 invited speakers who answered with an evidence-based report. Each report was submitted to a jury panel, representative of Italian experts in the fields of surgical oncology, gynecology, and medical oncology. The jury panel revised the reports before and after the open discussion during the CC. This article is the final document containing the clinical evidence reports and statements, revised and approved by all the authors before submission.

  17. Man with AIDS is awarded $1 million for abuse in jail.

    PubMed

    1996-03-22

    [Name removed], arrested for public intoxication, successfully sued the Jefferson County Department of Corrections and three prison guards. A Federal jury awarded [name removed] $1,180,000 for the abuse and mistreatment he endured during an overnight stay in the county jail. [Name removed], who is living with AIDS, was never given a sobriety test, and the charge of intoxication was later dismissed. However, [name removed] was strip-searched, denied the use of a toilet, shackled to his bed, kicked and threatened, and ridiculed about his homosexuality and HIV status. The suit charged that [name removed]'s Eighth Amendment protection against cruel and unusual punishment had been violated. The Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable strip-searches and the Americans with Disabilities Act's (ADA) protection against differential treatment based on disability were also cited. The jury found the Department of Corrections liable and the three guards responsible for actual and punitive damages. The county is still determining if it will appeal.

  18. A propensity score matching analysis of the relationship between victim sex and capital juror decision-making in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Wesley G; Richards, Tara N; Smith, M Dwayne; Bjerregaard, Beth; Fogel, Sondra J

    2015-07-01

    A small body of prior research has examined the impact of victim sex on jury death penalty decision-making and the majority of this research has demonstrated some evidence of a "female victim effect" such that cases involving a female victim are more likely to receive the death penalty than similarly situated cases with a male victim. However, within this line of research studies have suggested that victim sex may work in conjunction with other case characteristics. In order to further explore this phenomenon, the current study examines a near-population of death penalty cases from North Carolina (n=1069) from 1977-2009 using propensity score matching. Results demonstrate that once cases are matched on more than 50 legal and extralegal case characteristics, there is no statistically significant or substantive link between victim sex and death penalty decision-making. Findings suggest that it is concrete differences in the legal and extralegal factors observed in cases with female victims compared to male victims that shape jury death sentence decisions rather than a direct effect of victim sex (before matching: OR=1.53; 95% CI=1.20-1.95; p<.001/after matching: OR=0.90; 95% CI=0.66-1.24; p=.52). Study limitations and implications are also discussed.

  19. A Failure Analysis Conducted on a Fractured AISI 5160 Steel Blade Which Separated from an Agricultural Rotary Cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alan A.; Storey, Randall J.

    2011-07-01

    One of the six blades of an agricultural rotary cutter used for cutting down small trees and bushes broke into two pieces while the blades were rotating. One piece was hurled from the cutter and struck a young farmer, who had been operating the machine, causing a near fatal leg injury. In the ensuing litigation against the manufacturers and marketer of the machine each litigant retained a metallurgist and other experts. The metallurgists jointly directed laboratory work on the broken blade conducted at an independent laboratory according to a protocol which they developed and which was approved by the court. As a result of the laboratory work the present authors, working for the Plaintiffs, concluded that failure of the blade occurred because it contained quench cracks introduced when it was manufactured. The Defendants' metallurgists concluded that the blade had been misassembled onto the machine and, as a result, had failed by fatigue. Eventually, the case was set for a jury trial in a Circuit Court in rural Kentucky. The jury found for the Plaintiffs and awarded them $5.9 million in damages. Part of this judgement was later reversed by the Kentucky Court of Appeals and the case was then settled without a second trial under terms which were not revealed.

  20. The Novel New Jersey Eyewitness Instruction Induces Skepticism but Not Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, social scientists have shown that the reliability of eyewitness identifications is much worse than laypersons tend to believe. Although courts have only recently begun to react to this evidence, the New Jersey judiciary has reformed its jury instructions to notify jurors about the frailties of human memory, the potential for lineup administrators to nudge witnesses towards suspects that they police have already identified, and the advantages of alternative lineup procedures, including blinding of the administrator. This experiment tested the efficacy of New Jersey’s jury instruction. In a 2×2 between-subjects design, mock jurors (N = 335) watched a 35-minute murder trial, wherein identification quality was either “weak” or “strong” and either the New Jersey or a “standard” instruction was delivered. Jurors were more than twice as likely to convict when the standard instruction was used (OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.37–4.89, p < 0.001). The New Jersey instruction, however, did not improve juror's ability to discern quality; rather, jurors receiving those instructions indiscriminatingly discounted “weak” and “strong” testimony in equal measure. PMID:26650237

  1. [Where it is shown that a quarrel about precedence can lead to the Holy Bible].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2006-11-01

    The custom to print a "synthesis", for the last part of the mastership examination, the "chef d'oeuvre" was established in most of French towns. Kind of printed programme, the "synthesis" was a sheet of paper, of poster size. It listed the practicals to perform and the members of the jury, etc. The listing of the apothecaries participating in the jury used to be accompanied by elogious formulations i.e. "celeberrimo coet-cui pharmacoporum". The physicians immeditely reacted. How was it possible? Such elogious terms should be used for medicine doctors only! Not for apothecaries! Various printed arguments were exchanged and a tumultuous process took place. A judgement occured on December 14 1656: Such terms of Honour should be avoided in the future. During this judiciary episode, Latin citations from "Ecclesistics, 38" were exchanged. This ridiculous quarell rised nevertheless some serious questions. Didn't the translation of the Bible in modern languages contain some indaquancies concerning the people in charge of preparing and dispensing the medicines? A study of original Greek texts showed that it was the case.

  2. The emotional child witness: effects on juror decision-making.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Alexia; Quas, Jodi A; Cleveland, Kyndra C

    2014-01-01

    Despite wide variations in child witness behavior while on the stand, little research has focused on how that behavior influences jurors' perceptions of the child's credibility or the case itself. In the current study, the impact of a child's emotional displays on credibility judgments and verdict preferences was examined in jury-eligible college students and jurors released from jury duty. No significant differences emerged in perceptions or verdicts based on whether a child was shown as crying or not while participants read a transcript of the child's testimony. However, participants who rated the child as more emotional (regardless of whether the image showed a crying child) were more likely to render guilty verdicts, were more certain of guilt, and found the child more credible and the defendant less credible than participants who rated the child as less emotional. Also, when the child was perceived as low in emotion, older children were rated as less credible than younger children. The results have implications for understanding how children's emotional displays and jurors' perceptions of children's emotionality influence decisions in sexual abuse cases.

  3. Abortion foe convicted and sentenced for murders of women's health clinic workers.

    PubMed

    1996-03-22

    On March 18, after deliberating for approximately nine hours over two days, a Dedham, Massachusetts, jury found John Salvi guilty of two counts of first-degree murder for the December 1994 shooting deaths of Shannon Lowney and Lee Ann Nichols, receptionists at two Brookline, Massachusetts, women's health care clinics. Salvi was also convicted of five counts of assault with intent to murder (see RFN IV/1). Almost immediately, Norfolk Superior Court Judge Barbara Dortch-Okara ordered Salvi to serve the maximum sentence--two consecutive life terms in prison without parole--for the murders and an additional 90-100 years for the five assaults. Under Massachusetts law, the first-degree murder convictions will be automatically appealed. In reaching their verdict, the jury of six men and six women rejected Salvi's plea of not guilty by reason of insanity. The five-week trial included testimony from more than 100 witnesses. In the past two years, two other men have been convicted for the first-degree murders of abortion providers: Michael Griffin, who was convicted of murdering Dr. David Gunn in March 1994, is now serving a life sentence; and Paul Hill, who was convicted of murdering Dr. John Britton and James Barrett in November 1995, is on Florida's death row while his sentence is pending mandatory appeal (see RFN III/19, 22). full text

  4. Town vs. gown: a direct comparison of community residents and student mock jurors.

    PubMed

    Hosch, Harmon M; Culhane, Scott E; Tubb, V Anne; Granillo, Edgar A

    2011-01-01

    The use of students as mock jurors in the majority of legal psychology studies on jury behavior has been criticized (e.g., Bray & Kerr, 1979; Diamond, 1997). This study examined the degree to which student mock jurors' decisions were generalizable to those of real jurors. The participants of the study included 297 jury-eligible university students and 297 volunteers from the venire in the same community as that in which the students resided. All participants viewed one of six versions of a videotaped criminal trial. The defendant testified in English or in Spanish. In addition, the race of defendant was varied. Three bilingual individuals served as defendants with one appearing to be of northern European origin, one of Latino background, and one of African origin. Dependent variables included verdict and, for those who found the defendant guilty, the number of years to which he should be sentenced, and whether he should be fined. Student mock jurors differed reliably from their community counterparts on several demographic characteristics. However, the two groups had mixed results in relation to decision-making tasks. There was no difference in individual verdict preferences, but the students' sentence recommendations were more punitive. These results are interpreted in the context of the generalizability of mock juror studies.

  5. Evaluation of linguistic features useful in extraction of interactions from PubMed; Application to annotating known, high-throughput and predicted interactions in I2D

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yun; Otasek, David; Jurisica, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Identification and characterization of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the key aims in biological research. While previous research in text mining has made substantial progress in automatic PPI detection from literature, the need to improve the precision and recall of the process remains. More accurate PPI detection will also improve the ability to extract experimental data related to PPIs and provide multiple evidence for each interaction. Results: We developed an interaction detection method and explored the usefulness of various features in automatically identifying PPIs in text. The results show that our approach outperforms other systems using the AImed dataset. In the tests where our system achieves better precision with reduced recall, we discuss possible approaches for improvement. In addition to test datasets, we evaluated the performance on interactions from five human-curated databases—BIND, DIP, HPRD, IntAct and MINT—where our system consistently identified evidence for ∼60% of interactions when both proteins appear in at least one sentence in the PubMed abstract. We then applied the system to extract articles from PubMed to annotate known, high-throughput and interologous interactions in I2D. Availability: The data and software are available at: http://www.cs.utoronto.ca/∼juris/data/BI09/. Contact: yniu@uhnres.utoronto.ca; juris@ai.utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19850753

  6. Critical care management of patients following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: recommendations from the Neurocritical Care Society's Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Diringer, Michael N; Bleck, Thomas P; Claude Hemphill, J; Menon, David; Shutter, Lori; Vespa, Paul; Bruder, Nicolas; Connolly, E Sander; Citerio, Giuseppe; Gress, Daryl; Hänggi, Daniel; Hoh, Brian L; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Le Roux, Peter; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Schmutzhard, Erich; Stocchetti, Nino; Suarez, Jose I; Treggiari, Miriam; Tseng, Ming-Yuan; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wolf, Stefan; Zipfel, Gregory

    2011-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is an acute cerebrovascular event which can have devastating effects on the central nervous system as well as a profound impact on several other organs. SAH patients are routinely admitted to an intensive care unit and are cared for by a multidisciplinary team. A lack of high quality data has led to numerous approaches to management and limited guidance on choosing among them. Existing guidelines emphasize risk factors, prevention, natural history, and prevention of rebleeding, but provide limited discussion of the complex critical care issues involved in the care of SAH patients. The Neurocritical Care Society organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference on the critical care management of SAH to address this need. Experts from neurocritical care, neurosurgery, neurology, interventional neuroradiology, and neuroanesthesiology from Europe and North America were recruited based on their publications and expertise. A jury of four experienced neurointensivists was selected for their experience in clinical investigations and development of practice guidelines. Recommendations were developed based on literature review using the GRADE system, discussion integrating the literature with the collective experience of the participants and critical review by an impartial jury. Recommendations were developed using the GRADE system. Emphasis was placed on the principle that recommendations should be based not only on the quality of the data but also tradeoffs and translation into practice. Strong consideration was given to providing guidance and recommendations for all issues faced in the daily management of SAH patients, even in the absence of high quality data.

  7. The Novel New Jersey Eyewitness Instruction Induces Skepticism but Not Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Papailiou, Athan P; Yokum, David V; Robertson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, social scientists have shown that the reliability of eyewitness identifications is much worse than laypersons tend to believe. Although courts have only recently begun to react to this evidence, the New Jersey judiciary has reformed its jury instructions to notify jurors about the frailties of human memory, the potential for lineup administrators to nudge witnesses towards suspects that they police have already identified, and the advantages of alternative lineup procedures, including blinding of the administrator. This experiment tested the efficacy of New Jersey's jury instruction. In a 2×2 between-subjects design, mock jurors (N = 335) watched a 35-minute murder trial, wherein identification quality was either "weak" or "strong" and either the New Jersey or a "standard" instruction was delivered. Jurors were more than twice as likely to convict when the standard instruction was used (OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.37-4.89, p < 0.001). The New Jersey instruction, however, did not improve juror's ability to discern quality; rather, jurors receiving those instructions indiscriminatingly discounted "weak" and "strong" testimony in equal measure.

  8. Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereš, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; Chastel, Serge; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Flewelling, Heather; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugen A.; Morgan, Jeff S.; Price, Paul A.; Tonry, John L.; Waters, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a Monte Carlo technique to calculate the absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) of ∼240,000 asteroids observed by the Pan-STARRS1 telescope during the first 15 months of its 3-year all-sky survey mission. The system's exquisite photometry with photometric errors ≲ 0.04mag , and well-defined filter and photometric system, allowed us to derive accurate H and G even with a limited number of observations and restricted range in phase angles. Our Monte Carlo method simulates each asteroid's rotation period, amplitude and color to derive the most-likely H and G, but its major advantage is in estimating realistic statistical + systematic uncertainties and errors on each parameter. The method was tested by comparison with the well-established and accurate results for about 500 asteroids provided by Pravec et al. (Pravec, P. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 365-387) and then applied to determining H and G for the Pan-STARRS1 asteroids using both the Muinonen et al. (Muinonen, K. et al. [2010]. Icarus 209, 542-555) and Bowell et al. (Bowell, E. et al. [1989]. Asteroids III, Chapter Application of Photometric Models to Asteroids. University of Arizona Press, pp. 524-555) phase functions. Our results confirm the bias in MPC photometry discovered by Jurić et al. (Jurić, M. et al. [2002]. Astrophys. J. 124, 1776-1787).

  9. False confessions, expert testimony, and admissibility.

    PubMed

    Watson, Clarence; Weiss, Kenneth J; Pouncey, Claire

    2010-01-01

    The confession of a criminal defendant serves as a prosecutor's most compelling piece of evidence during trial. Courts must preserve a defendant's constitutional right to a fair trial while upholding the judicial interests of presenting competent and reliable evidence to the jury. When a defendant seeks to challenge the validity of that confession through expert testimony, the prosecution often contests the admissibility of the expert's opinion. Depending on the content and methodology of the expert's opinion, testimony addressing the phenomenon of false confessions may or may not be admissible. This article outlines the scientific and epistemological bases of expert testimony on false confession, notes the obstacles facing its admissibility, and provides guidance to the expert in formulating opinions that will reach the judge or jury. We review the 2006 New Jersey Superior Court decision in State of New Jersey v. George King to illustrate what is involved in the admissibility of false-confession testimony and use the case as a starting point in developing a best-practice approach to working in this area.

  10. A quantum probability account of order effects in inference.

    PubMed

    Trueblood, Jennifer S; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2011-01-01

    Order of information plays a crucial role in the process of updating beliefs across time. In fact, the presence of order effects makes a classical or Bayesian approach to inference difficult. As a result, the existing models of inference, such as the belief-adjustment model, merely provide an ad hoc explanation for these effects. We postulate a quantum inference model for order effects based on the axiomatic principles of quantum probability theory. The quantum inference model explains order effects by transforming a state vector with different sequences of operators for different orderings of information. We demonstrate this process by fitting the quantum model to data collected in a medical diagnostic task and a jury decision-making task. To further test the quantum inference model, a new jury decision-making experiment is developed. Using the results of this experiment, we compare the quantum inference model with two versions of the belief-adjustment model, the adding model and the averaging model. We show that both the quantum model and the adding model provide good fits to the data. To distinguish the quantum model from the adding model, we develop a new experiment involving extreme evidence. The results from this new experiment suggest that the adding model faces limitations when accounting for tasks involving extreme evidence, whereas the quantum inference model does not. Ultimately, we argue that the quantum model provides a more coherent account for order effects that was not possible before.

  11. Don't Ask a Neuroscientist about Phases of the Moon.

    PubMed

    Shats, Katherine; Brindley, Timothy; Giordano, James

    2016-10-01

    Ongoing developments in neuroscientific techniques and technologies-such as neuroimaging-offer potential for greater insight into human behavior and have fostered temptation to use these approaches in legal contexts. Neuroscientists are increasingly called on to provide expert testimony, interpret brain images, and thereby inform judges and juries who are tasked with determining the guilt or innocence of an individual. In this essay, we draw attention to the actual capabilities and limitations of currently available assessment neurotechnologies and examine whether neuroscientific evidence presents unique challenges to existing frameworks of evidence law. In particular, we focus on (1) fundamental questions of relevance and admissibility that can and should be posed before the tests afforded in Daubert v. Merrill Dow Pharmaceuticals or Frye v. U.S. are applied and (2) how these considerations fit into the broader contexts of criminal law. We contend that neuroscientific evidence must first be scrutinized more heavily for its relevance, within Daubert and Federal Rule of Evidence 702, to ensure that the right questions are asked of neuroscientists, so as to enable expert interpretation of neuroscientific evidence within the limits of their knowledge and discipline that allows the judge or jury to determine the facts at issue in the case. We use the analogy provided by the Daubert court of an expert on the phases of the moon testifying to an individual's behavior on a particular night to ensure that we are, in fact, asking the neuroscientific expert the appropriate question.

  12. Baseball Bats and Chocolate Chip Cookies: The Judicial Treatment of DNA in the Myriad Genetics Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Binnie, Ian; Park-Thompson, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    In June 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court rendered a controversial ruling that naturally occurring DNA segments are “products of nature” and therefore not patentable subject matter. At this intersection between science and law, in litigation of crucial importance to patients, science, and multibillion-dollar biotech enterprises, the appellate judges sidestepped genetics and engaged in a war of metaphors from diamonds to chocolate chip cookies. This case is not an outlier. Apprehensive judges and juries in both Canada and the United States find many convenient excuses to avoid coming to grips with the underlying science in patent cases. But this is simply not acceptable. Legal rulings must be, and must seem to be, well grounded, as a matter of both law and science. The legitimacy of court decisions in the eyes of the stakeholders and the broader public depends on it. PMID:25524722

  13. I spy with my little eye: jurors' detection of internal validity threats in expert evidence.

    PubMed

    McAuliff, Bradley D; Duckworth, Tejah D

    2010-12-01

    This experiment examined whether jury-eligible community members (N = 223) were able to detect internally invalid psychological science presented at trial. Participants read a simulated child sexual abuse case in which the defense expert described a study he had conducted on witness memory and suggestibility. We varied the study's internal validity (valid, missing control group, confound, and experimenter bias) and publication status (published, unpublished). Expert evidence quality ratings were higher for the valid versus missing control group version only. Publication increased ratings of defendant guilt when the study was missing a control group. Variations in internal validity did not influence perceptions of child victim credibility or police interview quality. Participants' limited detection of internal validity threats underscores the need to examine the effectiveness of traditional legal safeguards against junk science in court and improve the scientific reasoning ability of lay people and legal professionals.

  14. Renegotiating forensic cultures: between law, science and criminal justice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Paul

    2013-03-01

    This article challenges stereotypical conceptions of Law and Science as cultural opposites, arguing that English criminal trial practice is fundamentally congruent with modern science's basic epistemological assumptions, values and methods of inquiry. Although practical tensions undeniably exist, they are explicable-and may be neutralised-by paying closer attention to criminal adjudication's normative ideals and their institutional expression in familiar aspects of common law trial procedure, including evidentiary rules of admissibility, trial by jury, adversarial fact-finding, cross-examination and the ethical duties of expert witnesses. Effective partnerships between lawyers and forensic scientists are indispensable for integrating scientific evidence into criminal proceedings, and must be renegotiated between individual practitioners on an on-going basis. Fruitful interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars with a shared interest in forensic science should dispense with reductive cultural stereotypes of Science and Law. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Interior view of "mail box" for purging carbon dioxide from Lunar Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-14

    AS13-62-8929 (11-17 April 1970) --- Interior view of the Apollo 13 Lunar Module (LM) showing the "mail box," a jury-rigged arrangement which the Apollo 13 astronauts built to use the Command Module (CM) lithium hydroxide canisters to purge carbon dioxide from the LM. Lithium hydroxide is used to scrub CO2 from the spacecraft's atmosphere. Since there was a limited amount of lithium hydroxide in the LM, this arrangement was rigged up to utilize the canisters from the CM. The "mail box" was designed and tested on the ground at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) before it was suggested to the problem-plagued Apollo 13 crew men. Because of the explosion of one of the oxygen tanks in the Service Module (SM), the three crew men had to use the LM as a "lifeboat".

  16. Searching for Insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, Donald

    2010-09-01

    Is space-time only brought into being by its energy content? The jury is still out, but other questions that have been with me for much of my life—giant black holes in galactic nuclei, the formation of the Galaxy, the connection between first-order phase transitions and negative specific heats, the cause of the large-scale flow of galaxies relative to the cosmic microwave background—have all received reasonable answers. I have found great fun in understanding the dynamical mechanisms underlying such phenomena as magnetohydrodynamic jets, relativistic disks, and the bars, spirals, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The great challenges for future astronomers will be the exploration of the 96% of the Universe now believed to be neither atomic nor baryonic but perhaps partially leptonic. However, most advances do not come via frontal attack but from “bread-and-butter” investigations in related areas where observation is possible today!

  17. Absorbing New Subjects: Holography as an Analog of Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Sean F.

    2006-05-01

    I discuss the early history of holography and explore how perceptions, applications, and forecasts of the subject were shaped by prior experience. I focus on the work of Dennis Gabor (1900 1979) in England,Yury N. Denisyuk (b. 1924) in the Soviet Union, and Emmett N. Leith (1927 2005) and Juris Upatnieks (b. 1936) in the United States. I show that the evolution of holography was simultaneously promoted and constrained by its identification as an analog of photography, an association that influenced its assessment by successive audiences of practitioners, entrepreneurs, and consumers. One consequence is that holography can be seen as an example of a modern technical subject that has been shaped by cultural influences more powerfully than generally appreciated. Conversely, the understanding of this new science and technology in terms of an older one helps to explain why the cultural effects of holography have been more muted than anticipated by forecasters between the 1960s and 1990s.

  18. Incoherent holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Nils H.

    2000-10-01

    Dennis Gabor invented in-line holography in 1947, but at that time the coherent light from a laser did not yet exist and therefore the holograms he produced were of very low quality. When the laser was born in 1960 beautiful 3-D off- center holograms were for the first time produced by Emmett Leith and Juris Upatnieks. However, already as early as 1934 the inventor and artist Hans Weil patented a method to produce simple pictures that appeared floating in space, by scratching a transparent or metallic surface in certain directions. In 1995 William J. Beaty published a method for Hand-Drawn Holograms. Then it became possible for any artist to draw his own 3-D pictures of simple objects and using his ingenious techniques these hand drawn images will mimic many of the qualities of ordinary holograms.

  19. Protecting the airway and the physician: Aspects of litigation arising from tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Farida, Jeremy P; Lawrence, Lauren A; Svider, Peter F; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Zuliani, Giancarlo F; Folbe, Adam J; Carron, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    In recent decades, medical malpractice costs have increased and have led to a change in the way physicians practice medicine. Tracheotomies are cases in which complications have a high risk of morbidity and mortality and the potential for litigation. The Westlaw legal database was used to gather data on 43 jury verdicts and settlements from 1987 to 2013. Various factors included outcome, defendant specialty, and the reason for litigation. Median settlements were $500,000 and median verdict awards were $2,000,000. Postoperative negligence was alleged most often (81%) followed by intraoperative negligence (27.9%) and permanent injury (18.6%). Otolaryngologists were named as defendants most often (25.6%), with nurses named second most often. Pediatric cases had significantly higher awards and were more often named in favor of the plaintiff. An awareness of tracheotomy malpractice litigation has the potential to both help physicians avoid future litigation and improve patient safety. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Forensic utilization of familial searches in DNA databases.

    PubMed

    Gershaw, Cassandra J; Schweighardt, Andrew J; Rourke, Linda C; Wallace, Margaret M

    2011-01-01

    DNA evidence is widely recognized as an invaluable tool in the process of investigation and identification, as well as one of the most sought after types of evidence for presentation to a jury. In the United States, the development of state and federal DNA databases has greatly impacted the forensic community by creating an efficient, searchable system that can be used to eliminate or include suspects in an investigation based on matching DNA profiles - the profile already in the database to the profile of the unknown sample in evidence. Recent changes in legislation have begun to allow for the possibility to expand the parameters of DNA database searches, taking into account the possibility of familial searches. This article discusses prospective positive outcomes of utilizing familial DNA searches and acknowledges potential negative outcomes, thereby presenting both sides of this very complicated, rapidly evolving situation.

  1. Estimating the reliability of eyewitness identifications from police lineups

    PubMed Central

    Wixted, John T.; Mickes, Laura; Dunn, John C.; Clark, Steven E.; Wells, William

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory-based mock crime studies have often been interpreted to mean that (i) eyewitness confidence in an identification made from a lineup is a weak indicator of accuracy and (ii) sequential lineups are diagnostically superior to traditional simultaneous lineups. Largely as a result, juries are increasingly encouraged to disregard eyewitness confidence, and up to 30% of law enforcement agencies in the United States have adopted the sequential procedure. We conducted a field study of actual eyewitnesses who were assigned to simultaneous or sequential photo lineups in the Houston Police Department over a 1-y period. Identifications were made using a three-point confidence scale, and a signal detection model was used to analyze and interpret the results. Our findings suggest that (i) confidence in an eyewitness identification from a fair lineup is a highly reliable indicator of accuracy and (ii) if there is any difference in diagnostic accuracy between the two lineup formats, it likely favors the simultaneous procedure. PMID:26699467

  2. Police-induced confessions: risk factors and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Kassin, Saul M; Drizin, Steven A; Grisso, Thomas; Gudjonsson, Gisli H; Leo, Richard A; Redlich, Allison D

    2010-02-01

    Recent DNA exonerations have shed light on the problem that people sometimes confess to crimes they did not commit. Drawing on police practices, laws concerning the admissibility of confession evidence, core principles of psychology, and forensic studies involving multiple methodologies, this White Paper summarizes what is known about police-induced confessions. In this review, we identify suspect characteristics (e.g., adolescence; intellectual disability; mental illness; and certain personality traits), interrogation tactics (e.g., excessive interrogation time; presentations of false evidence; and minimization), and the phenomenology of innocence (e.g., the tendency to waive Miranda rights) that influence confessions as well as their effects on judges and juries. This article concludes with a strong recommendation for the mandatory electronic recording of interrogations and considers other possibilities for the reform of interrogation practices and the protection of vulnerable suspect populations.

  3. Assertions of "future dangerousness" at federal capital sentencing: rates and correlates of subsequent prison misconduct and violence.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mark D; Reidy, Thomas J; Sorensen, Jon R

    2008-02-01

    The federal prison disciplinary records of federal capital inmates (n=145) who were sentenced to life without possibility of release (LWOP) by plea bargain, pre-sentencing withdrawal of the death penalty, or jury determination were retrospectively reviewed (M=6.17 years post-admission). Disaggregated prevalence rates were inversely related to infraction severity: serious infraction =0.324, assaultive infraction =0.207, serious assault =0.09, assault with moderate injury =0.007, assault with major injuries or death =0.00. Frequency rates of misconduct were equivalent to other high-security federal inmates (n=18,561), regardless of infraction severity. Government assertions of "future dangerousness" as a nonstatutory aggravating factor were not predictive of prison misconduct. These findings inform federal capital risk assessments and have public policy implications for procedural reliability in death penalty prosecutions.

  4. Living With Earthquakes in California: A Survivor's Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Lisa B.

    I write this review from a California government building in a roomful of somber, frightened strangers with armed sheriffs guarding the door. We are prohibited from leaving. A state of emergency has been declared, the airports are closed, the burly man next to me is tearing up, and all I can think of is getting home to my loved ones. What are the odds of being trapped in a jury room with armed guards and a television set, watching the collapse of the World Trade Center Towers and the smoking Pentagon? What are the odds of being trapped in a building, thinking of loved ones, as the Earth shakes, the furniture dances, and the ceiling falls when the long-awaited ‘Big One’ finally hits California? The analogy is sobering.

  5. Internet comments as a barometer of public opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oster, Elad; Gilad, Erez; Feigel, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    A new method is developed to estimate social influence in Internet communities that follow a specific developing news story. The technique stems from mean-field treatment of magnetic systems and provides a measure for community stability, such as the potential of a small perturbation to culminate in a phase-transition-like phenomenon. Three real cases of developing news stories from CNN news website are analyzed. Continuous dynamics of social influence together with time is observed together with a significant increase of social influence after the announcement of important information, such as the jury decision in a legal case. This work makes it possible to estimate the size of a group that can change the opinion of the entire population. We argue that Internet comments may predict the level of social response similar to a barometer that predicts the intensity of a coming storm in still calm environment.

  6. Emergency Vehicle Siren Noise Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angela, Peter

    Navigating safely through traffic, while responding to an emergency, is often a challenge for emergency responders. To help alert other motorists, these responders use emergency lights and/or sirens. However, the former is useful only if within clear visual range of the other drivers. This shortcoming puts a greater emphasis on the importance of the audible emergency siren, which has its own shortcomings. This study considered several emergency siren systems with the goal to determine the most effective siren system(s) based on several criteria. Multiple experimental measurements and subjective analysis using jury testing using an NVH driving simulator were performed. It was found that the traditional mechanical siren was the most effective audible warning device; however, with significantly reduced electrical power requirements, the low frequency Rumbler siren, in conjunction with a more conventional electronic Yelp siren, was the preferred option. Recommendations for future work are also given.

  7. Back to the past in California: a temporary retreat to a Tarasoff duty to warn.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Robert; Vari, Gabor; Leong, Gregory B; Silva, J Arturo

    2006-01-01

    The original Tarasoff decision created a duty for California psychotherapists to warn potential victims of their patients. After rehearing the matter two years later, the California Supreme Court, in the landmark second Tarasoff decision, changed the duty to warn to a duty to protect potential victims, with warning as only one of the options for discharging that duty. Despite this change, the Tarasoff duty frequently was referred to erroneously as a duty to warn. This misunderstanding and an ambiguous California immunity statute culminated in "simplified" jury instructions and two appellate court decisions in 2004 in which it was assumed without question that there was a duty to warn, with liability for not doing so regardless of rationale. As a result of persistent lobbying by the California Psychiatric Association and other mental health groups, a recent bill corrected the problem created by the courts, returning the Tarasoff duty to a duty to protect.

  8. Baseball bats and chocolate chip cookies: the judicial treatment of DNA in the myriad genetics litigation.

    PubMed

    Binnie, Ian; Park-Thompson, Vanessa

    2014-12-18

    In June 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court rendered a controversial ruling that naturally occurring DNA segments are "products of nature" and therefore not patentable subject matter. At this intersection between science and law, in litigation of crucial importance to patients, science, and multibillion-dollar biotech enterprises, the appellate judges sidestepped genetics and engaged in a war of metaphors from diamonds to chocolate chip cookies. This case is not an outlier. Apprehensive judges and juries in both Canada and the United States find many convenient excuses to avoid coming to grips with the underlying science in patent cases. But this is simply not acceptable. Legal rulings must be, and must seem to be, well grounded, as a matter of both law and science. The legitimacy of court decisions in the eyes of the stakeholders and the broader public depends on it. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  9. Criminal sittings – rape in the colony, New Zealand, 1862.

    PubMed

    Erai, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In 1862 His Honor, Justice Johnston, issued his instructions to the jury of the New Zealand Supreme Court for two simultaneous rape trials – the alleged rape of a European woman by two Māori men, and an alleged “assault with intent to commit a rape” of a Māori woman by a European man. This article argues that those instructions should be read within an historiographical critique of British colonial expansion, print capitalism and violence. Drawing on feminist postcolonial theorizing the question posed here, is, “What is the historical, ideological context for a newspaper reporting of the possible rape of a Māori woman in 1862?

  10. On the presumption of evidentiary independence: can confessions corrupt eyewitness identifications?

    PubMed

    Hasel, Lisa E; Kassin, Saul M

    2009-01-01

    A confession is potent evidence, persuasive to judges and juries. Is it possible that a confession can also affect other evidence? The present study tested the hypothesis that a confession will alter eyewitnesses' identification decisions. Two days after witnessing a staged theft and making an identification decision from a lineup that did not include the thief, participants were told that certain lineup members had confessed or denied guilt during a subsequent interrogation. Among those participants who had made a selection but were told that another lineup member confessed, 61% changed their identifications. Among those participants who had not made an identification, 50% went on to select the confessor when his identity was known. These findings challenge the presumption in law that different forms of evidence are independent and suggest an important overlooked mechanism by which innocent confessors are wrongfully convicted: Potentially exculpatory evidence is corrupted by a confession itself.

  11. The relationship of victim injury to the progression of sexual crimes through the criminal justice system.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Kieran M

    2012-08-01

    A number of factors are known to influence the progression of sexual crimes through the criminal justice system. The role of victim injury in influencing decision-making at pivotal stages has been addressed by a number of separate research projects. This article consolidates existing research evidence in order to highlight the important role that victim injury plays at each step of the legal process. The importance of accurate diagnosis and recording of victim injury is highlighted. Furthermore, by describing the significant impact that the presence of victim injury can have on the legal outcome, the importance of ensuring that cases without victim injury are correctly interpreted by the police, legal professionals, judiciary and the jury is heavily emphasised.

  12. A research facility for habitation questions to be built at the German Aerospace Center in Cologne: future challenges of Space medicine.

    PubMed

    Koch, B; Gerzer, R

    2008-08-01

    For long term habitation in space and for living on Moon and Mars, many questions still need to be resolved. Such habitation questions include prevention of and rehabilitation from negative effects of weightlessness that are, in many instances, comparable to problems of aging people on Earth as well as of patients during and recovery from long term stays in bed. Therefore the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine has designed a concept for a research facility that will make it possible to join space research directly with terrestrial applications. From a strategic point of view, one major emphasis of :envihab is to form a closely interrelated network of scientists and the industry and the public. The project has been in the planning phase for several years. After an international architectural contest, the winning concept was selected in 2007 by a Jury with ESA participation.

  13. Back-and-Forth Methodology for Objective Voice Quality Assessment: From/to Expert Knowledge to/from Automatic Classification of Dysphonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredouille, Corinne; Pouchoulin, Gilles; Ghio, Alain; Revis, Joana; Bonastre, Jean-François; Giovanni, Antoine

    2009-12-01

    This paper addresses voice disorder assessment. It proposes an original back-and-forth methodology involving an automatic classification system as well as knowledge of the human experts (machine learning experts, phoneticians, and pathologists). The goal of this methodology is to bring a better understanding of acoustic phenomena related to dysphonia. The automatic system was validated on a dysphonic corpus (80 female voices), rated according to the GRBAS perceptual scale by an expert jury. Firstly, focused on the frequency domain, the classification system showed the interest of 0-3000 Hz frequency band for the classification task based on the GRBAS scale. Later, an automatic phonemic analysis underlined the significance of consonants and more surprisingly of unvoiced consonants for the same classification task. Submitted to the human experts, these observations led to a manual analysis of unvoiced plosives, which highlighted a lengthening of VOT according to the dysphonia severity validated by a preliminary statistical analysis.

  14. Italian consensus conference for colonic diverticulosis and diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Rosario; Barbara, Giovanni; Pace, Fabio; Annese, Vito; Bassotti, Gabrio; Binda, Gian Andrea; Casetti, Tino; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide; Fiocca, Roberto; Laghi, Andrea; Maconi, Giovanni; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Annibale, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    The statements produced by the Consensus Conference on Diverticular Disease promoted by GRIMAD (Gruppo Italiano Malattia Diverticolare, Italian Group on Diverticular Diseases) are reported. Topics such as epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of diverticular disease (DD) in patients with uncomplicated and complicated DD were reviewed by a scientific board of experts who proposed 55 statements graded according to level of evidence and strength of recommendation, and approved by an independent jury. Each topic was explored focusing on the more relevant clinical questions. Comparison and discussion of expert opinions, pertinent statements and replies to specific questions, were presented and approved based on a systematic literature search of the available evidence. Comments were added explaining the basis for grading the evidence, particularly for controversial areas.

  15. Italian consensus conference for colonic diverticulosis and diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, Giovanni; Pace, Fabio; Annese, Vito; Bassotti, Gabrio; Binda, Gian Andrea; Casetti, Tino; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide; Fiocca, Roberto; Laghi, Andrea; Maconi, Giovanni; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Annibale, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The statements produced by the Consensus Conference on Diverticular Disease promoted by GRIMAD (Gruppo Italiano Malattia Diverticolare, Italian Group on Diverticular Diseases) are reported. Topics such as epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of diverticular disease (DD) in patients with uncomplicated and complicated DD were reviewed by a scientific board of experts who proposed 55 statements graded according to level of evidence and strength of recommendation, and approved by an independent jury. Each topic was explored focusing on the more relevant clinical questions. Comparison and discussion of expert opinions, pertinent statements and replies to specific questions, were presented and approved based on a systematic literature search of the available evidence. Comments were added explaining the basis for grading the evidence, particularly for controversial areas. PMID:25360320

  16. A generalized Lyapunov theory for robust root clustering of linear state space models with real parameter uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of analyzing and designing controllers for linear systems subject to real parameter uncertainty is considered. An elegant, unified theory for robust eigenvalue placement is presented for a class of D-regions defined by algebraic inequalities by extending the nominal matrix root clustering theory of Gutman and Jury (1981) to linear uncertain time systems. The author presents explicit conditions for matrix root clustering for different D-regions and establishes the relationship between the eigenvalue migration range and the parameter range. The bounds are all obtained by one-shot computation in the matrix domain and do not need any frequency sweeping or parameter gridding. The method uses the generalized Lyapunov theory for getting the bounds.

  17. Corruption case.

    PubMed

    1999-07-23

    A Federal jury in Puerto Rico found three defendants guilty of participating in the theft of $2.2 million in Federal funds from the San Juan AIDS Institute. The key figure in the case is [name removed], a consultant to the institute. He was convicted of 12 counts of money laundering and faces up to 25 years in prison. Two other administrative officials were also convicted in the case. Four others have pleaded guilty, and three more await trial. Rep. Jose Granados Navado was among those implicated; he received $100,000 for his campaign for mayor of San Juan in 1988 from the institute=s medical director. U.S. Rep. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) has called for an audit of all Ryan White CARE Act funds since this scandal was uncovered.

  18. The potential of dyslexic individuals in communication design education.

    PubMed

    Corlu, Muzaffer; Ozcan, Oğuzhan; Korkmazlar, Umran

    2007-01-01

    If dyslexic individuals have the ability to express themselves in different ways, particularly in the field of modern graphic design, would they be a favoured group in creating the extraordinary and outstanding ideas that are required in communication design? The study group consisted of 20 primary school dyslexics between ages of 7-12 and 20 non-dyslexics serving as a control group. A jury with four specialists evaluated the drawings gathered from the 40 participants. Even though we might not say surely that the dyslexics are the best possible candidates for communication design education, based on the statistical results we have concluded that they should be among the potential candidates for both general communication design education and for more specific minor study areas such as icon design.

  19. Tobacco industry litigation strategies to oppose tobacco control media campaigns

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, J K; Glantz, Stanton A

    2006-01-01

    Objective To document the tobacco industry's litigation strategy to impede tobacco control media campaigns. Methods Data were collected from news and reports, tobacco industry documents, and interviews with health advocates and media campaign staff. Results RJ Reynolds and Lorillard attempted to halt California's Media Campaign alleging that the campaign polluted jury pools and violated First Amendment rights because they were compelled to pay for anti‐industry ads. The American Legacy Foundation was accused of violating the Master Settlement Agreement's vilification clause because its ads attacked the tobacco industry. The tobacco companies lost these legal challenges. Conclusion The tobacco industry has expanded its efforts to oppose tobacco control media campaigns through litigation strategies. While litigation is a part of tobacco industry business, it imposes a financial burden and impediment to media campaigns' productivity. Tobacco control professionals need to anticipate these challenges and be prepared to defend against them. PMID:16436406

  20. Understanding pretrial publicity: predecisional distortion of evidence by mock jurors.

    PubMed

    Hope, Lorraine; Memon, Amina; McGeorge, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Prejudicial pretrial publicity (PTP) constitutes a serious source of juror bias. The current study examined differences in predecisional distortion for mock jurors exposed to negative PTP (N-PTP) versus nonexposed control participants. According to work by K. A. Carlson and J. E. Russo (2001), predecisional distortion occurs when jurors bias new evidence in favor of their current leading party (prosecution or defense) rather than evaluating this information for its actual probative properties. Jury-eligible university students (N=116) acted as jurors in a mock trial. Elevated rates of guilty verdicts were observed in the N-PTP condition. Predecisional distortion scores were significantly higher in the N-PTP condition and reflected a proprosecution bias. The effect of prejudicial PTP on verdict outcomes was mediated by predecisional distortion in the evaluation of testimony. Results are discussed in relation to motivated decision making and confirmation biases. Copyright 2004 American Psychological Association

  1. Stellivore extraterrestrials? Binary stars as living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Clément

    2016-11-01

    We lack signs of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) despite decades of observation in the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Could evidence be buried in existing data? To recognize ETI, we first propose criteria discerning life from non-life based on thermodynamics and living systems theory. Then we extrapolate civilizational development to both external and internal growth. Taken together, these two trends lead to an argument that some existing binary stars might actually be ETI. Since these hypothetical beings feed actively on stars, we call them "stellivores". I present an independent thermodynamic argument for their existence, with a metabolic interpretation of interacting binary stars. The jury is still out, but the hypothesis is empirically testable with existing astrophysical data.

  2. Management of infections in cirrhotic patients: report of a consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Fagiuoli, Stefano; Colli, Agostino; Bruno, Raffaele; Burra, Patrizia; Craxì, Antonio; Gaeta, Giovan Battista; Grossi, Paolo; Mondelli, Mario U; Puoti, Massimo; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Stefani, Stefania; Toniutto, Pierluigi

    2014-03-01

    The statements produced by the consensus conference on infection in end-stage liver disease promoted by the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, are here reported. The topics of epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment of infections in patient with compensated and decompensated liver cirrhosis were reviewed by a scientific board of experts who proposed 26 statements that were graded according to level of evidence and strength of recommendation, and approved by an independent jury. Each topic was explored focusing on the more relevant clinical questions. By systematic literature search of available evidence, comparison and discussion of expert opinions, pertinent statements answering specific questions were presented and approved. Short comments were added to explain the basis for grading evidence particularly on case of controversial areas.

  3. The Internet and poverty: real help or real hype? Panos Briefing No. 28.

    PubMed

    Pruett, D; Deane, J

    1998-01-01

    Governments, donors and development organisations are rushing to realise the benefits that Internet access promises in the fight against poverty. But are the benefits it has brought so far merely isolated examples or are they signs that a revolution is underway? Access to information is an essential condition of development. The Internet has prompted a change in development thinking and many donor and multilateral lending organisations are radically reshaping their policies for the new information age. But is the enthusiasm among donors for spending on Internet development diverting funds from more traditional forms of development assistance? In terms of its most adaptive component, the World Wide Web, the Internet is still only four years old. Real hype or real help? The jury is still out. Quite simply, it is still too soon to tell.

  4. STS-47 MS Davis and Pilot Brown repair ISAIAH humidity problem aboard OV-105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr (foreground) and Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis (left) team up to cure a high humidity problem in the Israel Space Agency Investigation About Hornets (ISAIAH) experiment on the middeck of Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Via a jury-rigged hose hook-up, the two were able to blow air from a launch and entry suit (LES) fan into the experiment, thus eliminating condesation that obscured the viewing of ISAIAH. ISAIAH, an enclosure located in locker MF43H, contains 180 female Oriental Hornets and will examine the effects of microgravity on the orientation, reproductive capability and social activity of the hornets. Also, the direction of comb-building by hornet workers in microgravity, as well as the structural integrity of the combs, will be examined.

  5. Religious characteristics and the death penalty.

    PubMed

    Miller, Monica K; Hayward, R David

    2008-04-01

    Using one mock trial scenario, this study investigated whether religious and demographic factors were related to death penalty attitudes and sentencing verdicts. Those who favored the death penalty differed from those who had doubts about the penalty in gender, affiliation, fundamentalism, evangelism, literal Biblical interpretism, beliefs about God's attitudes toward murders, and perceptions of how their religious groups felt about the death penalty. These relationships generally held after mock jurors were death qualified. Gender, fundamentalism, literal interpretism, beliefs about God's death penalty position, and perceptions of how one's religious group felt about the death penalty predicted death penalty sentencing verdicts. Future research could determine whether using peremptory challenges to exclude potential jurors based on religion can help lawyers choose a more favorable jury.

  6. In the public interest: intellectual disability, the Supreme Court, and the death penalty.

    PubMed

    Abeles, Norman

    2010-11-01

    This article deals with a case that recently came before the U.S. Supreme Court. The issues involved whether attorneys provided effective assistance to a person convicted of murder when no mitigating evidence was presented (either strategically or by neglect) to the jury concerning the intellectual disabilities of their client during the death penalty phase of the trial. The Supreme Court had previously ruled that the death penalty for intellectually disabled individuals (mentally retarded) constituted cruel and unusual punishment. In this case the attorneys made a strategic decision not to present possibly mitigating evidence for the death penalty phase. The Supreme Court considered whether the appeals court abdicated its judicial review responsibilities. The results of psychological evaluations are presented, and the decisions of the Supreme Court are discussed.

  7. Jurors' locus of control and defendants' attractiveness in death penalty sentencing.

    PubMed

    Beckham, Crystal M; Spray, Beverly J; Pietz, Christina A

    2007-06-01

    The authors examined the relationship between jurors' locus of control and defendants' attractiveness in death penalty sentencing. Ninety-eight participants voluntarily served as mock jurors. The authors administered J. B. Rotter's (1966) Internal-External Locus of Control Scale to participants and then randomly assigned them to a group with either an attractive or an unattractive defendant (represented by photographs). Participants read a murder vignette and selected a punishment--either a lifetime jail sentence or the death penalty-for the defendant. Results indicated that neither jurors' locus of control nor defendants' attractiveness influenced sentencing. However, jurors' age and gender significantly influenced sentencing. Men, with the exception of the youngest men, were more likely than women to choose the death penalty. Additionally, young women were more likely than older women to select the death penalty. The authors discuss the implications of these results for the study of jury behavior and bias.

  8. Commentary: Pursuing justice in death penalty trials.

    PubMed

    Watson, Clarence; Eth, Spencer; Leong, Gregory B

    2012-01-01

    The capital trial, by its nature, is fraught with emotionally disturbing elements that jurors must face when deciding the ultimate fate of a guilty defendant. A confluence of mitigating and aggravating factors influences a capital jury's decision to impose a sentence of death. The presence or absence of defendant remorse in these cases may make all the difference in whether a capital defendant's life is spared. This commentary examines the onerous emotional toll encountered by capital jurors in light of the findings of Corwin and colleagues regarding defendant remorse and juror's need for affect. The commentary also presents practical and ethics-related considerations that should be kept in mind when reflecting on their study.

  9. Can jurors recognize missing control groups, confounds, and experimenter bias in psychological science?

    PubMed

    McAuliff, Bradley D; Kovera, Margaret Bull; Nunez, Gabriel

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the ability of jury-eligible community members (N = 248) to detect internal validity threats in psychological science presented during a trial. Participants read a case summary in which an expert testified about a study that varied in internal validity (valid, missing control group, confound, and experimenter bias) and ecological validity (high, low). Ratings of expert evidence quality and expert credibility were higher for the valid versus missing control group versions only. Internal validity did not influence verdict or ratings of plaintiff credibility and no differences emerged as a function of ecological validity. Expert evidence quality, expert credibility, and plaintiff credibility were positively correlated with verdict. Implications for the scientific reasoning literature and for trials containing psychological science are discussed.

  10. "A Psychopath by Any Other Name?": Juror Perceptions of the DSM-5 "Limited Prosocial Emotions" Specifier.

    PubMed

    Edens, John F; Mowle, Elyse N; Clark, John W; Magyar, Melissa S

    2017-02-01

    DSM-5 recently added the specifier "Limited Prosocial Emotions" (LPE) to the Conduct Disorder (CD) diagnosis, yet little is known about how these traits will affect attitudes toward CD youth. Laypersons attending jury duty (N = 326) were randomly assigned to one of four case vignette conditions in which a male juvenile offender was identified as having (a) CD symptoms only, (b) CD symptoms plus a diagnostic label, (c) CD symptoms plus a diagnostic label and description of LPE traits, or (d) CD symptoms plus a description of LPE traits and a "psychopath" label. LPE traits led to more negative perceptions of the youth (e.g., more dangerous, evil, and psychopathic) and adding the psychopath label to the LPE specifier resulted in somewhat stronger support for punishment and mandated treatment. The LPE specifier may provide useful diagnostic information, but these findings raise serious concerns that it will stigmatize youth in the legal system.

  11. I Spy with My Little Eye: Jurors' Detection of Internal Validity Threats in Expert Evidence

    PubMed Central

    McAuliff, Bradley D.; Duckworth, Tejah D.

    2010-01-01

    This experiment examined whether jury-eligible community members (N = 223) were able to detect internally invalid psychological science presented at trial. Participants read a simulated child sexual abuse case in which the defense expert described a study he had conducted on witness memory and suggestibility. We varied the study's internal validity (valid, missing control group, confound, and experimenter bias) and publication status (published, unpublished). Expert evidence quality ratings were higher for the valid versus missing control group version only. Publication increased ratings of defendant guilt when the study was missing a control group. Variations in internal validity did not influence perceptions of child victim credibility or police interview quality. Participants' limited detection of internal validity threats underscores the need to examine the effectiveness of traditional legal safeguards against junk science in court and improve the scientific reasoning ability of lay people and legal professionals. PMID:20162342

  12. A research facility for habitation questions to be built at the German Aerospace Center in Cologne: future challenges of Space medicine

    PubMed Central

    Koch, B; Gerzer, R

    2008-01-01

    For long term habitation in space and for living on Moon and Mars, many questions still need to be resolved. Such habitation questions include prevention of and rehabilitation from negative effects of weightlessness that are, in many instances, comparable to problems of aging people on Earth as well as of patients during and recovery from long term stays in bed. Therefore the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine has designed a concept for a research facility that will make it possible to join space research directly with terrestrial applications. From a strategic point of view, one major emphasis of :envihab is to form a closely interrelated network of scientists and the industry and the public. The project has been in the planning phase for several years. After an international architectural contest, the winning concept was selected in 2007 by a Jury with ESA participation. PMID:19048099

  13. Results of the First Bruno's International Creative Competition in the field of astronomy and space sciences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshkina, E.; Aleshkin, V.

    Results of the First International Creative Competition named after Giordano Bruno are presented. The main goal of the competition was to raise interest in astronomy, space exploration and related questions. There were two categories of participants - senior school students aged 13-18 years (A) and adult amateurs of astronomy (B). The topic of the first competition was "The Human and His/Her place in the Universe". The languages of the papers were to be Russian or English. 36 papers were submitted for the competition. On the decision of the jury it was awarded three degrees in the category A, one degree in the category B and 4 special nominations. The awarding ceremony was held in October 2002 in the Palace of the Youth Creativity in Sankt-Petersburg. Winners from Bulgaria, United Kingdom, Russia, Byelorussia, Latvia and Kazakhstan participated in the ceremony. It is planed to publish the best papers in special volume in Russian and English.

  14. The Consequences of Official Labels: An Examination of the Rights Lost by the Mentally Ill and Mentally Incompetent Since 1989.

    PubMed

    Walker, Andrea M; Klein, Michael S; Hemmens, Craig; Stohr, Mary K; Burton, Velmer S

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a survey of state statutes which restrict the civil rights of persons with a mental illness or who have been declared mentally incompetent. Five civil rights (voting, holding public office, jury service, parenting, and marriage) are examined. The results of this study are compared with the results of studies conducted in 1989 and 1999 to determine what changes have occurred over time in the restriction of civil rights of those suffering from mental health problems. This comparison reveals that states continue to restrict the rights of the mentally ill and incompetent, and that there is a trend towards increased restriction of political rights, including the right to vote and hold public office.

  15. What people believe about how memory works: a representative survey of the U.S. population.

    PubMed

    Simons, Daniel J; Chabris, Christopher F

    2011-01-01

    Incorrect beliefs about the properties of memory have broad implications: the media conflate normal forgetting and inadvertent memory distortion with intentional deceit, juries issue verdicts based on flawed intuitions about the accuracy and confidence of testimony, and students misunderstand the role of memory in learning. We conducted a large representative telephone survey of the U.S. population to assess common beliefs about the properties of memory. Substantial numbers of respondents agreed with propositions that conflict with expert consensus: Amnesia results in the inability to remember one's own identity (83% of respondents agreed), unexpected objects generally grab attention (78%), memory works like a video camera (63%), memory can be enhanced through hypnosis (55%), memory is permanent (48%), and the testimony of a single confident eyewitness should be enough to convict a criminal defendant (37%). This discrepancy between popular belief and scientific consensus has implications from the classroom to the courtroom.

  16. Can Jurors Recognize Missing Control Groups, Confounds, and Experimenter Bias in Psychological Science?

    PubMed Central

    McAuliff, Bradley D.; Kovera, Margaret Bull; Nunez, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the ability of jury-eligible community members (N = 248) to detect internal validity threats in psychological science presented during a trial. Participants read a case summary in which an expert testified about a study that varied in internal validity (valid, missing control group, confound, and experimenter bias) and ecological validity (high, low). Ratings of expert evidence quality and expert credibility were higher for the valid versus missing control group versions only. Internal validity did not influence verdict or ratings of plaintiff credibility and no differences emerged as a function of ecological validity. Expert evidence quality, expert credibility, and plaintiff credibility were positively correlated with verdict. Implications for the scientific reasoning literature and for trials containing psychological science are discussed. PMID:18587635

  17. [Orbital cellulitis in childhood. Medical-surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Gómez Campderá, J; Aranguez Moreno, G; Escamilla Carpintero, Y; Urán, M M; García-Món Marañés, F

    2000-03-01

    Orbital cellulitis is an uncommon complication resulting from a spectrum of disorders commonly found in pediatric practice. It usually occurs as a complication of infection of the paranasal sinuses, although it also can be caused by eyelid or dental juries, dental infection and external ocular infection. We studied the clinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of 152 children diagnosed as periorbital cellulitis and 27 children with orbital cellulitis admitted to our hospital in a 16-year period from January 1983 to December 1998. Twenty-four percent of patients (43 cases) had positive cultures. Thirty children with septal or preseptal cellulitis developed neurological or ophthalmological complications. Intravenous or oral antibiotic administration was effective in 150 patients, but a significant proportion required surgery of the paranasal sinus or orbit (16%).

  18. Rethinking argumentation-teaching strategies and indigenous knowledge in South African science classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Òtúlàjà, Fẹ´Mi S.; Cameron, Ann; Msimanga, Audrey

    2011-09-01

    Our response to Hewson and Ogunniyi's paper focuses, on the one hand, on some of the underlying tensions associated with alinging indigenous knowledge systems with westernized science in South African science classrooms, as suggested by the new, post-apartheid, curriculum. On the other hand, the use of argumentation as a vehicle to accomplish the alignment when the jury is still out on the appropriateness of argumentation as a pedagogical and research tool heightens the tension. We argue that the need for education stakeholders from indigenous heritages to value, know and document their own indigenous knowledge becomes paramount. The textualizing of indigenous knowledge, as has been done in western science, will create repositories for teachers to access and may help with the argumentation strategies such as advocated by the authors.

  19. Court affirms $234,000 verdict against free-spending caregiver.

    PubMed

    1996-08-09

    [Name removed], a man with AIDS, transferred his inherited money to his live-in caregiver, [name removed] executed a power of attorney in [name removed]' favor, and made her executrix of his will. One month after [name removed] spent [name removed]'s inheritance, she ordered him out of her home. [Name removed] sued [name removed] for breach of fiduciary duty, conversion, and fraud in a Harris County, TX, court. [Name removed] was awarded actual and exemplary damages. On appeal, [name removed] argued that there was insufficient evidence to support the verdict. The Texas Court of Appeals upheld the jury verdict, stating that acceptance of power of attorney created an agency relationship between [name removed] and [name removed].

  20. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    Nordita, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, was founded in 1957 by Niels Bohr and Torsten Gustafsson at Blegdamsvej in Copenhagen, joint to Bohr's legendary Institute. Today, memories of Bohr and his famous visitors -- Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Lev Landau and many others -- strongly contribute to Nordita's genius loci and inspire next generations of her visitors. Nordita awards ``Nordic Project'' grants to individual Nordic physicists to help conduct a world-class research in Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Island, Norway, and Sweden). Research reported here was generously supported by the Nordic Project "Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Black Hole and Neutron Star sources" awarded in 2005 to Marek Abramowicz. The Project supported the ``Nordita Workdays on QPO" (March 25 -- April 1, 2005) organized by Marek Abramowicz, Axel Brandenburg and Juri Poutanen with help of Hanne Bergen, Helle http://www.nordita.dk/positions/norproject.html

  1. Court ruling demonstrates ACA's power to reduce future medical expenses.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Leslie M

    2016-04-01

    Industry insiders who handle litigation involving catastrophic injury cases have eagerly awaited the first rulings to address the impact, if any, of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), often referred to as Obamacare, on claims for future damages. Before the ACA, it was uncertain whether injured individuals would have health insurance to cover ever-growing health care costs in the future. Consequently, in most jurisdictions, the applicable rule of law has prevented the argument that future damages should be reduced because of the availability of health insurance. Because of this, damages have remained essentially unrebutted, and the law has permitted such unrebutted damage projections to be calculated into the future. These projections, primarily in the form of life care plans, are generally the single largest financial component of damage claims. Such plans often project massive expenses that can drive equally massive jury verdicts. © 2016 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  2. Fostering juror comfort: effects of an orientation videotape.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Gregory S; Ross, David F; Bradshaw, Emily E; Headrick, Betty; Thomas, W Neil

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the present study is to assess the impact of a juror orientation videotape on juror knowledge of the legal system and comfort levels regarding jury service. Juror knowledge and comfort were measured using the Juror Knowledge and Comfort Scale (JKCS). It was hypothesized that jurors exposed to the orientation videotape would be significantly more knowledgeable about the legal system and significantly more comfortable with their role as jurors. It was further hypothesized that there would be a significant correlation between the knowledge scale and comfort scale of the JKCS. Results indicate that jurors exposed to the orientation videotape scored significantly higher on both the knowledge scale and comfort scale than jurors not exposed to the orientation videotape. There is also a significant correlation between the juror knowledge and comfort components of the JKCS. The implications of the findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  3. The "name-ease" effect and its dual impact on importance judgments.

    PubMed

    Labroo, Aparna A; Lambotte, Soraya; Zhang, Yan

    2009-12-01

    ABSTRACT- We demonstrate that merely naming a research finding elicits feelings of ease (a "name-ease" effect). These feelings of ease can reduce or enhance the finding's perceived importance depending on whether people are making inferences about how understandable or how memorable the finding is. When people assess their understanding of a finding, feelings of ease reduce the finding's perceived importance. This is because people usually invest effort to understand important information but also mistakenly infer the reverse-namely, that information that requires effort to be understood is important. In contrast, when people assess the memorability of a finding, feelings of ease increase the finding's perceived importance. Because people usually recall important information easily, in this case they equate ease with importance. Psychological effects, economic principles, math theorems, jury cases, and decisions to fund medical research can all show these effects.

  4. Bias, discrimination, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Puhl, R; Brownell, K D

    2001-12-01

    This article reviews information on discriminatory attitudes and behaviors against obese individuals, integrates this to show whether systematic discrimination occurs and why, and discusses needed work in the field. Clear and consistent stigmatization, and in some cases discrimination, can be documented in three important areas of living: employment, education, and health care. Among the findings are that 28% of teachers in one study said that becoming obese is the worst thing that can happen to a person; 24% of nurses said that they are "repulsed" by obese persons; and, controlling for income and grades, parents provide less college support for their overweight than for their thin children. There are also suggestions but not yet documentation of discrimination occurring in adoption proceedings, jury selection, housing, and other areas. Given the vast numbers of people potentially affected, it is important to consider the research-related, educational, and social policy implications of these findings.

  5. What People Believe about How Memory Works: A Representative Survey of the U.S. Population

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Daniel J.; Chabris, Christopher F.

    2011-01-01

    Incorrect beliefs about the properties of memory have broad implications: The media conflate normal forgetting and inadvertent memory distortion with intentional deceit, juries issue verdicts based on flawed intuitions about the accuracy and confidence of testimony, and students misunderstand the role of memory in learning. We conducted a large representative telephone survey of the U.S. population to assess common beliefs about the properties of memory. Substantial numbers of respondents agreed with propositions that conflict with expert consensus: Amnesia results in the inability to remember one's own identity (83% of respondents agreed), unexpected objects generally grab attention (78%), memory works like a video camera (63%), memory can be enhanced through hypnosis (55%), memory is permanent (48%), and the testimony of a single confident eyewitness should be enough to convict a criminal defendant (37%). This discrepancy between popular belief and scientific consensus has implications from the classroom to the courtroom. PMID:21826204

  6. Examining Harry Thaw's "brain-storm" defense: APA and ANA presidents as expert witnesses in a 1907 trial.

    PubMed

    Pinta, Emil R

    2008-06-01

    In 1907, Harry K. Thaw, son of a railroad multi-millionaire, stood trial for shooting and killing architect Stanford White during the performance of a Broadway musical. The defense claimed that Thaw had experienced a "brain storm" causing temporary insanity. The brain-storm defense was ridiculed by professional groups, the public and the press. However, the defense experts were all respected leaders in their fields. They included five past or future presidents of the American Psychiatric Association and American Neurological Association. With no standard terminology in 1907, the much-maligned brain-storm diagnosis was in many respects an appropriate term for a sudden, drastic and temporary defect of reasoning having a physical cause. In spite of a strict test for mental nonresponsibility, the jury did not return a murder verdict.

  7. Failings of trauma-specific and related psychological tests in detecting post-traumatic stress disorder in forensic settings.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Stuart B; Martell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Judges and juries tend to be particularly impressed by test data, especially quantitative test data. Psychometric tests specific for assessing the presence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are commonly employed by forensic mental health evaluators. Most of these instruments, however, have been designed to detect PTSD in treatment or research, and not forensic, settings. Those who rely on these measures without adequate awareness of their often significant limits in correctly identifying malingering may induce finders of fact to inordinately confidently accept the presence of PTSD. This article reviews problematic structural and content components of trauma-specific and related instruments used to evaluate PTSD and discusses the utility of specific techniques liable to be used in forensic settings to "fool" these measures.

  8. Criminal Evidence Act, 1992 [Excerpts. 7 July 1992].

    PubMed

    1993-04-30

    This Act amends Ireland's law on evidence to do the following among other things: a) in cases involving sexual or violent acts, allow a person under the age of 17 to give evidence by means of a live television link, unless the court sees good reason to the contrary; b) allow, upon a court's authorization, questions to be put to such a person in such a case by means of an intermediary; c) allow video recordings of interviews with children conducted by police officers or other competent persons to be admitted as evidence in such cases; and d) abolish the requirement that the unsworn evidence of a child must be corroborated and leave to the court's discretion whether to warn a jury about convicting a person on the basis of the uncorroborated evidence of a child. Additional provisions of the Act relate to the competence and compellability of spouses and former spouses to give evidence.

  9. Blood tests showing nonpaternity-conclusive or rebuttable evidence? The Chaplin case revisited.

    PubMed

    Benson, F

    1981-09-01

    A defendant accused of being the father of an illegitimate child denies responsibility. Blood samples from the child, mother, and alleged father are studied and the results reveal that the alleged father is excluded. What weight, if any, should the court (if a trial is held) or the jury give to the evidence of nonpaternity? Should the evidence be treated as conclusive proof of nonpaternity or should other evidence be admitted in the trial to overcome the nonpaternity evidence? A medical expert might conclude that a controversy exists because of the court's questioned trustworthiness of the paternity blood testing, while a legal expert might conclude that the controversy arises because of burdens of proof. Both conclusions are valid. The Berry v. Chaplin case held in California in 1946 illustrates this circumstance. In refreshing our memories on this case, we can review the problem in light of today's knowledge.

  10. The Syllogism of Neuro-Economics

    PubMed Central

    Padoa-Schioppa, Camillo

    2008-01-01

    If Neuroscience is to contribute to Economics, it will do so by the way of Psychology. Neural data can and do lead to better psychological theories, and psychological insights can and do lead to better economic models. Hence, Neuroscience can in principle contribute to Economics. Whether it actually will do so is an empirical question and the jury is still out. Economics currently faces theoretical and empirical challenges analogous to those faced by Physics at the turn of the 20th century and ultimately addressed by quantum theory. If “quantum Economics” will emerge in the coming decades, it may well be founded on such concepts as cognitive processes and brain activity. PMID:19050765

  11. An interdisciplinary mock trial involving pharmacy, law, and ethics.

    PubMed

    Broeseker, A E; Jones, M M

    1999-01-01

    To describe an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to illustrate the relationship between healthcare ethics and law. A mock trial was created for students enrolled in the Samford University McWhorter School of Pharmacy and Department of Paralegal Education. The trial served as the starting point to discuss confidentiality in health care in general and pharmacy in particular. Students from both programs served on the jury and rendered a verdict after the case had been presented. The Alabama statute concerning exceptions to confidentiality is reviewed. The students' assignment and lessons learned are also described. Students thoroughly enjoyed this method of teaching and learning. The mock trial provided an interesting way to exemplify the often complex relationship between healthcare ethics and law.

  12. An instrument for measuring cancer patients' preferences for support groups.

    PubMed

    Smoczyk, C M; Zhu, W; Whatley, M H

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable instrument to assess cancer patients' preferences for all types of social support and organizational features of cancer support groups. The content of the instrument was the result of a detailed analysis of four resources: (1) literature relating to cancer support group interventions, (2) program materials from existing groups, (3) interviews with individuals who developed or directed groups, and (4) interviews with patients who have participated in cancer support groups. A jury of six experts was used to establish content validity of the instrument. The reliability of the instrument was examined by measuring a sample of 258 cancer patients. The reliability coefficients of the instrument were all above .80, except for two types of social support (instrumental and informational-educational), which were .72 and .78, respectively. It was concluded that the instrument produces valid and reliable measurements of cancer patients' preferences for cancer support groups.

  13. Estimating the reliability of eyewitness identifications from police lineups.

    PubMed

    Wixted, John T; Mickes, Laura; Dunn, John C; Clark, Steven E; Wells, William

    2016-01-12

    Laboratory-based mock crime studies have often been interpreted to mean that (i) eyewitness confidence in an identification made from a lineup is a weak indicator of accuracy and (ii) sequential lineups are diagnostically superior to traditional simultaneous lineups. Largely as a result, juries are increasingly encouraged to disregard eyewitness confidence, and up to 30% of law enforcement agencies in the United States have adopted the sequential procedure. We conducted a field study of actual eyewitnesses who were assigned to simultaneous or sequential photo lineups in the Houston Police Department over a 1-y period. Identifications were made using a three-point confidence scale, and a signal detection model was used to analyze and interpret the results. Our findings suggest that (i) confidence in an eyewitness identification from a fair lineup is a highly reliable indicator of accuracy and (ii) if there is any difference in diagnostic accuracy between the two lineup formats, it likely favors the simultaneous procedure.

  14. Appeals court says FBI erred in terminating doctor's services. Federal Bureau of Investigations.

    PubMed

    1995-09-22

    The late Dr. [name removed] of San Francisco had a four-year contract to perform physical exams on local FBI agents and job applicants. When the FBI learned that Dr. [name removed] had AIDS, the San Francisco field office stopped using his services. An initial non-jury trial found that Dr. [name removed] did not have private right of action to sue the Federal government, and that his evasive answers as to his state of health and risk of transmission had prevented the FBI from learning the extent of risk. Upon appeal by Dr. [name removed]'s estate, however, a Federal court determined that the FBI had terminated Dr. [name removed] based on his HIV status, not on the quality of his work. The FBI's actions violated the 1973 Rehabilitation Act barring government-funded programs from discrimination based on disability.

  15. An Introduction to Medical Malpractice in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Medical malpractice law in the United States is derived from English common law, and was developed by rulings in various state courts. Medical malpractice lawsuits are a relatively common occurrence in the United States. The legal system is designed to encourage extensive discovery and negotiations between adversarial parties with the goal of resolving the dispute without going to jury trial. The injured patient must show that the physician acted negligently in rendering care, and that such negligence resulted in injury. To do so, four legal elements must be proven: (1) a professional duty owed to the patient; (2) breach of such duty; (3) injury caused by the breach; and (4) resulting damages. Money damages, if awarded, typically take into account both actual economic loss and noneconomic loss, such as pain and suffering. PMID:19034593

  16. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1982-12-01

    Your editor was fortunate to have an interview with the man who, along with Emmett Leith and Juris Upatnieks at the University of Michigan, was responsible for the rebirth of holography in the early 1960s. Professor Denisyuk is seldom seen in the West so I would like to share parts of the conversation that I had with him at the Volvilov Optical Institute, Leningrad, this October 1982. He is a vigorous and enthusiastic man with a great deal of personal charm. Our conversa-tions were of special interest to me because they supported my suspicion that truly great scientists are not merely smarter and harder working than the rest of us, but also are skilled at formulating both questions and answers in starkly simple ways.

  17. One American Perspective on the Rights of Accused: An Initial Survey of Miranda Rights in a Broader Context.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Richard; Sharf, Allyson J; Clark, John W; Drogin, Eric Y; Winningham, Darby B; Williams, Margot M

    2016-07-01

    In the wake of countless police dramas, commonly held misperceptions endure that the American public knows both Miranda warnings and concomitant rights. Past research has tested public knowledge of Miranda per se, without evaluating additional misconceptions. The current investigation utilizes the European Union's much more all-encompassing safeguards, as delineated in the EU's 2012 Directive and Letter of Rights. Besides knowledge of Miranda, the advisability of these enhanced rights and protections was also assessed. In order to obtain a cross-section of the community, 619 participants were recruited from actual jury pools. Interestingly, they believed that Miranda afforded arrestees many more protections than it actually does. In general, nearly all (>90%) agreed that the accused should be given accurate information (e.g., charges and alleged criminal acts) coupled with an absence of police deception. The potential implications of these findings are discussed as they relate to police practices and due process. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Junking good science: undoing Daubert v Merrill Dow through cross-examination and argument.

    PubMed

    Givelber, Daniel; Strickler, Lori

    2006-01-01

    For more than 40 years, the tobacco industry prevailed in lawsuits brought by injured smokers, despite overwhelming epidemiological evidence that smoking caused lung cancer. Tobacco lawyers were able to create doubt about causation. They sought to persuade jurors that "everybody knew" smoking was harmful but "nobody knows" what causes cancer by recreating in court the scientific debate resolved by the 1964 Surgeon General's Report. The particularistic structure of jury trials combined with the law's mechanistic view of causation enables a defendant to contest virtually any claim concerning disease causation. Despite judicial efforts to eliminate "junk science" from lawsuits, a well-financed defendant may succeed in persuading jurors of the epidemiological equivalent of the proposition that the earth is flat.

  19. Defining and evaluating perceptions of victim blame in antigay hate crimes.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Robert J; Nobles, Matt R; Amacker, Amanda M; Dovoedo, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    Victimology research often hinges on attribution of blame toward victims despite a lack of conceptual agreement on the definition and measure of the construct. Drawing on established blame attribution and intent literature, the present study evaluates psychometric properties of the Perceptions of Victim Blame Scale (PVBS) using mock jury samples in a vignette-based capital murder antigay hate crime context. Factor analyses show support for a three-factor structure with the following perceptions of victim blame subscales: Malice, Recklessness, and Unreliability. All factors displayed expected positive associations with homonegativity and authoritarianism. Likewise, all factors displayed null relations with trait aggression and social desirability. Only the Malice factor predicted sentencing decisions after controlling for crime condition and support for the death penalty. Results are reviewed with respect to blame attribution theory and practical application of a revised PVBS.

  20. The Potential of Dyslexic Individuals in Communication Design Education

    PubMed Central

    Çorlu, Muzaffer; Özcan, O&gcaron;uzhan; Korkmazlar, Ümran

    2007-01-01

    If dyslexic individuals have the ability to express themselves in different ways, particularly in the field of modern graphic design, would they be a favoured group in creating the extraordinary and outstanding ideas that are required in communication design? The study group consisted of 20 primary school dyslexics between ages of 7–12 and 20 non-dyslexics serving as a control group. A jury with four specialists evaluated the drawings gathered from the 40 participants. Even though we might not say surely that the dyslexics are the best possible candidates for communication design education, based on the statistical results we have concluded that they should be among the potential candidates for both general communication design education and for more specific minor study areas such as icon design. PMID:18430979