Science.gov

Sample records for k-12 significantly alters

  1. Partnerships and Local K-12 Arts Education Policy Development: Significant Beginnings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colley, Bernadette D.

    2008-01-01

    The author presents reviews that identify success factors in music and arts education partnerships between cultural institutions and K-12 schools. She incorporates the evaluation of one Massachusetts partnership, Arts Can Teach (ACT), to examine the connection between partnerships and K-12 arts-program policy decisions. ACT is a collaborative…

  2. Physiology of Escherichia coli K-12 During Conjugation: Altered Recipient Cell Functions Associated with Lethal Zygosis

    PubMed Central

    Skurray, Ronald A.; Reeves, Peter

    1973-01-01

    The number of viable F− cells decreases when Escherichia coli recipient cells are mixed with an excess of Hfr cells. Evidence is presented showing that lethal zygosis was accompanied by changes in the physiology of the recipient cells, including (i) inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, (ii) inhibition of β-galactosidase induction, (iii) altered transport and accumulation of galactosides, and (iv) leakage of β-galactosidase into the supernatant fluid. The results are discussed in terms of possible conjugation-associated changes that, at high Hfr to F− ratios, lead to lethal zygosis. PMID:4572705

  3. Increasing the Roles and Significance of Teachers in Policymaking for K-12 Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Convocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Engineering is a small but growing part of K-12 education. Curricula that use the principles and practices of engineering are providing opportunities for elementary, middle, and high school students to design solutions to problems of immediate practical and societal importance. Professional development programs are showing teachers how to use…

  4. K-12 School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the buildings of two K-12 schools, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on the architects and design team, a general building description, and general construction costs and specifications. Also provides a rough site plan and photographs. (EV)

  5. K-12 Art Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furney, Trudy; And Others

    The development of students in various art fields is the focus of this K-12 art curriculum guide. The philosophy of the art program and the roles of administrator, teacher, and parent are outlined. The underlying school community relationships, and the objective, goals, and purposes of art education are described. Phases of child development in…

  6. Thermosensitive mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 altered in the catalytic Subunit and in a Regulatory factor of the glutamy-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J; Delcuve, G

    1975-05-01

    The glutamyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase (GluRS) of a partial revertants (ts plus or minus) of the thermosensitive (ts) mutant strain JP1449 (LOcus gltx) and of a ts mutant strain EM111-ts1 with a lesion in or near the locus gltx have been studied to find the relation between these two genetic loci known to influence the GluRS activity in vitro and the presence of a catalytic subunit and of a regulatory subunit in the GluRS purified from Escherichia coli K-12. The ts character of strain JP1449-18ts plus or minus is co-transduced with the marker dsdA at the same frequency as is the ts character of strain JP1449. Its purified GluRS is very thermolabile and its Km for glutamate is higher than that of a wild-type GluRS. These results indicate that the locus gltX is in the structural gene for the catalytic subunit of this enzyme. The location of the mutation causing the partial ts reversion in strain JP1449-18ts plus or minus is discussed. The GluRS purified from the ts mutant strain EM111-ts1 has the same stability as the wild-type enzyme, but its Km forglutamate increases with the temperature, suggesting that the locus gltE codes for a regulatory factor, possibly for the polypeptide chain that is co-purified with the catalytic subunit.

  7. Thermosensitive mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 altered in the catalytic Subunit and in a Regulatory factor of the glutamy-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, J; Delcuve, G

    1975-01-01

    The glutamyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase (GluRS) of a partial revertants (ts plus or minus) of the thermosensitive (ts) mutant strain JP1449 (LOcus gltx) and of a ts mutant strain EM111-ts1 with a lesion in or near the locus gltx have been studied to find the relation between these two genetic loci known to influence the GluRS activity in vitro and the presence of a catalytic subunit and of a regulatory subunit in the GluRS purified from Escherichia coli K-12. The ts character of strain JP1449-18ts plus or minus is co-transduced with the marker dsdA at the same frequency as is the ts character of strain JP1449. Its purified GluRS is very thermolabile and its Km for glutamate is higher than that of a wild-type GluRS. These results indicate that the locus gltX is in the structural gene for the catalytic subunit of this enzyme. The location of the mutation causing the partial ts reversion in strain JP1449-18ts plus or minus is discussed. The GluRS purified from the ts mutant strain EM111-ts1 has the same stability as the wild-type enzyme, but its Km forglutamate increases with the temperature, suggesting that the locus gltE codes for a regulatory factor, possibly for the polypeptide chain that is co-purified with the catalytic subunit. PMID:1092645

  8. Quality Library Services, K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    Developed to promote excellence in Ohio's school libraries, this document is designed to: (1) provide a rationale for integration of the school library into the total education program; (2) delineate the dimensions of service of a dynamic K-12 library program; (3) identify essential components of an effective K-12 library program; (4) provide a…

  9. K-12 Aerospace Education Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA, the United States Air Force Academy, the Air Force Space Command, the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs (UCCS), and the United States Space Foundation teamed to produce a dynamic and successful graduate course and in-service program for K-12 educators that has a positive impact on education trends across the nation. Since 1986, more than 10,000 educators from across the United States have participated in Space Discovery and Teaching with Space affecting nearly a million students in grades K-12. The programs are designed to prepare educators to use the excitement of space to motivate students in all curriculum subjects.

  10. Partnerships with K-12 Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druckman, Rosanne; Peterson, Lorna M.; Thrasher, M. Sue

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how higher education consortia are forming K-12 partnerships and alliances that are linking with individual public schools and their school systems. Offers the examples of the Hartford Consortium for Higher Education and Massachusetts' Five Colleges, Incorporated. Includes a list with Web sites addresses of such consortium partnerships.…

  11. Creating Effective K-12 Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J.

    2011-12-01

    Grant opportunities require investigators to provide 'broader impacts' for their scientific research. For most researchers this involves some kind of educational outreach for the K-12 community. I have been able to participate in many different types of grant funded science teacher professional development programs. The most valuable have been outreach where the research seamlessly integrated with my classroom curriculum and was sustainable with my future classes. To accomplish these types of programs, the investigators needed to research the K-12 community and identify several key aspects of the K-12 environment where their expertise would benefit me and my students. There are a lot of different K-12 learning environments, so researchers need to be sure to match up with the right grade level and administrative environment. You might want to consider non-main stream school settings, such as magnet programs, STEM academies, and distance learning. The goal is to try to make your outreach seem natural and productive. This presentation will illustrate how researchers can create an educational outreach project that will be a win-win situation for everyone involved.

  12. California's Future: K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Laura; Gao, Niu; Warren, Paul

    2015-01-01

    California educates more than six million children in its K-12 public schools. More than half of these children are economically disadvantaged, and almost a quarter are not native English speakers (compared to less than one in ten nationwide). California is working to address these challenges, in part by adopting a new, simplified school finance…

  13. K-12 Science Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Community Schools, OH.

    GRADES OR AGES: K-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Science. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into three sections, one each for elementary grades, middle grades, and high school. The first two sections are further subdivided by grade level and the last section is subdivided by course. Sections are laid out in four columns across two…

  14. Classifying K-12 Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staker, Heather; Horn, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of online learning in the K-12 sector is occurring both remotely through virtual schools and on campuses through blended learning. In emerging fields, definitions are important because they create a shared language that enables people to talk about the new phenomena. The blended-learning taxonomy and definitions presented in this paper…

  15. Consumer Education Competencies: K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    The publication represents the result of the Consumer Education Task Force's attempt to develop competencies applicable to a K-12 continuum. It has been designed to provide school district personnel with relevant data to support a comprehensive curriculum development effort; or to support a variety of alternative approaches at various grade…

  16. California's Future: K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Laura; Gao, Niu; Warren, Paul

    2015-01-01

    California educates more than six million children in its K-12 public schools. More than half of these children are economically disadvantaged, and almost a quarter are not native English speakers (compared to less than one in ten nationwide). California is working to address these challenges, in part by adopting a new, simplified school finance…

  17. Policy Shop Casts Long K-12 Shadow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ujifusa, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In nearly 40 years of legislative advocacy, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC)--a free-market, limited-government group now drawing intense scrutiny for its support of a controversial self-defense law--has had a significant influence on K-12 education through its model legislation and work with state lawmakers to promote such…

  18. Policy Shop Casts Long K-12 Shadow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ujifusa, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In nearly 40 years of legislative advocacy, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC)--a free-market, limited-government group now drawing intense scrutiny for its support of a controversial self-defense law--has had a significant influence on K-12 education through its model legislation and work with state lawmakers to promote such…

  19. A worksite programme significantly alters nutrient intakes.

    PubMed

    Levin, Susan M; Ferdowsian, Hope R; Hoover, Valerie J; Green, Amber A; Barnard, Neal D

    2010-10-01

    To examine whether a worksite nutrition programme using a low-fat vegan diet could significantly improve nutritional intake. At two corporate sites of the Government Employees Insurance Company, employees who were either overweight (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2) and/or had type 2 diabetes participated in a 22-week worksite-based dietary intervention study. At the intervention site, participants were asked to follow a low-fat vegan diet and participate in weekly group meetings that included instruction and group support (intervention group). At the control site, participants received no instruction (control group). At weeks 0 and 22, participants completed 3 d dietary records to assess energy and nutrient intake. A total of 109 participants (sixty-five intervention and forty-four control). In the intervention group, reported intake of total fat, trans fat, saturated fat and cholesterol decreased significantly (P < or = 0.001), as did energy and protein (P = 0.01), and vitamin B12 (P = 0.002), compared with the control group. Intake (exclusive of any use of nutritional supplements) of carbohydrate, fibre, vitamin C, magnesium and potassium increased significantly (P < or = 0.0001), as did that for beta-carotene (P = 0.0004), total vitamin A activity (P = 0.004), vitamin K (P = 0.01) and sodium (P = 0.04) in the intervention group, compared with the control group. The present study suggests that a worksite vegan nutrition programme increases intakes of protective nutrients, such as fibre, folate and vitamin C, and decreases intakes of total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol.

  20. Digital Learning in California's K-12 Schools. Just the Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Niu

    2015-01-01

    This fact page briefly discusses the following facts on digital learning in California's K-12: (1) As California implements new tests in its K-12 schools, technology infrastructure is a key concern; (2) Many districts are confident that they had enough bandwidth for online field tests; (3) Digital learning will require significantly greater…

  1. Digital Learning in California's K-12 Schools. Just the Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Niu

    2015-01-01

    This fact page briefly discusses the following facts on digital learning in California's K-12: (1) As California implements new tests in its K-12 schools, technology infrastructure is a key concern; (2) Many districts are confident that they had enough bandwidth for online field tests; (3) Digital learning will require significantly greater…

  2. Optics education for K-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbro, James W.; Gaines Walker, Janice M.

    2000-06-01

    The SPIE Education Committee has developed an outreach program aimed at enhancing the dissemination of information about optics to children in kindergarten through the 12th grade (K-12). The main impetus behind the program was that more practicing optical scientists and engineers would be willing to give lectures and demonstrations aimed at inspiring the next generation about optics if material could be made easily available. Consequently, three instructional `outreach kits' were assembled to use in teaching optics to kids in exciting and fun ways. These kits were beta-tested over the last two years at six different U.S. regional sites. Each `outreach kit' contained: (1) a workbook on Optical Demonstrations on the Overhead Projector; (2) a Science and Math Experience Manual: Light, Color and Their Uses; (3) The Optics Discovery Classroom Kit; (4) a slide show; and (5) a video on careers in optics. The best tests were aimed at evaluating the practical ways of utilizing the kits, developing easy-to-follow instructions for guiding others in their use and providing suggestions on modifications, additions, and deletions to the kits. This paper discuses this outreach program and provides details relative to the kit's composition and future plans.

  3. Author Reply to K12 Inc. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Policy Center, 2012

    2012-01-01

    K12 Inc. enrolls more public school students than any other private education management organization in the U.S. Much has been written about K12 Inc. (referred to in this report simply as "K12") by financial analysts and investigative journalists because it is a large, publicly traded company and is the dominant player in the operation…

  4. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D.; Tagg, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  5. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. NASA Lewis' IITA K-12 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Information Infrastructure Technology and Applications for Kindergarten to 12th Grade (IITA K-12) Program is designed to introduce into school systems computing and communications technology that benefits math and science studies. By incorporating this technology into K-12 curriculums, we hope to increase the proficiency and interest in math and science subjects by K-12 students so that they continue to study technical subjects after their high school careers are over.

  7. Designer Librarian: Embedded in K12 Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, shifts in technology have altered the roles of school librarians in a multitude of ways. New rigorous standards, proliferation of devices, and steady growth of online and blended learning for the K12 market now demand librarians engage with learners in online environments. Taking an instructional design approach is the…

  8. Designer Librarian: Embedded in K12 Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, shifts in technology have altered the roles of school librarians in a multitude of ways. New rigorous standards, proliferation of devices, and steady growth of online and blended learning for the K12 market now demand librarians engage with learners in online environments. Taking an instructional design approach is the…

  9. K12 Online School Practice in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li; Wang, Nan; Qiao, Ailing

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is two fold. First, it presents the developmental stages and running modes of K12 Online Schools in China. Second, it illustrates online education practice, its current status, and the use of ICT in online schools. The experiences and lessons learned from the development of the K12 Online Schools are presented,…

  10. Standards for K-12 Engineering Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the value and feasibility of developing and implementing content standards for engineering education at the K-12 level. Content standards have been developed for three disciplines in STEM education--science, technology, and mathematic--but not for engineering. To date, a small but growing number of K-12

  11. K-12 Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N. Lopez

    2011-01-01

    The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth Lopez Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across…

  12. K-12 Master Plan: Starting the Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Paul

    This Legislative Analyst's Office (LAO) report was designed to assist the California legislature in developing a long-term state strategy--or master plan--for improving the state's K-12 education system. A K-12 master plan would serve two purposes. In developing the plan, the legislature would create a forum to review the state's existing…

  13. K12 Online School Practice in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li; Wang, Nan; Qiao, Ailing

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is two fold. First, it presents the developmental stages and running modes of K12 Online Schools in China. Second, it illustrates online education practice, its current status, and the use of ICT in online schools. The experiences and lessons learned from the development of the K12 Online Schools are presented,…

  14. Standards for K-12 Engineering Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the value and feasibility of developing and implementing content standards for engineering education at the K-12 level. Content standards have been developed for three disciplines in STEM education--science, technology, and mathematic--but not for engineering. To date, a small but growing number of K-12

  15. Nebraska Science Standards: Grades K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the Nebraska Science Standards for Grades K-12. The standards are presented according to the following grades: (1) Grades K-2; (2) Grades 3-5; (3) Grades 6-8; and (4) Grades 9-12.

  16. Investigating the Potential of MOOCs in K-12 Teaching and Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigh, Jennifer; Pytash, Kristine E.; Ferdig, Richard E.; Merchant, William

    2015-01-01

    The massive open online course (MOOC) is a relatively new concept in K-12 teaching and learning environments. Although significant work has been done with MOOCs since 2008, it has only been recently that MOOCs have been studied with K-12 populations. The purpose of this study was to further examine the motivation of K-12 students enrolled in a…

  17. Prognostic significance of TP53 alterations in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, T. I.; Holm, R.; Nesland, J. M.; Heimdal, K. R.; Ottestad, L.; Børresen, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Constant denaturant gel electrophoresis (CDGE) was used to screen 179 breast carcinomas for mutations in the conserved regions of the TP53 gene (exons 5 through 8). Mutations were found in 35 of 163 primary tumours (21%) and in 5 of 16 metastases (31%) and resided predominantly in exon 7. The majority of the mutations were G:C-->A:T transitions. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated nuclear accumulation of p53 protein in 35 of 162 primary tumours (22%) and in four of 15 metastases (27%). TP53 mutation was strongly associated with nuclear accumulation of p53 protein. In total 42 of 163 primary tumours (26%) and 5 of 16 metastases (31%) were demonstrated to contain TP53 alterations (mutation and/or nuclear protein accumulation). TP53 alteration in primary tumour was significantly associated with the following parameters: positive node status, T status > 1, negative oestrogen receptor status, negative progesterone receptor status, presence of ERBB2 gene amplification, and invasive ductal histology. Furthermore, there were statistically significant associations, independent of other prognostic factors, between TP53 alterations in primary tumour and disease-free and overall survival. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8102535

  18. Language Arts Resource Guide K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitman, John C.

    One of a series designed to help districts refine and upgrade their current curricular offerings, this resource guide deals with the development of a unified K-12 language arts curriculum that combines the four major language arts components of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Following a brief foreword and list of acknowledgments, the…

  19. K-12 Social Studies Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Community Schools, OH.

    GRADES OR AGES: K-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Social studies. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into three sections, one each for elementary grades, middle grades, and high school. The first two sections are further subdivided by grade level and the last section is subdivided by course. Sections are laid out in four columns across…

  20. SENDIT: North Dakota's K-12 Telecommunications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackman, Gleason

    SENDIT is a telecommunications network for North Dakota educators and students in the K-12 environment. Through SENDIT, both teachers and students have access to the Internet, and some of the isolation associated with the rurality of North Dakota has been diminished. SENDIT was developed by the North Dakota State University School of Education and…

  1. Legitimizing Community Engagement with K-12 Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furco, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of internal legitimization and its importance in securing high-quality community engagement in K-12 schools. Drawing on the literature from the fields of community engagement, school reform, school-university partnerships, and school-community partnerships, this article describes some of the prevailing challenges…

  2. State Electoral Victors Face K-12 Hurdles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    The new class of governors, state legislators, and chief state school officers elected last week will face formidable challenges in dealing with the squeeze the nation's sagging economy--and ballooning state budget deficits--is putting on K-12 education. In the November 4 elections, Democrats added one more governor's office--in Missouri--to their…

  3. Budget Pain Dampening K-12 Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Governors and state lawmakers are poised to kick off their toughest legislative sessions in years, with the hope of sparing K-12 education from deep budget cuts in the face of mounting deficits--a far cry from the more typical push for new policy initiatives and school programs. Simply holding the line may prove difficult. Together, 31 states face…

  4. Guidelines for Teaching Mathematics K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Rosabel; And Others

    This guide is intended to provide a basic outline for developing local mathematics programs. It was developed to give Kansas mathematics teachers from grades K-12 minimal sequential experiences in implementing the skills, values, and concepts of the mathematics program. The guide contains objectives, a checklist of topics appropriate for each…

  5. Program of Studies. Career Education, K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    This curricular framework for the subject area section, Career Education for Grades K-12, is one of eight Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) Programs of Studies. A foreword discusses Curriculum and Instruction, Use of the Program of Studies, Curriclum Change and Modification of the Program of Studies, State and Federal Government…

  6. Copyright Updates for K-12 Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2016-01-01

    Copyright concerns continue to bedevil K-12 librarians, who are often called upon to act as the copyright officers in public schools. This article describes recent copyright developments of concern to these librarians in three areas: a recent court case involving a university library, pending legislation supported by ALA, and a regulatory update.…

  7. Sea Grant: Enhancing K-12 Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.

    1998-01-01

    Sea Grant is a major contributor to marine and aquatic education in K-12 classrooms through curriculum development, teacher education, school programs at field sites, and educational research. Describes Sea Grant's efforts in these areas. Specific programs outlined include Operation Pathfinder, Ohio Sea Grant Partnerships for Great Lakes…

  8. Language Arts Resource Guide K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitman, John C.

    One of a series designed to help districts refine and upgrade their current curricular offerings, this resource guide deals with the development of a unified K-12 language arts curriculum that combines the four major language arts components of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Following a brief foreword and list of acknowledgments, the…

  9. K12 Inc. Scraps India Outsourcing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A company that runs one of the nation's largest networks of online schools recently decided to discontinue a program that arranged for high school teachers in the United States to send their students' English essays to India for evaluations by reviewers there. The existence of the program by Herndon, Virginia-based K12 Inc. is an example of the…

  10. Web Connects K-12 Students with Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that Derek Cummings and Justin Lessler, Johns Hopkins University epidemiologists, have come to the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY) to give a live webinar on the spread of swine flu. This web-based audio and video presentation is one of many efforts by universities and science organizations to put K-12 students in…

  11. Ballot Measures Reflect K-12 Funding Jitters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2010-01-01

    In an election year dominated by the pitched battle for Congress and major governors' races, state ballot measures involving education are largely tied to a similar theme: the burden of funding K-12 programs when state finances are shaky. In some cases, initiatives, constitutional amendments, and other ballot measures seek to tap new sources of…

  12. Web Connects K-12 Students with Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that Derek Cummings and Justin Lessler, Johns Hopkins University epidemiologists, have come to the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY) to give a live webinar on the spread of swine flu. This web-based audio and video presentation is one of many efforts by universities and science organizations to put K-12 students in…

  13. Music, K-12. Program of Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfax County Schools, VA.

    This program of studies defines the K-12 instructional program in music developed by the Fairfax County Public Schools, Virginia. The guide contains a general rationale for teaching music, program flow chart, and descriptions of programs in general music, vocal music, and instrumental music. Each general program description includes requisites for…

  14. Candidates Are at Odds over K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson; Hoff, David J.

    2008-01-01

    The presumed November match-up produced by the long presidential-primary season offers contrasting approaches to K-12 policy, along with some common ground on the basics of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Senator John McCain of Arizona, the presumptive Republican nominee, and Senator Barack Obama of Illinois, his Democratic counterpart, both…

  15. Social Networking for the K-12 Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Education technology leaders are ever seeking new ways to eliminate the traditional social and geographic boundaries that hinder communication and collaboration for both K-12 students and educators. Larger districts with geographically dispersed schools often find that innovative ideas for technology use and integration are balkanized into…

  16. K-12 Issues Will Await President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.; Klein, Alyson

    2008-01-01

    At the end of a presidential campaign in which education received some attention but never emerged as a top-tier issue, analysts were trying to look beyond the week's election to the K-12 issues awaiting the next president and gauge where they might fit as a new administration prepares to grapple with a global economic crisis. While education…

  17. Virtual K-12 Leadership: A Postmodern Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Tommy N.

    2014-01-01

    This phenomenological, mixed-method study compared and contrasted virtual K-12 school leadership with traditional face-to-face leadership. All 106 participants served for a minimum of two years in each setting. The study was conducted in two phases in order to reveal consensus and dissensus points of view. Conceptually, a postmodern framework was…

  18. Virtual K-12 Leadership: A Postmodern Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Tommy N.

    2014-01-01

    This phenomenological, mixed-method study compared and contrasted virtual K-12 school leadership with traditional face-to-face leadership. All 106 participants served for a minimum of two years in each setting. The study was conducted in two phases in order to reveal consensus and dissensus points of view. Conceptually, a postmodern framework was…

  19. K-12 Issues Will Await President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.; Klein, Alyson

    2008-01-01

    At the end of a presidential campaign in which education received some attention but never emerged as a top-tier issue, analysts were trying to look beyond the week's election to the K-12 issues awaiting the next president and gauge where they might fit as a new administration prepares to grapple with a global economic crisis. While education…

  20. Greening a K-12 School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The author, who has retired as Scarsdale elementary principal, was asked by the superintendent Michael McGill if he was interested in leading Scarsdale's green initiative. Early on in Scarsdale, they referred to their work as the "green initiative." After agreeing to lead the initiative, he set out to learn more about greening at K-12

  1. K-12 Curriculum Guide for Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poudre School District R-1, Ft. Collins, CO.

    This guide to environmental and outdoor education is based on the principle that man will properly care for his world only if he both understands and appreciates it. Seventy-two multidisciplinary environmental themes are identified for instruction in grades K-12. Each theme is presented with behavioral objectives, key concepts, and both in school…

  2. K-12 Bolsters Ties to Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2013-01-01

    When science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education is discussed in the K-12 sphere, it often seems like shorthand for mathematics and science, with perhaps a nod to technology and even less, if any, real attention to engineering. But recent developments signal that the "e" in STEM may be gaining a firmer foothold at…

  3. Earth Science Content Guidelines Grades K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Geological Inst., Alexandria, VA.

    Teams of teachers, other science educators, and scientists selected from a national search for project writers have proposed using the following set of questions to guide the inclusion of earth science content into the kindergarten through grade 12 curriculum. The Essential Questions are organized in a K-12 sequence by six content areas: (1) Solid…

  4. Candidates Are at Odds over K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson; Hoff, David J.

    2008-01-01

    The presumed November match-up produced by the long presidential-primary season offers contrasting approaches to K-12 policy, along with some common ground on the basics of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Senator John McCain of Arizona, the presumptive Republican nominee, and Senator Barack Obama of Illinois, his Democratic counterpart, both…

  5. Teaching K-12 Students to Combat Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallhead, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Physical education is one of the most viable intervention programs to reach overweight and obese children. Since physical activity habits developed early in life are more likely to persist into adulthood, it is important for K-12 physical educators to teach the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that will motivate students to become more active. Two…

  6. Sea Grant: Enhancing K-12 Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.

    1998-01-01

    Sea Grant is a major contributor to marine and aquatic education in K-12 classrooms through curriculum development, teacher education, school programs at field sites, and educational research. Describes Sea Grant's efforts in these areas. Specific programs outlined include Operation Pathfinder, Ohio Sea Grant Partnerships for Great Lakes…

  7. Legitimizing Community Engagement with K-12 Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furco, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of internal legitimization and its importance in securing high-quality community engagement in K-12 schools. Drawing on the literature from the fields of community engagement, school reform, school-university partnerships, and school-community partnerships, this article describes some of the prevailing challenges…

  8. K12 Inc. Scraps India Outsourcing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A company that runs one of the nation's largest networks of online schools recently decided to discontinue a program that arranged for high school teachers in the United States to send their students' English essays to India for evaluations by reviewers there. The existence of the program by Herndon, Virginia-based K12 Inc. is an example of the…

  9. Approaching K-12 Online Education in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadell, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how K-12 schools are addressing the need to accommodate online learners in Pennsylvania. It is built upon a review of literature focusing on educational legislation, the personalization of online learning and online learning solutions. The study posed 21 questions utilizing a mixed methods approach to…

  10. Copyright Updates for K-12 Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2016-01-01

    Copyright concerns continue to bedevil K-12 librarians, who are often called upon to act as the copyright officers in public schools. This article describes recent copyright developments of concern to these librarians in three areas: a recent court case involving a university library, pending legislation supported by ALA, and a regulatory update.…

  11. Energy Retrofit for Aging K-12 Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    3D/International, Houston, TX.

    Successfully retrofitting aging K-12 schools using energy conservation measures (ECM) that can improve the physical plant and reduce energy consumption are explored. Topics explore how certain ECM measures can benefit educational facilities, why retrofitting begun sooner rather than later is important, how to finance the retrofit program, and the…

  12. Critical Issues in K-12 Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Tech. Environmental Education Center, Bettendorf, IA.

    This document reviews the critical issues in K-12 environmental education discussed at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/Morgan State University summer institute for kindergarten through grade 12 educators. Areas reviewed included curriculum, employment opportunities and career awareness, environmental equity, professional development, and…

  13. Approaching K-12 Online Education in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadell, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how K-12 schools are addressing the need to accommodate online learners in Pennsylvania. It is built upon a review of literature focusing on educational legislation, the personalization of online learning and online learning solutions. The study posed 21 questions utilizing a mixed methods approach to…

  14. Student Success in Online K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronsisvalle, Tammy; Watkins, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    While online education has made great strides in recent years to become an accepted component of higher education, with many colleges now offering accredited online degree programs, the current opportunities and challenges of online K-12 education are still awash in the turbulent waters of regional politics, temperamental technologies, changing…

  15. Greening a K-12 School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The author, who has retired as Scarsdale elementary principal, was asked by the superintendent Michael McGill if he was interested in leading Scarsdale's green initiative. Early on in Scarsdale, they referred to their work as the "green initiative." After agreeing to lead the initiative, he set out to learn more about greening at K-12

  16. Development of K-12 Engineering Outreach Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, William

    2003-01-01

    Six modules were created that can be used in K-12 classes to introduce students to what engineers can do at NASA.The purpose of this project was to create outreach materials for the classroom. To make it appealing to students, many color NASA photographs are used to illustrate NASA applications.Student experiments are described that can be performed to illustrate topics.

  17. Ballot Measures Reflect K-12 Funding Jitters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2010-01-01

    In an election year dominated by the pitched battle for Congress and major governors' races, state ballot measures involving education are largely tied to a similar theme: the burden of funding K-12 programs when state finances are shaky. In some cases, initiatives, constitutional amendments, and other ballot measures seek to tap new sources of…

  18. Chloride alterations in hospitalized patients: Prevalence and outcome significance

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Cheng, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Serum Cl (sCl) alterations in hospitalized patients have not been comprehensively studied in recent years. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and outcome significance of (1) sCl alterations on hospital admission, and (2) sCl evolution within the first 48 hr of hospital admission. We conducted a retrospective study of all hospital admissions in the years 2011–2013 at Mayo Clinic Rochester, a 2000-bed tertiary medical center. Outcome measures included hospital mortality, length of hospital stay and discharge disposition. 76,719 unique admissions (≥18 years old) were studied. Based on hospital mortality, sCl in the range of 105–108 mmol/L was found to be optimal. sCl <100 (n = 13,611) and >108 (n = 11,395) mmol/L independently predicted a higher risk of hospital mortality, longer hospital stay and being discharged to a care facility. 13,089 patients (17.1%) had serum anion gap >12 mmol/L; their hospital mortality, when compared to 63,630 patients (82.9%) with anion gap ≤12 mmol/L, was worse. Notably, patients with elevated anion gap displayed a progressively worsening mortality with rising sCl. sCl elevation within 48 hr of admission was associated with a higher proportion of 0.9% saline administration and was an independent predictor for hospital mortality. Moreover, the magnitude of sCl rise was inversely correlated to the days of patient survival. In conclusion, serum Cl alterations on admission predict poor clinical outcomes. Post-admission sCl increase, due to Cl-rich fluid infusion, independently predicts hospital mortality. These results raise a critical question of whether iatrogenic cause of hyperchloremia should be avoided, a question to be addressed by future prospective studies. PMID:28328963

  19. Significance of the effect of mineral alteration of nuclide migration

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Takashi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Isobe, Hiroshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Yanase, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Hideo

    1994-12-31

    In order to clarify the effect of mineral alteration on nuclide migration, we examined the processes, mechanisms, and kinetics of chlorite weathering, and the uranium concentrations in minerals and rocks at Koongarra, Australia. The observed concentrations of uranium in rocks were compared to those calculated. The sequence of chlorite weathering may be simply expressed as a chlorite {yields} vermiculite {yields} kaolinite conversion. These minerals occur as a function of depth, which corresponds well to uranium concentrations on the meter scale. Iron minerals, closely related to the uranium redistribution, are released during the weathering. The first-order kinetic model of the weathering process suggests that the weathering rate is not constant but time-dependent. The uranium concentrations are qualitatively proportional to the extent of the weathering, the weathered part having higher uranium concentration. Uranium mainly occurs with iron minerals, and sub micron sized saleeite, a uranyl phosphate, is one of the most probable uranyl phases associated with the iron minerals. The uranium fixation mechanisms are probably saleeite microcrystal coprecipitation and sorption to the iron minerals. Our model, which describes uranium concentrations in rocks as a function of time, shows that the transition zone (a vermiculite dominant area) plays an important role in the uranium migration. We have established that weathering of chlorite has affected the redistribution of uranium for more than one million years. The present study demonstrates the significance of mineral alteration when we estimate nuclide migration for geologic time.

  20. Brief anesthesia, but not voluntary locomotion, significantly alters cortical temperature

    PubMed Central

    Shirey, Michael J.; Kudlik, D'Anne E.; Huo, Bing-Xing; Greene, Stephanie E.; Drew, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in brain temperature can alter electrical properties of neurons and cause changes in behavior. However, it is not well understood how behaviors, like locomotion, or experimental manipulations, like anesthesia, alter brain temperature. We implanted thermocouples in sensorimotor cortex of mice to understand how cortical temperature was affected by locomotion, as well as by brief and prolonged anesthesia. Voluntary locomotion induced small (∼0.1°C) but reliable increases in cortical temperature that could be described using a linear convolution model. In contrast, brief (90-s) exposure to isoflurane anesthesia depressed cortical temperature by ∼2°C, which lasted for up to 30 min after the cessation of anesthesia. Cortical temperature decreases were not accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the γ-band local field potential power, multiunit firing rate, or locomotion behavior, which all returned to baseline within a few minutes after the cessation of anesthesia. In anesthetized animals where core body temperature was kept constant, cortical temperature was still >1°C lower than in the awake animal. Thermocouples implanted in the subcortex showed similar temperature changes under anesthesia, suggesting these responses occur throughout the brain. Two-photon microscopy of individual blood vessel dynamics following brief isoflurane exposure revealed a large increase in vessel diameter that ceased before the brain temperature significantly decreased, indicating cerebral heat loss was not due to increased cerebral blood vessel dilation. These data should be considered in experimental designs recording in anesthetized preparations, computational models relating temperature and neural activity, and awake-behaving methods that require brief anesthesia before experimental procedures. PMID:25972579

  1. Connecting with Teachers and Students through K-12 Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Susan; Lindbo, David; Robinson, Clay

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Science Society of America has invested heavily in a significant outreach effort to reach teachers and students in the primary/secondary grades (K-12 grades in US/Canada) to raise awareness of soil as a critical resource. The SSSA K-12 committee has been charged with increasing interest and awareness of soil science as a scientific pursuit and career choice, and providing resources that integrate more information on soil science into biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science areas taught at multiple grade levels. Activities center around five main areas: assessment and standards, learning modules/lesson plans, website development, and books and materials, and partnership activities. Members (professionals and students) of SSSA are involved through committee participation, local events, materials review, and project development.

  2. Scientists Involved in K-12 Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robigou, V.

    2004-12-01

    The publication of countless reports documenting the dismal state of science education in the 1980s, and the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS) report (1996) called for a wider involvement of the scientific community in K-12 education and outreach. Improving science education will not happen without the collaboration of educators and scientists working in a coordinated manner and it requires a long-term, continuous effort. To contribute effectively to K-12 education all scientists should refer to the National Science Education Standards, a set of policies that guide the development of curriculum and assessment. Ocean scientists can also specifically refer to the COSEE recommendations (www.cosee.org) that led to the creation of seven regional Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence. Scientists can get involved in K-12 education in a multitude of ways. They should select projects that will accommodate time away from their research and teaching obligations, their talent, and their interest but also contribute to the education reform. A few examples of effective involvement are: 1) collaborating with colleagues in a school of education that can lead to better education of all students and future teachers, 2) acting as a resource for a national program or a local science fair, 3) serving on the advisory board of a program that develops educational material, 4) speaking out at professional meetings about the value of scientists' involvement in education, 5) speaking enthusiastically about the teaching profession. Improving science education in addition to research can seem a large, overwhelming task for scientists. As a result, focusing on projects that will fit the scientist's needs as well as benefit the science reform is of prime importance. It takes an enormous amount of work and financial and personnel resources to start a new program with measurable impact on students. So, finding the right opportunity is a priority, and stepping

  3. Genetic transformation in Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    Cosloy, S D; Oishi, M

    1973-01-01

    An auxotrophic strain of E. coli K12 treated with CaCl(2) was transformed for several markers at a frequency of up to 10(-6) per recipient cell by a DNA preparation isolated from a prototrophic strain. The transforming activity of the DNA preparation was eliminated by treatment with DNase, heat, or sonication, whereas RNase or Pronase treatment had little effect. Two closely linked genetic markers (leu and ara) showed a high degree of cotransformation linkage when high molecular weight DNA was used, but the linkage was almost completely eliminated when sheared, smaller molecular weight DNA was used. There is genetic evidence that the transformation is a result of the replacement of the preexisting genetic marker on the chromosome by that of the donor DNA.

  4. Magmatism significantly alters the thermal structure of the wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees Jones, D. W.; Katz, R. F.; Rudge, J. F.; Tian, M.

    2016-12-01

    The temperature structure of the mantle wedge is typically modelled as a balance between thermal diffusion and advection by the solid mantle [e.g., 1]. The thermal state of the wedge promotes melting and melt transport in the natural system, but the thermal consequences of these processes have been neglected from previous models. We show that advective transport of sensible and latent heat by liquid magma can locally alter the temperature structure from canonical models by up to 200K. Liquids are liberated from the subducting slab by de-volatilization reactions. They trigger melting and become silicic en route to the surface, where they cause arc volcanism. These liquids transport heat advectively, and consume or supply latent heat as they melt or freeze. To analyse these effects, we parameterise melting in the presence of volatile species. We combine this with a one-dimensional "melting-column model," previously used to understand mid-ocean ridge volcanism. Our calculations highlight the thermal and chemical response to melt transport across the mantle wedge. Finally, we solve two-dimensional geodynamic models with a prescribed slab flux [2]. These models allow us to identify the most thermally significant fluxes of melt in the system. Perturbations of 200K are found at the base of the overriding lithosphere. This thermal signature of melt migration should be considered when interpreting heat flow, petrologic and seismic data [e.g., 3]. Such a thermal perturbation is likely to affect the chemistry of arc volcanoes, the solid mantle flow and, perhaps, the location of the volcanos themselves [4]. [1] van Keken, P. E., Currie, C., King, S. D., Behn, M. D., Cagnioncle, A., He, J., et al. (2008). A community benchmark for subduction zone modeling. PEPI, doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2008.04.015 [2] Wilson, C. R., Spiegelman, M., van Keken, P. E., & Hacker, B. R. (2014). Fluid flow in subduction zones: The role of solid rheology and compaction pressure. EPSL, doi:10.1016/j

  5. Ultrasound settings significantly alter arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Kathleen; Reed, Christopher J; Green, Daniel J; Hankey, Graeme J; Arnolda, Leonard F

    2008-01-01

    Background Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT), measured by ultrasound, are widely used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions. Although assessment methods vary, automated edge-detecting image analysis software is routinely used to measure changes in FMD and CIMT. We aimed to quantify the effect that commonly adjusted ultrasound settings have on arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements made with CIMT measurement software. Methods We constructed phantom arteries from a tissue-mimicking agar compound and scanned them in a water bath with a 10 MHz multi-frequency linear-array probe attached to a high-resolution ultrasound machine. B-mode images of the phantoms were recorded with dynamic range (DR) and gain set at five decibel (dB) increments from 40 dB to 60 dB and -10 dB to +10 dB respectively. Lumen diameter and wall-thickness were measured off-line using CIMT measurement software. Results Lumen measurements: there was a strong linear relationship between DR and gain and measured lumen diameter. For a given gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR reduced the measured lumen diameter by 0.02 ± 0.004 mm (p < 0.001). For a given DR level, a 5 dB increase in gain reduced measured lumen diameter by 0.04 ± 0.004 mm (p < 0.001). A 5 mm increase in distance between the ultrasound probe and the artery reduced measured lumen diameter by 0.04 ± 0.03 mm (p < 0.001) CIMT measurements: For a fixed gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR increased measured wall thickness by 0.003 ± 0.002 mm (p < 0.001). The effects of increasing gain were not consistent and appeared to vary depending on the distance between the artery and the ultrasound probe and the thickness of the artery wall. Conclusion DR, gain and probe distance significantly alter lumen diameter and CIMT measurements made using image analysis software. When CIMT and FMD are used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions, the DR, gain and probe position used to

  6. Scientific and Engineering Practices in K-12 Classrooms: Understanding "A Framework for K-12 Science Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the science and engineering practices from the recently released "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC 2011). The author recognizes the changes implied by the new framework, and eventually a new generation of science education standards will present new…

  7. Scientific and Engineering Practices in K-12 Classrooms: Understanding "A Framework for K-12 Science Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the science and engineering practices from the recently released "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC 2011). The author recognizes the changes implied by the new framework, and eventually a new generation of science education standards will present new…

  8. Gene controlling L-glutamic acid decarboxylase synthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Lupo, M; Halpern, Y S

    1970-08-01

    Genetically related Escherichia coli K-12 strains were found to differ widely in their l-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity. This variation is due to differences in the amount of GAD produced by the different cultures, rather than to the appearance of altered enzymes differing in catalytic activity. A regulatory gene, gadR, which controls the amount of GAD was mapped on the E. coli K-12 chromosome. A strain with a lesion in the structural gene for GAD is described.

  9. K-12 educational outcomes of immigrant youth.

    PubMed

    Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N López

    2011-01-01

    The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth López Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across segments of the immigrant population defined by generational status, race and ethnicity, and national origin. A good deal of evidence points to an immigrant advantage in multiple indicators of academic progress, meaning that many youths from immigrant families outperform their peers in school. This apparent advantage is often referred to as the immigrant paradox, in that it occurs despite higher-than-average rates of social and economic disadvantages in this population as a whole. The immigrant paradox, however, is more pronounced among the children of Asian and African immigrants than other groups, and it is stronger for boys than for girls. Furthermore, evidence for the paradox is far more consistent in secondary school than in elementary school. Indeed, school readiness appears to be one area of potential risk for children from immigrant families, especially those of Mexican origin. For many groups, including those from Latin America, any evidence of the immigrant paradox usually emerges after researchers control for family socioeconomic circumstances and youths' English language skills. For others, including those from Asian countries, it is at least partially explained by the tendency for more socioeconomically advantaged residents of those regions to leave their home country for the United States. Bilingualism and strong family ties help to explain immigrant advantages in schooling; school, community, and other contextual disadvantages may suppress these advantages or lead to immigrant risks. Crosnoe and Turley also discuss several policy efforts targeting young people from immigrant families, especially those of Latin

  10. Recognizing Warning Signs of K-12 Christian School Distress That Lead to School Closure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellers, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify statistically significant warning signs of K12 Christian school distress that can lead to school closure in the areas of leadership, homogeneity of vision and culture, finances, and competition, as described by Fitzpatrick (2002) and Nichols (2006). Twenty-four strong, declining, and closed K-12

  11. Applying the Quadratic Usage Framework to Research on K-12 STEM Digital Learning Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luetkemeyer, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policymakers have called for K-12 educators to increase their effectiveness by transforming science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning and teaching with digital resources and tools. In this study we outline the significance of studying pressing issues related to use of digital resources in the K-12 environment and…

  12. An Examination of Ideology among Selected K12 Christian School Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, Jimmy L.

    2013-01-01

    This research project focused on explaining the decision making process of K12 Christian school superintendents whose schools belong to the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) organization. In spite of their similar religious and philosophical beliefs, ACSI K12 Christian school superintendents differed significantly in…

  13. An Examination of Ideology among Selected K12 Christian School Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, Jimmy L.

    2013-01-01

    This research project focused on explaining the decision making process of K12 Christian school superintendents whose schools belong to the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) organization. In spite of their similar religious and philosophical beliefs, ACSI K12 Christian school superintendents differed significantly in…

  14. Recognizing Warning Signs of K-12 Christian School Distress That Lead to School Closure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellers, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify statistically significant warning signs of K12 Christian school distress that can lead to school closure in the areas of leadership, homogeneity of vision and culture, finances, and competition, as described by Fitzpatrick (2002) and Nichols (2006). Twenty-four strong, declining, and closed K-12

  15. The K-12 Educational Technology Value Chain: Apps for Kids, Tools for Teachers and Levers for Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Glenn L.; Cleary, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Historically implementing, maintaining and managing educational technology has been difficult for K-12 educational systems. Consequently, opportunities for significant advances in K-12 education have often gone unrealized. With the maturation of Internet delivered services along with K-12 institutional trends, educational technologies are poised…

  16. The K-12 Educational Technology Value Chain: Apps for Kids, Tools for Teachers and Levers for Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Glenn L.; Cleary, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Historically implementing, maintaining and managing educational technology has been difficult for K-12 educational systems. Consequently, opportunities for significant advances in K-12 education have often gone unrealized. With the maturation of Internet delivered services along with K-12 institutional trends, educational technologies are poised…

  17. Using Google Earth for K-12 Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, K.; Bailey, J. E.; Ornduff, T.

    2009-12-01

    Google Earth offers powerful medium for people to view the world. The ability to explore over mountains, through canyons, under oceans and even back in time to historical views of the landscape, makes it an ideal tool for teaching about the planet we live on. However, the true power of Google Earth is only fully unlocked when it is used as a background for dynamic geospatial content visualized through Keyhole Markup Language. Google Earth provides data layers both (e.g., roads) and dynamic (e.g. clouds) in nature. But KML allows for other, user-created content to be added. All of these data can form the basis for stories and lessons told with the backdrop of an interactive model of the Earth. Since 2006, educators from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) have worked in collaboration with Google to promote use, understanding and knowledge of Google Earth and KML in K-12 schools across the state of Alaska. Activities have included running workshops for teachers (of all technical abilities), visits to students in rural classrooms to provide hands-on tuition, and the development of lesson plans in combination with teachers in the community. The goal is to foster an understanding of how these tools work and to generate ideas of how they might enhance learning in the classroom. In this case, Alaska offers an excellent testing ground for methods that could be employed in other states or countries.

  18. What K-12 Leaders Can Learn from Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stader, David L.; Munoz, Ava J.; Rowett, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Community college Quality Enhancement Plans (QEPs) typically focus on improving student outcomes. QEPs are in many ways analogous to the campus improvement plans (CIPs) that have become standard practice for virtually all K-12 schools. K-12 campus and district leaders often seek school improvement ideas from other K-12 districts. However, much can…

  19. State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbour, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the initial "Snapshot State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada" report was to provide an overview of the state of K-12 online learning in Canada. This was accomplished through the use of short commentaries about the state of K-12 distance education for each province and territory, along with more developed case…

  20. What K-12 Leaders Can Learn from Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stader, David L.; Munoz, Ava J.; Rowett, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Community college Quality Enhancement Plans (QEPs) typically focus on improving student outcomes. QEPs are in many ways analogous to the campus improvement plans (CIPs) that have become standard practice for virtually all K-12 schools. K-12 campus and district leaders often seek school improvement ideas from other K-12 districts. However, much can…

  1. NASA-OAI HPCCP K-12 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA-OAI High Performance Communication and Computing K- 12 School Partnership program has been completed. Cleveland School of the Arts, Empire Computech Center, Grafton Local Schools and the Bug O Nay Ge Shig School have all received network equipment and connections. Each school is working toward integrating computer and communications technology into their classroom curriculum. Cleveland School of the Arts students are creating computer software. Empire Computech Center is a magnet school for technology education at the elementary school level. Grafton Local schools is located in a rural community and is using communications technology to bring to their students some of the same benefits students from suburban and urban areas receive. The Bug O Nay Ge Shig School is located on an Indian Reservation in Cass Lake, MN. The students at this school are using the computer to help them with geological studies. A grant has been issued to the friends of the Nashville Library. Nashville is a small township in Holmes County, Ohio. A community organization has been formed to turn their library into a state of the art Media Center. Their goal is to have a place where rural students can learn about different career options and how to go about pursuing those careers. Taylor High School in Cincinnati, Ohio was added to the schools involved in the Wind Tunnel Project. A mini grant has been awarded to Taylor High School for computer equipment. The computer equipment is utilized in the school's geometry class to computationally design objects which will be tested for their aerodynamic properties in the Barberton Wind Tunnel. The students who create the models can view the test in the wind tunnel via desk top conferencing. Two teachers received stipends for helping with the Regional Summer Computer Workshop. Both teachers were brought in to teach a session within the workshop. They were selected to teach the session based on their expertise in particular software applications.

  2. Colorado K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper No. 26

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the "Colorado K-12 & School Choice Survey" is to measure public opinion on, and in some cases awareness or knowledge of, a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. A total of 601 telephone interviews were completed from August 29 to September 16, 2015, with questions on the direction of K-12 education,…

  3. UPSeis - Visiting Seismographs for K-12 Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, S. R.; Len, S.; Pennington, W. D.

    2004-12-01

    Upper Peninsula Seismic Experiments in Schools (UPSeis) is an educational program developed to engage K-12 students in hands-on activities learning about earthquakes and Earth science. The system is intended to enhance teaching earth sciences to students, typically using teleseismic and regional earthquakes recorded directly in the classroom. This seismograph is computer-based and self-contained, requiring no hook-ups to the Internet or to advanced timing devices. It is easy to operate and relatively inexpensive to purchase. The UPSeis curriculum is designed so that a seismograph operates in a classroom for two or three months at a time, allowing the recording of at least 2 to 3 very large earthquakes somewhere in the world. The system comes with classroom activities, which are broken into several units, such as 'Seismic Waves', 'The UPSeis Technique' and 'Earthquake Hazards'. Within each unit, activities are rated for the appropriate grade level. All of the units have also been correlated to the Michigan Content Standards, and are easily adaptable to other state educational content standards as well. Our intention is to assist teachers and volunteers with bringing earth science into the classroom, by making it easier to obtain and operate seismographs. Ideally, a sponsor (University or Company) will pay for a system and any related costs. We further plan to train volunteers at conferences and meetings (such as AGU or SEG) in order to train them on a system and provide them with the knowledge required to assist teachers in the classroom. The volunteer would be available to come into the school and work with the teacher and students on some of the activities, particularly after they have recorded an earthquake. In addition, the volunteer would rotate their system between local area schools every 2 or 3 months. This allows teachers to use the system for a few months without the concern for maintenance of a permanent system. For schools interested in having a

  4. Helicobacter Infection Significantly Alters Pregnancy Success in Laboratory Mice.

    PubMed

    Bracken, Tara C; Cooper, Caitlin A; Ali, Zil; Truong, Ha; Moore, Julie M

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter spp. are gram-negative, helically shaped bacteria that cause gastric and enterohepatic infections in mammalian species. Although Helicobacter infection frequently is implicated to interfere with reproductive success, few experimental data support these claims. We therefore retrospectively investigated the effect of Helicobacter infection on murine pregnancy outcome after the identification of endemic Helicobacter infection in an animal research facility. Multiplex conventional PCR analysis was used to characterize Helicobacter infection status in one inbred and 2 transgenic strains of mice in 2 self-contained rooms assigned to the same investigator. Outcomes of timed-mating experiments were compared among Helicobacter spp.-infected and uninfected mice of the same strain; Helicobacter infection was eradicated from the colony through fostering with uninfected dams. Although Helicobacter infection affected fecundity in only one strain of transgenic mouse, the total number of embryos per gravid uterus was significantly reduced in C57BL/6J mice that were infected with a single Helicobacter species, H. typhlonius. Helicobacter infection was also associated with a significant increase in the number of resorbing embryos per uterus and significant decreases in pregnancy-associated weight gain relative to uninfected mice in C57BL6/J mice and one transgenic strain. Helicobacter spp.-infected mice of all tested strains exhibited higher frequency of intrauterine hemorrhaging relative to uninfected mice. These results indicate that naturally-acquired Helicobacter infection not only reduces the productivity of a research animal breeding colony, but also negatively impacts embryo health. Despite these deleterious effects, these data suggest that colonies can be rederived to be Helicobacter-free by Cesarean section and fostering with uninfected dams. This paper provides the first evidence that H. typhlonius infection is sufficient to interfere with reproductive success

  5. Addition of Cryoprotectant Significantly Alters the Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sung-Jae; Rahman, Md Saidur; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Park, Yoo-Jin; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2016-01-01

    Although cryopreservation has been developed and optimized over the past decades, it causes various stresses, including cold shock, osmotic stress, and ice crystal formation, thereby reducing fertility. During cryopreservation, addition of cryoprotective agent (CPA) is crucial for protecting spermatozoa from freezing damage. However, the intrinsic toxicity and osmotic stress induced by CPA cause damage to spermatozoa. To identify the effects of CPA addition during cryopreservation, we assessed the motility (%), motion kinematics, capacitation status, and viability of epididymal spermatozoa using computer-assisted sperm analysis and Hoechst 33258/chlortetracycline fluorescence staining. Moreover, the effects of CPA addition were also demonstrated at the proteome level using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Our results demonstrated that CPA addition significantly reduced sperm motility (%), curvilinear velocity, viability (%), and non-capacitated spermatozoa, whereas straightness and acrosome-reacted spermatozoa increased significantly (p < 0.05). Ten proteins were differentially expressed (two decreased and eight increased) (>3 fold, p < 0.05) after CPA, whereas NADH dehydrogenase flavoprotein 2, f-actin-capping protein subunit beta, superoxide dismutase 2, and outer dense fiber protein 2 were associated with several important signaling pathways (p < 0.05). The present study provides a mechanistic basis for specific cryostresses and potential markers of CPA-induced stress. Therefore, these might provide information about the development of safe biomaterials for cryopreservation and basic ground for sperm cryopreservation. PMID:27031703

  6. Addition of Cryoprotectant Significantly Alters the Epididymal Sperm Proteome.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Jae; Rahman, Md Saidur; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Park, Yoo-Jin; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2016-01-01

    Although cryopreservation has been developed and optimized over the past decades, it causes various stresses, including cold shock, osmotic stress, and ice crystal formation, thereby reducing fertility. During cryopreservation, addition of cryoprotective agent (CPA) is crucial for protecting spermatozoa from freezing damage. However, the intrinsic toxicity and osmotic stress induced by CPA cause damage to spermatozoa. To identify the effects of CPA addition during cryopreservation, we assessed the motility (%), motion kinematics, capacitation status, and viability of epididymal spermatozoa using computer-assisted sperm analysis and Hoechst 33258/chlortetracycline fluorescence staining. Moreover, the effects of CPA addition were also demonstrated at the proteome level using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Our results demonstrated that CPA addition significantly reduced sperm motility (%), curvilinear velocity, viability (%), and non-capacitated spermatozoa, whereas straightness and acrosome-reacted spermatozoa increased significantly (p < 0.05). Ten proteins were differentially expressed (two decreased and eight increased) (>3 fold, p < 0.05) after CPA, whereas NADH dehydrogenase flavoprotein 2, f-actin-capping protein subunit beta, superoxide dismutase 2, and outer dense fiber protein 2 were associated with several important signaling pathways (p < 0.05). The present study provides a mechanistic basis for specific cryostresses and potential markers of CPA-induced stress. Therefore, these might provide information about the development of safe biomaterials for cryopreservation and basic ground for sperm cryopreservation.

  7. Climatic Extremes Significantly Alter Carbon Fluxes in Time and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Ouyan, Z.; John, R.; Chu, H.; Zenone, T.; Deal, M.; Gottgens, J.

    2012-12-01

    It has been increasingly evident that climatic extremes play crucial roles in the magnitudes and directions of carbon fluxes. However, significantly less is known about how these effects may change across multiple time and spatial scales. Here we used several databases collected from eddy-covariance (EC) towers and MODIS to understand these effects for: 1) long-term influences at an oak opening site (i.e. single site); 2) a cluster of EC fluxes from the Maumee watershed (i.e. different ecosystem types under the same climate); 3) several agricultural systems in the Midwest (i.e., same ecosystem among different climates); and 4) long term EVI, ET, GPP and LST (2000-2011) impacts across the Mongolia Plateau. We employed various wavelet analyses (transform, variance, coherency, and cross-wavelet) for the temporal data while an anomaly index was calculated for the spatial data on the plateau. As expected, the occurrences of extreme events and their influences varied greatly by year, but all produced significant and lasting effects on NEE, ER and, particularly on GEP. Three different ecosystems in the Maumee Watershed responded differently in magnitude/direction to the same climate anomaly (e.g. 2012 warmest March on record). Both the beginning time and magnitude of the NEE oscillation of the daily period at Oak Openings and the marshland were influenced by the unusual high March temperature, but the cropland ecosystem was less influenced because crops were not sown until the end of spring. Similarly, crops in different climates responded differently to the similar extremes. Across the broader spatiotemporal scales, we found that the forest biome more resistant to climatic extremes than the grassland and desert biomes on Mongolia Plateau. Frequency distributions of standardized anomalies of EVI during 2000-2010 showed that a number of the positively skewed years were more common in the desert biome compared to grasslands and forests. Positively skewed drought years

  8. K-12 Online Teacher Beliefs: Relationships among Intelligence, Confidence, Teacher-Student Interactions, and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Ploeg, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    The vigorous expansion of online learning in K-12 education is a recent change to the conceptualization of schooling that has been occurring for more than 10 years. However, methods used for recruiting, hiring, and preparing online teachers have not been altered beyond the current federal standard defined by No Child Left Behind of Highly…

  9. K-12 Online Teacher Beliefs: Relationships among Intelligence, Confidence, Teacher-Student Interactions, and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Ploeg, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    The vigorous expansion of online learning in K-12 education is a recent change to the conceptualization of schooling that has been occurring for more than 10 years. However, methods used for recruiting, hiring, and preparing online teachers have not been altered beyond the current federal standard defined by No Child Left Behind of Highly…

  10. Developing Open Education Literacies with Practicing K-12 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmons, Royce M.

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to understand how to use formal learning activities to effectively support the development of open education literacies among K-12 teachers. Considering pre-and post-surveys from K-12 teachers (n = 80) who participated in a three-day institute, this study considers whether participants entered institutes with false confidence or…

  11. Tracking K-12 Education Spending in California: An Updated Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krop, Cathy S.; Carroll, Stephen J.; Anderson, John R.

    This study provides a detailed look at statewide, county, and district spending for K-12 education in California during 1994-96, and updates an earlier study (Krop and others, 1995) examining how California's allocation of federal, state, and local education dollars were spent. California's financial reporting system as well as average K-12

  12. Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through Technological Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Narelle, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Educational technologies are becoming more commonplace across the K-12 curriculum. In particular, the use of innovative digital technology is expanding the potential of arts education, presenting new opportunities--and challenges--to both curricular design and pedagogical practice. "Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through…

  13. Formulating Independent School K-12 Quality Physical Education Program Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Stuart M.; Phillips, Michael B.; Jubenville, Colby B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate Tennessee independent school K-12 quality physical education program guidelines. A panel of 18 physical education representatives from Tennessee independent schools K-12 participated in a three-phase Delphi study and completed three opinionnaires via e-mail. In Phase One, Opinionnaire One solicited panel…

  14. A Special Session Guide to K-12 Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Paul; Turnage, Robert; Lee, Jannelle; Manwaring, Robert; Jones, Mary

    This document was designed to help the California Legislature address long-term and short-term concerns in K-12 legislation. Part 1, which focuses on a suggested K-12 master plan, presents some preliminary conclusions from the governor's office about the role of the state in education. This section outlines governance changes since 1970 and…

  15. A Critique of the Brave New World of K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades has changed so rapidly that remote areas of the Earth are now inhabited by human beings. Technology has also developed and people can stay at home and have access to virtual schools. This has stimulated the need for K-12 education. K-12 education has emerged from the no-child-left-behind concerns of governments for…

  16. Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through Technological Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Narelle, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Educational technologies are becoming more commonplace across the K-12 curriculum. In particular, the use of innovative digital technology is expanding the potential of arts education, presenting new opportunities--and challenges--to both curricular design and pedagogical practice. "Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through…

  17. Formulating Independent School K-12 Quality Physical Education Program Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Stuart M.; Phillips, Michael B.; Jubenville, Colby B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate Tennessee independent school K-12 quality physical education program guidelines. A panel of 18 physical education representatives from Tennessee independent schools K-12 participated in a three-phase Delphi study and completed three opinionnaires via e-mail. In Phase One, Opinionnaire One solicited panel…

  18. State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbour, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Two years ago, the then North American Council for Online Learning released the initial "Snapshot State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada" report. This study was the first systematic examination of K-12 distance education policies and activities in each of the thirteen Canadian provinces and territories. One year ago, the…

  19. Investing in K-12 Technology Equipment: Strategies for State Policymakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Dixie Griffin

    This report examines decisions regarding investments in K-12 technology. The first section presents an overview of technology in K-12 public schools, including a sampling of how technology is being used to further education goals for teachers, students, and administrators. The second section establishes a set of figures that indicate the current…

  20. K-12 science education: A teacher`s view

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.

    1994-12-31

    Science education has experienced significant changes over the past two decades. Science is now vital to good citizenship, performance in the workplace, and everyday life.It is time to re-tool and re-design the entire K-12 science education system, employing the same principles and methods used in the practice of science itself. We can no longer ignore the special needs of science instruction. All students need a course that develops their scientific literacy and critical thinking skills every year. Each science program needs meaningful, useful content and skill standards to drive and continuously update the curriculum content and enabel usefull assessment. Science teachers must articulate their needs and develop opportunities for professional development and the strengthening of their profession. We need a national plan that gets the many different participants working coherently towards a common goal.

  1. Designing Effective K-12 Educational Initiatives for Grant Proposals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Marion

    2009-11-01

    The National Science Foundation requires that grantees make an effort to extend the reach of academic research to communities beyond the laboratory and address the work's possible ``Broader Impacts'' to society. NSF CAREER awards and many of the NSF Research Center grant solicitations are even more explicit, requiring that grantees craft educational initiatives that are based in best practices, bring the academic research to the broader community, and positively impact the pipeline of students pursuing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. For new faculty, and even veteran faculty, these requirements for creative educational initiatives that significantly affect a community outside the confines of the laboratory can be very daunting. This presentation addresses how to design an effective educational plan that incorporates K-12 educational outreach, that will have a real impact on the target audience, and that can realistically be accomplished by a science faculty member.

  2. Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST Survey of K-12 Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie; Stork, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    Discipline-based education research in astronomy is focused on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms used by students when learning astronomy and teachers when teaching astronomy. Systematic surveys of K-12 teacher' knowledge in the domain of astronomy are conducted periodically in order to better focus and improve professional development. These surveys are most often done when doing contemporary needs assessments or when new assessment instruments are readily available. Designed by Stephanie J. Slater of the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research, the 29-item multiple-choice format Test Of Astronomy STandards - TOAST is a carefully constructed, criterion-referenced instrument constructed upon a solid list of clearly articulated and widely agreed upon learning objectives. The targeted learning concepts tightly align with the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's 1996 National Science Education Standards. Without modification, the TOAST is also aligned with the significantly less ambitious 2013 Next Generation Science Standards created by Achieve, Inc., under the auspices of the National Research Council. This latest survey reveals that K-12 teachers still hold many of the same fundamental misconceptions uncovered by earlier surveys. This includes misconceptions about the size, scale, and structure of the cosmos as well as misconceptions about the nature of physical processes at work in astronomy. This suggests that professional development in astronomy is still needed and that modern curriculum materials are best served if they provide substantial support for implementation.

  3. Alaska K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The "Alaska K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research Incorporated (BRI), measures Alaska registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education issues and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response…

  4. Louisiana K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The "Louisiana K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research Incorporated (BRI), measures Louisiana registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. In this paper the author and his colleagues…

  5. Washington K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The "Washington K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research Incorporated (BRI), measures Washington registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report…

  6. New Mexico K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The "New Mexico K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research Incorporated (BRI), measures New Mexico voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education issues and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response…

  7. Idaho K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education. Polling Paper No. 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The "Idaho K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research Incorporated (BRI), measures Idaho registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education issues and school choice reforms. We report response "levels" and…

  8. Indiana K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper No. 27

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the "Indiana K-12 & School Choice Survey" is to measure public opinion on, and in some cases awareness or knowledge of, a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice developed this project in partnership with Braun Research, Inc., who conducted the live phone…

  9. North Dakota K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper Number 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The "North Dakota K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures North Dakota registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response…

  10. Delaware K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper No. 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The "Delaware K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures Delaware registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response levels…

  11. Minnesota K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper No. 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The "Minnesota K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures Minnesota registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response…

  12. Tennessee K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The "Tennessee K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research Inc. (BRI), measures Tennessee registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response levels…

  13. Texas K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper Number 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The "Texas K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures Texas registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response levels and…

  14. Missouri K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper No. 19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The "Missouri K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures Missouri registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response levels…

  15. Nevada K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper No. 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The "Nevada K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures Nevada registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response levels and…

  16. Montana K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper Number 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The "Montana K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures Montana registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response levels…

  17. Maine K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper Number 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The "Maine K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures Maine registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response levels and…

  18. Oklahoma K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper No. 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The "Oklahoma K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures Oklahoma registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response levels…

  19. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents outstanding science trade books published in 2002 for students in grades K-12. Sections include Archaeology, Anthropology, and Paleontology; Biography; Environment and Ecology; Life Science; Physical Science; and Science-Related Careers. (KHR)

  20. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents outstanding science trade books published in 2002 for students in grades K-12. Sections include Archaeology, Anthropology, and Paleontology; Biography; Environment and Ecology; Life Science; Physical Science; and Science-Related Careers. (KHR)

  1. Outreach to Space Scientists Interested in K-12 Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Cherilynn A

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for work on outreach to space scientists interested in k-12 education. It outlines what was accomplished during the two years of support and one year no-cost extension (October 1995-September 1998).

  2. A Vision in Aeronautics: The K-12 Wind Tunnel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A Vision in Aeronautics, a project within the NASA Lewis Research Center's Information Infrastructure Technologies and Applications (IITA) K-12 Program, employs small-scale, subsonic wind tunnels to inspire students to explore the world of aeronautics and computers. Recently, two educational K-12 wind tunnels were built in the Cleveland area. During the 1995-1996 school year, preliminary testing occurred in both tunnels.

  3. K-12 Phenology Lessons for the Phenocam Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    Phenology is defined as periodic [or annual] life cycles of plants and animals driven by seasonal environmental changes. Climate change impinges a strong effect on phenology, potentially altering the structure and functioning of ecosystems. In the fall of 2011, the Ashburnham-Westminster Regional School District became the first of five schools to join Harvard University's Phenocam Network with the installation of a webcam to monitor phenology (or 'phenocam') at Overlook Middle School in Ashburnham, Massachusetts. Our school district is now part of a network of near-surface remote sensing phenocams that capture and send images of forest, shrub, and grassland vegetation cover at more than 130 diverse sites in North America. Our phenocam provides a digital image every half hour of the mixed forest canopy north from the school, enabling the detection of changes in canopy development, quantified as canopy 'greenness'. As a part of the Phenocam project, students at the K-12 level have expanded the scope of phenological monitoring protocol that is part of the Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology Program, Buds, Leaves, and Global Warming. In this protocol, students work with ecologists at Harvard Forest to monitor buds and leaves on schoolyard trees to determine the length of the growing season, giving them the opportunity to be a part of real and important research concerning the critical environmental issue of climate change. Students involved in the Buds, Leaves, and Global Warming study have the opportunity to compare their ground data on budburst, color change, and leaf drop to the phenocam images, as well as to similar forested sites in locations throughout the United States. Lessons have been developed for comparing student data to phenocam images, canopy greenness time series graphs extracted from the images, and satellite data. Lessons addressing map scale and the Urban Heat Island effect will also be available for teachers. This project will greatly enhance the

  4. Undergraduate interest in K--12 teaching and the perceived 'climate' for the K--12 education profession in the natural sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdeman, Robert Dean

    Previous research suggests that the natural science setting in universities does not offer a supportive environment for undergraduates interested in K--12 education careers, an important problem given the need for K--12 science teachers. A mixed-method approach was used to examine student perspectives toward K--12 education careers, and the influence of the college experience on perspectives, at a public research university. Quantitative data come from a cross-sectional survey sample (N = 444) of upper-division natural science majors in the university. The survey focused on student background characteristics, undergraduate experiences, perceptions of the college environment, career interests, and satisfaction. Pursuit of K--12 education as a top current career choice was rare among the respondents (3.6%). However, about one-fourth of them indicated some interest in this career and overall interest increased slightly during the college experience. Based on student perceptions, K--12 education was substantially less emphasized within the natural sciences than other career fields. Regression analyses revealed that the most important predictors (aside from initial career interests) of interest in and attitude toward K--12 teaching were self-concept and personality measures. Several college experience measures were also predictors, including perceptions about faculty and peers in the natural sciences. The effect of college experiences differed for students initially more inclined toward K--12 teaching, who reported a net decrease in interest, versus those more disinclined, who reported a net gain in interest. Satisfaction with the college experience was similar for the two groups. Qualitative data come from follow-up interviews conducted with eight survey respondents who recalled a top choice of K--12 teaching upon entering college but had decided to pursue another career. These students perceived other career fields to offer better professional opportunities for

  5. Selection and characterization of beta-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli K-12 mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffé, A; Chabbert, Y A; Derlot, E

    1983-01-01

    beta-Lactam-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 were selected by using 12 different beta-lactam derivatives. The mutants fell into three categories showing (i) altered permeation through reduction or loss of outer membrane porin proteins (including ompF, ompR, and envZ alleles); (ii) increase in the rate of synthesis of chromosomally mediated beta-lactamase; or (iii) defective synthesis or action of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-phosphate (cya and crp alleles). PMID:6344786

  6. Framing K-12 partnerships in order to make a difference.

    PubMed

    Hamos, James E

    2006-06-01

    The Health Professions Partnership Initiative (HPPI) furthered the establishment of partnerships between academic health centers and K-12 school systems. The present article contends that partnerships in efforts such as the HPPI exist in varying degrees of depth with deeper partnerships being those based in a concept of mutuality even as partners continue to maintain institutional identity. In the context of K-12 schools, the article reinforces the view that K-12 students, teachers, and administrators can benefit through partnership contexts, but also suggests that institutions of higher education-including academic health centers-should enter into partnerships because they benefit when they commit as stakeholders in the outcomes, not principally as altruistic good neighbors to the schools. Partnerships can continue to grow when multiple stakeholders accept mutual dependence as a norm, with goals, processes, and outcomes impacting each partner.

  7. West Bridgewater K-12 Social Studies Curriculum Map.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janelli, J. Michael

    This curriculum is designed to build social science skills and knowledge in a sequential manner as the student progresses from kindergarten through secondary school. Prerequisite skills, knowledge objectives, skill objectives, and attitudinal objectives are outlined for each grade level and subject area in the K-12 social science curriculum. The…

  8. Social Studies Graded Course of Study: K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euclid City Schools, OH.

    A K-12 social studies curriculum organized around concept teaching and skill development is presented in five sections. Section 1 contains general information on philosophy and program goals. Section 2, subdivided into 7 parts, outlines the courses of study for grades K-6. Presented in chart form, each grade level description outlines major…

  9. Green Power Partnership Top 30 K-12 Schools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. On this list are the largest green power users among K-12 school partners within the GPP.

  10. Laptop Computers in the K-12 Classroom. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Yvonne

    Improvements in portable computing technology and examples of successful pilot programs using laptop computers and other portables have inspired many K-12 schools to consider laptops for their students. In a study of Anytime Anywhere Learning, commissioned by Microsoft (published as the Rockman Report), five models were identified of laptop use…

  11. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presented are 38 environmental education activities for grades K-12. Topics include seed dispersal, food chains, plant identification, sizes and shapes, trees, common names, air pollution, recycling, temperature, litter, water conservation, photography, insects, urban areas, diversity, natural cycles, rain, erosion, phosphates, human population,…

  12. Enriching K-12 Science and Mathematics Education Using LEGOs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Keeshan; Igel, Irina; Poveda, Ronald; Kapila, Vikram; Iskander, Magued

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a series of illustrative LEGO Mindstorms-based science and math activities, developed under an NSF GK-12 Fellows project, for elementary, middle, and high school grades. The activities, developed by engineering and science graduate Fellows in partnership with K-12 teachers, are grade appropriate, address pertinent learning…

  13. Health and Safety Guide for K-12 Schools in Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Richard E.; Kerns, James T.; Currie, Michael

    This guide, which can be used as a school self-inspection tool, is designed to help Washington's K-12 public schools prevent and reduce injuries and illnesses by focusing on good health and safety practices. The guide also focuses on practices that can be undertaken during the design, construction, renovation, operation, maintenance, or inspection…

  14. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents a list of outstanding science trade books published in 2001 for use in the K-12 grade levels. Includes the areas of archaeology, anthropology, and paleontology; biography; life sciences; integrated science; physical sciences; science related careers; and technology and engineering. Provides information on the books and the selection…

  15. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a list of outstanding science trade books for grade levels K-12 in the areas of Archaeology, Anthropology, Paleontology, Biography, Life Sciences, Integrated Science, Physical Science, Science Related Careers, and Technology and Engineering. Includes information on the selection process. (YDS)

  16. Social Studies Graded Course of Study: K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euclid City Schools, OH.

    A K-12 social studies curriculum organized around concept teaching and skill development is presented in five sections. Section 1 contains general information on philosophy and program goals. Section 2, subdivided into 7 parts, outlines the courses of study for grades K-6. Presented in chart form, each grade level description outlines major…

  17. Technological Collaborations: K-12 and Higher Education. Fastback 438.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kay McPherson; Kopp, O. W.

    This brief report examines various ways in which K-12 schools and institutions of higher education can collaborate to effect critical changes in teaching and learning through the use of computers. The first section briefly reviews the history of computer use in education, noting such critical needs as teacher training, and reviews the…

  18. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 37 environmental science activities for students in grades K-12. Topics include water pollution, glaciers, protective coloration, shapes in nature, environmental impacts, recycling, creative writing, litter, shapes found in nature, color, rain cycle, waste management, plastics, energy, pH, landfills, runoff, watersheds,…

  19. Student Recommendations for Improving Nutrition in America's K-12 Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NCSSSMST Journal, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Co-hosted by the National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science, and Technology (NCSSSMST) and The Keystone Center, the third annual Keystone Center Youth Policy Summit focused on Adolescent and Childhood Nutrition in America's K-12 Schools. In June 2006, 40 students from 10 math and science schools came together in…

  20. Unifying K-12 Learning Processes: Integrating Curricula through Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Michael J.; Fogarty, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine whether a set of cross-curricular learning processes could be found in the respective K-12 US national standards for math, language arts, foreign language, science, social studies, fine arts, and technology. Using a qualitative research methodology, the standards from the national associations for these content…

  1. The Condition of K-12 Public Education in Maine: 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donis-Keller, Christine; Silvernail, David L.

    2009-01-01

    This twelfth edition of "The Condition of K-12 Public Education in Maine" is designed to provide Maine citizens, legislators, and educators a yearly report on the state of Maine public schools and education. This new edition updates educational information which appeared in earlier editions, and also provides information on several new…

  2. Unified Science Approach K-12, Proficiency Levels 1-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oickle, Eileen M., Ed.

    Presented are first-revision materials of the K-12 unified science program implemented in the public schools of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Detailed descriptions are given of the roles of students and teachers, purposes of bibliography, major concepts in unified science, processes of inquiry, scheme and model for scientific literacy, and…

  3. Course Goals in Music, Grades K-12. Critique Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multnomah County Intermediate Education District, Portland, OR.

    This document on course goals in music is one part of a critique series dealing with the development and evaluation of course goals in six subject matter areas for grades K-12. The series provides an initial pool of course-level goals that are expected to be of considerable value in assisting educators with goal definition related to curriculum…

  4. Intergovernmental Approaches for Strengthening K-12 Accountability Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour-Garb, Allison, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This volume contains an edited transcript of the Rockefeller Institute's October 29, 2007 symposium (Chicago, IL) entitled "Intergovernmental Approaches to Strengthen K-12 Accountability Systems" as well as a framework paper circulated in preparation for the symposium. The transcript begins with a list of the forty state and federal education…

  5. Inspiring the Next Generation: Astronomy Catalyzes K12 STEM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borders, Kareen; Thaller, Michelle; Winglee, Robert; Borders, Kyla

    2017-06-01

    K-12 educators need effective and relevant astronomy professional development. NASA's Mission Science provides innovative and accessible opportunities for K-12 teachers. Science questions involve scale and distance, including Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance of objects in the universe. Teachers can gain an understanding of basic telescopes, the history of telescopes, ground and satellite based telescopes, and models of JWST Telescope. An in-depth explanation of JWST and Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. During teacher training, we taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. The stations included an overview via lecture and power point, the use of ultraviolet beads to determine ultraviolet exposure, the study of lenticulars and diagramming of infrared data, looking at visible light through diffraction glasses and diagramming the data, protocols for using astronomy based research in the classroom, and infrared thermometers to compare environmental conditions around the observatory. An overview of LIDAR physics was followed up by a simulated LIDAR mapping of the topography of Mars.We will outline specific steps for K-12 infrared astronomy professional development, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional K-12 professional development.Funding was provided by Washington STEM, NASA, and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.

  6. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presented are 38 environmental education activities for grades K-12. Topics include seed dispersal, food chains, plant identification, sizes and shapes, trees, common names, air pollution, recycling, temperature, litter, water conservation, photography, insects, urban areas, diversity, natural cycles, rain, erosion, phosphates, human population,…

  7. K-12 Marketplace Sees Major Flow of Venture Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The flow of venture capital into the K-12 education market has exploded over the past year, reaching its highest transaction values in a decade in 2011, industry observers say. They attribute that rise to such factors as a heightened interest in educational technology; the decreasing cost of electronic devices such as tablet computers, laptops,…

  8. Leadership Analysis in K-12 Case Study: "Divided Loyalties"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    This report mainly aims to provide a critical and in-depth analysis of the K-12 Case, "Divided Loyalty" by Holy and Tartar (2004). The case recounts how the manifestation of inadequate leadership skills in a school setting could affect negatively the performance of students.

  9. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 20 science activities for students K-12. Topics include role playing, similarities between urban and forest communities, ecosystems, garbage, recycling, food production, habitats, insects, tidal zone, animals, diversity, interest groups, rivers, spaceship earth, ecological interactions, and the cost of recreation. (KR)

  10. Types, Subjects, and Purposes of K-12 Online Learning Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borup, Jered

    2013-01-01

    Although K-12 online learning has experienced exceptional growth, research in the area has lagged behind. This dissertation addressed this gap in the literature using a multiple article dissertation format. The first article used survey data from two online English courses at the Open High School of Utah (OHSU) to examine students' reported…

  11. A Guide to Networking for K-12 Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic networking information and planning assistance for technology coordinators and others involved in building networks for K-12 schools. The information in this guide focuses on the first few steps in the networking process. It reviews planning considerations and network design issues facing educators who…

  12. Tablets in K-12 Education: Integrated Experiences and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Heejung, Ed.; Alon, Sandra, Ed.; Fuentes, David, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of new and emerging technologies in the education sector has been a topic of interest to researchers, educators, and software developers alike in recent years. Utilizing the proper tools in a classroom setting is a critical factor in student success. "Tablets in K-12 Education: Integrated Experiences and Implications"…

  13. Demographics and Preparation Levels of K-12 Online Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jean Sutton

    2014-01-01

    This study collected and examined information on K-12 teachers currently involved in online education in the United States. The purposes of this study included defining the demographics of these teachers, determining the extent to which they were formally educated and/or trained to teach online, and to compare these findings to those from a…

  14. Florida's Opinion on K-12 Public Education Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Greg

    2006-01-01

    This scientifically representative poll of 1,200 Floridians finds that public opinion about K-12 public education spending is seriously misinformed. Floridians think public schools need more money, but the main reason is that they are badly mistaken about how much money the public schools actually get. Key findings of the study include: (1) Half…

  15. Best Practices in Administration of K-12 Dance Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henneman, Suzanne E.

    2013-01-01

    The role of administering K-12 dance education programs is both exciting and invigorating. Being part of the decision-making process, problem solving with teams of colleagues, establishing routines and initiatives, creating "something from nothing," and watching programs grow is appealing to dance teachers as creative and critical…

  16. Winona State University Anthology of K-12 Action Research Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Thomas F., Ed.; Lundquist, Margaret, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    These papers are partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Education at Winona State University in Winona, Minnesota. The cohort included a variety of licenser areas that represent most levels and content areas of K-12 education. The students were encouraged to keep their questions and hypothesis directed at…

  17. National K-12 Foreign Language Resource Center Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemis, Mari; Lively, Mandi

    This report evaluates the activities from February 1, 1994 to May 31, 1995 of the National K-12 Foreign Language Resource Center at Iowa State University. The center's purpose is to support training of elementary and secondary school foreign language teachers. Initiatives of the center focus on professional development in three areas: use of…

  18. Addressing Excellence Gaps in K-12 Education. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Gifted Children, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Since the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2001, a major objective of federal and state education policy has been to narrow K-12 achievement gaps. This position statement notes that the available data suggest that the singular focus on the most struggling learners has resulted in meaningful progress in closing minimum-competency…

  19. Education Nation: Obama, Romney Outline Different K-12, Postsecondary Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dervarics, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With negative ads already rampant on radio and TV, it's clear that President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney differ on most issues. That statement carries over to education as well, as both offer starkly different views on K-12 and higher education policy for the fall campaign. Obama is touting a large increase in Pell Grants…

  20. GOP Candidates Eye Scaling Back Federal K-12 Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    Though education has played second fiddle so far to other domestic issues in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, the narrowing field includes GOP candidates with compatible views on scaling back the federal role in K-12, but big contrasts in policy specifics and experience. President Barack Obama, meanwhile, is expected to put a…

  1. Comprehension Across the Curriculum: Perspectives and Practices K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganske, Kathy, Ed.; Fisher, Douglas, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Successful students use comprehension skills and strategies throughout the school day. In this timely book, leading scholars present innovative ways to support reading comprehension across content areas and the full K-12 grade range. Chapters provide specific, practical guidance for selecting rewarding texts and promoting engagement and…

  2. Environmental Education: Food - The Coming Crisis (Grades K-12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Council for Environmental Education, Upper Montclair.

    This publication presents classroom activities for teaching about the world food shortage. These activities are organized by objectives, are multidisciplinary and cover the K-12 grade levels. The objectives listed include: (1) Describe some food chains; (2) Appraise the effect of soil conditions, geographic and climatic factors on the food…

  3. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a list of outstanding science trade books for grade levels K-12 in the areas of Archaeology, Anthropology, Paleontology, Biography, Life Sciences, Integrated Science, Physical Science, Science Related Careers, and Technology and Engineering. Includes information on the selection process. (YDS)

  4. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents a list of outstanding science trade books published in 2001 for use in the K-12 grade levels. Includes the areas of archaeology, anthropology, and paleontology; biography; life sciences; integrated science; physical sciences; science related careers; and technology and engineering. Provides information on the books and the selection…

  5. Purposeful Partnerships: Linking Preservice Teachers with Diverse K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClanahan, Lauren; Buly, Marsha Riddle

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges of any K-12 teacher education program is providing pre-service teachers opportunities to work with students who are culturally and linguistically different from themselves. Despite best efforts of selecting texts and facilitating discussions, new teachers recently interviewed report that coursework just did not help…

  6. Using Cue Cards throughout the K-12 Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Hedin, Laura R.

    2015-01-01

    As a flexible instructional tool, cue cards offer support for students with and without disabilities. By providing different amounts of support, they also can be used to differentiate instruction in a variety of subject areas and grade levels. This article describes various strategies for using cue cards and includes examples from K-12 classrooms.

  7. Classrooms and Courtrooms: Facing Sexual Harassment in K-12 Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Nan

    This book uses evidence gathered from legal, anecdotal, and survey-based sources to explore sexual harassment in K-12 schools. The text is divided into seven chapters. Chapters 1 and 2 use material from surveys, salient lawsuits, and students' stories to describe harassment and to elaborate on the contradictions and confusions that surround this…

  8. Course Goals in Social Science, Grades K-12. Critique Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multnomah County Intermediate Education District, Portland, OR.

    This document on course goals in the social sciences is one part of a critique series dealing with the development and evaluation of course goals in six subject matter areas for grades K-12. The series provides an initial pool of course-level goals that are expected to be of considerable value in assisting educators with goal definition related to…

  9. Media Literacy and the K-12 Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Renee

    2005-01-01

    Media literacy education is being explored by scholars in many different fields (including education, literature, media studies, psychology, and public health), but there is less evidence of implementations occurring in K-12 settings. With more than 1.3 million teachers in U.S. public schools, it is impossible to estimate the extent to which the…

  10. Best Practices in Administration of K-12 Dance Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henneman, Suzanne E.

    2013-01-01

    The role of administering K-12 dance education programs is both exciting and invigorating. Being part of the decision-making process, problem solving with teams of colleagues, establishing routines and initiatives, creating "something from nothing," and watching programs grow is appealing to dance teachers as creative and critical…

  11. A K-12 Written Guidance Plan. Minimum Standards Implementation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Elementary and Secondary Education.

    One of a series of implementation documents prepared in conjunction with the revised minimum standards adopted in 1983 by the Ohio State Board of Education for elementary and secondary schools, this leadership document addresses the need, the purpose, and the implementation procedures for a K-12 written guidance plan in accordance with the Ohio…

  12. Technological Collaborations: K-12 and Higher Education. Fastback 438.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kay McPherson; Kopp, O. W.

    This brief report examines various ways in which K-12 schools and institutions of higher education can collaborate to effect critical changes in teaching and learning through the use of computers. The first section briefly reviews the history of computer use in education, noting such critical needs as teacher training, and reviews the…

  13. K-12 and University Partnerships: Bridging the Advocacy Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Charity; Sims, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Research has cited numerous advantages and benefits of K-12 collaborations with the larger university community (Castle, Fox, & Souder, 2006; Crocco, Faithfull, & Schwartz, 2003). Departments of kinesiology across the country are well positioned to establish partnerships with local school systems in order to advocate for quality, daily physical…

  14. Project WILD K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Environmental Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Project WILD K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide" focuses on wildlife and habitat. It is organized in topic units and is based on the Project WILD conceptual framework. Because these activities are designed for integration into existing courses of study, instructors may use one or many Project WILD activities or the entire set of activities…

  15. Project WILD K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Environmental Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Project WILD K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide" focuses on wildlife and habitat. It is organized in topic units and is based on the Project WILD conceptual framework. Because these activities are designed for integration into existing courses of study, instructors may use one or many Project WILD activities or the entire set of activities…

  16. K-12 and University Partnerships: Bridging the Advocacy Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Charity; Sims, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Research has cited numerous advantages and benefits of K-12 collaborations with the larger university community (Castle, Fox, & Souder, 2006; Crocco, Faithfull, & Schwartz, 2003). Departments of kinesiology across the country are well positioned to establish partnerships with local school systems in order to advocate for quality, daily physical…

  17. Teachers' Curriculum Guide to the Hayward Shoreline, K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachle, Leo; And Others

    This teaching guide gives environmental education ideas for grades K-12. The field trips and activities all relate to the Hayward shoreline of the San Francisco, California, Bay. Included in the guide are 44 science activities, 15 social science activities, and 18 humanities activities. Each activity description gives the experience level, site…

  18. Media Literacy and the K-12 Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Renee

    2005-01-01

    Media literacy education is being explored by scholars in many different fields (including education, literature, media studies, psychology, and public health), but there is less evidence of implementations occurring in K-12 settings. With more than 1.3 million teachers in U.S. public schools, it is impossible to estimate the extent to which the…

  19. Missouri's Framework for Curriculum Development in Fine Arts K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    This K-12 framework focuses on educating students regarding the importance of fine arts in a global society and encourages the integration of all subject matter throughout the curriculum. The fine arts framework addresses what students in Missouri are expected to know and be able to do in the fine arts areas when they leave school. The main…

  20. Unified Science Approach K-12, Proficiency Levels 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oickle, Eileen M., Ed.

    Presented is the second part of the K-12 unified science materials used in the public schools of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Detailed descriptions are made of the roles of students and teachers, purposes of the bibliography, major concepts in unified science, processes of inquiry, a scheme and model for scientific literacy, and program…

  1. Online System Adoption and K-12 Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmons, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the relationship between K-12 online system adoption (e.g., Blackboard, Edmodo, WordPress) and school-level academic achievement ratings. Utilizing a novel approach to data collection via website data extraction and indexing of all school websites in a target state in the United States (n?=?732) and merging these…

  2. Idaho K-12 English Language Arts Content Guide and Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Lynn Langer

    Representing a shift toward performance based education, this content guide and framework is designed to help schools in Idaho develop a K-12 English language arts curriculum and program and formulate some realistic goals for themselves and their students. An introductory section discusses performance based education, goals for English language…

  3. Teaching Engineering at the K-12 Level: Two Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kenneth L.; Burghardt, David

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors share their own perspectives regarding engineering education at the K-12 level. Smith believes that there must be a more direct infusion of appropriate mathematics and science with the unique technological content (tools, machines, materials, processes) for an effective engineering education program to exist. He thinks…

  4. Project WILD Aquatic K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Environmental Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Project WILD Aquatic K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide" emphasizes aquatic wildlife and aquatic ecosystems. It is organized in topic units and is based on the Project WILD conceptual framework. Because these activities are designed for integration into existing courses of study, instructors may use one or many Project WILD Aquatic activities…

  5. Health Education Guide: A Design for Teaching K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Morris

    This teaching guide to health education includes instruction units for grades K-12. Section 1 discusses the need for health education and includes a scope and sequence chart for each of the instruction units. Section 2 consists of instruction units in the areas of physical development, social and emotional development, chemicals and addiction, and…

  6. Nebraska K-12 Internet Evaluation Progress Report--Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Consortium of Educational Service Units.

    The goals of the Internet Evaluation Project, undertaken cooperatively by the University of Nebraska at Omaha and the Nebraska Consortium of Educational Service Units, focus on a long range assessment of Internet integration into the K-12 Nebraska schools and the support delivered by the Educational Service Units (ESUs). The purpose of this report…

  7. Personal/Social Behavior. Exceptional Child Education Curriculum K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuser, Debbie; And Others

    This curriculum guide aims to facilitate teaching and learning in the area of personal/social behavior for exceptional children in grades K-12. The scope and sequence of the guide are intended to reflect the course of normal social development beginning with a focus upon the self, through the metamorphosis of the self into a social being. A major…

  8. Designing GIS Learning Materials for K-12 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jung Eun

    2017-01-01

    Although previous studies have proven the usefulness and effectiveness of geographic information system (GIS) use in the K-12 classroom, the rate of teacher adoption remains low. The identified major barrier to its use is a lack of teachers' background and experience. To solve this limitation, many organisations have provided GIS-related teacher…

  9. Information Security Management Practices of K-12 School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyachwaya, Samson

    2013-01-01

    The research problem addressed in this quantitative correlational study was the inadequacy of sound information security management (ISM) practices in K-12 school districts, despite their increasing ownership of information assets. Researchers have linked organizational and sociotechnical factors to the implementation of information security…

  10. Trends in K-12 Social Studies. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risinger, C. Frederick

    Drawing on contemporary research literature, recently developed curriculum guides, and blue-ribbon reports, this digest reviews 10 contemporary trends in K-12 social studies in the United States. Trends are as follows: (1) History, history, and more history; (2) More geography, too; (3) Using literature to teach social studies; (4) Focus on the…

  11. K-12 Marketplace Sees Major Flow of Venture Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The flow of venture capital into the K-12 education market has exploded over the past year, reaching its highest transaction values in a decade in 2011, industry observers say. They attribute that rise to such factors as a heightened interest in educational technology; the decreasing cost of electronic devices such as tablet computers, laptops,…

  12. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 20 science activities for students K-12. Topics include role playing, similarities between urban and forest communities, ecosystems, garbage, recycling, food production, habitats, insects, tidal zone, animals, diversity, interest groups, rivers, spaceship earth, ecological interactions, and the cost of recreation. (KR)

  13. Environmental Education: Food - The Coming Crisis (Grades K-12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Council for Environmental Education, Upper Montclair.

    This publication presents classroom activities for teaching about the world food shortage. These activities are organized by objectives, are multidisciplinary and cover the K-12 grade levels. The objectives listed include: (1) Describe some food chains; (2) Appraise the effect of soil conditions, geographic and climatic factors on the food…

  14. An Environmental Education Program (K-12), Based on Environmental Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapp, William B.

    1971-01-01

    Describes a strategy for development and implementation of a comprehensive environmental education program (K-12) which can be integrated into existing curriculum of a school. Environmental encounters" stressed as meaningful approaches to goal achievement. Philosophy of spaceship earth" is fundamental to the program. (LK)

  15. Information Security Management Practices of K-12 School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyachwaya, Samson

    2013-01-01

    The research problem addressed in this quantitative correlational study was the inadequacy of sound information security management (ISM) practices in K-12 school districts, despite their increasing ownership of information assets. Researchers have linked organizational and sociotechnical factors to the implementation of information security…

  16. Transforming K-12 Rural Education through Blended Learning: Teacher Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerer, Paula; Kellerer, Eric; Werth, Eric; Werth, Lori; Montgomery, Danielle; Clyde, Rozella; Cozart, Joe; Creach, Laura; Hibbard, Laura; LaFrance, Jason; Rupp, Nadine; Walker, Niki; Carter, Theresa; Kennedy, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative study exploring rural teacher perspectives on the impact of blended learning on students and teachers was conducted in Idaho during the Fall of 2013. Researchers from Northwest Nazarene University's DOCEO Center in partnership with Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA) and the International Association for K-12 Online Learning…

  17. Project WILD Aquatic K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Environmental Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Project WILD Aquatic K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide" emphasizes aquatic wildlife and aquatic ecosystems. It is organized in topic units and is based on the Project WILD conceptual framework. Because these activities are designed for integration into existing courses of study, instructors may use one or many Project WILD Aquatic activities…

  18. Using Cue Cards throughout the K-12 Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Hedin, Laura R.

    2015-01-01

    As a flexible instructional tool, cue cards offer support for students with and without disabilities. By providing different amounts of support, they also can be used to differentiate instruction in a variety of subject areas and grade levels. This article describes various strategies for using cue cards and includes examples from K-12 classrooms.

  19. Supporting the K-12 Classroom through University Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskal, Barbara; Skokan, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a field-based example of a series of outreach programs that have been designed in response to current recommendations found in the K-12 outreach literature. These programs begin with university mathematics and science faculty members teaching a 10-day summer workshop to elementary and middle school teachers. Following this…

  20. Meaningful Involvement of Science Undergraduates in K-12 Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Sujaya; Shamah, Devora; Collay, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    The authors argue for the involvement of science undergraduates in K-12 outreach to enhance their communication skills, generate enthusiasm for science in today's youth, and extend relationships between institutions of higher learning and surrounding communities. Here we present three opportunities created at Oregon State University for engaging…

  1. Gender Sorting across K-12 Schools in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Mark C.; Conger, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    This article documents evidence of nonrandom gender sorting across K-12 schools in the United States. The sorting exists among coed schools and at all grade levels, and it is highest in the secondary school grades. We observe some gender sorting across school sectors and types: for instance, males are slightly underrepresented in private schools…

  2. Types, Subjects, and Purposes of K-12 Online Learning Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borup, Jered

    2013-01-01

    Although K-12 online learning has experienced exceptional growth, research in the area has lagged behind. This dissertation addressed this gap in the literature using a multiple article dissertation format. The first article used survey data from two online English courses at the Open High School of Utah (OHSU) to examine students' reported…

  3. Course Goals in Mathematics, Grades K-12. Critique Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multnomah County Intermediate Education District, Portland, OR.

    This document is one part of a critique series that deals with the development and evaluation of course goals in six subject matter areas for grades K-12. The series provides an initial pool of course-level goals that are expected to be of considerable value in assisting educators with goal definition related to curriculum planning and…

  4. Evaluating the Performance of Online K-12 Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Dick; Kafer, Krista; Reeser, Kelly; Shafer, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    This article examines K-12 online student and school performance across an entire state (Colorado) in the United States through two comparisons. First, state assessment scores of students in online schools are compared to those in traditional brick and mortar schools. Second, the accountability scores of online schools are compared to those of…

  5. A Framework for Educational Computer Usage. K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Julia; And Others

    A framework for educational computer usage in grades K-12 is outlined. For each grade level, objectives are shown for the following knowledge areas: computer-related terminology and use; history and development of computers; the use of the computer as a tool; communicating instructions to the computer; social implications; and robotics. Suggested…

  6. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 37 environmental science activities for students in grades K-12. Topics include water pollution, glaciers, protective coloration, shapes in nature, environmental impacts, recycling, creative writing, litter, shapes found in nature, color, rain cycle, waste management, plastics, energy, pH, landfills, runoff, watersheds,…

  7. A Coordinated Development Program for K-12 Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, George; Morgan, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    Given the lean times in education today, a coordinated fund-raising effort could highly benefit public K-12 education. An office of development could coordinate grant writing, interaction with foundations, corporate partnerships, the development of endowed chairs, and individual fund raising and manage local fund raisers. Development follows three…

  8. Teaching Engineering at the K-12 Level: Two Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kenneth L.; Burghardt, David

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors share their own perspectives regarding engineering education at the K-12 level. Smith believes that there must be a more direct infusion of appropriate mathematics and science with the unique technological content (tools, machines, materials, processes) for an effective engineering education program to exist. He thinks…

  9. Course Goals in Physical Education, Grades K-12. Critique Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multnomah County Intermediate Education District, Portland, OR.

    This document on course goals in physical education is one part of a critique series dealing with the development and evaluation of course goals in six subject matter areas for grades K-12. The series provides an initial pool of course-level goals that are expected to be of considerable value in assisting educators with goal definition related to…

  10. 2011 Census of Technology: Missouri Schools K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Census of Technology (COT) is designed to assess Missouri's continuing investment in K-12 education technologies. The COT provides important data for the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) to share with state and national decision-makers to help advance public policy and increase public awareness and support for education…

  11. Exploring the Effectiveness of Online Education in K-12 Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heafner, Tina L., Ed.; Hartshorne, Richard, Ed.; Petty, Teresa, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of technology in classrooms is rapidly emerging as a way to provide more educational opportunities for students. As virtual learning environments become more popular, evaluating the impact of this technology on student success is vital. "Exploring the Effectiveness of Online Education in K-12 Environments" combines…

  12. New K-12 Science Education Standards May Face Implementation Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2013-04-01

    Kindergarten is not just a place to learn letters and numbers, practice finger painting, and listen to story time. If a new set of national science standards is adopted, it will also be the start of a carefully planned effort to engage students in science-based activities throughout their K-12 academic careers.

  13. Tablets in K-12 Education: Integrated Experiences and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Heejung, Ed.; Alon, Sandra, Ed.; Fuentes, David, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of new and emerging technologies in the education sector has been a topic of interest to researchers, educators, and software developers alike in recent years. Utilizing the proper tools in a classroom setting is a critical factor in student success. "Tablets in K-12 Education: Integrated Experiences and Implications"…

  14. Education Nation: Obama, Romney Outline Different K-12, Postsecondary Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dervarics, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With negative ads already rampant on radio and TV, it's clear that President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney differ on most issues. That statement carries over to education as well, as both offer starkly different views on K-12 and higher education policy for the fall campaign. Obama is touting a large increase in Pell Grants…

  15. The Condition of K-12 Public Education in Maine: 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravelle, Paula B.; Silvernail, David L.

    2006-01-01

    This tenth edition of "The Condition of K-12 Public Education in Maine" is designed to provide Maine citizens, legislators, and educators a yearly report on the state of Maine public schools and education. This new edition updates educational information which appeared in earlier editions, and also provides information on several new…

  16. The Condition of K-12 Public Education in Maine: 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravelle, Paula B.; Silvernail, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This ninth edition of "The Condition of K-12 Public Education in Maine" is designed to provide Maine citizens, legislators, and educators a yearly report on the state of Maine public schools and education. This new edition updates educational information which appeared in earlier editions, and also provides information on several new…

  17. The Condition of K-12 Public Education in Maine, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravelle, Paula B.; Silvernail, David L.

    2004-01-01

    This eighth edition of "The Condition of K-12 Public Education in Maine" is designed to provide Maine citizens, legislators, and educators a yearly report on the state of Maine public schools and education. This new edition updates educational information which appeared in earlier editions, and also provides information on several new…

  18. K-12 Engineering Education Standards: Opportunities and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    Does the nation need K-12 engineering education standards? The answer to this question is paradoxically both simple and complex, and requires an examination of a rationale for such standards as well as the opportunities and barriers to developing and implementing the standards. In two decades since 1989, the idea of national standards for…

  19. Exploring the Effectiveness of Online Education in K-12 Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heafner, Tina L., Ed.; Hartshorne, Richard, Ed.; Petty, Teresa, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of technology in classrooms is rapidly emerging as a way to provide more educational opportunities for students. As virtual learning environments become more popular, evaluating the impact of this technology on student success is vital. "Exploring the Effectiveness of Online Education in K-12 Environments" combines…

  20. Modern & Classical Languages: K-12 Program EValuation 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Margaret Perea

    This evaluation of the modern and classical languages programs, K-12, in the Albuquerque (New Mexico) public school system provides general information on the program's history, philosophy, recognition, curriculum development, teachers, and activities. Specific information is offered on the different program components, namely, the elementary…

  1. West Bloomfield Schools Social Studies Curriculum K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, James E.; And Others

    The curriculum guide outlines behavioral objectives, learning activities, evaluation methods, and resources to help K-12 classroom teachers develop and implement social studies programs. Major objectives are to extend knowledge, develop skills to make effective use of this knowledge, and to facilitate the socialization process. The first section…

  2. Online System Adoption and K-12 Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmons, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the relationship between K-12 online system adoption (e.g., Blackboard, Edmodo, WordPress) and school-level academic achievement ratings. Utilizing a novel approach to data collection via website data extraction and indexing of all school websites in a target state in the United States (n?=?732) and merging these…

  3. Engaging K-12 Language Learners in Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egbert, Joy; Neville, Chon

    2015-01-01

    Calls to integrate media literacy into K-12 language classrooms appear to have gone largely unheeded. However, media literacy skills are seen as crucial for 21st-century learners. This article answers the calls for a focus on media literacy in the language classroom by addressing both why and how systematic attention might be brought to this issue…

  4. Meeting the Challenge: K-12 Public Education in Colorado, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    Colorado schools are undergoing a major transformation. Local communities are organizing around their schools and developing action plans to reach the state's educational goals. The 1992 report on K-12 education contains information about Colorado's efforts to implement four strategies: educational accountability; high expectations and standards…

  5. Satellite Outreach Program to Rural K-12 Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanborn, John; Borasky, Stacey; Frost, Charles

    Middle Tennessee State University recently developed a satellite-linked, interactive distance learning system with six rural K-12 schools. Faculty were then invited to make a single presentation over this system. The social work department, recognizing both the opportunities and the limitations presented by this new system, elected to be one of…

  6. Comprehension Across the Curriculum: Perspectives and Practices K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganske, Kathy, Ed.; Fisher, Douglas, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Successful students use comprehension skills and strategies throughout the school day. In this timely book, leading scholars present innovative ways to support reading comprehension across content areas and the full K-12 grade range. Chapters provide specific, practical guidance for selecting rewarding texts and promoting engagement and…

  7. Connecting the Dots: Postsecondary's Role in Preparing K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, 2012

    2012-01-01

    For the first time in the nation's history 46 States and the District of Columbia have agreed that all K-12 students will be educated along a common continuum of high academic expectations known as the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Having clear, consistent standards in English language arts/literacy and mathematics will help ensure that all…

  8. Engaging K-12 Language Learners in Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egbert, Joy; Neville, Chon

    2015-01-01

    Calls to integrate media literacy into K-12 language classrooms appear to have gone largely unheeded. However, media literacy skills are seen as crucial for 21st-century learners. This article answers the calls for a focus on media literacy in the language classroom by addressing both why and how systematic attention might be brought to this issue…

  9. Racializing ESOL Teacher Identities in U.S. K-12 Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motha, Suhanthie

    2006-01-01

    Through a year-long critical feminist ethnography, this article examines the challenges faced by beginning K-12 ESOL teachers in the United States as they grappled with the significance of their own racial identities in the process of negotiating the inherent racialization of ESOL in their language teaching contexts. I foreground the significance…

  10. Algebra Project DR K-12 Cohorts--Demonstration Project: Summative Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Algebra Project DR K-12, funded by the National Science Foundation as a Research and Development Project, addressed the challenge of offering significant STEM content for students to ensure public literacy and workforce readiness. The project's primary purpose was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a model for establishing four-year…

  11. K-12 Science and Mathematics Teachers' Beliefs about and Use of Inquiry in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jeff C.; Horton, Robert; Igo, Brent L.; Switzer, Deborah M.

    2009-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed and administered to 1,222 K-12 mathematics and science teachers to measure their beliefs about and use of inquiry in the classroom. Four variables (grade level taught, content area taught, level of support received, and self-efficacy for teaching inquiry) were significantly correlated to two dependent variables,…

  12. Perspectives and Visions of Computer Science Education in Primary and Secondary (K-12) Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.; Mittermeir, Roland T.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the recent developments in many countries, for example, in the USA and in the UK, it appears that computer science education (CSE) in primary or secondary schools (K-12) has reached a significant turning point, shifting its focus from ICT-oriented to rigorous computer science concepts. The goal of this special issue is to offer a…

  13. Perceptions of Professional and Educational Skills Learning Opportunities Made Available through K-12 Robotics Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakke, Christine K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether participation in robotics provides opportunities for educational and professional skill development, significant enough to merit the recommendation of robotics courses as a part of mainstream curriculum offerings in K-12 schools. This non-experimental, mixed methods study examined current junior high…

  14. School Hopscotch: A Comprehensive Review of K-12 Student Mobility in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Richard O.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an integrative review of the extant literature on K-12 student mobility in the United States. Student mobility is a widespread phenomenon with significant policy implications. Changing schools is most prevalent among minority and low-income students in urban school districts. There is an ongoing debate about whether student…

  15. Building Pressure: Modeling the Fiscal Future of California K-12 School Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Liz S.; Vincent, Jefrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Public school districts across California, particularly those in low-wealth areas, experience significant funding shortfalls for their facilities. Industry benchmarks suggest the state's K-12 school districts should spend nearly $18 billion a year to maintain their inventory, ensure buildings are up-to-date, and to build new spaces to handle…

  16. Perspectives and Visions of Computer Science Education in Primary and Secondary (K-12) Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.; Mittermeir, Roland T.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the recent developments in many countries, for example, in the USA and in the UK, it appears that computer science education (CSE) in primary or secondary schools (K-12) has reached a significant turning point, shifting its focus from ICT-oriented to rigorous computer science concepts. The goal of this special issue is to offer a…

  17. Perceptions of Professional and Educational Skills Learning Opportunities Made Available through K-12 Robotics Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakke, Christine K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether participation in robotics provides opportunities for educational and professional skill development, significant enough to merit the recommendation of robotics courses as a part of mainstream curriculum offerings in K-12 schools. This non-experimental, mixed methods study examined current junior high…

  18. Isolation and characterization of norfloxacin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, K; Aoyama, H; Suzue, S; Irikura, T; Iyobe, S; Mitsuhashi, S

    1986-01-01

    We isolated spontaneous mutants from Escherichia coli K-12 with low-level resistance to norfloxacin. These mutants were classified into the following three types on the basis of their properties: (i) NorA appeared to result for mutation in the gyrA locus for the A subunit of DNA gyrase; (ii) NorB showed low-level resistance to quinolones and other antimicrobial agents (e.g., cefoxitin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline), and the norB gene was considered to map at about 34 min on the E. coli K-12 chromosome; (iii) NorC was less susceptible to norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin but was hypersusceptible to hydrophobic quinolones such as nalidixic acid and rosoxacin, hydrophobic antibiotics, dyes, and detergents. Susceptibility to bacteriophages and the hydrophobicity of the NorC cell surface also differed from that of the parent strain. The norC gene was located near the lac locus at 8 min on the E. coli K-12 chromosome. Both NorB and NorC mutants had a lower rate of norfloxacin uptake, and it was found that the NorB mutant was altered in OmpF porin and that the NorC mutant was altered in both OmpF porin and apparently in the lipopolysaccharide structure of the outer membrane. PMID:3532944

  19. Effect of simulated microgravity on E. coli K12 MG1655 growth and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Arunasri, Kotakonda; Adil, Mohammed; Venu Charan, Katari; Suvro, Chatterjee; Himabindu Reddy, Seerapu; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the effects of simulated microgravity on E. coli K 12 MG1655 grown on LB medium supplemented with glycerol. Global gene expression analysis indicated that the expressions of hundred genes were significantly altered in simulated microgravity conditions compared to that of normal gravity conditions. Under these conditions genes coding for adaptation to stress are up regulated (sufE and ssrA) and simultaneously genes coding for membrane transporters (ompC, exbB, actP, mgtA, cysW and nikB) and carbohydrate catabolic processes (ldcC, ptsA, rhaD and rhaS) are down regulated. The enhanced growth in simulated gravity conditions may be because of the adequate supply of energy/reducing equivalents and up regulation of genes involved in DNA replication (srmB) and repression of the genes encoding for nucleoside metabolism (dfp, pyrD and spoT). In addition, E. coli cultured in LB medium supplemented with glycerol (so as to protect the cells from freezing temperatures) do not exhibit multiple stress responses that are normally observed when cells are exposed to microgravity in LB medium without glycerol.

  20. Active Commuting among K-12 Educators: A Study Examining Walking and Biking to Work

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, Melissa; Hastmann, Tanis J.; Norton, Alyssa N.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Walking and biking to work, active commuting (AC) is associated with many health benefits, though rates of AC remain low in the US. K-12 educators represent a significant portion of the workforce, and employee health and associated costs may have significant economic impact. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the current rates of AC and factors associated with AC among K-12 educators. Methods. A volunteer sample of K-12 educators (n = 437) was recruited to participate in an online survey. Participants responded about AC patterns and social ecological influences on AC (individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors). t-tests and ANOVAs examined trends in AC, and Pearson correlations examined the relationship between AC and dependent variables. Multiple regression analysis determined the relative influence of individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental levels on AC. Results. Participants actively commuted 0.51 ± 1.93 times/week. There were several individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors significantly related to AC. The full model explained 60.8% of the variance in AC behavior. Conclusions. This study provides insight on the factors that determine K-12 educators mode of commute and provide some insight for employee wellness among this population. PMID:24089620

  1. K-12 Students Flock To ToxTown In San Diego: Results of an SOT K-12 Education Outreach Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    Just prior to the start of the 2015 Annual Meeting in San Diego, hundreds of K-12 students, teachers, and science enthusiasts visited the ToxTown booth at the annual San Diego Festival of Science and Engineering grand finale event, EXPO Day. Over 20,000 attendees participated in ...

  2. K-12 Students Flock To ToxTown In San Diego: Results of an SOT K-12 Education Outreach Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    Just prior to the start of the 2015 Annual Meeting in San Diego, hundreds of K-12 students, teachers, and science enthusiasts visited the ToxTown booth at the annual San Diego Festival of Science and Engineering grand finale event, EXPO Day. Over 20,000 attendees participated in ...

  3. Soil Science Society of America - K-12 Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbo, David L.; Loynachan, Tom; Mblia, Monday; Robinson, Clay; Chapman, Susan

    2013-04-01

    The Soil Science Society of America created its K12 Committee in 2006 in part to compliment the Dig It! The Secrets of Soil exhibit that opened in July 2008 at the Smithsonian's Institution's Nation Museum of Natural History (of which SSS was a founding sponsor). The committee's work began quickly with a website designed to provide resources for K12 teachers. The first accomplishments included reviewing and posting links to web based information already available to teachers. These links were sorted by subject and grade level to make it easier for teachers to navigate the web and find what they needed quickly. Several presentations and lessons designed for K12 teachers were also posted at this time. Concurrent with this effort a subcommittee review and organized the national teaching standards to show where soils could fit into the overall K12 curriculum. As the website was being developed another subcommittee developed a soils book (Soil! Get the Inside Scoop, 2008) to further compliment the Dig It! exhibit. This was a new endeavor for SSSA having never worked with the non-academic audience in developing a book. Peer-reviews of this book included not only scientist but also students in order to make sure the book was attractive to them. Once the book was published and the website developed it became clear more outreach was needed. SSSA K12 Committee has attended both the National Science Teachers Association (since 2008) the USA Science and Engineering Festival (since 2010) with exhibits and workshops. It has cooperated and contributed to the American Geologic Institutes' Earth Science Week materials with brochures and lesson plans and with National Association of Conservation Districts by providing peer-review and distribution of materials. The most recent developments from the committee include a web redesign that is more student and teacher friendly, the development of a peer-review system to publish K12 Lesson Plans, and finally the publication of a new soils

  4. Technical Feasibility Study for Zero Energy K-12 Schools

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, Shanti D.; Torcellini, Paul A.; Bonnema, Eric; Goldwasser, David

    2016-08-26

    A simulation-based technical feasibility study was completed to show the types of technologies required to achieve ZEB status with this building type. These technologies are prioritized across the building's subsystem such that design teams can readily integrate the ideas. Energy use intensity (EUI) targets were established for U.S. climate zones such that K-12 schools can be zero-ready or can procure solar panels or other renewable energy production sources to meet the zero energy building definition. Results showed that it is possible for K-12 schools to achieve zero energy when the EUI is between 20 and 26 kBtu/ft2/yr. Temperate climates required a smaller percentage of solar panel coverage than very hot or very cold climates. The paper provides a foundation for technically achieving zero energy schools with a vision of transforming the school construction market to mainstream zero energy buildings within typical construction budgets.

  5. K-12 Math and Science Education: A Physicist Meets Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstein, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Can professional engineers, mathematicians, and scientists have a positive impact on K-12 math and science education? The experience of the Santa Fe Alliance for Science, and several other like-minded organizations, indicates that they can indeed. But success is by no means assured. Good scientists are not automatically good educators, but they can learn enough about pedagogy, classroom, and community to do well. For example, their experiences working on research topics of great societal interest (e.g. the energy supply or global warming) can be a great attraction to young people. This discussion will be oriented around three major points: lessons learned, prospects for the future, and how our effort fits into state-wide plans for re-inventing K-12 math and science education in New Mexico.

  6. Bridging the gap between community health and K-12 schools.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Christine

    The topic of this article is program planning for K-12 school health programs collaborating with community agencies, businesses, colleges, and organizations. Community involvement was listed as one of the weakest areas of school health efforts in a national coordinated school health study [1]. This article presents the 5-year results demonstrating the outcomes of K-12 schools program planning aimed at community involvement in the coordinated school health model. Directors of the Departments of Education and Health in South Dakota initiated training for school personnel in the coordinated school health model through development of councils in the schools starting in 2000. The expectations of the councils were to design a program plan to support the health of students and staff in their school. The short-term results of a 5-year evaluation indicated the greatest area of gain was in community health involvement to improve student and staff health.

  7. Technical Feasibility Study for Zero Energy K-12 Schools

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnema, Eric; Goldwasser, David; Torcellini, Paul; Pless, Shanti; Studer, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    This technical feasibility study provides documentation and research results supporting a possible set of strategies to achieve source zero energy K-12 school buildings as defined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) zero energy building (ZEB) definition (DOE 2015a). Under this definition, a ZEB is an energy-efficient building in which, on a source energy basis, the actual annual delivered energy is less than or equal to the on-site renewable exported energy.

  8. The hsd (host specificity) genes of E. coli K 12.

    PubMed

    Sain, B; Murray, N E

    1980-01-01

    The hsd genes of E. coli K 12 have been cloned in phage lambda by a combination of in vitro and in vivo techniques. Three genes, whose products are required for K-specific restriction and modification, have been identified by complementation tests as hsdR, M and S. The order of these closely linked genes was established as R, M, S by analysis of the DNA of genetically characterised deletion derivatives of lambda hsd phages. The three genes are transcribed in the same direction but not necessarily as a single operon. Genetic evidence identifies two promoters, one from which transcription of hsdM and S is initiated and a second for the hsdR gene. The hsdR gene codes for a polypeptide of molecular weight approximately 130 000; hsdM for one of 62--65 000 and the hsdS gene was associated with two polypeptides of approximately 50 000. Circumstantial evidence suggest that one of these two polypeptides may be a degradation, or processed, derivative of the other. The hsdS polypeptide of E. coli B has a slightly higher mobility in an SDS-polyacrylamide gel than does that of E. coli K 12. A probe comprising most of the hsdR gene and all of the hsdM and S genes of E. coli K 12 shares extensive homology with the DNA of E. coli B but none with that of E. coli C.

  9. K-12 Education with the National Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddick, M. J.; O'Mullane, W.; Szalay, A. S.; Christian, C.

    2005-12-01

    We have created the first K-12 education activity using data provided by the National Virtual Observatory (NVO). The activity, ``Adopt an Object,'' was suggested by Heidi Kaiter, a middle school science teacher from Concord, MA. It is designed for middle school students, but could be adapted for high school and Astro 101 students as well. Each group of students selects a well-known sky object to ``adopt'' for detailed study. Students use the NVO's ``Data-Scope'' to look up multiwavelength images, observations, and catalog data for their object. The activity ends with a brief oral presentation and written report summarizing what each group has learned about their object. The activity includes a complete teacher's guide, with a lesson plan, additional resources, and correlations to national education standards. We are currently inviting K-12 teachers to field test the activity in their classes. We are also developing several other activities for K-12 and college teachers using NVO data. The activity discussed here is available online at http://www.voservices.net/nvoedu.

  10. Involving Practicing Scientists in K-12 Science Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Teacher Education Program (STEP) offered a unique framework for creating professional development courses focused on Arctic research from 2006-2009. Under the STEP framework, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training was delivered by teams of practicing Arctic researchers in partnership with master teachers with 20+ years experience teaching STEM content in K-12 classrooms. Courses based on the framework were offered to educators across Alaska. STEP offered in-person summer-intensive institutes and follow-on audio-conferenced field-test courses during the academic year, supplemented by online scientist mentorship for teachers. During STEP courses, teams of scientists offered in-depth STEM content instruction at the graduate level for teachers of all grade levels. STEP graduate-level training culminated in the translation of information and data learned from Arctic scientists into standard-aligned lessons designed for immediate use in K-12 classrooms. This presentation will focus on research that explored the question: To what degree was scientist involvement beneficial to teacher training and to what degree was STEP scientist involvement beneficial to scientist instructors? Data sources reveal consistently high levels of ongoing (4 year) scientist and teacher participation; high STEM content learning outcomes for teachers; high STEM content learning outcomes for students; high ratings of STEP courses by scientists and teachers; and a discussion of the reasons scientists indicate they benefited from STEP involvement. Analyses of open-ended comments by teachers and scientists support and clarify these findings. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze teacher and scientist qualitative feedback. Comments were coded and patterns analyzed in three databases. The vast majority of teacher open-ended comments indicate that STEP involvement improved K-12 STEM classroom instruction, and the vast majority of scientist open-ended comments

  11. Use of Cooperative K-12 Water Quality Data by Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, M. H.; Clemons, J.; Bales, R. C.

    2001-05-01

    Cooperative data collected by volunteers who are not paid professionals has been successfully used in weather observations, groundwater levels, and water quality. However, the notion of involving K-12 students directly in research, specifically concerning water quality data, has left many research scientists wondering "what about quality assurance and control (QA/QC)?" Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) is a worldwide network of K-12 students, teachers, and scientists working together to study and understand the global environment. Students and teachers from over 8,000 schools in more than 80 countries are working with research scientists to learn more about our planet. GLOBE students make environmental observations (hydrology, meteorology, soils, and other measurements) at or near their schools and report their data through the Internet (www.globe.gov). GLOBE and other parallel K-12 volunteer measurement programs have developed multi-year records of stream water quality at locations where career scientists do not or only infrequently sample. Since 1995, over 600 GLOBE schools throughout the U.S. have gathered and reported surface water quality data for alkalinity, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, and temperature. A comparative analysis of GLOBE and USGS water quality data, and the protocols used to make these measurements, was done to assess: i) how measurement protocols compare qualitatively, ii) how the variability in data compare, and iii) what spatial and/or temporal patterns are apparent in the data. When compared to equivalent USGS protocols, it becomes apparent that some of the GLOBE hydrology protocols can be improved. However there are limits to the quality of K-12 data imposed by the levels of scientific training of participants and sophistication of instrumentation. The higher spatial and statistical variability of GLOBE data compared to USGS data makes it unsuited for use as a stand-alone method for

  12. Females and STEM: Determining the K-12 Experiences that Influenced Women to Pursue STEM Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Anne Marie

    In the United States, careers in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are increasing yet there are not enough trained personnel to meet this demand. In addition, of those that seek to pursue STEM fields in the United States, only 26% are female. In order to increase the number of women seeking STEM based bachelor's degrees, K-12 education must provide a foundation that prepares students for entry into these fields. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to determine the perceived K-12 experiences that influenced females to pursue a STEM field. Twelve college juniors or seniors seeking a degree in Biology, Mathematics, or Physics were interviewed concerning their K-12 experiences. These interviews were analyzed and six themes emerged. Teacher passion and classroom characteristics such as incorporating challenging activities played a significant role in the females' decisions to enter STEM fields. Extra-curricular activities such as volunteer and mentor opportunities and the females' need to benefit others also influenced females in their career choice. Both the formal (within the school) and informal (outside of the traditional classroom) pipeline opportunities that these students encountered helped develop a sense of self-efficacy in science and mathematics; this self-efficacy enabled them to persist in pursuing these career fields. Several participants cited barriers that they encountered in K-12 education, but these barriers were primarily internal as they struggled with overcoming self-imposed obstacles in learning and being competitive in the mathematics and science classrooms. The experiences from these female students can be used by K-12 educators to prepare and encourage current female students to enter STEM occupations.

  13. Infrared Astronomy Professional Development for K-12 Educators: WISE Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borders, Kareen; Mendez, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    K-12 educators need effective and relevant astronomy professional development. WISE Telescope (Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer) and Spitzer Space Telescope Education programs provided an immersive teacher professional development workshop at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico during the summer of 2009. As many common misconceptions involve scale and distance, teachers worked with Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance of objects in the universe. Teachers built and used basic telescopes, learned about the history of telescopes, explored ground and satellite based telescopes, and explored and worked on models of WISE Telescope. An in-depth explanation of WISE and Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. We taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. The stations included an overview via lecture and power point, the use of ultraviolet beads to determine ultraviolet exposure, the study of WISE lenticulars and diagramming of infrared data, listening to light by using speakers hooked up to photoreceptor cells, looking at visible light through diffraction glasses and diagramming the data, protocols for using astronomy based research in the classroom, and infrared thermometers to compare environmental conditions around the observatory. An overview of LIDAR physics was followed up by a simulated LIDAR mapping of the topography of Mars. We will outline specific steps for K-12 infrared astronomy professional development, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional K-12 professional development. Funding was provided by WISE Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, Starbucks, Arecibo Observatory, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.

  14. K-12 science education as the road to consilient curricula.

    PubMed

    Lederman, L M

    2001-05-01

    We begin with the absurdity of ninth-grade biology to bewail the fate of high school science education as one component of a wholly inadequate K-12 education. Our proposal for a coherent physics-chemistry-biology core curriculum for all high school students leads naturally to seeking the connections between the sciences, the sciences and mathematics, and indeed to the social sciences and the humanities. Our goal is literacy--scientific and humanistic--as the sensible goal for a 21st century high school graduate.

  15. AIAA Educator Academy: Enriching STEM Education for K-12 Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagle, E.; Bering, E. A.; Longmier, B. W.; Henriquez, E.; Milnes, T.; Wiedorn, P.; Bacon, L.

    2012-12-01

    Educator Academy is a K-12 STEM curriculum developed by the STEM K-12 Outreach Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Consisting of three independent curriculum modules, K-12 students participate in inquiry-based engineering challenges to improve critical thinking skills and enhance problem solving skills. The Mars Rover Celebration Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 3-8. Throughout this module, students learn about Mars and the solar system. Working with given design criteria, students work in teams to do basic research about Mars that will determine the operational objectives and structural features of their rover. Then, students participate in the design and construction of a model of a mock-up Mars Rover to carry out a specific science mission on the surface of Mars. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share their rover designs and what they have learned. The Electric Cargo Plan Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 6-12. Throughout this module, students learn about aerodynamics and the four forces of flight. Working individually or in teams, students design and construct an electrically-powered model aircraft to fly a tethered flight of at least one lap without cargo, followed by a second tethered flight of one lap carrying as much cargo as possible. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share what they have learned and compete with their different cargo plane designs. The Space Weather Balloon Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 9-12. Throughout this module, students learn and refine physics concepts as well as experimental research skills. Students participate in project-based learning that is experimental in nature. Students are engaged with the world around them as they collaborate to launch a high altitude

  16. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers.

    PubMed

    Soitamo, Arto J; Jada, Balaji; Lehto, Kirsi

    2011-04-20

    RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs). These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA) mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter) the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent). Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1) were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) were also decreased in

  17. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs). These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA) mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter) the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent). Results Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1) were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) were

  18. Genetic alterations of histone lysine methyltransferases and their significance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Holowatyj, Andreana; Yang, Zeng-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Histone lysine methyltransferases (HMTs), a large class of enzymes that catalyze site-specific methylation of lysine residues on histones and other proteins, play critical roles in controlling transcription, chromatin architecture, and cellular differentiation. However, the genomic landscape and clinical significance of HMTs in breast cancer remain poorly characterized. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of approximately 50 HMTs in breast cancer and identified associations among recurrent copy number alterations, mutations, gene expression, and clinical outcome. We identified 12 HMTs with the highest frequency of genetic alterations, including 8 with high-level amplification, 2 with putative homozygous deletion, and 2 with somatic mutation. Different subtypes of breast cancer have different patterns of copy number and expression for each HMT gene. In addition, chromosome 1q contains four HMTs that are concurrently or independently amplified or overexpressed in breast cancer. Copy number or mRNA expression of several HMTs was significantly associated with basal-like breast cancer and shorter patient survival. Integrative analysis identified 8 HMTs (SETDB1, SMYD3, ASH1L, SMYD2, WHSC1L1, SUV420H1, SETDB2, and KMT2C) that are dysregulated by genetic alterations, classifying them as candidate therapeutic targets. Together, our findings provide a strong foundation for further mechanistic research and therapeutic options using HMTs to treat breast cancer. PMID:25537518

  19. Communicating Regional Geology and Geohazards to K-12 Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B.; Butler, R. F.; Whitman, J. M.; Granshaw, F. D.; Magura, B.; Hedeen, C.; Groom, R.; Thompson, D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Teachers on the Leading Edge (TOTLE) program has designed an innovative model for middle school teacher professional development related to Pacific NW plate margin hazards and EarthScope science. The program has been effective at improving teacher knowledge and confidence and has led to high rates of curricular implementation. The elements particularly key to success are: a) facilitation team with broad expertise in both geoscience and education; b) regional team format that encouraged learning community development; c) teachers' desire to focus on regional geologic hazards; d) significant use of animations and field trips to aid in "visualization" of processes; and e) extensive "kit" of teaching materials for easy classroom transfer. The 1-week workshops were held in summer 2008-2010 and 35 Pacific NW middle school teachers attended each year. Geoscientists from universities and research institutions conducted the field trips and content sessions. Master K-12 Earth science teachers designed or modified curricular materials and led the teaching implementation sessions. Each year, the teachers were divided into 5 regional teams led by geoscience educator team leaders (community college instructors or similar). Teachers were surveyed on teaching confidence and content knowledge before and after the workshops. Follow-up surveys addressed teaching confidence and curricular implementation and were conducted 0.7 years after (all cohorts), 1.7 years after (2009 cohort), and 2.7 years after (2008 cohort). Teacher confidence (4-point scale: 1="not at all confident"; 4="very confident") on workshop content topics continued to rise in each subsequent survey from 2.7 (pre) to 3.3 (post) to 3.5 (0.7 yr follow up) to 3.7 (2-3 yr follow up) suggesting the program impact is long-lived. In the post-workshop surveys, 100% of participants agreed or strongly agreed that the program would positively impact their teaching. Average teacher performance on content questions improved

  20. Altered cortical microarchitecture in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Farr, Joshua N; Zhang, Wei; Kumar, Shaji K; Jacques, Richard M; Ng, Alvin C; McCready, Louise K; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Drake, Matthew T

    2014-01-30

    Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are at increased fracture risk, and we have previously shown that MGUS patients have altered trabecular bone microarchitecture compared with controls. However, there are no data on whether the porosity of cortical bone, which may play a greater role in bone strength and the occurrence of fractures, is increased in MGUS. Thus, we studied cortical porosity and bone strength (apparent modulus) using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography imaging of the distal radius in 50 MGUS patients and 100 age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched controls. Compared with controls, MGUS patients had both significantly higher cortical porosity (+16.8%; P < .05) and lower apparent modulus (-8.9%; P < .05). Despite their larger radial bone size, MGUS patients have significantly increased cortical bone porosity and reduced bone strength relative to controls. This increased cortical porosity may explain the increased fracture risk seen in MGUS patients.

  1. Polyphenols from olive mill waste affect biofilm formation and motility in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Lisa; Fasolato, Luca; Montemurro, Filomena; Martino, Maria Elena; Balzan, Stefania; Servili, Maurizio; Novelli, Enrico; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. A potential option for bioremediation to overcome ecological problems is the reutilization of these natural compounds in food production. The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of the antimicrobial mode of action of a phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW) at molecular level by studying Escherichia coli as a model microorganism. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E. coli K-12 exposed to PEOVW. The repression of genes for flagellar synthesis and the involvement of genes linked to biofilm formation and stress response were observed. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility, thus confirming the gene expression data. This study provides interesting insights on the molecular action of PEOVW on E. coli K-12. Given these anti-biofilm properties and considering that biofilm formation is a serious problem for the food industry and human health, PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E. coli K-12 exposed to phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW). Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility. Given these anti-biofilm properties PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. PMID:24628798

  2. Clinically significant hemodynamic alterations after propacetamol injection in the emergency department: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bae, June-Il; Ahn, Shin; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Kim, Won Young; Lee, Jae Ho; Oh, Bum Jin; Lim, Kyung Soo

    2017-04-01

    Propacetamol, a water-soluble prodrug form of paracetamol, is hydrolyzed by esterase to generate paracetamol in the blood. Each gram of propacetamol is equal to 0.5 g of paracetamol. It has been reported to cause hypotension in critically ill patients with a fever. We aimed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of propacetamol for the control of fever in patients with diverse severities of illness who were managed in the emergency department (ED). We also aimed to identify clinical factors related to significant hemodynamic alterations in ED patients. This was a retrospective study of 1507 ED patients who received propacetamol. Significant hemodynamic alterations were defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) <90 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) <60 mmHg, or a drop in SBP >30 mmHg, which required treatments with a bolus of fluid or vasopressor administration. Postinfusion SBP and DBP were significantly lower than the preinfusion SBP and DBP. A clinically significant drop in BP occurred in 162 (10.7 %) patients, and interventions were necessary. Among the predictors assessed, congestive heart failure (OR 6.21, 95 % CI 2.67-14.45) and chills (OR 3.10, 95 % CI 2.04-4.70) were independent factors for a significant hemodynamic change. Administration of propacetamol can provoke a reduction in BP in ED patients. This reduction was clinically significant for 10 % of infusions. Clinicians should be aware of this potential deleterious effect, especially in patients with congestive heart failure or who experience chills prior to the administration of propacetamol.

  3. Telling Your Story: Ocean Scientists in the K-12 Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, H.

    2006-12-01

    Most scientists and engineers are accustomed to presenting their research to colleagues or lecturing college or graduate students. But if asked to speak in front of a classroom full of elementary school or junior high school students, many feel less comfortable. TERC, as part of its work with The Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence-New England (COSEE-NE) has designed a workshop to help ocean scientists and engineers develop skills for working with K-12 teachers and students. We call this program: Telling Your Story (TYS). TYS has been offered 4 times over 18 months for a total audience of approximately 50 ocean scientists. We will discuss the rationale for the program, the program outline, outcomes, and what we have learned. ne.net/edu_project_3/index.php

  4. The complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Blattner, F R; Plunkett, G; Bloch, C A; Perna, N T; Burland, V; Riley, M; Collado-Vides, J; Glasner, J D; Rode, C K; Mayhew, G F; Gregor, J; Davis, N W; Kirkpatrick, H A; Goeden, M A; Rose, D J; Mau, B; Shao, Y

    1997-09-05

    The 4,639,221-base pair sequence of Escherichia coli K-12 is presented. Of 4288 protein-coding genes annotated, 38 percent have no attributed function. Comparison with five other sequenced microbes reveals ubiquitous as well as narrowly distributed gene families; many families of similar genes within E. coli are also evident. The largest family of paralogous proteins contains 80 ABC transporters. The genome as a whole is strikingly organized with respect to the local direction of replication; guanines, oligonucleotides possibly related to replication and recombination, and most genes are so oriented. The genome also contains insertion sequence (IS) elements, phage remnants, and many other patches of unusual composition indicating genome plasticity through horizontal transfer.

  5. K-12 students with concussions: a legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Zirkel, Perry A; Brown, Brenda Eagan

    2015-04-01

    This article provides a multipart analysis of the public schools' responsibility for students with concussions. The first part provides the prevailing diagnostic definitions of concussions and postconcussive syndrome. The second and central part provides (a) the legal framework of the two overlapping federal laws--the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the varying state laws or local policies for individual health plans and (b) a summary of the developing body of hearing officer decisions, court decisions, and Office for Civil Rights rulings that have applied this framework to K-12 students with concussions. The final part offers recommendations for proactive return to school policies, with the school nurse playing a central supporting role.

  6. The Aloha Telescope for K-12 STEM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowell, James R.

    2015-01-01

    How does one bring night-time astronomical observations into the classroom? How does a teacher - during the school day - show students the craters on the Moon, the rings of Saturn, or the four Galilean moons of Jupiter? One of the greatest drawbacks to teaching Astronomy is the lack of real-time telescopic observations during the school day, and yet this is a very exciting time for astronomical discoveries. The solution is to access a telescope in a substantially different time zone where it is still night. This facility - the Aloha Telescope - on Maui has already been established by a partnership between Georgia Tech and the Air Force Research Lab. This robotic telescope's sole purpose is for K-12 education, as it is equipped with a video-camera and is operated remotely via high-speed internet connections. This facility and its outreach program allow east-coast teachers and, in turn, students to have local daytime access to - and direct control of - the telescope. When observing the Moon, teachers and students will move the telescope wherever they wish across the highly-magnified lunar surface (~ 5 arcminute FOV). This telescope will enable night-time astronomical observations to come alive as day-time activities and will be an important tool for STEM education and activities. The use of the Aloha Telescope requires minimal training and is free after registering for a date and time.Dr. Sowell has written specific telescopic exercises and surface feature tours appropriate for K-12 and college-level users. These exercises, and other aspects of the Aloha Telescope and program, are posted on the website at http://aloha.gatech.edu

  7. How to Get Successfully Involved with K-12 Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, D.; Fraknoi, A.; Bennett, M.

    1998-05-01

    Many astronomers now have some involvement in K-12 education, either through their children, through large projects with an education or outreach office, or through an educational component to their own grants. Some may need to incorporate education components into future proposals. For those new to education, it can be difficult to decide how best to use their limited resources without "re-inventing the wheel." Some astronomers are comfortable taking a direct role in the classroom or working with teachers, others prefer developing web-based or printed materials, while still others wouldrather work with local schools of education to enhance the training of future teachers. Which of these roles is most useful? In this session, participants will learn what has worked well in the past, with special attention paid to ways in which astronomers' and physicists' training and instincts may fail them when working in education. Invited teachers will describe their classrooms and how astronomers can be most helpful to them. Sample (successful) activities will be demonstrated, and information given about the wide range of existing astronomy and space-science education programs around the country. A full menu of useful ways that astronomers can get involved will be presented, as well as the organizations and institutions which can help in devising a meaningful education program. Handouts will include a catalog of national astronomy education projects, a list of educational web sites, information about the NASA OSS education brokers and facilitators, examples of successful educational materials, and a listing of roles astronomers have played or could play to enhance K-12 education. Registration is required; see the AAS Education WWW page or email aased@aas.org.

  8. Prognostic significance of p16 INK4a alteration for Ewing sarcoma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Honoki, Kanya; Stojanovski, Elizabeth; McEvoy, Mark; Fujii, Hiromasa; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kido, Akira; Takakura, Yoshinori; Attia, John

    2007-09-15

    Despite findings from individual studies regarding prognostic factors for Ewing sarcoma, no conclusive results have been produced, partly because of small sample sizes. The objective of the current study was to evaluate whether the presence of p16(INK4a) alteration is associated with a poorer prognosis in patients with Ewing sarcomas. A review was conducted of publications that assessed associations between p16(INK4a) status and 2-year survival among patients with Ewing sarcoma. The association between metastatic disease at initial diagnosis and 2-year survival was evaluated by synthesizing data in the form of risk ratios. Of 11 studies that were identified in the initial search strategy, 6 studies, representing 188 patients, met the inclusion criteria and, consequently, were pooled for quantitative analyses. The estimated pooled risk ratio of p16(INK4a) aberration was 2.17 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.55-3.03; P < .001), whereas the estimated pooled risk ratio of metastasis at diagnosis among the 164 eligible patients was 2.60 (95% CI, 1.71-3.97; P < .001). There was no statistically significant difference in the pooled estimated risk ratios of p16(INK4a) aberration for a poor prognosis between patients with and without metastasis at diagnosis (1.86 and 2.21, respectively; P > .59). The presence of p16(INK4a) alteration was a statistically significant predictor of prognosis for patients with Ewing sarcoma. Along with other prognostic factors, such as metastasis, the p16(INK4a) alteration may be a potential candidate for improving the risk-stratifying strategy for patients with these tumors. (c) 2007 American Cancer Society.

  9. Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli K-12 and O157:H7 Associated with Lettuce Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Ryan C.; Black, Elaine P.; Hou, Zhe; Sugawara, Masayuki; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of outbreaks of gastroenteritis recently caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7 have been linked to the consumption of leafy green vegetables. Although it is known that E. coli survives and grows in the phyllosphere of lettuce plants, the molecular mechanisms by which this bacterium associates with plants are largely unknown. The goal of this study was to identify E. coli genes relevant to its interaction, survival, or attachment to lettuce leaf surfaces, comparing E. coli K-12, a model system, and E. coli O157:H7, a pathogen associated with a large number of outbreaks. Using microarrays, we found that upon interaction with intact leaves, 10.1% and 8.7% of the 3,798 shared genes were differentially expressed in K-12 and O157:H7, respectively, whereas 3.1% changed transcript levels in both. The largest group of genes downregulated consisted of those involved in energy metabolism, including tnaA (33-fold change), encoding a tryptophanase that converts tryptophan into indole. Genes involved in biofilm modulation (bhsA and ybiM) and curli production (csgA and csgB) were significantly upregulated in E. coli K-12 and O157:H7. Both csgA and bhsA (ycfR) mutants were impaired in the long-term colonization of the leaf surface, but only csgA mutants had diminished ability in short-term attachment experiments. Our data suggested that the interaction of E. coli K-12 and O157:H7 with undamaged lettuce leaves likely is initiated via attachment to the leaf surface using curli fibers, a downward shift in their metabolism, and the suppression of biofilm formation. PMID:22247152

  10. Transcriptional responses of Escherichia coli K-12 and O157:H7 associated with lettuce leaves.

    PubMed

    Fink, Ryan C; Black, Elaine P; Hou, Zhe; Sugawara, Masayuki; Sadowsky, Michael J; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2012-03-01

    An increasing number of outbreaks of gastroenteritis recently caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7 have been linked to the consumption of leafy green vegetables. Although it is known that E. coli survives and grows in the phyllosphere of lettuce plants, the molecular mechanisms by which this bacterium associates with plants are largely unknown. The goal of this study was to identify E. coli genes relevant to its interaction, survival, or attachment to lettuce leaf surfaces, comparing E. coli K-12, a model system, and E. coli O157:H7, a pathogen associated with a large number of outbreaks. Using microarrays, we found that upon interaction with intact leaves, 10.1% and 8.7% of the 3,798 shared genes were differentially expressed in K-12 and O157:H7, respectively, whereas 3.1% changed transcript levels in both. The largest group of genes downregulated consisted of those involved in energy metabolism, including tnaA (33-fold change), encoding a tryptophanase that converts tryptophan into indole. Genes involved in biofilm modulation (bhsA and ybiM) and curli production (csgA and csgB) were significantly upregulated in E. coli K-12 and O157:H7. Both csgA and bhsA (ycfR) mutants were impaired in the long-term colonization of the leaf surface, but only csgA mutants had diminished ability in short-term attachment experiments. Our data suggested that the interaction of E. coli K-12 and O157:H7 with undamaged lettuce leaves likely is initiated via attachment to the leaf surface using curli fibers, a downward shift in their metabolism, and the suppression of biofilm formation.

  11. ELF5 isoform expression is tissue-specific and significantly altered in cancer.

    PubMed

    Piggin, Catherine L; Roden, Daniel L; Gallego-Ortega, David; Lee, Heather J; Oakes, Samantha R; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2016-01-07

    E74-like factor 5 (ELF5) is an epithelial-specific member of the E26 transforming sequence (ETS) transcription factor family and a critical regulator of cell fate in the placenta, pulmonary bronchi, and milk-producing alveoli of the mammary gland. ELF5 also plays key roles in malignancy, particularly in basal-like and endocrine-resistant forms of breast cancer. Almost all genes undergo alternative transcription or splicing, which increases the diversity of protein structure and function. Although ELF5 has multiple isoforms, this has not been considered in previous studies of ELF5 function. RNA-sequencing data for 6757 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed to characterize ELF5 isoform expression in multiple normal tissues and cancers. Extensive in vitro analysis of ELF5 isoforms, including a 116-gene quantitative polymerase chain reaction panel, was performed in breast cancer cell lines. ELF5 isoform expression was found to be tissue-specific due to alternative promoter use but altered in multiple cancer types. The normal breast expressed one main isoform, while in breast cancer there were subtype-specific alterations in expression. Expression of other ETS factors was also significantly altered in breast cancer, with the basal-like subtype demonstrating a distinct ETS expression profile. In vitro inducible expression of the full-length isoforms 1 and 2, as well as isoform 3 (lacking the Pointed domain) had similar phenotypic and transcriptional effects. Alternative promoter use, conferring differential regulatory responses, is the main mechanism governing ELF5 action rather than differential transcriptional activity of the isoforms. This understanding of expression and function at the isoform level is a vital first step in realizing the potential of transcription factors such as ELF5 as prognostic markers or therapeutic targets in cancer.

  12. Alteration of complex sphingolipid composition and its physiological significance in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking vacuolar ATPase.

    PubMed

    Tani, Motohiro; Toume, Moeko

    2015-12-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, complex sphingolipids have three types of polar head group and five types of ceramide; however, the physiological significance of the structural diversity is not fully understood. Here, we report that deletion of vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in yeast causes dramatic alteration of the complex sphingolipid composition, which includes decreases in hydroxylation at the C-4 position of long-chain bases and the C-2 position of fatty acids in the ceramide moiety, decreases in inositol phosphorylceramide (IPC) levels, and increases in mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide (MIPC) and mannosyldiinositol phosphorylceramide [M(IP)2C] levels. V-ATPase-deleted cells exhibited slow growth at pH 7.2, whereas the increase in MIPC levels was significantly enhanced when V-ATPase-deleted cells were incubated at pH 7.2. The protein expression levels of MIPC and M(IP)2C synthases were significantly increased in V-ATPase-deleted cells incubated at pH 7.2. Loss of MIPC synthesis or an increase in the hydroxylation level of the ceramide moiety of sphingolipids on overexpression of Scs7 and Sur2 sphingolipid hydroxylases enhanced the growth defect of V-ATPase-deleted cells at pH 7.2. On the contrary, the growth rate of V-ATPase-deleted cells was moderately increased on the deletion of SCS7 and SUR2. In addition, supersensitivities to Ca2+, Zn2+ and H2O2, which are typical phenotypes of V-ATPase-deleted cells, were enhanced by the loss of MIPC synthesis. These results indicate the possibility that alteration of the complex sphingolipid composition is an adaptation mechanism for a defect of V-ATPase.

  13. K-12 Professional Development at the Harvard Forest LTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts seeks to train the next generation of researchers, by involving K-12 grade students and their teachers in hands-on, field-based, ecological research in their own schoolyard and community. Students learn to collect data on important long-term ecological issues and processes. Student data are then shared on the Harvard Forest website. To prepare teachers for project protocols, teachers are given direct access to Harvard ecologists with professional development workshops and on-line resources. With the Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER program, students can participate in three different research projects focusing on phenology, invasive insects, and vernal pools. Teachers attend the Summer Institute for Teachers to learn project content and methods. They return in fall to participate in one of three levels of data workshops to learn how to input, manage, and analyze project data. In the spring, teachers again meet with the Harvard ecologists about project protocols, and to share, through a series of teacher presentations, the ways these project themes are being integrated into class curricula. These professional development opportunities result in long term collaborative partnerships with local schools and the Harvard Forest LTER. In addition to the LTER Schoolyard Ecology Program, the Harvard Forest has supported a successful Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program for the last six years. Throughout the summer, teachers work on research projects alongside Harvard Forest and affiliated scientists, post-docs, graduate students, and REU's (Research Experience for Undergraduates). The RET program provides teachers with the opportunity to build scientific knowledge, develop an understanding of research methods, and translate their new knowledge and experiences into cutting edge classroom lessons. The past two summers I have worked with Dr. Andrew Richardson

  14. School-university partnership strategies for K--12 science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, Suzanne

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe strategies for creating and sustaining school-university partnerships for K--12 science education. This descriptive study focused on the science partnership experience of two research universities and their K--12 partner schools. The study utilized a theoretical approach of "appreciative inquiry" and examined the following questions: (1) What are the characteristics and processes of school-university science partnerships that enable them to develop and sustain the partnership? (2) What are the characteristics and process of school-university science partnerships that hinder and limit the partnership? The researcher made on-site visits to each university to collect survey and interview data from a total of forty-nine participants within six school-university science partnerships. This study was not designed to be generalizable to other partnerships. Participants' responses were analyzed according to three partnership themes generated from the literature in order to frame this study: governance, collaboration, and change. Three key school-university science partnership strategies emerged from this analysis: linking science partnerships with the academic mission of the university, with the student services mission of the university, and with school reform efforts. Core research results included: participants concurred science is more peripheral than reading, language arts, and math content areas in current K--6 curriculum; the majority of respondents reported faculties' participation in school-university partnerships is sustainable when tied to their academic and research interests and rewarded with credit toward tenure; most participants reported science partnerships are sustainable when they create an aggregate for change. This study concludes that: Current school reform efforts need to focus on teaching more science, especially in the K--6 curriculum. For science partnerships to be sustainable, faculty

  15. Significant alterations in reported clinical practice associated with increased oversight of organ transplant center performance.

    PubMed

    Schold, Jesse D; Arrington, Charlotte J; Levine, Greg

    2010-09-01

    In the past several years, emphasis on quality metrics in the field of organ transplantation has increased significantly, largely because of the new conditions of participation issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These regulations directly associate patients' outcomes and measured performance of centers with the distribution of public funding to institutions. Moreover, insurers and marketing ventures have used publicly available outcomes data from transplant centers for business decision making and advertisement purposes. We gave a 10-question survey to attendees of the Transplant Management Forum at the 2009 meeting of the United Network for Organ Sharing to ascertain how centers have responded to the increased oversight of performance. Of 63 responses, 55% indicated a low or near low performance rating at their center in the past 3 years. Respondents from low-performing centers were significantly more likely to indicate increased selection criteria for candidates (81% vs 38%, P = .001) and donors (77% vs 31%, P < .001) as well as alterations in clinical protocols (84% vs 52%, P = .007). Among respondents indicating lost insurance contracts (31%), these differences were also highly significant. Based on respondents' perceptions, outcomes of performance evaluations are associated with significant changes in clinical practice at transplant centers. The transplant community and policy makers should practice vigilance that performance evaluations and regulatory oversight do not inadvertently lead to diminished access to care among viable candidates or decreased transplant volume.

  16. "Flipping" educational technology professional development for K-12 educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Daniel

    As the demand for more effective professional development increases in K-12 schools, trainers must adjust their training methods to meet the needs of their teacher learners. Just as lecture-heavy, teacher-centered instruction only meet the learning needs of a small minority of students, "sit and get" professional development rarely results in the teachers gaining the skills and confidence necessary to use technology effectively in their instruction. To resolve the frustrations of teachers related to ineffective professional development, a "Flipped PD" training model was developed based on the learning needs of adult learners, the integration of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK), learning activities, and the Flipped Classroom concept. Under this model, training shifts from a passive, trainer-centered format, to an active, learner-centered format where teachers learn to use technology in their classrooms by first focusing on pedagogical issues, then choosing the options that work best for addressing those issues in their unique situation, and completing "learn-by-doing" projects. Those who participate in "Flipped PD" style trainings tend to have more confidence upon completion that they can use the tools they were trained on in their teaching, as well as believe that the PD was engaging and a good use of their time.

  17. Barriers in the Physics Pipeline from K-12 to Tenure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Micha

    2016-09-01

    The lack of diversity in physics is a known problem, and yet efforts to change our demographics have only had minor effects during the last decade. I will explain some of the hidden barriers that dissuade underrepresented minorities in becoming physicists using a framework borrowed from sociology, Maslow's hierarchy of needs. I will draw from current research at the undergraduate to faculty levels over a variety of STEM fields that are also addressing a lack of diversity. I will also provide analysis from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of Elements (JINA-CEE) outreach programs to understand the likelihood of current K-12 students in becoming physicists. Specifically, I will present results from the pre-surveys from our Art 2 Science Camps (ages 8-14) about their attitudes towards science as well as results from analysis of teacher recommendations for our high school summer program. I will conclude with a positive outlook describing the pipeline created by JINA-CEE to retain students from middle school through college. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1430152 (JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements).

  18. Earth System Science Online Courses for K-12 Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerin, T. G.

    2001-05-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) is a partnership between the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) and the Center for Educational Technologies (CET) at Wheeling Jesuit University, through funding from NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. ESSEA is supporting universities, colleges, and science education organizations in offering K-12 Earth system science online graduate courses that have been developed within the CET at Wheeling Jesuit University for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. The Earth system science courses use an inquiry-based instructional design model, are delivered over the Internet, and feature student-centered, knowledge-building virtual communities. They have been successfully implemented for both in-service and pre-service teacher education. An annual announcement by ESSEA solicits proposals from US teams interested in offering the courses. Currently 12 institutions from across the US are offering the courses to teachers, with plans to select 7 new organizations in early 2001. This presentation will focus on the content and structure of the courses, which can be freely downloaded and used by any organization, as well as lessons learned about online instruction.

  19. The D-allose operon of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C; Song, S; Park, C

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 can utilize D-allose, an all-cis hexose, as a sole carbon source. The operon responsible for D-allose metabolism was localized at 92.8 min of the E. coli linkage map. It consists of six genes, alsRBACEK, which are inducible by D-allose and are under the control of the repressor gene alsR. This operon is also subject to catabolite repression. Three genes, alsB, alsA, and alsC, appear to be necessary for transport of D-allose. D-Allose-binding protein, encoded by alsB, is a periplasmic protein that has an affinity for D-allose, with a Kd of 0.33 microM. As was found for other binding-protein-mediated ABC transporters, the allose transport system includes an ATP-binding component (AlsA) and a transmembrane protein (AlsC). It was found that AlsE (a putative D-allulose-6-phosphate 3-epimerase), but not AlsK (a putative D-allose kinase), is necessary for allose metabolism. During this study, we observed that the D-allose transporter is partially responsible for the low-affinity transport of D-ribose and that strain W3110, an E. coli prototroph, has a defect in the transport of D-allose mediated by the allose permease. PMID:9401019

  20. GeoWall Experiences in K-12 Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. E.

    2003-12-01

    Since the mid 1990s the Electronic Visualization Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago has been investigating how advanced visualization technology such as CAVEs, ImmersaDesks, PCs, and plasma panels can be used effectively in K-12 education. The creation of the GeoWall has given us more flexibility in deploying these technologies, and conducting these investigations outside the laboratory. Over the two years we have been using GeoWalls in a variety of educational settings around the Chicago area. Since the Fall of 2002, the SciTech Museum in Aurora, IL has used a GeoWall to show a variety of educational content. In February 2002 the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, IL set up a GeoWall to show 'Virtual Harlem' which allowed museum patrons to walk the streets of Harlem NY in the 1930s to learn about the place and the people. Since 1999 we have been working with Abraham Lincoln Elementary School in Oak Park, IL using a variety of display devices to teach the scientific method and investigate the use of multiple perspectives in learning. We began using a GeoWall there in the spring of 2002 and in the spring of 2003 we expanded our work in Oak Park to include Gwendolyn Brooks Middle School.

  1. Explorations in K-12 Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, S. S.; Pertzborn, R. A.; Sromovsky, L. A.

    1997-07-01

    Space exploration remains a topic of immense interest and excitement for children and the general public. A diverse approach has been utilized at the Space Science and Engineering Center to initiate outreach and K-12 education activities. The hands-on experience gained through a working relationships with educators has been useful in understanding the challenges, usefulness and limitations of scientists' involvement in the education process. Our efforts have included school visits, development of lesson plans (KidSat), internet based activities (Planet Exploration Toolkit for Live from Mars, a Passport to Knowledge Project), World Wide Web, Public Lectures, summer teacher enhancement workshops, internships, and substitute teaching in science classes. The feedback and comments from teachers and students has demonstrated the usefulness and need for these efforts. The experience has also demonstrated that a committed effort in outreach is ultimately satisfying although immensely time consuming. Our outreach efforts have been partially supported by a NASA/IDEA grant, Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium, NOAA and more recently, the Evjue Foundation (Madison-Wisconsin).

  2. Transcriptome sequencing revealed significant alteration of cortical promoter usage and splicing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing Qin; Wang, Xi; Beveridge, Natalie J; Tooney, Paul A; Scott, Rodney J; Carr, Vaughan J; Cairns, Murray J

    2012-01-01

    While hybridization based analysis of the cortical transcriptome has provided important insight into the neuropathology of schizophrenia, it represents a restricted view of disease-associated gene activity based on predetermined probes. By contrast, sequencing technology can provide un-biased analysis of transcription at nucleotide resolution. Here we use this approach to investigate schizophrenia-associated cortical gene expression. The data was generated from 76 bp reads of RNA-Seq, aligned to the reference genome and assembled into transcripts for quantification of exons, splice variants and alternative promoters in postmortem superior temporal gyrus (STG/BA22) from 9 male subjects with schizophrenia and 9 matched non-psychiatric controls. Differentially expressed genes were then subjected to further sequence and functional group analysis. The output, amounting to more than 38 Gb of sequence, revealed significant alteration of gene expression including many previously shown to be associated with schizophrenia. Gene ontology enrichment analysis followed by functional map construction identified three functional clusters highly relevant to schizophrenia including neurotransmission related functions, synaptic vesicle trafficking, and neural development. Significantly, more than 2000 genes displayed schizophrenia-associated alternative promoter usage and more than 1000 genes showed differential splicing (FDR<0.05). Both types of transcriptional isoforms were exemplified by reads aligned to the neurodevelopmentally significant doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) gene. This study provided the first deep and un-biased analysis of schizophrenia-associated transcriptional diversity within the STG, and revealed variants with important implications for the complex pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  3. The Crowded Sea: Incorporating Multiple Marine Activities in Conservation Plans Can Significantly Alter Spatial Priorities

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Tessa; Possingham, Hugh P.; Edelist, Dori; Brokovich, Eran; Kark, Salit

    2014-01-01

    Successful implementation of marine conservation plans is largely inhibited by inadequate consideration of the broader social and economic context within which conservation operates. Marine waters and their biodiversity are shared by a host of stakeholders, such as commercial fishers, recreational users and offshore developers. Hence, to improve implementation success of conservation plans, we must incorporate other marine activities while explicitly examining trade-offs that may be required. In this study, we test how the inclusion of multiple marine activities can shape conservation plans. We used the entire Mediterranean territorial waters of Israel as a case study to compare four planning scenarios with increasing levels of complexity, where additional zones, threats and activities were added (e.g., commercial fisheries, hydrocarbon exploration interests, aquaculture, and shipping lanes). We applied the marine zoning decision support tool Marxan to each planning scenario and tested a) the ability of each scenario to reach biodiversity targets, b) the change in opportunity cost and c) the alteration of spatial conservation priorities. We found that by including increasing numbers of marine activities and zones in the planning process, greater compromises are required to reach conservation objectives. Complex plans with more activities incurred greater opportunity cost and did not reach biodiversity targets as easily as simplified plans with less marine activities. We discovered that including hydrocarbon data in the planning process significantly alters spatial priorities. For the territorial waters of Israel we found that in order to protect at least 10% of the range of 166 marine biodiversity features there would be a loss of ∼15% of annual commercial fishery revenue and ∼5% of prospective hydrocarbon revenue. This case study follows an illustrated framework for adopting a transparent systematic process to balance biodiversity goals and economic

  4. Missense Variants of Uncertain Significance (VUS) Altering the Phosphorylation Patterns of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    PubMed Central

    Tram, Eric; Savas, Sevtap; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are responsible for a large proportion of breast-ovarian cancer families. Protein-truncating mutations have been effectively used in the clinical management of familial breast cancer due to their deleterious impact on protein function. However, the majority of missense variants identified throughout the genes continue to pose an obstacle for predictive informative testing due to low frequency and lack of information on how they affect BRCA1/2 function. Phosphorylation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 play an important role in their function as regulators of DNA repair, transcription and cell cycle in response to DNA damage but whether missense variants of uncertain significance (VUS) are able to disrupt this important process is not known. Here we employed a novel approach using NetworKIN which predicts in vivo kinase-substrate relationship, and evolutionary conservation algorithms SIFT, PolyPhen and Align-GVGD. We evaluated whether 191 BRCA1 and 43 BRCA2 VUS from the Breast Cancer Information Core (BIC) database can functionally alter the consensus phosphorylation motifs and abolish kinase recognition and binding to sites known to be phosphorylated in vivo. Our results show that 13.09% (25/191) BRCA1 and 13.95% (6/43) BRCA2 VUS altered the phosphorylation of BRCA1 and BRCA2. We highlight six BRCA1 (K309T, S632N, S1143F, Q1144H, Q1281P, S1542C) and three BRCA2 (S196I, T207A, P3292L) VUS as potentially clinically significant. These occurred rarely (n<2 in BIC), mutated evolutionarily conserved residues and abolished kinase binding to motifs established in the literature involved in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, transcription or response to DNA damage. Additionally in vivo phosphorylation sites identified via through-put methods are also affected by VUS and are attractive targets for studying their biological and functional significance. We propose that rare VUS affecting phosphorylation may be a novel and important mechanism for which BRCA1 and

  5. Mechanical Unloading of Mouse Bone in Microgravity Significantly Alters Cell Cycle Gene Set Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Kaplan, Warren; Burns, Brnedan

    2012-07-01

    Spaceflight factors, including microgravity and space radiation, have many detrimental short-term effects on human physiology, including muscle and bone degradation, and immune system dysfunction. The long-term progression of these physiological effects is still poorly understood, and a serious concern for long duration spaceflight missions. We hypothesized that some of the degenerative effects of spaceflight may be caused in part by an inability of stem cells to proliferate and differentiate normally resulting in an impairment of tissue regenerative processes. Furthermore, we hypothesized that long-term bone tissue degeneration in space may be mediated by activation of the p53 signaling network resulting in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis in osteoprogenitors. In our analyses we found that spaceflight caused significant bone loss in the weight-bearing bones of mice with a 6.3% reduction in bone volume and 11.9% decrease in bone thickness associated with increased osteoclastic activity. Along with this rapid bone loss we also observed alterations in the cell cycle characterized by an increase in the Cdkn1a/p21 cell cycle arrest molecule independent of Trp53. Overexpression of Cdkn1a/p21 was localized to osteoblasts lining the periosteal surface of the femur and chondrocytes in the head of the femur, suggesting an inhibition of proliferation in two key regenerative cell types of the femur in response to spaceflight. Additionally we found overexpression of several matrix degradation molecules including MMP-1a, 3 and 10, of which MMP-10 was localized to osteocytes within the shaft of the femur. This, in conjunction with 40 nm resolution synchrotron nano-Computed Tomography (nano-CT) observations of an increase in osteocyte lacunae cross-sectional area, perimeter and a decrease in circularity indicates a potential role for osteocytic osteolysis in the observed bone degeneration in spaceflight. To further investigate the genetic response of bone to mechanical

  6. K-12 Education Nonprofit Employees' Perceptions of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Tara Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the key reasons individuals who work in K-12 education nonprofit organizations enter the field of K-12 nonprofit education and their motivations for doing so. The purpose of this study was to find new strategies for recruiting and retaining K-12 education nonprofit employees by examining the obstacles that exist to…

  7. Interview with Joe Freidhoff: A Bird's-Eye View of K-12 Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pourreau, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    The intent of this article is to introduce long-time "Online Learning" readership to the field of K-12 online learning while also providing direction for the K-12 online learning scholars about where the field is going or should be going in terms of meeting the needs of K-12 stakeholders. Recently an interview was conducted with Dr. Joe…

  8. Harnessing Technology to Improve K-12 Education. Discussion Paper 2012-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterji, Aaron; Jones, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Technological progress has consistently driven remarkable advances in the U.S. economy, yet K-12 education sees little technological change compared to other sectors, even as U.S. K-12 students increasingly lag behind students in other nations. This proposal considers how we can take a signature American strength--innovation--and apply it to K-12

  9. Harnessing Technology to Improve K-12 Education. Discussion Paper 2012-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterji, Aaron; Jones, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Technological progress has consistently driven remarkable advances in the U.S. economy, yet K-12 education sees little technological change compared to other sectors, even as U.S. K-12 students increasingly lag behind students in other nations. This proposal considers how we can take a signature American strength--innovation--and apply it to K-12

  10. K-12 Education Nonprofit Employees' Perceptions of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Tara Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the key reasons individuals who work in K-12 education nonprofit organizations enter the field of K-12 nonprofit education and their motivations for doing so. The purpose of this study was to find new strategies for recruiting and retaining K-12 education nonprofit employees by examining the obstacles that exist to…

  11. What Do Indiana Voters Say about K-12 Education & School Choice? Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Educational Choice, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Indiana K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by The Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research Incorporated (BRI), measures Indiana registered voters' awareness and opinions on a range of K-12 education issues. "What Do Indiana Voters Say about K-12 Education & School Choice?"…

  12. TAGCNA: A Method to Identify Significant Consensus Events of Copy Number Alterations in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiguo; Zhang, Junying; Yang, Liying; Zhang, Shengli; Chen, Baodi; Geng, Yaojun; Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Somatic copy number alteration (CNA) is a common phenomenon in cancer genome. Distinguishing significant consensus events (SCEs) from random background CNAs in a set of subjects has been proven to be a valuable tool to study cancer. In order to identify SCEs with an acceptable type I error rate, better computational approaches should be developed based on reasonable statistics and null distributions. In this article, we propose a new approach named TAGCNA for identifying SCEs in somatic CNAs that may encompass cancer driver genes. TAGCNA employs a peel-off permutation scheme to generate a reasonable null distribution based on a prior step of selecting tag CNA markers from the genome being considered. We demonstrate the statistical power of TAGCNA on simulated ground truth data, and validate its applicability using two publicly available cancer datasets: lung and prostate adenocarcinoma. TAGCNA identifies SCEs that are known to be involved with proto-oncogenes (e.g. EGFR, CDK4) and tumor suppressor genes (e.g. CDKN2A, CDKN2B), and provides many additional SCEs with potential biological relevance in these data. TAGCNA can be used to analyze the significance of CNAs in various cancers. It is implemented in R and is freely available at http://tagcna.sourceforge.net/. PMID:22815924

  13. Postranslational modifications significantly alter the binding-folding pathways of proteins associating with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoian, Garegin

    2012-02-01

    Many important regulators of gene activity are natively disordered, but fully or partially order when they bind to their targets on DNA. Interestingly, the ensembles of disordered states for such free proteins are not structurally featureless, but can qualitatively differ from protein to protein. In particular, in random coil like states the chains are swollen, making relatively few contacts, while in molten globule like states a significant collapse occurs, with ensuing high density of intra-protein interactions. Furthermore, since many DNA binding proteins are positively charged polyelectrolytes, the electrostatic self-repulsion also influences the degree of collapse of the chain and its conformational preferences in the free state and upon binding to DNA. In our work, we have found that the nature of the natively disordered ensemble significantly affects the way the protein folds upon binding to DNA. In particular, we showed that posttranslational modifications of amino acid residues, such as lysine acetylation, can alter the degree of collapse and conformational preferences for a free protein, and also profoundly impact the binding affinity and pathways for the protein DNA association. These trends will be discussed in the context of DNA interacting with various histone tails and the p53 protein.

  14. Escherichia coli K-12 pathogenicity in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, reveals reduced antibacterial defense in aphids.

    PubMed

    Altincicek, Boran; Ter Braak, Bas; Laughton, Alice M; Udekwu, Klas I; Gerardo, Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    To better understand the molecular basis underlying aphid immune tolerance to beneficial bacteria and immune defense to pathogenic bacteria, we characterized how the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum responds to Escherichia coli K-12 infections. E. coli bacteria, usually cleared in the hemolymph of other insect species, were capable of growing exponentially and killing aphids within a few days. Red fluorescence protein expressing E. coli K-12 laboratory strain multiplied in the aphid hemolymph as well as in the digestive tract, resulting in death of infected aphids. Selected gene deletion mutants of the E. coli K-12 predicted to have reduced virulence during systemic infections showed no difference in either replication or killing rate when compared to the wild type E. coli strain. Of note, however, the XL1-Blue E. coli K-12 strain exhibited a significant lag phase before multiplying and killing aphids. This bacterial strain has recently been shown to be more sensitive to oxidative stress than other E. coli K-12 strains, revealing a potential role for reactive oxygen species-mediated defenses in the otherwise reduced aphid immune system.

  15. The Pragmatics of Virtual Worlds for K-12 Educators: Investigating the Affordances and Constraints of "Active Worlds" and "Second Life" with K-12 In-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to address the pragmatics of integrating virtual worlds for teaching and learning for K-12 education. Specifically this qualitative investigation focuses on a reflective dialogue gathered from a group of K-12 (primary and secondary school) educators about their experiences using both "Active Worlds Educational…

  16. K-12 Teachers Encounter Digital Games: A Qualitative Investigation of Teachers' Perceptions of the Potential of Digital Games for K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' perceptions of the integration of digital games for K-12 education. Specifically, this qualitative investigation focuses on reflective dialogued gathered from a group of K-12 educators about their experiences and perceptions of learning about and playing digital games for teaching and learning.…

  17. K-12 Teachers Encounter Digital Games: A Qualitative Investigation of Teachers' Perceptions of the Potential of Digital Games for K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' perceptions of the integration of digital games for K-12 education. Specifically, this qualitative investigation focuses on reflective dialogued gathered from a group of K-12 educators about their experiences and perceptions of learning about and playing digital games for teaching and learning.…

  18. Ultraviolet-Sensitive Mutator Strain of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Eli C.

    1973-01-01

    An ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive mutator gene, mutU, was identified in Escherichia coli K-12. The mutation mutU4 is very close to uvrD, between metE and ilv, on the E. coli chromosome. It was recessive as a mutator and as a UV-sensitive mutation. The frequency of reversion of trpA46 on an F episome was increased by mutU4 on the chromosome. The mutator gene did not increase mutation frequencies in virulent phages or in lytically grown phage λ. The mutU4 mutation predominantly induced transitional base changes. Mutator strains were normal for recombination and host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated phage T1. They were normally resistant to methyl methanesulfonate and were slightly more sensitive to gamma irradiation than Mut+ strains. UV irradiation induced mutations in a mutU4 strain, and phage λ was UV-inducible. Double mutants containing mutU4 and recA, B, or C were extremely sensitive to UV irradiation; a mutU4 uvrA6 double mutant was only slightly more sensitive than a uvrA6 strain. The mutU4 uvrA6 and mutU4 recA, B, or C double mutants had mutation rates similar to that of a mutU4 strain. Two UV-sensitive mutators, mut-9 and mut-10, isolated by Liberfarb and Bryson in E. coli B/UV, were found to be co-transducible with ilv in the same general region as mutU4. PMID:4345920

  19. Linkage map of Escherichia coli K-12, edition 8.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, B J

    1990-01-01

    The linkage map of Escherichia coli K-12 depicts the arrangement of genes on the circular chromosome of this organism. The basic units of the map are minutes, determined by the time-of-entry of markers from Hfr into F- strains in interrupted-conjugation experiments. The time-of-entry distances have been refined over the years by determination of the frequency of cotransduction of loci in transduction experiments utilizing bacteriophage P1, which transduces segments of DNA approximately 2 min in length. In recent years, the relative positions of many genes have been determined even more precisely by physical techniques, including the mapping of restriction fragments and the sequencing of many small regions of the chromosome. On the whole, the agreement between results obtained by genetic and physical methods has been remarkably good considering the different levels of accuracy to be expected of the methods used. There are now few regions of the map whose length is still in some doubt. In some regions, genetic experiments utilizing different mutant strains give different map distances. In other regions, the genetic markers available have not been close enough to give accurate cotransduction data. The chromosome is now known to contain several inserted elements apparently derived from lambdoid phages and other sources. The nature of the region in which the termination of replication of the chromosome occurs is now known to be much more complex than the picture given in the previous map. The present map is based upon the published literature through June of 1988. There are now 1,403 loci placed on the linkage group, which may represent between one-third and one-half of the genes in this organism. PMID:2194094

  20. Transcriptome Sequencing Revealed Significant Alteration of Cortical Promoter Usage and Splicing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing Qin; Wang, Xi; Beveridge, Natalie J.; Tooney, Paul A.; Scott, Rodney J.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Cairns, Murray J.

    2012-01-01

    Background While hybridization based analysis of the cortical transcriptome has provided important insight into the neuropathology of schizophrenia, it represents a restricted view of disease-associated gene activity based on predetermined probes. By contrast, sequencing technology can provide un-biased analysis of transcription at nucleotide resolution. Here we use this approach to investigate schizophrenia-associated cortical gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings The data was generated from 76 bp reads of RNA-Seq, aligned to the reference genome and assembled into transcripts for quantification of exons, splice variants and alternative promoters in postmortem superior temporal gyrus (STG/BA22) from 9 male subjects with schizophrenia and 9 matched non-psychiatric controls. Differentially expressed genes were then subjected to further sequence and functional group analysis. The output, amounting to more than 38 Gb of sequence, revealed significant alteration of gene expression including many previously shown to be associated with schizophrenia. Gene ontology enrichment analysis followed by functional map construction identified three functional clusters highly relevant to schizophrenia including neurotransmission related functions, synaptic vesicle trafficking, and neural development. Significantly, more than 2000 genes displayed schizophrenia-associated alternative promoter usage and more than 1000 genes showed differential splicing (FDR<0.05). Both types of transcriptional isoforms were exemplified by reads aligned to the neurodevelopmentally significant doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) gene. Conclusions This study provided the first deep and un-biased analysis of schizophrenia-associated transcriptional diversity within the STG, and revealed variants with important implications for the complex pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:22558445

  1. Global Climate Change and the Wildlands of Montana: Promoting Scientific Understanding for K-12 Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graumlich, L. J.; Simonsen, L. M.

    2004-12-01

    The complexities and uncertainties associated with the science of global climate change is a barrier to the implementation of global change into K-12 classrooms. This issue is part of a larger conundrum where by teachers who are not well-versed in the content of an emerging science field are less likely to incorporate that topic into their curriculum. As such, it is not surprising that the K-12 community has been slow to embrace global climate change as a curriculum element, given that science underlying global climate change is interdisciplinary and replete with new discoveries, complex models, and competing theories. Faculty members associated with the Big Sky Institute have experimented with ways to promote collaboration between researchers and educators to enhance scientific literacy. In 2004, with funding from the US Environmental Protection Agency and private foundations, we implemented a five-day, field based professional development workshop for middle and high school teachers that focused on the research underlying EPA's Climate Change, Wildlife and Wildlands curriculum. A primary objective of the overall project is to promote one-on-one engagement of teachers with researchers whose work forms the basis of the content of the curriculum. Further, we seek to assess the degree to which increased content knowledge leads to incorporation of global climate change content into classrooms and curricula. During the workshop, we focused on two broad research findings, namely: 1) Global climate change is systemically pervasive such that even wildlands (i.e., unmanaged, pristine parks and reserves) are or potentially will be altered by global climate change. 2) At the same time, natural climate variability may enhance or mask human-induced climate impacts on wildlands and wildlife. In addition, we emphasized two broadly framed "ways of thinking" about global climate change, namely: 1) Wildlands can be used to detect and measure the impacts of human-induced climate

  2. Effect of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on the in vitro growth of Candida albicans and its protective effect in an oral candidiasis model.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sanae A; Hayama, Kazumi; Burton, Jeremy P; Reid, Gregor; Okada, Masashi; Matsushita, Yuji; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is often accompanied by severe inflammation, resulting in a decline in the quality of life of immunosuppressed individuals and elderly people. To develop a new oral therapeutic option for candidiasis, a nonpathogenic commensal oral probiotic microorganism, Streptococcus salivarius K12, was evaluated for its ability to modulate Candida albicans growth in vitro, and its therapeutic activity in an experimental oral candidiasis model was tested. In vitro inhibition of mycelial growth of C. albicans was determined by plate assay and fluorescence microscopy. Addition of S. salivarius K12 to modified RPMI 1640 culture medium inhibited the adherence of C. albicans to the plastic petri dish in a dose-dependent manner. Preculture of S. salivarius K12 potentiated its inhibitory activity for adherence of C. albicans. Interestingly, S. salivarius K12 was not directly fungicidal but appeared to inhibit Candida adhesion to the substratum by preferentially binding to hyphae rather than yeast. To determine the potentially anti-infective attributes of S. salivarius K12 in oral candidiasis, the probiotic was administered to mice with orally induced candidiasis. Oral treatment with S. salivarius K12 significantly protected the mice from severe candidiasis. These findings suggest that S. salivarius K12 may inhibit the process of invasion of C. albicans into mucous surfaces or its adhesion to denture acrylic resins by mechanisms not associated with the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin. S. salivarius K12 may be useful as a probiotic as a protective tool for oral care, especially with regard to candidiasis.

  3. Effect of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on the In Vitro Growth of Candida albicans and Its Protective Effect in an Oral Candidiasis Model

    PubMed Central

    Hayama, Kazumi; Burton, Jeremy P.; Reid, Gregor; Okada, Masashi; Matsushita, Yuji; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is often accompanied by severe inflammation, resulting in a decline in the quality of life of immunosuppressed individuals and elderly people. To develop a new oral therapeutic option for candidiasis, a nonpathogenic commensal oral probiotic microorganism, Streptococcus salivarius K12, was evaluated for its ability to modulate Candida albicans growth in vitro, and its therapeutic activity in an experimental oral candidiasis model was tested. In vitro inhibition of mycelial growth of C. albicans was determined by plate assay and fluorescence microscopy. Addition of S. salivarius K12 to modified RPMI 1640 culture medium inhibited the adherence of C. albicans to the plastic petri dish in a dose-dependent manner. Preculture of S. salivarius K12 potentiated its inhibitory activity for adherence of C. albicans. Interestingly, S. salivarius K12 was not directly fungicidal but appeared to inhibit Candida adhesion to the substratum by preferentially binding to hyphae rather than yeast. To determine the potentially anti-infective attributes of S. salivarius K12 in oral candidiasis, the probiotic was administered to mice with orally induced candidiasis. Oral treatment with S. salivarius K12 significantly protected the mice from severe candidiasis. These findings suggest that S. salivarius K12 may inhibit the process of invasion of C. albicans into mucous surfaces or its adhesion to denture acrylic resins by mechanisms not associated with the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin. S. salivarius K12 may be useful as a probiotic as a protective tool for oral care, especially with regard to candidiasis. PMID:22267663

  4. Polymeric tannins significantly alter properties and in vitro digestibility of partially gelatinized intact starch granule.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Derrick B; Awika, Joseph M

    2016-10-01

    Excess calorie intake is a growing global problem. This study investigated effect of complexing partially gelatinized starch with condensed tannins on in vitro starch digestibility. Extracts from tannin and non-tannin sorghum, and cellulose control, were reacted with normal and waxy maize starch in 30% (30E) and 50% ethanol (50E) solutions at 70°C/20min. More tannins complexed with the 30E than 50E starches (mean 6.2 vs 3.5mg/g, respectively). In the 30E treatments, tannins significantly increased crystallinity, pasting temperature, peak viscosity, and slow digesting starch (from 100 to 274mg/g) in normal, but not waxy starch, suggesting intragranular cross-linking with amylose. Tannins doubled resistant starch (RS) to approx. 300mg/g in both starches. In 50E treatments, tannins made both maize starches behave like raw potato starch (>90% RS), suggesting granule surface interactions dominated. Non-tannin treatments generally behaved similar to cellulose. Condensed tannins could be used to favorably alter starch digestion profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lecture Demonstrations on Earthquakes for K-12 Teachers and Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, M. D.; Patterson, G. L.

    2005-12-01

    Lecture Demonstrations on Earthquakes for K-12 Teachers and Students Since 1975, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, (CERI), at The University of Memphis, has strived to satisfy its information transfer directives through diverse education and outreach efforts, providing technical and non-technical earthquake information to the general public, K-16 teachers and students, professional organizations, and state and federal organizations via all forms of written and electronic communication. <> Through these education and outreach efforts, CERI tries to increase earthquake hazard awareness to help limit future losses. <>In the past three years, education programs have reached over 20,000 K-16 students and teachers through in-service training workshops for teachers and earthquake/earth science lecture demonstrations for students. The presentations include an hour-long lecture demonstration featuring graphics and an informal question and answer format. Graphics used include seismic hazard maps, damage photos, plate tectonic maps, layers of the Earth, and more, all adapted for the audience. Throughout this presentation, manipulatives such as a Slinky, Silly Putty, a foam Earth with depth and temperature features, and Popsicle sticks are used to demonstrate seismic waves, the elasticity of the Earth, the Earth's layers and their features, and the brittleness of the crust. Toward the end, a demonstration featuring a portable shake table with a dollhouse mounted on it is used to illustrate earthquake-shaking effects. This presentation is also taken to schools when they are unable to visit CERI. Following this presentation, groups are then taken to the Public Earthquake Resource Center at CERI, a space featuring nine displays, seven of which are interactive. The interactive displays include a shake table and building blocks, a trench with paleoliquefaction features, computers with web access to seismology sites, a liquefaction model, an oscilloscope and

  6. Cool Science: K-12 Climate Change Art Displayed on Buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. F.; Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Cool science is an art contest where K12 students create placards (7" x 22") to educate the public about climate change. Students are prompted to create their artwork in response to questions such as: What is the evidence for climate change? How does climate change impact your local community? What can you do to reduce the impacts of climate change? In each of three years, 500-600 student entrees have been submitted from more than 12 school districts across Massachusetts. A panel of judges including scientists, artists, rapid transit representatives, and educators chooses elementary, middle, and high school winners. Winners (6), runners-up (6), and honorable mentions (12) and their families and teachers are invited to an annual Cool Science Award Ceremony to be recognized and view winning artwork. All winning artwork is posted on the Cool Science website. The winning artwork (2 per grade band) is converted into placards (11" x 28") and posters (2.5' x 12') that are placed on the inside (placards) and outside (posters) of buses. Posters are displayed for one month. So far, Cool Science was implemented in Lowell, MA where over 5000 public viewers see the posters daily on the sides of Lowell Rapid Transit Authority (LRTA) buses, making approximately 1,000,000 impressions per year. Cool Science acts to increase climate literacy in children as well as the public, and as such promotes intergenerational learning. Using art in conjunction with science learning about climate change appears to be effective at engaging not just traditionally high achieving science students, but also those interested in the creative arts. Hearing winners' stories about how they created their artwork and what this contest meant to them supports the idea that Cool Science attracts a wide diversity of students. Parents discuss climate change with their children. Multiple press releases announcing the winners further promotes the awareness of climate change throughout school districts and their

  7. Use of Streptococcus salivarius K12 in the prevention of streptococcal and viral pharyngotonsillitis in children.

    PubMed

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Colombo, Maria; Zanvit, Alberto; Risso, Paolo; Rottoli, Amilcare S

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius K12 is an oral probiotic strain releasing two lantibiotics (salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B) that antagonize the growth of S. pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans also affected by episodes of acute otitis media. S. salivarius K12 successfully colonizes the oral cavity, and is endowed with an excellent safety profile. We tested its preventive role in reducing the incidence of both streptococcal and viral pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis in children. We enrolled 61 children with a diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal disorders. Thirty-one of them were enrolled to be treated daily for 90 days with a slow-release tablet for oral use, containing no less than 1 billion colony-forming units/tablet of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®), and the remaining 30 served as the untreated control group. During treatment, they were all examined for streptococcal infection. Twenty children (ten per group) were also assessed in terms of viral infection. Secondary end points in both groups were the number of days under antibiotic and antipyretic therapy and the number of days off school (children) and off work (parents). The 30 children who completed the 90-day trial with Bactoblis® showed a significant reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (>90%), as calculated by comparing the infection rates of the previous year. No difference was observed in the control group. The treated group showed a significant decrease in the incidence (80%) of oral viral infections. Again, there was no difference in the control group. With regard to secondary end points, the number of days under antibiotic treatment of the treated and control groups were 30 and 900 respectively, days under antipyretic treatment 16 and 228, days of absence from school 16 and 228, and days of absence from work 16 and 228. The product was well tolerated by the subjects, with no side effects, and only one individual reported bad

  8. K-12 Neuroscience Education Outreach Program: Interactive Activities for Educating Students about Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Alex L.; Erickson, Kristen J.; Bilsky, Edward J.; Hillman, Susan J.; Burman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The University of New England’s Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences has developed a successful and growing K-12 outreach program that incorporates undergraduate and graduate/professional students. The program has several goals, including raising awareness about fundamental issues in neuroscience, supplementing science education in area schools and enhancing undergraduate and graduate/professional students’ academic knowledge and skill set. The outreach curriculum is centered on core neuroscience themes including: Brain Safety, Neuroanatomy, Drugs of Abuse and Addiction, Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders, and Cognition and Brain Function. For each theme, lesson plans were developed based upon interactive, small-group activities. Additionally, we’ve organized our themes in a “Grow-up, Grow-out” approach. Grow-up refers to returning to a common theme, increasing in complexity as we revisit students from early elementary through high school. Grow-out refers to integrating other scientific fields into our lessons, such as the chemistry of addiction, the physics of brain injury and neuronal imaging. One of the more successful components of our program is our innovative team-based model of curriculum design. By creating a team of undergraduate, graduate/professional students and faculty, we create a unique multi-level mentoring opportunity that appears to be successful in enhancing undergraduate students’ skills and knowledge. Preliminary assessments suggest that undergraduates believe they are enhancing their content knowledge and professional skills through our program. Additionally, we’re having a significant, short-term impact on K-12 interest in science. Overall, our program appears to be enhancing the academic experience of our undergraduates and exciting K-12 students about the brain and science in general. PMID:25565921

  9. Efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide for nonthermal inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Hyun-Gyun; Geveke, David J; Zhang, Howard Q

    2010-03-31

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) system with a gas-liquid porous metal contactor for eliminating Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider. Pasteurized, preservative-free apple cider was inoculated with E. coli K12 and processed using the SCCO(2) system at CO(2) concentrations of 0-10% (wt.%, g CO(2)/100g product), outlet temperatures of 34, 38, and 42 degrees C, a system pressure of 7.6 MPa, and a flow rate of 1L/min. Increased CO(2) concentrations and temperatures significantly (P<0.05) enhanced the bactericidal effect, resulting in a maximum reduction of 7.31 log CFU/mL at 8% CO(2) and 42 degrees C. A response surface model indicated that minimum CO(2) concentrations of 9.9% at 34 degrees C, 7.4% at 38 degrees C, and 5.4% at 42 degrees C are needed to achieve a 5-log reduction of E. coli K12 in apple cider. SEM observations showed morphological changes in the cell envelope after SCCO(2) processing. At a processing condition of 8% and 38 degrees C, the reduction of E. coli was 6.03 log and the sublethal injury of the survivors was 84%. The regrowth or survival of E. coli in SCCO(2) processed apple cider was not observed during storage for 28 days at 4, 8, and 20 degrees C. Thus this study showed the potential of SCCO(2) processing with a gas-liquid porous metal contactor for the nonthermal pasteurization of apple cider.

  10. K-12 Neuroscience Education Outreach Program: Interactive Activities for Educating Students about Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Deal, Alex L; Erickson, Kristen J; Bilsky, Edward J; Hillman, Susan J; Burman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The University of New England's Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences has developed a successful and growing K-12 outreach program that incorporates undergraduate and graduate/professional students. The program has several goals, including raising awareness about fundamental issues in neuroscience, supplementing science education in area schools and enhancing undergraduate and graduate/professional students' academic knowledge and skill set. The outreach curriculum is centered on core neuroscience themes including: Brain Safety, Neuroanatomy, Drugs of Abuse and Addiction, Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders, and Cognition and Brain Function. For each theme, lesson plans were developed based upon interactive, small-group activities. Additionally, we've organized our themes in a "Grow-up, Grow-out" approach. Grow-up refers to returning to a common theme, increasing in complexity as we revisit students from early elementary through high school. Grow-out refers to integrating other scientific fields into our lessons, such as the chemistry of addiction, the physics of brain injury and neuronal imaging. One of the more successful components of our program is our innovative team-based model of curriculum design. By creating a team of undergraduate, graduate/professional students and faculty, we create a unique multi-level mentoring opportunity that appears to be successful in enhancing undergraduate students' skills and knowledge. Preliminary assessments suggest that undergraduates believe they are enhancing their content knowledge and professional skills through our program. Additionally, we're having a significant, short-term impact on K-12 interest in science. Overall, our program appears to be enhancing the academic experience of our undergraduates and exciting K-12 students about the brain and science in general.

  11. Sense and Sensibility: The Case for the Nationwide Inclusion of Engineering in the K-12 Curriculum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, Robert E.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Batterson, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The competitive status of the United States is inextricably linked to innovation just as innovation is inseparable from science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. To stay competitive in innovation requires that the United States produce a 21st century workforce complete with requisite education, training, skills, and motivation. If we accept a priori that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education are crucial to competitiveness and innovation and that, in terms of innovation, mathematics, science, and engineering are interdependent, why are mathematics and science uniformly ubiquitous in the K-12 curriculum while engineering is conspicuously absent? We are passionate in our belief that the uniform addition of engineering to the K-12 curriculum will help ensure that the nation has "the right" 21st Century workforce. Furthermore, we believe that a nationwide effort, led by a coalition of engineering academics, practitioners, and societies is required to turn this goal into reality. However, accomplishing this goal necessitates, as we are reminded by the title of Jane Austen's timeless novel, "Sense and Sensibility", a workable solution that seeks the "middle ground" between passion and reason. We begin our paper by making two essential points: Engineers are not scientists. Engineering exists separate from science, has its own specialized knowledge community apart from science, and it is largely responsible for many of the most significant advancements and improvements in the quality of our life. Our workable solution requires that K-12 education, nationwide, accommodate the inclusion of engineering as a stand alone curriculum and we offer three reasons to support our position: (1) workforce development, (2) stimulating interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses and careers, and (3) creating a technologically literate society. We conclude with some thoughts on how this important goal can be accomplished.

  12. [Significance of phosphoinositide 3 kinase/AKT pathway alterations in endometrial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Dong, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-ming; Liang, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Meng, Yi-ting; Wang, Ying; Wang, Wei; Nong, Lin; Li, Ting; Liao, Qin-Ping

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the clinicopathologic and prognostic implications of phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway alterations in endometrial cancers of Chinese women. The expression of PTEN, p-AKT, and ER/PR was assessed in 71 cases of endometrial carcinoma by immunohistochemistry (EnVision method). The PIK3CA mutation at exon 9 and exon 20 was analyzed by PCR and direct sequencing in 34 tumors. (1) Of the 71 cases of endometrial carcinoma, 65 cases were endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEC) and 6 cases were nonendometrioid adenocarcinoma (NEEC). PTEN loss of expression was found in 63.4% (45/71) of tumors, and more commonly occurred in EEC (66.2%, 43/65) than that in NEEC (2/6, P = 0.18). Patients with PTEN loss in their tumors (45 cases) had a better survival than those without (26 cases, P = 0.07). In ER negative subgroup, the patients with PTEN loss of expression (12 cases) had longer survival than those with normal PTEN expression (7 cases; P = 0.04). (2) The frequency of PIK3CA mutation was 41.2% (14/34) with a hot mutation spot at T544 in exon 9. PIK3CA mutations more commonly occurred in EEC (44.8%, 13/29) than in NEEC (1/5, P > 0.05). The mutations at exon 9 more commonly occurred in EEC, well- and moderately-differentiated EEC, and tumors at early stage (P > 0.05). On the contrary, in tumors at early stages, the frequency of mutations in exon 20 (14.3%, 4/28) was significantly lower than that at late stages (4/6, P = 0.01). (3) p-AKT was positive in 59.2% (42/71) of tumors that were more frequently found in EEC (60.0%, 39/65) than that in NEEC (3/6, P = 0.68). However, the significant difference of p-AKT expression was found between well- and moderately-differentiated EEC (75.0%, 21/28; 53.6%, 15/28) and poorly-differentiated EEC (3/9, P = 0.02). Moreover, p-AKT expression was significantly correlated with positive ER (r = 0.339, P = 0.00). Endometrial carcinoma patients with loss of PTEN and p-AKT positivity have a favorable prognosis. PIK3CA mutations at

  13. Issues for Universities Working with K-12 Institutions Implementing Prepackaged Pre-Engineering Curricula Such as Project Lead the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Kenneth J.; Feldhaus, Charles R.

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of pre-engineering, standard curricula in K-12 schools is growing at a rapid pace. One such curriculum model, Project Lead the Way, consists of six standardized courses requiring significant training for teachers, specified laboratory equipment, standard topics, exams, etc. Schools implementing Project Lead the Way implement an…

  14. School Counselors' Systematic Perceptions of Change Agency through Primal Leadership and Empowerment: Critical Provisions towards K-12 Students' Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Miriam Soler; Martin, Barbara Nell

    2005-01-01

    In this examination, 194 K-12 school counselors completed the Self-Perceptions of Effectiveness as Educational Change Agent (SPECA) survey. Analyses uncovered that Primal Leadership and personal power or empowerment both play a significant role in counselors' potential effectiveness to effect change regardless of gender or building level. Personal…

  15. Teaching Decolonial Sounds on the Margins: Reflections on a K-12 Teacher Workshop Covering Black & Brown Musical Transculturation in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervantes, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate the significance of cultural crossings in Texas and how cultural exchanges can inform teachers and students in the areas of history, fine arts, geography, and social studies, the author constructed a Summer 2013 teacher workshop for Texas K-12 teachers through the Smithsonian Affiliated Institute of Texan Cultures. The author…

  16. Descriptors for Psychological Understanding: A Guide to Asking Questions about Learning related to Psychology in Wisconsin Schools, K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Social Studies Curriculum Study Committee.

    Statements of learning objectives are provided to help clarify and direct the teaching of psychology in Wisconsin schools and to help educators identify the most significant ideas in the discipline which should be incorporated into the K-12 curriculum. These statements, or "descriptors," were developed after the State of Wisconsin Social…

  17. Teaching Decolonial Sounds on the Margins: Reflections on a K-12 Teacher Workshop Covering Black & Brown Musical Transculturation in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervantes, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate the significance of cultural crossings in Texas and how cultural exchanges can inform teachers and students in the areas of history, fine arts, geography, and social studies, the author constructed a Summer 2013 teacher workshop for Texas K-12 teachers through the Smithsonian Affiliated Institute of Texan Cultures. The author…

  18. Positive clinical outcomes derived from using Streptococcus salivarius K12 to prevent streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children: a pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Colombo, Maria; Zanvit, Alberto; Rottoli, Amilcare S

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius K12 (BLIS K12(®)) is a probiotic strain producing the bacteriocins salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B, both of which strongly antagonize the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans. It successfully colonizes and exhibits persistence in the oral cavity and is endowed with an excellent safety profile. Previous observations of a small group of children indicated that the use of BLIS K12 could also reduce the occurrence of viral pharyngitis. The present study focused on a further evaluation of the role of BLIS K12 in the control of pediatric streptococcal disease and moreover whether its use could also help provide protection against various nonstreptococcal infections. In total, 48 children with a recent history of recurrent pharyngeal streptococcal disease were enrolled in the treated group. The control group comprised 76 children known to have had a very low recent occurrence of oral streptococcal disease. The treated children were given BLIS K12 daily for 90 days. The number of episodes of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis, tracheitis, viral pharyngitis, rhinitis, flu, laryngitis, acute otitis media, enteritis, and stomatitis was recorded during probiotic treatment and for a follow-up period of 9 months, and this was compared with the episodes of the control group over the corresponding period. Compared with the pretreatment time period, 2013, a 90% reduction of streptococcal pharyngeal disease was observed in 2014; compared with untreated children, a statistically significant reduction of all of the other disease conditions assessed, other than stomatitis, was detected in the probiotic-treated children. In agreement with previous findings, in the present study, it was found that the daily use of BLIS K12 has been associated with a concurrent and persisting reduction in the occurrence of pharyngeal, recurrent, streptococcal disease. Moreover, the benefits to children may also

  19. Positive clinical outcomes derived from using Streptococcus salivarius K12 to prevent streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children: a pilot investigation

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Colombo, Maria; Zanvit, Alberto; Rottoli, Amilcare S

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus salivarius K12 (BLIS K12®) is a probiotic strain producing the bacteriocins salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B, both of which strongly antagonize the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans. It successfully colonizes and exhibits persistence in the oral cavity and is endowed with an excellent safety profile. Previous observations of a small group of children indicated that the use of BLIS K12 could also reduce the occurrence of viral pharyngitis. The present study focused on a further evaluation of the role of BLIS K12 in the control of pediatric streptococcal disease and moreover whether its use could also help provide protection against various nonstreptococcal infections. Methods In total, 48 children with a recent history of recurrent pharyngeal streptococcal disease were enrolled in the treated group. The control group comprised 76 children known to have had a very low recent occurrence of oral streptococcal disease. The treated children were given BLIS K12 daily for 90 days. The number of episodes of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis, tracheitis, viral pharyngitis, rhinitis, flu, laryngitis, acute otitis media, enteritis, and stomatitis was recorded during probiotic treatment and for a follow-up period of 9 months, and this was compared with the episodes of the control group over the corresponding period. Results Compared with the pretreatment time period, 2013, a 90% reduction of streptococcal pharyngeal disease was observed in 2014; compared with untreated children, a statistically significant reduction of all of the other disease conditions assessed, other than stomatitis, was detected in the probiotic-treated children. Conclusion In agreement with previous findings, in the present study, it was found that the daily use of BLIS K12 has been associated with a concurrent and persisting reduction in the occurrence of pharyngeal, recurrent, streptococcal disease. Moreover

  20. Genomewide profiling of copy-number alteration in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Mikulasova, Aneta; Smetana, Jan; Wayhelova, Marketa; Janyskova, Helena; Sandecka, Viera; Kufova, Zuzana; Almasi, Martina; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Gregora, Evzen; Kessler, Petr; Wrobel, Marek; Walker, Brian A; Wardell, Christopher P; Morgan, Gareth J; Hajek, Roman; Kuglik, Petr

    2016-12-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a benign condition with an approximate 1% annual risk of symptomatic plasma cell disorder development, mostly to multiple myeloma (MM). We performed genomewide screening of copy-number alterations (CNAs) in 90 MGUS and 33 MM patients using high-density DNA microarrays. We identified CNAs in a smaller proportion of MGUS (65.6%) than in MM (100.0%, P = 1.31 × 10(-5) ) and showed median number of CNAs is lower in MGUS (3, range 0-22) than in MM (13, range 4-38, P = 1.82 × 10(-10) ). In the MGUS cohort, the most frequent losses were located at 1p (5.6%), 6q (6.7%), 13q (30.0%), 14q (14.4%), 16q (8.9%), 21q (5.6%), and gains at 1q (23.3%), 2p (6.7%), 6p (13.3%), and Xq (7.8%). Hyperdiploidy was detected in 38.9% of MGUS cases, and the most frequent whole chromosome gains were 3 (25.6%), 5 (23.3%), 9 (37.8%), 15 (23.3%), and 19 (32.2%). We also identified CNAs such as 1p, 6q, 8p, 12p, 13q, 16q losses, 1q gain and hypodiploidy, which are potentially associated with an adverse prognosis in MGUS. In summary, we showed that MGUS is similar to MM in that it is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, but overall cytogenetic instability is lower than in MM, which confirms that genetic abnormalities play important role in monoclonal gammopathies.

  1. Clinical Significance of Epigenetic Alterations in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Its Association with Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    Accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations is a hallmark of cancer genomes, including those in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Particularly, in human HCC, epigenetic changes are more frequently observed than genetic changes in a variety of cancer-related genes, suggesting a potential role for epigenetic alterations during hepatocarcinogenesis. Several environmental factors, such as inflammation, obesity, and steatosis, are reported to affect the epigenetic status in hepatocytes, which could play a role in HCC development. In addition, genetic mutations in histone modulators and chromatin regulators would be critical for the acceleration of epigenetic alteration. It is also possible that major genetic mutations of HCC, such as TP53 and CNTTB1 mutations, are associated with the disturbance of epigenetic integrity. For example, specific TP53 mutations frequently induced by aflatoxin B1 exposure might affect histone modifiers and nucleosome remodelers. Generally, epigenetic alteration is reversible, because of which dysregulation of transcription takes place, without affecting protein structure. Therefore, differentiation therapy is one of the potential approaches for HCC with advanced epigenetic alterations. On the other hand, a tumor carrying an accumulation of genetic mutations would result in many abnormal proteins that could be recognized as non-self and could be targets for immune reactions; thus, immune-checkpoint blockers should be effective for HCCs with genetic hypermutation. Although the emergence of genetic and epigenetic alterations could be linked to each other and there could be some crossover or convergence between these cancer pathways, characterization of the mutation spectrum of genetic and epigenetic alterations could influence future HCC treatment.

  2. The Next Generation Science Standards: An Historic Opportunity for K-12 Earth and Space Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.; Passow, M. J.; Holzer, M. A.; Moore, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) provide an historic opportunity to significantly improve Earth and space science (ESS) education nationally at the K-12 level. The increased emphasis on ESS related topics in the NGSS relative to previous standards provides a real opportunity for ensuring all K-12 students in adopting states learn about the ESS - allowing us to reach many more students than are currently are exposed to our discipline. The new standards are also exciting in that they explicitly couple science and engineering practice, cross-cutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas in such a way that student must actively demonstrate their understanding through actions rather than through mere regurgitation of memorized responses. Achieving mastery of NGSS Performance Expectations will require practice with higher-order learning skills - with students engaging in the practices of scientists and engineers. Preparing students for this mastery will be a challenging task for teachers, since in many states professional development support is limited at best for the current curriculum - let alone the curricula that will be developed to address the NGSS. As adoption of the NGSS expands across the country, states will be at various levels of implementation of the new standards over the next several years - and there is real concern that teachers must have sufficient professional development to be able to be successful in preparing their students - particularly in view of likely coupled assessments and teacher evaluations. NESTA strongly supports implementation of the NGSS, and the rigorous and compelling ESS education it will engender, when coupled with a strong emphasis nationwide on teacher professional development. For the past two years, the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) has continued our leadership in K-12 ESS education through workshops, web seminars, events and publications that emphasize implementation of the NGSS in ESS

  3. Circular RNA Expression Profiles Alter Significantly in Mouse Brain After Transient Focal Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Suresh L; Pandi, Gopal; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2017-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel class of noncoding RNAs formed from many protein-coding genes by backsplicing. Although their physiological functions are not yet completely defined, they are thought to control transcription, translation, and microRNA levels. We investigated whether stroke changes the circRNAs expression profile in the mouse brain. Male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, and circRNA expression profile was evaluated in the penumbral cortex at 6, 12, and 24 hours of reperfusion using circRNA microarrays and real-time PCR. Bioinformatics analysis was conducted to identify microRNA binding sites, transcription factor binding, and gene ontology of circRNAs altered after ischemia. One thousand three-hundred twenty circRNAs were expressed at detectable levels mostly from exonic (1064) regions of the genes in the cerebral cortex of sham animals. Of those, 283 were altered (>2-fold) at least at one of the reperfusion time points, whereas 16 were altered at all 3 time points of reperfusion after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion compared with sham. Postischemic changes in circRNAs identified by microarray analysis were confirmed by real-time PCR. Bioinformatics showed that these 16 circRNAs contain binding sites for many microRNAs. Promoter analysis showed that the circRNAs altered after stroke might be controlled by a set of transcription factors. The major biological and molecular functions controlled by circRNAs altered after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion are biological regulation, metabolic process, cell communication, and binding to proteins, ions, and nucleic acids. This is a first study that shows that stroke alters the expression of circRNAs with possible functional implication to poststroke pathophysiology. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Construction of an improved D-arabinose pathway in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Bartkus, J M; Mortlock, R P

    1986-01-01

    A ribitol catabolic pathway was transduced into Escherichia coli K-12 in an effort to determine whether the ribitol pathway would confer an advantage to D-arabinose-positive mutants growing on D-arabinose as the sole carbon source. Competition studies in chemostats showed that ribitol-positive strains, with a selection coefficient of 9%/h, have a significant competitive advantage over ribitol-negative strains. Ribitol-positive strains grown in batch culture also exhibited a shorter lag period than did ribitol-negative strains when transferred from glucose to D-arabinose. Repeated transfer of a ribitol-positive strain of E. coli K-12 on D-arabinose yielded a strain with further improved growth on D-arabinose. This "evolved" strain was found to constitutively synthesize L-fucose permease, isomerase, and kinase but had lost the ability to grow on L-fucose, apparently owing to the loss of a functional aldolase. This constitutive mutation is not linked to the fucose gene cluster and may be similar to an unlinked constitutive mutation described by Chen et al. (J. Bacteriol. 159:725-729, 1984). PMID:3512519

  5. K--12 science educator perception of instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliday-Cashwell, Janet Rose

    2000-10-01

    Selected K--12 public school science educators in 14 eastern North Carolina counties were surveyed to examine their perceptions of their undergraduate preparation programs with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom. A quantitative study, this research examined science educator preparedness in instructing students with learning disabilities by evaluating educator perception in regard to mainstrearned and inclusive educational settings. Specifically, two null hypotheses were tested. Null hypothesis I stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' perceptions of their undergraduate teacher education preparation programs and their perceptions of their abilities to instruct students needing accommodations on behalf of their learning disabilities in mainstrearned or inclusive settings. Participants' responses to perception as well as value statements regarding opinions, adaptations, and undergraduate training with respect to mainstreaming and inclusion were evaluated through t-test analyses of 22 Likert-scale items. Null hypothesis 1 was not accepted because a statistically significant difference did exist between the educators' perceptions of their undergraduate training and their perceived abilities to instruct students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive settings. Null hypothesis 2 stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' attained educational level; grade level currently taught, supervised or chaired; and years of experience in teaching science, supervising science education, and/or chairing science departments in selected North Carolina public schools and their opinions of their undergraduate teacher education program with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive educational settings. Null hypothesis 2 was evaluated through an analysis of

  6. Enhancing K-12 Science Education Via Satellite-Televised Interactive Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    Enhancing K-12 Science Education Via Satellite-Televised Interactive Technologies Dr. Paula G. Coble, Assistant Professor Dr. Sarah Tebbens Teresa...Training activities by providing a telepresence for science education and developing K-12 marine science curriculum and supplemental activities. OBJECTIVES...REPORT DATE 1998 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1998 to 00-00-1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing K-12 Science Education Via Satellite

  7. Frustration, anger, and the significance of alter-ego transferences in group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stone, W N

    1995-07-01

    When working with narcissistically vulnerable and angry patients in group psychotherapy one must take into account the entire treatment context. Interaction takes place among the identified patient, the other members, the therapist, and the image of the group as a whole. In members' counter-reactions to the difficult person, group-destructive forces frequently are stimulated. The offending individual may flee, or the group may reach an impasse in which little growth occurs. In this communication, I have focused on alter-ego relationships and transferences as a way of understanding aspects of group formation and destruction. Angry patients may have intense wishes to be like others and to feel part of the human condition. They suffer from feeling alone. Disruption of an alter-ego relationship may result in rage. A self-psychological perspective in concert with knowledge of group dynamics enables the clinician to formulate ways of intervening in problematic group interactions. The therapist's capacity to attend to the vulnerabilities of the self of all persons involved in the group is often severely tested, particularly under circumstances of emotional contagion. Elucidation of twinship and alter-ego transferences may help stabilize difficult patients and enable them to restart their psychological growth.

  8. The Significance of Acid Alteration in the Los Humeros High-Temperature Geothermal Field, Puebla, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elders, W. A.; Izquierdo, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Los Humeros geothermal field is a high-enthalpy hydrothermal system with more than 40 drilled deep wells, mostly producing high steam fractions at > 300oC. However, although it has a large resource potential, low permeability and corrosive acid fluids have hampered development so that it currently has an installed electrical generating capacity of only 40 MWe. The widespread production of low pH fluids from the reservoir is inconsistent with the marked absence in the reservoir rocks of hydrothermal minerals typical of acid alteration. Instead the hydrothermal alteration observed is typical of that due to neutral to alkaline pH waters reacting with the volcanic rocks of the production zones. Thus it appears that since the reservoir has recently suffered a marked drop in fluid pressure and is in process of transitioning from being water-dominated to being vapor-dominated. However sparse examples of acid leaching are observed locally at depths of about 2 km in the form of bleached, intensely silicified zones, in low permeability and very hot (>350oC) parts of reservoir. Although these leached rocks retain their primary volcanic and pyroclastic textures, they are altered almost entirely to microcrystalline quartz, with some relict pseudomorphs of plagioclase phenocrysts and traces of earlier-formed hydrothermal chlorite and pyrite. These acid-altered zones are usually only some tens of meters thick and deeper rocks lack such silicification. The acid fluids responsible for their formation could either be magmatic volatiles, or could be formed during production (e.g. reaction of water and salts forming hydrogen chloride by hydrolysis at high temperatures). The very high boron content of the fluids produced by the Los Humeros wells suggests that their ultimate source is most likely magmatic gases. However, these acid gases did not react widely with the rocks. We suggest that the silicified zones are forming locally where colder descending waters are encountering

  9. Abdominal Fat and Sarcopenia in Women Significantly Alter Osteoblasts Homeostasis In Vitro by a WNT/β-Catenin Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wannenes, Francesca; Papa, Vincenza; Greco, Emanuela A.; Fornari, Rachele; Marocco, Chiara; Di Luigi, Luigi; Donini, Lorenzo M.; Lenzi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and sarcopenia have been associated with mineral metabolism derangement and low bone mineral density (BMD). We investigated whether imbalance of serum factors in obese or obese sarcopenic patients could affect bone cell activity in vitro. To evaluate and characterize potential cellular and molecular changes of human osteoblasts, cells were exposed to sera of four groups of patients: (1) affected by obesity with normal BMD (O), (2) affected by obesity with low BMD (OO), (3) affected by obesity and sarcopenia (OS), and (4) affected by obesity, sarcopenia, and low BMD (OOS) as compared to subjects with normal body weight and normal BMD (CTL). Patients were previously investigated and characterized for body composition, biochemical and bone turnover markers. Then, sera of different groups of patients were used to incubate human osteoblasts and evaluate potential alterations in cell homeostasis. Exposure to OO, OS, and OOS sera significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and BMP4 expression compared to cells exposed to O and CTL, indicating a detrimental effect on osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, sera of all groups of patients induced intracellular alteration in Wnt/β-catenin molecular pathway, as demonstrated by the significant alteration of specific target genes expression and by altered β-catenin cellular compartmentalization and GSK3β phosphorylation. In conclusion our results show for the first time that sera of obese subjects with low bone mineral density and sarcopenia significantly alter osteoblasts homeostasis in vitro, indicating potential detrimental effects of trunk fat on bone formation and skeletal homeostasis. PMID:24963291

  10. Abdominal Fat and Sarcopenia in Women Significantly Alter Osteoblasts Homeostasis In Vitro by a WNT/ β -Catenin Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wannenes, Francesca; Papa, Vincenza; Greco, Emanuela A; Fornari, Rachele; Marocco, Chiara; Baldari, Carlo; Di Luigi, Luigi; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Guidetti, Laura; Donini, Lorenzo M; Lenzi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and sarcopenia have been associated with mineral metabolism derangement and low bone mineral density (BMD). We investigated whether imbalance of serum factors in obese or obese sarcopenic patients could affect bone cell activity in vitro. To evaluate and characterize potential cellular and molecular changes of human osteoblasts, cells were exposed to sera of four groups of patients: (1) affected by obesity with normal BMD (O), (2) affected by obesity with low BMD (OO), (3) affected by obesity and sarcopenia (OS), and (4) affected by obesity, sarcopenia, and low BMD (OOS) as compared to subjects with normal body weight and normal BMD (CTL). Patients were previously investigated and characterized for body composition, biochemical and bone turnover markers. Then, sera of different groups of patients were used to incubate human osteoblasts and evaluate potential alterations in cell homeostasis. Exposure to OO, OS, and OOS sera significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and BMP4 expression compared to cells exposed to O and CTL, indicating a detrimental effect on osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, sera of all groups of patients induced intracellular alteration in Wnt/ β -catenin molecular pathway, as demonstrated by the significant alteration of specific target genes expression and by altered β -catenin cellular compartmentalization and GSK3 β phosphorylation. In conclusion our results show for the first time that sera of obese subjects with low bone mineral density and sarcopenia significantly alter osteoblasts homeostasis in vitro, indicating potential detrimental effects of trunk fat on bone formation and skeletal homeostasis.

  11. Supercritical CO2 induces marked changes in membrane phospholipids composition in Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Sabrina; Anesi, Andrea; Ferrentino, Giovanna; Spilimbergo, Sara; Guella, Graziano; Jousson, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) treatment is one of the most promising alternative techniques for pasteurization of both liquid and solid food products. The inhibitory effect of SC-CO2 on bacterial growth has been investigated in different species, but the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. Membrane permeabilization has been proposed to be the first event in SC-CO2-mediated inactivation. Flow cytometry, high performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry and NMR analyses were performed to investigate the effect of SC-CO2 treatment on membrane lipid profile and membrane permeability in Escherichia coli K12. After 15 min of SC-CO2 treatment at 120 bar and 35 °C, the majority of bacterial cells dissipated their membrane potential (95 %) and lost membrane integrity, as 81 % become partially permeabilized and 18 % fully permeabilized. Membrane permeabilization was associated with a 20 % decrease in bacterial biovolume and to a strong (>50 %) reduction in phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membrane lipids, without altering the fatty acid composition and the degree of unsaturation of acyl chains. PGs are thought to play an important role in membrane stability, by reducing motion of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) along the membrane bilayer, therefore promoting the formation of inter-lipid hydrogen bonds. In addition, the decrease in intracellular pH induced by SC-CO2 likely alters the chemical properties of phospholipids and the PE/PG ratio. Biophysical effects of SC-CO2 thus cause a strong perturbation of membrane architecture in E. coli, and such alterations are likely associated with its strong inactivation effect.

  12. Extended Safety Data for the Oral Cavity Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12.

    PubMed

    Burton, J P; Chilcott, C N; Wescombe, P A; Tagg, J R

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies of the bacteriocin-producing Streptococcus salivarius K12 monitored a variety of intrinsic strain characteristics of potential relevance to its application as an oral probiotic in humans. These included the content of antibiotic resistance and virulence determinants, the production of deleterious metabolic by-products and its genetic stability. In the present study, we examined additional safety factors including the responses of rats to either short- or long-term oral dosing with strain K12 preparations. In addition, the potential genotoxicity of strain K12 was tested using a bacterial reverse mutation assay. To determine the occurrence and concentrations in human saliva of S. salivarius having the same bacteriocin phenotype as strain K12, saliva samples from 780 children were evaluated. The level of dosing with strain K12 required to achieve oral cavity colonization levels similar to those occurring naturally for this type of bacteriocin-producing S. salivarius was established using 100 human subjects. Following the oral instillation of lyophilized S. salivarius K12 cells in these subjects, its persistence was not at levels higher than those found naturally for this type of bacterium. The various sets of data obtained in this study showed no evidence of genotoxicity and no acute or subacute toxicity effects associated with strain K12. Based on the previously published data, the long history of use by humans and the information presented here, it is concluded that S. salivarius K12 is safe for human consumption.

  13. Value Added Models and the Implementation of the National Standards of K-12 Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Clancy M.; Garrison, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of value-added models of teacher evaluation continue to expand in public education, but the effects of using student test scores to evaluate K-12 physical educators necessitates further discussion. Using the five National Standards for K-12 Physical Education from the Society of Health and Physical Educators America (SHAPE),…

  14. The Social Studies Program in Virginia's Public Schools, K-12: A Framework: Working Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond. Div. of Humanities and Secondary Administration.

    This working draft framework for the social studies program in Virginia's public schools is intended to provide guidelines for local school divisions in planning the social studies curriculum for grades K-12. The framework begins with outlines of the current and proposed K-12 social studies scope and sequence. The following section, which…

  15. Review of "Overcoming the Governance Challenge in K-12 Online Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbour, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This fifth and final paper in the Fordham Institute's series examining digital learning policy is "Overcoming the Governance Challenge in K-12 Online Learning". The purpose of this report is to outline the steps required to move the governance of K-12 online learning from the local district level to the less restrictive state level and to create a…

  16. The Efficiency and Effectiveness of the K-12 Energy Technology Education Promotion Centers in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In order to promote energy literacy for graders K-12, the Ministry of Education (MOE) in Taiwan initiated a K-12 Energy Technology Education Project in September 2010. This 40-month project has one project office affiliated to a university, and 18 promotion centers affiliated to 18 schools--including 5 regional centers for upper-secondary schools…

  17. State P-20 Councils and Collaboration between K-12 and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rippner, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    For decades, numerous observers have agreed on the value of collaboration between K-12 and higher education--especially as these sectors work toward increasing college readiness and success. While most states maintain separate agencies for K-12 and higher education, many states have worked to foster collaboration through state P-20 councils.…

  18. Alternative Use of K-12 School Buildings: Opportunities for Expanded Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, John B.

    This report examines the underutilization of K-12 school facilities and the hidden advantages and disadvantages in expanding K-12 school facilities beyond a 7-hour weekday. It concludes that the benefits from extending facility hours for more teaching, increased extracurricular activities, and community use appear to far outweigh the more…

  19. Integrating Data Mining in Program Evaluation of K-12 Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Jui-Long; Hsu, Yu-Chang; Rice, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated an innovative approach of program evaluation through analyses of student learning logs, demographic data, and end-of-course evaluation surveys in an online K-12 supplemental program. The results support the development of a program evaluation model for decision making on teaching and learning at the K-12 level. A case study…

  20. Development of an Attitude Scale to Assess K-12 Teachers' Attitudes toward Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lan, Yu-Ling

    2012-01-01

    To maximize the contributions of nanotechnology to this society, at least 60 countries have put efforts into this field. In Taiwan, a government-funded K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was established to train K-12 teachers with adequate nanotechnology literacy to foster the next generation of Taiwanese people with sufficient knowledge in…

  1. Kentucky Budget Would Hike K-12 Spending: But Some Contend Amounts Fall Short of Meeting Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Kentucky schools are poised to get their biggest state spending boost in more than a decade, but educators say it won't be enough to counter a lawsuit arguing the state inadequately finances its K-12 schools. In the legisltative session that concluded earlier this month, Kentucky lawmakers passed a two-year budget with $7.9 billion for K-12

  2. Integrating Data Mining in Program Evaluation of K-12 Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Jui-Long; Hsu, Yu-Chang; Rice, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated an innovative approach of program evaluation through analyses of student learning logs, demographic data, and end-of-course evaluation surveys in an online K-12 supplemental program. The results support the development of a program evaluation model for decision making on teaching and learning at the K-12 level. A case study…

  3. K-12 Teachers: Technology Use and the Second Level Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhart, Julie M.; Thomas, Earl; Toriskie, Jeanne M.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study examines differences in K-12 educators' use of technology for instruction across school economic factors. Survey data from 94 practicing K-12 teachers are analyzed. This study finds that schools' economic factors explain variation in how teachers use technology to promote higher-order thinking skills. Our findings support…

  4. Education for a New Era: Design and Implementation of K-12 Education Reform in Qatar. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Dominic J.; Augustine, Catherine H.; Zellman, Gail L.; Ryan, Gery; Goldman, Charles A.; Stasz, Cathleen; Constant, Louay

    2007-01-01

    The leadership of Qatar has a social and political vision that calls for improving the outcomes of the Qatari K-12 education system. With this vision in mind, the leadership asked RAND to examine Qatar's K-12 education system, to recommend options for building a world-class system, and, subsequently, to develop the chosen option and support its…

  5. K-12 Teachers' Perceptions of School Policy and Fear of School Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Melissa L.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1990s, schools have focused their attention on policies designed to improve school safety. Most researches on school violence policies have concentrated on the needs of students and administrators. This study investigated the impact of school violence policies on K-12 teachers' fear. Using self-report data from 447 K-12 teachers from a…

  6. Development of an Attitude Scale to Assess K-12 Teachers' Attitudes toward Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lan, Yu-Ling

    2012-01-01

    To maximize the contributions of nanotechnology to this society, at least 60 countries have put efforts into this field. In Taiwan, a government-funded K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was established to train K-12 teachers with adequate nanotechnology literacy to foster the next generation of Taiwanese people with sufficient knowledge in…

  7. K-12 Career Awareness & Development Sequence [with Appendices, Executive and Implementation Guide].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CareerTec, Freeport, IL.

    This packet includes four publications of a project to develop and pilot a K-12 career awareness and development sequence (CADS) for education-to-careers. The K-12 CADS sequence presents a pyramid of the recommended CADS by grade level; recommended career-cluster focus for grades K-8; suggestions for implementation with this information for each…

  8. Perspectives on...Special Collections at ARL Libraries and K-12 Outreach: Current Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the results of a survey sent to Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Special Collections requesting information on outreach to K-12 students. Over half of the respondents work with K-12 and many of those who currently do not are planning to. New pressures and changing philosophies contribute to this trend.

  9. Education Imperatives for Ohio: K-12 Policy Priorities for the Next Biennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, 2010

    2010-01-01

    For the past two decades, lawmakers from both parties in Ohio have invested heavily in the public education sector. As a consequence, total K-12 education funding, measured in constant dollars, has grown by over 60 percent since 1997, even as Ohio's K-12 student enrollment has shrunk by more than 24,000 students (1.4 percent) during that same…

  10. An Exploratory Study on K-12 Teachers' Use of Technology and Multimedia in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Carr, Marsha L.

    2015-01-01

    21st century has seen new technology and multimedia made available for integration in K-12 classrooms. This exploratory study examines K-12 teachers' use of technology and multimedia in the classroom in two southern counties in the Southeastern United States. The purpose of the study was to answer the following five research questions: 1) What…

  11. Preparing Teacher Candidates for Virtual Field Placements via an Exposure to K-12 Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tian; Hibbard, Laura; Franklin, Teresa; Moore, David Richard

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: The goal of this project was to determine what effects exposure to online K-12 teaching and learning activities had on teacher candidates' perceptions of K-12 online learning, how the exposure allowed teacher candidates to reach greater understanding of online pedagogy, and what effect such exposure had on teacher candidates'…

  12. Virtual Schools: The Changing Landscape of K-12 Education in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toppin, Ian N.; Toppin, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtual schools are a growing phenomenon in k-12 education. School systems in almost every state in the United States offer some version of fully online or blended education. It is no longer far-fetched to conclude that if the current trend continues, virtual school enrollments will eclipse those of traditional brick-and-mortar k-12 institutions…

  13. Safety Assessment of the Oral Cavity Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Jeremy P.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Moore, Chris J.; Chilcott, Chris N.; Tagg, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a prominent member of the oral microbiota and has excellent potential for use as a probiotic targeting the oral cavity. In this report we document safety data relating to S. salivarius K12, including assessment of its antibiogram, metabolic profiles, and virulence determinants, and we examine the microbial composition of saliva following the dosing of subjects with K12. PMID:16598017

  14. K-12 Teachers' Perceptions of School Policy and Fear of School Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Melissa L.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1990s, schools have focused their attention on policies designed to improve school safety. Most researches on school violence policies have concentrated on the needs of students and administrators. This study investigated the impact of school violence policies on K-12 teachers' fear. Using self-report data from 447 K-12 teachers from a…

  15. Out Gay and Lesbian K-12 Educators: A Study in Radical Honesty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJean, William

    2007-01-01

    Interpretive methodology is used to study the experiences of gay and lesbian K-12 Caucasian educators in California who consider themselves "out" within the classrooms in which they teach. Three main research questions framed this study: What are the lived experiences of out gay and lesbian K-12 educators? What are the interconnections…

  16. Analysis of the Supporting Websites for the Use of Instructional Games in K-12 Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebritchi, Mansureh; Hirumi, Atsusi; Kappers, Wendi; Henry, Renee

    2009-01-01

    This paper identifies resources to be included in a website designed to facilitate the integration of instructional games in K-12 settings. Guidelines and supporting components are based on a survey of K-12 educators who are integrating games, an analysis of existing instructional game websites, and summaries of literature on the use of…

  17. Preparing Teacher Candidates for Virtual Field Placements via an Exposure to K-12 Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tian; Hibbard, Laura; Franklin, Teresa; Moore, David Richard

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: The goal of this project was to determine what effects exposure to online K-12 teaching and learning activities had on teacher candidates' perceptions of K-12 online learning, how the exposure allowed teacher candidates to reach greater understanding of online pedagogy, and what effect such exposure had on teacher candidates'…

  18. A Framework for Quality K-12 Engineering Education: Research and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tamara J.; Glancy, Aran W.; Tank, Kristina M.; Kersten, Jennifer A.; Smith, Karl A.; Stohlmann, Micah S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent U.S. national documents have laid the foundation for highlighting the connection between science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the K-12 level. However, there is not a clear definition or a well-established tradition of what constitutes a quality engineering education at the K-12 level. The purpose of the current work has been…

  19. Keeping Pace with K-12 Digital Learning: An Annual Review of Policy and Practice. Eleventh Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, John; Pape, Larry; Murin, Amy; Gemin, Butch; Vashaw, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    "Keeping Pace with K-12 Digital Learning" (2014) is the 11th in a series of annual reports that began in 2004 that examine the status of K-12 online education across the country. The report provides an overview of the latest policies, practices, and trends affecting online learning programs across all 50 states. It summarizes that at a…

  20. Education for a New Era: Design and Implementation of K-12 Education Reform in Qatar. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Dominic J.; Augustine, Catherine H.; Zellman, Gail L.; Ryan, Gery; Goldman, Charles A.; Stasz, Cathleen; Constant, Louay

    2007-01-01

    The leadership of Qatar has a social and political vision that calls for improving the outcomes of the Qatari K-12 education system. With this vision in mind, the leadership asked RAND to examine Qatar's K-12 education system, to recommend options for building a world-class system, and, subsequently, to develop the chosen option and support its…

  1. Identity and Biography as Mediators of Science and Mathematics Faculty's Involvement in K-12 Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skerrett, Allison; Sevian, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    This article explores aspects of science and mathematics faculty identities and biographies that mediated their involvement in K-12 service. Faculty expressed five motivations for participating in K-12 service--advancing their research agenda, advocating environmental consciousness, desiring to be involved in their children's schools, aspiring to…

  2. Physical Education Teacher Educator's Perceptions toward and Understanding of K-12 Online Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daum, David N.; Woods, Amelia M.

    2015-01-01

    K-12 online physical education (OLPE) is as an educational opportunity in at least 30 states in the US (NASPE, 2006; 2010; 2012). The purpose of this study was to examine physical education teacher educators' perceptions toward and understanding of K-12 OLPE. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (1986) served as the theoretical framework for this…

  3. STEM Integration in K-12 Education: Status, Prospects, and an Agenda for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honey, Margaret; Pearson, Greg; Schweingruber, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    "STEM Integration in K-12 Education" examines current efforts to connect the STEM disciplines in K-12 education. This report identifies and characterizes existing approaches to integrated STEM education, both in formal and after- and out-of-school settings. The report reviews the evidence for the impact of integrated approaches on…

  4. Identity and Biography as Mediators of Science and Mathematics Faculty's Involvement in K-12 Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skerrett, Allison; Sevian, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    This article explores aspects of science and mathematics faculty identities and biographies that mediated their involvement in K-12 service. Faculty expressed five motivations for participating in K-12 service--advancing their research agenda, advocating environmental consciousness, desiring to be involved in their children's schools, aspiring to…

  5. A Framework for Quality K-12 Engineering Education: Research and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tamara J.; Glancy, Aran W.; Tank, Kristina M.; Kersten, Jennifer A.; Smith, Karl A.; Stohlmann, Micah S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent U.S. national documents have laid the foundation for highlighting the connection between science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the K-12 level. However, there is not a clear definition or a well-established tradition of what constitutes a quality engineering education at the K-12 level. The purpose of the current work has been…

  6. Problems Associated with a Lack of Cohesive Policy in K-12 Pre-College Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, John; Fontenot, A. Dean; Tate, Derrick

    2011-01-01

    This article identifies a number of issues associated with current STEM education reform efforts, especially with regard to efforts to integrate engineering education into the K-12 curriculum. Precollege engineering is especially problematic in STEM reform since there is no well-established tradition of engineering in the K-12 curriculum. This…

  7. Development and Evaluation of Food Safety Modules for K-12 Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Travis K.; Pfuntner, Rachel C.; Stasiewicz, Matthew J.; Wiedmann, Martin; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Career and educational opportunities in food science and food safety are underrecognized by K-12 students and educators. Additionally, misperceptions regarding nature of science understanding persist in K-12 students despite being emphasized as an important component of science education for over 100 y. In an effort to increase awareness…

  8. Students with Special Health Care Needs in K-12 Virtual Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Heidi; Ferdig, Richard E.; Thompson, Lindsay A.; Schottke, Katherine; Black, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to establish a baseline for understanding the epidemiology of online K-12 students with special health care needs, determine the prevalence in K-12 online schooling of students from certain racial/ethnic backgrounds, those with socioeconomic disadvantages, and determine how these students perform in online classes compared to…

  9. Identity and biography as mediators of science and mathematics faculty's involvement in K-12 service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skerrett, Allison; Sevian, Hannah

    2010-09-01

    This article explores aspects of science and mathematics faculty identities and biographies that mediated their involvement in K-12 service. Faculty expressed five motivations for participating in K-12 service—advancing their research agenda, advocating environmental consciousness, desiring to be involved in their children's schools, aspiring to improve their pedagogical practices and promoting equity and social justice.

  10. Online Facilitators and Sense of Community in K-12 Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drysdale, Jeffery S.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the continued growth of K-12 online learning, there remains a need for additional research addressing roles of online facilitators and how they can improve the sense of community at K-12 online schools. The first article of this dissertation presents a case study illustrating how online facilitators can provide the same level of support…

  11. Development and Evaluation of Food Safety Modules for K-12 Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Travis K.; Pfuntner, Rachel C.; Stasiewicz, Matthew J.; Wiedmann, Martin; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Career and educational opportunities in food science and food safety are underrecognized by K-12 students and educators. Additionally, misperceptions regarding nature of science understanding persist in K-12 students despite being emphasized as an important component of science education for over 100 y. In an effort to increase awareness…

  12. An Exploratory Study on K-12 Teachers' Use of Technology and Multimedia in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Carr, Marsha L.

    2015-01-01

    21st century has seen new technology and multimedia made available for integration in K-12 classrooms. This exploratory study examines K-12 teachers' use of technology and multimedia in the classroom in two southern counties in the Southeastern United States. The purpose of the study was to answer the following five research questions: 1) What…

  13. K-12 Teacher Perceptions Regarding the Flipped Classroom Model for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, Evan; DeJong, David; Grundmeyer, Trent; Baron, Mark

    2017-01-01

    A great deal of evidence can be cited from higher education literature on the effectiveness of the flipped classroom; however, very little research was discovered on the flipped classroom at the K-12 level. This study examined K-12 teachers' perceptions regarding the flipped classroom and differences in teachers' perceptions based on grade level…

  14. State P-20 Councils and Collaboration between K-12 and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rippner, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    For decades, numerous observers have agreed on the value of collaboration between K-12 and higher education--especially as these sectors work toward increasing college readiness and success. While most states maintain separate agencies for K-12 and higher education, many states have worked to foster collaboration through state P-20 councils.…

  15. Pairing K-12 Teachers with Geographic Researchers: Why It Should Take Place and How It Can.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orvis, Kenneth H.; Horn, Sally P.; Jumper, Sidney R.

    1999-01-01

    Contends that excitement can be infused into the K-12 geography curriculum by involving teachers in real research projects led by professional geographers. Describes a project where K-12 teachers and geographers participated in geography field research in the mountain highlands of the Valle Nuevo Scientific Reserve of the Dominican Republic. (CMK)

  16. Students with Special Health Care Needs in K-12 Virtual Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Heidi; Ferdig, Richard E.; Thompson, Lindsay A.; Schottke, Katherine; Black, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to establish a baseline for understanding the epidemiology of online K-12 students with special health care needs, determine the prevalence in K-12 online schooling of students from certain racial/ethnic backgrounds, those with socioeconomic disadvantages, and determine how these students perform in online classes compared to…

  17. New Learning Models: The Evolution of Online Learning into Innovative K-12 Blended Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The author traces the growth of K-12 online learning in the United States from its modest genesis in the mid-1990s with 50,000 students to the more than 4 million enrollments today, the fastest scaling ever of any innovation in K-12 education. The evolution from one-size-fits-all online courses to innovative, blended instructional models that are…

  18. Stacks of Ideas: Activities for Library Media Center and Classroom K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Developed for library media specialists and teachers, this K-12 guide presents a model for combining library media skills with the regular instructional program. Following a K-12 scope and sequence for library and information skills, 15 elementary and junior high school units and 12 high school units are presented. The elementary and junior high…

  19. Online Teaching in K-12: Models, Methods, and Best Practices for Teachers and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryans-Bongey, Sarah, Ed.; Graziano, Kevin J., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    "Online Teaching in K-12" is the essential hands-on reference and textbook for education professionals seeking success in the planning, design, and teaching of K-12 online courses and programs. This skillfully edited book brings together more than two dozen experts and practitioners to present an array of innovative models and methods,…

  20. Teacher Perception of Barriers and Benefits in K-12 Technology Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, Lin B.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores K-12 teachers' perceptions of the benefits and barriers to technology integration by either teachers or students in K-12 instruction. The sample was composed of 68 students enrolled in online classes in the graduate studies in education department of a small private liberal arts institution in the southeast. Data was collected…

  1. Pairing K-12 Teachers with Geographic Researchers: Why It Should Take Place and How It Can.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orvis, Kenneth H.; Horn, Sally P.; Jumper, Sidney R.

    1999-01-01

    Contends that excitement can be infused into the K-12 geography curriculum by involving teachers in real research projects led by professional geographers. Describes a project where K-12 teachers and geographers participated in geography field research in the mountain highlands of the Valle Nuevo Scientific Reserve of the Dominican Republic. (CMK)

  2. K-12 Teacher Perceptions Regarding the Flipped Classroom Model for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, Evan; DeJong, David; Grundmeyer, Trent; Baron, Mark

    2017-01-01

    A great deal of evidence can be cited from higher education literature on the effectiveness of the flipped classroom; however, very little research was discovered on the flipped classroom at the K-12 level. This study examined K-12 teachers' perceptions regarding the flipped classroom and differences in teachers' perceptions based on grade level…

  3. Virginia's Opinion on K-12 Education and School Choice. School Choice Survey in the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This statistically representative survey of 1,203 likely Virginia voters illustrates public opinion on a wide range of K-12 education issues. The underlying purpose of the Friedman Foundation's state surveys is to measure voter knowledge and attitudes toward public institutions and policies, innovative ideas, and the state's K-12 education system.…

  4. Efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide for nonthermal inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) system with a gas-liquid porous metal contactor for eliminating Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider. Pasteurized, preservative-free apple cider was inoculated with E. coli K12 and processed using the SCCO2 system at CO2 conc...

  5. From Teacher to Teacher Educator: Should You Move from a K-12 Classroom into Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    College teaching can be as rewarding as a K-12 career and, whether in elementary school or college, students deserve good teachers. College professors who prepare teachers can have a tremendous impact on K-12 classrooms for decades into the future. However, career paths vary widely, and the path to teaching in higher education is as unique as the…

  6. A Critique of the Brave New World of K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades life style has changed so rapidly that remote areas of the Earth are now inhabited by human beings. Technology has also developed and people can stay at home and have access to virtual schools. This has stimulated the need for K-12 Education. K-12 education has emerged from the no-child-left-behind concerns of governments…

  7. Review of the National Research Council's Framework for K-12 Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    The new "Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" is a big, comprehensive volume, carefully organized and heavily documented. It is the long-awaited product of the Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New K-12 Science Education Standards. As noted, it is a weighty document (more than 300…

  8. Physical Education Teacher Educator's Perceptions toward and Understanding of K-12 Online Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daum, David N.; Woods, Amelia M.

    2015-01-01

    K-12 online physical education (OLPE) is as an educational opportunity in at least 30 states in the US (NASPE, 2006; 2010; 2012). The purpose of this study was to examine physical education teacher educators' perceptions toward and understanding of K-12 OLPE. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (1986) served as the theoretical framework for this…

  9. Mapping the Terrain: Educational Leadership Field Experiences in K-12 Virtual Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFrance, Jason A.; Beck, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Opportunities for K-12 students to choose virtual and blended learning experiences continue to grow. All 50 states including Washington, D.C., now offer some virtual experience in K-12 education. Of these, 40 states have state virtual schools or state-led online learning initiatives. In addition, federal and state support for this type of learning…

  10. K-12 Online Learning and Students with Disabilities: Perspectives from State Special Education Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdette, Paula J.; Greer, Diana L.; Woods, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    K-12 special education policies and practices that ensure students with disabilities receive a free, appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment are coming under pressure from the rapid expansion of online learning. Forty-six state and non-state jurisdiction special education directors responded to a brief survey about K-12

  11. Virtual Schools: The Changing Landscape of K-12 Education in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toppin, Ian N.; Toppin, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtual schools are a growing phenomenon in k-12 education. School systems in almost every state in the United States offer some version of fully online or blended education. It is no longer far-fetched to conclude that if the current trend continues, virtual school enrollments will eclipse those of traditional brick-and-mortar k-12 institutions…

  12. STEM Integration in K-12 Education: Status, Prospects, and an Agenda for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honey, Margaret; Pearson, Greg; Schweingruber, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    "STEM Integration in K-12 Education" examines current efforts to connect the STEM disciplines in K-12 education. This report identifies and characterizes existing approaches to integrated STEM education, both in formal and after- and out-of-school settings. The report reviews the evidence for the impact of integrated approaches on…

  13. The Internet Resource Directory for K-12 Teachers and Librarians, 94/95 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Elizabeth B.

    Designed for educators who are beginning to explore the Internet, this guide designates sites of interest for K-12 education and describes how to access them. The importance and benefits of Internet access for K-12 schools are discussed in the opening chapters. Guidelines and tips for getting started are offered and scenarios of how teachers and…

  14. K-12 Education and the Internet: A Technical Report Prepared for Saskatchewan Education, Training and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, L. F.; Allen, A. J.

    This report examines the context and impact on the classroom of teacher and student access to the Internet in K-12 education in Saskatchewan (Canada) public schools. It begins with a description of the Internet, including funding and connectivity concerns. The following four basic services of the Internet are introduced with examples of K-12

  15. K-12 Teachers: Technology Use and the Second Level Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhart, Julie M.; Thomas, Earl; Toriskie, Jeanne M.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study examines differences in K-12 educators' use of technology for instruction across school economic factors. Survey data from 94 practicing K-12 teachers are analyzed. This study finds that schools' economic factors explain variation in how teachers use technology to promote higher-order thinking skills. Our findings support…

  16. Opinions on Computing Education in Korean K-12 System: Higher Education Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dae-Kyoo; Jeong, Dongwon; Lu, Lunjin; Debnath, Debatosh; Ming, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The need for computing education in the K-12 curriculum has grown globally. The Republic of Korea is not an exception. In response to the need, the Korean Ministry of Education has announced an outline for software-centric computing education in the K-12 system, which aims at enhancing the current computing education with software emphasis. In…

  17. Educating Tomorrow's Workforce: A Report on the Semiconductor Industry's Commitment to Youth in K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semiconductor Industry Association, San Jose, CA.

    The U.S. semiconductor industry, now the nation's largest manufacturing industry, displays its commitment to training its current workers and educating future workers by supporting educational efforts on the K-12 level. This catalog describes innovative actions by 16 Semiconductor Industry Association companies to improve education at the K-12

  18. Strength in Numbers: State Spending on K-12 Assessment Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chingos, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    In the coming years, states will need to make the most significant changes to their assessment systems in a decade as they implement the Common Core State Standards, a common framework for what students are expected to know that will replace existing standards in 45 states and the District of Columbia. The Common Core effort has prompted concerns…

  19. The Biomechanical Implications of Obesity in K-12 Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmeyer, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Few biomechanical studies have examined obese individuals as primary subjects. However, some mechanical differences have been identified between overweight or obese individuals and nonoverweight movers. It is not clear how obesity affects the onset of osteoarthritis, for example, but it is evident that obesity does place significant limitations on…

  20. Strength in Numbers: State Spending on K-12 Assessment Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chingos, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    In the coming years, states will need to make the most significant changes to their assessment systems in a decade as they implement the Common Core State Standards, a common framework for what students are expected to know that will replace existing standards in 45 states and the District of Columbia. The Common Core effort has prompted concerns…

  1. Aligning K-12 and Postsecondary Career Pathways with Workforce Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Since 2013, states have witnessed significant legislative activity related to secondary- and postsecondary-level career/technical education (CTE). One key goal of much recent policymaking activity has been to improve alignment between high school and postsecondary CTE programs, including by developing state or regional structures to design career…

  2. Berry Shriveling Significantly Alters Shiraz (Vitis vinifera L.) Grape and Wine Chemical Composition.

    PubMed

    Šuklje, Katja; Zhang, Xinyi; Antalick, Guillaume; Clark, Andrew C; Deloire, Alain; Schmidtke, Leigh M

    2016-02-03

    Berry shriveling is an often reported occurrence in the Shiraz (Vitis vinifera L.) cultivar. This study investigated the effect of berry shriveling occurring in a high yielding (18.6 ± 1.6 kg/vine) Shiraz vineyard in relation to a temporal investigation of grape and wine composition using three harvest dates. Berry shriveling resulted in delayed total soluble solids and amino acid accumulation into the berry, however differences between treatments diminished or became smaller by the third harvest date. Similarly, ethyl esters of fatty acids and higher alcohol acetates were lower in wines from shriveled berries from the first two harvests; anthocyanins were reduced in wines from shriveled berries at all harvest dates, whereas terpenes were unaltered. Wines made from shriveled berries had higher γ-nonalactone and β-damascenone concentrations. This study provides novel information on the chemical alterations of grapes and wines made from grapes affected by shriveling.

  3. Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 Schools -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2013-02-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-K12) (ASHRAE et al. 2011a). The AEDG-K12 provides recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in K-12 schools over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-K12 was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  4. Information Infrastructure Technology and Applications (IITA) Program: Annual K-12 Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Paul; Likens, William; Leon, Mark

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the K-12 workshop is to stimulate a cross pollination of inter-center activity and introduce the regional centers to curing edge K-1 activities. The format of the workshop consists of project presentations, working groups, and working group reports, all contained in a three day period. The agenda is aggressive and demanding. The K-12 Education Project is a multi-center activity managed by the Information Infrastructure Technology and Applications (IITA)/K-12 Project Office at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). this workshop is conducted in support of executing the K-12 Education element of the IITA Project The IITA/K-12 Project funds activities that use the National Information Infrastructure (NII) (e.g., the Internet) to foster reform and restructuring in mathematics, science, computing, engineering, and technical education.

  5. Climate Change Education Today in K-12: What's Happening in the Earth and Space Science Classroom?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, M. A.; National Earth Science Teachers Association

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is a highly interdisciplinary topic, involving not only multiple fields of science, but also social science and the humanities. There are many aspects of climate change science that make it particularly well-suited for exploration in the K-12 setting, including opportunities to explore the unifying processes of science such as complex systems, models, observations, change and evolution. Furthermore, this field of science offers the opportunity to observe the nature of science in action - including how scientists develop and improve their understanding through research and debate. Finally, climate change is inherently highly relevant to students - indeed, students today will need to deal with the consequences of the climate change. The science of climate change is clearly present in current science education standards, both at the National level as well as in the majority of states. Nonetheless, a significant number of teachers across the country report difficulties addressing climate change in the classroom. The National Earth Science Teachers Association has conducted several surveys of Earth and space science educators across the country over the past several years on a number of issues, including their needs and concerns, including their experience of external influences on what they teach. While the number of teachers that report external pressures to not teach climate change science are in the minority (and less than the pressure to not teach evolution and related topics), our results suggest that this pressure against climate change science in the K-12 classroom has grown over the past several years. Some teachers report being threatened by parents, being encouraged by administrators to not teach the subject, and a belief that the "two sides" of climate change should be taught. Survey results indicate that teachers in religious or politically-conservative districts are more likely to report difficulties in teaching about climate change than in

  6. Developmental Toxicity Studies with Pregabalin in Rats: Significance of Alterations in Skull Bone Morphology.

    PubMed

    Morse, Dennis C; Henck, Judith W; Bailey, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    Pregabalin was administered to pregnant Wistar rats during organogenesis to evaluate potential developmental toxicity. In an embryo-fetal development study, compared with controls, fetuses from pregabalin-treated rats exhibited increased incidence of jugal fused to maxilla (pregabalin 1250 and 2500 mg/kg) and fusion of the nasal sutures (pregabalin 2500 mg/kg). The alterations in skull development occurred in the presence of maternal toxicity (reduced body weight gain) and developmental toxicity (reduced fetal body weight and increased skeletal variations), and were initially classified as malformations. Subsequent investigative studies in pregnant rats treated with pregabalin during organogenesis confirmed the advanced jugal fused to maxilla, and fusion of the nasal sutures at cesarean section (gestation day/postmating day [PMD] 21) in pregabalin-treated groups. In a study designed to evaluate progression of skull development, advanced jugal fused to maxilla and fusion of the nasal sutures was observed on PMD 20-25 and PMD 21-23, respectively (birth occurs approximately on PMD 22). On postnatal day (PND) 21, complete jugal fused to maxilla was observed in the majority of control and 2500 mg/kg offspring. No treatment-related differences in the incidence of skull bone fusions occurred on PND 21, indicating no permanent adverse outcome. Based on the results of the investigative studies, and a review of historical data and scientific literature, the advanced skull bone fusions were reclassified as anatomic variations. Pregabalin was not teratogenic in rats under the conditions of these studies.

  7. Significant alterations in anisotropic ice growth rate induced by the ice nucleation-active bacteria Xanthomonas campestris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nada, Hiroki; Zepeda, Salvador; Miura, Hitoshi; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2010-09-01

    In the present study, we found that the ice nucleation-active bacteria Xanthomonas campestris significantly altered anisotropic ice growth rate. Results of ice growth experiments in the presence of X. campestris showed that this bacterium decreased the ice crystal growth rate in the c-axis, whereas it increased growth rates in directions normal to the c-axis. These results indicate that these alterations in anisotropic growth rate are the result of selective binding of bacterial ice-nucleating proteins along the {0 0 0 1} basal plane.

  8. PEF based hurdle strategy to control Pichia fermentans, Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli k12 in orange juice.

    PubMed

    McNamee, C; Noci, F; Cronin, D A; Lyng, J G; Morgan, D J; Scannell, A G M

    2010-03-31

    The combination of pulsed electric fields (PEF) and bacteriocins in a hurdle approach has been reported to enhance microbial inactivation. This study investigates the preservation of orange juice using PEF in combination with nisin (2.5 ppm), natamycin (10 ppm), benzoic acid (BA; 100 ppm), or lactic acid, (LA; 500 ppm). Pichia fermentans, a spoilage yeast frequently isolated from orange juice, Escherichia coli k12 or Listeria innocua were inoculated into sterile orange juice (OJ) with, and without, added preservatives. The antimicrobial activity over time was evaluated relative to an untreated control. The effect of PEF treatment (40 kV/cm, 100 micros; max temperature 56 degrees C) was assessed on its own, and in combination with each antimicrobial. The acidic environment of OJ inactivated E. coli k12 (1.5log reduction) and L. innocua (0.7log reduction) slightly but had no effect on P. fermentans. PEF caused a significant decrease (P<0.05) in the viability of P. fermentans, L. innocua and E. coli k12 achieving reductions of 4.8, 3.7 and 6.3log respectively. Nisin combined with PEF inactivated L. innocua and E. coli k12 in a synergistic manner resulting in a total reduction to 5.6 and 7.9log respectively. A similar synergy was shown between LA and PEF in the inactivation of L. innocua and P. fermentans (6.1 and 7.8log reduction), but not E. coli k12. The BA-PEF combination caused an additive inactivation of P. fermentans, whereas the natamycin-PEF combination against P. fermentans was not significantly different to the effect caused by PEF alone. This study shows that combining PEF with the chosen preservatives, at levels lower than those in current use, can provide greater than 5log reductions of E. coli k12, L. innocua and P. fermentans in OJ. These PEF-bio-preservative combination hurdles could provide the beverage industry with effective non-thermal alternatives to prevent microbial spoilage, and improve the safety of fruit juice. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B

  9. Antimicrobial activity of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on bacteria involved in oral malodour.

    PubMed

    Masdea, L; Kulik, E M; Hauser-Gerspach, I; Ramseier, A M; Filippi, A; Waltimo, T

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-producing strain Streptococcus salivarius K12 against several bacteria involved in halitosis. The inhibitory activity of S. salivarius K12 against Solobacterium moorei CCUG39336, four clinical S. moorei isolates, Atopobium parvulum ATCC33793 and Eubacterium sulci ATCC35585 was examined by a deferred antagonism test. Eubacterium saburreum ATCC33271 and Parvimonas micra ATCC33270, which have been tested in previous studies, served as positive controls, and the Gram-negative strain Bacteroides fragilis ZIB2800 served as a negative control. Additionally, the occurrence of resistance in S. moorei CCUG39336 to S. salivarius K12 was analysed by either direct plating or by passage of S. moorei CCUG39336 on chloroform-inactived S. salivarius K12-containing agar plates. S. salivarius K12 suppressed the growth of all Gram-positive bacteria tested, but the extent to which the bacteria were inhibited varied. E. sulci ATCC35585 was the most sensitive strain, while all five S. moorei isolates were inhibited to a lesser extent. Natural resistance seems to be very low in S. moorei CCUG39336, and there was only a slight decrease in sensitivity after exposure to S. salivarius K12 over 10 passages. Our studies demonstrate that S. salivarius K12 has antimicrobial activity against bacteria involved in halitosis. This strain might be an interesting and valuable candidate for the development of an antimicrobial therapy for halitosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Recommendations for Broader Impacts in K-12: Advice from Einstein Educator Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, H. A.; LaDue, N.; Moore, J. D.; Whitsett, S.

    2011-12-01

    Since 1994, the Albert Einstein Distinguished Science Educator Fellowship Act has brought Master K-12 STEM educators to Washington D.C. and Virginia for 11-month appointments in STEM-related Federal agencies and Congressional Offices. These top educators are leaders in their communities and often have years of experience working with government-funded researchers reaching out to the K-12 community. During their fellowship year, Einstein Fellows use their years of experience and expertise in to inform efforts and initiatives in the federal departments, directorates and offices to which they are assigned. The collaborative efforts of a group of NSF Einstein Fellows has led to the development of "Broader Impacts in the K-12 Community", a suite of experience-based recommendations and ideas designed to leverage grant resources and maximize effective partnerships between the research and K-12 communities. The goal of this presentation is to communicate best practices for researchers engaging in the realm of K-12 education from the perspective of educators. Challenges are highlighted and mapped to realistic solutions. Written originally as a panel talk to help NSF panel members consider feasible, high-quality K-12 broader impacts, this presentation has become an invaluable resource for principle investigators as they consider engaging with the K-12 community. While this presentation specifically addresses merit review components of NSF solicitations, these recommendations are relevant for any STEM initiatives that involve partnerships between scientists and teachers.

  11. Incidence of Significantly Altered Pain Experience among Individuals with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biersdorff, Kathleen K.

    1993-01-01

    Reports of injury/illness incidents involving 123 adults with developmental disabilities were studied to determine the incidence of pain insensitivity/indifference. A significantly elevated pain threshold was noted for 25% of subjects and was related to severity of mental retardation. Medical and rehabilitation implications in terms of risking…

  12. In Search of the Active Site of PMMO Enzyme: Partnership between a K-12 Teacher, a Graduate K-12 Teaching Fellow, and a Research Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, Katherine K.; Mainardi, Daniela S.; Culligan, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    The partnership between a K-12 teacher (Culligan), an NSF GK-12 Teaching Fellow graduate student (Bearden), and a Louisiana Tech faculty member (Mainardi) collaborating in a research and education project is described in this work. The unique grouping of these three researchers allows for maximum dissemination of developed modules. By the end of…

  13. Surface point mutations that significantly alter the structure and stability of a protein's denatured state.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. K.; Bu, Z.; Anderson, K. S.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Engelman, D. M.; Regan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Significantly different m values (1.9-2.7 kcal mol-1 M-1) were observed for point mutations at a single, solvent-exposed site (T53) in a variant of the B1 domain of streptococcal Protein G using guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) as a denaturant. This report focuses on elucidating the energetic and structural implications of these m-value differences in two Protein G mutants, containing Ala and Thr at position 53. These two proteins are representative of the high (m+) and low (m-) m-value mutants studied. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed no evidence of equilibrium intermediates. A comparison of GuHCl denaturation monitored by fluorescence and circular dichroism showed that secondary and tertiary structure denatured concomitantly. The rates of folding (286 S-1 for the m+ mutant and 952 S-1 for the m- mutant) and the rates of unfolding (11 S-1 for m+ mutant and 3 S-1 for the m- mutant) were significantly different, as determined by stopped-flow fluorescence. The relative solvation free energies of the transition states were identical for the two proteins (alpha ++ = 0.3). Small-angle X-ray scattering showed that the radius of gyration of the denatured state (Rgd) of the m+ mutant did not change with increasing denaturant concentrations (Rgd approximately 23 A); whereas, the Rgd of the m- mutant increased from approximately 17 A to 23 A with increasing denaturant concentration. The results indicate that the mutations exert significant effects in both the native and GuHCl-induced denatured state of these two proteins. PMID:8897601

  14. Cell cycle and immune-related processes are significantly altered in chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Oh, S J; Cho, S B; Park, S-H; Piao, C Z; Kwon, S M; Kim, I; Yoon, S S; Kim, B K; Park, E K; Kang, J J; Yang, S-J; Lee, W J; Yoo, C-H; Hwang, S; Kim, S H; Kim, J H; Park, S

    2008-06-01

    Currently, the pathogenesis of chronic GVHD is unclear. To elucidate the molecular characteristics underlying chronic GVHD, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of 21 mononuclear cell samples from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. Self organizing map (SOM) clustering showed that the entire expression profiles of chronic GVHD samples were clearly different from those of the non-GVHD samples, and significance analysis of microarray (SAM) demonstrated that 120 genes, including PTDSS1, VAV1 and CD3D, were up-regulated, and 5 genes, including calnexin, were down-regulated in GVHD patients. Gene ontology annotation revealed that these genes are related to the phosphorous metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) experiments validated the up-regulation of PTDSS1, VAV1 and CD3D in separate samples. Pathway-wise global test revealed that differential gene expression in cell cycle and T cell immune-associated pathways were significant between GVHD patients and non-GVHD patients. Seventeen classifier genes selected using a PAM (prediction analysis of microarray) algorithm showed favorable performance (prediction accuracy=0.85) for identifying patients with chronic GVHD. In conclusion, we identified differentially expressed genes and pathways in chronic GVHD patients using microarray analysis, and we also selected diagnostic genes predicting chronic GVHD status.

  15. Even mild respiratory distress alters tissue oxygenation significantly in preterm infants during neonatal transition.

    PubMed

    Schwaberger, Bernhard; Pichler, Gerhard; Binder, Corinna; Avian, Alexander; Pocivalnik, Mirjam; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2014-10-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables continuous non-invasive measurements of regional oxygen saturation (rSO2). The aim was to evaluate the dynamics of rSO2 of the brain, preductal and postductal tissues during postnatal transition in preterm infants with and without respiratory support (RS). This single-centre study was designed as an exploratory prospective observational study. Fifty one preterm infants (≥ 30 + 0 and < 37 + 0 weeks) delivered by caesarean section were included. RS using a T-Piece-Resuscitator and supplemental oxygen were given according to guidelines. NIRS measurements were carried out by using Invos Monitor (Covidien; USA) for the first 15 min of life. Three NIRS transducers were attached on the forehead (rSO2brain), the right forearm (rSO2arm) and the left lower leg (rSO2leg). Two groups were compared based on need for RS: normal transition (NT) and RS group. In NT group rSO2brain increased over time and was significantly higher than rSO2arm, whereas in RS group rSO2brain and rSO2arm increased without significant differences. Courses of rSO2arm and rSO2leg increased over time and showed a converging pattern with initially lower values of rSO2leg in NT group and a diverging pattern with lower levels of rSO2leg in RS group. Overall, rSO2 levels were higher in NT compared to RS group. Our findings indicate that the decreased rSO2 levels in RS group compared to NT group are not only caused by lower arterial oxygen saturation levels, but also by a compromised perfusion even in infants with only mild respiratory distress.

  16. Induction of Filament Formation and Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, M.; Sicard, N.

    1970-01-01

    The study of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli K-12 carrying mutations which control filament formation after ultraviolet irradiation showed that there is not necessarily a relationship between filament formation and thymineless death. PMID:4908682

  17. Effect of Certain Antimetabolites and of Chloramphenicol on Conjugation of E. coli K-12,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    organisms. The authors studied the effect of chloramphenicol, 5-bromouracil (5-BU), and 8-azaguanine (8-AG) on the conjugation of E . coli K-12 on the transfer of genetic markers from the donor to the recipient.

  18. Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach: K - 12 Formal Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolone, Lindsay; Smith, D. A.; Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B. L.; Universe Professional Development Collaborative, Multiwavelength; NASA Data Collaborative, Use of; SEPOF K-12 Formal Education Working Group; E/PO Community, SMD

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its education and public outreach (E/PO) community through a coordinated effort to enhance the coherence and efficiency of SMD-funded E/PO programs. The Forums foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present opportunities for the astronomy community to participate in collaborations supporting the NASA SMD efforts in the K - 12 Formal Education community. Members of the K - 12 Formal Education community include classroom educators, homeschool educators, students, and curriculum developers. The Forums’ efforts for the K - 12 Formal Education community include a literature review, appraisal of educators’ needs, coordination of audience-based NASA resources and opportunities, professional development, and support with the Next Generation Science Standards. Learn how to join in our collaborative efforts to support the K - 12 Formal Education community based upon mutual needs and interests.

  19. K12 Education Program Lessons Learned at the Center for Earthquake Research and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G. L.; Dry, M.

    2003-12-01

    The Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis has been committed to increasing awareness for Seismic Hazard, Earthquake Engineering, and Earth Science among Mid-America's policy-makers, engineers, emergency managers, the general public, and K-12 teachers and students for nearly three decades. During that time we have learned many lessons related to providing effective education and outreach programs, especially for K-12 students. The lessons learned from these activities may be particularly appropriate for other regions where large earthquakes occur infrequently but have disproportionately high consequence areas due to low attenuation of seismic waves. Effective education programs in these settings must provide a consistent message across many states to a wide variety of socio-economic groups and professional communities through the leveraged resources of various groups and agencies. It is also beneficial to hire and train staff with K-12 teaching experience to work directly K-12 education organizations, and science curriculum coordinators.

  20. Significant glial alterations in response to iron loading in a novel organotypic hippocampal slice culture model

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Sinead; McMahon, Jill; Owens, Peter; FitzGerald, Una

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant iron deposition in the brain is associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. To study the collective response to iron loading, we have used hippocampal organotypic slices as a platform to develop a novel ex vivo model of iron accumulation. We demonstrated differential uptake and toxicity of iron after 12 h exposure to 10 μM ferrous ammonium sulphate, ferric citrate or ferrocene. Having established the supremacy of ferrocene in this model, the cultures were then loaded with 0.1–100 μM ferrocene for 12 h. One μM ferrocene exposure produced the maximal 1.6-fold increase in iron compared with vehicle. This was accompanied by a 1.4-fold increase in ferritin transcripts and mild toxicity. Using dual-immunohistochemistry, we detected ferritin in oligodendrocytes, microglia, but rarely in astrocytes and never in neurons in iron-loaded slice cultures. Moreover, iron loading led to a 15% loss of olig2-positive cells and a 16% increase in number and greater activation of microglia compared with vehicle. However, there was no appreciable effect of iron loading on astrocytes. In what we believe is a significant advance on traditional mono- or dual-cultures, our novel ex vivo slice-culture model allows characterization of the collective response of brain cells to iron-loading. PMID:27808258

  1. Grapevine phenolic compounds in xylem sap and tissues are significantly altered during infection by Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Christopher M; Chen, Jianchi

    2012-09-01

    Pierce's disease of grapevine (PD), caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, remains a serious problem for grape production in California and elsewhere. This research examined induction of phenolic compounds in grapevines ('Thompson Seedless') infected with X. fastidiosa over a 6-month period. Two months postinoculation with X. fastidiosa, catechin, digalloylquinic acid, and astringin were found at greater levels in xylem sap; multiple catechins, procyanidins, and stilbenoids were found at greater levels in xylem tissues; and precursors to lignin and condensed tannins were found at greater levels in xylem cell walls. However, such large-scale inductions of phenolic compounds were not observed 4 months after inoculation. Six months after inoculation, infected plants had significantly reduced phenolic levels in xylem sap and tissues when compared with control plants, including lowered levels of lignin and condensed tannins. At 6 months, PD symptoms were severe in infected plants and most photosynthetic tissue was abscised. These results suggest that, even though grapevine hosts may initially respond to X. fastidiosa infections with increased production of phenolic compounds, ultimately, PD causes grapevines to enter a state of decline whereby diseased hosts no longer have the resources to support secondary metabolite production, including defense-associated phenolic compounds.

  2. Dietary Mannoheptulose Does Not Significantly Alter Daily Energy Expenditure in Adult Labrador Retrievers

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Leslie L.; Root-McCaig, Jared; Wright, David; Davenport, Gary M.; France, James; Shoveller, Anna Kate

    2015-01-01

    Mannoheptulose (MH), a sugar found in avocados that inhibits glycolysis in vitro, has been preliminarily investigated as a novel food ingredient for dogs. This study aimed to determine the effects of dietary MH, delivered as an extract of un-ripened avocado, on energy expenditure (EE) in healthy adult Labrador Retriever dogs (total of 12 dogs, 26.99 ± 0.634 kg, 4.9 ± 0.2 y). The study was a double-blind, cross-over with each dog receiving both dietary treatments, control (CON) and MH (400 mg/kg of diet; 6 mg/kg BW), in random order. Resting and post-prandial (10 h) EE and respiratory quotient (RQ) were determined by indirect calorimetry (d 42). The following day, body composition was assessed using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Continuous activity monitoring was conducted using an Atical® accelerometer (d 43–47). A vastus lateralis muscle biopsy was obtained prior to the morning meal (d 49) and 4 h after consumption of their meal (d 56) to determine the protein content and phosphorylation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Diet did not affect body weight, resting EE or skeletal muscle AMPK phosphorylation. Dogs fed MH had significantly lower post-prandial RQ (p = 0.02) and ratio of fat to lean body mass (p = 0.02). Physical activity during light time periods (but not dark) was lower in dogs fed MH (p < 0.05) during weekends, but not on weekdays. These results suggest that MH affects energy balance of adult dogs, but that these effects are not dose dependent and not due to physical activity. PMID:26656105

  3. Recent trends in vegetation greenness in China significantly altered annual evapotranspiration and water yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yibo; Xiao, Jingfeng; Ju, Weimin; Xu, Ke; Zhou, Yanlian; Zhao, Yuntai

    2016-09-01

    There has been growing evidence that vegetation greenness has been increasing in many parts of the northern middle and high latitudes including China during the last three to four decades. However, the effects of increasing vegetation greenness particularly afforestation on the hydrological cycle have been controversial. We used a process-based ecosystem model and a satellite-derived leaf area index (LAI) dataset to examine how the changes in vegetation greenness affected annual evapotranspiration (ET) and water yield for China over the period from 2000 to 2014. Significant trends in vegetation greenness were observed in 26.1% of China’s land area. We used two model simulations driven with original and detrended LAI, respectively, to assess the effects of vegetation ‘greening’ and ‘browning’ on terrestrial ET and water yield. On a per-pixel basis, vegetation greening increased annual ET and decreased water yield, while vegetation browning reduced ET and increased water yield. At the large river basin and national scales, the greening trends also had positive effects on annual ET and had negative effects on water yield. Our results showed that the effects of the changes in vegetation greenness on the hydrological cycle varied with spatial scale. Afforestation efforts perhaps should focus on southern China with larger water supply given the water crisis in northern China and the negative effects of vegetation greening on water yield. Future studies on the effects of the greenness changes on the hydrological cycle are needed to account for the feedbacks to the climate.

  4. Long-term soil transplant simulating climate change with latitude significantly alters microbial temporal turnover.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Wang, Feng; Wen, Chongqing; Deng, Ye; Xue, Kai; Qin, Yujia; Yang, Yunfeng; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-12-01

    To understand soil microbial community stability and temporal turnover in response to climate change, a long-term soil transplant experiment was conducted in three agricultural experiment stations over large transects from a warm temperate zone (Fengqiu station in central China) to a subtropical zone (Yingtan station in southern China) and a cold temperate zone (Hailun station in northern China). Annual soil samples were collected from these three stations from 2005 to 2011, and microbial communities were analyzed by sequencing microbial 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicons using Illumina MiSeq technology. Our results revealed a distinctly differential pattern of microbial communities in both northward and southward transplantations, along with an increase in microbial richness with climate cooling and a corresponding decrease with climate warming. The microbial succession rate was estimated by the slope (w value) of linear regression of a log-transformed microbial community similarity with time (time-decay relationship). Compared with the low turnover rate of microbial communities in situ (w=0.046, P<0.001), the succession rate at the community level was significantly higher in the northward transplant (w=0.058, P<0.001) and highest in the southward transplant (w=0.094, P<0.001). Climate warming lead to a faster succession rate of microbial communities as well as lower species richness and compositional changes compared with in situ and climate cooling, which may be related to the high metabolic rates and intense competition under higher temperature. This study provides new insights into the impacts of climate change on the fundamental temporal scaling of soil microbial communities and microbial phylogenetic biodiversity.

  5. Long-term soil transplant simulating climate change with latitude significantly alters microbial temporal turnover

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Wang, Feng; Wen, Chongqing; Deng, Ye; Xue, Kai; Qin, Yujia; Yang, Yunfeng; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    To understand soil microbial community stability and temporal turnover in response to climate change, a long-term soil transplant experiment was conducted in three agricultural experiment stations over large transects from a warm temperate zone (Fengqiu station in central China) to a subtropical zone (Yingtan station in southern China) and a cold temperate zone (Hailun station in northern China). Annual soil samples were collected from these three stations from 2005 to 2011, and microbial communities were analyzed by sequencing microbial 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicons using Illumina MiSeq technology. Our results revealed a distinctly differential pattern of microbial communities in both northward and southward transplantations, along with an increase in microbial richness with climate cooling and a corresponding decrease with climate warming. The microbial succession rate was estimated by the slope (w value) of linear regression of a log-transformed microbial community similarity with time (time–decay relationship). Compared with the low turnover rate of microbial communities in situ (w=0.046, P<0.001), the succession rate at the community level was significantly higher in the northward transplant (w=0.058, P<0.001) and highest in the southward transplant (w=0.094, P<0.001). Climate warming lead to a faster succession rate of microbial communities as well as lower species richness and compositional changes compared with in situ and climate cooling, which may be related to the high metabolic rates and intense competition under higher temperature. This study provides new insights into the impacts of climate change on the fundamental temporal scaling of soil microbial communities and microbial phylogenetic biodiversity. PMID:25989371

  6. Clinical significance of altering epithelial-mesenchymal transition in metastatic lymph nodes of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Keishi; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Arigami, Takaaki; Yanagita, Shigehiro; Matsushita, Daisuke; Kijima, Takashi; Amatatsu, Masahiko; Uchikado, Yasuto; Kijima, Yuko; Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2017-02-28

    The E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and Snail genes are epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducible genes. Previous studies demonstrated that the expression of EMT markers in the primary tumor sites of gastric cancer correlates with tumor progression and prognosis. However, the clinical significance of the expression of these EMT markers in metastatic lymph nodes remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expression of these EMT markers in the primary tumor sites and metastatic lymph nodes. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and Snail in 89 primary tumors and 511 metastatic lymph nodes obtained from patients with gastric cancer. The weak expression of E-cadherin in tumors and lymph nodes increased with more lymph node metastasis and in more undifferentiated tumors. The strong expression of N-cadherin in lymph nodes correlated with more lymph nodes metastasis, an advanced stage, and poor prognosis. The weak expression of Snail in tumors correlated with lymphatic invasion. The strong expression of Snail in lymph nodes correlated with more lymph node metastasis and an advanced stage. The strong expression of Snail in tumors and its weak expression in lymph nodes correlated with more lymph node metastasis, an advanced stage, and poor prognosis. The expression of N-cadherin in metastatic lymph nodes is useful for predicting the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. The Snail switch-namely, the positive-to-negative conversion of the Snail status-between primary tumors and lymph node metastasis may be important for confirming EMT and mesenchymal-epithelial transition.

  7. Increase of energy balance significantly alters major lipogenic gene expression in lactation ewes.

    PubMed

    Laliotis, George P; Bizelis, Iosif; Vitsa, Alkistis; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine changes observed in the expression of cytosolic NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) genes, the major implicated genes in ruminant lipogenesis in terms of produce NADPH, during the early post-weaning period in dairy ewes in respect to energy intake, and to further correlate the noted changes with their respective enzymatic activities. A total of 21 subcutaneous adipose tissue samples were obtained from seven lactating (2nd lactation period) dairy ewes of the Chios breed. Adipose tissue samples were taken from the tail head region at weeks 1, 2, and 4 after weaning (45 days after parturition). Dairy ewes were in negative energy balance during weeks 1 and 2 after weaning and they moved into a strong positive energy balance at week 4 after weaning. Expression of ICDH and G6PD genes and their respective enzymatic activity was determined. Results showed that both genes' expression and enzymatic activities were significantly minimal at week 1 after weaning, reaching a maximum level at week 4 after weaning (P < 0.05). A 3.5-fold and a 5-fold increase of G6PD and ICDH mRNA levels were observed, respectively. Concerning their respective enzymatic activities, a 5.5-fold and 2-fold increase was noted, respectively. A positive correlation was found between ICDH and G6PD gene expression (P < 0.001) indicating a synchronized response to energy intake changes. Almost similar changes were observed for enzymatic activities, rendering these enzymes as potential biochemical markers of ovine lipogenesis. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  8. Genome sequence of the lantibiotic bacteriocin producer Streptococcus salivarius strain K12.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Caroline; Alvarez-Martin, Pablo; Foata, Francis; Renault, Pierre; Berger, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a prevalent commensal species of the oropharyngeal tract. S. salivarius strain K12 is an isolate from the saliva of a healthy child, used as an oral probiotic. Here, we report its genome sequence, i.e., the full sequence of the 190-kb megaplasmid pSsal-K12 and a high-quality draft 2.2-Gb chromosomal sequence.

  9. Genome Sequence of the Lantibiotic Bacteriocin Producer Streptococcus salivarius Strain K12

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Martin, Pablo; Foata, Francis; Renault, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a prevalent commensal species of the oropharyngeal tract. S. salivarius strain K12 is an isolate from the saliva of a healthy child, used as an oral probiotic. Here, we report its genome sequence, i.e., the full sequence of the 190-kb megaplasmid pSsal-K12 and a high-quality draft 2.2-Gb chromosomal sequence. PMID:23045482

  10. Development of an Attitude Scale to Assess K-12 Teachers' Attitudes toward Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yu-Ling

    2012-05-01

    To maximize the contributions of nanotechnology to this society, at least 60 countries have put efforts into this field. In Taiwan, a government-funded K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was established to train K-12 teachers with adequate nanotechnology literacy to foster the next generation of Taiwanese people with sufficient knowledge in nanotechnology. In the present study, the Nanotechnology Attitude Scale for K-12 teachers (NAS-T) was developed to assess K-12 teachers' attitudes toward nanotechnology. The NAS-T included 23 Likert-scale items that can be grouped into three components: importance of nanotechnology, affective tendencies in science teaching, and behavioural tendencies to teach nanotechnology. A sample of 233 K-12 teachers who have participated in the K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was included in the present study to investigate the psychometric properties of the NAS-T. The exploratory factor analysis of this teacher sample suggested that the NAS-T was a three-factor model that explained 64.11% of the total variances. This model was also confirmed by the confirmatory factor analysis to validate the factor structure of the NAS-T. The Cronbach's alpha values of three NAS-T subscales ranged from 0.89 to 0.95. Moderate to strong correlations among teachers' NAS-T domain scores, self-perception of own nanoscience knowledge, and their science-teaching efficacy demonstrated good convergent validity of the NAS-T. As a whole, psychometric properties of the NAS-T indicated that this instrument is an effective instrument for assessing K-12 teachers' attitudes toward nanotechnology. The NAS-T will serve as a valuable tool to evaluate teachers' attitude changes after participating in the K-12 Nanotechnology Programme.

  11. Plasmid encoded antibiotics inhibit protozoan predation of Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    Ahmetagic, Adnan; Philip, Daniel S; Sarovich, Derek S; Kluver, Daniel W; Pemberton, John M

    2011-09-01

    Bacterial plasmids and phages encode the synthesis of toxic molecules that inhibit protozoan predation. One such toxic molecule is violacein, a purple pigmented, anti-tumour antibiotic produced by the Gram-negative soil bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum. In the current experiments a range of Escherichia coli K12 strains were genetically engineered to produce violacein and a number of its coloured, biosynthetic intermediates. A bactivorous predatory protozoan isolate, Colpoda sp.A4, was isolated from soil and tested for its ability to 'graze' on various violacein producing strains of E. coli K12. A grazing assay was developed based on protozoan "plaque" formation. Using this assay, E. coli K12 strains producing violacein were highly resistant to protozoan predation. However E. coli K12 strains producing violacein intermediates, showed low or no resistance to predation. In separate experiments, when either erythromycin or pentachlorophenol were added to the plaque assay medium, protozoan predation of E. coli K12 was markedly reduced. The inhibitory effects of these two molecules were removed if E. coli K12 strains were genetically engineered to inactivate the toxic molecules. In the case of erythromycin, the E. coli K12 assay strain was engineered to produce an erythromycin inactivating esterase, PlpA. For pentachlorophenol, the E. coli K12 assay strain was engineered to produce a PCP inactivating enzyme pentachlorophenol-4-monooxygenase (PcpB). This study indicates that in environments containing large numbers of protozoa, bacteria which use efflux pumps to remove toxins unchanged from the cell may have an evolutionary advantage over bacteria which enzymatically inactivate toxins.

  12. A randomized trial of ACT bibliotherapy on the mental health of K-12 teachers and staff.

    PubMed

    Jeffcoat, Tami; Hayes, Steven C

    2012-09-01

    The mental health challenges of some vocations present a challenge for current intervention models. Bibliotherapy focused on transdiagnostic processes that might both prevent and alleviate a range of mental health distress could be an effective and practical approach. K-12 school personnel (N = 236; 91% female; 30-60 years old) responding to a wellness-oriented program announcement were randomized to receive an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) self-help volume or to a waitlist. Three-fourths were above clinical cutoffs in general mental health, depression, anxiety, or stress. Participants read the book for two months, completed exercises and quizzes, and after post assessment were followed for 10 weeks; waitlist participants were then also given the book with two months to complete it. Overall, participants showed significant improvement in psychological health. Significant preventive effects for depression and anxiety were observed along with significant ameliorative effects for those in the clinical ranges of depression, anxiety and stress. Follow up general mental health, depression, and anxiety outcomes were related to the manner in which participants used the workbook and to post levels of psychological flexibility.

  13. Stock culture heterogeneity rather than new mutational variation complicates short-term cell physiology studies of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Nahku, Ranno; Peebo, Karl; Valgepea, Kaspar; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2011-09-01

    Nutrient-limited continuous cultures in chemostats have been used to study microbial cell physiology for over 60 years. Genome instability and genetic heterogeneity are possible uncontrolled factors in continuous cultivation experiments. We investigated these issues by using high-throughput (HT) DNA sequencing to characterize samples from different phases of a glucose-limited accelerostat (A-stat) experiment with Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 and a duration regularly used in cell physiology studies (20 generations of continuous cultivation). Seven consensus mutations from the reference sequence and five subpopulations characterized by different mutations were detected in the HT-sequenced samples. This genetic heterogeneity was confirmed to result from the stock culture by Sanger sequencing. All the subpopulations in which allele frequencies increased (betA, cspG/cspH, glyA) during the experiment were also present at the end of replicate A-stats, indicating that no new subpopulations emerged during our experiments. The fact that ~31 % of the cells in our initial cultures obtained directly from a culture stock centre were mutants raises concerns that even if cultivations are started from single colonies, there is a significant chance of picking a mutant clone with an altered phenotype. Our results show that current HT DNA sequencing technology allows accurate subpopulation analysis and demonstrates that a glucose-limited E. coli K-12 MG1655 A-stat experiment with a duration of tens of generations is suitable for studying cell physiology and collecting quantitative data for metabolic modelling without interference from new mutations.

  14. Cryomilling-induced solid dispersion of poor glass forming/poorly water-soluble mefenamic acid with polyvinylpyrrolidone K12.

    PubMed

    Kang, Naewon; Lee, Jangmi; Choi, Ji Na; Mao, Chen; Lee, Eun Hee

    2015-06-01

    The effect of mechanical impact on the polymorphic transformation of mefenamic acid (MFA) and the formation of a solid dispersion of mefenamic acid, a poor glass forming/poorly-water soluble compound, with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K12 was investigated. The implication of solid dispersion formation on solubility enhancement of MFA, prepared by cryomilling, was investigated. Solid state characterization was conducted using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with crystal structure analysis. Apparent solubility of the mixtures in pH 7.4 buffer was measured. A calculation to compare the powder patterns and FTIR spectra of solid dispersions with the corresponding physical mixtures was conducted. Solid state characterization showed that (1) MFA I transformed to MFA II when pure MFA I was cryogenically milled (CM); and (2) MFA forms a solid dispersion when MFA was cryogenically milled with PVP K12. FTIR spectral analysis showed that hydrogen bonding facilitated by mechanical impact played a major role in forming solid dispersions. The apparent solubility of MFA was significantly improved by making a solid dispersion with PVP K12 via cryomilling. This study highlights the importance of cryomilling with a good hydrogen bond forming excipient as a technique to prepare solid dispersion, especially when a compound shows a poor glass forming ability and therefore, is not easy to form amorphous forms by conventional method.

  15. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Required for Swarming Motility in Escherichia coli K-12▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tetsuyoshi; Shingaki, Ryuji; Hirose, Shotaro; Waki, Kaori; Mori, Hirotada; Fukui, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 has the ability to migrate on semisolid media by means of swarming motility. A systematic and comprehensive collection of gene-disrupted E. coli K-12 mutants (the Keio collection) was used to identify the genes involved in the swarming motility of this bacterium. Of the 3,985 nonessential gene mutants, 294 were found to exhibit a strongly repressed-swarming phenotype. Further, 216 of the 294 mutants displayed no significant defects in swimming motility; therefore, the 216 genes were considered to be specifically associated with the swarming phenotype. The swarming-associated genes were classified into various functional categories, indicating that swarming is a specialized form of motility that requires a wide variety of cellular activities. These genes include genes for tricarboxylic acid cycle and glucose metabolism, iron acquisition, chaperones and protein-folding catalysts, signal transduction, and biosynthesis of cell surface components, such as lipopolysaccharide, the enterobacterial common antigen, and type 1 fimbriae. Lipopolysaccharide and the enterobacterial common antigen may be important surface-acting components that contribute to the reduction of surface tension, thereby facilitating the swarm migration in the E. coli K-12 strain. PMID:17122336

  16. ETUDE AU MICROSCOPE ELECTRONIQUE DES TRANSFORMATIONS NUCLEAIRES DE E. COLI K12 S ET K12 S (λ26) APRES IRRADIATION AUX RAYONS ULTRAVIOLETS ET AUX RAYONS X

    PubMed Central

    Ryter, Antoinette

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear transformations induced in E. coli K12S and K12S(λ26) by ultraviolet radiations and x-rays have been studied with ultrathin sections in the electron microscope. The nucleoplasm keeps its normal aspect during "fragmentation" and during "condensation" of the nucleus into the "vesicular" form. Serial sections show that the "fragmented" nucleus consists in reality of only one very tortuous vacuole. No difference either in the shape or in the fine structure of the nucleus could be observed between the lysogenic strain and the non-lysogenic strain. A high concentration of NaCl has a "condensation" effect on the fragmented nuclei and decreases the induction rate. PMID:13745076

  17. The commensal Streptococcus salivarius K12 downregulates the innate immune responses of human epithelial cells and promotes host-microbe homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cosseau, Celine; Devine, Deirdre A; Dullaghan, Edie; Gardy, Jennifer L; Chikatamarla, Avinash; Gellatly, Shaan; Yu, Lorraine L; Pistolic, Jelena; Falsafi, Reza; Tagg, John; Hancock, Robert E W

    2008-09-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an early colonizer of human oral and nasopharyngeal epithelia, and strain K12 has reported probiotic effects. An emerging paradigm indicates that commensal bacteria downregulate immune responses through the action on NF-kappaB signaling pathways, but additional mechanisms underlying probiotic actions are not well understood. Our objective here was to identify host genes specifically targeted by K12 by comparing their responses with responses elicited by pathogens and to determine if S. salivarius modulates epithelial cell immune responses. RNA was extracted from human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14O- cells) cocultured with K12 or bacterial pathogens. cDNA was hybridized to a human 21K oligonucleotide-based array. Data were analyzed using ArrayPipe, InnateDB, PANTHER, and oPOSSUM. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) and growth-regulated oncogene alpha (Groalpha) secretion were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was demonstrated that S. salivarius K12 specifically altered the expression of 565 host genes, particularly those involved in multiple innate defense pathways, general epithelial cell function and homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, cell development and migration, and signaling pathways. It inhibited baseline IL-8 secretion and IL-8 responses to LL-37, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and flagellin in epithelial cells and attenuated Groalpha secretion in response to flagellin. Immunosuppression was coincident with the inhibition of activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. Thus, the commensal and probiotic behaviors of S. salivarius K12 are proposed to be due to the organism (i) eliciting no proinflammatory response, (ii) stimulating an anti-inflammatory response, and (iii) modulating genes associated with adhesion to the epithelial layer and homeostasis. S. salivarius K12 might thereby ensure that it is tolerated by the host and maintained on the epithelial surface while actively protecting the host from inflammation and apoptosis

  18. Points of View: Effective Partnerships between K-12 and Higher Education--Moving from Outreach to Partnership: Striving for Articulation and Reform across the K-20+ Science Education Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Erin; Tanner, Kimberly

    2005-01-01

    One would be hard-pressed to find a college or university in the United States without at least one outreach program designed to support science education in local K-12 schools. Over the last three decades, scores of thriving science education outreach programs have had significant and extraordinarily positive effects on K-12 science education. In…

  19. Points of View: Effective Partnerships between K-12 and Higher Education--Moving from Outreach to Partnership: Striving for Articulation and Reform across the K-20+ Science Education Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Erin; Tanner, Kimberly

    2005-01-01

    One would be hard-pressed to find a college or university in the United States without at least one outreach program designed to support science education in local K-12 schools. Over the last three decades, scores of thriving science education outreach programs have had significant and extraordinarily positive effects on K-12 science education. In…

  20. Suppression of lex Mutations Affecting Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair in Escherichia coli K-12 by Closely Linked Thermosensitive Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mount, David W.; Walker, Anita C.; Kosel, C.

    1973-01-01

    A major class of ultraviolet (UV)-resistant derivatives of lex− strains of Escherichia coli K-12 grows normally at 30 C but at 42.5 C fails to produce colonies on complete or minimal agar. At 42.5 C these thermosensitive strains form filaments without septa, due to an apparent defect in cell division. Deoxyribonucleic acid degradation in UV-irradiated cultures of the thermosensitive strains is slow, in contrast to the rapid degradation in UV-irradiated cultures of the parental lex− strains. The thermosensitive mutations (tsl) are tightly linked (less than 0.04 min on the E. coli K-12 linkage map) to the site of the lex mutation in the parental strain and could lie within the same gene. The tsl+/tsl− heterozygotes grow at 42.5 C and are UV resistant when grown at 30 or 42.5 C. The tsl mutations are, therefore, recessive in contrast to lex mutations, which are dominant. It appears likely that the tsl mutations alter the diffusible product that gives rise to the Lex− mutant phenotype. This product appears to be necessary for deoxyribonucleic acid repair and cell division. PMID:4583257

  1. Developing Partnerships between Higher Education Faculty, K-12 Science Teachers, and School Administrators via MSP initiatives: The RITES Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulkins, J. L.; Kortz, K. M.; Murray, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science Project (RITES) is a NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership (MSP) project that seeks to improve science education. RITES is, at its core, a unique partnership that fosters relationships between middle and high school science teachers, district and school administrators, higher education (HE) faculty members, and science education researchers. Their common goal is to enhance scientific inquiry, increase classroom technology usage, and improve state level science test scores. In one of the more visible examples of this partnership, middle and high school science teachers work closely with HE science faculty partners to design and teach professional development (PD) workshops. The PD sessions focus on technology-enhanced scientific investigations (e.g. use of probes, online simulations, etc.), exemplify inquiry-based instruction, and relate expert content knowledge. Teachers from these sessions express substantial satisfaction in the program, report increased comfort levels in teaching the presented materials (both via post-workshop surveys), and show significant gains in content knowledge (via pre-post assessments). Other benefits to this kind of partnership, in which K-12 and HE teachers are considered equals, include: 1) K-12 teachers are empowered through interactions with HE faculty and other science teachers in the state; 2) HE instructors become more informed not only about good pedagogical practices, but also practical aspects of teaching science such as engaging students; and 3) the PD sessions tend to be much stronger than ones designed and presented solely by HE scientists, for while HE instructors provide content expertise, K-12 teachers provide expertise in K-12 classroom practice and implementation. Lastly, the partnership is mutually beneficial for the partners involved because both sides learn practical ways to teach science and inquiry at different levels. In addition to HE faculty and K-12 science teacher

  2. All About Frozen Ground, an Educational On-line Resource for K-12 Students and Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, E.; Zhang, T.

    2008-12-01

    How do you design a site that will meet the needs of teachers and students and actually be used in the classroom, when there are millions of Web sites competing for their attention? Many science centers, including the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), strive to meet the informational needs of the general public without specifically targeting educators, who desire Web material that is prepackaged for use in the classroom. In creating a new educational Web site, we wanted to develop our materials to ensure the content is used by educators in the classroom, seeking collaborators beyond our organization. Noting a lack of on-line information geared to the public on frozen ground and its significance to global climate, we are developing a Web site, All About Frozen Ground, to assist K-12 students, teachers and the public to understand frozen ground, its relation to the climate system, and its impact on engineering in cold regions. NSIDC partnered with scientists, writers, teachers, and an evaluator to make certain the content meets science standards and the requirements and interests of teachers and their students. Following accepted evaluation procedures, we will test the material in the classroom and through on-line surveys, and use the feedback to improve the Web site and its accompanying educational materials.

  3. Brain Based Learning: K-12 Teachers' Preferred Methods of Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Donna Lachman

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate Brain Based Learning (BBL) techniques in teaching science. Participants included 216 K-12, full-time, regular education teachers from 8 Northeast Tennessee school systems who taught at least 1 science class. Specifically this research was guided by 7 research questions on teachers' perceptions and practices in teaching science. Data were collected by a survey that consisted of 82 statements where teachers rated their level of agreement and was distributed online via Survey Monkey. The first portion of my survey included demographic identifiers, teachers' knowledge of the term BBL, and inquiries regarding science background and training. The remainder of the statements were focused on teachers' perceptions and practices of BBL strategies in teaching science. The final item was open-ended and allowed teachers to share comments related to teaching science. For statements 6-81, participants responded by using a 5-point Likert scale that ranged from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 ( strongly agree). Quantitative data were analyzed with a series of independent samples t tests, one-way analysis of variance tests, and a Pearson correlation coefficient. The results of the study indicate that teachers' perceptions are positively correlated to their self-reported practices. Females, in general, and elementary teachers tend to practice BBL strategies in teaching science significantly more than other subgroups.

  4. Environmental and genetic factors that contribute to Escherichia coli K-12 biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Prüss, Birgit M; Verma, Karan; Samanta, Priyankar; Sule, Preeti; Kumar, Sunil; Wu, Jianfei; Christianson, David; Horne, Shelley M; Stafslien, Shane J; Wolfe, Alan J; Denton, Anne

    2010-09-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria whose formation on surfaces requires a large portion of the bacteria's transcriptional network. To identify environmental conditions and transcriptional regulators that contribute to sensing these conditions, we used a high-throughput approach to monitor biofilm biomass produced by an isogenic set of Escherichia coli K-12 strains grown under combinations of environmental conditions. Of the environmental combinations, growth in tryptic soy broth at 37 degrees C supported the most biofilm production. To analyze the complex relationships between the diverse cell-surface organelles, transcriptional regulators, and metabolic enzymes represented by the tested mutant set, we used a novel vector-item pattern-mining algorithm. The algorithm related biofilm amounts to the functional annotations of each mutated protein. The pattern with the best statistical significance was the gene ontology 'pyruvate catabolic process,' which is associated with enzymes of acetate metabolism. Phenotype microarray experiments illustrated that carbon sources that are metabolized to acetyl-coenzyme A, acetyl phosphate, and acetate are particularly supportive of biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed structural differences between mutants that lack acetate metabolism enzymes and their parent and confirmed the quantitative differences. We conclude that acetate metabolism functions as a metabolic sensor, transmitting changes in environmental conditions to biofilm biomass and structure.

  5. A preliminary study of the effect of probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 on oral malodour parameters.

    PubMed

    Burton, J P; Chilcott, C N; Moore, C J; Speiser, G; Tagg, J R

    2006-04-01

    To determine whether dosing with bacteriocin-producing Streptococcus salivarius following an antimicrobial mouthwash effects a change in oral malodour parameters and in the composition of the oral microbiota of subjects with halitosis. Twenty-three subjects with halitosis undertook a 3-day regimen of chlorhexidine (CHX) mouth rinsing, followed at intervals by the use of lozenges containing either S. salivarius K12 or placebo. Assessment of the subjects' volatile sulphur compound (VSC) levels 1 week after treatment initiation showed that 85% of the K12-treated group and 30% of the placebo group had substantial (>100 ppb) reductions. The bacterial composition of the saliva was monitored by culture and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Changes in the PCR-DGGE profiles occurred in most subjects following K12 treatment. In vitro testing showed that S. salivarius K12 suppressed the growth of black-pigmented bacteria in saliva samples and also in various reference strains of bacteria implicated in halitosis. Administration of bacteriocin-producing S. salivarius after an oral antimicrobial mouthwash reduces oral VSC levels. The outcome of this preliminary study indicates that the replacement of bacteria implicated in halitosis by colonization with competitive bacteria such as S. salivarius K12 may provide an effective strategy to reduce the severity of halitosis.

  6. Effects of sound exposure on the growth and intracellular macromolecular synthesis of E. coli k-12.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shaobin; Zhang, Yongzhu; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, as one of the primary producers of the biosphere, play an important role in ecosystems. Exploring the mechanism of adaptation and resistance of microbial population to various environmental factors has come into focus in the fields of modern microbial ecology and molecular ecology. However, facing the increasingly serious problem of acoustic pollution, very few efforts have been put forth into studying the relation of single cell organisms and sound field exposure. Herein, we studied the biological effects of sound exposure on the growth of E. coli K-12 with different acoustic parameters. The effects of sound exposure on the intracellular macromolecular synthesis and cellular morphology of E. coli K-12 were also analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that E. coli K-12 exposed to sound waves owned a higher biomass and a faster specific growth rate compared to the control group. Also, the average length of E. coli K-12 cells increased more than 27.26%. The maximum biomass and maximum specific growth rate of the stimulation group by 8000 Hz, 80dB sound wave was about 1.7 times and 2.5 times that of the control group, respectively. Moreover, it was observed that E. coli K-12 can respond rapidly to sound stress at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by promoting the synthesis of intracellular RNA and total protein. Some potential mechanisms may be involved in the responses of bacterial cells to sound stress.

  7. Effects of sound exposure on the growth and intracellular macromolecular synthesis of E. coli k-12

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongzhu; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, as one of the primary producers of the biosphere, play an important role in ecosystems. Exploring the mechanism of adaptation and resistance of microbial population to various environmental factors has come into focus in the fields of modern microbial ecology and molecular ecology. However, facing the increasingly serious problem of acoustic pollution, very few efforts have been put forth into studying the relation of single cell organisms and sound field exposure. Herein, we studied the biological effects of sound exposure on the growth of E. coli K-12 with different acoustic parameters. The effects of sound exposure on the intracellular macromolecular synthesis and cellular morphology of E. coli K-12 were also analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that E. coli K-12 exposed to sound waves owned a higher biomass and a faster specific growth rate compared to the control group. Also, the average length of E. coli K-12 cells increased more than 27.26%. The maximum biomass and maximum specific growth rate of the stimulation group by 8000 Hz, 80dB sound wave was about 1.7 times and 2.5 times that of the control group, respectively. Moreover, it was observed that E. coli K-12 can respond rapidly to sound stress at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by promoting the synthesis of intracellular RNA and total protein. Some potential mechanisms may be involved in the responses of bacterial cells to sound stress. PMID:27077011

  8. The adipokine leptin increases skeletal muscle mass and significantly alters skeletal muscle miRNA expression profile in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, Mark W.; Herberg, Samuel; Arounleut, Phonepasong; He, Hong-Zhi; Shiver, Austin; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhou, Li; Isales, Carlos M.; and others

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Aging is associated with muscle atrophy and loss of muscle mass, known as the sarcopenia of aging. {yields} We demonstrate that age-related muscle atrophy is associated with marked changes in miRNA expression in muscle. {yields} Treating aged mice with the adipokine leptin significantly increased muscle mass and the expression of miRNAs involved in muscle repair. {yields} Recombinant leptin therapy may therefore be a novel approach for treating age-related muscle atrophy. -- Abstract: Age-associated loss of muscle mass, or sarcopenia, contributes directly to frailty and an increased risk of falls and fractures among the elderly. Aged mice and elderly adults both show decreased muscle mass as well as relatively low levels of the fat-derived hormone leptin. Here we demonstrate that loss of muscle mass and myofiber size with aging in mice is associated with significant changes in the expression of specific miRNAs. Aging altered the expression of 57 miRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle, and many of these miRNAs are now reported to be associated specifically with age-related muscle atrophy. These include miR-221, previously identified in studies of myogenesis and muscle development as playing a role in the proliferation and terminal differentiation of myogenic precursors. We also treated aged mice with recombinant leptin, to determine whether leptin therapy could improve muscle mass and alter the miRNA expression profile of aging skeletal muscle. Leptin treatment significantly increased hindlimb muscle mass and extensor digitorum longus fiber size in aged mice. Furthermore, the expression of 37 miRNAs was altered in muscles of leptin-treated mice. In particular, leptin treatment increased the expression of miR-31 and miR-223, miRNAs known to be elevated during muscle regeneration and repair. These findings suggest that aging in skeletal muscle is associated with marked changes in the expression of specific miRNAs, and that nutrient

  9. Clinically significant copy number alterations and complex rearrangements of MYB and NFIB in head and neck adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Persson, Marta; Andrén, Ywonne; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Frierson, Henry F; Cooke, Susanna L; Futreal, Philip Andrew; Kling, Teresia; Nelander, Sven; Nordkvist, Anders; Persson, Fredrik; Stenman, Göran

    2012-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the head and neck is a malignant tumor with poor long-term prognosis. Besides the recently identified MYB-NFIB fusion oncogene generated by a t(6;9) translocation, little is known about other genetic alterations in ACC. Using high-resolution, array-based comparative genomic hybridization, and massively paired-end sequencing, we explored genomic alterations in 40 frozen ACCs. Eighty-six percent of the tumors expressed MYB-NFIB fusion transcripts and 97% overexpressed MYB mRNA, indicating that MYB activation is a hallmark of ACC. Thirty-five recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) were detected, including losses involving 12q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 14q, 1p, and 5q and gains involving 1q, 9p, and 22q. Grade III tumors had on average a significantly higher number of CNAs/tumor compared to Grade I and II tumors (P = 0.007). Losses of 1p, 6q, and 15q were associated with high-grade tumors, whereas losses of 14q were exclusively seen in Grade I tumors. The t(6;9) rearrangements were associated with a complex pattern of breakpoints, deletions, insertions, inversions, and for 9p also gains. Analyses of fusion-negative ACCs using high-resolution arrays and massively paired-end sequencing revealed that MYB may also be deregulated by other mechanisms in addition to gene fusion. Our studies also identified several down-regulated candidate tumor suppressor genes (CTNNBIP1, CASP9, PRDM2, and SFN) in 1p36.33-p35.3 that may be of clinical significance in high-grade tumors. Further, studies of these and other potential target genes may lead to the identification of novel driver genes in ACC.

  10. Does degree of alteration in effort sense caused by eccentric exercise significantly affect initial exercise hyperpnea in humans?

    PubMed

    Hotta, Norio; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Ogata, Hisayoshi; Maher, Patrick; Okumura, Naoya; Ishida, Koji

    2016-08-24

    Previous research has shown an exaggeration in exercise hyperpnea 2 days after eccentric exercise (ECC). Enhancement in central command has been suggested as one candidate to account for this effect given that ECC-induced neuromuscular dysfunction increases relative exercise intensity, thus resulting in reinforcement of effort sense. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to elucidate whether the degree of alteration in effort sense caused by ECC affects exercise hyperpnea. Ten subjects performed 20-s single-arm extension-flexion exercises with weight strapped to the wrist, and ventilatory response was measured before (Pre) and 2 days after ECC (D2). Relative exercise intensity at Pre was 5 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of Pre, whereas that at D2 was 9 % MVC of D2 because of decline in muscle strength. Ventilatory responses were significantly exaggerated at D2 with a significant increase in effort sense. Although effort sense was significantly reduced during exercise at D2 when wrist weight was subtracted to match relative exercise intensity at Pre (5 % MVC of D2), ventilatory responses were still significantly higher than those of Pre. After the disappearance of post-ECC muscle damage, subjects performed the same exercise with weight added (9 % MVC of Pre) so that effort was equalized to match that of D2; however, no significant increase in ventilatory response was detected. The fact that the extent of change in effort sense caused by ECC-induced neuromuscular dysfunction did not affect ventilatory response at the onset of exercise after ECC may suggest that the exaggeration of ventilatory response after ECC is caused by mechanisms other than alteration of the central command.

  11. Offering Preservice Teachers Field Experiences in K-12 Online Learning: A National Survey of Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Kathryn; Archambault, Leanna

    2012-01-01

    Enrollment in K-12 online learning is growing at an exponential rate throughout the United States. Currently, all 50 states offer K-12 online learning opportunities. Some states such as Michigan, Alabama, New Mexico, and Idaho have passed legislative measures requiring K-12 students to complete at least one online learning experience by the time…

  12. A Longitudinal Study of the Effectiveness of a K-12 Engagement Program on Graduate Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Faith; Gong, Ruiyang; Harbor, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Programs that connect higher and K-12 education provide benefits to K-12 students, teachers, and higher education. The National Science Foundation (NSF) invested in programs connecting domestic STEM graduate students with K-12 education for over a decade (GK-12), intending that such engagement would help achieve graduate student learning outcomes…

  13. The Engaged Microbiologist: Bringing the Microbiological Sciences to the K-12 Community.

    PubMed

    Westenberg, David J

    2016-03-01

    Exposing K-12 students to cutting edge science that impacts their daily lives can bring classroom lessons to life. Citizen-science projects are an excellent way to bring high-level science to the classroom and help satisfy one of the cornerstone concepts of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), "engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use." This can be a daunting task for teachers who may lack the background or resources to integrate these projects into the classroom. This is where scientific societies such as the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) can play a critical role. ASM encourages its members to engage with the K-12 community by providing networking opportunities and resources for ASM members and K-12 teachers to work together to bring microbiology into the classroom. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  14. Prognostic Significance of Remote Myocardium Alterations Assessed by Quantitative Noncontrast T1 Mapping in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Reinstadler, Sebastian J; Stiermaier, Thomas; Liebetrau, Johanna; Fuernau, Georg; Eitel, Charlotte; de Waha, Suzanne; Desch, Steffen; Reil, Jan-Christian; Pöss, Janine; Metzler, Bernhard; Lücke, Christian; Gutberlet, Matthias; Schuler, Gerhard; Thiele, Holger; Eitel, Ingo

    2017-06-09

    This study assessed the prognostic significance of remote zone native T1 alterations for the prediction of clinical events in a population with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who were treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) and compared it with conventional markers of infarct severity. The exact role and incremental prognostic relevance of remote myocardium native T1 mapping alterations assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) after STEMI remains unclear. We included 255 consecutive patients with STEMI who were reperfused within 12 h after symptom onset. CMR core laboratory analysis was performed to assess left ventricular (LV) function, standard infarct characteristics, and native T1 values of the remote, noninfarcted myocardium. The primary endpoint was a composite of death, reinfarction, and new congestive heart failure within 6 months (major adverse cardiac events [MACE]). Patients with increased remote zone native T1 values (>1,129 ms) had significantly larger infarcts (p = 0.012), less myocardial salvage (p = 0.002), and more pronounced LV dysfunction (p = 0.011). In multivariable analysis, remote zone native T1 was independently associated with MACE after adjusting for clinical risk factors (p = 0.001) or other CMR variables (p = 0.007). In C-statistics, native T1 of remote myocardium provided incremental prognostic information beyond clinical risk factors, LV ejection fraction, and other markers of infarct severity (all p < 0.05). The addition of remote zone native T1 to a model of prognostic CMR parameters (ejection fraction, infarct size, and myocardial salvage index) led to net reclassification improvement of 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.46 to 1.17; p < 0.001) and to an integrated discrimination improvement of 0.07 (95% confidence interval: 0.02 to 0.13; p = 0.01). In STEMI patients treated by PPCI, evaluation of remote zone alterations by quantitative noncontrast T1 mapping provided independent

  15. K-12 Teacher Understanding of Energy Conservation: Conceptual Metaphor, Dissipation, and Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daane, Abigail R.

    In K-12 educational settings, conservation of energy is typically presented in two ways: the conservation of energy principle (energy is neither created nor destroyed) and the sociopolitical need to conserve energy (we guard against energy being used up). These two meanings of conservation typically remain disconnected from each other and can appear contradictory, even after instruction. In an effort to support teachers in building robust understandings of energy from their existing knowledge, I designed a study to investigate the productive ideas in K-12 teachers' conversations about energy. A micro-analysis of discourse, gestures, and artifacts of professional development courses revealed teachers' productive ideas about three aspects of energy: conceptual metaphor, dissipation and degradation. In learning about energy, K-12 teachers come to use conceptual metaphors in their own language and value attending to students' metaphorical language as a means of formative assessment. Teachers' conversations about dissipation suggest that apparent difficulties with energy conservation may have their roots in a strong association between forms of energy (thermal) and their perceptible indicators (warmth). Teachers address this challenge by employing an exaggeration strategy to locate the dissipated thermal energy, making the energy indicator perceptible. Finally, teachers' unprompted statements about sociopolitical aspects of energy are related to both statements from the NGSS and aspects of energy degradation. I conclude that energy conservation can be better taught and learned in K-12 Education by: 1) understanding and applying conceptual metaphors about energy in K-12 settings, 2) using prior experiences to better understand dissipative energy processes involving imperceptible thermal energy, thereby understanding how energy conservation applies in all situations, and 3) connecting productive ideas about sociopolitical aspects of energy to canonical physics. Keywords

  16. K-12 Math and Science Education: Tales from the Santa Fe Alliance for Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstein, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Can professional engineers, mathematicians, and scientists have a positive impact on K-12 math and science education? The experience of the Santa Fe Alliance for Science, and several other like-minded organizations, indicates that they can indeed. But success is by no means assured. Good scientists are not automatically good educators, but they can learn enough about pedagogy, classroom, and community to do well. This discussion will be oriented around three major points: lessons learned, prospects for the future, and how our effort fits into state-wide plans for re-inventing K-12 math and science education in New Mexico.

  17. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance, K-12 Schools (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the K-12 Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. We emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluation of the most promising retrofit measure for each building type. K-12 schools were selected as one of the highest priority building sectors, because schools affect the lives of most Americans. They also represent approximately 8% of the energy use and 10% of the floor area in commercial buildings.

  18. Financing Energy Upgrades for K-12 School Districts: A Guide to Tapping into Funding for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Goggio Borgeson, Merrian; Zimring, Mark

    2013-04-01

    This guide focuses on clean energy financing options for school administrators, facility managers, and other K-12 school decision makers who are considering investments in high performance school projects. This guide explicitly focuses on comprehensive energy upgrades, those that involve multiple measures and are targeted toward achieving significant energy savings. Successful implementation of clean energy upgrades in schools is a matter of understanding the opportunity, making the commitment, and creatively tapping into available financing. This guide attempts to provide the foundation needed for successful projects in U.S. schools. It walks through the financing options available to K-12 schools and provides case studies of six school districts from around the country.

  19. Reduction of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus pharyngo-tonsillar infections associated with use of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Giuseppe; Righi, Ornella; Risso, Paolo; Boiardi, Goffreda; Demuru, Giovanni; Ferzetti, Anna; Galli, Antonio; Ghisoni, Marco; Lenzini, Sonia; Marenghi, Claudio; Mura, Caterina; Sacchetti, Roberto; Suzzani, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent pharyngo-tonsillar infections caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) occur frequently in young children, and the treatment of these infections contributes substantially to the total current requirement for antibiotic prescribing. Our study goal was to assess through a retrospective observational analysis whether the administration of the oral probiotic, Streptococcus salivarius K12 (SsK12), could reduce the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children who had a recent history of recurrent episodes of these infections. Twelve primary care pediatricians identified, through their databases, a total of 130 children who had experienced recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections over a period of at least 6-12 months prior to their inclusion in the study. Of these children, 76 then undertook a 90-day program requiring once-a-day dosing with a commercially available (Bactoblis) lozenge containing SsK12. No probiotic supplement was given to the remaining 54 (control) children. Each subject was monitored for the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillitis and also for acute otitis media, bronchitis, sinusitis, and bronchopneumonia for at least 12 months following their entry to the study. Even 9 months after the use of SsK12 had been stopped, the probability of new GABHS infections was significantly lower (P>0.001) when compared to the period before dosing commenced. When compared to the untreated children, those taking SsK12 appear to have had significantly fewer GABHS infections both during the 90-day period of prophylaxis and during the following 9 months (P<0.001). These observations are supportive of the use of probiotic SsK12 for the control of recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children, and as an associated benefit, the use of this probiotic could lead to reduced antibiotic consumption. Follow-up controlled prospective studies should now be initiated in order to further establish the efficacy of this newly

  20. Reduction of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus pharyngo-tonsillar infections associated with use of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gregori, Giuseppe; Righi, Ornella; Risso, Paolo; Boiardi, Goffreda; Demuru, Giovanni; Ferzetti, Anna; Galli, Antonio; Ghisoni, Marco; Lenzini, Sonia; Marenghi, Claudio; Mura, Caterina; Sacchetti, Roberto; Suzzani, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent pharyngo-tonsillar infections caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) occur frequently in young children, and the treatment of these infections contributes substantially to the total current requirement for antibiotic prescribing. Our study goal was to assess through a retrospective observational analysis whether the administration of the oral probiotic, Streptococcus salivarius K12 (SsK12), could reduce the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children who had a recent history of recurrent episodes of these infections. Twelve primary care pediatricians identified, through their databases, a total of 130 children who had experienced recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections over a period of at least 6–12 months prior to their inclusion in the study. Of these children, 76 then undertook a 90-day program requiring once-a-day dosing with a commercially available (Bactoblis) lozenge containing SsK12. No probiotic supplement was given to the remaining 54 (control) children. Each subject was monitored for the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillitis and also for acute otitis media, bronchitis, sinusitis, and bronchopneumonia for at least 12 months following their entry to the study. Even 9 months after the use of SsK12 had been stopped, the probability of new GABHS infections was significantly lower (P>0.001) when compared to the period before dosing commenced. When compared to the untreated children, those taking SsK12 appear to have had significantly fewer GABHS infections both during the 90-day period of prophylaxis and during the following 9 months (P<0.001). These observations are supportive of the use of probiotic SsK12 for the control of recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children, and as an associated benefit, the use of this probiotic could lead to reduced antibiotic consumption. Follow-up controlled prospective studies should now be initiated in order to further establish the efficacy of this newly

  1. Integrative genomic and transcriptomic analysis for pinpointing recurrent alterations of plant homeodomain genes and their clinical significance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huimei; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Lanxin; Shan, Wenqi; Chu, Xiaofang; Yang, Zhe; Yang, Zeng-Quan

    2017-02-21

    A wide range of the epigenetic effectors that regulate chromatin modification, gene expression, genomic stability, and DNA repair contain structurally conserved domains called plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers. Alternations of several PHD finger-containing proteins (PHFs) due to genomic amplification, mutations, deletions, and translocations have been linked directly to various types of cancer. However, little is known about the genomic landscape and the clinical significance of PHFs in breast cancer. Hence, we performed a large-scale genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 98 PHF genes in breast cancer using TCGA and METABRIC datasets and correlated the recurrent alterations with clinicopathological features and survival of patients. Different subtypes of breast cancer had different patterns of copy number and expression for each PHF. We identified a subset of PHF genes that was recurrently altered with high prevalence, including PYGO2 (pygopus family PHD finger 2), ZMYND8 (zinc finger, MYND-type containing 8), ASXL1 (additional sex combs like 1) and CHD3 (chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 3). Copy number increase and overexpression of ZMYND8 were more prevalent in Luminal B subtypes and were significantly associated with shorter survival of breast cancer patients. ZMYND8 was also involved in a positive feedback circuit of the estrogen receptor (ER) pathway, and the expression of ZMYND8 was repressed by the bromodomain and extra terminal (BET) inhibitor in breast cancer. Our findings suggest a promising avenue for future research-to focus on a subset of PHFs to better understand the molecular mechanisms and to identify therapeutic targets in breast cancer.

  2. Integrative genomic and transcriptomic analysis for pinpointing recurrent alterations of plant homeodomain genes and their clinical significance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huimei; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Lanxin; Shan, Wenqi; Chu, Xiaofang; Yang, Zhe; Yang, Zeng-Quan

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of the epigenetic effectors that regulate chromatin modification, gene expression, genomic stability, and DNA repair contain structurally conserved domains called plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers. Alternations of several PHD finger-containing proteins (PHFs) due to genomic amplification, mutations, deletions, and translocations have been linked directly to various types of cancer. However, little is known about the genomic landscape and the clinical significance of PHFs in breast cancer. Hence, we performed a large-scale genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 98 PHF genes in breast cancer using TCGA and METABRIC datasets and correlated the recurrent alterations with clinicopathological features and survival of patients. Different subtypes of breast cancer had different patterns of copy number and expression for each PHF. We identified a subset of PHF genes that was recurrently altered with high prevalence, including PYGO2 (pygopus family PHD finger 2), ZMYND8 (zinc finger, MYND-type containing 8), ASXL1 (additional sex combs like 1) and CHD3 (chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 3). Copy number increase and overexpression of ZMYND8 were more prevalent in Luminal B subtypes and were significantly associated with shorter survival of breast cancer patients. ZMYND8 was also involved in a positive feedback circuit of the estrogen receptor (ER) pathway, and the expression of ZMYND8 was repressed by the bromodomain and extra terminal (BET) inhibitor in breast cancer. Our findings suggest a promising avenue for future research—to focus on a subset of PHFs to better understand the molecular mechanisms and to identify therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:28055972

  3. Inactivation of Escherichia coli K-12 in apple juice using combination of high-pressure homogenization and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Thippareddi, H; Subbiah, J; Zivanovic, S; Davidson, P M; Harte, F

    2009-01-01

    Apple juice and apple cider were inoculated with Escherichia coli K-12 and processed using a high-pressure homogenizer to study bacterial inactivation. Seven levels of pressure ranging from 50 to 350 MPa were used in the high-pressure homogenizer. Two types of chitosan (regular and water soluble) with 2 levels of concentration 0.01% and 0.1% were investigated for synergistic effect with high-pressure homogenization for the bacterial inactivation. E. coli K-12 inactivation was evaluated as a function of homogenizing pressure at different concentration of 2 types of chitosan in apple juice and cider. High-pressure homogenization (HPH) induced significant inactivation in the range of 100 to 200 MPa, while thermal inactivation was the primary factor for the bacterial inactivation above 250 MPa. Significant (P < 0.05) 2-way interactions involving pressure and type of substrate or pressure and chitosan concentration were observed during the study. The homogenization pressure and the incremental quantity of chitosan (both types) acted synergistically with the pressure to give higher inactivation. Significantly (P < 0.05) higher inactivation was observed in apple juice than apple cider at same homogenizing pressure. No effect of type of chitosan was observed on the bacterial inactivation.

  4. The Top 10 Energy Wasters in K-12 Facilities (and What to Do about Them)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathers, Dave

    2010-01-01

    Every year, K-12 facilities waste millions of dollars in excess energy consumption. Those dollars may take the form of lost heat through walls, windows, doors, and roofs. Or the villain may be poorly conceived or mismanaged control systems. Those excess funds that districts are sending to the local utility companies could be invested "at home" to…

  5. Modern Japan: An Idea Book for K-12 Teachers. Multicultural Education Resource Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernson, Mary Hammond, Ed.; Magnusson, Elaine, Ed.

    This idea book of supplementary lessons on Japan is a compilation of lessons produced by elementary and secondary teachers (K-12) at a 1983 summer institute. Lessons offer teaching strategies, factual information, and teaching tips, focusing primarily on writing skills; visual arts; games, music, and other arts; and social studies. The writing…

  6. African Dance Aesthetics in a K-12 Dance Setting: From History to Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Sheila A.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites the reader to gain a deeper understanding of the aesthetics of African-based dance through the elements of tradition, transformation, and social justice. A discussion of the aesthetics of African dances within Africa and throughout the African diaspora opens the doors to present these dances in a K-12 setting, to explore a…

  7. Curriculum Profiles: A Resource of the EDC K-12 Science Curriculum Dissemination Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide useful information for teachers and school systems engaged in the process of examining and choosing science curriculum materials appropriate for their settings. The curriculum profiles include summaries of selected programs available for K?12 science curriculum programs. Each profile describes a number of…

  8. A Look at Research on Mobile Learning in K-12 Education from 2007 to the Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Scordino, Robert; Geurtz, Renata; Navarrete, Cesar; Ko, Yujung; Lim, Mihyun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine data-based studies published on mobile learning in K-12 from 2007 to the present. In total, 63 studies from 15 refereed journals were selected for analysis. The findings are organized in four themes: (a) comparison studies, (b) no comparison studies, (c) mobilized learning, and (d) academic…

  9. Teaching K-12 teachers and students about nanoscale science through microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Nancy

    2014-09-01

    The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN) is an integrated partnership of 14 universities across the US funded by NSF to support nanoscale researchers. NNIN's education and outreach programs are large and varied and includes outreach to the K-12 community in the form of professional development workshops and school programs. Two important components of nanoscale science education are understanding size and scale and the tools used in nanoscale science and engineering (NSE). As part of our K-12 endeavors, we educate K-12 students and teachers about the tools of nanoscience by providing experiences with the Hitachi TM 3000 tabletop Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). There are three of these across the network that are used in education and outreach. This paper will discuss approaches we use to engage the K-12 community at NNIN's site at Georgia Institute of Technology to understand size and scale and the applications of a variety of microscopes to demonstrate the imaging capabilities of these to see both the micro and nano scales. We not only use the tabletop SEM but also include USB digital microscopes, a Keyence VHX- 600 Digital Microscope, and even a small lens used with smart phones. The goal of this outreach is to educate students as well as teachers about the capabilities of the various instruments and their importance at different size scales.

  10. The Social Studies Program of the Grosse Pointe Public Schools: K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse Pointe Public School System, MI.

    This outline specifies social studies subject matter, concepts, skills, and attitudes appropriate for students at various grade levels from K-12. The social studies program combines educational practices of the Grosse Pointe Public Schools, concepts developed by the National Council of the Social Studies, and ideas from junior high and high school…

  11. A Review of Resources for Evaluating K-12 Computer Science Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Justus J.; Hartikainen, Elina

    2004-01-01

    Since computer science education is a key to preparing students for a technologically-oriented future, it makes sense to have high quality resources for conducting summative and formative evaluation of those programs. This paper describes the results of a critical analysis of the resources for evaluating K-12 computer science education projects.…

  12. Commercially Available or Home-Grown: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of K-12 Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proffitt, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Online learning in K-12 education is becoming a familiar option for students. By the end of 2011, all 50 states and the District of Columbia offered some form of online learning as an option for some students (Watson, Murin, Vashaw, Gemin, & Rapp, 2011). Online courses are appealing to students for a variety of reasons. The five most common…

  13. Curriculum Profiles: A Resource of the EDC K-12 Science Curriculum Dissemination Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide useful information for teachers and school systems engaged in the process of examining and choosing science curriculum materials appropriate for their settings. The curriculum profiles include summaries of selected programs available for K?12 science curriculum programs. Each profile describes a number of…

  14. Impact of Guided Notes on Achievement in K-12 and Special Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larwin, Karen H.; Dawson, Daniel; Erickson, Matthew; Larwin, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The common practice of using of guided notes in the K-12 and special education classroom is not fully appreciated or understood. In an effort to add to the existing research about this phenomenon, the current investigation expands on previously published research and one previously published meta-analysis that examined the impact of guided notes…

  15. Critical Issues in K-12 Service-Learning: Case Studies and Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulati-Partee, Gita, Ed.; Finger, William R., Ed.

    This compilation includes practical and transferable principles that can be used by service-learning practitioners. The 39 case studies and personal essays in the compilation are organized around critical issues in strengthening long-term institutional and community support for K-12 service-learning programs. Each article describes how the issue…

  16. An Exploratory Essay on Listening Instruction in the K-12 Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Joanne E.

    2007-01-01

    Even though the importance of effective listening skills is well recognized and many K-12 language arts standards include listening skills, the amount of time devoted to the teaching of listening and the quality of instructional resources that will enable the effectiveness of teaching listening as a two-way communication process are in question.…

  17. A Correlational Analysis of Strategic Information Systems Planning in K-12 Public Educational Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Three decades of research has indicated that strategic information systems planning is a vital component to business success. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship strategic information systems planning and financial commitment has within the K-12 public education sector. Data for this study was obtained from top management of…

  18. Standards Based Design: Teaching K-12 Educators to Build Quality Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiroz, René E.; Ritter, Nicola L.; Li, Yun; Newton, Rhonda C.; Palkar, Trupti

    2016-01-01

    The number of online courses, programs, and schools are growing exponentially in K-12 education. Given the unique nature of online courses and the distinct skills necessary to create a quality online course, it is essential that effective professional development be provided for teachers designing online courses. Online courses need to be of the…

  19. Students Doing Chemistry: A Hand-On Experience for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selco, Jodye I.; Bruno, Mary; Chan, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on, minds-on inquiry chemistry experiment was developed for use in K-12 schools that enables students to combine the chemicals of their choice and observe the results. The chemistry involved is water based and builds upon acid-base, double displacement, and iodometric detection of starch reactions. Chemicals readily available in the…

  20. English as a Second Language Curriculum Resource Handbook. A Practical Guide for K-12 ESL Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Italiano, Graciela; Rounds, Patricia

    Resources and strategies for teachers, administrators, and curriculum specialists working in K-12 English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) programs are presented in this handbook. The book is designed to provide information on the background of ESL programs as well as current information on publications, standards, and special materials. Contents are…