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Sample records for k-alpha emission spectra

  1. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations of K alpha line emission from S, Ar, Ca and Fe are presented. It is reported that on the basis of data for hard X-ray bursts, the flux during most impulsive, non-thermal events is likely to be weak, though for a few strong bursts, a flux of approximately 100 photons/cm/s may be expected. The amount of S K alpha emission particularly is sensitively dependent on the value of the lower energy bound of the non-thermal electron distribution, offering a possible means of determining this. Thermal K alpha emission is only significant for Fe ions. The calculated thermal K alpha radiation is much less than that observed during an intense soft X-ray burst. It is concluded that a detailed temperature structure for the emission source is required in order to explain the discrepancy.

  2. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The expected flux of K alpha line emission from sulfur, argon, calcium, and iron is calculated during both thermal and nonthermal solar X-ray events. Such emission is shown to be weak during the course of most of the nonthermal hard X-ray bursts that Kane and Anderson (1970) have observed. If Compton backscattering is significant at high energies, the flux is reduced still further for disk flares, but it is noted that the strong, near-limb burst of June 26 would have produced about 100 photons /sq cm/sec of sulfur and iron K alpha emission. The impulsive hard X-ray bursts may in general be too short-lived for much K alpha emission. It may be noted that sulfur K alpha emission in particular depends sensitively on the lower-energy limit of the nonthermal electron spectrum, assuming such a sharply defined boundary exists. During soft X-ray bursts, when temperatures of a few 10 to the 7th power K are obtained, K alpha emission from certain iron ions, specifically Fe XVIII-XXIII, may be important.

  3. THE DIFFERENCE IN NARROW Fe K{alpha} LINE EMISSION BETWEEN SEYFERT 1 AND SEYFERT 2 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Teng; Wang Junxian E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.c

    2010-12-20

    We compile a sample of 89 Seyfert galaxies with both [O IV] 25.89 {mu}m line luminosities observed by Spitzer IRS and X-ray spectra observed by XMM-Newton EPIC. Using [O IV] emission as a proxy for active galactic nucleus (AGN) intrinsic luminosity, we find that although type 2 AGNs have higher line equivalent widths, the narrow Fe K{alpha} lines in Compton-thin and Compton-thick Seyfert 2 galaxies are 2.9{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6} and 5.6{sup +1.9}{sub -1.4} times weaker in terms of luminosity than Seyfert 1 galaxies, respectively. This indicates that different correction factors need to be applied for various types of AGNs before the narrow Fe K{alpha} line luminosity could serve as an intrinsic AGN luminosity indicator. We also find that Seyfert 1 galaxies in our sample have on average marginally larger line widths and higher line centroid energies, suggesting contamination from highly ionized Fe line or broader line emission from much smaller radius, but this effect is too weak to explain the large difference in narrow Fe K{alpha} line luminosity between type 1 and type 2 AGNs. This is the first observational evidence showing that the narrow Fe K{alpha} line emission in AGNs is anisotropic. The observed difference is consistent with theoretical calculations assuming a smoothly distributed obscuring torus and could provide independent constraints on the clumpiness of the torus.

  4. Fluorescent excitation of photospheric Fe K-alpha emission during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, A. N.; Culhane, J. L.; Rapley, C. G.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.; Dennis, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    The Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the NASA Solar Maximum Mission satellite provides high spectral and temporal resolution observations of the Fe K-alpha lines. Analyses have been conducted of spectra from almost 50 solar flares that occurred during 1980. These data strongly support fluorescent excitation of photospheric iron by photons of E greater than 7.11 keV emitted by the hot coronal plasma produced during the flare. After comparison of the data with a model, the observed K-alpha line widths are discussed along with estimates of the size of the emitting region, the height of the coronal source and the photospheric iron abundance.

  5. XMM-Newton Observation of Fe K(alpha) Emission from a BAL QSO: Mrk 231

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from a 20 ksec XMM-Newton observation of Mrk 231. EPIC spectral data reveal strong line emission due to Fe K alpha, which has rarely been detected in this class, as BAL QSOs are very faint in the X-ray band. The line energy is consistent with an origin in neutral Fe. The width of the line is equivalent to a velocity dispersion approximately 18,000 kilometers per second and thus the line may be attributed to transmission and/or reflection from a distribution of emitting clouds. If, instead, the line originates in the accretion disk then the line strength and flat X-ray continuum support some contribution from a reflected component, although the data disfavor a model where the hard X-ray band is purely reflected X-rays. The line parameters are similar to those obtained for the Fe Ka line detected in another BAL QSO, H1413 + 117.

  6. Evolution of Iron K Alpha Line Emission in the Black Hole Candidate GX 339-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y. X.; Zhang, S. N.; Sun, X.; Durouchoux, Ph.; Chen, Wan; Cui, Wei

    2001-01-01

    GX 339-4 was regularly monitored with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer during a period (in 1999) when its X-ray flux decreased significantly (from 4.26 x 10(exp -10) to 7.6 x 10(exp -12) ergs in the 3-20 keV band), as the source settled into the 'off state.' Our spectral analysis revealed the presence of a prominent iron K alpha line in the observed spectrum of the source for all observations. The line shows an interesting evolution: it is centered at approx. 6.4 keV when the measured flux is above 5 x 10(exp -1) ergs per sq cm/s but is shifted to approx. 6.7 keV at lower fluxes. The equivalent width of the line appears to increase significantly toward lower fluxes, although it is likely to be sensitive to calibration uncertainties. While the fluorescent emission of neutral or mildly ionized iron atoms in the accretion disk can perhaps account for the 6.4 keV line, as is often invoked for black hole candidates, it seems difficult to understand the 6.7 keV line with this mechanism because the disk should be less ionized at lower fluxes (unless its density changes drastically). On the other hand, the 6.7 keV line might be due to a recombination cascade of hydrogen- or helium-like iron ions in an optically thin, highly ionized plasma. We discuss the results in the context of proposed accretion models.

  7. A POSSIBLE ULTRA STRONG AND BROAD Fe K{alpha} EMISSION LINE IN SEYFERT 2 GALAXY IRAS 00521-7054

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Y.; Wang, J. X.; Shu, X. W.; Zhou Youyuan E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn E-mail: yyzhou@ustc.edu.cn

    2012-03-15

    We present XMM-Newton spectra of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy IRAS 00521-7054. A strong feature at {approx}6 keV (observer's frame) can be formally fitted with a strong (EW = 1.3 {+-} 0.3 keV in the rest frame) and broad Fe K{alpha} line, extending down to 3 keV. The underlying X-ray continuum could be fitted with an absorbed power law (with {Gamma} = 1.8 {+-} 0.2 and N{sub H} 5.9{sup +0.6}{sub -0.7} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) plus a soft component. If due to relativistically smeared reflection by an X-ray illuminated accretion disk, the spin of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) is constrained to be 0.97{sup +0.03}{sub -0.13} (errors at 90% confidence level for one interesting parameter), and the accretion system is viewed at an inclination angle of 37 Degree-Sign {+-} 4 Degree-Sign . This would be the first type 2 active galactic nucleus reported with strong red Fe K{alpha} wing detected which demands a fast rotating SMBH. The unusually large EW would suggest that the light bending effect is strong in this source. Alternatively, the spectra could be fitted by a dual-absorber model (though with a global {chi}{sup 2} higher by {approx}6 for 283 dof) with N{sub H1} 7.0 {+-} 0.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} covering 100% of the X-ray source, and N{sub H2} = 21.7{sup +5.6}{sub -5.4} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} covering 71%, which does not require an extra broad Fe K{alpha} line.

  8. Evolution of the Iron K-Alpha Emission Line in the Black Hole Candidate GX339-4 During and Outburst Decay Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y.; Zhang, S.-N.; Chen, W.; Cui, Wei

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of the iron K-alpha line emission feature was found from the black hole candidate GX339-4 when its X-ray flux (2 to 10 keV) decreased significantly. With RXTE observations, a broad line emission feature around 7 keV was detected in its quiescent and low flux state; while in the high flux state, an emission line feature around 6.4 keV was detected. A similar 6.4 keV line feature was also detected with previous ASCA observations in a high flux state. We consider that the evolution could be the evidence of the variations in the geometric structure and the physical properties of the accretion flow when the accretion rate changed. This is because that the 7 keV line feature can be produced by the radiative recombination cascade, collisional excitation, and fluorescence of Fe XXVI and Fe XXV, which can exist in a very high temperature plasma; while the 6.4 keV line feature can be produced by fluorescent K-alpha line emission of neutral iron atoms in the cold accretion disk. (copyright) 1999 American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. The Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 2110: Hard X-Ray Emission Observed by NuStar and Variability of the Iron K-Alpha Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Bianchi, S.; Lu, T. N.; Arevalo, P.; Balokovic, M.; Ballantyne, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Stern, D.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the bright Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2110 obtained in 2012, when the source was at the highest flux level ever observed, and in 2013, when the source was at a more typical flux level. We include archival observations from other X-ray satellites, namely XMM-Newton, Suzaku, BeppoSAX, Chandra and Swift. Simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift broad band spectra (in the 3-80 keV range) indicate a cutoff energy E(sub c) greater than 210 keV, with no detectable contribution from Compton reflection. NGC 2110 is one of the very few sources where no evidence for distant Compton thick scattering is found and, by using temporal information collected over more than a decade, we investigate variations of the iron K(alpha) line on time scales of years. The Fe K alpha line is likely the sum of two components: one constant (originating from distant Compton-thick material) and the other one variable and linearly correlated with the source flux (possibly arising from Compton-thin material much closer to the black hole).

  10. High-resolution measurements of the K-alpha spectra of low-ionizationm species of iron: A new spectral signature of nonequilibrium ionization conditions in young supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decaux, V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A.; Chen, M.; Kahn, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first systematic laboratory measurements of high-resolution K-alpha spectra of intermediate ions of iron, Fe X-XVII. These lines are not produced in collisional equilibrium plasmas because of the relevant charge states cannot exist at the high electron temperatures required for appreciable excitation of the K-alpha transitions. However, they can provide excellent spectral diagnostics for nonequilibrium ionization conditions, such the ionizing plasmas of young supernova remnants. To facilitate the line identifications, we compare our spectra with theoretical atomic calculations performed using multiconfiguration parametric potential and Dirac-Fock atomic codes. Our measurements also allow direct comparison with time-dependent ionization balance calculations for ionizing plasmas, and good agreement is found.

  11. The excitation of the iron K-alpha feature in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between the hard X-ray photon spectrum and the flux of iron K-alpha emission in a thick-target electron bombardment model is evaluated. Results are presented for various power-law hard X-ray spectra. These results are applied to two events observed with the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer and the K-alpha channel of the X-Ray Polychromator Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. For one of the events, on March 29, 1980, at 09:18 UT, the K-alpha flux predicted for a thick-target nonthermal process is significant compared to the background fluorescent component, and the data are indeed consistent with an enhancement of the predicted amount. For the other event, on October 14, 1980 at 0.6:09 UT, the hard X-ray spectrum is so steep that no significant K-alpha flux is predicted for this process, and no enhancement is seen. It is concluded that the agreement between the predicted K-alpha flux and the observed magnitude of the K-alpha enhancement above the fluorescent background at the time of the large hard X-ray bursts lends support to a thick-target nonthermal interpretation of impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares.

  12. K(alpha) x-ray emission characterization of 100 Hz, 15 mJ femtosecond laser system with high contrast ratio.

    PubMed

    Fourmaux, S; Serbanescu, C; Kincaid, R E; Krol, A; Kieffer, J C

    2008-12-12

    We report K(alpha) x-ray production with a high energy (110 mJ per pulse at 800 nm before compression/15 mJ at 400 nm after compression), high repetition rate (100 Hz), and high pulse contrast (better than 10(-9) at 400 nm) laser system. To develop laser-based x-ray sources for biomedical imaging requires to use high-energy and high-power ultra-fast laser system where compression is achieved under vacuum. Using this type of laser system, we demonstrate long-term stability of the x-ray yield, conversion efficiency higher than 1.5 x 10(-5) with a Mo target, and the x-ray spot size close to the optical focal spot. This high-repetition K(alpha) x-ray source can be very useful for x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

  13. The role of hot electron refluxing in laser-generated K-alpha sources

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P.; Aurand, B.; Basko, M.; Ecker, B.; Gibbon, P.; Karmakar, A.; Hochhaus, D. C.; Kazakov, E.; Kuehl, T.; Labaune, C.; Rosmej, O.; Tauschwitz, An.

    2010-10-15

    A study of the contribution of refluxing electrons in the production of K-alpha radiation from high-intensity laser irradiated thin targets has been performed. Thin copper foils both freestanding, and backed by a thick substrate were irradiated with laser pulses of energies around 100 J at intensities ranging from below 10{sup 17} to above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. At high laser intensities we find a strong reduction in the K-alpha yield from targets backed by the substrate. The observed yield reduction is in good agreement with a simple model using hot electron spectra from particle-in-cell simulations or directly inferred from the measured bremsstrahlung emission and can therefore be interpreted as due to the suppression of hot electron refluxing. The study shows that refluxing electrons play a dominant role in high-intensity laser driven K- alpha generation and have to be taken into account in designing targets for laser driven high-flux K-alpha sources.

  14. Theoretical determination of characteristic x-ray lines and the copper K alpha spectrum.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Hayward, A C L; Grant, I P

    2009-09-18

    Core excitations above the K edge result in K alpha characteristic x-ray emission. Understanding these spectra is crucial for high accuracies in investigations into QED, near-edge x-ray structure and advanced crystallography. We address unresolved quantitative discrepancies between experiment and theory for copper. These discrepancies arise from an incomplete treatment of electronic interactions. By finding solutions to relativistic multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock equations accounting for correlation and exchange corrections, we obtain an accurate reproduction of the peak energies, excellent agreement of theory with experiment for the line shapes, good convergence between gauges, and account for the K alpha doublet ratio of 0.522 +/- 0.003ratio1.

  15. K{alpha} satellite transitions in elements with 12{<=}Z{<=}30 produced by electron incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Limandri, Silvina P.; Carreras, Alejo C.; Trincavelli, Jorge C.; Bonetto, Rita D.

    2010-09-15

    The emission of x-ray satellite lines in the K{alpha} region of Mg, Si, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn induced by electron incidence was studied by means of wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The satellite lines studied were K{alpha}{sup '}, K{alpha}{sub 3}, K{alpha}{sub 4}, K{alpha}{sub 5}, K{alpha}{sub 6}, and two transitions denoted here as K{alpha}{sub 22} and K{alpha}{sub 12}. Energy shifts with respect to the main K{alpha}{sub 1} diagram line and transition probabilities relative to the whole K{alpha} group were determined for a number of lines through a careful spectral processing. The dependence of these parameters, as well as of the K{beta}:K{alpha} intensity ratio, on the atomic number was compared with previous experimental and theoretical determinations when available. A discussion about the different mechanisms responsible for vacancy creation involved in the production of double-ionization satellites was performed in the light of the results obtained. Finally, the behavior of the satellite intensities as a function of the incidence energy was discussed for silicon.

  16. Frequency Spectra of Magnetoacoustic Emission in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, S. V.; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Kolchanov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the magnetoacoustic emission spectra of iron meteorites and their industrial analogs. The revealed differences in signal amplitude, position and width of the peaks are associated with the features of structure and the magnetic texture.

  17. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  18. K-alpha X-rays from cosmic ray oxygen. [Detection and calculation of equilibrium charge fractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Boldt, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium charge fractions are calculated for subrelativistic cosmic ray oxygen ions in the interstellar medium. These are used to determine the expected flux of K-alpha rays arising from atomic processes for a number of different postulated interstellar oxygen spectra. Relating these results to the diffuse X-ray background measured at the appropriate energy level suggests an observable line feature. If the flux of low energy cosmic ray oxygen is sufficiently large, K-alpha X-ray line emission from these nuclei will comprise a significant fraction of the total diffuse flux at approximately 0.6 keV. A satellite borne detector with a resolution greater than 30 percent could observe this feature if the subrelativistic interstellar cosmic ray oxygen spectrum is as large as certain theoretical estimates expressed in the text.

  19. Martian Analogues Emissivity Spectra From the Berlin Emissivity Database (BED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Moroz, L.

    2006-12-01

    Remote sensing infrared spectroscopy is the principal field of investigation for planetary surfaces composition. Past, present and future missions to bodies in the solar system include in their payload instruments measuring the emerging radiation in the infrared range. For the interpretation of the measured data an emissivity spectral library of planetary analog materials is needed. The Berlin Emissivity Database (BED) currently contains emissivity spectra of plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulphur, and Martian analogue minerals, measured in the wavelength range from 7 to 22 microns as a function of particle size. For each sample we measured the spectra of four particle size separates ranging from 0 to 250 microns. The device we used is built at DLR (Berlin) and is coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Bruker IFS 88), purged with dry air and equipped with a cooled detector (MCT). All spectra were acquired with a spectral resolution of 4 cm-1. We present here the results of our analysis on well knew and characterized Martian analogue minerals: JSC Mars-1, Salten Skov, and Palagonite from Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We are currently working to upgrade our emissivity facility. A new spectrometer (Bruker VERTEX 80v) and new detectors will allow us to measure the emissivity of samples in the wavelength range from 1 to 50 microns, even in a vacuum environment.

  20. Variable Iron K(alpha) Lines in Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, K. A.; Gelbord, J.; Yaqoob, T.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We find that variability of the iron K alpha line is common in Seyfert 1 galaxies. Using data from the ASCA archive for objects that have been observed more than once during the mission, we study the time-averaged spectra from individual observations, thereby probing variability on timescales that range from days to years. Since the statistics of the data do not warrant searches for line variability in terms of a complex physical model, we use a simple Gaussian to model the gross shape of the line and then use the centroid energy, intensity, and equivalent width as robust indicators of changes in the line profile. We find that approximately 70% of Seyfert 1 galaxies (10 out of 15) show variability in at least one of these parameters: the centroid energy, intensity, and equivalent width vary in six, four, and eight sources, respectively. Because of the low signal-to-noise ratio, limited sampling, and time averaging, we consider these results to represent lower limits to the rate of incidence of variability. In most cases changes in the line do not appear to track changes in the continuum. In particular, we find no evidence for variability of the line intensity in NGC 4151, suggesting an origin in a region larger than the putative accretion disk, where most of the iron line has been thought to originate. Mrk 279 is investigated on short timescales. The time-averaged effective line energy (as measured by the Gaussian center energy, which is weighted by emission in the entire line profile) is 6.5 keV in the galaxy rest frame. As the continuum flux increases by 20% in a few hours, the Fe K line responds within approximately 10,000 seconds with the effective line energy increasing by 0.22 keV (approximately 10,500 kilometers per second). We also examine the ROSAT PSPC spectrum of Mrk 279 but find inconsistencies with ASCA. Problems with the ASCA and ROSAT calibration that affect simultaneous spectral fits at low energies are discussed in an appendix.

  1. Comparison of experimental and simulated K{alpha} yield for 400 nm ultrashort pulse laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Khattak, F. Y.; Percie du Sert, O. A. M. B.; Riley, D.; Foster, P. S.; Divall, E. J.; Hooker, C. J.; Langley, A. J.; Smith, J.; Gibbon, P.

    2006-08-15

    Ti K{alpha} emission yields from foils irradiated with {approx}45 fs, p-polarized pulses of a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser are presented. A simple model invoking vacuum heating to predict absorption and hot electron temperature was coupled with the cross section for K-shell ionization of Ti and the Bethe-Bloch stopping power equation for electrons. The peak predicted K{alpha} emission was in generally good agreement with experiment. This contrasts strongly with previous work at the fundamental frequency. Similar predictions using particle-in-cell (PIC) code simulation to estimate the number and temperature of hot electrons also gave good agreement for yield.

  2. Double-Resonance Facilitated Decomposion of Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ryota; Ishikawa, Haruki

    2016-06-01

    Emission spectra provide us with rich information about the excited-state processes such as proton-transfer, charge-transfer and so on. In the cases that more than one excited states are involved, emission spectra from different excited states sometimes overlap and a decomposition of the overlapped spectra is desired. One of the methods to perform a decomposition is a time-resolved fluorescence technique. It uses a difference in time evolutions of components involved. However, in the gas-phase, a concentration of the sample is frequently too small to carry out this method. On the other hand, double-resonance technique is a very powerful tool to discriminate or identify a common species in the spectra in the gas-phase. Thus, in the present study, we applied the double-resonance technique to resolve the overlapped emission spectra. When transient IR absorption spectra of the excited state are available, we can label the population of the certain species by the IR excitation with a proper selection of the IR wavenumbers. Thus, we can obtain the emission spectra of labeled species by subtracting the emission spectra with IR labeling from that without IR. In the present study, we chose the charge-transfer emission spectra of cyanophenyldisilane (CPDS) as a test system. One of us reported that two charge-transfer (CT) states are involved in the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) process of CPDS-water cluster and recorded the transient IR spectra. As expected, we have succeeded in resolving the CT emission spectra of CPDS-water cluster by the double resonance facilitated decomposion technique. In the present paper, we will report the details of the experimental scheme and the results of the decomposition of the emission spectra. H. Ishikawa, et al., Chem. Phys. Phys. Chem., 9, 117 (2007).

  3. Retrieval of constituent mixing ratios from limb thermal emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, William A.; Kunde, Virgil G.; Conrath, Barney J.

    1988-01-01

    An onion-peeling iterative, least-squares relaxation method to retrieve mixing ratio profiles from limb thermal emission spectra is presented. The method has been tested on synthetic data, containing various amounts of added random noise for O3, HNO3, and N2O. The retrieval method is used to obtain O3 and HNO3 mixing ratio profiles from high-resolution thermal emission spectra. Results of the retrievals compare favorably with those obtained previously.

  4. Thermal Emission and Reflected Light Spectra of Super Earths with Flat Transmission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Line, Michael; Kempton, Eliza; Lewis, Nikole; Cahoy, Kerri

    2015-12-01

    Planets larger than Earth and smaller than Neptune are some of the most numerous in the galaxy, but observational efforts to understand this population have proved challenging because optically thick clouds or hazes at high altitudes obscure molecular features. We present models of super Earths that include thick clouds and hazes and predict their transmission, thermal emission, and reflected light spectra. Very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities. Cloudy thermal emission spectra have muted features more like blackbodies, and hazy thermal emission spectra have emission features caused by an inversion layer at altitudes where the haze forms. Close analysis of reflected light from warm (˜400-800 K) planets can distinguish cloudy spectra, which have moderate albedos (0.05-0.20), from hazy models, which are very dark (0.0-0.03). Reflected light spectra of cold planets (˜200 K) accessible to a space-based visible light coronagraph will have high albedos and large molecular features that will allow them to be more easily characterized than the warmer transiting planets. We suggest a number of complementary observations to characterize this population of planets, including transmission spectra of hot (≳ 1000 K) targets, thermal emission spectra of warm targets using the James Webb Space Telescope, high spectral resolution (R ˜ 105) observations of cloudy targets, and reflected light spectral observations of directly imaged cold targets. Despite the dearth of features observed in super Earth transmission spectra to date, different observations will provide rich diagnostics of their atmospheres.

  5. K-alpha x-ray source using high energy and high repetition rate laser system for phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbanescu, Cristina; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-08-01

    K-alpha x-ray sources from laser produced plasmas provide completely new possibilities for x-ray phase-contrast imaging applications. By tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses onto a solid target, K-alpha x-ray pulses are generated through the interaction of energetic electrons created in the plasma with the bulk target. In this paper, we present a continuous and efficient Mo K-alpha x-ray source produced by a femtosecond laser system operating at 100 Hz repetition rate with maximum pulse energy of 110 mJ before compression. The source has x-ray conversion efficiency greater than 10-5 into K-alpha line emission. In preparation for phase contrast imaging applications, the size of the resultant K-alpha x-ray emission spot has been also characterized. The source exhibits sufficient spatial coherence to observe phase contrast. We observe a relatively small broadening of the K-alpha source size compared to the size of the laser beam itself. Detailed characterization of the source including the x-ray spectrum and the x-ray average yield along with phase contrast images of test objects will be presented.

  6. Synthesized Spectra of Optically Thin Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olluri, K.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.; De Pontieu, B.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years realistic 3D numerical models of the solar atmosphere have become available. The models attempt to recreate the solar atmosphere and mimic observations in the best way, in order to make it possible to couple complicated observations with physical properties such as the temperatures, densities, velocities, and magnetic fields. We here present a study of synthetic spectra created using the Bifrost code in order to assess how well they fit with previously taken solar data. A study of the synthetic intensity, nonthermal line widths, Doppler shifts, and correlations between any two of these three components of the spectra first assuming statistical equilibrium is made, followed by a report on some of the effects nonequilibrium ionization will have on the synthesized spectra. We find that the synthetic intensities compare well with the observations. The synthetic observations depend on the assumed resolution and point-spread function (PSF) of the instrument, and we find a large effect on the results, especially for intensity and nonthermal line width. The Doppler shifts produce the reported persistent redshifts for the transition region (TR) lines and blueshifts for the upper TR and corona lines. The nonthermal line widths reproduce the well-known turnoff point around (2-3) × 105 K, but with much lower values than those observed. The nonthermal line widths tend to increase with decreasing assumed instrumental resolution, also when nonequilibrium ionization is included. Correlations between the nonthermal line width of any two TR line studies as reported by Chae et al. are reproduced, while the correlations of intensity to line width are reproduced only after applying a PSF to the data. Doppler shift correlations reported by Doschek for the TR lines and correlations of Doppler shift to nonthermal line width of the Fe xii 19.5 line reported by Doschek et al. are reproduced.

  7. K-alpha X-rays from cosmic-ray oxygen. [subrelativistic interstellar oxygen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Boldt, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium charge fractions are calculated for subrelativistic cosmic-ray oxygen ions in the interstellar medium. These are used to determine the expected flux of K-alpha rays arising from atomic processes for a number of different postulated interstellar oxygen spectra. Relation of these results to the diffuse X-ray background measured at the appropriate energy (about 0.6 keV) suggests an observable broadened line feature.

  8. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  9. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  10. A CORRELATION BETWEEN STELLAR ACTIVITY AND HOT JUPITER EMISSION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard

    2010-09-10

    We present evidence for a correlation between the observed properties of hot Jupiter emission spectra and the activity levels of the host stars measured using Ca II H and K emission lines. We find that planets with dayside emission spectra that are well-described by standard one-dimensional atmosphere models with water in absorption (HD 189733, TrES-1, TrES-3, WASP-4) orbit chromospherically active stars, while planets with emission spectra that are consistent with the presence of a strong high-altitude temperature inversion and water in emission orbit quieter stars. We estimate that active G and K stars have Lyman {alpha} fluxes that are typically a factor of 4-7 times higher than quiet stars with analogous spectral types and propose that the increased UV flux received by planets orbiting active stars destroys the compounds responsible for the formation of the observed temperature inversions. In this paper, we also derive a model-independent method for differentiating between these two atmosphere types using the secondary eclipse depths measured in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands on the Spitzer Space Telescope and argue that the observed correlation is independent of the inverted/non-inverted paradigm for classifying hot Jupiter atmospheres.

  11. Analysis of far-infrared emission Fourier transform spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.; Carli, B.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis method that uses the nonlinear least-squares fit technique has been developed for emission spectra obtained with a Fourier transform spectrometer. This method is used for the analysis of submillimeter-region atmospheric emission spectra obtained with a balloon-borne FT spectrometer that was carried out as a correlative measurement for the Limb IR Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) satellite experiment. The retrieved mixing ratios of H2O and O3 in the stratosphere from four spectral intervals have standard deviations of about 10 percent, and the average values agree to within 10 percent of corresponding results from the LIMS satellite experiment which used a broadband emission radiometer in the IR region.

  12. SMM observations of K-alpha radiation from fluorescence of photospheric iron by solar flare X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, A. N.; Culhane, J. L.; Rapley, C. G.; Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution Fe K-alpha spectra near 1.94 A observed during solar flares with the Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission are presented. The evidence for two possible excitation mechanisms, electron impact and fluorescence, is examined. It is found that the fluorescence mechanism satisfactorily describes the results, while the observations do not support electron collisional excitation of the Fe K-alpha transitions in low ionization stages (II-XII) of iron. Using Bai's model of the fluorescent excitation process, the photospheric iron abundance relative to that of hydrogen is estimated to be 5-6 x 10 to the -5th. The mean height of the soft X-ray source producing the K-alpha fluorescence is calculated on the basis of this model for about 40 large flares. The solar K-alpha lines are found to be about 25 percent wider than those measured in the laboratory. Weak line features observed at wavelengths shorter than that of the K-alpha lines are discussed.

  13. Stratospheric HBr mixing ratio obtained from far infrared emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.; Carli, B.; Barbis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Emission features of HBr isotopes have been identified in high-resolution FIR emission spectra obtained with a balloon-borne Fourier-transform spectrometer in the spring of 1979 at 32 deg N latitude. When six single-scan spectra at a zenith angle of 93.2 deg were averaged, two features of HBr isotopes at 50.054 and 50.069/cm were obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5. The volume mixing ratio retrieved from the average spectrum is 2.0 x 10 to the -11th, which is assumed to be constant above 28 km, with an uncertainty of 35 percent. This stratospheric amount of HBr is about the same as the current level of tropospheric organic bromine compounds, 25 pptv. Thus HBr could be the major stratospheric bromine species.

  14. Stratospheric HBr mixing ratio obtained from far infrared emission spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H. ); Carli, B. ); Barbis, A. )

    1989-08-01

    Emission features of HBr isotopes have been identified in high-resolution far-infrared emission spectra obtained with a balloon-born Fourier transform spectrometer in the spring of 1979 at 32{degree}N latitude. When six single-scan spectra at a zenith angle of 93.2{degree} were averaged, two features of HBr isotopes at 50.054 and 50.069 cm{sup {minus}1} were obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5. The volume mixing ratio retrieved from the average spectrum is 2.0 {times} 10{sub {minus}11}, which is assumed to be constant above 28 km, with an uncertainty of 35%. This stratospheric amount of HBr is about the same as the current level of tropospheric organic bromine compounds, 25 pptv. Thus, HBr could be the major stratospheric bromine species.

  15. Analysis and Interpretation of Astrophysical Optical Emission-Line Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubser, S. I.

    This study consists of a quantitative optical emission-line analysis of spectra from five blue compact galaxies (Zw 0855, Mrk 1267, II Zw 33, Tol 2 & Tol 3), as well as a qualitative analysis of spectra from two galactic H II regions (NGC 3603 & NGC 3576). It serves a two-fold purpose: first, to understand the CCD reduction, spectra extraction and different nebular analysis methods, together with their applications and limitations, preparatory to studies using the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) and second, to extend current star formation related research to include extragalactic starburst galaxies. The observations were carried out using the 1.9m telescope (equipped with a grating spectroscope and CCD detector) of the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO), during the period 1 to 7 March 2005. The necessary CCD data reduction, spectra extraction, wavelength and flux calibration, Doppler shift as well as reddening correction procedures were performed before the emission lines were identified and measured. A full nebular analysis, including temperature, density, metallicity (oxygen abundance) and other chemical abundance determinations, was performed on the blue compact galaxies (BCGs). Two different nebular analysis packages viz. IRAF's nebular and SNAP were used, with all the results well within the range of values expected for metal poor BCGs. Recommendations on the different methods and their applications are made.

  16. Hot Electron Generation and Transport Using K(alpha) Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K U; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Chawla, S; Chen, C D; Fedosejevs, R; Freeman, R R; Friesen, H; Giraldez, E; Green, J S; Hey, D S; Higginson, D P; Hund, J; Jarrott, L C; Kemp, G E; King, J A; Kryger, A; Lancaster, K; LePape, S; Link, A; Ma, T; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; McLean, H S; Murphy, C; Norreys, P A; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P K; Ping, Y; Sawada, H; Schumacher, D; Theobald, W; Tsui, Y Y; Van Woerkom, L D; Wei, M S; Westover, B; Yabuuchi, T

    2009-10-15

    We have conducted experiments on both the Vulcan and Titan laser facilities to study hot electron generation and transport in the context of fast ignition. Cu wires attached to Al cones were used to investigate the effect on coupling efficiency of plasma surround and the pre-formed plasma inside the cone. We found that with thin cones 15% of laser energy is coupled to the 40{micro}m diameter wire emulating a 40{micro}m fast ignition spot. Thick cone walls, simulating plasma in fast ignition, reduce coupling by x4. An increase of prepulse level inside the cone by a factor of 50 reduces coupling by a factor of 3.

  17. Infrared emission spectra of candidate interstellar aromatic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Interstellar dust is responsible, through surface reactions, for the creation of molecular hydrogen, the main component of the interstellar clouds in which new stars form. Intermediate between small, gas-phase molecules and dust are the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Such molecules could account for 2-30% of the carbon in the Galaxy, and may provide nucleation sites for the formation of carbonaceous dust. Although PAHs have been proposed as the sources of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in the spectra of a variety of interstellar sources, the emission characteristics of such molecules are still poorly understood. Here we report laboratory emission spectra of several representative PAHs, obtained in conditions approximating those of the interstellar medium, and measured over the entire spectral region spanned by the unidentified infrared bands. We find that neutral PAHs of small and moderate size can at best make only a minor contribution to these emission bands. Cations of these molecules, as well as much larger PAHs and their cations, remain viable candidates for the sources of these bands.

  18. Investigating the origin of emissivity features in airless body spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Bowles, N. E.; Thomas, I.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been noted that mid-infrared emissivity features remote observations of airless bodies do not generally match reflectance and ambient thermal emission laboratory measurements. Recently Vernazza et al., (2012) conducted reflectance experiments and successfully reproduced spectral differences by doping a fine (<30 micron) particulate samples of meteorite and/or minerals with KBr (potassium bromide) powder, which is transparent in the infrared. Their results suggest that porosity and/or cavity effects are significant in modifying the observed spectra of asteroids and derived values of surface thermal inertia. At similar wavelengths, the lunar community has long supported the theory that radiative transfer was a driving phenomenon through the creation of strong thermal gradients in the upper 100 microns of a particulate surface (e.g. Logan et al., 1973; Henderson et al., 1995). These thermal gradients are steep within the depth of thermal emission causing a strong wavelength dependence to the observed thermal emission spectrum. For example, strong absorptions like Reststrahlen Bands emit from the colder, shallower surface while strongly transparent features such as the Christiansen Feature emit from the warmer, deeper surface. To study these effects, we have built simulated airless body thermal emission chambers at University of Oxford and JPL (Thomas et al., 2012). In this study we investigate both radiative transfer and porosity phenomenon by measuring KBr-doped samples in reflectance and both ambient and simulated airless body emission.

  19. Terrestrial FeO Continuum Emission Observed in Sky Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, Tom G.; Melchiorri, R.; Saran, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial continuum emission in the visible spectral region has often been studied by both astronomers and aeronomers, in order to clarify backgrounds and the nature of the emissions. New observations from the ESI spectrograph on the Keck II telescope, as well as from the OSIRIS/Odin spectrograph and orbiter, have established that a major component of the emission originates with the FeO molecule [Evans et al., 2010]. This quasi-continuum peaks at 5950 A and extends from 5000 A well into the infrared. The identity has been demonstrated by comparison with meteor trains and laboratory measurements [Jenniskens et al., 2000]. Early studies of the continuum show consistency with the FeO emission as presently observed [Gadsden and Marovich, 1973]. Analysis of spectra from Kitt Peak [Neugent and Massey, 2010] demonstrates the great similarity between FeO emission in a clean atmosphere and high pressure sodium lamp emission in a polluted atmosphere. This research was supported by NSF Aeronomy under Grant ATM-0637433 . Evans, W.F.J., et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. [in press, 2010] Gadsden, M. and E. Marovich, J. Atm. Terr. Phys., 35, 1601-1614 [1973] Jenniskens, P., et al., Earth, Moon and Planets, 82-83, 429-434 [2000] Neugent, K.F. and P. Massey, PASP [in press, 2010

  20. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-01-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  1. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  2. Outer-core emission spectra of heavy alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, R. L.; First, P. N.; Flynn, C. P.

    1988-09-01

    We report np5(n+1)s2-->np6(n+1)s emission spectra of K (n=3), Rb (n=4), and Cs (n=5), and compare emission-band characteristics through the series Na-Cs using earlier data for Na. The normalized band profiles of the different alkali metals are remarkably similar when scaled by the Fermi energy EF. However, the spin-orbit partner intensity ratios are far from the ideal value 2, reaching approximately 60 for Rb and above 65 for Cs, mainly owing to Coster-Kronig decays from higher levels. We confirm that the Mahan-Nozières-De Dominicis ``anomaly'' at EF is generally weaker in emission than in absorption. It decreases through the series to become undetectable for emission from Cs. A systematic increase of the core-hole-lifetime width occurs through the column of alkali metals from a reported estimate of 10 meV for Na to a value of 50 meV for Cs. A study of the Fermi-edge shape between 20 and 300 K reveals temperature-dependent phonon broadening in generally good agreement with theoretical predictions. Incomplete relaxation plays only a minor role in the edge processes of the heavy alkali metals. Additional Fermi-edge broadening and the shifted emission edges of surface atoms are observed for alkali-metal films 10-100 Å thick.

  3. A new scheme for multidimensional line transfer. II - ETLA method in one dimension with application to iron K-alpha lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castor, John I.; Dykema, Pieter G.; Klein, Richard I.

    1992-01-01

    The 1D version of the radiation hydrodynamics computer code ALTAIR is discribed. It is an implementation of the equivalent two-level atom method, and also incorporates a variety of other iterative techniques to achieve a fast, accurate solution of the problem of coupled atomic kinetics and radiative transfer. All the techniques are described in sufficient detail to enable their use by others. The application of the program is illustrated by a set of calculations of the iron X-ray emission spectrum from intercloud hot gas that may exist in the broad-line region of active galactic nuclei. These calculations demonstrate that such spectra may be a rich load to mine for information about the hot gas in AGNs, and also that the concept of 'the iron K-alpha line' inadequately depicts the spectrum.

  4. Infrared emission spectra from operating elastohydrodynamic sliding contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra from an operating EHD sliding contact were obtained through a diamond window for an aromatic polymer solute present in equal concentration in four different fluids. Three different temperature ranges, three different loads, and three different speeds for every load were examined. Very sensitive Fourier spectrophotometric (Interferometric) techniques were employed. Band Intensities and band intensity ratios found to depend both on the operating parameters and on the fluid. Fluid film and metal surface temperatures were calculated from the spectra and their dependence on the mechanical parameters plotted. The difference between these temperatures could be plotted against shear rate on one curve for all fluids. However, at the same shear rate the difference between bulk fluid temperature and diamond window temperature was much higher for one of the fluids, a traction fluid, than for the others.

  5. Structural Effects of Oncogenic PI3K alpha Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    S Gabelli; C Huang; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Physiological activation of PI3K{alpha} is brought about by the release of the inhibition by p85 when the nSH2 binds the phosphorylated tyrosine of activated receptors or their substrates. Oncogenic mutations of PI3K{alpha} result in a constitutively activated enzyme that triggers downstream pathways that increase tumor aggressiveness and survival. Structural information suggests that some mutations also activate the enzyme by releasing p85 inhibition. Other mutations work by different mechanisms. For example, the most common mutation, His1047Arg, causes a conformational change that increases membrane association resulting in greater accessibility to the substrate, an integral membrane component. These effects are examples of the subtle structural changes that result in increased activity. The structures of these and other mutants are providing the basis for the design of isozyme-specific, mutation-specific inhibitors for individualized cancer therapies.

  6. X-ray emission and photoelectron spectra of Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kurmaev, E.Z.; Korotin, M.A.; Galakhov, V.R.; Finkelstein, L.D.; Zabolotzky, E.I.; Efremova, N.N.; Lobachevskaya, N.I.; Stadler, S.; Ederer, D.L.; Callcott, T.A.; Zhou, L.; Moewes, A.; Bartkowski, S.; Neumann, M.; Matsuno, J.; Mizokawa, T.; Fujimori, A.; Mitchell, J.

    1999-05-01

    The results of measurements of x-ray photoelectron (XPS), x-ray emission (XES), and x-ray absorption spectra and local spin-density approximation band structure (LSDA) calculations of Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} are presented. The excitation energy dependence of Mn L{sub 2,3} and O K{alpha} x-ray emission spectra of Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} is measured using tunable synchrotron radiation. The XES measurements yielded no photon energy dependence for the O K{alpha} spectra, but the Mn L{sub 2,3} spectra yielded inelastic scattering losses of 2 and 6 eV, corresponding to features in the structure of the occupied part of the valence band. Comparing XPS and XES measurements with LSDA band-structure calculations, one concludes that the electronic structure of the compound consists mainly of Mn 3d and O 2p states. States of 3d character localized at the Mn site predominate near the top of the valence band (VB). Some differences in the Mn 3d distribution in this part of the XPS valence band and Mn L{sub 3} XES with {ital d} symmetry due to spin-selection rules that govern the Mn L{sub 3} XES. In addition, the Mn 3d states distribution is hybridized with the O 2p part of the VB. Mn L{sub 3} XES spectra were determined relative to the Fermi energy by assuming normal x-ray emission begins from the lowest level of the p{sup 5}d{sup n+1}L intermediate state (which is the Mn 2p ionizatation threshold). From the local spin-density approximation, the orbital character of the Mn 3d electrons can be assigned e{sub g} symmetry at the top of the valence band T{sub 2g} in the central part of the VB, and equal contributions of e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} states at the bottom of the valence band. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Galactic Soft X-ray Emission Revealed with Spectroscopic Study of Absorption and Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Takei, Y.; Hagihara, T.; Yoshino, T.; Wang, Q. D.; Yao, Y.; McCammon, D.

    2010-03-01

    Spectroscopic study of Oxygen emission/absorption lines is a new tool to investigate the nature of the soft X-ray background. We investigated the emission spectra of 14 fields obtained by Suzaku, and detected OVII and OVIII lines separately. There is an almost isotropic OVII line emission with 2 LU intensity. As the attenuation length in the Galactic plane for that energy is short, that OVII emission should arise within 300 pc of our neighborhood. In comparison with the estimated emission measure for the local bubble, the most plausible origin of this component is the solar wind charge exchange with local interstellar materials. Another component presented from the correlation between the OVII and OVIII line intensity is a thermal emission with an apparent temperature of 0.2 keV with a field-to-field fluctuation of 10% in temperature, while the intensity varies about a factor of 4. By the combination analysis of the emission and the absorption spectra, we can investigate the density and the scale length of intervening plasma separately. We analyzed the Chanrdra grating spectra of LMC X-3 and PKS 2155-304, and emission spectra toward the line of sight by Suzaku. In both cases, the combined analysis showed that the hot plasma is not iso-thermal nor uniform. Assuming an exponential disk distribution, the thickness of the disk is as large as a few kpc. It suggests that there is a thick hot disk or hot halo surrounding our Galaxy, which is similar to X-ray hot haloes around several spiral galaxies.

  8. Study of silver K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung radiation from short-pulse laser-matter interactions with applications for x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Beg, F. N.; MacPhee, A.; Chen, C.; Hey, D.; Maddox, B.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ma, T.

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of K{alpha} radiation yield and x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from thin-foil silver targets are presented. The targets were irradiated by a short pulse laser with intensities from 5x10{sup 16} to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} at 40 ps. Single hit charge-coupled device detectors, differential filter-stack detectors, and a crystal spectrometer were used to investigate the angular distribution of the K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung x-rays. This study is the first to use a broadband detector to estimate the absolute numbers of K{alpha} photons and to determine K{alpha} to bremsstrahlung ratios. The relevance of this work in the context of x-ray diffraction and x-ray radiography is discussed.

  9. A K-alpha x-ray source using high energy and high repetition rate laser system for phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Serbanescu, Cristina; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    K-alpha x-ray sources from laser produced plasmas provide completely new possibilities for x-ray phase-contrast imaging applications. By tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses onto a solid target K-alpha x-ray pulses are generated through the interaction of energetic electrons created in the plasma with the bulk target. In this paper, we present a continuous and efficient Mo K-alpha x-ray source produced by a femtosecond laser system operating at 100 Hz repetition rate with maximum pulse energy of 110 mJ before compression. The source has an x-ray conversion efficiency of greater than 10(-5) into K-alpha line emission. In preparation for phase contrast imaging applications, the size of the resultant K-alpha x-ray emission spot has been also characterized. The source exhibits sufficient spatial coherence to observe phase contrast. We observe a relatively small broadening of the K-alpha source size compared to the size of the laser beam itself. Detailed characterization of the source including the x-ray spectrum and the x-ray average yield along with phase contrast images of test objects will be presented.

  10. Common substructure in otoacoustic emission spectra of land vertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, Geoffrey A.; Köppl, Christine; Bergevin, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In humans, a similar spectral periodicity is found in all otoacoustic emission types and in threshold fine structure. This may reflect travelling wave phase and reflectance from "structural roughness" in the organ of Corti, or entrainment and suppressive interactions between emissions. To further understand these phenomena, we have examined spontaneous otoacoustic emission (SOAE) spectra in 9 lizard species and the barn owl and find a comparable periodicity. Importantly, the frequency spacing between SOAE peaks was independent of the physical spacing and of the frequency space constants in hearing organs. In 9 lizard species, median spectral gaps lay between 219 and 461 Hz, with no correlation to papillar length (0.3 to 2.1 mm). Similarly in much longer organs: In humans (35 mm), SOAE spectral gaps vary up to 220 Hz at 4 kHz; in the barn owl (11 mm), the median SOAE peak spacing was 395Hz. In the barn owl, a very large space constant between 5 and 10 kHz (5 mm/octave) contrasts with stable SOAE spacing between 1 and 11 kHz. Similar SOAE spectral gaps across all species suggests they represent a basic frequency grating revealing local phase-dependent interactions between active hair cells, a feature not determined by macro-structural anatomy. Emission spectral spacing is independent of cochlear length, of the frequency space constant, of the existence of travelling waves or of a tectorial membrane. Our data suggest that there are greater similarities between frequency selectivity reflected at the level of the hair cells' spontaneous mechanical output (OAEs) than there are at the level of the auditory nerve, where macro-structural anatomy links hair-cell activity differentially to the neural output. Apparently, all hair-cell arrays show a similar frequency substructure not directly replicated in neural tuning.

  11. Jet-Cooled Emission Spectra of the Xylyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selco, J. I.; Carrick, P. G.

    1995-09-01

    Jet-cooled electronic emission spectra from ortho-, meta-, and para-xylyl (methylbenzyl) radicals have been recorded with a corona excited supersonic expansion (CESE) apparatus. A full vibronic analysis of the D1 → D0 transitions for all three isomers has been carried out, allowing for unambiguous assignments of the gas-phase ground state vibrational frequencies. For modes exhibiting progressions (numbering according to Green and Wilson) (11 (18a), 29 (6b), 10 (6a), 9 (1), 25 (3) and 5 (14) in ortho-xylyl; 10 (6b) in meta-xylyl; and 5 (1), 6 (6a), 3 (7a), and 17 (10a) in para-xylyl), anharmonicity constants are calculated and reported. Although CESE excitation of the xylenes (used in this study as precursors) did not result in the interconversion of isomers, it does occur along with homolytic methyl C-H bond dissociation during the formation of the radicals.

  12. Fluorescence Emission and Excitation Spectra of Photo-Fragmented Nitrobenzene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Christopher J.; Tanjaroon, Chakree; Johnson, J. Bruce; Allen, Susan D.; Reeve, Scott W.

    2012-06-01

    Upon absorption of a UV photon, nitrobenzene readily dissociates into C_6H_5, NO_2, C_6H_5NO, O, C_6H_5O, and NO through three different channels. We have recorded high resolution emission and excitation spectra of the NO resulting from photo-fragmented nitrobenzene using a pulsed picosecond tunable laser and a nanosecond dye laser. Specifically, the lasers probed the A^2Σ^+→ X^2π(1/2,3/2) NO band system between 225-260 nm using an one or two color process. In a one color process, the same energy (wavelength) photon is used to dissociate nitrobenzene and excite NO. In a two color process, photons of a particular energy are used to dissociate the nitrobenzene while photons of a different energy are used to probe the resultant NO. We have determined the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the nascent NO. And, we have examined the effect of the relative timing of the two photons on the fluorescence spectra to extract information about the photodissociation dynamics. Lin, M.-F.; Lee, Y. T.; Ni, C.-K.; Xu, S. and Lin, M. C. J. Chem. Phys., AIP, 2007, 126.

  13. Orbits and emission spectra from the 2014 Camelopardalids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, José M.; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Zamorano, Jaime; Izquierdo, Jaime; de Miguel, Alejandro Sánchez; Ocaña, Francisco; Ortiz, José L.; Espartero, Francisco; Morillas, Lorenzo G.; Cardeñosa, David; Moreno-Ibáñez, Manuel; Urzáiz, Marta

    2014-12-01

    We have analysed the meteor activity associated with meteoroids of fresh dust trails of Comet 209P/LINEAR, which produced an outburst of the Camelopardalid meteor shower (IAU code #451, CAM) in 2014 May. With this aim, we have employed an array of high-sensitivity CCD video devices and spectrographs deployed at 10 meteor observing stations in Spain in the framework of the Spanish Meteor Network. Additional meteoroid flux data were obtained by means of two forward-scatter radio systems. The observed peak zenithal hourly rate was much lower than expected, of around 20 meteors h-1. Despite of the small meteor flux in the optical range, we have obtained precise atmospheric trajectory, radiant and orbital information for 11 meteor and fireball events associated with this stream. The ablation behaviour and low tensile strength calculated for these particles reveal that Camelopardalid meteoroids are very fragile, mostly pristine aggregates with strength similar to that of the Orionids and the Leonids. The mineral grains seem to be glued together by a volatile phase. We also present and discuss two unique emission spectra produced by two Camelopardalid bright meteors. These suggest a non-chondritic nature for these particles, which exhibit Fe depletion in their composition.

  14. NGC 5548: LACK OF A BROAD Fe K{alpha} LINE AND CONSTRAINTS ON THE LOCATION OF THE HARD X-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M.; Krongold, Y.; Liu, Y.; Mathur, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the co-added and individual 0.7-40 keV spectra from seven Suzaku observations of the Sy 1.5 galaxy NGC 5548 taken over a period of eight weeks. We conclude that the source has a moderately ionized, three-zone warm absorber, a power-law continuum, and exhibits contributions from cold, distant reflection. Relativistic reflection signatures are not significantly detected in the co-added data, and we place an upper limit on the equivalent width of a relativistically broad Fe K{alpha} line at EW {<=} 26 eV at 90% confidence. Thus NGC 5548 can be labeled as a 'weak' type 1 active galactic nucleus (AGN) in terms of its observed inner disk reflection signatures, in contrast to sources with very broad, strong iron lines such as MCG-6-30-15, which are likely much fewer in number. We compare physical properties of NGC 5548 and MCG-6-30-15 that might explain this difference in their reflection properties. Though there is some evidence that NGC 5548 may harbor a truncated inner accretion disk, this evidence is inconclusive, so we also consider light bending of the hard X-ray continuum emission in order to explain the lack of relativistic reflection in our observation. If the absence of a broad Fe K{alpha} line is interpreted in the light-bending context, we conclude that the source of the hard X-ray continuum lies at radii r{sub s} {approx}> 100 r{sub g}. We note, however, that light-bending models must be expanded to include a broader range of physical parameter space in order to adequately explain the spectral and timing properties of average AGNs, rather than just those with strong, broad iron lines.

  15. Quantitative analysis of directional spontaneous emission spectra from light sources in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-05-15

    We have performed angle-resolved measurements of spontaneous-emission spectra from laser dyes and quantum dots in opal and inverse opal photonic crystals. Pronounced directional dependencies of the emission spectra are observed: angular ranges of strongly reduced emission adjoin with angular ranges of enhanced emission. It appears that emission from embedded light sources is affected both by the periodicity and by the structural imperfections of the crystals: the photons are Bragg diffracted by lattice planes and scattered by unavoidable structural disorder. Using a model comprising diffuse light transport and photonic band structure, we quantitatively explain the directional emission spectra. This work provides detailed understanding of the transport of spontaneously emitted light in real photonic crystals, which is essential in the interpretation of quantum optics in photonic-band-gap crystals and for applications wherein directional emission and total emission power are controlled.

  16. New downshifted maximum in stimulated electromagnetic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Evgeny; Grach, Savely

    A new spectral maximum in spectra of stimulated electromagnetic emission of the ionosphere (SEE, [1]) was detected in experiments at the SURA facility in 2008 for the pump frequencies f0 4.4-4.5 MHz, most stably for f0 = 4.3 MHz, the lowest possible pump frequency at the SURA facility. The new maximum is situated at frequency shifts ∆f -6 kHz from the pump wave frequency f0 , ∆f = fSEE - f0 , somewhat closer to the f0 than the well known [2,3] Downshifted Maximum in the SEE spectrum at ∆f -9 kHz. The detection and detailed study of the new feature (which we tentatively called the New Downshifted Maximum, NDM) became possible due to high frequency resolution in spectral analysis. The following properties of the NDM are established. (i) The NDM appears in the SEE spectra simultaneously with the DM and UM features after the pump turn on (recall that the less intensive Upshifted Maximum, UM, is situated at ∆f +(6-8) kHz [2,3]). The NDM can't be attributed to 1 DM [4] or Narrow Continuum Maximum (NCM, 2 [5]) SEE features, as well as to splitted DM near gyroharmonics [2]. (ii) The NDM is observed as prominent feature for maximum pump power of the SURA facility P ≈ 120 MW ERP, for which the DM is almost covered by the Broad Continuum SEE feature [2,3]. For P ˜ 30-60 MW ERP the DM and NDM have comparable intensities. For the lesser pump power the DM prevails in the SEE spectrum, while the NDM becomes invisible being covered by the thermal Narrow Continuum feature [2]. (iii) The NDM is exactly symmetrical for the UM relatively to f0 when the former one is observed, although the UM frequency offset increases up to ∆fUM ≈ +9 kHz with a decrease of the pump power up to P ≈ 4 MW ERP. The DM formation in the SEE spectrum is attributed to a three-wave interaction between the upper and lower hybrid waves in the ionosphere, and the lower hybrid frequency ( 7 kHz) determines the frequency offset of the DM high frequency flank [2,6]. The detection of the NDM with

  17. Measuring the response of canopy emissivity spectra to leaf area index variation using thermal hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neinavaz, Elnaz; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Groen, Thomas A.

    2016-12-01

    One of the plant biophysical factors affecting the canopy spectral reflectance of plants in the optical domain to receive research attention in recent decades is leaf area index (LAI). Although it is expected that the value of LAI affects the emission of radiation, it not known how. To our knowledge, the effect of LAI on plant canopy emissivity spectra has not yet been investigated in the thermal infrared region (TIR 8-14 μm). The overall aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of LAI on canopy emissivity spectra of different species at the nadir position. The 279 spectral wavebands in the TIR domain were measured under controlled laboratory condition using a MIDAC spectrometer for four plant species. The corresponding LAI of each measurement was destructively calculated. We found a positive correlation between canopy emissivity spectra at various LAI values, indicating that emissivity increases concomitantly with LAI value. The canopy emissivity spectra of the four species were found to be statistically different at various wavebands even when the LAI values of the species were similar. It seems that other biophysical or biochemical factors also contribute to canopy emissivity spectra: this merits further investigation. We not only quantify the role of LAI on canopy emissivity spectra for the first time, but also demonstrate the potential of using hyperspectral thermal data to estimate LAI of plant species.

  18. Equilibrium excited state and emission spectra of molecular aggregates from the hierarchical equations of motion approach.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liping; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2013-01-28

    The hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) method was applied to calculate the emission spectra of molecular aggregates using the Frenkel exciton model. HEOM equations for the one-exciton excited state were first propagated until equilibration. The reduced density operator and auxiliary density operators (ADOs) were used to characterize the coupled system-bath equilibrium. The dipole-dipole correlation functions were then calculated to obtain the emission spectra of model dimers, and the B850 band of light-harvesting complex II (LH2) in purple bacteria. The effect of static disorder on equilibrium excited state and the emission spectra of LH2 was also explicitly considered. Several approximation schemes, including the high temperature approximation (HTA) of the HEOM, a modified version of the HTA, the stochastic Liouville equation approach, the perturbative time-local and time-nonlocal generalized quantum master equations, were assessed in the calculation of the equilibrium excited state and emission spectra.

  19. Spectra and rates of bremsstrahlung neutrino emission in stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gang; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the energy-differential rate for neutrino emission from electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung in stellar interiors taking into account the effects of electron screening and ionic correlations. We compare the energy-differential and the net rates, as well as the average ν¯e and ν¯x(x =μ ,τ ) energies, for this process with those for e± pair annihilation, plasmon decay, and photoneutrino emission over a wide range of temperature and density. We also compare our updated energy loss rates for the above thermal neutrino emission processes with the fitting formulas widely used in stellar evolution models and determine the temperature and density domain in which each process dominates. We discuss the implications of our results for detection of ν¯e from massive stars during their presupernova evolution and find that pair annihilation makes the predominant contribution to the signal from the thermal emission processes.

  20. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon…

  1. Thermal emission spectra of the Earth and atmosphere from the Nimbus 4 Michelson interferometer experiment.

    PubMed

    Hanel, R A; Conrath, B J

    1970-10-10

    Profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and ozone can be recovered from the thermal emission spectra in the interval 400 to 1,500 cm(-1) obtained from the Nimbus 4 satellite. The spectra can also be used to study surface restrahlen effects and other geophysical and meteorological phenomena.

  2. X-ray bumps, iron K-alpha lines, and X-ray suppression by obscuring tori in Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.; Madau, Piero; Zycki, Piotr T.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the X-ray spectral properties of unobscured type 1 and obscured type 2 Seyferts as predicted by the unified Seyfert scheme. We consider the reprocessing of X-ray photons by photoelectric absorption, iron fluorescence, and Compton downscattering in the obscuring tori surrounding these active nuclei, and compute by Monte Carlo methods the reprocessed spectra as a function of the viewing angle. Depending on the optical depth and shape of the torus, and on the viewing angle, the X-ray flux can be suppressed by substantial factors when our line of sight is obscured. We show that an immediate consequence of the existence of an obscuring thick torus is the production in the spectra of type 1 Seyfert galaxies of a bump in the continuum above 10-20 keV and an Fe K-alpha line with significant equivalent width. In those type 2 Seyferts for which the hard X-ray spectrum has been substantially suppressed, the equivalent width of the Fe K-alpha line in the transmitted spectrum can be very large.

  3. Emission spectra of YAG:Er3+ under pulse laser-thermal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, V. M.; Shakir, Yu. A.

    2016-12-01

    Spectra and kinetics of emission of YAG:0.5% Er3+ monocrystal in visible and NIR ranges were investigated under laser-thermal excitation by the pulses of CO2 laser of 100 ns duration at wavelength λ = 10,6 μμm. Kinetics of integral emission was interpreted.

  4. [A new automated method to identify emission line star from massive spectra].

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing-Chang; Zhang, Cai-Ming; Wei, Peng; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2012-06-01

    Stellar spectra are characterized by obvious absorption lines or absorption bands, while those with emission lines are usually special stars such as cataclysmic variable stars (CVs), HerbigAe/Be etc. The further study of this kind of spectra is meaningful. The present paper proposed a new method to identify emission line stars (ELS) spectra automatically. After the continuum normalization is done for the original spectral flux, line detection is made by comparing the normalized flux with the mean and standard deviation of the flux in its neighbor region The results of the experiment on massive spectra from SDSS DR8 indicate that the method can identify ELS spectra completely and accurately. Since no complex transformation and computation are involved in this method, the identifying process is fast and it is ideal for the ELS detection in large sky survey projects like LAMOST and SDSS.

  5. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitar, David

    2012-12-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboralory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediale results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon point-and-shoot auto focusing camera and two different cellphone cameras: one at 6.1 MP and the other at 5.1 MP.

  6. Effects of grain boundary characteristics of steel on magnetoacoustic emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Yost, W. T.; Utrata, D.; Grainger, J. L.; Kushnick, P. W.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the effects of grain boundary characteristics on the properties of a magnetoacoustic emission spectra obtained by external ac magnetic field-driven domain wall motions. In studies with HY80 steel samples, it is found that the domain wall-defect interaction enhances as more grain boundary is introduced. The enhancement of the domain wall-defect interaction generates high amplitude magnetoacoustic emission pulses and reduces the rate of magnetoacoustic emission events by limiting domain wall motions.

  7. Separation of Atmospheric and Surface Spectral Features in Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2000-01-01

    We present two algorithms for the separation of spectral features caused by atmospheric and surface components in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. One algorithm uses radiative transfer and successive least squares fitting to find spectral shapes first for atmospheric dust, then for water-ice aerosols, and then, finally, for surface emissivity. A second independent algorithm uses a combination of factor analysis, target transformation, and deconvolution to simultaneously find dust, water ice, and surface emissivity spectral shapes. Both algorithms have been applied to TES spectra, and both find very similar atmospheric and surface spectral shapes. For TES spectra taken during aerobraking and science phasing periods in nadir-geometry these two algorithms give meaningful and usable surface emissivity spectra that can be used for mineralogical identification.

  8. Excitation Spectra of Carbon Nuclei near η ' Emission Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itahashi, Kenta; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas; Friedrich, Stefan; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Geissel, Hans; Gellanki, Jnaneswari; Guo, Chenlei; Gutz, Eric; Haettner, Emma; Harakeh, Muhsin N.; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Higashi, Yuko; Hirenzaki, Satoru; Hornung, Christine; Igarashi, Yoichi; Ikeno, Natsumi; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Jido, Daisuke; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; Kanungo, Rituparna; Knoebel, Ronja; Kurz, Nikolaus; Metag, Volker; Mukha, Ivan; Nagae, Tomofumi; Nagahiro, Hideko; Nanova, Mariana; Nishi, Takahiro; Ong, Hooi Jin; Pietri, Stephane; Prochazka, Andrej; Rappold, Christophe; Reiter, Moritz P.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José L.; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Simon, Haik; Sitar, Branislav; Strmen, Peter; Sun, Baohua; Suzuki, Ken; Szarka, Imrich; Takechi, Maya; Tanaka, Yoshiki K.; Tanihata, Isao; Terashima, Satoru; Watanabe, Yuni N.; Weick, Helmut; Widmann, Eberhard; Winfield, John S.; Xu, Xiaodong; Yamakami, Hiroki; Zhao, Jianwei

    We measured an excitation spectrum of 12C(p, d) reaction near the η' emission threshold using a 2.5 GeV proton beam. The measured spectrum shows no peak structures which are associated to formation of η'-mesic nuclei. Further analysis is ongoing to deduce upper limits of the formation cross section and to set constraints in the η'-nucleus interaction.

  9. Inclusive Proton Emission Spectra from Deuteron Breakup Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. V.; Capote, R.; Sin, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present calculations of deuteron elastic and nonelastic breakup cross sections and angular distributions at deuteron energies below 100 MeV obtained using the post-form DWBA approximation. The elastic breakup cross section was extensively studied in the past. Very few calculations of nonelastic breakup have been performed, however. We compare two forms of the elastic DWBA breakup amplitude but conclude that neither provides a correct description of the inclusive proton emission cross section.

  10. High-resolution measurements, line identification, and spectral modeling of K-alpha transitions in Fe XVIII-Fe XXV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Phillips, T.; Jacobs, V. L.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Von Goeler, S.; Kahn, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the iron K-alpha emission spectrum covering the wavelength region from 1.840 to 1.940 A is presented. Measurements are made with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak for plasma conditions which closely resemble those of solar flares. A total of 40 features are identified, consisting of either single or multiple lines from eight charge states in iron, Fe XVIII - Fe XXV, and their wavelengths are determined with an accuracy of 0.1-0.4 mA. Many of these features are identified for the first time. In the interpretation of our observations we rely on model calculations that determine the ionic species abundances from electron density and temperature profiles measured independently with nonspectroscopic techniques and that incorporate theoretical collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates resulting in the excitation of the 1s2sr2ps configurations. The model calculations also include the effect of diffusive ion transport. Good overall agreement between the model calculations and the observations is obtained, which gives us confidence in our line identifications and spectral modeling capabilities. The results are compared with earlier analyses of the K-alpha emission from the Sun.

  11. Modeling the Infrared Emission Spectra of Specific PAH Molecules in Interstellar Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aigen

    2007-05-01

    The 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3 micron emission features ubiquitously seen in a wide variety of Galactic and extragalactic objects, are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Although the PAH hypothesis is quite successful in explaining the general pattern of the observed emission spectra, so far there is no actual precise identification of a single specific PAH molecule in interstellar space. Therefore, when modeling the observed PAH emission spectra, astronomers usually take an empirical approach by constructing 'astro-PAHs' which do not represent any specific material, but approximate the actual absorption properties of the PAH mixture in astrophysical regions. We propose a Spitzer Theory Program to study the photoexcitation of specific PAH molecules and their ions in interstellar space, taking a statistical-mechanical (instead of thermal) approach. For most of the specific PAH molecules selected for this research (with a small number of vibrational degrees of freedom), thermal approximation is not valid. Using available laboratory and quantum-chemical data (e.g. vibrational frequencies, UV/visible/IR absorption cross sections), we will calculate the emission spectra of 21 representative specific PAH molecules and their ions, ranging from naphthalene to circumcoronene, illuminated by interstellar radiation fields of a wide range of intensities. This program will create a web-based 'library' of the emission spectra of 21 specific PAH molecules and their ions as a function of starlight intensities. This 'library' will be made publicly available by October 2008 on the internet at http://www.missouri.edu/~lia/. By comparing observed PAH spectra with model spectra produced by co-adding the emission spectra of different PAH molecules available in this 'library' (with different weights for different species), one will be able to estimate the total PAH mass and relative abundances of each PAH species, using real PAH properties.

  12. Calculation of gain and luminescence spectra of quantum-cascade laser structures taking into account asymmetric emission line broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, D V; Manak, I S; Kononenko, V K

    2010-05-26

    The energy levels, wave functions, and matrix elements of optical dipole transitions are calculated numerically for superlattice quantum-cascade structures. The effect of spectral broadening on the shape of emission spectra is estimated and semiphenomenological asymmetric profiles of emission line broadening are proposed. It is shown that the electroluminescence spectra well agree with the calculated spontaneous recombination spectra. (lasers)

  13. Noise and Signal for Spectra of Intermittent Noiselike Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D.

    2011-05-01

    We show that intermittency of noiselike emission, after propagation through a scattering medium, affects the distribution of noise in the observed correlation function. Intermittency also affects correlation of noise among channels of the spectrum, but leaves the average spectrum, average correlation function, and distribution of noise among channels of the spectrum unchanged. Pulsars are examples of such sources: intermittent and affected by interstellar propagation. We assume that the source emits Gaussian white noise, modulated by a time envelope. Propagation convolves the resulting time series with an impulse-response function that represents effects of dispersion, scattering, and absorption. We assume that this propagation kernel is shorter than the time for an observer to accumulate a single spectrum. We show that rapidly varying intermittent emission tends to concentrate noise near the central lag of the correlation function. We derive mathematical expressions for this effect, in terms of the time envelope and the propagation kernel. We present examples, discuss effects of background noise, and compare our results with observations.

  14. NOISE AND SIGNAL FOR SPECTRA OF INTERMITTENT NOISELIKE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D. E-mail: michaeltdh@physics.ucsb.edu

    2011-05-20

    We show that intermittency of noiselike emission, after propagation through a scattering medium, affects the distribution of noise in the observed correlation function. Intermittency also affects correlation of noise among channels of the spectrum, but leaves the average spectrum, average correlation function, and distribution of noise among channels of the spectrum unchanged. Pulsars are examples of such sources: intermittent and affected by interstellar propagation. We assume that the source emits Gaussian white noise, modulated by a time envelope. Propagation convolves the resulting time series with an impulse-response function that represents effects of dispersion, scattering, and absorption. We assume that this propagation kernel is shorter than the time for an observer to accumulate a single spectrum. We show that rapidly varying intermittent emission tends to concentrate noise near the central lag of the correlation function. We derive mathematical expressions for this effect, in terms of the time envelope and the propagation kernel. We present examples, discuss effects of background noise, and compare our results with observations.

  15. A new emission feature in IRAS spectra and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    IRAS spectra of those sources which show strong 7.7 and 11.3 micron emission features also show a plateau of emission extending from 11.3 to about 13.0 microns. Like the 11.3 micron feature, this new feature is attributed to the CH out-of-plane bending mode in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its discovery reinforces the identification of the 'unidentified infrared emission features' as emission from PAHs. The wavelength of this new feature suggests that interstellar PAHs are not as partially hydrogenated as hitherto thought. It also constrains their molecular structure.

  16. Time-Resolved Emission Spectra Of Tryptophan And Proteins From Frequency-Domain Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmacineki, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1988-06-01

    We report measurements of time-resolved emission spectra of N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATA), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, residues 1-24), and of S. Nuclease. These spectra were calculated from the frequency-response of the emission, measured at several wavelengths across the emission spectra. Measurements were performed on samples not quenched and quenched by acrylamide, the latter providing additional information on the short time events. The time-resolved center-of-gravity does not decay as a single exponential. At least two spectral relaxation times are needed to account for the present data. NATA and ACTH each display relaxation times near 50 and 800 ps, which may be characteristic of exposed tryptophan residues. S. nuclease displayed slower relaxation times near 0.5 and 10 ns, which probably reflect the dynamic protein matrix which surrounds the residue.

  17. Natural broadening in the quantum emission spectra of higher-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-01-01

    Following an intriguing heuristic argument of Bekenstein, many researches have suggested during the last four decades that quantized black holes may be characterized by discrete radiation spectra. Bekenstein and Mukhanov (BM) have further argued that the emission spectra of quantized (3 +1 )-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes are expected to be sharp in the sense that the characteristic natural broadening δ ω of the black-hole radiation lines, as deduced from the quantum time-energy uncertainty principle, is expected to be much smaller than the characteristic frequency spacing Δ ω =O (TBH/ℏ) between adjacent black-hole quantum emission lines. It is of considerable physical interest to test the general validity of the interesting conclusion reached by BM regarding the sharpness of the Schwarzschild black-hole quantum radiation spectra. To this end, in the present paper we explore the physical properties of the expected radiation spectra of quantized (D +1 )-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. In particular, we analyze the functional dependence of the characteristic dimensionless ratio ζ (D )≡δ ω /Δ ω on the number D +1 of spacetime dimensions. Interestingly, it is proved that the dimensionless physical parameter ζ (D ), which characterizes the sharpness of the black-hole quantum emission spectra, is an increasing function of D . In particular, we prove that the quantum emission lines of (D +1 )-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes in the regime D ≳10 are characterized by the dimensionless ratio ζ (D )≳1 and are therefore effectively blended together. The results presented in this paper thus suggest that, even if the underlying energy spectra of quantized (D +1 )-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes are fundamentally discrete, as argued by many authors, the quantum phenomenon of natural broadening is expected to smear the characteristic emission spectra of these higher-dimensional black holes into a continuum.

  18. Emission spectra of selected SSME elements and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.; Vandyke, David B.; Bircher, Felix E.; Gardner, Donald G.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    Stennis Space Center (SSC) is pursuing the advancement of experimental techniques and theoretical developments in the field of plume spectroscopy for application to rocket development testing programs and engine health monitoring. Exhaust plume spectral data for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are routinely acquired. The usefulness of this data depends upon qualitative and quantitative interpretation of spectral features and their correlation with the engine performance. A knowledge of the emission spectral characteristics of effluent materials in the exhaust plume is essential. A study of SSME critical components and their materials identified 30 elements and 53 materials whose engine exhaust plume spectral might be required. The most important were evaluated using SSC's Diagnostic Testbed Facility Thruster (DTFT), a 1200-lbf, liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen rocket engine which very nearly replicates the temperature and pressure conditions of the SSME exhaust plume in the first Mach diamond. This report presents the spectral data for the 10 most important elements and 27 most important materials which are strongly to moderately emitting in the DTFT exhaust plume. The covered spectral range is 300 to 426 nm and the spectral resolution is 0.25 nm. Spectral line identification information is provided and line interference effects are considered.

  19. Critical assessment of the emission spectra of various photosystem II core complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhai; Kell, Adam; Acharya, Khem; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate low-temperature (low-T) emission spectra of photosystem II core complexes (PSII-cc) previously reported in the literature, which are compared with emission spectra of PSII-cc obtained in this work from spinach and for dissolved PSII crystals from Thermosynechococcus (T.) elongatus. This new spectral dataset is used to interpret data published on membrane PSII (PSII-m) fragments from spinach and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, as well as PSII-cc from T. vulcanus and intentionally damaged PSII-cc from spinach. This study offers new insight into the assignment of emission spectra reported on PSII-cc from different organisms. Previously reported spectra are also compared with data obtained at different saturation levels of the lowest energy state(s) of spinach and T. elongatus PSII-cc via hole burning in order to provide more insight into emission from bleached and/or photodamaged complexes. We show that typical low-T emission spectra of PSII-cc (with closed RCs), in addition to the 695 nm fluorescence band assigned to the intact CP47 complex (Reppert et al. J Phys Chem B 114:11884-11898, 2010), can be contributed to by several emission bands, depending on sample quality. Possible contributions include (i) a band near 690-691 nm that is largely reversible upon temperature annealing, proving that the band originates from CP47 with a bleached low-energy state near 693 nm (Neupane et al. J Am Chem Soc 132:4214-4229, 2010; Reppert et al. J Phys Chem B 114:11884-11898, 2010); (ii) CP43 emission at 683.3 nm (not at 685 nm, i.e., the F685 band, as reported in the literature) (Dang et al. J Phys Chem B 112:9921-9933, 2008; Reppert et al. J Phys Chem B 112:9934-9947, 2008); (iii) trap emission from destabilized CP47 complexes near 691 nm (FT1) and 685 nm (FT2) (Neupane et al. J Am Chem Soc 132:4214-4229, 2010); and (iv) emission from the RC pigments near 686-687 nm. We suggest that recently reported emission of single PSII-cc complexes from T. elongatus may not represent

  20. Sulphur Kβ emission spectra reveal protonation states of aqueous sulfuric acid

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Johannes; Sahle, Christoph J.; Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Müller, Harald; Kavčič, Matjaž; Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Petric, Marko; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report an X-ray emission study of bulk aqueous sulfuric acid. Throughout the range of molarities from 1 M to 18 M the sulfur Kβ emission spectra from H2SO4 (aq) depend on the molar fractions and related deprotonation of H2SO4. We compare the experimental results with results from emission spectrum calculations based on atomic structures of single molecules and structures from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the S Kβ emission spectrum is a sensitive probe of the protonation state of the acid molecules. Using non-negative matrix factorization we are able to extract the fractions of different protonation states in the spectra, and the results are in good agreement with the simulation for the higher part of the concentration range. PMID:26888159

  1. Calculation of spontaneous emission and gain spectra for quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. K.; Li, A. Z.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, a quantum cascade laser has been treated as a three-level system, and the calculation of the spontaneous emission and gain spectra has been given. In the calculation, the conduction band nonparabolicity and the injection and exit of electrons have been considered. Results have shown that with increasing injection current, the spontaneous emission peak blue shifts, and the peak intensity increases near linearly with current. With increasing temperatures, the broadening of the spontaneous emission spectra has been attributed to the electron-optical phonon interactions. The peak gain of the stimulated emission has been shown to be determined mainly by the subband lifespans. We have pointed out that it is essential to obtain a long lifespan for the second excited state and short lifespan for the first excited state in order to obtain efficient population inversion and high peak gain for quantum cascade lasers.

  2. Biexciton decay and multimagnon sideband in emission spectra of CsMnF 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Hirano, M.

    1980-11-01

    Emission spectra of intrinsic and impurity-trapped excitons and their side- bands have been measured in CsMnF 3 by a polarized time-resolved spectroscopy. From a biexcitonic decay of an emission an exciton- exciton interaction was found to be very small in contrast with those of MnF 2 and KMnF 3. Multimagnon sidebands have been assigned with the aid of calculation of magnon density of states.

  3. Discernment of lint trash in raw cotton using multivariate analysis of excitation-emission luminescence spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excitation-Emission luminescence spectra of basic (pH 12.5) phosphate buffer solution extracts were used to distinguish among botanical components of trash within seed cotton. All components were separated from whole plants removed from a field in southern New Mexico. Unfolded Principal Component An...

  4. A Safe and Interactive Method of Illuminating Discharge Tubes for Studying Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Discharge tubes are useful tools for teaching emission spectra and the discrete energy levels of the Bohr model. A new setup uses a plasma globe to illuminate the discharge tube and allows a higher degree of interactivity owing to the omission of a traditional, high-voltage power source. The decreased power consumption also reduces the heating of…

  5. Cassini VIMS Spectra of the Thermal Emission from Hot Spots Along Enceladus South Pole Fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Cassini VIMS Team

    2016-10-01

    Most of the south pole fissure region has not been directly illuminated by sunlight since the sub-solar point moved into the northern hemisphere in 2009, thereby eliminating the background of reflected sunlight at VIMS wavelengths and making the fissure thermal emission readily measureable. Since then, VIMS has measured spectra of at least 11 hot spots along the fissures. Most of these measurements were acquired in ride-along mode with CIRS as the prime instrument. During at least 2 encounters, VIMS and CIRS acquired simultaneous or near-simultaneous spectra of the same fissure location. VIMS spectra include multiple hot spots along Damascus, Baghdad, Cairo, and a likely hot spot on Alexandria.All of the VIMS spectra examined to date are consistent with this scenario of a self-regulating fissure maximum T~200 K with brighter VIMS emissions corresponding to fissures up to ~20 m wide. Emission from the warm fissure interior walls dominate the VIMS spectra with <15% contributed by conductive heating of the adjacent terrain at VIMS wavelengths.CIRS spectra report slightly cooler T's due to CIRS increased sensitivity to lower T emission at longer wavelengths and averaging over contributions from both the hottest and cooler areas. Combined analysis of the CIRS and VIMS spectra spanning 3 to 500 micron wavelengths promises to reveal the distribution of [T, area] near the fissures that cannot be spatially resolved. This [T, area] distribution holds the key to understanding how heat is transferred to the surface within a few 100 m of the fissures.The VIMS-detected emission is concentrated in localized hot spots along the fissures and does not seem to be distributed continuously along them. CIRS spectra suggest a more continuous distribution of the emission along the fissure length. Jets locations also are distributed along the fissure length and it appears that the VIMS-detected hot spots in general correlate with jet locations, but not all of the jet locations have been

  6. Modification of Optical Properties of Seawater Exposed to Oil Contaminants Based on Excitation-Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The optical behaviour of seawater exposed to a residual amount of oil pollution is presented and a comparison of the fluorescence spectra of oil dissolved in both n-hexane and seawater is discussed based on excitation-emission spectra. Crude oil extracted from the southern part of the Baltic Sea was used to characterise petroleum properties after contact with seawater. The wavelength-independent fluorescence maximum for natural seawater and seawater artificially polluted with oil were determined. Moreover, the specific excitation-emission peaks for natural seawater and polluted water were analysed to identify the natural organic matter composition. It was found that fluorescence spectra identification is a promising method to detect even an extremely low concentration of petroleum residues directly in the seawater. In addition, alien substances disturbing the fluorescence signatures of natural organic substances in a marine environment is also discussed.

  7. [Experimental study on the size spectra and emission factor of ultrafine particle from coal combustion].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zai; Yang, Wen-jun; Xie, Xiao-fang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Cai, Zhi-liang

    2014-12-01

    The emission characteristics of ultrafine particles released from pulverized coal combustion were studied, the size spectra of ultrafine particles (5.6-560 nm) were measured with FMPS (fast mobility particle sizer) on a self-built aerosol experiment platform. Meanwhile, a particle dynamic evolution model was established to obtain the particle deposition rate and the emission rate through the optimized algorithm. Finally, the emission factor was calculated. The results showed that at the beginning of particle generation, the size spectra were polydisperse and complex, the initial size spectra was mainly composed of three modes including 10 nm, 30-40 nm and 100-200 nm. Among them, the number concentration of mode around 10 nm was higher than those of other modes, the size spectrum of around 100-200 nm was lognormal distributed, with a CMD (count median diameter) of around 16 nm. Then, as time went on, the total number concentration was decayed by exponential law, the CMD first increased and then tended to be stable gradually. The calculation results showed that the emission factor of particles from coal combustion under laboratory condition was (5.54 x 10(12) ± 2.18 x 10(12)) unit x g(-1).

  8. An automated research facility for measuring thermoluminescence emission spectra using an optical multichannel analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piters, T. M.; Meulemans, W. H.; Bos, A. J. J.

    1993-01-01

    A facility for research into the mechanism of thermoluminescence (TL) is described. The facility comprises three units: an annealing oven, an irradiator, and a TL-emission spectrometer. Crystals or hot-pressed chips can be moved from and to the mentioned units by an automated sample changer. All units operate automatically and are controlled by a personal computer program. The spectrometer is based on a dispersive grating and an intensified diode array (512 active elements) and covers the 200-800-nm wavelength range. The wavelength resolution of the spectrometer is 6 nm when a 25-μm-wide entrance slit is used and 29 nm when a 1-mm-wide entrance slit is used. The sensitive spectrometer could measure emission spectra of CaSO4:Dy (TLD-200) irradiated at an absorbed dose as low as 3 mGy at a signal-to-noise ratio of 10:1 for LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) this ratio was obtained at 75 mGy. A detailed description is given how measured data can be related to spectra predicted by a model, taking into account all system aberrations. Spectra of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) irradiated to an absorbed dose of 5 Gy are analyzed according to the Franck-Condon model for light emission. Two emission bands with peak energies of 3.01 and 2.60 eV at 463 K have been found.

  9. Peculiarities of spectra of induced emission of polymethine dye solutions at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melishchuk, M. V.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Shpak, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Results from studying the induced emission spectra with monochromatic excitation (superluminescent regime) within a temperature range of 300 K - 5.2 K are presented. The significant feature of such operations is the appearance of quasi-lines whose minimum width is realized at 4.2 K. The frequency distribution of the quasi-lines unambiguously characterizes the dye investigated. When interpreting these results, the idea of an inhomogeneous broadening of the polymethine dye spectra in the solution being studied experimentally was used for the first time. The quasi-lines observed are interpreted as a manifestation of the electron vibration structure of singlet states of a complex molecule.

  10. Remote sensing of trace constituents from atmospheric infrared emission and absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, D. B.; Brooks, J. N.; Goldman, A.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. H.; Van Allen, J.; Williams, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Atmospheric infrared emission and absorption spectra obtained from aircraft and balloon-borne spectrometers are presented. From such spectra, mixing ratio vs altitude profiles are derived for several minor constituents. Recent results for HNO3, CF2Cl2, CFCl3, and HF are presented. In addition, the feasibility of infrared detection of other trace constituents, such as HCl, HF, NH3, NO and SO2, against the rest of the atmospheric background is studied. From this study, made on a line-by-line basis for 'state of the art' airborne spectrometers, potential spectral features for detection of the trace constituents are isolated.

  11. Laboratory simulation of infrared astrophysical features. Ph.D. Thesis; [emission spectra of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    Intermediate resolution emission spectroscopy was used to study a group of 9 terrestrial silicates, 1 synthetic silicate, 6 meteorites and 2 lunar soils; comparisons were made with the intermediate resolution spectra of Comet Kohoutek in order to determine which materials best simulate the 10um astrophysical feature. Mixtures of silicates which would yield spectra matching the spectrum of the comet in the 10um region include: (1) A hydrous layer lattice silicate in combination with a high temperature condensate; (2) an amorphous magnesium silicate in combination with a high temperature condensate and (3) glassy olivine and glassy anorthite in approximately equal proportions.

  12. Charge Exchange Spectra of Hydrogenic and He-like Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wargelin, B J; Beiersdorfer, P; Neill, P A; Olson, R E; Scofield, J H

    2005-04-27

    We present H-like Fe XXVI and He-like Fe XXV charge-exchange spectra resulting from collisions of highly charged iron with N{sub 2} gas at an energy of {approx}10 eV amu{sup -1} in an electron beam ion trap. Although high-n emission lines are not resolved in our measurements, we observe that the most likely level for Fe{sup 25+} {yields} Fe{sup 24+} electron capture is n{sub max} {approx} 9, in line with expectations, while the most likely value for Fe{sup 26+} {yields} Fe{sup 25+} charge exchange is significantly higher. In the Fe XXV spectrum, the K{alpha} emission feature dominates, whether produced via charge exchange or collisional excitation. The K{alpha} energy centroid is lower in the former case than the latter (6666 versus 6685 eV, respectively), as expected because of the strong enhancement of emission from the forbidden and intercombination lines, relative to the resonance line, in charge-exchange spectra. In contrast, the Fe XXVI high-n Lyman lines have a summed intensity greater than that of Ly{alpha}, and are substantially stronger than predicted from theoretical calculations of charge exchange with atomic H. A discussion is presented of the relevance of our results to studies of diffuse Fe emission in the Galactic Center and Galactic Ridge, particularly with ASTRO-E2.

  13. On the effect of emergence angle on emissivity spectra: application to small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, Alessandro; Helbert, Jörn; Ferrari, Sabrina; D'Amore, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Dependence of laboratory-measured emissivity spectra from the emergence angle is a subject that still needs a lot of investigations to be fully understood. Most of the previous work is based on reflectance measurements in the VIS-NIR spectral region and on emissivity measurements of flat, solid surfaces (mainly metals), which are not directly applicable to the analysis of remote sensing data. Small bodies in particular (c.f. asteroids Itokawa and 1999JU3, the respective targets of JAXA Hayabusa and Hayabusa 2 missions) have a very irregular surface; hence, the spectra from those rough surfaces are difficult to compare with laboratory spectra, where the observing geometry is always close to "nadir." At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), we have set up a series of spectral measurements to investigate this problem in the 1- to 16-µm spectral region. We measured the emissivity for two asteroid analogue materials (meteorite Millbillillie and a synthetic enstatite) in vacuum and under purged air, at surface temperature of 100 °C, for emergence angles of 0°, 5°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, and 60°. Emissivity of a serpentinite slab, already used as calibration target for the MARA instrument on Hayabusa 2 MASCOT lander and for the thermal infrared imager spectrometer on Hayabusa 2 orbiter, was measured under the same conditions. Additionally, a second basalt slab was measured. Both slabs were not measured at 5° inclination. Complementary reflectance measurements of the four samples were taken. For all the samples measured, we found that for calibrated emissivity, significant variations from values obtained at nadir (0° emergence angle) appear only for emergence angles ≥40°. Reflectance measurements confirmed this finding, showing the same trend of variations.

  14. C-H Hot Bands in the Near-IR Emission Spectra of Leonids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, F. T.; Scoville, J.; Holm, R.; Seelemann, R.; Freund, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    The reported infrared (IR) emission spectra from 1999 Leonid fireballs show a 3.4 micron C-H emission band and unidentified bands at longer wavelengths. Upon atmospheric entry, the Leonid meteorites were flash-heated to temperatures around 2400K, which would destroy any organics on the surface of the meteorite grains. We propose that the nu(sub )CH emission band in the Leonid emission spectra arises from matrix-embedded C(sub n)-H-O entities that are protected from instant pyrolysis. Our model is based on IR absorption nu(sub )CH bands, which we observed in laboratory-grown MgO and natural olivine single crystals, where they arise from C(sub n)-H-O units imbedded in the mineral matrix, indicative of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3 organics. Instead of being pyrolyzed, the C(sub n)-H-O entities in the Leonid trails become vibrationally excited to higher levels n = 1, 2, 3 etc. During de-excitation they emit at 3.4 microns, due to the (0 => 1) transition, and at longer wavelengths, due to hot bands. As a first step toward verifying this hypothesis we measured the C-H vibrational manifold of hexane (C6H14). The calculated positions of the (2 => l ) , (3 => 2), and possibly (4 => 3) hot bands agree with the Leonid emission bands at 3.5, 3.8 and 4.l microns.

  15. Searching for Dwarf H Alpha Emission-line Galaxies within Voids III: First Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. Ward; Draper, Christian; McNeil, Stephen; Joner, Michael D.

    2017-02-01

    The presence or absence of dwarf galaxies with {M}r\\prime > -14 in low-density voids is determined by the nature of dark matter halos. To better understand what this nature is, we are conducting an imaging survey through redshifted Hα filters to look for emission-line dwarf galaxies in the centers of two nearby galaxy voids called FN2 and FN8. Either finding such dwarfs or establishing that they are not present is a significant result. As an important step in establishing the robustness of the search technique, we have observed six candidates from the survey of FN8 with the Gillett Gemini telescope and GMOS spectrometer. All of these candidates had emission, although none was Hα. The emission in two objects was the [O iii]λ4959, 5007 doublet plus Hβ, and the emission in the remaining four was the [O ii]λ3727 doublet, all from objects beyond the void. While no objects were within the void, these spectra show that the survey is capable of finding emission-line dwarfs in the void centers that are as faint as {M}r\\prime ∼ -12.4, should they be present. These spectra also show that redshifts estimated from our filtered images are accurate to several hundred km s‑1 if the line is identified correctly, encouraging further work in finding ways to conduct redshift surveys through imaging alone.

  16. Measurements of trace constituents from atmospheric infrared emission and absorption spectra, a feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Williams, W. J.; Murcray, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of detecting eight trace constituents (CH4, HCl, HF, HNO3, NH3, NO, NO2 and SO2) against the rest of the atmospheric background at various altitudes from infrared emission and absorption atmospheric spectra was studied. Line-by-line calculations and observational data were used to establish features that can be observed in the atmospheric spectrum due to each trace constituent. Model calculations were made for experimental conditions which approximately represent state of the art emission and absorption spectrometers.

  17. Robust red-emission spectra and yields in firefly bioluminescence against temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Wang, Yu; Hiyama, Miyabi; Akiyama, Hidefumi

    2014-05-01

    We measured the quantitative spectra of firefly (Photinus pyralis) bioluminescence at various temperatures to investigate the temperature dependence of the luciferin-luciferase reaction at 15-34 °C. The quantitative spectra were decomposed very well into red (1.9 eV), orange (2.0 eV), and green (2.2 eV) Gaussian components. The intensity of the green component was the only temperature sensitive quantity that linearly decreased as the temperature increased at pH 7 and 8. We found the quantitative bioluminescence spectra to be robust below 2.0 eV against temperature and other experimental conditions. The revealed robustness of the red emissions should be useful for quantitative applications such as adenosine-5'-triphosphate detection.

  18. Study of dynamic emission spectra from lubricant films in an elastohydrodynamic contact using Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra were obtained through a diamond window from lubricating fluids in an operating sliding elastohydrodynamic contact and analyzed by comparison with static absorption spectra under similar pressures. Different loads, shear rates and temperatures were used. Most of the spectra exhibited polarization characteristics, indicating directional alignment of the lubricant in the EHD contact. Among the fluids studied were a "traction" fluid, an advanced ester, and their mixtures, a synthetic paraffin, a naphthenic reference fluid (N-1), both neat and containing 1 percent of p-tricresyl phosphate as an anti-wear additive, and a C-ether. Traction properties were found to be nearly proportional to mixture composition for traction fluid and ester mixtures. The anti-wear additive reduced traction and fluid temperature under low loads but increased them under higher loads, giving rise to formation of a friction polymer.

  19. Measurements of internal magnetic structures from neutral beam emission spectra in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Chung, J.; Song, M.; You, K. I.

    2012-10-01

    The magnetic pitch angle and the magnitude from magnetically confined fusion devices are measured by fitting the beam emission spectra under the motional Stark effect (MSE). Initial values for the free parameters in the complicated raw spectra are obtained from and constrained by the MSE model in the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) which uses a collisional-radiative model with level populations nlm-resolved up to n = 4 and a simple born approximation for ion-impact cross sections. This technique is examined for the MSE spectra taken from the KSTAR plasma discharges and its validity and applicability are discussed to directly infer the internal magnetic field structure with a wide range of pitch angles. The sensitivity of EFIT reconstruction on these internal magnetic data is also discussed.

  20. Statistical simulation of the energy spectra of field-emission electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, N. V.; Antonov, A. Yu.; Demchenko, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Random energies of electrons that escape from the source in the course of field emission are simulated using energy spectra. A relationship of the random values of total energy and the energy related to the normal (with respect to surface) component of momentum is established. A family of quadrature formulas needed for the integration of the distribution density of particles is analyzed. A hypothesis on the compliance of selected random energies with desired distribution laws is statistically tested.

  1. Automated diagnostics of a magnetron discharge plasma based on atomic molecular emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, V. M.; Zimin, A. M.; Krivitskiy, S. E.; Serushkin, S. V.; Troynov, V. I.

    2012-12-01

    A software-hardware complex intended for investigating spatial distributions of the plasma spectral emissivity is described. It allows us to record and identify the lines and systems of molecular bands in an automatic mode and to perform computer processing of spectra. Molecular bands of deuterium for different electronic-vibrational-rotational transitions are identified. The excitation temperatures of atomic levels, translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures are estimated for a discharge in a planar magnetron.

  2. Control of emission spectra in quantum dot microdisk/microring lasers.

    PubMed

    Kryzhanovskaya, N V; Mukhin, I S; Moiseev, E I; Shostak, I I; Bogdanov, A A; Nadtochiy, A M; Maximov, M V; Zhukov, A E; Kulagina, M M; Vashanova, K A; Zadiranov, Yu M; Troshkov, S I; Lipovskii, A A; Mintairov, A

    2014-10-20

    Focused ion beam is applied to quantum dot based microresonators to form pits or groove on their surface. The emission spectra of the resonators based lasers are significantly thinned out after the ion beam milling, and one or two modes become dominant instead of a group of modes having comparable intensities. The linewidth of the lasing mode is kept unchanged, whereas the lasing threshold demonstrates an insignificant growth.

  3. L α X-Ray Emission Spectra of Copper Compounds and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara

    1994-05-01

    With a two-crystal vacuum spectrometer equipped with beryl crystals,the Cu Lα emission spectra in fluorescence have been measuredfor selected copper compounds Cu2O, CuO, CuCl, CuBr, CuI,CuF2, CuCl2, CuBr2, CuF2·2H2O,CuCl2·2H2O and Cu3P, and alloysα-Cu+35%Zn and Cu+2%Be. The measured spectra aregrouped into three classes. The first class comprises the spectraof alloys, which consist of a single broad band similar to thatof Cu metal. The second class includes the spectra of monovalentcopper compounds, which are composed of a prominent peak and itshigh- and low-energy structures. To the third class belong thespectra of divalent copper compounds, which consist of a strongpeak accompanied with a characteristic dip and hump on thehigh-energy side. The Cu Lα emission bands of Cu2O,CuCl and CuBr are compared with available XPS spectra andtheoretical Cu-3d-DOS.

  4. EVIDENCE FOR SECONDARY EMISSION AS THE ORIGIN OF HARD SPECTRA IN TeV BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. G.; Kang, T.

    2013-02-20

    We develop a model for the possible origin of hard, very high energy (VHE) spectra from a distant blazar. In the model, both the primary photons produced in the source and secondary photons produced outside it contribute to the observed high-energy {gamma}-ray emission. That is, the primary photons are produced through the synchrotron self-Compton process, and the secondary photons are produced through high-energy proton interactions with background photons along the line of sight. We apply the model to a characteristic case of VHE {gamma}-ray emission in the distant blazar 1ES 1101-232. Assuming suitable electron and proton spectra, we obtain excellent fits to the observed spectra of this blazar. This indicated that the surprisingly low attenuation of the high-energy {gamma}-rays, especially the shape of the VHE {gamma}-ray tail of the observed spectra, can be explained by secondary {gamma}-rays produced in interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons in intergalactic space.

  5. Evidence for Secondary Emission as the Origin of Hard Spectra in TeV Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. G.; Kang, T.

    2013-02-01

    We develop a model for the possible origin of hard, very high energy (VHE) spectra from a distant blazar. In the model, both the primary photons produced in the source and secondary photons produced outside it contribute to the observed high-energy γ-ray emission. That is, the primary photons are produced through the synchrotron self-Compton process, and the secondary photons are produced through high-energy proton interactions with background photons along the line of sight. We apply the model to a characteristic case of VHE γ-ray emission in the distant blazar 1ES 1101-232. Assuming suitable electron and proton spectra, we obtain excellent fits to the observed spectra of this blazar. This indicated that the surprisingly low attenuation of the high-energy γ-rays, especially the shape of the VHE γ-ray tail of the observed spectra, can be explained by secondary γ-rays produced in interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons in intergalactic space.

  6. Sources of High-Energy Emission in the Green Pea Galaxies: New Constraints from Magellan Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Derek Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered Green Pea galaxies display extreme starburst activity and may be some of the only possible Lyman continuum emitting galaxies at low redshift. Green Peas are characterized by their unusually high [O III]/[O II] ratios, similar to the ratios observed in high-redshift galaxies. In addition, the presence of the high-energy He II 4686 line shows that the Green Peas are highly ionized. However, the origin of the He II emission in the Green Peas, and many other starburst galaxies, is still an open question. We analyze IMACS and MagE spectra from the Magellan telescopes in order to evaluate the most probable cause of this He II emission. We also analyze other properties like dust content, temperature and density, and kinematic components. Our IMACS spectra show no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features. We set upper limits on the WR populations in our sample and conclude that Wolf-Rayet stars are not a likely candidate for the He II emission. With deeper MagE spectra we investigate energetic shocks as a possible source of the He II, and move one step closer to uncovering the origin of high-energy photons in these unique starbursts.

  7. Variation of Spectra Luminescence Emission of Moganite under Different Stimulation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Guinea, J.; Bustillo, M. A.; Crespo-Feo, E.; Tormo, L.; Finch, A. A.; Hole, D. E.; Townsend, P. D.; Correcher, V.

    2009-08-01

    This work focuses on a characterization of various type of luminescence in Moganite-rich silica minerals from Mogan (Gran Canaria, Spain). The silica minerals formed by complicated hydrous processes exhibit luminescence emissions, which depend on sample temperature and type of an irradiation for excitation such as heat, laser, ion-beam, X-ray, incident electron beam and so on. Here we examined thermoluminescence (TL), ion beam luminescence (IBL), radioluminescence (RL), cathodoluminescence (CL) of moganite aliquots combined with Raman spectroscopy for clarification of relationship between lattice defects and the spectral luminescence emissions. The spatially-resolved CL spectroscopy coupled to the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM-CL) displays different luminescence spectral signals between the moganite veined core (dull emission) and the rim (bright emission) together with larger porosity and additional ions in the outer part, suggesting a later alteration process with alkali, metals and volatile ions for the moganite formation. RL and IBL spectra of silica minerals in core and rim mainly show a progressive increase in intensity of RL emission band at 470-500 nm with decrease in sample temperature, which is caused by cryogenic stress on the [AlO4]0 centers. Continuous H+ ion beam implantation on samples at room temperature produces a subtle diminishing of blue emission and a quite brightening of red emission at 700 nm assigned to Fe3+ point defects. The white turbid rim with opaline SiO2 in cavities emits bright CL emission in panchromatic CL image, and has spectral emission bands at 290 nm with high intensity (100 000 a.u.) and one at 520 nm which are probably related to H2O(Si-OH) groups, H+, Na+ and metallic ions such as Fe3+, Ti4+ and Nb4+. Moganite core zones only display emission bands at 390 nm and 670 nm (8500 a.u.) attributed to [AlO4/Na+]0 centers and silanol groups, respectively.

  8. VIRTIS on Venus Express thermal emission spectra near 1μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Nils; Tsang, Constantine; Helbert, Joern; Smrekar, Suzanne; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Thermal emission from the surface of Venus is observable through narrow spectral windows close to 1μm. Surface temperature is strongly constrained by surface elevation, due to the thick and dense atmosphere. The data from Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer VIRTIS on Venus Express together with altimetry constrain surface emissivity. In VIRTIS observations at 1.02μm, strongly deformed highland plateaus (tesserae) appear to have a lower emissivity consistent with continental crust, an interpretation that implies existence of an early ocean. Comparison between the Magellan stereo digital elevation model (DEM) and altimetry shows that the altimetry height error in rough tesserae greatly exceeds the formal error. In the one tesserae outlier covered by altimetry, DEM, and VIRTIS, the height error could account for the observed emissivity variation. The radiances observed at 1.10 and 1.18μm have a different response to topography, mostly due to spectrally varying absorption in the overlying atmospheric column. Thus if the tesserae have the same emissivity as volcanic plains, its spectrum should be the same as that of plains of the correct surface elevation. In order to investigate this statistically, we create a database of all long exposure duration VIRTIS spectra in the range of 1 - 1.4μm. The spectra are corrected for the ubiquitous straylight from the dayside, based on analysis of spectra showing deep space. Because the 1.10 and 1.18μm peaks are narrow compared to the variation of instrument spectral registration, we fit each spectrum with a synthetic spectrum from an atmospheric radiative transfer model, using wavelength offset and bandwidths as parameters in addition to atmospheric variables. This dataset of ~28 million thermal emission spectra spans a wide range of southern latitudes and night local times, and thus may be useful for studies beyond the question of surface emissivity. A portion of this research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion

  9. Photoluminescence emission spectra of Makrofol® DE 1-1 upon irradiation with ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, M.; Aydarous, Abdulkadir

    Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of Makrofol® DE 1-1 (bisphenol-A based polycarbonate) upon irradiation with ultraviolet radiation of different wavelengths were investigated. The absorption-and attenuation coefficient measurements revealed that the Makrofol® DE 1-1 is characterized by high absorbance in the energy range 6.53-4.43 eV but for a lower energy than 4.43 eV, it is approximately transparent. Makrofol® DE 1-1 samples were irradiated with ultraviolet radiation of wavelength in the range from 250 (4.28 eV) to 400 (3.10 eV) nm in step of 10 nm and the corresponding photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra were measured with a spectrofluorometer. It is found that the integrated counts and the peak height of the photoluminescence emission (PL) bands are strongly correlated with the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. They are increased at the ultraviolet radiation wavelength 280 nm and have maximum at 290 nm, thereafter they decrease and diminish at 360 nm of ultraviolet wavelength. The position of the PL emission band peak was red shifted starting from 300 nm, which increased with the increase the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. The PL bandwidth increases linearly with the increase of the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. When Makrofol® DE 1-1 is irradiated with ultraviolet radiation of short wavelength (UVC), the photoluminescence emission spectra peaks also occur in the UVC but of a relatively longer wavelength. The current new findings should be considered carefully when using Makrofol® DE 1-1 in medical applications related to ultraviolet radiation.

  10. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  11. Thermal Emission Spectra of Phobos, Vesta, Ceres, and Pallas: A Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet, visual, and near-infrared spectra of Phobos, obtained by Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiters, were interpreted to suggest a compositional similarity with carbonaceous chrondrites. Such a composition would be inconsistent with the moon's origin in the proto-Mars region, as Mars is composed chiefly of differentiated silicates. This interpretation was used to suggest that the moons originated in the main-asteroid belt, with subsequent capture and orbital evolution into their current locations. Interpretations of more recent visual and near-infrared spectra, obtained by Phobos-2 and Mars Pathfinder, have demonstrated that the Phobos spectrum is more similar to spectra of other classes of asteroids and lunar soils. If lunar mare soil is the correct analogy, then such a composition suggests a formation of Phobos from materials similar to that on Mars, i.e. basalts, and would not require a dynamically difficult capture and orbital evolution. During the science phasing orbits of the Mars Global Surveyor mission Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations of Phobos were acquired at each of four encounters. The spectral variability observed for localized surface regions on Phobos has been previously reported and is greatest near the northern wall of Stickney crater. Interpretation of the thermal infrared spectra of airless bodies, based upon most existing laboratory measurements, is complicated by the absence of interstitial gases on the celestial objects that would act to minimize potential thermal gradients in the upper layers of the surface. As an aid to interpretation of the TES Phobos spectra are compared to telescopic and airborne thermal infrared spectra of asteroids from several classes, including Ceres (G), Pallas (B), and Vesta (V). The asteroid spectra provide a direct analogy to the physical situation encountered at the surface of Phobos, albeit different thermal gradients may exist for each surface. This work is supported by NASA RTOP's 344

  12. TDDFT prediction of UV-vis absorption and emission spectra of tocopherols in different media.

    PubMed

    Bakhouche, Kahina; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Lahmar, Souad; Hammoutène, Dalila

    2015-06-01

    We use the TDDFT/PBE0/6-31+G* method to determine the electronic absorption and emission energies, in different media, of the four forms of tocopherol, which differ by the number and the position of methyl groups on the chromanol. Geometries of the ground state S0 and the first singlet excited state S1 were optimized in the gas phase, and various solvents. The solvent effect is evaluated using an implicit solvation model (IEF-PCM). Our results are compared to the experimental ones obtained for the vitamin E content in several vegetable oils. For all forms of tocopherols, the HOMO-LUMO first vertical excitation is a π-π* transition. Gas phase and non-polar solvents (benzene and toluene) give higher absorption wavelengths than polar solvents (acetone, ethanol, methanol, DMSO, and water); this can be interpreted by a coplanarity between the O-H group and the chroman, allowing a better electronic resonance of the oxygen lone pairs and the aromatic ring, and therefore giving an important absorption wavelength, whereas the polar solvents give high emission wavelengths comparatively to gas phase and non-polar solvents. Fluorescence spectra permit the determination, the separation, and the identification of the four forms of tocopherols by a large difference in emission wavelength values. Graphical Abstract Scheme from process methodological to obtain the absorption and emission spectra for tocopherols.

  13. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  14. Doppler effects on 3-D non-LTE radiation transport and emission spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Davis, J.; DasGupta, A.; Apruzese, John P.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Clark, R. W.; Ampleford, David J.; Bailey, James E.; Thornhill, Joseph W.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-10-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved X-ray emission lines contain information about temperatures, densities, velocities, and the gradients in a plasma. Extracting this information from optically thick lines emitted from complex ions in dynamic, three-dimensional, non-LTE plasmas requires self-consistent accounting for both non-LTE atomic physics and non-local radiative transfer. We present a brief description of a hybrid-structure spectroscopic atomic model coupled to an iterative tabular on-the-spot treatment of radiative transfer that can be applied to plasmas of arbitrary material composition, conditions, and geometries. The effects of Doppler line shifts on the self-consistent radiative transfer within the plasma and the emergent emission and absorption spectra are included in the model. Sample calculations for a two-level atom in a uniform cylindrical plasma are given, showing reasonable agreement with more sophisticated transport models and illustrating the potential complexity - or richness - of radially resolved emission lines from an imploding cylindrical plasma. Also presented is a comparison of modeled L- and K-shell spectra to temporally and radially resolved emission data from a Cu:Ni plasma. Finally, some shortcomings of the model and possible paths for improvement are discussed.

  15. Biochemical Applications Of Frequency-Domain Fluorometry; Determination Of Time-Resolved Anisotropies And Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Gryczynski, Ignazy; Cherek, Henryh; Laczko, Gabor; Joshi, Nanda

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of time-resolved fluorescence are often used for studies of biological macromolecules. Such measurements are usually performed in the time-domain, by measurement of the time-dependent emission following pulsed excitation. It has recently become possible to measure the frequency-response of the emission to intensity modulated light, over a wide range of modulation frequencies. We used frequency-domain fluorometers which operates from 1 to 220 MHz, and more recently to 2000 MHz. The frequency-domain data provide excellent resolution of time-dependent spectral parameters. It is now possible to resolve closely spaced fluorescence lifetimes, to determine multi-exponential decays of anisotropy and to determine time-resolved emission spectra of samples which display time-dependent spectral shifts. In this article we show representative results on tryptophan fluorescence from proteins and for protein-bound fluorophores.

  16. Reinvestigation of the Emission Spectra Following the 266 NM Photolysis of Iodomethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Cian-Ping; Cheng, Hsin-I.; Chang, Bor-Chen

    2013-06-01

    Nascent emission spectra following the 266 nm photolysis of iodomethanes (CHI_3, CH_2I_2, CH_3I, and CH_2ICl) were recorded in a slow flow system, and are similar to those following the 266 nm photolysis of bromomethanes except a number of unknown bands that appear between 520 nm and 820 nm. Interestingly, there are no isotopic shifts in these unknown bands even when the precursors were replaced by the deuterated or ^{13}C-substituted isotopomers (CD_2I_2, CD_3I, and ^{13}CH_2I_2). This indicates that the carrier of these unknown bands does not contain any hydrogen or carbon atoms. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation and dispersed-fluorescence (DF) spectra were recorded, but these spectra show different vibrational structures than those of the unknown bands. While the LIF and DF spectra can be well described by the I_2 b^3 Π _{0,u} ^+ - X^1 Σ _g ^+ transition, there exist systematic deviations between the unknown bands and the I_2 b-X transition. We have improved the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios and the resolution for these unknown bands. Our new analysis shows that the unknown bands consist of several band systems including the I_2 b-X transition. Moreover, the excited state iodine atom was found in the nascent emission spectra, but its formation mechanism still remains unsolved. The details of our current progress will be presented. S.-X. Yang, G.-Y. Hou, J.-H. Dai, C-.H. Chang, and B.-C. Chang, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4785 (2010). J.-J. Du, C.-H. Chen, and B.-C. Chang, 67^{th} OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, WG04 (2012).

  17. Rat epileptic seizures evoked by BmK {alpha}IV and its possible mechanisms involved in sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Zhifang; Bai Zhantao; Zhang Xuying; Liu Tong; Pang Xueyan; Ji Yonghua . E-mail: yhji@server.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-05-01

    This study showed that rat unilateral intracerebroventricular injection of BmK {alpha}IV, a sodium channel modulator derived from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induced clusters of spikes, epileptic discharges and convulsion-related behavioral changes. BmK {alpha}IV potently promoted the release of endogenous glutamate from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. In vitro examination of the effect of BmK {alpha}IV on intrasynaptosomal free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and sodium concentration [Na{sup +}]{sub i} revealed that BmK {alpha}IV-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was associated with an increase in Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +} influx. Moreover, BmK {alpha}IV-mediated glutamate release and ion influx was completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, a blocker of sodium channel. Together, these results suggest that the induction of BmK {alpha}IV-evoked epileptic seizures may be involved in the modulation of BmK {alpha}IV on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels located on the nerve terminal, which subsequently enhances the Ca{sup 2+} influx to cause an increase of glutamate release. These findings may provide some insight regarding the mechanism of neuronal action of BmK {alpha}IV in the central nervous system for understanding epileptogenesis involved in sodium channels.

  18. Constraining hot Jupiter’s atmospheric structure and dynamics through Doppler shifted emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jisheng; Kempton, Eliza; Rauscher, Emily

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, astronomers have begun successfully observing the atmospheres of extrasolar planets using ground-based telescopes equipped with spectrographs capable of observing at high spectral resolution (R~105). Such studies are capable of diagnosing the atmospheric structure, composition, and dynamics (winds and rotation) of both transiting and non-transiting exoplanets. However, few studies have examined how the 3-D atmospheric dynamics could alter the emitted light of hot Jupiters at such high spectral resolution. Here, we present a model to explore such influence on the hot Jupiters’ thermal emission spectra. Our aim is to investigate the extent to which the effects of 3-D atmospheric dynamics are imprinted on planet-averaged thermal emission spectra. We couple together a 3-D general circulation model of hot Jupiter atmospheric dynamics (Rauscher & Menou, 2012) with a radiative transfer solver to predict the planet’s disk-integrated emission spectrum as a function of its orbital phase. For the first time, we self-consistently include the effects of the line-of-sight atmospheric motions (resulting from winds and rotation) in the calculation to produce Doppler-shifted spectral line profiles that result from the atmospheric dynamics. We focus our study on three benchmark hot Jupiters, HD 189733b, HD 209458b, and WASP-43b which have been the focus of previous detailed observational studies. We find that the high-resolution Doppler shifted thermal emission spectra can be used to diagnose key properties of the dynamical atmosphere - the planet’s longitudinal temperature and wind structure, and its rotation rate.

  19. The nuclear region of low luminosity flat radio spectrum sources. II. Emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. C.; Serote Roos, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopic study of 19 low luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum (LL FRS) sources selected from Marchã's et al. (\\cite{March96}) 200 mJy sample. In the optical, these objects are mainly dominated by the host galaxy starlight. After correcting the data for this effect, we obtain a new set of spectra clearly displaying weak emission lines; such features carry valuable information concerning the excitation mechanisms at work in the nuclear regions of LL FRS sources. We have used a special routine to model the spectra and assess the intensities and velocities of the emission lines; we have analyzed the results in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Our analysis shows that 79% of the studied objects harbour a Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region (or LINER) whose contribution was swamped by the host galaxy starlight. The remaining objects display a higher ionization spectrum, more typical of Seyferts; due to the poor quality of the spectra, it was not possible to identify any possible large Balmer components. The fact that we observe a LINER-type spectrum in LL FRS sources supports the idea that some of these objects could be undergoing an ADAF phase; in addition, such a low ionization emission-line spectrum is in agreement with the black hole mass values and sub-Eddington accretion rates published for some FRS sources. Based on observations collected at the Multiple Mirror Telescope on Mt. Hopkins. Full Fig. 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  20. 20-100 keV K(alpha) X-Ray Source Generation by Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Phillips, T W; Goldsack, T

    2003-08-22

    We are studying the feasibility of utilizing K{alpha} x-ray sources in the range of 20 to 100 keV as a backlighters for imaging various stages of implosions and high areal density planar samples driven by the NIF laser facility. The hard x-ray K{alpha} sources are created by relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after a radiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. In order to understand K{alpha} source characteristics such as production efficiency and brightness as a function of laser parameters, we have performed experiments using the 10 J, 100 fs JanUSP laser. We utilized single-photon counting spectroscopy and x-ray imaging diagnostics to characterize the K{alpha} source. We find that the K{alpha} conversion efficiency from the laser energy is {approx} 3 x 10{sup -4}.

  1. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wootan, David W.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  2. Detection and Characterisation of H-{alpha} Emission Lines from Gaia BP/RP Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenes, Juergen; Laur, Sven; Kolka, Indrek

    2008-12-05

    The Gaia probe, set to launch in 2011, will measure an estimated billion astronomical objects, producing an enormous amount of data. One of the data analysis tasks will be the identification and classification of measured objects. A vast majority of them will be 'ordinary' stars from our Galaxy but a certain percentage will belong to 'peculiar' objects. We are interested in detecting emission line stars (ELS). The characteristic feature of most ELS is the presence of a H-{alpha} emission line in their spectra. In the case of Gaia measurements, the influence of this line could be detected in low resolution prismatic spectra which will be recorded both in blue (BP) and red (RP) spectral region. In this work, we compare different algorithms for detecting and characterising H-{alpha} lines in Gaia spectra. These include a simple, integrated flux ratio-based algorithm and several machine learning algorithms, such as neural networks, support vector machines and support vector regression. We study line detection both from single-transit and over-sampled end-of-mission data.

  3. Method for characterization of a spherically bent crystal for K.alpha. X-ray imaging of laser plasmas using a focusing monochromator geometry

    DOEpatents

    Kugland, Nathan; Doeppner, Tilo; Glenzer, Siegfried; Constantin, Carmen; Niemann, Chris; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-04-07

    A method is provided for characterizing spectrometric properties (e.g., peak reflectivity, reflection curve width, and Bragg angle offset) of the K.alpha. emission line reflected narrowly off angle of the direct reflection of a bent crystal and in particular of a spherically bent quartz 200 crystal by analyzing the off-angle x-ray emission from a stronger emission line reflected at angles far from normal incidence. The bent quartz crystal can therefore accurately image argon K.alpha. x-rays at near-normal incidence (Bragg angle of approximately 81 degrees). The method is useful for in-situ calibration of instruments employing the crystal as a grating by first operating the crystal as a high throughput focusing monochromator on the Rowland circle at angles far from normal incidence (Bragg angle approximately 68 degrees) to make a reflection curve with the He-like x-rays such as the He-.alpha. emission line observed from a laser-excited plasma.

  4. Searching for Narrow Emission Lines in X-ray Spectra: Computation and Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taeyoung; van Dyk, David A.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2008-12-01

    The detection and quantification of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra is a challenging statistical task. The Poisson nature of the photon counts leads to local random fluctuations in the observed spectrum that often result in excess emission in a narrow band of energy resembling a weak narrow line. From a formal statistical perspective, this leads to a (sometimes highly) multimodal likelihood. Many standard statistical procedures are based on (asymptotic) Gaussian approximations to the likelihood and simply cannot be used in such settings. Bayesian methods offer a more direct paradigm for accounting for such complicated likelihood functions, but even here multimodal likelihoods pose significant computational challenges. The new Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods developed in 2008 by van Dyk and Park, however, are able to fully explore the complex posterior distribution of the location of a narrow line, and thus provide valid statistical inference. Even with these computational tools, standard statistical quantities such as means and standard deviations cannot adequately summarize inference and standard testing procedures cannot be used to test for emission lines. In this paper, we use new efficient MCMC algorithms to fit the location of narrow emission lines, we develop new statistical strategies for summarizing highly multimodal distributions and quantifying valid statistical inference, and we extend the method of posterior predictive p-values proposed by Protassov and coworkers to test for the presence of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra. We illustrate and validate our methods using simulation studies and apply them to the Chandra observations of the high-redshift quasar PG 1634+706.

  5. TIR Emissivity Spectra of Thermally Processed Sulfates, Carbonates and Phyllosilicates as Analog Materials for Asteroid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.

    2013-12-01

    At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin we are building a database of spectral measurements of several meteorites and other analogs for asteroid surfaces. Bi-directional reflectance of samples in the 1 to 100 μm spectral range, are measured by using an evacuated (10-4 bar) Bruker Vertex 80V FTIR spectrometer and a Bruker A513 reflection unit, allowing phase angles between 26° and 170°. Emissivity in the 1 to 100 μm spectral range is measured with the same instrument coupled with an external emissivity chamber, for sample temperatures ranging from low (50° C) to very high (above 800° C). We present here new measurements on sulfates, carbonates, and phyllosilicates in various grain size ranges. The setup was configured to simulate the thermal history of surface minerals on the asteroid 2008 EV5 during its revolution around the Sun. This asteroid is the scientific target of the ESA Marco Polo-R mission. The samples in vacuum (< 0.8 mbar) are measured at surface temperature around 70° C, then the same samples are heated to 220° C, and maintained at this temperature for one hour. Slowly the sample temperature is reduced back again to 70° C and a second measurement is taken. Emissivity spectra before and after thermal processing of the samples are complemented with reflectance measurements on samples fresh and after thermal processing. This comparison show us that for some minerals no spectral/structural changes appear, while others show signs of dehydration and among them some species show structural changes. We conclude that a proper spectral library of emissivity spectra for asteroid analogue materials must include thermally processed samples, reproducing the thermal evolution for the asteroid that is target of the actual investigation.

  6. The Emission-line Spectra of Major Mergers: Evidence for Shocked Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Kurt T.; Martin, C. L.; Prescott, M. K. M.; Armus, L.

    2012-09-01

    Using a spectral decomposition technique, we investigate the physical origin of the high-velocity emission-line gas in a sample of 39 gas-rich, ultraluminous infrared galaxy mergers. Regions with shock-like excitation were identified in two kinematically distinct regimes, characterized by broad (σ > 150 km s-1) and narrow linewidths (σ <= 150 km s-1). Here, we investigate the physical origin of the broad emission, which we show is predominantly excited by shocks with velocities of 200-300 km s-1. Considering the large amount of extinction in these galaxies, the blueshift of the broad emission suggests an origin on the near side of the galaxy and therefore an interpretation as a galactic outflow. The large spatial extent of the broad, shocked emission component is generally inconsistent with an origin in the narrow-line region of an active galactic nucleus. The kinetic energy in the mass loss as well as the luminosity of the emission lines is consistent with the fraction of the supernova energy attributed to these mechanisms by shocked stellar winds. Since some shocks can be recognized in moderately high resolution, integrated spectra of nearby ultraluminous starbursts, the spectral fitting technique introduced in Soto & Martin may therefore be used to improve the accuracy of the physical properties measured for high-redshift galaxies from their (observed frame) infrared spectra. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  7. Excitation and emission spectra of rubidium in rare-gas thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Sin, Kyungseob; Momose, Takamasa

    2012-07-01

    To understand the optical properties of atoms in solid state matrices, the absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of rubidium doped thin-films of argon, krypton, and xenon were investigated in detail. A two-dimensional spectral analysis extends earlier reports on the excitation and emission properties of rubidium in rare-gas hosts. We found that the doped crystals of krypton and xenon exhibit a simple absorption-emission relation, whereas rubidium in argon showed more complicated spectral structures. Our sample preparation employed in the present work yielded different results for the Ar crystal, but our peak positions were consistent with the prediction based on the linear extrapolation of Xe and Kr data. We also observed a bleaching behavior in rubidium excitation spectra, which suggests a population transfer from one to another spectral feature due to hole-burning. The observed optical response implies that rubidium in rare-gas thin-films is detectable with extremely high sensitivity, possibly down to a single atom level, in low concentration samples.

  8. Excitation and emission spectra of rubidium in rare-gas thin-films.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Sin, Kyungseob; Momose, Takamasa

    2012-07-07

    To understand the optical properties of atoms in solid state matrices, the absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of rubidium doped thin-films of argon, krypton, and xenon were investigated in detail. A two-dimensional spectral analysis extends earlier reports on the excitation and emission properties of rubidium in rare-gas hosts. We found that the doped crystals of krypton and xenon exhibit a simple absorption-emission relation, whereas rubidium in argon showed more complicated spectral structures. Our sample preparation employed in the present work yielded different results for the Ar crystal, but our peak positions were consistent with the prediction based on the linear extrapolation of Xe and Kr data. We also observed a bleaching behavior in rubidium excitation spectra, which suggests a population transfer from one to another spectral feature due to hole-burning. The observed optical response implies that rubidium in rare-gas thin-films is detectable with extremely high sensitivity, possibly down to a single atom level, in low concentration samples.

  9. Excitation and emission spectra of rubidium in rare-gas thin-films

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Sin, Kyungseob; Momose, Takamasa

    2012-07-07

    To understand the optical properties of atoms in solid state matrices, the absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of rubidium doped thin-films of argon, krypton, and xenon were investigated in detail. A two-dimensional spectral analysis extends earlier reports on the excitation and emission properties of rubidium in rare-gas hosts. We found that the doped crystals of krypton and xenon exhibit a simple absorption-emission relation, whereas rubidium in argon showed more complicated spectral structures. Our sample preparation employed in the present work yielded different results for the Ar crystal, but our peak positions were consistent with the prediction based on the linear extrapolation of Xe and Kr data. We also observed a bleaching behavior in rubidium excitation spectra, which suggests a population transfer from one to another spectral feature due to hole-burning. The observed optical response implies that rubidium in rare-gas thin-films is detectable with extremely high sensitivity, possibly down to a single atom level, in low concentration samples.

  10. Chemical effects of CeL(gamma4) emission spectra for Ce compounds.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisashi; Takehara, Yuki; Kawamura, Naomi; Mizumaki, Masaichiro

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution CeL(gamma4) emission spectra of CeF(3), Ce(2)S(3), CeF(4), and CeO(2) have been measured using a multicrystal, multidetector spectrometer. The spectra exhibited substantial differences depending on the chemical environment of the Ce ions. By comparing the observed CeO(2) spectrum with the band calculations, we determined that the observed chemical effects of the main emission line were primarily attributable to the transitions of the Ce5p band; the high-energy tail at around 6.539 keV was assigned to the ligand p-->Ce2s cross transition. Further, a key difference between CeL(gamma4) and EuL(gamma4) is discussed with reference to CeL(1)- and EuL(1)-X-ray absorption fine-structures (XAFS). Possible applications of CeL(gamma4) emissions to material characterization are also suggested.

  11. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2013-06-04

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines, and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of water-soluble SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and α-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ∼100 ppb ammonia in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (∼0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for λexcitation = 420 ± 50 nm and λemission = 475 ± 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to λexcitation = 320 ± 25 nm and λemission = 425 ± 38 nm for the α-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the EEM spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles may have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  12. A New Interpretation for the Variation in Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.; Allen, James T.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ferland, Gary J.; Meskhidze, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Starburst galaxies have been easily distinguished from AGN using diagnostic emission line ratio diagrams constraining their excitation mechanism. Previous modeling of the star forming (SF) galaxy sequence outlined on the BPT diagram has led to the interpretation that high metallicity SF galaxies and low ionization SF galaxies are synonymous. Here, we present a new interpretation. Using a large sample of low-z SDSS galaxies, we co-added similar spectra of pure star forming galaxies allowing many weaker emission lines to act as consistency checks on strong line diagnostics. For the first time, we applied a locally optimally-emitting cloud (LOC) model to understand the physical reason for the variation in starburst galaxy emission line spectra. We fit over twenty diagnostic diagrams constraining the excitation mechanism, SED, temperature, density, metallicity, and grain content, making this work far more constrained than previous studies. Our results indicate that low luminosity SF galaxies could simply have less concentrated regions of ionized gas compared to their high luminosity counterparts, but have similar metallicities, thus requiring reevaluation about underlying nature of star forming galaxies.

  13. Emission spectra of photoionized plasmas induced by intense EUV pulses: Experimental and theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Ismail; Bartnik, Andrzej; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Wachulak, Przemysław; Jarocki, Roman; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2017-03-01

    Experimental measurements and numerical modeling of emission spectra in photoionized plasma in the ultraviolet and visible light (UV/Vis) range for noble gases have been investigated. The photoionized plasmas were created using laser-produced plasma (LPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The source was based on a gas puff target; irradiated with 10ns/10J/10Hz Nd:YAG laser. The EUV radiation pulses were collected and focused using grazing incidence multifoil EUV collector. The laser pulses were focused on a gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulses. Irradiation of gases resulted in a formation of low temperature photoionized plasmas emitting radiation in the UV/Vis spectral range. Atomic photoionized plasmas produced this way consisted of atomic and ionic with various ionization states. The most dominated observed spectral lines originated from radiative transitions in singly charged ions. To assist in a theoretical interpretation of the measured spectra, an atomic code based on Cowan's programs and a collisional-radiative PrismSPECT code have been used to calculate the theoretical spectra. A comparison of the calculated spectral lines with experimentally obtained results is presented. Electron temperature in plasma is estimated using the Boltzmann plot method, by an assumption that a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition in the plasma is validated in the first few ionization states. A brief discussion for the measured and computed spectra is given.

  14. Emission spectra of the cations of some fluoro-substituted phenols in the gaseous phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, John Paul; Marthaler, O.; Mohraz, Manijeh; Shiley, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Emission spectra of the cations of 2,5- and 3,5-difluorophenol, of 2,3,4- and 2,4,5-trifluorophenol, of 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenol and of 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenol have been obtained in the gas phase using low-energy electron beam excitation. The band systems are assigned to the B??(??-1) ??? X??(??-1) electronic transitions of these cations by reference to photoelectron spectroscopic data. The He(I??) photoelectron spectra and the ionisation energies of ten fluoro-substituted phenols are reported. The symmetries of the four lowest electronic states of these cations are inferred from the radiative decay studies. The lifetimes of the lowest vibrational levels of the B??(??-1) state of the six fluoro-substituted phenol cations above have also been measured. ?? 1980.

  15. An algorithm for identification of substances using a finite set of secondary-emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, N. S.; Golyak, Il. S.; Morozov, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    A problem of identification of chemical composition in the absence of sampling procedures is considered. A method that allows identification using spectra of a desired substance is proposed. The measure of the difference between spectral sets is determined. The method is employed in the experiments using a visible and near-UV Fourier spectrometer. The secondary emission of samples is excited by UV sources with maximum intensities at wavelengths of 280 and 310 nm. Anthracene, POPOP, PPO, stilbene, and tryptophan are used in experiments. The ROC curves are constructed and compared to specify the parameters that are used in the algorithm for searching for substances in the database of reference spectra. The results will make it possible to improve the reliability and applicability of express analyzers of chemical substances.

  16. Emission spectra analysis of arc plasma for synthesis of carbon nanostructures in various magnetic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures. By introducing a non-uniform magnetic field in arc plasmas, high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and large-scale graphene flakes can be obtained in a single step. In this paper, ultraviolet-visible emission spectra of arc in different spots under various magnetic conditions are analyzed to provide an in situ investigation for transformation processes of evaporated species and growth of carbon nanostructures in arc. Based on the arc spectra of carbon diatomic Swan bands, vibrational temperature in arc is determined. The vibrational temperature in arc center was measured around 6950 K, which is in good agreement with our simulation results. Experimental and simulation results suggest that SWCNT are formed in the arc periphery region. Transmission electronic microscope and Raman spectroscope are also employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures.

  17. Time evolution, Lamb shift, and emission spectra of spontaneous emission of two identical atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dawei; Li Zhenghong; Zheng Hang; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-04-15

    A unitary transformation method is used to investigate the dynamic evolution of two multilevel atoms, in the basis of symmetric and antisymmetric states, with one atom being initially prepared in the first excited state and the other in the ground state. The unitary transformation guarantees that our calculations are based on the ground state of the atom-field system and the self-energy is subtracted at the beginning. The total Lamb shifts of the symmetric and antisymmetric states are divided into transformed shift and dynamic shift. The transformed shift is due to emitting and reabsorbing of virtual photons, by a single atom (nondynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (quasi-static shift). The dynamic shift is due to the emitting and reabsorbing of real photons, by a single atom (dynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (dynamic interatomic shift). The emitting and reabsorbing of virtual and real photons between the two atoms result in the interatomic shift, which does not exist for the one-atom case. The spectra at the long-time limit are calculated. If the distance between the two atoms is shorter than or comparable to the wavelength, the strong coupling between the two atoms splits the spectrum into two peaks, one from the symmetric state and the other from the antisymmetric state. The origin of the red or blue shifts for the symmetric and antisymmetric states mainly lies in the negative or positive interaction energy between the two atoms. In the investigation of the short time evolution, we find the modification of the effective density of states by the interaction between two atoms can modulate the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects in the decays of the symmetric and antisymmetric states.

  18. PHASE-AVERAGED SPECTRA AND LUMINOSITIES OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSIONS FROM YOUNG ISOLATED PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Jiang, Z. J.; Zhang, L.

    2013-03-10

    We study the phase-averaged spectra and luminosities of {gamma}-ray emissions from young, isolated pulsars within a revised outer gap model. In the revised version of the outer gap, there are two possible cases for the outer gaps: the fractional size of the outer gap is estimated through the photon-photon pair process in the first case (Case I), and is limited by the critical field lines in the second case (Case II). The fractional size is described by Case I if the fractional size at the null charge surface in Case I is smaller than that in Case II, and vice versa. Such an outer gap can extend from the inner boundary, whose radial distance to the neutron star is less than that of the null charge surface to the light cylinder for a {gamma}-ray pulsar with a given magnetic inclination. When the shape of the outer gap is determined, assuming that high-energy emission at an averaged radius of the field line in the center of the outer gap, with a Gaussian distribution of the parallel electric field along the gap height, represents typical emission, the phase-averaged {gamma}-ray spectrum for a given pulsar can be estimated in the revised model with three model parameters. We apply the model to explain the phase-averaged spectra of the Vela (Case I) and Geminga (Case II) pulsars. We also use the model to fit the phase-averaged spectra of 54 young, isolated {gamma}-ray pulsars, and then calculate the {gamma}-ray luminosities and compare them with the observed data from Fermi-LAT.

  19. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  20. Modeling biological fluorescence emission spectra using Lorentz line shapes and nonlinear optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, Paul D.; Howard, A. Q.; Webb, Lincoln J.

    2007-08-01

    Using the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear optimization algorithm and a series of Lorentzian line shapes, the fluorescence emission spectra from BG (Bacillus globigii) bacteria can be accurately modeled. This method allows data from both laboratory and field sources to model the return signal from biological aerosols using a typical LIF (lidar induced fluorescence) system. The variables found through this procedure match individual fluorescence components within the biological material and therefore have a physically meaningful interpretation. The use of this method also removes the need to calculate phase angles needed in autoregressive all-pole models.

  1. Calcium Pyroxenes at Mercurian Surface Temperatures: Investigation of In-Situ Emissivity Spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Sabrina; Maturilli, Alessandro; Helbert, Jörn; Rossi, Manuela; Nestola, Fabrizio; D'Amore, Mario; Hiesinger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Several observations point to the possibility that Ca-rich (and low-Fe) clinopyroxenes could be common constituent minerals of the surface of Mercury. The upcoming ESA-JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury will carry on board the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) that will provide surface emissivity spectra in the wavelength range from 7-14 μm. This spectral range is very useful to identify the fine-scale structural properties of several silicates including pyroxenes. The extreme daily surface temperature range of Mercury (70 to 725 K) that significantly affects the spectral signature of minerals will make the interpretation of MERTIS observations challenging. It has been shown that spectra of clinopyroxenes with similar calcium content display a deepening of the main absorption bands, and a shift of the band minima toward higher wavelengths with increasing temperatures. Similar shifts can also be observed at constant temperature with increasing iron content in the M2 site. Therefore, the thermal expansion induced by the increasing temperature simulates the presence of a larger cation (e.g., iron vs. magnesium) within the mineral structure. Interestingly, each band shifts by a different amount, representing a marker for the real chemistry of the sample. A detailed study of the described mineral behavior is fundamental to localize those spectral bands sensitive to the daily temperature range of the Mercury surface. In combination with the temperature measurements obtained independently by the radiometer channel of MERTIS this will help to further constrain the mineralogical interpretation of the MERTIS spectral data. Here we present high-temperature (up to 750 K) laboratory emissivity spectra of several augitic pyroxenes with different calcium contents and very different magnesium to iron ratios. The spectra were derived from individual well-preserved natural crystals of several pyroxenes of less than 125 ?m in size, which approaches the

  2. The hard X-ray emission spectra from accretion columns in intermediate polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Insu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray emission from accretion columns in an intermediate polar system, GK Per, using a simple settling solution. The rate of photon emission per logarithmic energy interval can be fitted with a power law, E(exp -gamma), with gamma approximately 2.0, in agreement with observations. This index is only weakly dependent on the mass accretion rate, dot-M, for dot-M in the range of a few times 10(exp 16-18) g/s. The peak energy of the photon spectra (after photoelectric absorption) is expected to be E(sub p) approximately (5 keV) gamma(exp -1/3) (N(sub H)/10(exp 23)/sq cm)(exp 1/3) where N(sub H) is the hydrogen column density along the line of sight. The observed spectra of GK Per and possibly of V1223 Sgr suggest N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 23)/sq cm. This large N(sub H) may be due to partially ionized preshock column material. Alternatively, we also consider absorption by the cool outer parts of an accretion disk. In this case the photoelectric absorption depth in the disk is a sensitive function of inclination. For GK Per the required inclination is approximately 83 deg. For mass accretion rates larger than a critical rate of approximately 10(exp 18) g/s, X-ray emission from the column accretion is significantly affected by radiation drag. Although the mass accretion rate increases dramatically during outbursts, the observed hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray luminosity will not rise proportionately. The slope and peak energy of the outburst spectra are only weakly affected. We conclude that the observed X-ray spectra can be explained by this simple analytic solution and that the production of hard X-rays from the accretion shock at the magnetic poles in the intermediate polars is in general agreement with the observations. However, since the X-ray emission and absorption depend on the mass accretion rate in a complicated manner, observed hard X-ray luminosities (greater than 2 keV) are not a good indicator of the mass

  3. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter σ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high σ flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  4. K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra in MnF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.; Parlebas, J. C.; Uozumi, T.; Kotani, A.; Kao, C.-C.

    2000-01-15

    We report experimental and theoretical results on Mn K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra (K{beta} RXES) at the pre-edge region of K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy in a powdered MnF{sub 2} sample. The experimental results are studied theoretically in terms of coherent second-order optical process, using a MnF{sub 6}{sup -4} cluster model with the effects of intra-atomic multiplet coupling and interatomic hybridization in the space of three configurations and taking into account both the Mn 1s-3d quadrupole excitation and the Mn 1s-4p dipole excitation. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. Moreover, we show that if the sample is a single crystal the resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy caused by the quadrupole excitation has a strong sensitivity to the angle of the incident photon. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Bound-bound transitions in the emission spectra of Ba+-He excimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroshkin, P.; Kono, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the emission and absorption spectra of the Ba+ ions and Ba+*He excimer quasimolecules in the cryogenic Ba-He plasma. We observe several spectral features in the emission spectrum, which we assign to the electronic transitions between bound states of the excimer correlating to the 6 2P3 /2 and 5 2D3 /2 ,5 /2 states of Ba+. The resulting Ba+(5 2DJ) He is a metastable electronically excited complex with orbital angular momentum L =2 , thus expanding the family of known metal-helium quasimolecules. It might be suitable for high-resolution spectroscopic studies and for the search for new polyatomic exciplex structures.

  6. Inferring physical properties of galaxies from their emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucci, G.; Ferrara, A.; Gallerani, S.; Pallottini, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a new approach based on Supervised Machine Learning algorithms to infer key physical properties of galaxies (density, metallicity, column density and ionization parameter) from their emission-line spectra. We introduce a numerical code (called GAME, GAlaxy Machine learning for Emission lines) implementing this method and test it extensively. GAME delivers excellent predictive performances, especially for estimates of metallicity and column densities. We compare GAME with the most widely used diagnostics (e.g. R23, [N II] λ6584/Hα indicators) showing that it provides much better accuracy and wider applicability range. GAME is particularly suitable for use in combination with Integral Field Unit spectroscopy, both for rest-frame optical/UV nebular lines and far-infrared/sub-millimeter lines arising from photodissociation regions. Finally, GAME can also be applied to the analysis of synthetic galaxy maps built from numerical simulations.

  7. Paradoxical solvent effects on the absorption and emission spectra of amino-substituted perylene monoimides.

    PubMed

    Zoon, Peter D; Brouwer, Albert M

    2005-08-12

    In N-(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-9-pyrrolidinoperylene-3,4-dicarboximide (5PI) the absorption and emission spectra display large solvatochromic shifts, but, remarkably, the Stokes shift is practically independent of solvent polarity. This unique behavior is caused by the extraordinarily large ground-state dipole moment of 5PI, which further increases upon increasing the solvent polarity, whereas the excited-state dipole moment is less solvent dependent. In the corresponding piperidine compound, 6PI, this effect is much less important owing to the weaker coupling between the amino group and the aromatic imide moiety, and in the corresponding naphthalimide, 5NI, it is absent. The latter shows the conventional solvatochromic behavior of a push-pull substituted conjugated system, that is, minor shifts in absorption and a larger change in the emission energy with solvent polarity.

  8. ``Drifting tadpoles'' in wavelet spectra of decimetric radio emission of fiber bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészárosová, H.; Karlický, M.; Rybák, J.; Jiřička, K.

    2009-08-01

    Aims: The solar decimetric radio emission of fiber bursts was investigated searching for the “drifting tadpole” structures proposed by theoretical studies. Methods: Characteristic periods with the tadpole pattern were searched for in the radio flux time series by wavelet analysis methods. Results: For the first time, we have found drifting tadpoles in the wavelet spectra of the decimetric radio emission associated with the fiber bursts observed in July 11, 2005. These tadpoles were detected at all radio frequencies in the 1602-1780 MHz frequency range. The characteristic period of the wavelet tadpole patterns was found to be 81.4 s and the frequency drift of the tadpole heads is -6.8 MHz s-1. These tadpoles are interpreted as a signature of the magnetoacoustic wave train moving along a dense flare waveguide and their frequency drift as a motion of the wave train modulating the radio emission produced by the plasma emission mechanism. Using the Aschwanden density model of the solar atmosphere, only low values of the Alfvén speed and the magnetic field strength in the loop guiding this wave train were derived which indicates a neutral current sheet as the guiding structure. The present analysis supports the model of fiber bursts based on whistler waves.

  9. Thermal Infrared Emission Spectra of Terrestrial Exoplanets Influenced by Multi-layer Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Vasquez, Mayte; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Kitzmann, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Clouds play an important role in the radiative transfer of planetary atmospheres: they are key elements of the climate system and influence the planet's spectral appearance. Given the thousands of exoplanets discovered so far, including some dozens of Earth-sized exoplanets, the feasibility of remote sensing of exoplanet atmospheres is attracting increasing attention. Here we present a study of the thermal emission of cloud-covered Earth-like exoplanets orbiting in the habitable zone of F, G, K, and M-type stars. A line-by-line model for molecular absorption has been coupled to a discrete ordinate multiple scattering radiative transfer solver. Pressure, temperature, and molecular concentration profiles were taken from a consistent radiative-convective climate model including a parameterized cloud description (Kitzmann et al., A&A, 2010). The main focus of the current work is the impact of multi-layer clouds on emission spectra in the thermal infrared. The effects of low-level water clouds and high level ice clouds simultaneously on signatures of H2O, CO2, O3, etc will be studied for various resolutions. Furthermore, comparisons with spectra resulting from a low-resolution code will be shown.

  10. Near-infrared emission spectra of TeS, TeSe and Te2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setzer, K. D.; Fink, E. H.

    2014-10-01

    Emission spectra of the radicals TeS, TeSe and Te2 in the near-infrared spectral region have been measured with a high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer. The molecules were generated in a fast-flow system by reacting microwave-discharged mixtures of Tex, Sx, and/or Sex vapour and Ar carrier gas and excited by energy transfer and energy pooling processes in collisions with metastable oxygen O2(a1Δg). The b1Σ+(b0+) → X3Σ-(X10+,X21) electric dipole transitions of TeS and TeSe and the b1Σ+g(b0+g) → X3Σ-g(X21g) magnetic dipole transition of Te2 were measured at medium and high spectral resolution. A very weak emission at 3356 cm-1 observed in the spectrum of TeSe was identified to be the 0-0 band of the hitherto unknown a1Δ(a2) → X3Σ-(X21) transition of the molecule. Analyses of the spectra have yielded a number of new or improved spectroscopic parameters of the molecules.

  11. Evaluation of potential emission spectra for the reliable classification of fluorescently coded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2011-06-01

    The conservation and efficient use of natural and especially strategic resources like oil and water have become global issues, which increasingly initiate environmental and political activities for comprehensive recycling programs. To effectively reutilize oil-based materials necessary in many industrial fields (e.g. chemical and pharmaceutical industry, automotive, packaging), appropriate methods for a fast and highly reliable automated material identification are required. One non-contacting, color- and shape-independent new technique that eliminates the shortcomings of existing methods is to label materials like plastics with certain combinations of fluorescent markers ("optical codes", "optical fingerprints") incorporated during manufacture. Since time-resolved measurements are complex (and expensive), fluorescent markers must be designed that possess unique spectral signatures. The number of identifiable materials increases with the number of fluorescent markers that can be reliably distinguished within the limited wavelength band available. In this article we shall investigate the reliable detection and classification of fluorescent markers with specific fluorescence emission spectra. These simulated spectra are modeled based on realistic fluorescence spectra acquired from material samples using a modern VNIR spectral imaging system. In order to maximize the number of materials that can be reliably identified, we evaluate the performance of 8 classification algorithms based on different spectral similarity measures. The results help guide the design of appropriate fluorescent markers, optical sensors and the overall measurement system.

  12. Modeling of the EUV and X-Ray Emission Spectra Induced by the Solar Winds Ions in the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out investigation of the EUV and X-ray emission spectra induced in interaction between the Solar Wind (SW) and interstellar neutral gas. The spectra of most important SW ions have been computed for the charge-exchange mechanism of X-ray emission using new accurate spectroscopic data from recent laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Total spectra have been constructed as a sum of spectra induced in the charge-exchange collisions by individual O(exp q+), C(exp q+), N(exp q+), Ne(exp q+), Mg (exp q+) and Fe(exp q+) ions. Calculations have been performed for X-ray emission from the heliospheric hydrogen and helium gas. X-ray maps of the heliosphere have been computed. The power density of X-ray sources in the heliospheric ecliptic plane is shown for the H gas and for the He gas. Distances from the Sun (0,0) are given in AU. The helium cone is clear seen in the X-ray map of the charge-exchange emission induced by the solar wind. X-ray emission spectra detected by the Chandra X-ray telescope from the "dark" side of Moon has been identified as a X-ray background emission induced by the solar wind from the geocorona. Spectra and intensities of this charge-exchange X-rays have been compared with the heliospheric component of the X-ray background. Observations and modeling of the SW spectra induced from the geocorona indicate a strong presence of emission lines of highly charged oxygen ions. Anisotropy in distribution of heliospheric X-rays has been predicted and calculated for the regions of the fast and slow solar winds.

  13. Modeling the Emission Spectra of Organic Molecules: A Competition between Franck-Condon and Nuclear Ensemble Methods.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Leonardo Evaristo; Ribeiro, Luiz Antonio; Fonseca, Antonio Luciano de Almeida; da Silva Filho, Demétrio Antonio

    2016-07-14

    The emission spectra of flexible and rigid organic molecules are theoretically investigated in the framework of the Franck-Condon (FC) and nuclear ensemble (NE) approaches, both of which rely on results from density functional theory but differ in the way vibrational contributions are taken into account. Our findings show that the emission spectra obtained using the NE approach are in better agreement with experiment than the ones produced by FC calculations considering both rigid and flexible molecules. Surprisingly, the description of a suitable balance between the vibronic progression and the emission spectra envelope shows dependency on the initial sampling for the NE calculations which must be judiciously selected. Our results intend to provide guidance for a better theoretical description of light emission properties of organic molecules with applications in organic electronic devices.

  14. Emissivity Spectra of Meteoritic Powders mixed with Liquid Formamide (NH2COH) at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaele, S.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Helbert, J.

    2013-12-01

    noticed in the emissivity spectra strong signatures attributable to liquid formamide. We interpret them as being originated from a column of hot vaporized formamide, lying above the sample surface. For all the samples this effect vanished already at 100°C, probably due to complete evaporation of liquid formamide that was deposited on the meteorite sample surfaces. However, all the spectra measured at 100° and 140° C show signs of the presence of formamide, that we infer from comparing them with the 70° C dry measurement of the same sample. For 2 samples out of 3, when heating at 200°C (and only there) a new feature appears at 7.08 μm. This band is very close to a similar band that liquid formamide has at 7.19 μm, and that was even present in all the spectra of wet meteorites taken at 70°C. We interpret this band shift as a possible sign of interaction of formamide with the catalyst (the meteorite powder): the CH bend responsible for that is probably strengthening.

  15. Neutral Gas Temperature Estimates in an Inductively Coupled CF4 Plasma by Fitting Diatomic Emission Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2001-01-01

    This work examines the accuracy of plasma neutral temperature estimates by fitting the rotational band envelope of different diatomic species in emission. Experiments are performed in an inductively coupled CF4 plasma generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell. Visible and ultraviolet emission spectra are collected at a power of 300 W (approximately 0.7 W/cc) and pressure of 30 mtorr. The emission bands of several molecules (CF, CN, C2, CO, and SiF) are fit simultaneously for rotational and vibrational temperatures and compared. Four different rotational temperatures are obtained: 1250 K for CF and CN, 1600 K for CO, 1800 K for C2, and 2300 K for SiF. The vibrational temperatures obtained vary from 1750-5950 K, with the higher vibrational temperatures generally corresponding to the lower rotational temperatures. These results suggest that the different species have achieved different degrees of equilibration between the rotational and vibrational modes and may not be equilibrated with the translational temperatures. The different temperatures are also related to the likelihood that the species are produced by ion bombardment of the surface, with etch products like SiF, CO, and C2 having higher temperatures than species expected to have formed in the gas phase.

  16. Absorption, Fluorescence and Emission Anisotropy Spectra of 4-Cyano-N,N-dimethylaniline in Different Media and at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Piszczek, G.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of temperature on fluorescence and emission anisotropy spectra of 4-cyano-N,N-dimethylaniline (CDMA) was investigated in viscous (glycerol and paraffin oil) and rigid (polyvinyl alcohol) PVA and polyvinyl chloride) PVC) media. A strong effect of temperature on the intensity of a and b emission bands was observed. It was also found that the emission anisotropy, r, does not vary in the longwave emission band a at a fixed temperature but decreases in the emission band b together with the decreasing wavelength. The latter effect is due to the fact that the transition moment in this band is perpendicular to the long axis of the CDMA molecule. For CDMA in paraffin oil, a normal b band with negative emission anisotropy only occurs. In all other media used, the emission anisotropy has lower values, approaching zero, which results from the considerable covering of band b with a broad emission band a.

  17. Reflection and Emission Spectra of Fe-Oxides Under Venus-Like Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Mark A.; Tsang, Con C. C.; Durda, Dan D.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The Solar System’s last solid planet for which we have no mineralogy data is Venus. Soviet landers acquired images and elemental abundances at six locations on the surface of Venus. γ-ray and XRF spectroscopy performed by the landers showed that the plains are made of mafic basalts. Very large concentrations of K at the Venera 8 and 13 landing sites indicated the presence of alkaline basalts.Near-IR and thermal IR remote sensing of Mars, both from orbit and at the surface, have revealed the layered mineralogical complexity of that planet. Dominated by basalts and a wide-variety of fluid-altered phases, the mineralogy of Mars tells a complex story of wet and dry epochs in a history of dramatic climate change.At the surface of Venus, optical pathlengths are small and there is little scattering due to hazes. The environment around a lander or rover on Venus can be mapped from 0.4 to 3 μm just as well as it has been on Mars. Laboratory spectra show that the ferric edge at 0.55 μm that makes Mars red shifts to 1 μm at Venus surface temperatures (Pieters et al., 1986). This spectral feature is caused by strong charge transfer transitions in the UV between overlapping orbitals of iron and oxygen, and crystal-field electronic transition bands of ferric Fe (Pieters and Englert, 1993). Pressure and temperature will alter and broaden crystal-field electronic transition bands. Johnson and Fegley (2000) showed that a halogenated/hydrated amphibole (tremolite) is metastable on Venus; thus, metamorphic remnants of an ancient hydrosphere could still exist. In future work the reflectance and emission spectra of this phase will also be studied at high temperatures.We will present reflection and emission spectra of several Fe-oxides up to 450°C and 100 bars. These environmental conditions are programmable in a small, off-the-shelf 1 cc chamber that sits in the optical path of a Nicolet FTIR spectrometer. Our work will show that ambient pressure and temperature have significant

  18. K-(alpha) Radiography at 20-100 keV Using Short-Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H S; Chambers, D; Clarke, R; Eagleton, R; Giraldez, E; Goldsack, T; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; Key, M; King, J; Koch, J; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A; Nikroo, A; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Remington, B; Robey, H; Snavely, R; Steinman, D; Stephenson, R; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Town, R J

    2005-08-29

    X-ray radiography is an important tool for diagnosing and imaging planar and convergent hydrodynamics phenomena for laser experiments. Until now, hydrodynamics experiments at Omega and NIF utilize E{sub x-ray} < 9 keV backlighter x-rays emitted by thermal plasmas. However, future experiments will need to diagnose larger and denser targets and will require x-ray probes of energies from 20-100 keV and possibly up to 1 MeV. Hard K-{alpha} x-ray photons can be created through high-energy electron interactions in the target material after irradiation by petawatt-class high-intensity-short-pulse lasers with > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have performed several experiments on the JanUSP, and the Vulcan 100TW, and Vulcan Petawatt lasers to understand K-{alpha} sources and to test radiography concepts. 1-D radiography using an edge-on foil and 2-D radiography using buried wires and cone-fiber targets were tested. We find that 1-D thin edge-on foils can have imaging resolution better than 10 {micro}m. Micro volume targets produce bright sources with measured conversion efficiency from laser energy to x-ray photons of {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. This level of conversion may not be enough for 2-D point projection radiography. A comparison of our experimental measurements of small volume sources with the LSP/PIC simulation show similar K-{alpha} creation profiles but discrepancy in absolute yields.

  19. Somatic mutations in PI3K[alpha]: Structural basis for enzyme activation and drug design

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelli, Sandra B.; Mandelker, Diana; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The PI3K pathway is a communication hub coordinating critical cell functions including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation, motility and metabolism. Because PI3K{alpha} harbors recurrent somatic mutations resulting in gains of function in human cancers, it has emerged as an important drug target for many types of solid tumors. Various PI3K isoforms are also being evaluated as potential therapeutic targets for inflammation, heart disease, and hematological malignancies. Structural biology is providing insights into the flexibility of the PI3Ks, and providing basis for understanding the effects of mutations, drug resistance and specificity.

  20. Discovery of the Red-Skewed K-alpha Iron Line in Cyg X-2 with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai; Titarchuk, Lev; Laurent, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    We report on the Suzaku observation of neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 which reveals strong iron K-alpha emission line. The line profile shows a prominent red wing extending down to 4 keV. This discovery increases the number of neutron star sources where red-skewed iron lines were observed and strongly suggests that this phenomenon is common not only in black holes but also in other types of compact objects. We examine the line profile by fitting it with the model which attributes its production to the relativistic effects due to disk reflection of X-ray radiation. We also apply an alternative model where the red wing is a result of down-scattering effect of the first order with respect to electron velocity in the wind outflow. Both models describe adequately the observed line profile. However, the X-ray variability in a state similar to that in the Suzaku observation which we establish by analysing RXTE observation favors the wind origin of the line formation.

  1. BRIEF COMMUNICATION: Calculation of a magnetic field effect on emission spectra of light diatomic molecules for diagnostic application to fusion edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikama, T.; Fujii, K.; Mizushiri, K.; Hasuo, M.; Kado, S.; Zushi, H.

    2009-12-01

    A scheme for computation of emission spectra of light diatomic molecules under external magnetic and electric fields is presented. As model species in fusion edge plasmas, the scheme is applied to polarization-resolved emission spectra of H2, CH, C2, BH and BeH molecules. The possibility of performing spatially resolved measurements of these spectra is examined.

  2. The glassy random laser: replica symmetry breaking in the intensity fluctuations of emission spectra

    PubMed Central

    Antenucci, Fabrizio; Crisanti, Andrea; Leuzzi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of a newly introduced overlap parameter, measuring the correlation between intensity fluctuations of waves in random media, is analyzed in different physical regimes, with varying amount of disorder and non-linearity. This order parameter allows to identify the laser transition in random media and describes its possible glassy nature in terms of emission spectra data, the only data so far accessible in random laser measurements. The theoretical analysis is performed in terms of the complex spherical spin-glass model, a statistical mechanical model describing the onset and the behavior of random lasers in open cavities. Replica Symmetry Breaking theory allows to discern different kinds of randomness in the high pumping regime, including the most complex and intriguing glassy randomness. The outcome of the theoretical study is, eventually, compared to recent intensity fluctuation overlap measurements demonstrating the validity of the theory and providing a straightforward interpretation of qualitatively different spectral behaviors in different random lasers. PMID:26616194

  3. Observations of the Quadrantid meteor shower from 2008 to 2012: Orbits and emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, José M.; Espartero, Francisco; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Pujols, Pep; Pastor, Sensi; de los Reyes, José A.; Rodríguez, Diego

    2016-09-01

    The activity of the Quadrantids in January during several years (2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012) has been investigated in the framework of the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN). For this purpose, an array of high-sensitivity CCD video devices and CCD all-sky cameras have been used to obtain multi-station observations of these meteors. These allowed to obtain precise radiant and orbital information about this meteoroid stream. This paper presents a large set of orbital data (namely, 85 orbits) of Quadrantid meteoroids. Most meteors produced by these particles were recorded during the activity peak of this shower. Besides, we discuss four Quadrantid emission spectra. The tensile strength of Quadrantid meteoroids has been also obtained.

  4. Deriving chlorophyll fluorescence emissions of vegetation canopies from high resolution field reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Daughtry, Craig S.; Entcheva Campbell, Petya K.; Butcher, L. Maryn

    2005-11-01

    Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) peaks centered at 685 nm and 735 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SIF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops and small tree plots of three deciduous species (red maple, tulip poplar, sweet gum). Leaf level measurements were also made of foliage which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) contents). As part of ongoing experiments, measurements were made on N application plots within corn (280, 140, 70, and 0 kg N/ha) and tree (0, 37.5, 75, 112.5, 150 kg N /ha) sites at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrow- band regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red SIF ratio (SIFratio) derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment ratios altered by N application rates in both corn crops. This ratio was also positively correlated to the C/N ratio at leaf and canopy levels, for the available corn data (e.g., 2004). No consistent N treatment or species differences in SIF were detected in the tree foliage, but additional 2005 data are forthcoming. This study has relevance to future passive satellite remote sensing approaches to monitoring C dynamics from space.

  5. The Impact of Non-uniform Thermal Structure on the Interpretation of Exoplanet Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. Katherina; Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob; Kreidberg, Laura; Parmentier, Vivien

    2016-09-01

    The determination of atmospheric structure and molecular abundances of planetary atmospheres via spectroscopy involves direct comparisons between models and data. While varying in sophistication, most model spectra comparisons fundamentally assume one-dimensional (1D) model physics. However, knowledge from general circulation models and of solar system planets suggests that planetary atmospheres are inherently three-dimensional in their structure and composition. We explore the potential biases resulting from standard “1D” assumptions within a Bayesian atmospheric retrieval framework. Specifically, we show how the assumption of a single 1D thermal profile can bias our interpretation of the thermal emission spectrum of a hot Jupiter atmosphere that is composed of two thermal profiles. We retrieve spectra of unresolved model planets as observed with a combination of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)+Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) as well as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) under varying differences in the two thermal profiles. For WFC3+IRAC, there is a significantly biased estimate of CH4 abundance using a 1D model when the contrast is 80%. For JWST, two thermal profiles are required to adequately interpret the data and estimate the abundances when contrast is greater than 40%. We also apply this preliminary concept to the recent WFC3+IRAC phase curve data of the hot Jupiter WASP-43b. We see similar behavior as present in our simulated data: while the {{{H}}}2{{O}} abundance determination is robust, CH4 is artificially well-constrained to incorrect values under the 1D assumption. Our work demonstrates the need to evaluate model assumptions in order to extract meaningful constraints from atmospheric spectra and motivates exploration of optimal observational setups.

  6. Simulated infrared emission spectra of highly excited polyatomic molecules: a detailed model of the PAH-UIR hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Cook, D J; Saykally, R J

    1998-02-01

    A detailed description of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/unidentified infrared band (UIR) mechanism is presented in which experimental spectral bandshape functions are used to simulate IR emission spectra for individual molecules. These spectra are additively superimposed to produce a conglomerate spectrum representative of a family of PAH molecules. Ab initio vibrational frequencies and intensities for nine PAHs (neutral and cationic) as large as ovalene are used in conjunction with measured bandshape and temperature-dependent redshift data to simulate the UIR bands. The calculated spectra of cations provide a closer match to the UIRs than do those of the neutrals. However, the PAH cations used in the simulations fail to reproduce the details of the UIR emission spectra. The discrepancies are potentially alleviated if both larger PAHs and a greater number of PAHs were included in the simulation.

  7. Simulated infrared emission spectra of highly excited polyatomic molecules: a detailed model of the PAH-UIR hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A detailed description of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/unidentified infrared band (UIR) mechanism is presented in which experimental spectral bandshape functions are used to simulate IR emission spectra for individual molecules. These spectra are additively superimposed to produce a conglomerate spectrum representative of a family of PAH molecules. Ab initio vibrational frequencies and intensities for nine PAHs (neutral and cationic) as large as ovalene are used in conjunction with measured bandshape and temperature-dependent redshift data to simulate the UIR bands. The calculated spectra of cations provide a closer match to the UIRs than do those of the neutrals. However, the PAH cations used in the simulations fail to reproduce the details of the UIR emission spectra. The discrepancies are potentially alleviated if both larger PAHs and a greater number of PAHs were included in the simulation.

  8. Emission spectra and kinetics of copolymer films of styrene and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Donald B.; Scott, Gary W.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The temperature-dependent steady-state emission spectra and fluorescence kinetics of copolymer films of styrene and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene are reported. The polystyrene excimer emission is efficiently quenched in the presence of relatively small amounts of the pentafluorophenyl quencher in spite of the fact that direct energy transfer from the excimer to the quencher chromophores is not possible. The quenching of the polystyrene excimer emission at room temperature and of the polystyrene monomer emission at 13 K is attributed to the interception of the migrating monomer excitation by the quencher. The data suggest that this quenching mechanism is independent of temperature.

  9. Lyman-alpha emission from the Lyman-alpha forest. [in high red shift quasar spectra due to molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.; Weymann, Ray J.

    1987-01-01

    It is suggested that high-dispersion long-slit spectra or very narrow-band etalon images of 'blank' sky could reveal patches of Ly-alpha line emission from the population of clouds whose absorption produces the 'Ly-alpha forest' in QSO spectra. A nonobservation can put limits on the ionizing background at high redshift which are better than those obtainable by direct measurements of background light.

  10. The impact of non-uniform thermal structure on the interpretation of exoplanet emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Line, Michael R.

    2016-10-01

    Observations and models have revealed the complex and dynamic states of exoplanetary atmospheres. In particular, the atmospheres of warm and hot gas giants have opened the doors to physical and chemical regimes unseen in our solar system. To understand their thermal structures and chemical abundances, the field has been moving towards inverse models, or ``retrievals.'' Traditionally, one retrieves what are supposed to be 1D hemispheric average atmospheric conditions. However, the real spectra are produced by 3D structures that feature hot and cool spots, chemical gradients, clouds, etc. How well does a 1D retrieval represent, or misrepresent, a complex reality?Here, we investigate the biases accompanying the 1D interpretation of retrievals by putting more complex retrieval scenarios to the test on emission spectra. Our first scenario is the emission from a hypothetical HD 189733b-like planet at first or third quarter phase, featuring a ``hot'' dayside and ``colder'' nightside thermal profile. We simulate JWST and WFC3+IRAC data and compare the results of retrieving for 1 profile (1 T-Ps) and abundances versus for 2 profiles (2 T-Ps) and abundances. We also examine the effects of increasing contrast between the two profiles. We find that, for both JWST and WFC3+IRAC, when the contrast is large (80% difference between the temperatures at the top of the atmosphere), the 1 T-P approach shows well constrained abundances -- but the retrieved values are inaccurate. When we apply the 2 T-P approach, we better recover the true value. We also demonstrate the effect on real WASP-43b HST+Spitzer phase curve data: invoking a second profile indeed reveals that 1 T-P returns a well-constrained, but likely false, abundance of methane. We also quantify which wavelengths are more sensitive to temperature profile differences. Our work is greatly complementary to observational studies.In the future, we will expand to retrieve from spectra at different phases and the study of dayside

  11. Time resolved spectra in the infrared absorption and emission from shock heated hydrocarbons. [in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Borchardt, D. B.

    1990-01-01

    The wavelength range of a previously constructed multichannel fast recording spectrometer was extended to the mid-infrared. With the initial configuration, light intensities were recorded simultaneously with a silicon-diode array simultaneously at 20 adjacent wavelengths, each with a 20-micron time resolution. For studies in the infrared, the silicon diodes were replaced by a 20-element PbSe array of similar dimensions, cooled by a three-stage thermoelectric device. It is proposed that infrared emissions could be due to shock-heated low molecular-weight hydrocarbons. The full Swan band system appeared in time-integrated emission spectra from shock-heated C2H2; no soot was generated. At low resolution, the profiles on the high-frequency side of the black body maximum show no distinctive features. These could be fitted to Planck curves, with temperatures that declined with time from an initial high that was intermediate between T5 (no conversion) and T5(eq).

  12. Triton Emission Spectra in Some Target Nuclei Irradiated by Ultra-Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Büyükuslu, H.; Demirkol, İ.; Arasoğlu, A.

    2010-08-01

    High-current proton accelerator technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. The produced neutrons are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, triton emission spectra by using ultra-fast neutrons (incident neutron energy >50 MeV), the ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 56Fe, 59Co, 208Pb and 209Bi have been investigated. In the calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  13. Package for Interactive Analysis of Line Emission (Analysis of UV-X-Ray High-Resolution Emission Spectra)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashyap, Vinay; Hunter, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PINTofALE is an IDL based package to analyze high-resolution grating spectra. The first version was made available to the public on 3 February 2001. Since then we have carried out numerous changes, and the current release is version 1.5, released on 9 October 2002. The changes include upgrades to handle higher versions of IDL, the new version of the CHIANTI database (v4), major enhancements in user-friendliness, improved handling of response matrices, the ability to handle 24-bit color, access to the Atomic Plasma Emission Database (APED), and beta releases of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based DEM fitting routines. Plans for the future include: inclusion of MCMC techniques in the fitting programs, enhanced graphics capabilities, an overhaul of the line and continuum database structure, and bug fixes. In September 2002, we hired a data analyst (LiWei Lin) to work on PINTofALE. Mr.Lin is concentrating on incorporating MCMC as well as simpler Monte-Carlo techniques, fast RMF convolution, etc., into the code base, as well as reviewing the existing documentation and searching for bugs. A detailed description of the package, together with fairly detailed documentation, example walks-throughs, and downloadable tar files, are available on-line from http://hea-www. harvard.edu/PINTofALE/

  14. Nebular and auroral emission lines of [Cl III] in the optical spectra of planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Keenan, F P; Aller, L H; Ramsbottom, C A; Bell, K L; Crawford, F L; Hyung, S

    2000-04-25

    Electron impact excitation rates in Cl III, recently determined with the R-matrix code, are used to calculate electron temperature (T(e)) and density (N(e)) emission line ratios involving both the nebular (5517.7, 5537.9 A) and auroral (8433.9, 8480.9, 8500.0 A) transitions. A comparison of these results with observational data for a sample of planetary nebulae, obtained with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, reveals that the R(1) = I(5518 A)/I(5538 A) intensity ratio provides estimates of N(e) in excellent agreement with the values derived from other line ratios in the echelle spectra. This agreement indicates that R(1) is a reliable density diagnostic for planetary nebulae, and it also provides observational support for the accuracy of the atomic data adopted in the line ratio calculations. However the [Cl iii] 8433.9 A line is found to be frequently blended with a weak telluric emission feature, although in those instances when the [Cl iii] intensity may be reliably measured, it provides accurate determinations of T(e) when ratioed against the sum of the 5518 and 5538 A line fluxes. Similarly, the 8500.0 A line, previously believed to be free of contamination by the Earth's atmosphere, is also shown to be generally blended with a weak telluric emission feature. The [Cl iii] transition at 8480.9 A is found to be blended with the He i 8480.7 A line, except in planetary nebulae that show a relatively weak He i spectrum, where it also provides reliable estimates of T(e) when ratioed against the nebular lines. Finally, the diagnostic potential of the near-UV [Cl iii] lines at 3344 and 3354 A is briefly discussed.

  15. Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Regional Integration to Quantify Spectra for Dissolved Organic Matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, W.; Westerhoff, P.; Leenheer, J.A.; Booksh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water and soil. However, interpreting the >10,000 wavelength-dependent fluorescence intensity data points represented in EEMs has posed a significant challenge. Fluorescence regional integration, a quantitative technique that integrates the volume beneath an EEM, was developed to analyze EEMs. EEMs were delineated into five excitation-emission regions based on fluorescence of model compounds, DOM fractions, and marine waters or freshwaters. Volumetric integration under the EEM within each region, normalized to the projected excitation-emission area within that region and dissolved organic carbon concentration, resulted in a normalized region-specific EEM volume (??i,n). Solid-state carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, and EEMs were obtained for standard Suwannee River fulvic acid and 15 hydrophobic or hydrophilic acid, neutral, and base DOM fractions plus nonfractionated DOM from wastewater effluents and rivers in the southwestern United States. DOM fractions fluoresced in one or more EEM regions. The highest cumulative EEM volume (??T,n = ????i,n) was observed for hydrophobic neutral DOM fractions, followed by lower ??T,n values for hydrophobic acid, base, and hydrophilic acid DOM fractions, respectively. An extracted wastewater biomass DOM sample contained aromatic protein- and humic-like material and was characteristic of bacterial-soluble microbial products. Aromatic carbon and the presence of specific aromatic compounds (as indicated by solid-state 13C NMR and FTIR data) resulted in EEMs that aided in differentiating wastewater effluent DOM from drinking water DOM.

  16. Electromagnetic Emission from Long-lived Binary Neutron Star Merger Remnants. II. Lightcurves and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Ciolfi, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations indicate that in a large fraction of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers a long-lived neutron star (NS) may be formed rather than a black hole. Unambiguous electromagnetic (EM) signatures of such a scenario would strongly impact our knowledge on how short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and their afterglow radiation are generated. Furthermore, such EM signals would have profound implications for multimessenger astronomy with joint EM and gravitational-wave (GW) observations of BNS mergers, which will soon become reality thanks to the ground-based advanced LIGO/Virgo GW detector network. Here we explore such EM signatures based on the model presented in a companion paper, which provides a self-consistent evolution of the post-merger system and its EM emission up to ˜107 s. Light curves and spectra are computed for a wide range of post-merger physical properties. We present X-ray afterglow light curves corresponding to the “standard” and the “time-reversal” scenario for SGRBs (prompt emission associated with the merger or with the collapse of the long-lived NS). The light curve morphologies include single and two-plateau features with timescales and luminosities that are in good agreement with Swift observations. Furthermore, we compute the X-ray signal that should precede the SGRB in the time-reversal scenario, the detection of which would represent smoking-gun evidence for this scenario. Finally, we find a bright, highly isotropic EM transient peaking in the X-ray band at ˜102-104 s after the BNS merger with luminosities of LX ˜ 1046-1048 erg s-1. This signal represents a very promising EM counterpart to the GW emission from BNS mergers.

  17. ELECTROMAGNETIC EMISSION FROM LONG-LIVED BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGER REMNANTS. II. LIGHT CURVES AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Ciolfi, Riccardo E-mail: riccardo.ciolfi@unitn.it

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations indicate that in a large fraction of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers a long-lived neutron star (NS) may be formed rather than a black hole. Unambiguous electromagnetic (EM) signatures of such a scenario would strongly impact our knowledge on how short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and their afterglow radiation are generated. Furthermore, such EM signals would have profound implications for multimessenger astronomy with joint EM and gravitational-wave (GW) observations of BNS mergers, which will soon become reality thanks to the ground-based advanced LIGO/Virgo GW detector network. Here we explore such EM signatures based on the model presented in a companion paper, which provides a self-consistent evolution of the post-merger system and its EM emission up to ∼10{sup 7} s. Light curves and spectra are computed for a wide range of post-merger physical properties. We present X-ray afterglow light curves corresponding to the “standard” and the “time-reversal” scenario for SGRBs (prompt emission associated with the merger or with the collapse of the long-lived NS). The light curve morphologies include single and two-plateau features with timescales and luminosities that are in good agreement with Swift observations. Furthermore, we compute the X-ray signal that should precede the SGRB in the time-reversal scenario, the detection of which would represent smoking-gun evidence for this scenario. Finally, we find a bright, highly isotropic EM transient peaking in the X-ray band at ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} s after the BNS merger with luminosities of L{sub X} ∼ 10{sup 46}–10{sup 48} erg s{sup −1}. This signal represents a very promising EM counterpart to the GW emission from BNS mergers.

  18. Bayesian electron density inference from JET lithium beam emission spectra using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J.; Brix, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    A Bayesian model to infer edge electron density profiles is developed for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system, measuring Li I (2p-2s) line radiation using 26 channels with  ∼1 cm spatial resolution and 10∼ 20 ms temporal resolution. The density profile is modelled using a Gaussian process prior, and the uncertainty of the density profile is calculated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme. From the spectra measured by the transmission grating spectrometer, the Li I line intensities are extracted, and modelled as a function of the plasma density by a multi-state model which describes the relevant processes between neutral lithium beam atoms and plasma particles. The spectral model fully takes into account interference filter and instrument effects, that are separately estimated, again using Gaussian processes. The line intensities are inferred based on a spectral model consistent with the measured spectra within their uncertainties, which includes photon statistics and electronic noise. Our newly developed method to infer JET edge electron density profiles has the following advantages in comparison to the conventional method: (i) providing full posterior distributions of edge density profiles, including their associated uncertainties, (ii) the available radial range for density profiles is increased to the full observation range (∼26 cm), (iii) an assumption of monotonic electron density profile is not necessary, (iv) the absolute calibration factor of the diagnostic system is automatically estimated overcoming the limitation of the conventional technique and allowing us to infer the electron density profiles for all pulses without preprocessing the data or an additional boundary condition, and (v) since the full spectrum is modelled, the procedure of modulating the beam to measure the background signal is only necessary for the case of overlapping of the Li I line with impurity lines.

  19. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emissions of Vegetation Canopies From High Resolution Field Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Corp, L. A.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva

    2006-01-01

    A two-year experiment was performed on corn (Zea mays L.) crops under nitrogen (N) fertilization regimes to examine the use of hyperspectral canopy reflectance information for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vegetation production. Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll ChlF peaks centered at 685V10 nm and 735V5 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops, as part of an ongoing multi-year experiment at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. A spectroradiometer (ASD-FR Fieldspec Pro, Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., Boulder, CO) was used to measure canopy radiances 1 m above plant canopies with a 22deg field of view and a 0deg nadir view zenith angle. Canopy and plant measurements were made at the R3 grain fill reproductive stage on 3-4 replicate N application plots provided seasonal inputs of 280, 140, 70, and 28 kg N/ha. Leaf level measurements were also made which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and N contents). Crop yields were determined at harvest. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrowband regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red S F ratio derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment levels (e.g., total chlorophyll, Chl) associated with N application rates in both corn crops. This canopy-level spectral ratio was also

  20. X-ray emission of SNRs in nonuniform medium: properties of thermal and nonthermal spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, O.

    2006-05-01

    In this report we consider two effects in the thermal and nonthermal spectra of supernova remnants (SNRs) which could be caused by the nonuniform ISM: i) the mimicry of the thermal X-ray spectrum of SNRs under the nonthermal one and ii) artificial broadening of the high-energy end of the nonthermal X-ray spectrum of SNRs. 1.There is possibility that the nonthermal features in the X-ray spectrum of some supernova remnants may be in fact of the thermal origin. Observed spectrum from SNRs is a superposition of ``individual'' spectra from different small volumes along the line of sight. The plasma is under different conditions in different places in SNR. The thermal X-ray spectrum of emission from a volume with high enough gradients of density and temperature may mimic under nonthermal one. This effect is studied with special attention to the case of supernova remnant evolution in the nonuniform interstellar medium like near molecular cloud. The mimicry-effect may be responsible for the nonthermal properties of X-ray spectra in those SNRs where nonthermal flux in photons with energy < 2 keV is expected to be less than thermal one in et least 2 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the effect cannot be a reason of the nonthermal features in X-ray spectra of SN 1006 and other SNRs where nonthermal flux is estimated to be of order or higher than the thermal one. 2.The observed spectrum of SNR is a superposition of many ``local'' spectra emitted by regions of SNR which are under different physical conditions. Does broadening of the high-energy end of the observed nonthermal spectrum of SNRs, like in G347.3-0.5 and SN 1006, may be an artifact of observations or is it a consequence of the microphysics involved in the acceleration process? In this note we study the influence of parameter variations in the volume and over the surface of SNR on the shape of the high-energy end of the synchrotron spectrum. It is shown that gradients of density and magnetic field strength downstream of

  1. Precision Fe K-Alpha and Fe K-Beta Line Spectroscopy of the Seyfert 1.9 Galaxy NGC 2992 with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Murphy, Kendrah D.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Haba, Yoshito; Inoue, Hajime; Itoh, Takeshi; Kelley, Richard; Kokubun, Motohide; Markowitz, Alex; Mushotzky, Richard; Okajima, Takashi; Ptak, Andrew; Reeves, James; Selemitos, Peter J.; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Terashima, Yuichi

    2006-01-01

    We present detailed time-averaged X-ray spectroscopy in the 0.5-10 keV band of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992 with the Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XIS). The source had a factor approximately 3 higher 2-10 keV flux (approximately 1.2 x l0(exp -11) erg per square cm per s) than the historical minimum and a factor approximately 7 less than the historical maximum. The XIS spectrum of NGC 2992 can be described by several components. There is a primary continuum, modeled as a power-law with a photon index of Gamma = 1.57(sup +0.06) (sup -0.03) that is obscured by a Compton-thin absorber with a column density of 8.01(sup +0.6) (sup -0.5)x l0 (exp 21) per square cm. . There is another, weaker, unabsorbed power-law component (modeled with the same slope as the primary), that is likely to be due to the primary continuum being electron-scattered into our line-of-sight by a region extended on a scale of hundreds of parsecs. We measure the Thomson depth of the scattering zone to be Tau = 0.072 +/- 0.021. An optically-thin thermal continuum emission component, which probably originates in the same extended region, is included in the model and yields a temperature and luminosity of KT = 0.656(sup +0.088) (sup -0.0.61) keV and approximately 1.2 +/- 0.4 x l0 (exp 40) erg per s respectively. We detect an Fe K emission complex which we model with broad and narrow lines and we show that the intensities of the two components are decoupled at a confidence level > 3 sigma. The broad Fe K alpha line has an equivalent width of 118(sup +32) (sup -61) eV and could originate in an accretion disk (with inclination angle greater than approximately 30 deg) around the putative central black hole. The narrow Fe K alpha line has an equivalent width of 1632(sup +47) (sup -26) eV and is unresolved (FWHM < 4630 km per s) and likely originates in distant matter. The absolute flux in the narrow line implies that the column density out of the line-of-sight could be much higher than measured in

  2. K-(alpha) X-ray Thomson Scattering From Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Castor, J; Doppner, T; Falcone, R W; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Morse, E C; Ng, A; Pollaine, S; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2009-05-07

    Spectrally resolved Thomson scattering using ultra-fast K-{alpha} x-rays has measured the compression and heating of shocked compressed matter. The evolution and coalescence of two shock waves traveling through a solid density LiH target were characterized by the elastic scattering component. The density and temperature at shock coalescence, 2.2 eV and 1.7 x 10{sup 23}cm{sup -3}, were determined from the plasmon frequency shift and the relative intensity of the elastic and inelastic scattering features in the collective scattering regime. The observation of plasmon scattering at coalescence indicates a transition to the dense metallic state in LiH. The density and temperature regimes accessed in these experiments are relevant for inertial confinement fusion experiments and for the study of planetary formation.

  3. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  4. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  5. High-resolution spectra of distant compact narrow emission line galaxies: Progrenitors of spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, David C.; Guzman, Rafael; Faber, S. M.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Kron, Richard G.; Takamiya, Marianne

    1995-01-01

    Emission-line velocity widths have been determined for 17 faint (B approximately 20-23) very blue, compact galaxies whose redshifts range from z = 0.095 to 0.66. The spectra have a resolution of 8 Km/s and were taken with the HIRES echelle spectrograph of the Keck 10 m telescope. The galaxies are luminous with all but two within 1 mag of M(sub B) approximately -21. Yet they exhibit narrow velocity widths between sigma = 28-157 km/s, more consistent with typical values of extreme star-forming galaxies than with those of nearby spiral galaxies of similar luminosity. In particular, objects with sigma is less than or equal to 65 km/s follow the same correlations between sigma and both blue and H beta luminosities as those of nearby H II galaxies. These results strengthen the identification of H II glaxies as thier local counterparts. The blue colors and strong emission lines suggest these compact galaxies are undergoing a recent, strong burst of star formation. Like those which characterize some H II galaxies, this burst could be a nuclear star-forming event within a much larger, older stellar population. If the burst is instead a major episode in the total star-forming history, these distant galaxies could fade enough to match the low luminosities and surface brightnesses typical of nearby spheroidals like NGC 185 or NGC 205. Together with evidence for recent star formation, exponential light profiles, and subsolar metallicities, the postfading correlations between luminosity and velocity width and bewtween luminosity and surface brightness suggest that among the low-sigma galaxies, we may be witnessing, in situ, the progenitors of today's spheroidal galaxies.

  6. Single particle size and fluorescence spectra from emissions of burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate burn pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Houck, Joshua D. T.; Clark, Pamela A.; Pinnick, Ronald G.

    2013-08-01

    A single-particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer were used to measure the fluorescence spectra and particle size distribution from the particulate emissions of 12 different burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate open-air burning of garbage. Although the particulate emissions are likely dominated by particles <1 μm diameter, only the spectra of supermicron particles were measured here. The overall fluorescence spectral profiles exhibit either one or two broad bands peaked around 300-450 nm within the 280-650 nm spectral range, when the particles are illuminated with a 263-nm laser. Different burning materials have different profiles, some of them (cigarette, hair, uniform, paper, and plastics) show small changes during the burning process, and while others (beef, bread, carrot, Styrofoam, and wood) show big variations, which initially exhibit a single UV peak (around 310-340 nm) and a long shoulder in visible, and then gradually evolve into a bimodal spectrum with another visible peak (around 430-450 nm) having increasing intensity during the burning process. These spectral profiles could mainly derive from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with the combinations of tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, and other humic-like substances. About 68 % of these single-particle fluorescence spectra can be grouped into 10 clustered spectral templates that are derived from the spectra of millions of atmospheric aerosol particles observed in three locations; while the others, particularly these bimodal spectra, do not fall into any of the 10 templates. Therefore, the spectra from particulate emissions of burning materials can be easily discriminated from that of common atmospheric aerosol particles. The SFFS technology could be a good tool for monitoring burning pit emissions and possibly for distinguishing them from atmospheric aerosol particles.

  7. Electronic spectra of 2- and 3-tolunitrile in the gas phase. II. Geometry changes from Franck-Condon fits of fluorescence emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Gmerek, Felix; Stuhlmann, Benjamin; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-02-28

    We determined the changes of the geometries of 2- and 3-tolunitrile upon excitation to the lowest excited singlet states from Franck-Condon fits of the vibronic intensities in several fluorescence emission spectra and of the rotational constant changes upon excitation. These structural changes can be connected to the altered electron distribution in the molecules and are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. We show how the torsional barriers of the methyl groups in both components are used as probe of the molecular changes upon electronic excitation.

  8. Electronic spectra of 2- and 3-tolunitrile in the gas phase. II. Geometry changes from Franck-Condon fits of fluorescence emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmerek, Felix; Stuhlmann, Benjamin; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W.; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We determined the changes of the geometries of 2- and 3-tolunitrile upon excitation to the lowest excited singlet states from Franck-Condon fits of the vibronic intensities in several fluorescence emission spectra and of the rotational constant changes upon excitation. These structural changes can be connected to the altered electron distribution in the molecules and are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. We show how the torsional barriers of the methyl groups in both components are used as probe of the molecular changes upon electronic excitation.

  9. NUMERICAL MODELING OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH SPECTRA OF M87 CORE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Hilburn, G.; Liang, E. P.

    2012-02-10

    Spectral fits to M87 core data from radio to hard X-ray are generated via a specially selected software suite, comprised of the High-Accuracy Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics GRMHD accretion disk model and a two-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transport code. By determining appropriate parameter changes necessary to fit X-ray-quiescent and flaring behavior of M87's core, we assess the reasonableness of various flaring mechanisms. This shows that an accretion disk model of M87's core out to 28 GM/c{sup 2} can describe the inner emissions. High spin rates show GRMHD-driven polar outflow generation, without citing an external jet model. Our results favor accretion rate changes as the dominant mechanism of X-ray flux and index changes, with variations in density of approximately 20% necessary to scale between the average X-ray spectrum and flaring or quiescent spectra. The best-fit parameters are black hole spin a/M > 0.8 and maximum accretion flow density n {<=} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}, equivalent to horizon accretion rates between m-dot = M-dot / M-dot{sub Edd}{approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} (with M-dot{sub Edd} defined assuming a radiative efficiency {eta} = 0.1). These results demonstrate that the immediate surroundings of M87's core are appropriate to explain observed X-ray variability.

  10. Comparison of Cathodoluminescent and Photoluminescent Emission Spectra of LuPO4 with Different Dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Goedeke, Shawn; Hollerman, William Andrew; Allison, Stephen W; Gray, P A; Lewis, Linda A; Smithwick III, Robert W; Boatner, Lynn A; Glasgow, David C; Wise, H.

    2008-01-01

    The current interest in returning human exploration to the Moon and Mars makes cost-effective and low-mass health monitoring sensors essential for spacecraft development. In space, there are many surface measurements that are required to monitor the condition of the spacecraft including: surface temperature, radiation dose, and impact. Through the use of tailored phosphors, these conditions can be monitored. Practical space-based phosphor sensors will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of phosphors to ionizing radiation and their ability to anneal or 'self-heal' from damage caused by ionizing radiation. For the present research, a group of lutetium orthophosphate (LuPO{sub 4}) crystals with dopants including europium, erbium, and neodymium were characterized. Cathodoluminescence (CL) testing was performed using the low energy electron system located at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The data were collected using an Ocean Optics HR4000 spectrometer and a fiber optic feed-through. Previous research has shown that increases in both beam energy and current density improved the CL fluorescence yield. While the total electron dose was small, the intention was to maximize the number of irradiated materials. Additionally, these samples were evaluated using a PTI Quantum Master Spectrophotometer to determine the photoluminescence emission spectra.

  11. Simulation of emission spectra from nonuniform reactive laser-induced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Jörg; Lorusso, Antonella; Perrone, Alessio; Strafella, Francesco; Dutouquet, Christophe; Torralba, Béatrice

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that chemical reactions leading to the formation of AlO radicals in plasmas produced by ablation of aluminum or Ti-sapphire with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses can be predicted by the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, emission spectra recorded with an echelle spectrometer and a gated detector were compared to the spectral radiance computed for uniform and nonuniform equilibrium plasmas. The calculations are based on analytical solutions of the radiation transfer equation. The simulations show that the plasmas produced in argon background gas are almost uniform, whereas temperature and density gradients are evidenced in air. Furthermore, chemical reactions exclusively occur in the cold plume periphery for ablation in air. The formation of AlO is negligible in argon as the plasma temperature is too large in the time interval of interest up to several microseconds. Finally, the validity of local thermodynamic equilibrium is shown to depend on time, space, and on the elemental composition. The presented conclusions are of interest for material analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and for laser materials processing.

  12. Theoretical Auger electron and X-ray emission spectra of CO and H 2O by density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takao; Chong, Delano P.; Maki, Jun; Kawabe, Hiroyuki; Endo, Kazunaka

    2002-02-01

    We propose a new method for analysis of X-ray emission and Auger electron spectra (XES and AES) of molecules involving the valence spectra using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. To obtain the more accurate transition energies and the relative intensities, we use the total-energy difference procedure ( ΔE-KS) for all transition energies, and transform the coefficients in the LCGTO-MO scheme in the DFT to those for the linear combination of the LCGTO-AO scheme. The method is applied to the analysis of valence spectra, XES and AES for CO and H 2O molecules. The simulated spectra are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Computing the Absorption and Emission Spectra of 5-Methylcytidine in Different Solvents: A Test-Case for Different Solvation Models.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, L; Pepino, A J; Segarra-Martí, J; Banyasz, A; Garavelli, M; Improta, R

    2016-09-13

    The optical spectra of 5-methylcytidine in three different solvents (tetrahydrofuran, acetonitrile, and water) is measured, showing that both the absorption and the emission maximum in water are significantly blue-shifted (0.08 eV). The absorption spectra are simulated based on CAM-B3LYP/TD-DFT calculations but including solvent effects with three different approaches: (i) a hybrid implicit/explicit full quantum mechanical approach, (ii) a mixed QM/MM static approach, and (iii) a QM/MM method exploiting the structures issuing from molecular dynamics classical simulations. Ab-initio Molecular dynamics simulations based on CAM-B3LYP functionals have also been performed. The adopted approaches all reproduce the main features of the experimental spectra, giving insights on the chemical-physical effects responsible for the solvent shifts in the spectra of 5-methylcytidine and providing the basis for discussing advantages and limitations of the adopted solvation models.

  14. Analysis of soft x-ray emission spectra of laser-produced dysprosium, erbium and thulium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheil, John; Dunne, Padraig; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Kos, Domagoj; Long, Elaine; Miyazaki, Takanori; O’Reilly, Fergal; O’Sullivan, Gerard; Sheridan, Paul; Suzuki, Chihiro; Sokell, Emma; White, Elgiva; Kilbane, Deirdre

    2017-03-01

    Soft x-ray emission spectra of dysprosium, erbium and thulium ions created in laser-produced plasmas were recorded with a flat-field grazing-incidence spectrometer in the 2.5–8 nm spectral range. The ions were produced using an Nd:YAG laser of 7 ns pulse duration and the spectra were recorded at various power densities. The experimental spectra were interpreted with the aid of the Cowan suite of atomic structure codes and the flexible atomic code. At wavelengths above 5.5 nm the spectra are dominated by overlapping n = 4 ‑ n = 4 unresolved transition arrays from adjacent ion stages. Below 6 nm, n = 4 ‑ n = 5 transitions also give rise to a series of interesting overlapping spectral features.

  15. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of 1,5-dihydroxyanthraquinone-d2 in n-hexane at 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smulevich, Giulietta; Foggi, Paolo

    1987-11-01

    The fluorescence excitation, between 430 and 505 nm, and emission, between 505 and 725 nm, spectra in n-hexane of 1,5-dihydroxyanthraquinone-d0 and -d2 at 10 K have been measured. Dual excitation and emission associated to excited state proton transfer were observed. Apart from the long wavelength emission, well resolved vibrational structures were obtained. A remarkable spectral shift (684 cm-1) of the origin of the high frequency transition was observed upon deuteration. The energy gaps between the transition origins both in excitation and emission as well as the isotopic shifts of the origins, were interpreted in terms of Lippincott-Schroeder asymmetric double minimum potential functions along the OH coordinate. An extra fluorescence occurs in the low frequency range, vanishing upon deuteration. It was explained as due to the ν(OH) stretching mode of the high frequency emission enhanced via vibronic coupling between the two ground states.

  16. Analysis of arc emission spectra of stainless steel electric arc furnace slag affected by fluctuating arc voltage.

    PubMed

    Aula, Matti; Mäkinen, Ari; Fabritius, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Control of chromium oxidation in the electric arc furnace (EAF) is a significant problem in stainless steel production due to variations of the chemical compositions in the EAF charge. One potential method to control chromium oxidation is to analyze the emission spectrum of the electric arc in order to find indicators of rising chromium content in slag. The purpose of this study was to determine if slag composition can be gained by utilizing electric arc emission spectra in the laboratory environment, despite electric arc voltage fluctuations and varying slag composition. The purpose of inducing voltage fluctuation was to simulate changes in the industrial EAF process. The slag samples were obtained from Outokumpu Stainless Oy Tornio Works, and three different arc currents were used. The correlation analysis showed that the emission spectra offer numerous peak ratios with high correlations to the X-ray fluorescence-measured slag CrO(x)/FeO(x) and MnO/SiO2 ratios. These ratios are useful in determining if the reduction agents have been depleted in the EAF. The results suggest that analysis of laboratory-scale electric arc emission spectra is suitable for indicating the high CrO(x) or MnO content of the slag despite the arc fluctuations. Reliable analysis of other slag components was not successful.

  17. Quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency measurements using simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Sanam; Hannagan, John; Rigby, Paul; Pfleger, Kevin; Corry, Ben

    2013-02-01

    Accurate quantification of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using intensity-based methods is difficult due to the overlap of fluorophore excitation and emission spectra. Consequently, mechanisms are required to remove bleedthrough of the donor emission into the acceptor channel and direct excitation of the acceptor when aiming to excite only the donor fluorophores. Methods to circumvent donor bleedthrough using the unmixing of emission spectra have been reported, but these require additional corrections to account for direct excitation of the acceptor. Here we present an alternative method for robust quantification of FRET efficiencies based upon the simultaneous spectral unmixing of both excitation and emission spectra. This has the benefit over existing methodologies in circumventing the issue of donor bleedthrough and acceptor cross excitation without the need for additional corrections. Furthermore, we show that it is applicable with as few as two excitation wavelengths and so can be used for quantifying FRET efficiency in microscope images as easily as for data collected on a spectrofluorometer. We demonstrate the accuracy of the approach by reproducing efficiency values in well characterized FRET standards: HEK cells expressing a variety of linked cerulean and venus fluorescent proteins. Finally we describe simple ImageJ plugins that can be used to calculate and create images of FRET efficiencies from microscope images.

  18. Analysis of the X-ray emission spectra of copper, germanium and rubidium plasmas produced at the Phelix laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comet, M.; Pain, J.-C.; Gilleron, F.; Piron, R.; Denis-Petit, D.; Méot, V.; Gosselin, G.; Morel, P.; Hannachi, F.; Gobet, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.

    2017-03-01

    We present the analysis of X-ray emission spectra of copper, germanium and rubidium plasmas measured at the Phelix laser facility. The laser intensity was around 6×1014 W.cm-2. The analysis is based on the hypothesis of an homogeneous plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium using an effective temperature. This temperature is deduced from hydrodynamic simulations and collisional-radiative computations. Spectra are then calculated using the LTE opacity codes OPAMCDF and SCO-RCG and compared to experimental data.

  19. Excitation Emission Matrix Spectra (EEMS) of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced during Microbial Incubation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, N.; Nelson, N. B.; Parsons, R.

    2013-12-01

    The chromophoric or light-absorbing fraction of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is present ubiquitously in natural waters and has a significant impact on ocean biogeochemistry, affecting photosynthesis and primary production as well direct and indirect photochemical reactions (Siegel et al., 2002; Nelson et al., 2007). It has been largely researched in the past few decades, however the exact chemical composition remains unknown. Instrumental methods of analysis including simultaneous excitation-emission fluorescence spectra have allowed for further insight into source and chemical composition. While certain excitation-emission peaks have been associated with ';marine' sources, they have not been exclusively linked to bacterial production of CDOM (Coble, 1996; Zepp et al., 2004). In this study, ';grazer diluted' seawater samples (70% 0.2μm filtered water; 30% whole water) were collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) site in the Sargasso Sea (31° 41' N; 64° 10' W) and incubated with an amendment of labile dissolved organic carbon (10μM C6H12O6), ammonium (1μM NH4Cl) and phosphate (0.1μM K2HPO4) to facilitate bacterial production. These substrates and concentrations have been previously shown to facilitate optimum bacterial and CDOM production (Nelson et al., 2004). Sample depths were chosen at 1m and 200m as water at these depths has been exposed to UV light (the Subtropical Mode Water at 200m has been subducted from the surface) and therefore has low initial concentrations of CDOM. After the samples were amended, they were incubated at in-situ temperatures in the dark for 72 hours, with bacteria counts, UV-Vis absorption and EEMS measurements taken at 6-8 hour intervals. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements were collected daily. For the surface water experiment specific bacteria populations were investigated using Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis. Results showed a clear production of bacteria and production of CDOM, which

  20. Discharge Modes Suggested by Emission Spectra of Nitrogen Dielectric Barrier Discharge with Wire-Cylinder Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuxiang; Mu, Zongxin; Zhang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, nitrogen dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was generated in a quartz tube with coaxial wire-cylinder electrodes at atmospheric pressure. By varying the nitrogen gas flow (FN) in the range of 0-1 m3/h, the plasma optical emission spectra (OES) were measured and studied. The vibration (Tvib) and rotation temperature (Trot) of nitrogen were obtained, by fitting the rovibronic bands of N2(C3Πu - B3Πg, 0-1), and by the Boltzmann plot method for purposes of comparison. Tvib increased up to 2481 K with increasing nitrogen flow till 0.2 m3/h, and then decreased with further increasing FN, while Trot decreased monotonously and approached to ˜350 K for FN ≥ 0.6 m3/h. The intensity of N2(C3Πu - B3Πg, 0-0, 1-0, 0-3) and N2+ (B2Σu+ - X2 Σ+g, 0-0) exhibited similar evolution with increasing FN to those of the Tvib and Trot, respectively. The discharge photos revealed that the discharge filaments gradually decreased with increasing FN, and eventually disappeared, which implied that a discharge mode transition emerged with increasing FN. The possible mechanism for the discharge mode transition is studied in detail according to the vibration (Tvib) and rotation temperature (Trot) of nitrogen. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475040, 11375041) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. DUT14ZD[G]04)

  1. Effect of heat treatment on the far-infrared emission spectra and fine structures of black tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yan; Gan, Kun

    2014-05-01

    Mineral black tourmaline powders were heat-treated at different temperatures. Their crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffractometer. Their infrared absorption and emission spectra before and after the heat treatment were analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The corresponding fine structures were discussed in detail. The results showed that the powders possessed higher infrared emissivity at the band where they showed stronger infrared absorption. However, there is no certain correlation between the peak intensity of infrared absorption and emissivity values at the same frequency. Because of the crystal shrinkage of c-axis, the electronic transitions were stimulated between different energy levels, and the abilities of infrared absorption and emission were enhanced with increasing the temperature of heat treatment.

  2. Ultrafast K-alpha Thomson scattering from shock compressed matter for use as a dense matter diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritcher, Andrea Lynn

    intensity of the elastic scattering component. The observation of scattering from plasmons, electron plasma oscillations, at shock coalescence indicates a transition to a dense metallic plasma state in LiH. From the frequency shift of the measured plasmon feature the electron density was directly determined with high accuracy, providing a material compression of a factor of three times solid density. The quality of data achieved in these experiments demonstrates the capability for single-shot dynamic characterization of dense shock compressed matter. The conditions probed in this experiment are relevant for the study of the physics of planetary formation and to characterize inertial confinement fusion targets. In addition, presented in this thesis are the first ultrafast temporally, spectrally and angularly resolved x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from shock-compressed matter. These experiments allowed the testing of theoretical models used in the multi-shock experiments to infer temperatures, from dependency of the elastic scattering feature intensity on the ion form factor. The experimental spectra provided the absolute elastic and inelastic scattering intensities from the measured density of free electrons. Laser-compressed lithium-hydride samples were well characterized by inelastic Compton and Plasmon scattering of a K-alpha x-ray probe providing independent measurements of temperature and density. The data show excellent agreement with the total intensity and structure when using the two-species form factor and accounting for the screening of ion-ion interactions. Also presented in this thesis are proof-of-principle x-ray scattering measurements from inertial confinement fusion implosion targets, and a discussion of ongoing and future work. These first measurements provided temperature and density conditions for imploding CH shells for the investigation of the capsule ablator adiabat. Measurement and understanding of the adiabat response to implosion and target

  3. c2d Spitzer IRS spectra of embedded low-mass young stars: gas-phase emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahuis, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Blake, G. A.; Evans, N. J.

    2010-09-01

    Context. A survey of mid-infrared gas-phase emission lines of H2, H2O and various atoms toward a sample of 43 embedded low-mass young stars in nearby star-forming regions is presented. The sources are selected from the Spitzer “Cores to Disks” (c2d) legacy program. Aims: The environment of embedded protostars is complex both in its physical structure (envelopes, outflows, jets, protostellar disks) and the physical processes (accretion, irradiation by UV and/or X-rays, excitation through slow and fast shocks) which take place. The mid-IR spectral range hosts a suite of diagnostic lines which can distinguish them. A key point is to spatially resolve the emission in the Spitzer-IRS spectra to separate extended PDR and shock emission from compact source emission associated with the circumstellar disk and jets. Methods: An optimal extraction method is used to separate both spatially unresolved (compact, up to a few hundred AU) and spatially resolved (extended, thousand AU or more) emission from the IRS spectra. The results are compared with the c2d disk sample and literature PDR and shock models to address the physical nature of the sources. Results: Both compact and extended emission features are observed. Warm (T_ex few hundred K) H2, observed through the pure rotational H2 S(0), S(1) and S(2) lines, and [S i] 25 μm emission is observed primarily in the extended component. [S i] is observed uniquely toward truly embedded sources and not toward disks. On the other hand hot (T_ex ⪆ 700 K) H2, observed primarily through the S(4) line, and [Ne ii] emission is seen mostly in the spatially unresolved component. [Fe ii] and [Si ii] lines are observed in both spatial components. Hot H2O emission is found in the spatially unresolved component of some sources. Conclusions: The observed emission on ≥1000 AU scales is characteristic of PDR emission and likely originates in the outflow cavities in the remnant envelope created by the stellar wind and jets from the embedded

  4. Compact characterization of liquid absorption and emission spectra using linear variable filters integrated with a CMOS imaging camera

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yuhang; Carlson, John A.; Kesler, Benjamin A.; Peng, Wang; Su, Patrick; Al-Mulla, Saoud A.; Lim, Sung Jun; Smith, Andrew M.; Dallesasse, John M.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    A compact analysis platform for detecting liquid absorption and emission spectra using a set of optical linear variable filters atop a CMOS image sensor is presented. The working spectral range of the analysis platform can be extended without a reduction in spectral resolution by utilizing multiple linear variable filters with different wavelength ranges on the same CMOS sensor. With optical setup reconfiguration, its capability to measure both absorption and fluorescence emission is demonstrated. Quantitative detection of fluorescence emission down to 0.28 nM for quantum dot dispersions and 32 ng/mL for near-infrared dyes has been demonstrated on a single platform over a wide spectral range, as well as an absorption-based water quality test, showing the versatility of the system across liquid solutions for different emission and absorption bands. Comparison with a commercially available portable spectrometer and an optical spectrum analyzer shows our system has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and acceptable spectral resolution for discrimination of emission spectra, and characterization of colored liquid’s absorption characteristics generated by common biomolecular assays. This simple, compact, and versatile analysis platform demonstrates a path towards an integrated optical device that can be utilized for a wide variety of applications in point-of-use testing and point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:27389070

  5. Compact characterization of liquid absorption and emission spectra using linear variable filters integrated with a CMOS imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yuhang; Carlson, John A.; Kesler, Benjamin A.; Peng, Wang; Su, Patrick; Al-Mulla, Saoud A.; Lim, Sung Jun; Smith, Andrew M.; Dallesasse, John M.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-07-01

    A compact analysis platform for detecting liquid absorption and emission spectra using a set of optical linear variable filters atop a CMOS image sensor is presented. The working spectral range of the analysis platform can be extended without a reduction in spectral resolution by utilizing multiple linear variable filters with different wavelength ranges on the same CMOS sensor. With optical setup reconfiguration, its capability to measure both absorption and fluorescence emission is demonstrated. Quantitative detection of fluorescence emission down to 0.28 nM for quantum dot dispersions and 32 ng/mL for near-infrared dyes has been demonstrated on a single platform over a wide spectral range, as well as an absorption-based water quality test, showing the versatility of the system across liquid solutions for different emission and absorption bands. Comparison with a commercially available portable spectrometer and an optical spectrum analyzer shows our system has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and acceptable spectral resolution for discrimination of emission spectra, and characterization of colored liquid’s absorption characteristics generated by common biomolecular assays. This simple, compact, and versatile analysis platform demonstrates a path towards an integrated optical device that can be utilized for a wide variety of applications in point-of-use testing and point-of-care diagnostics.

  6. Effect of nearest-neighbor ions on excited ionic states, emission spectra, and line profiles in hot and dense plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzmann, D.; Stein, J.; Goldberg, I. B.; Pratt, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the cylindrical symmetry imposed by the nearest-neighbor ions on the ionic levels and the emission spectra of a Li-like Kr ion immersed in hot and dense plasmas is investigated using the Stein et al. (1989) two-centered model extended to include computations of the line profiles, shifts, and widths, as well as the energy-level mixing and the forbidden transition probabilities. It is shown that the cylindrical symmetry mixes states with different orbital quantum numbers l, particularly for highly excited states, and, thereby, gives rise to forbidden transitions in the emission spectrum. Results are obtained for the variation of the ionic level shifts and mixing coefficients with the distance to the nearest neighbor. Also obtained are representative computed spectra that show the density effects on the spectral line profiles, shifts, and widths, and the forbidden components in the spectrum.

  7. Advances in physical study of high enthalpy plasma jets of technological interest: emission spectra and plasma characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belevtsev, A. A.; Chinnov, V. F.; Isakaev, E. Kh.; Markin, A. V.; Tazikova, T. F.; Tereshkin, S. A.

    1998-10-01

    Offers a comprehensive study of the emission spectra and plasma characteristics of high enthalpy atmospheric pressure argon and nitrogen jets produced by a high- current industrially important arc plasmatron with a vortex stabilized channel-anode (I<=3D500A, G=3D1-4g/s, jet diameter at a minimum-6mm). The spectra are taken at different distances from the cathode in the 200-950nm region with a spectral resolution=3D0.01nm allowing a fine structure of vibronic bands to be essentially resolved except that due to the dublet (spin) splitting and Λ-doubling. Also derived (through the Abel inversion) are radial distributions of plasma components. The spectra obtained have been used for determining plasma composition, the electron component parameters (by atomic/ionic Stark half-widths and intensities) and the assessment of rotational and vibrational temperatures by simulating molecular bands.

  8. Paradigms and challenges for bioapplication of rare earth upconversion luminescent nanoparticles: small size and tunable emission/excitation spectra.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ling-Dong; Wang, Ye-Fu; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2014-04-15

    Rare earth (RE) materials, which are excited in the ultraviolet and emit in the visible light spectrum, are widely used as phosphors for lamps and displays. In the 1960's, researchers reported an abnormal emission phenomenon where photons emitted from a RE element carried more energy than those absorbed, owing to the sequential energy transfer between two RE ions--Yb(3+)-sensitized Er(3+) or Tm(3+)--in the solid state. After further study, researchers named this abnormal emission phenomenon upconversion (UC) emission. More recent approaches take advantage of solution-based synthesis, which allows creation of homogenous RE nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled size and structure that are capable of UC emission. Such nanoparticles are useful for many applications, especially in biology. For these applications, researchers seek small NPs with high upconversion emission intensity. These UCNPs have the potential to have multicolor and tunable emissions via various activators. A vast potential for future development remains by developing molecular antennas and energy transfer within RE ions. We expect UCNPs with optimized spectra behavior to meet the increasing demand of potential applications in bioimaging, biological detection, and light conversion. This Account focuses on efforts to control the size and modulate the spectra of UCNPs. We first review efforts in size control. One method is careful control of the synthesis conditions to manipulate particle nucleation and growth, but more recently researchers have learned that the doping conditions can affect the size of UCNPs. In addition, constructing homogeneous core/shell structures can control nanoparticle size by adjusting the shell thickness. After reviewing size control, we consider how diverse applications impose different requirements on excitation and/or emission photons and review recent developments on tuning of UC spectral profiles, especially the extension of excitation/emission wavelengths and the adjustment

  9. X-RAY REFLECTED SPECTRA FROM ACCRETION DISK MODELS. II. DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS FOR X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    GarcIa, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F. E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.gov

    2011-04-20

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance, and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis on the 2-10 keV energy region and in particular on the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe K{alpha} on the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is {approx}800 eV for models with log {xi} {approx} 1.5 and decreases monotonically as {xi} increases. For lower values of {xi}, the Fe K{alpha} EW decreases to a minimum near log {xi} {approx} 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low-ionized, reflection-dominated cases, the 2-10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S L{alpha} lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca X K{alpha} line. In some cases, the S XV blends with the He-like Si radiative recombination continua producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  10. [Transient emission spectra from OH, CH and C2 free radicals in the combustion reaction of n-decane].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-dong; Li, Ping; Zhang, Chang-hua; Tang, Hong-chang; Ye, Bin; Li, Xiang-yuan

    2012-05-01

    Using an intensified spectroscopic detector CCD and a heated shock tube, transient emission spectra of n-decane in the combustion reaction were measured in a spectral range of 200-850 nm. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of 1100-1600 K, a pressure of 2.0 atm, an initial fuel mole fraction of 1.0% and an equivalence ratio of 1.0. Results show that the main emission bands are attributed to OH, CH and C2 radicals produced during the combustion process of n-decane. Emission intensities of the three radicals reached their maximums only after 5 micros from the onset of their ignitions. After about 30 micros had passed, the band of OH radical was still observed, but the bands of CH and C2 radicals almost disappeared. Time histories of spectral emission intensities represent the time histories of concentrations of the three radicals during the process of combustion The emission peak ratio of OH (306.4 nm)/CH(431.4 nm) is approximately 27/100 in the combustion of n-decane, which is much greater than the corresponding ratio of about 7/100 in the combustion of n-heptane. This result reveals that the two fuels have different reaction mechanisms. High resolution characteristic spectra of CH and C2 were also acquired in the present experiment, the spectra show the rotational structures of the bands clearly. Current results are valuable for understanding the property and validating the mechanism of n-decane combustion reaction

  11. Simulation of the single-vibronic-level emission spectra of HAsO and DAsO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Daniel K. W.; Lee, Edmond P. F.; Dyke, John M.

    2016-05-01

    The single-vibronic-level (SVL) emission spectra of HAsO and DAsO have been simulated by electronic structure/Franck-Condon factor calculations to confirm the spectral molecular carrier and to investigate the electronic states involved. Various multi-reference (MR) methods, namely, NEVPT2 (n-electron valence state second order perturbation theory), RSPT2-F12 (explicitly correlated Rayleigh-Schrodinger second order perturbation theory), and MRCI-F12 (explicitly correlated multi-reference configuration interaction) were employed to compute the geometries and relative electronic energies for the X ˜ 1 A ' and A ˜ 1 A ″ states of HAsO. These are the highest level calculations on these states yet reported. The MRCI-F12 method gives computed T0 (adiabatic transition energy including zero-point energy correction) values, which agree well with the available experimental T0 value much better than previously computed values and values computed with other MR methods in this work. In addition, the potential energy surfaces of the X ˜ 1 A ' and A ˜ 1 A ″ states of HAsO were computed using the MRCI-F12 method. Franck-Condon factors between the two states, which include anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation, were then computed and used to simulate the recently reported SVL emission spectra of HAsO and DAsO [R. Grimminger and D. J. Clouthier, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184308 (2011)]. Our simulated SVL emission spectra confirm the assignments of the molecular carrier, the electronic states involved, and the vibrational structures observed in the SVL emission spectra but suggest a loss of intensity in the reported experimental spectra at the low emission energy region almost certainly due to a loss of responsivity near the cutoff region (˜800 nm) of the detector used. Computed and experimentally derived re (equilibrium) and/or r0 {the (0,0,0) vibrational level} geometries of the two states of HAsO are discussed.

  12. Outer atmospheres of cool stars. XII - A survey of IUE ultraviolet emission line spectra of cool dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Bornmann, P. L.; Carpenter, K. G.; Hege, E. K.; Wing, R. F.; Giampapa, M. S.; Worden, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative information is obtained on the chromospheres and transition regions of M dwarf stars, in order to determine how the outer atmospheres of dMe stars differ from dM stars and how they compare with the outer atmospheres of quiet and active G and K type dwarfs. IUE spectra of six dMe and four dM stars, together with ground-based photometry and spectroscopy of the Balmer and Ca II H and K lines, show no evidence of flares. It is concluded, regarding the quiescent behavior of these stars, that emission-line spectra resemble that of the sun and contain emission lines formed in regions with 4000-20,000 K temperatures that are presumably analogous to the solar chromosphere, as well as regions with temperatures of 20,000-200,000 K that are presumably analogous to the solar transition region. Emission-line surface fluxes are proportional to the emission measure over the range of temperatures at which the lines are formed.

  13. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  14. A VLBA SEARCH FOR BINARY BLACK HOLES IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH DOUBLE-PEAKED OPTICAL EMISSION LINE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.

    2011-06-15

    We have examined a subset of 11 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) drawn from a sample of 87 objects that possess double-peaked optical emission line spectra, as put forward by Wang et al. and are detectable in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters (FIRST) survey at radio wavelengths. The double-peaked nature of the optical emission line spectra has been suggested as evidence for the existence of binary black holes in these AGNs, although this interpretation is controversial. We make a simple suggestion that direct evidence of binary black holes in these objects could be searched for in the form of dual sources of compact radio emission associated with the AGNs. To explore this idea, we have used the Very Long Baseline Array to observe these 11 objects from the Wang et al. sample. Of the 11 objects, we detect compact radio emission from two, SDSS J151709+335324 and SDSS J160024+264035. Both objects show single components of compact radio emission. The morphology of SDSS J151709+335324 is consistent with a recent comprehensive multi-wavelength study of this object by Rosario et al. Assuming that the entire sample consists of binary black holes, we would expect of order one double radio core to be detected, based on radio wavelength detection rates from FIRST and very long baseline interferometry surveys. We have not detected any double cores, thus this work does not substantially support the idea that AGNs with double-peaked optical emission lines contain binary black holes. However, the study of larger samples should be undertaken to provide a more secure statistical result, given the estimated detection rates.

  15. The Case for General Relativistic Effects in the Fe K(alpha) Profile of an Active Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Mushotzky, R.; Yaqoob, T.; George, I. M.; Snowden, S. L.; Netzer, H.; Kraemer, S. B.; Nandra, K.; Chelouche, D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a simultaneous Chandra HETG (High Energy Transmission Grating) and XMM (X-ray Multi-mirror Mission)-Newton observation of NGC 3516. We find evidence for several narrow components of Fe K(alpha) along with a broad line. We consider the possibility that the lines arise in a blob of material ejected from the nucleus with velocity of approximately 0.25c. We also consider an origin in a neutral accretion disk, suffering enhanced illumination at 35 and 175 R(sub g), perhaps due to magnetic reconnection. The presence of these narrow features indicates there is no Comptonizing region along the line-of-sight to the nucleus. This in turn is compelling support for the hypothesis that broad Fe K(alpha) components are, in general, produced by strong gravity.

  16. TD-DFT Study of Absorption and Emission Spectra of 2-(2'-Aminophenyl)benzothiazole Derivatives in Water.

    PubMed

    Manojai, Natthaporn; Daengngern, Rathawat; Kerdpol, Khanittha; Kungwan, Nawee; Ngaojampa, Chanisorn

    2017-03-01

    Reduction of aromatic azides to amines is an important property of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) which is useful in fluorescence microscopy and H2S probing in cells. The aim of this work is to study the substituent effect on the absorption and emission spectra of 2-(2'-aminophenyl)benzothiazole (APBT) in order to design APBT derivatives for the use of H2S detection. Absorption and emission spectra of APBT derivatives in aqueous environment were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level. The computed results favoured the substitution of strong electron-donating group on the phenyl ring opposite to the amino group for their large Stokes' shifts and emission wavelengths of over 600 nm. Also, three designed compounds were suggested as potential candidates for the fluorescent probes. Such generalised guideline learnt from this work can also be useful in further designs of other fluorescent probes of H2S in water.

  17. Effects of Incident Electron Fluence and Energy on the Election Yield Curves and Emission Spectra of Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Alec; Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, Clint

    2005-01-01

    We present an experimental study of evolution of electron emission yields and spectra as a result of internal charge build up due to electron dose. Reliable total, backscattered and secondary yield curves and electron emission spectra for un-charged insulators using a low fluence, pulsed electron beam (= or < 5 microsec at = or < 3 nA/sq mm or = or < 10(exp 5) e/sq mm per pulse) with low energy electron and UV flooding to neutralize the charging between pulses. Quantifiable changes in yield curves are observed due to < 100 fC/sq mm fluences for several excellent dielectric thin film materials. We find good agreement with a phenomenological argument based on insulator charging predicted by the yield curve; this includes an approximately linear decrease in the magnitude of the yield as incident energies approach the crossover energies and an exponential decrease in yield as accumulated internal charge reduces the landing energy to asymptotically approach a steady state surface charge and unity yield. We also find that the exponential decay of yield curves with fluence exhibit an energy dependent decay constant, alpha(E), over a broad range of incident energies below, between and above the crossover energies. Finally, we present some preliminary physics-based models for this energy dependence and attempt to relate our charging measurements to knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and transport, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators.

  18. Searching for narrow absorption and emission lines in XMM-Newton spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Braito, V.; D'Avanzo, P.; Ghirlanda, G.; Melandri, A.; Pescalli, A.; Salafia, O. S.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic search for narrow emission and absorption features in the X-ray spectra of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Using XMM-Newton data, both EPIC and RGS spectra, of six bright (fluence > 10-7 erg cm-2) and relatively nearby (z = 0.54-1.41) GRBs, we performed a blind search for emission or absorption lines that could be related to a high cloud density or metal-rich gas in the environ close to the GRBs. We detected five emission features in four of the six GRBs with an overall statistical significance, assessed through Monte Carlo simulations, of ≲ 3.0σ. Most of the lines are detected around the observed energy of the oxygen edge at ~ 0.5 keV, suggesting that they are not related to the GRB environment but are most likely of Galactic origin. No significant absorption features were detected. A spectral fitting with a free Galactic column density (NH) testing different models for the Galactic absorption confirms this origin because we found an indication of an excess of Galactic NH in these four GRBs with respect to the tabulated values.

  19. Chemical Environment Effects on K[beta]/K[alpha] Intensity Ratio: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment on Periodic Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Chaney R.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Nivens, Delana A.; Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from an energy-dispersive XRF instrument were used to investigate the chlorine K[alpha] and K[beta] peaks in several group 1 salts. The ratio of the peak intensity is sensitive to the local chemical environment of the chlorine atoms studied in this experiment and it shows a periodic trend for these salts. (Contains 1…

  20. Measurement of Excitation Spectra in the 12/SUP>C 1(p ,d ) Reaction near the η' Emission Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y. K.; Itahashi, K.; Fujioka, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Friedrich, S.; Geissel, H.; Gellanki, J.; Guo, C.; Gutz, E.; Haettner, E.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Higashi, Y.; Hirenzaki, S.; Hornung, C.; Igarashi, Y.; Ikeno, N.; Iwasaki, M.; Jido, D.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Knöbel, R.; Kurz, N.; Metag, V.; Mukha, I.; Nagae, T.; Nagahiro, H.; Nanova, M.; Nishi, T.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rappold, C.; Reiter, M. P.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Sun, B.; Suzuki, K.; Szarka, I.; Takechi, M.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Weick, H.; Widmann, E.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.; Yamakami, H.; Zhao, J.; η-PRiME/Super-FRS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Excitation spectra of 11C are measured in the 12C (p ,d ) reaction near the η' emission threshold. A proton beam extracted from the synchrotron SIS-18 at GSI with an incident energy of 2.5 GeV impinges on a carbon target. The momenta of deuterons emitted at 0° are precisely measured with the fragment separator (FRS) operated as a spectrometer. In contrast to theoretical predictions on the possible existence of deeply bound η'-mesic states in carbon nuclei, no distinct structures are observed associated with the formation of bound states. The spectra are analyzed to set stringent constraints on the formation cross section and on the hitherto barely known η'-nucleus interaction.

  1. Plasma Emission Spectra of Opuntia Nopalea Obtained with Microsecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, L.; Flores, T.; Arronte, A.; Flores, A.

    2008-04-01

    Laser-induced Plasma Spectroscopy was performed during the spines ablation of Opuntia by using Nd:YAG microsecond laser pulses. The results show strong absorption in Glochids that causes the intense electronic noise on the spectra. This process is consider suitable for practical elimination of spines in alimentary products like opuntia.

  2. In situ phytoplankton absorption, fluorescence emission, and particulate backscattering spectra determined from reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roesler, Collin S.; Pery, Mary Jane

    1995-01-01

    An inverse model was developed to extract the absortion and scattering (elastic and inelastic) properties of oceanic constituents from surface spectral reflectance measurements. In particular, phytoplankton spectral absorption coefficients, solar-stimulated chlorophyll a fluorescence spectra, and particle backscattering spectra were modeled. The model was tested on 35 reflectance spectra obtained from irradiance measurements in optically diverse ocean waters (0.07 to 25.35 mg/cu m range in surface chlorophyll a concentrations). The universality of the model was demonstrated by the accurate estimation of the spectral phytoplankton absorption coefficents over a range of 3 orders of magnitude (rho = 0.94 at 500 nm). Under most oceanic conditions (chlorophyll a less than 3 mg/cu m) the percent difference between measured and modeled phytoplankton absorption coefficents was less than 35%. Spectral variations in measured phytoplankton absorption spectra were well predicted by the inverse model. Modeled volume fluorescence was weakly correlated with measured chl a; fluorescence quantum yield varied from 0.008 to 0.09 as a function of environment and incident irradiance. Modeled particle backscattering coefficients were linearly related to total particle cross section over a twentyfold range in backscattering coefficents (rho = 0.996, n = 12).

  3. Plasma Emission Spectra of Opuntia Nopalea Obtained with Microsecond Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, L.; Flores, T.; Arronte, A.; Flores, A.

    2008-04-15

    Laser-induced Plasma Spectroscopy was performed during the spines ablation of Opuntia by using Nd:YAG microsecond laser pulses. The results show strong absorption in Glochids that causes the intense electronic noise on the spectra. This process is consider suitable for practical elimination of spines in alimentary products like opuntia.

  4. Hot topic: Innovative lactation-stage-dependent prediction of methane emissions from milk mid-infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Vanlierde, A; Vanrobays, M-L; Dehareng, F; Froidmont, E; Soyeurt, H; McParland, S; Lewis, E; Deighton, M H; Grandl, F; Kreuzer, M; Gredler, B; Dardenne, P; Gengler, N

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop, apply, and validate a new method to predict an indicator for CH4 eructed by dairy cows using milk mid-infrared (MIR) spectra. A novel feature of this model was the consideration of lactation stage to reflect changes in the metabolic status of the cow. A total of 446 daily CH4 measurements were obtained using the SF6 method on 142 Jersey, Holstein, and Holstein-Jersey cows. The corresponding milk samples were collected during these CH4 measurements and were analyzed using MIR spectroscopy. A first derivative was applied to the milk MIR spectra. To validate the novel calibration equation incorporating days in milk (DIM), 2 calibration processes were developed: the first was based only on CH4 measurements and milk MIR spectra (independent of lactation stage; ILS); the second included milk MIR spectra and DIM information (dependent on lactation stage; DLS) by using linear and quadratic modified Legendre polynomials. The coefficients of determination of ILS and DLS equations were 0.77 and 0.75, respectively, with standard error of calibration of 63g/d of CH4 for both calibration equations. These equations were applied to 1,674,763 milk MIR spectra from Holstein cows in the first 3 parities and between 5 and 365 DIM. The average CH4 indicators were 428, 444, and 448g/d by ILS and 444, 467, and 471g/d by DLS for cows in first, second, and third lactation, respectively. Behavior of the DLS indicator throughout the lactations was in agreement with the literature with values increasing between 0 and 100 DIM and decreasing thereafter. Conversely, the ILS indicator of CH4 emission decreased at the beginning of the lactation and increased until the end of the lactation, which differs from the literature. Therefore, the DLS indicator seems to better reflect biological processes that drive CH4 emissions than the ILS indicator. The ILS and DLS equations were applied to an independent data set, which included 59 respiration chamber

  5. Emission Line Spectra in the Soft X-ray Region 20 - 75 Angstroms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EDIT-II, emission lines of argon and sulfur in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet region were studied. Observations of Ar IX through Ar XVI and S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 Angstrom are presented to illustrate our work.

  6. Room temperature and low-temperature absorption and emission spectra of some polypyridylruthenium(II) 3.2.1 complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. I.; Burrows, H. D.; Formosinho, S. J.; Miguel, M. da G.

    2001-05-01

    Electronic absorption and luminescence spectra are reported for a series of complexes of type [Ru(tpy)(L-L)(py)] 2+, where tpy and py are 2,2',2″-terpyridine and pyridine, and L-L represents the bidentate ligands bipyridyl, 4,4'-dimethylbipyridyl, 4-nitrobipyridyl, oxalate and acetylacetonate. The effect of solvent polarity and temperature on their spectral and light emission properties is studied. Energies are reported for the lowest-energy 3MLCT ∗ excited state, and on the basis of these it is suggested that the complexes may make good triplet energy acceptors for use in organic and polymeric light emitting devices.

  7. Neutron Capture Cross Sections and Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Capture on 234,236,238U Measured with DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Mosby, S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C.-Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2014-05-01

    A new measurement of the 238U(n, γ) cross section using a thin 48 mg/cm2 target was made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE over the energy range from 10 eV to 500 keV. The results confirm earlier measurements. Measurements of the gamma-ray emission spectra were also made for 238U(n, γ) as well as 234,236U(n, γ). These measurements help to constrain the radiative strength function used in the cross-section calculations.

  8. Energy Spectra of the Soft X-Ray Diffuse Emission in Fourteen Fields Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Tomotaka; Mitsuda, Kazuhiasa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh; Hagihara, Toshishige; Masui, Kensuke; Bauer, Michael; McCammon, Dan; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Wang, Q. Daniel; Yao, Yangsen

    2009-08-01

    The soft diffuse X-ray emission of twelve fields observed with Suzaku are presented together with two additional fields from previous analyses. All have galactic longitudes 65° < l < 295° to avoid contributions from the very bright diffuse source that extends at least 30° from the Galactic center. The surface brightnesses of the Suzaku nine fields for which apparently uncontaminated ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) were available were statistically consistent with the RASS values, with an upper limit for differences of 17 × 10-6 c s-1 arcmin-2 in R45-band. The OVII and OVIII intensities are well correlated to each other, and OVII emission shows an intensity floor at ˜2 photons s-1 cm-2 str-1 (LU). The high-latitude O VIII emission shows a tight correlation with excess of O VII emission above the floor, with (O VIII intensity) = 0.5 × [(OVII intensity) - 2LU], suggesting that temperatures averaged over different line-of-sight show a narrow distribution around ˜0.2keV. We consider that the offset intensity of OVII arises from the Heliospheric solar wind charge exchange and perhaps from the local hot bubble, and that the excess OVII (2--7LU) is emission from more distant parts of the Galaxy. The total bolometric luminosity of this galactic emission is estimated to be 4 × 1039erg s-1, and its characteristic temperature may be related to the virial temperature of the Galaxy.

  9. How to Collect National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Traceable Fluorescence Excitation and Emission Spectra.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Adam Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary spectrofluorimeters comprise exciting light sources, excitation and emission monochromators, and detectors that without correction yield data not conforming to an ideal spectral response. The correction of the spectral properties of the exciting and emission light paths first requires calibration of the wavelength and spectral accuracy. The exciting beam path can be corrected up to the sample position using a spectrally corrected reference detection system. The corrected reference response accounts for both the spectral intensity and drift of the exciting light source relative to emission and/or transmission detector responses. The emission detection path must also be corrected for the combined spectral bias of the sample compartment optics, emission monochromator, and detector. There are several crucial issues associated with both excitation and emission correction including the requirement to account for spectral band-pass and resolution, optical band-pass or neutral density filters, and the position and direction of polarizing elements in the light paths. In addition, secondary correction factors are described including (1) subtraction of the solvent's fluorescence background, (2) removal of Rayleigh and Raman scattering lines, as well as (3) correcting for sample concentration-dependent inner-filter effects. The importance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable calibration and correction protocols is explained in light of valid intra- and interlaboratory studies and effective spectral qualitative and quantitative analyses including multivariate spectral modeling.

  10. Rocketborne cryogenic (10 K) high-resolution interferometer spectrometer flight HIRIS: auroral and atmospheric IR emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Stair, A T; Pritchard, J; Coleman, I; Bohne, C; Williamson, W; Rogers, J; Rawlins, W T

    1983-04-01

    A Michelson interferometer spectrometer cooled to 10 degrees by liquid helium was flown into an IBC class III aurora on 1 April 1976 from Poker Flat, Alas. The sensor, HIRIS, covered the spectral range 455-2500 wave numbers (4-22 microm) with a spectral resolution of 1.8 cm(-1) and an NESR of 5 x 10-12 W/cm2 scrm(-1) at 1000 cm(-1). An atmospheric emission spectrum was obtained every 0.7 sec over an altitude range of 70-125 km. Atmospheric spectra were obtained of CO2 (nu3), NO (Deltanu = 1), O3 (nu3) and CO2 (nu2). Auroral produced excitations were observed for each band, this being the first known measurement of auroral enhancements of O3 (nu3), 9.6 microm, and CO2 (nu2), 15 microm, emissions.

  11. Acoustic emission spectra and sonochemical activity in a 36 kHz sonoreactor.

    PubMed

    Son, Younggyu; Lim, Myunghee; Khim, Jeehyeong; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2012-01-01

    During ultrasound-induced cavitation in liquids, acoustic emissions at fundamental and harmonic frequencies can be detected. The effect of acoustic emissions at harmonic frequencies on the sonochemical and sonophysical activities has not been explored, especially in large-scale sonoreactors. In this study, the acoustic emissions in the range, 0-250 kHz in a 36 kHz sonoreactor with varying liquid heights were studied and compared with the sonochemical activities. The acoustic pressures at both fundamental and harmonics decreased drastically as the liquid height was increased due to the attenuation of sound energy. It was observed that the increase in input power resulted in only an increase in the acoustic emissions at derivative frequencies such as, harmonics and subharmonics. The sonochemical activity, evaluated in terms of sonochemiluminescence and H2O2 yield, was not significantly enhanced at higher input power levels. This suggests that at higher power levels, the "extra" acoustic energy is not effectively used to generate primary cavitation activity; rather it is converted to generate acoustic emissions at harmonic and subharmonic frequencies. This is an important observation for the design of energy efficiency large-scale sonochemical reactors.

  12. Quasi-similar decameter emission features appearing in the solar and jovian dynamic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, G. V.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Panchenko, M.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Rucker, H. O.; Vinogradov, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the dynamic spectra of the Sun and jovian decametric radiation obtained by the authors with the radio telescopes UTR-2 and URAN-2 (Kharkov, Poltava, Ukraine). We focus on the similar structures that appear on the dynamic spectra of those objects: S-bursts, drifting pairs, absorption bursts and zebra patterns. Similarity in structures allows us to assume that the plasma processes in the solar corona and in the jovian magnetosphere might have similar properties. We analyze and compare the main parameters of those structures and describe briefly some mechanisms of their generation that have already discussed in publications. We selected the mechanisms which, in our opinion, most completely and consistently explain the properties of the structures under consideration.

  13. An Investigation of Fe xv Emission Lines in Solar Flare Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-05

    321.8 Å)/I(417.3 Å) ratio at 3 electron temperatures, namely that of maximum fractional abundance for Fe  in ionization equilibrium , Te = 106.3 K...spectra 5 pare with the observations. However, Huang et al. (1988) have detected the 2p2 3P–2p3s 3P lines in a tokamak spectrum, and found their

  14. Emission and absorption spectra of some bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, J. M.; Pathirana, R. N.; Stibbard, J. H. A.

    Absorption spectra in neutral and acidic media are reported for a series of bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines, which are unable to tautomerize. Comparison is made with non-bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines capable of tautomeric rearrangement. Both bridged and non-bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines are essentially non-fluorescent due to the "proximity effect" of interaction between singlet ηπ* and ππ* states of similar energy, a phenomenon previously recognised in six-membered nitrogen heterocycles.

  15. Contribution to the Interpretation of Emission-line spectra in Ionised Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rola, C. S.

    1995-05-01

    The study of ionised nebulae from their emission-line intensities is the aim of this work. It concerns two complementary aspects. Firstly, we have studied the influence of the emission-line detection and measurement procedures in the values of the measured intensities. Secondly, we have developed diagnostic methods for the determination of the nature and physical properties of emission-line objects, using a minimum number of line intensities. Detailed simulations of the emission-line detection and intensity measurement procedures allowed us to estimate the errors committed in the intensity measurement of lines with low signal-to-noise ratio. Obtained results permitted us to show the existence of a bias in the measured intensities distribution and to determine a model for it. Furthermore, we determined analytically the probability distribution function of a intensity lines ratio. In this context, we have studied the effect of uncertainties in the intensity measures, and of temperature fluctuations in the determination of the C/O abundance ratio in planetary nebulae. With the purpose of determining the characteristics and the nature of emission-line objects having only a few line intensities available, we calculated the upper limits for photoionisation by OB stars in diagnostic diagrams. For this we build an extensive grid of photoionisation models covering a wide range of physical conditions in H II regions. The results obtained were used in the determination of the nature of the "Canada-France Redshift Survey" emission-line field galaxies, showing the importance of this type of diagnostic in deep redshift surveys.

  16. Analysis of emission spectra of Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Naresh, V. Buddhudu, S.

    2014-04-24

    In the present paper, we report on the absorption and emission properties of (0.1-1.5 mol %) Ho{sup 3+} doped LFBCd (Li{sub 2}O{sub −}LiF{sub −}B{sub 2}O{sub 3−}CdO) glasses prepared via melt quenching method. On exciting these glasses at (λ{sub exci}) = 452 nm, two emissions at 556 nm ({sup 5}S{sub 2}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}; Green), 655 nm ({sup 5}F{sub 5}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}; Red) have been obtained. Upon exciting these glasses with a 980 nm diode laser, NIR emissions at 1195 nm ({sup 5}I{sub 6}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}), 1951 nm ({sup 5}I{sub 7}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}) have been measured for 1 mol % Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glass. For higher concentration beyond 1.0 mol %, emission quenching of Ho{sup 3+} glass has been noticed and which has successfully been explained in terms of an energy level diagram. From absorption cross-section data, stimulated emission cross-section has been evaluated by applying McCumber's theory and further cross-sectional gain has also been computed for the emissions at 1195 nm (∼1.20 μm) and 1951 nm (∼2.0 μm) of 1 mol % Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glass.

  17. Equatorial electromagnetic emission with discrete spectra near harmonics of oxygen gyrofrequency during magnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Kokubun, S.; Hayashi, K. )

    1994-02-01

    The authors examine ELF data taken by the Akebono satellite in the low altitude plasmasphere during magnetic storms. They find that there are a set of these wave observations which are frequency related to the oxygen ion gyrofrequency. They observe emissions at frequencies closely related to the first and second harmonic of the oxygen ion gyrofrequency. The spacing between bands observed in the ELF are at the first or second oxygen ion gyrofrequency, and the frequency varies with the geomagnetic field. The authors argue that these emissions orginate from oxygen ions in the ring current region.

  18. Long-term X-ray studies of Sco X-1. [emission spectra of constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Kaluzienski, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    No modulation of the 3-6 keV X-ray intensity of Sco X-1 at a level of excess of 1% was observed at the optical period of .787313d. Evidence is found for shot-noise character in a large fraction of the X-ray emission. Almost all of the Sco X-1 emission can be synthesized in terms of approximately 200 shots per day, each with a duration of approximately 1/3 day. A pinhole camera was used to obtain data and the data were statistically analyzed.

  19. LIF dispersed emission spectra and characterization of ZnRg (Rg = Ne, Ar, Kr) ground-state potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strojecki, M.; Koperski, J.

    2009-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence dispersed emission spectra recorded using the C1Π1(υ')→X1Σ0+ transition in ZnKr, ZnAr and ZnNe complexes are reported. The complexes were produced in a continuous free-jet beam crossed with a pulsed dye-laser beam. The spectra were recorded using a spectrograph equipped with CCD camera. The recorded profiles displayed characteristic Condon internal diffraction patterns. The patterns consisted of reflection type continuous features corresponding to bound → free transitions and bound → bound transitions. In simulation of the spectra, M-S(9.09, 7.81), M-S(10.86, 10.32) and M-S(14.49, 8.91) Maitland-Smith M-S( n0, n1) functions were found to represent the repulsive walls of the X1Σ0+-state potentials of ZnKr, ZnAr and ZnNe, respectively. The obtained results were compared with available experimental and theoretical representations of other studies.

  20. Analysis of (030),(110), and (011) interacting states of D II 16O from hot temperature emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikova, Eugeniya N.; Mikhailenko, Semen N.; Mellau, Georg Ch.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2006-12-01

    This study is the continuation of our analysis of emission spectra of pure D II0. The spectra have been recorded in the 320 - 860 and 1750 - 4300 cm -1 spectral regions at different pressures and temperatures. The measurements were performed in an alumina cell with an effective length of hot gas of about 50 cm. All spectra have been recorded by using the Bruker IFS 120 spectrometer at the Physikalisch-Chemisches-Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen, Germany). More than 5600 lines have been assigned to the second triad {(030), (110), (011)} of interacting states of the D II 160 molecule. These transitions were assigned to 24 vibration-rotation and rotational bands. An extended set of more than 1500 experimental rovibrational levels for the (030), (110), and (011) interacting states has been obtained. The maximum values of rotational quantum numbers are J max = 30 and K a max = 21 with E max = 10568 cm -1 for the (011) state; J max = 29 and K a max = 21 with E max= 10540 cm -1 for the (030) state, and Jm 26 and Ka max 22 with Eniax 10488 cm1 for the (110) state. A comparison of the observed energy levels with the best available values from literature and with the global prediction is discussed.

  1. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. I. Full cumulant expansions and system-bath entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    We study the Förster resonant energy transfer rate, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. The multichromophoric Förster theory (MCFT) is determined from an overlap integral of generalized matrices related to the donor’s emission and acceptor’s absorption spectra, which are obtained via a full 2nd-order cumulant expansion technique developed in this work. We calculate the spectra and MCFT rate for both localized and delocalized systems, and calibrate the analytical 2nd-order cumulant expansion with the exact stochastic path integral method. We present three essential findings: (i) The role of the initial entanglement between the donor and its bath is found to be crucial in both the emission spectrum and the MCFT rate. (ii) The absorption spectra obtained by the cumulant expansion method are nearly identical to the exact spectra for both localized and delocalized systems, even when the system-bath coupling is far from the perturbative regime. (iii) For the emission spectra, the cumulant expansion can give reliable results for localized systems, but fail to provide reliable spectra of the high-lying excited states of a delocalized system, when the system-bath coupling is large and the thermal energy is small. This paper also provides a simple golden-rule derivation of the MCFT, reviews existing methods, and motivates further developments in the subsequent papers.

  2. Emission-line spectra of circumstellar envelopes - Infrared hydrogen line fluxes from Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, S. E.; McGregor, P. J.

    1985-09-01

    Fluxes for eight H I emission lines between 1.28 and 4.67 μm are presented for a sample of seven Be stars. Brα fluxes are given for six additional Be stars. The H I line ratios form the basis for an observational test of models for emission from circumstellar shells that have a range of Brα optical depths well in excess of unity. Enough data on optically thick H I, Ca II, and O I line strengths of circumstellar envelope stars now exist that it should be possible to place detailed radiative-transfer calculations of optically thick envelope emission on a secure observational footing. Comparisons of line ratios with the models by Simon et al. for infrared line emission from stellar winds show promise. The Be star H I line ratios can also be compared with similar data for deeply dust-embedded young stellar objects. These enigmatic objects display stronger H I lines per unit luminosity than the Be stars, but share similar overall envelope physical conditions. Several infrared line ratios are examined to lay the groundwork for extinction determinations and guidelines for radiative-transfer models.

  3. Thermal Emission Spectra of Altered Tephras and Constraints on the Composition of Martian Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Victoria E.; Morris, Richard V.

    2003-01-01

    We have begun to create a comprehensive set of thermal infrared (TIR, approx. 1650-200/cm, approx. 6-50 microns) spectra of palagonitic and hydrothermally altered soils that exhibit a range of mineralogical and chemical compositions for use in analyzing MGS TES data. Palagonite, a phyllosilicate-poor hydrolytically altered tephra, has been suggested as a possible component of the martian soil/dust based on visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectral similarities with martian dusty regions. The chemistry and crystallinity of altered tephras are highly variable depending on the parent material and local environmental conditions, and are important indicators of alteration processes.

  4. Investigating Metal-Enrichment, Tidal Heating, and Clouds in the Emission and Transmission Spectra of GJ 436b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline; Knutson, Heather; Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Teal, Dillon; Lupu, Roxana E.

    2016-10-01

    One of the legacies of the Kepler mission is the preponderance of planets between Earth and Neptune in radius; a major goal of atmospheric studies is to characterize planets spanning this size range. What is the range of compositions of these objects, and does these compositions correlate with planet mass (or some other property)? Do they have clouds and/or hazes in their atmospheres? How do atmospheric dynamics shape our observations? The Neptune-mass GJ 436b is one of the most-studied transiting exoplanets to date, with repeated measurements of both its thermal emission and transmission spectra. I will discuss new observations of GJ 436b's thermal emission at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, which reduce the uncertainties in estimates of GJ 436b's flux at those wavelengths and demonstrate consistency between Spitzer observations spanning more than 7 years. For the first time, we analyze the Spitzer thermal emission photometry and Hubble WFC3 transmission spectrum in tandem. I will show how we use a powerful dual-pronged modeling approach, comparing these data to both self-consistent and retrieval models. We vary the metallicity, intrinsic luminosity from tidal heating, disequilibrium chemistry, and heat redistribution. We also study the potential effect of both clouds and photochemical hazes on the spectra, but do not find strong evidence for either. The self-consistent and retrieval modeling combine to suggest that GJ 436b has a high atmospheric metallicity, with best fits at or above several hundred times solar metallicity, tidal heating warming its interior with best-fit intrinsic effective effective temperatures around 300-350 K, and disequilibrium chemistry. We suggest that Neptune-mass planets may be a more diverse class than previously imagined, with a range of metal-enhancements spanning over an order of magnitude from 50-100 to perhaps over 1000× solar metallicity. High fidelity observations with instruments like JWST will be critical for characterizing this diversity.

  5. Effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Study by short-interval double pulses with different pulse durations

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Ayaka Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Takashi; Ogata, Yukio H.; Fukami, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-14

    We investigate the effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra of laser ablation plasma in water. We use short-interval (76 ns) double pulses with different pulse durations of the composing two pulses for the irradiation of underwater target. Narrow atomic spectral lines in emission spectra are obtained by the irradiation, where the two pulses are wide enough to be merged into a single-pulse-like temporal profile, while deformed spectra are obtained when the two pulses are fully separated. The behavior of the atomic spectral lines for the different pulse durations is consistent with that of the temporal profiles of the optical emission intensities of the plasma. All these results suggest that continuous excitation of the plasma during the laser irradiation for ∼100 ns is a key to obtain narrow emission spectral lines.

  6. Positronium emission spectra from self-assembled metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Barbiellini, B.; Brown, B. L.; Feldblyum, J. I.; Guo, P.; Gidley, D. W.; Gerchow, L.; Matzger, A. J.

    2014-06-01

    Results of positronium (Ps) emission into vacuum from self-assembled metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are presented and discussed in detail. Four different MOF crystals are considered, namely, MOF-5, IRMOF-8, ZnO4(FMA)3, and IRMOF-20. The measurements reveal that a fraction of the Ps is emitted into vacuum with a distinctly smaller energy than what one would expect for Ps localized in the MOFs' cells. Only calculations considering the Ps delocalized in a Bloch state can reproduce the measured Ps emission energy providing a robust demonstration of wave function delocalization in quantum mechanics. We show how the Bloch state population can be controlled by tuning the initial positron beam energy. Therefore, Ps in MOFs can be used both to simulate the dynamics of delocalized excitations in materials and to probe the MOFs for their advanced characterization.

  7. Effects of quantum interference in spectra of cascade spontaneous emission from multilevel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. A.; Yudson, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    A general expression for the spectrum of cascade spontaneous emission from an arbitrary multilevel system is presented. Effects of the quantum interference of photons emitted in different transitions are analyzed. These effects are especially essential when the transition frequencies are close. Several examples are considered: (i) Three-level system; (ii) Harmonic oscillator; (iii) System with equidistant levels and equal rates of the spontaneous decay for all the transitions; (iv) Dicke superradiance model.

  8. X-ray emission study of ion beam mixed Cu/Al films on polyimide

    SciTech Connect

    Kurmaev, E.Z.; Zatsepin, D.A.; Winarski, R.P.; Stadler, S.; Ederer, D.L.; Moewes, A.; Fedorenko, V.V.; Shamin, S.N.; Galakhov, V.R.; Chang, G.S.; Whang, C.N.

    1999-03-01

    Cu (40 nm)/Al/polyimide/Si was mixed with 80 keV Ar{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +} from 5.0{times}10{sup 15} to 15{times}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Ultrasoft x-ray emission valence spectra (XES) of Cu, C, N and O excited by electron and photon radiation were used for study of chemical reactions in Cu/Al/PI/Si and PI/Si systems induced by ion beam mixing in dependence of type of ions and dose. It is found that ion beam mixing changes the chemical state of Cu atoms with respect to that of pure metal. These changes depend on the dose of ion beam bombardment and type of ions and are attributed to a formation of CuAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} interfacial layer, which can be responsible for enhanced interfacial adhesion strength. On the other hand, it is shown that the shape of C {ital K}{alpha}, N {ital K}{alpha} and O {ital K}{alpha} XES of ion beam mixed polyimide layer (PI/Si) is modified with ion bombardment. This means that the ion-beam mixing process is able to break the bonding of constituent atoms of irradiated PI layers and can induce the formation of chemically bonded complexes linking atoms in the Cu, Al and PI layers.{copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  9. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  10. Investigating the Sensitivity of Emission Line Spectra to the Incident SED in Narrow Line Seyferts and LINERs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Christopher; Richardson, Chris T.

    2017-01-01

    This research investigates photoionization models of the Narrow Line Region (NLR) of Seyfert galaxies and Low-Ionization Nuclear Emitting Region (LINER) galaxies with the use of the astrophysical code CLOUDY. Groves et al. 2004 attempted to resolve the apparent uniformity of emission line ratios in the NLR through introducing dusty, radiation pressure-dominated photoionization models of AGN. This model assumed a simple power law relation for the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED). Grupe et al. 2010 found a correlation between αuv and αx, and by constraining αuv as a function of αx we developed a photoionization model for the ionizing spectrum of a typical Seyfert Narrow Line Region. The incident SED is based upon the spectral indices αuv, αx, αox , and the blackbody accretion disk temperature Tbb . We set the value of αox based on the average of data collected in Grupe et al. 2010, and fix the value of αuv to αx based on their linear correlation. To check the validity of our model, simulations were run across a range of blackbody accretion disk temperatures and αx, while fixing the hydrogen density, ionization parameter, and elemental abundance of clouds in the NLR. The emission lines produced by these simulations were plotted using standard diagnostic diagrams and compared to emission line data obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our model produces emission lines without significant variation between simulations with αx = 1.42, 1.17, and 2.19, with Tbb ranging from 104 K to 107 K, except with regard to [O I] λ6300/Hα, where our simulated spectra started to fall on the boundary between Seyferts and LINERs. This leads us to examine the ability of our photoionization model to create emission line spectra that are typical of LINERs, as debate still continues over the primary excitation mechanism for LINERs. To adjust our model to fit LINERs, we lower the value of the ionization parameter and discuss the preliminary results within the context of

  11. Predicting the stellar and non-equilibrium dust emission spectra of high-resolution simulated galaxies with DART-RAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natale, Giovanni; Popescu, Cristina C.; Tuffs, Richard. J.; Debattista, Victor P.; Fischera, Jörg; Grootes, Meiert W.

    2015-05-01

    We describe the calculation of the stochastically heated dust emission using the 3D ray-tracing dust radiative transfer code DART-RAY, which is designed to solve the dust radiative transfer problem for galaxies with arbitrary geometries. In order to reduce the time required to derive the non-equilibrium dust emission spectra from each volume element within a model, we implemented an adaptive spectral energy distribution library approach, which we tested for the case of axisymmetric galaxy geometries. To show the capabilities of the code, we applied DART-RAY to a high-resolution N-body+SPH galaxy simulation to predict the appearance of the simulated galaxy at a set of wavelengths from the UV to the sub-mm. We analyse the results to determine the effect of dust on the observed radial and vertical profiles of the stellar emission as well as on the attenuation and scattering of light from the constituent stellar populations. We also quantify the proportion of dust re-radiated stellar light powered by young and old stellar populations, both bolometrically and as a function of infrared wavelength.

  12. Thermal emission spectra of Mars (5.4-10.5 microns) - Evidence for sulfates, carbonates, and hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Roush, Ted; Witteborn, Fred; Bregman, Jesse; Wooden, Diane; Stoker, Carol; Toon, Owen B.

    1990-01-01

    Spectra of the Martian thermal emission in the 5.4-10.5 micron region are reported. Emission features at 7.8 and 9.7 microns are attributed to surface silicates, and an emission feature at 6.1 micron is attributed to a molecular water component of the surface material. An absorption band at 8.7 micron and a possible one at 9.8 microns is attributed to sulfate or bisulfate anions probably located at a distorted crystalline site, and an absorption band at 6.7 microns is attributed to carbonate or bicarbonate anions located in a distorted crystalline site. Spectral simulations indicate that the sulfate- and carbonate-bearing minerals are contained in the same particles of airborne dust as the dominant silicate minerals, that the dust optical depth is about 0.6 at a reference wavelength of 0.3 micron over the area of the observed spots, and that sulfates and carbonates constitute 10-15 percent and 1-3 percent by volume of the airborne dust, respectively.

  13. Thermal emission spectra of Mars (5.4-10.5 microns) - Evidence for sulfates, carbonates, and hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, James B.; Roush, Ted; Witteborn, Fred; Bregman, Jesse; Wooden, Diane; Stoker, Carol; Toon, Owen B.

    1990-08-01

    Spectra of the Martian thermal emission in the 5.4-10.5 micron region are reported. Emission features at 7.8 and 9.7 microns are attributed to surface silicates, and an emission feature at 6.1 micron is attributed to a molecular water component of the surface material. An absorption band at 8.7 micron and a possible one at 9.8 microns is attributed to sulfate or bisulfate anions probably located at a distorted crystalline site, and an absorption band at 6.7 microns is attributed to carbonate or bicarbonate anions located in a distorted crystalline site. Spectral simulations indicate that the sulfate- and carbonate-bearing minerals are contained in the same particles of airborne dust as the dominant silicate minerals, that the dust optical depth is about 0.6 at a reference wavelength of 0.3 micron over the area of the observed spots, and that sulfates and carbonates constitute 10-15 percent and 1-3 percent by volume of the airborne dust, respectively.

  14. 1er cru: A spectropolarimeter to measure the polarisation of auroral thermospheric emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, Mathieu; Lamy, Herve; Lilensten, Jean; Vialatte, Anne

    2015-04-01

    The polarisation of auroral thermospheric red line have been detected few years ago with degree of polarisation around 2% (Lilensten et al. 2008). Since then several measurements campaign and simulation have been performed (Barthelemy et al. 2011, Lilensten et al. 2013). However, the polarisation of other lines have never been explored. We built a spectropolarimeter able to cover the auroral spectrum from 400 nm to 700 nm with spectral resolution down to 0.5 nm. The first light of the instrument have been performed in December 2014 in Skibotn (Norway). Despite some misalignments problem, we have been able to get some spectra on both ordinary and extraordinary channels. The data are underprocessing but we are confident to be able to extract the polarisation of some other lines. We will especially check that the green line is unpolarized as explained in Bommier et al. (2011).

  15. Automated system for identification of atomic elements and calculation of lines profiles in emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Wilder; Restrepo, Elisabeth; Devia, Alfonso

    2001-04-01

    A database was designed starting from the Kurucz cd-rom N0 23 of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. In this database the different atomic elements are ordered by wavelength with their ionization levels. Also, there are other data like statistic weight, Einstein's coefficient, information about energy levels, constant of damping, among others. The spectra of the discharge are processed using a digital filtrate technique, with the purpose of reducing the noise present in the data to locate the points where the maximum amplitudes are presented. Starting from these results, consultations dynamic SQL are made, these obtain the elements present in these regions from the database. Finally, by means of the use of statistical methods it is determined which are the elements that have the highest probability of conform with the plasma. .

  16. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Duan, Qianqian; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-11-01

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd3+ lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho3+ was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb3+ to Yb3+ was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar+ laser, Kr+ laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc.

  17. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-11-15

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd{sup 3+} lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho{sup 3+} was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+} was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar{sup +} laser, Kr{sup +} laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc.

  18. Optical cavity temperature measurement based on the first overtones spontaneous emission spectra for HF chemical laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shukai; Li, Liucheng; Duo, Liping; Wang, Yuanhu; Yu, Haijun; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    An optical cavity temperature test method has been established for the HF chemical laser. This method assumes that in HF optical cavity the rotational distribution of vibrationally excited HF molecules meets the statistical thermodynamic distribution, the first overtones (v = 3-1 and 2-0) spontaneous emission spectral intensity distribution is obtained by using OMA V, the optical cavity temperature is calculated by linear fitting the rotational thermal equilibrium distribution formula for each HF vibrationally excited state. This method is simple, reliable, and repeatable. This method can be used to test the optical cavity temperature not only without lasing, but also with lasing.

  19. Chinese-scorpion (Buthus martensi Karsch) toxin BmK alphaIV, a novel modulator of sodium channels: from genomic organization to functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Zhi-Fang; Zhu, Mang-Mang; Bai, Zhan-Tao; Liu, Tong; Tan, Miao; Pang, Xue-Yan; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2006-11-01

    In the present study, BmK alphaIV, a novel modulator of sodium channels, was cloned from venomous glands of the Chinese scorpion (Buthus martensi Karsch) and expressed successfully in Escherichia coli. The BmK alphaIV gene is composed of two exons separated by a 503 bp intron. The mature polypeptide contains 66 amino acids. BmK alphaIV has potent toxicity in mice and cockroaches. Surface-plasmon-resonance analysis found that BmK alphaIV could bind to both rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes and cockroach neuronal membranes, and shared similar binding sites on sodium channels with classical AaH II (alpha-mammal neurotoxin from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector), BmK AS (beta-like neurotoxin), BmK IT2 (the depressant insect-selective neurotoxin) and BmK abT (transitional neurotoxin), but not with BmK I (alpha-like neurotoxin). Two-electrode voltage clamp recordings on rNav1.2 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed that BmK alphaIV increased the peak amplitude and prolonged the inactivation phase of Na+ currents. The structural and pharmacological properties compared with those of other scorpion alpha-toxins suggests that BmK alphaIV represents a novel subgroup or functional hybrid of alpha-toxins and might be an evolutionary intermediate neurotoxin for alpha-toxins.

  20. Emission lines of [K V] in the optical spectra of gaseous nebulae.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Francis P; Aller, Lawrence H; Espey, Brian R; Exter, Katrina M; Hyung, Siek; Keenan, Michael T C; Pollacco, Don L; Ryans, Robert S I

    2002-04-02

    Recent R-matrix calculations of electron impact excitation rates in K v are used to derive the nebular emission line ratio R = I(4122.6 A)/I(4163.3 A) as a function of electron density (N(e)). This ratio is found to be very sensitive to changes in N(e) over the density range 10(3) to 10(6) cm(-3), but does not vary significantly with electron temperature, and hence in principle should provide an excellent optical N(e) diagnostic for the high-excitation zones of nebulae. The observed value of R for the planetary nebula NGC 7027, measured from a spectrum obtained with the Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, implies a density in excellent agreement with that derived from [Ne iv], formed in the same region of the nebula as [K v]. This observation provides observational support for the accuracy of the theoretical [K v] line ratios, and hence the atomic data on which they are based. However, the analysis of a high-resolution spectrum of the symbiotic star RR Telescopii, obtained with the University College London Echelle Spectrograph on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope, reveals that the [K v] 4122.6 A line in this object is badly blended with Fe ii 4122.6 A. Hence, the [K v] diagnostic may not be used for astrophysical sources that show a strong Fe ii emission line spectrum.

  1. INTENSITY ENHANCEMENT OF O VI ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION LINES IN SOLAR SPECTRA DUE TO OPACITY

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, F. P.; Mathioudakis, M.; Doyle, J. G.; Madjarska, M. S.; Rose, S. J.; Bowler, L. A.; Britton, J.; McCrink, L.

    2014-04-01

    Opacity is a property of many plasmas. It is normally expected that if an emission line in a plasma becomes optically thick, then its intensity ratio to that of another transition that remains optically thin should decrease. However, radiative transfer calculations undertaken both by ourselves and others predict that under certain conditions the intensity ratio of an optically thick to an optically thin line can show an increase over the optically thin value, indicating an enhancement in the former. These conditions include the geometry of the emitting plasma and its orientation to the observer. A similar effect can take place between lines of differing optical depths. While previous observational studies have focused on stellar point sources, here we investigate the spatially resolved solar atmosphere using measurements of the I(1032 Å)/I(1038 Å) intensity ratio of O VI in several regions obtained with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory satellite. We find several I(1032 Å)/I(1038 Å) ratios observed on the disk to be significantly larger than the optically thin value of 2.0, providing the first detection (to our knowledge) of intensity enhancement in the ratio arising from opacity effects in the solar atmosphere. The agreement between observation and theory is excellent and confirms that the O VI emission originates from a slab-like geometry in the solar atmosphere, rather than from cylindrical structures.

  2. THEORETICAL EMISSION SPECTRA OF ATMOSPHERES OF HOT ROCKY SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Yuichi; Ikoma, Masahiro; Kawahara, Hajime; Nagahara, Hiroko; Kawashima, Yui; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2015-03-10

    Motivated by recent detection of transiting high-density super-Earths, we explore the detectability of hot rocky super-Earths orbiting very close to their host stars. In an environment hot enough for their rocky surfaces to be molten, they would have an atmosphere composed of gas species from the magma oceans. In this study, we investigate the radiative properties of the atmosphere that is in gas/melt equilibrium with the underlying magma ocean. Our equilibrium calculations yield Na, K, Fe, Si, SiO, O, and O{sub 2} as the major atmospheric species. We compile the radiative absorption line data of those species available in the literature and calculate their absorption opacities in the wavelength region of 0.1–100 μm. Using them, we integrate the thermal structure of the atmosphere. Then, we find that thermal inversion occurs in the atmosphere because of the UV absorption by SiO. In addition, we calculate the ratio of the planetary to stellar emission fluxes during secondary eclipse, and we find prominent emission features induced by SiO at 4 μm detectable by Spitzer, and those at 10 and 100 μm detectable by near-future space telescopes.

  3. Glow Discharge Emission Spectra in Air with Liquid Electrode Based on Distilled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuchman, M. P.; Mesarosz, L. V.; Shuaibov, A. K.; Kiris, V. V.; Tarasenko, N. V.

    2016-11-01

    The results of spectroscopic studies of a glow discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure in air with an electrode based on distilled water are presented. The parametric effects affecting the discharge emission are analyzed. The dependence of the emission intensity of the various discharge components and their spatial localization in the discharge gap on the current strength is explained by change in the discharge geometry and the conditions of oxidation with increase of the current. It is shown that the composition of the gas mixture in the electrode gap changes with increase of the discharge current from nitrogen-rich (12-19 mA) to rich in water vapor and its dissociation products (19-24 mA). At higher currents, the gas mixture is also rich in the products of plasma chemical reactions and nitric oxide in particular. The redistribution of the radiation intensity of the molecules of nitrogen and its oxide with increase of the current occurs mainly in the cathode region (at the plasma-fluid boundary), where the formation of oxides is improved as a result of increase in the amount of vaporized solution and in the effectiveness of oxidation reactions with increase of the water temperature and discharge current.

  4. Modulation structures in the dynamic spectra of Jovian radio emission obtained with high time-frequency resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, G. V.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Ryabov, B. P.; Taubenschuss, U.; Vinogradov, V. V.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The wide-band dynamic spectra of Jovian decameter emission obtained over the last decade with high-frequency and high time resolution equipment on the largest decameter band antenna array, the Ukrainian T-shape Radio telescope (UTR-2), are presented. Methods: We analyzed the data obtained with the Digital SpectroPolarimiter (DSP) and WaveForm Reciever (WFR) installed at UTR-2. The combination of the large antenna and high performance equipment gives the best sensitivity and widest band of analysis, dynamic range, time and frequency resolutions. The wavelet transform method and the Fourier technique was used for further data processing. Results: The main characteristics of already known and newly detected modulation events were investigated and specified. The new receiving-recording facilities, methodology and program of observations are described in detail.

  5. Theoretical emission line ratios for [Fe III] and [Fe VII] applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae.

    PubMed

    Keenan, F P; Aller, L H; Ryans, R S; Hyung, S

    2001-08-14

    Recent calculations of electron impact excitation rates and Einstein A-coefficients for transitions among the 3d(6) levels of Fe III and among the 3d(2) levels of Fe VII are used to derive theoretical emission line ratios applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae. Results for [Fe III] are generated for electron temperatures T(e) = 7,000-20,000 K and densities N(e) = 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3), whereas those for [Fe VII] are provided for T(e) = 10,000-30,000 K and N(e) = 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3). The theoretical line ratios are significantly different in some instances from earlier calculations and resolve discrepancies between theory and observation found for the planetary nebulae IC 4997 and NGC 7027.

  6. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra coupled with parallel factor and regional integration analysis to characterize organic matter humification.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Li, Xiang; Pan, Hong-Wei; An, Da; Bai, Shuo-Guo; Li, Dan; Cui, Dong-Yu

    2013-11-01

    The present several humification indexes cannot provide the whole fluorescence information on organic matter composition and the evaluation results from them are inconsistent sometimes. In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis and fluorescence regional integration analysis were utilized to investigate organic matter humification, and the projection pursuit cluster (PPC) model was applied to form a suitable index for overcoming the difficulties in multi-index evaluation. The result showed that the ratio between the volume of humic- and fulvic-like fluorescence region and the volume of protein-like fluorescence region not only revealed the heterogeneity of organic matter, but also provided more accurate information on organic matter humification. In addition, the results showed that the PPC model could be used to characterize integrally the humification, and the projected characteristic value calculated from the PPC model could be used as the integrated humification evaluation index.

  7. BROADBAND X-RAY SPECTRA OF TWO LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI NGC 1566 AND NGC 4941 OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi

    2013-06-20

    We report the first broadband X-ray spectra of the low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs), NGC 1566 (type 1.5) and NGC 4941 (type 2), observed with Suzaku and Swift/BAT covering the 0.5-195 keV band. Both targets have hard X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 41-42} erg s{sup -1} in the 15-55 keV band. The spectra of the nucleus are well reproduced by a sum of partially or fully covered transmitted emission and its reflection from the accretion disk, reprocessed emission from the torus accompanied by a strong narrow iron-K{alpha} line, and a scattered component (for NGC 4941). We do not significantly detect a broad iron-K{alpha} line from the inner accretion disk in both targets, and obtain an upper limit on the corresponding solid angle of {Omega}/2{pi} < 0.3 in NGC 1566. The reflection strength from the torus is moderate, {Omega}/2{pi}=0.45{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10} in NGC 1566 and {Omega}/2{pi}=0.64{sup +0.69}{sub -0.27} in NGC 4941. Comparison of the equivalent width of the narrow iron-K{alpha} line with a model prediction based on a simple torus geometry constrains its half-opening angle to be {theta}{sub oa} {approx_equal} 60 Degree-Sign -70 Degree-Sign in NGC 4941. These results agree with the obscured AGN fraction obtained from hard X-ray and mid-infrared selected samples at similar luminosities. Our results support the implication that the averaged covering fraction of AGN tori is peaked at L {approx} 10{sup 42-43} erg s{sup -1} but decreases toward lower luminosities.

  8. Visible to Near Infrared Emission Spectra of Electron-Excited H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, A.; James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Abgrall, H.; Roueff, E.

    2006-01-01

    The electron-impact induced fluorescence spectrum of H2 at 100 eV from 700 nm to 950 nm at a spectral resolution of between 0.2 nm to 0.3 nm has been measured. The laboratory spectrum has been compared with our theoretical simulated spectrum obtained by calculating the lines emission cross sections from the upper states of g symmetry (EF, GK, HH, P, O ; I, R, J, S ) towards the states of u symmetry (B, C, B', D) of H2. The nine above Born-Openheimer g-upper states have been coupled together as well as the four above Born-Openheimer u-lower states. The comparison seems adequate with few minor discrepancies.

  9. The Northern ω-Scorpiid Meteoroid Stream: Orbits and Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espartero, Francisco A.; Madiedo, José M.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the activity of the Northern ω-Scorpiid meteor shower between 2010 and 2012. For this purpose we have employed an array of low-lux CCD video cameras and spectrographs deployed at different astronomical observatories in Spain. As a result of our survey, the atmospheric trajectory and radiant position of 11 of these meteor events were obtained. The tensile strength and orbital parameters of the progenitor meteoroids have been also calculated. The calculated orbital data and the behaviour of these meteoroids in the atmosphere are compatible with an asteroidal origin of this stream. In addition, we discuss a unique emission spectrum recorded for one of these meteors. This is, to our knowledge, the first North ω-Scorpiid spectrum discussed in the scientific literature, and it has provided information about the chemical nature of the meteoroid and the progenitor body.

  10. Emission line spectra of S VII ? S XIV in the 20 ? 75 ? wavelength region

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P; Behar, E; Kahn, S M

    2004-08-06

    As part of a larger project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II, the authors present observations of sulfur lines in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet regions. The database includes wavelength measurements with standard errors, relative intensities, and line assignments for 127 transitions of S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 {angstrom}. The experimental data are complemented with a full set of calculations using the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code (HULLAC). A comparison of the laboratory data with Chandra measurements of Procyon allows them to identify S VII-S XI lines.

  11. Stratospheric minor constituent distributions from far-infrared thermal emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Traub, Wesley A.

    1992-11-01

    We retrieve mixing ratio profiles of O3, H2(O-16), H2(O-17), H2(O-18), HF, and HCl from far-infrared thermal emission observations of the limb in the 80-220 cm/sec spectral region. The observations were made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer as a part of the 1983 Balloon Intercomparison Campaign (BIC-2). A subset of the data was analyzed previously using the method in the work of Traub et al. (1982, 1991); in the present paper we use an alternative method of calibration and analysis, given by Abbas et al. (1985). The retrieved constituent profiles are compared with the measurements made with other instruments on the BIC-2 flights. The results for the concentrations of H2(O-17) and H2(O-18) obtained in this study indicate no isotopic enhancement or depletion with a standard deviation of about 20 percent.

  12. Thermal Emission Spectra of Silica-coated Basalt and Considerations for Martian Surface Mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Michalski, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Among the most important discoveries made during the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission was that the rocky materials of Mars are broadly divisible into two distinct rock types. The geological significance of this finding is dependent on the mineralogy of these rock types as well as their geographic and stratigraphic positions. Much work has yet to be done to understand these relationships and the small-scale variability of these units. For now, it is worth considering various scenarios that could have resulted in Mars global-scale mineralogical dichotomy. Such work will make clearer what must be looked for in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (THEMIS) data, what to test with other data sets, and what geological processes can be considered or ruled out as we advance with interpreting Martian geologic history. Here, we suggest that exogenic coatings of secondary silica on basaltic rocks may provide a plausible explanation for the newly discovered distribution of rock types.

  13. Ion temperatures in HIP-1 and SUMMA from charge-exchange neutral optical emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures were obtained from observations of the H sub alpha, D sub alpha, and He 587.6 nm lines emitted from hydrogen, deuterium, and helium plasmas in the SUMMA and HIP-1 mirror devices at Lewis Research Center. Steady state discharges were formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical or annular anodes and hollow cathodes located at the peaks of the mirrors. The ion temperatures were found from the Doppler broadening of the charge-exchange components of spectral lines. A statistical method was developed for obtaining scaling relations of ion temperature as a function of current, voltage, and magnetic flux density. Derivations are given that take into account triangular monochromator slit functions, loss cones, and superimposed charge-exchange processes. In addition, the Doppler broadening was found to be sensitive to the influence of drift on charge-exchange cross section. The effects of finite ion-cyclotron radius, cascading, and delayed emission are reviewed.

  14. Anomalous Series of Bands in the Edge Emission Spectra of CdS(О)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, N. K.; Kanakhin, A. A.; Galstyan, V. G.; Shnitnikov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    The region of the edge emission spectrum of CdS(O) single crystals with cadmium excess is examined. An anomalous series of equidistant bands with leading line at 514 nm and phonon replicas has been revealed. These bands grow in intensity with increase of the excitation density up to 1026-1027 cm-3ṡs-1 at 80 K, and the leading line of the series is observed even at 300 K. It is shown that luminescence is conditioned by the exciton spectrum in perfect bulk single-crystals of CdO. Some characteristics of this spectrum are presented, in particular, the dependence on temperature, excitation intensity, composition and size of the crystals, and the LO interaction. The results experimentally confirm the theoretically calculated magnitude of the direct band gap of CdO.

  15. Stratospheric minor constituent distributions from far-infrared thermal emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Traub, Wesley A.

    1992-01-01

    We retrieve mixing ratio profiles of O3, H2(O-16), H2(O-17), H2(O-18), HF, and HCl from far-infrared thermal emission observations of the limb in the 80-220 cm/sec spectral region. The observations were made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer as a part of the 1983 Balloon Intercomparison Campaign (BIC-2). A subset of the data was analyzed previously using the method in the work of Traub et al. (1982, 1991); in the present paper we use an alternative method of calibration and analysis, given by Abbas et al. (1985). The retrieved constituent profiles are compared with the measurements made with other instruments on the BIC-2 flights. The results for the concentrations of H2(O-17) and H2(O-18) obtained in this study indicate no isotopic enhancement or depletion with a standard deviation of about 20 percent.

  16. Temperature-induced tuning of emission spectra of liquid-crystal optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemánek, Pavel; Pilát, Zdeněk.; Ježek, Jan; Bernatová, Silvie; Aas, Mehdi; Kiraz, Alper; Jonáš, Alexandr

    2016-12-01

    Emulsion droplets of liquid crystals (LC) suspended in water and labeled with a suitable fluorescent dye can serve as active optofluidic microcavities, since the contrast of refractive index between the LC droplets and the surrounding aqueous medium allows excitation of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in the droplets. In addition, such emulsion droplets can be also stably trapped in three-dimensions using optical tweezers which stabilizes the droplets while investigating their spectral characteristics. We explore various combinations of fluorescently dyed LC droplets and host liquid - surfactant systems and show that the WGM emission spectrum of an optically trapped LC droplet-based cavity can be largely and (almost) reversibly tuned by controlled changes of the ambient temperature that induce phase transitions in the LC droplets. Our results indicate feasibility of this approach for creating miniature tunable sources of coherent light.

  17. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Yue, Weisheng; Li, Xiaolin; Wan, Tianmin; Liu, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Guilin; Li, Yan

    2006-06-01

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM(10) were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPs collected from various pollution sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM(10) is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM(10) are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  18. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y.

    2006-06-15

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  19. Modelling the Emission And/or Absorption Features in the High Resolution Spectra of the Southern Binary System: HH Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseoglu, Dogan; Bakış, Hicran

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution spectra (R=48000) of the southern close binary system, HH Car, has been analyzed with modern analysis techniques. Precise absolute parameters were derived from the simultaneous solution of the radial velocity, produced in this study and the light curves, published. According to the results of these analyses, the primary component is an O9 type main sequence star while the secondary component is a giant/subgiant star with a spectral type of B0. Hα emissions can be seen explicitly in the spectra of HH Car. These features were modelled using the absolute parameters of the components. Since components of HH Car are massive early-type stars, mass loss through stellar winds can be expected. This study revealed that the components of HH Car have stellar winds and the secondary component loses mass to the primary. Stellar winds and the gas stream between the components were modelled as a hot shell around the system. It is determined that the interaction between the winds and the gas stream leads to formation of a high temperature impact region.

  20. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234 , 236 , 238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Krticka, M.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the neutron-capture cross section at low neutron energies (10 eV through 100's of keV) are very sensitive to the nuclear level density and radiative strength function. These quantities are often poorly known, especially for radioactive targets, and actual measurements of the capture cross section are usually required. An additional constraint on the calculation of the capture cross section is provided by measurements of the cascade gamma spectrum following neutron capture. Recent measurements of 234 , 236 , 238U(n, γ) emission spectra made using the DANCE 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will be presented. Calculations of gamma-ray spectra made using the DICEBOX code and of the capture cross section made using the CoH3 code will also be presented. These techniques may be also useful for calculations of more unstable nuclides. This work was performed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734).

  1. Using violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for crop yield assessment of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Tetteh, Jonathan P.

    2004-07-01

    The use of violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) emission spectra to monitor the growth of five varieties of cowpea in the University of Cape Coast Botanical Garden is presented. Radiation from a continuous-wave violet laser diode emitting at 396 nm through a fibre is closely incident on in vivo leaves of cowpea to excite chlorophyll fluorescence, which is detected by an integrated spectrometer with CCD readout. The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra with peaks at 683 and 731 nm were used for growth monitoring of the cowpea plants over three weeks and analysed using Gaussian spectral functions with curve fitted parameters to determine the peak positions, area under the spectral curve and the intensity ratio F683/F731. The variation in the intensity ratio of the chlorophyll bands showed sensitive changes indicating the photosynthetic activity of the cowpea varieties. A discussion of the fluorescence result as compared to conventional assessment is presented with regard to discrimination between the cowpea varieties in terms of crop yield performance.

  2. Temperature sensitivity of Cu K(alpha) imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K U; Key, M H; Chung, H K; Hansen, S B; Freeman, R R; Chen, M H; Gregori, G; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Izumi, N; King, J A; Kuba, J; Norreys, P; Mackinnon, A J; Murphy, C D; Snavely, R; Stepehens, R; Stoeckel, C; Theobald, W; Zhang, B

    2006-08-07

    The Vulcan laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory was used to study the interaction of a 75 J 10 ps, high intensity laser beam with low-mass solid, Cu targets. Two instruments were fielded as diagnostics of the Cu K-shell emission from the targets: A single photon counting CCD spectrometer provided the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield and a spherically bent Bragg crystal recorded 2D monochromatic images with a spatial resolution of 10 {micro}m. Due to the shifting and broadening of the K{sub {alpha}} spectral lines with increasing temperature, there is a temperature dependence of the crystal collection efficiency. This provides a temperature diagnostic when cross calibrated against a single hit CCD spectrometer, and it affects measurements of the spatial pattern of electron transport. The experimental data showing changing collection efficiency are presented. The results are discussed in light of modeling of the temperature-dependent spectrum of Cu K-shell emission.

  3. Bremsstrahlung and K(alpha) fluorescence measurements for inferring conversion efficiencies into fast ignition relevant hot electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C D; Patel, P K; Hey, D S; Mackinnon, A J; Key, M H; Akli, K U; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Chawla, S; Chen, H; Freeman, R R; Higginson, D P; Link, A; Ma, T Y; MacPhee, A G; Stephens, R B; Van Woerkom, L D; Westover, B; Porkolab, M

    2009-07-24

    The Bremsstrahlung and K-shell emission from 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm planar targets irradiated by a short-pulse 3 x 10{sup 18}-8 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} laser were measured. The Bremsstrahlung was measured using a filter stack spectrometer with spectral discrimination up to 500 keV. K-shell emission was measured using a single photon counting charge coupled device (CCD). From Monte Carlo modeling of the target emission, conversion efficiencies into 1-3 MeV electrons of 3-12%, representing 20-40% total conversion efficiencies were inferred for intensities up to 8 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Comparisons to scaling laws using synthetic energy spectra generated from the intensity distribution of the focal spot imply slope temperatures less than the ponderomotive potential of the laser. Resistive transport effects may result in potentials of a few hundred kV in the first few tens of microns in the target. This would lead to higher total conversion efficiencies than inferred from Monte Carlo modeling but lower conversion efficiencies into 1-3 MeV electrons.

  4. Spontaneous emission spectra and quantum light-matter interactions from a strongly coupled quantum dot metal-nanoparticle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vlack, C.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Hughes, S.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the quantum optical properties of a quantum-dot dipole emitter coupled to a finite-size metal nanoparticle using a photon Green-function technique that rigorously quantizes the electromagnetic fields. We first obtain pronounced Purcell factors and photonic Lamb shifts for both a 7- and 20-nm-radius metal nanoparticle, without adopting a dipole approximation. We then consider a quantum-dot photon emitter positioned sufficiently near the metal nanoparticle so that the strong-coupling regime is possible. Accounting for nondipole interactions, quenching, and photon transport from the dot to the detector, we demonstrate that the strong-coupling regime should be observable in the far-field spontaneous emission spectrum, even at room temperature. The vacuum-induced emission spectra show that the usual vacuum Rabi doublet becomes a rich spectral triplet or quartet with two of the four peaks anticrossing, which survives in spite of significant nonradiative decays. We discuss the emitted light spectrum and the effects of quenching for two different dipole polarizations.

  5. Simultaneous physical retrieval of Martian geophysical parameters using Thermal Emission Spectrometer spectra: the φ-MARS algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Fonti, Sergio; Mancarella, Francesca; Roush, Ted L

    2015-03-20

    In this paper, we present a new methodology for the simultaneous retrieval of surface and atmospheric parameters of Mars. The methodology is essentially based on similar codes implemented for high-resolution instruments looking at Earth, supported by a statistical retrieval procedure used to initialize the physical retrieval algorithm with a reliable first guess of the atmospheric parameters. The methodology has been customized for the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), which is a low-resolution interferometer. However, with minor changes to the forward and inverse modules, it is applicable to any instrument looking at Mars, and with particular effectiveness to high-resolution instruments. The forward module is a monochromatic radiative transfer model with the capability to calculate analytical Jacobians of any desired geophysical parameter. In the present work, we describe the general methodology and its application to a large sample of TES spectra. Results are drawn for the case of surface temperature and emissivity, atmospheric temperature profile, water vapor, and dust and ice mixing ratios. Comparison with climate models and other TES data analyses show very good agreement and consistency.

  6. Emission spectra from direct current and microwave powered Hg lamps at very high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamady, M.; Lister, G. G.; Stafford, L.

    2013-11-01

    Discharge lamps containing mercury at pressures above 100 bar are commercially used in data projectors and television projector systems. Due to their small size, these lamps are difficult to investigate experimentally, but spectral measurements, combined with radiation transport calculations, have provided useful information on the visible spectrum. However, classical spectral line broadening theory is inadequate to describe the UV portion of the spectrum, so self-consistent modelling of these discharges is not possible at present. This paper discusses the differences between discharges containing electrodes and discharges sustained by a microwave (mw) electromagnetic field, on the basis of the experimentally measured temperature profile in an electroded discharge, and a temperature profile computed from a 1D power balance model for a microwave discharge. A model based on the ray-tracing method is employed to simulate the radiation transport in these lamps. The model has been validated by comparing the emission spectrum from dc discharge lamps with those obtained experimentally. The output flux, luminous flux, luminous efficacy, the correlated colour temperature, the chromaticity coordinates and photometric curves of the lamp were then obtained. These results were also compared with those of a theoretically calculated temperature profile for the same lamp, excited by microwave power in the TM010 mode.

  7. FLUORESCENCE EMISSION SPECTRA OF MARINE AND BRACKISH-WATER ECOTYPES OF FUCUS VESICULOSUS AND FUCUS RADICANS (PHAEOPHYCEAE) REVEAL DIFFERENCES IN LIGHT-HARVESTING APPARATUS(1).

    PubMed

    Maria Gylle, Anna; Rantamäki, Susanne; Ekelund, Nils G A; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2011-02-01

    The Bothnian Sea in the northerly part of the Baltic Sea is a geologically recent brackish-water environment, and rapid speciation is occurring in the algal community of the Bothnian Sea. We measured low-temperature fluorescence emission spectra from the Bothnian Sea and the Norwegian Sea ecotypes of Fucus vesiculosus L., a marine macroalga widespread in the Bothnian Sea. Powdered, frozen thallus was used to obtain undistorted emission spectra. The spectra were compared with spectra measured from the newly identified species Fucus radicans Bergström et L. Kautsky, which is a close relative of F. vesiculosus and endemic to the Bothnian Sea. The spectrum of variable fluorescence was used to identify fluorescence peaks originating in PSI and PSII in this chl c-containing alga. The spectra revealed much higher PSII emission, compared to PSI emission, in the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus than in F. radicans or in the Norwegian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus. The results suggest that more light-harvesting chl a/c proteins serve PSII in the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus than in the two other algal strains. Treatment of the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus in high salinity (10, 20, and 35 practical salinity units) for 1 week did not lead to spectral changes, indicating that the measured features of the Bothnian Sea F. vesiculosus are stable and not simply a direct result of exposure to low salinity.

  8. Age-related Shifts in Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Peak-ratios and Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is an important temporal cue for precise speech and complex sound recognition. However, functional decline of the auditory periphery as well as degradation of central auditory processing due to aging can reduce the salience and resolution of temporal cues. Age-related deficits in central temporal processing have previously been observed at more rapid AM frequencies and various AM depths. These centrally observed changes result from cochlear changes compounded with changes along the ascending auditory pathway. In fact, a decrease in ability to detect temporally modulated sounds accurately could originate from changes in cochlear filtering properties and in cochlear mechanics due to aging. Nonetheless, few studies have examined cochlear mechanisms in AM detection. To assess integrity of the mechanical properties of the auditory periphery, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are a tool commonly used in clinics and in research. In this study, we measured DPOAEs to reveal age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and degradation in AM detection by basilar membrane vibration. Two tones (f1 and f2, f2>f1) at various f2/f1 ratios and simultaneous presentation of one AM and one pure tone were used as stimuli to evoke DPOAEs. In addition of observing reduced DPOAE amplitudes and steeper slopes in the input-output DPOAE functions, higher peak f2/f1 ratios and broader f2/f1 tuning were also observed in aged animals. Aged animals generally had lower distortion product (DP) and first sideband (SB 1) responses evoked by an f1 pure tone and an f2 AM tone, regardless of whether the AM frequency was 45 Hz or 128 Hz. SB 1 thresholds, which corresponds to the smallest stimulus AM depth that can induce cochlear vibrations at the DP generator locus, were higher in aged animals as well. The results suggest that age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and AM detection by basilar membrane vibration are consistent with a reduction in endocochlear

  9. ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION-LINE CORRELATIONS IN HST/COS SPECTRA OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: SINGLE-EPOCH BLACK HOLE MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Evan M.; Shull, J. Michael E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu

    2013-09-01

    Effective methods of measuring supermassive black hole masses in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are of critical importance to studies of galaxy evolution. While there has been much success in obtaining masses through reverberation mapping, the extensive observing time required by this method has limited the practicality of applying it to large samples at a variety of redshifts. This limitation highlights the need to estimate these masses using single-epoch spectroscopy of ultraviolet (UV) emission lines. We use UV spectra of 44 AGNs from HST/COS, the International Ultraviolet Explorer, and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer of the C IV {lambda}1549, O VI {lambda}1035, O III] {lambda}1664, He II {lambda}1640, C II {lambda}1335, and Mg II {lambda}2800 emission lines and explore their potential as tracers of the broad-line region and supermassive black hole mass. The higher signal-to-noise ratio and better spectral resolution of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) resolve AGN intrinsic absorption and produce more accurate line widths. From these, we test the viability of mass-scaling relationships based on line widths and luminosities and carry out a principal component analysis based on line luminosities, widths, skewness, and kurtosis. At L{sub 1450} {<=} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, the UV line luminosities correlate well with H{beta}, as does the 1450 A continuum luminosity. We find that C IV, O VI, and Mg II can be used as reasonably accurate estimators of AGN black hole masses, while He II and C II are uncorrelated.

  10. The effects of consistent chemical kinetics calculations on the pressure-temperature profiles and emission spectra of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, B.; Tremblin, P.; Baraffe, I.; Amundsen, D. S.; Mayne, N. J.; Venot, O.; Goyal, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we investigate the impact of calculating non-equilibrium chemical abundances consistently with the temperature structure for the atmospheres of highly-irradiated, close-in gas giant exoplanets. Chemical kinetics models have been widely used in the literature to investigate the chemical compositions of hot Jupiter atmospheres which are expected to be driven away from chemical equilibrium via processes such as vertical mixing and photochemistry. All of these models have so far used pressure-temperature (P-T) profiles as fixed model input. This results in a decoupling of the chemistry from the radiative and thermal properties of the atmosphere, despite the fact that in nature they are intricately linked. We use a one-dimensional radiative-convective equilibrium model, ATMO, which includes a sophisticated chemistry scheme to calculate P-T profiles which are fully consistent with non-equilibrium chemical abundances, including vertical mixing and photochemistry. Our primary conclusion is that, in cases of strong chemical disequilibrium, consistent calculations can lead to differences in the P-T profile of up to 100 K compared to the P-T profile derived assuming chemical equilibrium. This temperature change can, in turn, have important consequences for the chemical abundances themselves as well as for the simulated emission spectra. In particular, we find that performing the chemical kinetics calculation consistently can reduce the overall impact of non-equilibrium chemistry on the observable emission spectrum of hot Jupiters. Simulated observations derived from non-consistent models could thus yield the wrong interpretation. We show that this behaviour is due to the non-consistent models violating the energy budget balance of the atmosphere.

  11. Deriving the Extinction to Young Stellar Objects using [Fe II] Near-infrared Emission Lines: Prescriptions from GIANO High-resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecchioli, T.; Sanna, N.; Massi, F.; Oliva, E.

    2016-07-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) emission lines of Fe+ at 1.257, 1.321, and 1.644 μm share the same upper level; their ratios can then be exploited to derive the extinction to a line emitting region once the relevant spontaneous emission coefficients are known. This is commonly done, normally from low-resolution spectra, in observations of shocked gas from jets driven by Young Stellar Objects. In this paper we review this method, provide the relevant equations, and test it by analyzing high-resolution (R ∼ 50,000) NIR spectra of two young stars, namely the Herbig Be star HD 200775 and the Be star V1478 Cyg, which exhibit intense emission lines. The spectra were obtained with the new GIANO echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Notably, the high-resolution spectra allowed checking the effects of overlapping telluric absorption lines. A set of various determinations of the Einstein coefficients are compared to show how much the available computations affect extinction derivation. The most recently obtained values are probably good enough to allow reddening determination within 1 visual mag of accuracy. Furthermore, we show that [Fe ii] line ratios from low-resolution pure emission-line spectra in general are likely to be in error due to the impossibility to properly account for telluric absorption lines. If low-resolution spectra are used for reddening determinations, we advice that the ratio 1.644/1.257, rather than 1.644/1.321, should be used, being less affected by the effects of telluric absorption lines.

  12. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  13. Measurements of the Temperature of Subsonic CO{sub 2} Induction Plasma Flows by Analyzing Their Emission Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bykova, N.G.; Kuznetsova, L.A.

    2004-11-15

    Results are presented from measurements of the temperature characteristics of subsonic CO{sub 2} plasma flows generated by a 100-kW induction plasmatron at the Institute for Problems of Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences. The atomic excitation temperature T{sub a} and the population temperature T{sub e} of the electronic states of C{sub 2} molecules (both averaged over the jet diameter) were measured from the absolute intensities of the atomic spectral lines and the spectrum of C{sub 2} molecules in different generation regimes at gas pressures of 25-140 hPa and anode supply powers of 29-72 kW. The longitudinal and radial profiles of the temperatures were determined for some of these regimes and compared to those obtained from numerical calculations of equilibrium induction plasma flows in the discharge channel. For some generation regimes, the dependences of the averaged (over the line of sight) rotational and vibrational temperatures (T{sub r} and T{sub v} ) on the discharge parameters, as well as the radial profiles of these temperatures, were determined from the best fit of the measured and calculated spectra of C{sub 2} molecules (Swan bands). The self-absorption of molecular emission was observed at sufficiently high temperatures and gas pressures, and its influence on the measured values of the molecular temperatures T{sub e} , T{sub v} , and T{sub r} was examined.

  14. High resolution catalogue of emission lines in the spectra of comet C/2002 C1 Ikeya-Zhang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capria, M. T.; Cremonese, G.; de Sanctis, M. C.; Buzzoni, A.

    2003-04-01

    The comet C/2002 C1 Ikeya-Zhang was observed at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in Canary Islands with the echelle spectrograph SARG during the night 19-20 of April 2002. One echelle spectrum composed by 55 orders covering the spectral range from 462 to 792 nm with R=57000 was acquired. The observations were performed in the frame of a program aimed to collect, catalogue and identify cometary emission lines in the optical part of the spectral range. In this range many important lines of daughters molecules and ions can be found; most of these lines were detected many times with low resolution spectroscopy, but the cataloguing with high resolution spectroscopy was done until now for few comets, and many lines still remain unidentified. We present here a first version of our catalogue, in which the line identification, based on wavelength coincidence only, is made using as starting line lists the ones compiled by Brown et al. [1] and Cochran and Cochran [2]. The O(1S) and O(1D) metastable lines are also clearly visible in our spectra and well separated from the other cometary and telluric lines, so we present also a preliminary estimate of the ratio of the green and red lines. [1] M.E. Brown et al. (1996) AJ, 112. [2] A. Cochran and D. Cochran (2002) Icarus, 157.

  15. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. I. Identifying student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. This article (Paper I) describes how several serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. Paper II illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to significant improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  16. Diagnosis of lubricating oil by evaluating cyanide and carbon molecular emission lines in laser induced breakdown spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnasharty, I. Y.; Kassem, A. K.; Sabsabi, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    To prevent engine failure it is essential to change lubricating oil regularly before it loses its protective properties. It is also necessary to monitor the physical and chemical conditions of the oil to reliably determine the optimum oil-change intervals. The present work focuses on studying evolution of the cyanide (CN) and carbon (C 2) molecular spectral emission lines in the laser induced breakdown spectra of lubricating oil as a function of its consumption. The intensities of these molecular bands have been taken as indicator of engine oil degradation at certain mileage. Furthermore, the percentage of decay of CN and C 2 integral intensity values at the corresponding mileage was calculated in order to relate it to the degree of consumption of the motor oil. Such percentage decay of the CN and C 2 integral intensities have been found to increase gradually with increasing mileage which is accompanied with increasing depletion of engine oil. The results of using LIBS technique in the present measurements proved that it is possible to have a direct, straightforward and easy method for prediction of lubricating oil degree of consumption. This may facilitate scheduling the proper time and/or mileage intervals for changing the oil to avoid any possibility of engine failure.

  17. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-time Spectra of a Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; de Cia, A.; Masci, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83-148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ˜1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ˜ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70-220 M⊙), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ˜ 1051 erg, Ekin ˜ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ˜4500 km s-1 and a ˜300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ˜2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ˜4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M⊙. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M⊙ H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95-150) M⊙ about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ˜15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  18. DETECTION OF BROAD Hα EMISSION LINES IN THE LATE-TIME SPECTRA OF A HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lin; Masci, F.; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; Cia, A. de; Yaron, O.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1}, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day{sup −1}. The measured ejecta velocity is ∼ 13,000 km s{sup −1}. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M{sub ⊙}), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (E{sub rad} ∼ 10{sup 51} erg, E{sub kin} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 53} erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ∼4500 km s{sup −1} and a ∼300 km s{sup −1} blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ∼2 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1} as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ∼4 × 10{sup 16} cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M{sub ⊙}. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M{sub ⊙} H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M{sub ⊙} about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ∼15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  19. Complex X-ray Absorption and the Fe K(alpha) Profile in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; George, I. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Botorff, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We present data from simultaneous Chandra, XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken during 2001 April and November. We have investigated the nature of the very flat observed X-ray spectrum. Chandra grating data show the presence of X-ray absorption lines, revealing two distinct components of the absorbing gas, one which is consistent with our previous model of the UV/X-ray absorber while the other, which is outflowing at a velocity of approximately 1100 kilometers per second, has a larger column density and is much more highly ionized. The broad-band spectral characteristics of the X-ray continuum observed with XMM during 2001 April, reveal the presence of a third layer of absorption consisting of a very large column (approximately 2.5 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter) of highly ionized gas with a covering fraction approximately 50%. This low covering fraction suggests that the absorber lies within a few 1t-days of the X-ray source and/or is filamentary in structure. Interestingly, these absorbers are not in thermal equilibrium with one another. The two new components are too highly ionized to be radiatively accelerated, which we suggest is evidence for a hydromagnetic origin for the outflow. Applying our model to the November dataset, we can account for the spectral variability primarily by a drop in the ionization states of the absorbers, as expected by the change in the continuum flux. When this complex absorption is accounted for we find the underlying continuum to be typical of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The spectral curvature attributed to the high column absorber, in turn, reduces estimates of the flux and extent of any broad Fe emission line from the accretion disk.

  20. Clouds in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. II. Thermal emission spectra of Earth-like planets influenced by low and high-level clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzmann, D.; Patzer, A. B. C.; von Paris, P.; Godolt, M.; Rauer, H.

    2011-07-01

    Aims: We study the impact of multi-layered clouds (low-level water and high-level ice clouds) on the thermal emission spectra of Earth-like planets orbiting different types of stars. Clouds have an important influence on such planetary emission spectra due to their wavelength dependent absorption and scattering properties. We also investigate the influence of clouds on the ability to derive information about planetary surface temperatures from low-resolution spectra. Methods: We use a previously developed parametric cloud model based on observations in the Earth's atmosphere, coupled to a one-dimensional radiative-convective steady state climate model. This model is applied here to study the effect of clouds on the thermal emission spectra of Earth-like extrasolar planets in dependence of the type of central star. Results: The presence of clouds lead in general to a decrease of the planetary IR spectrum associated with the dampening of spectral absorption features such as the 9.6 μm absorption band of O3 for example. This dampening is not limited to absorption features originating below the cloud layers but was also found for features forming above the clouds. When only single cloud layers are considered, both cloud types exhibit basically the same effects on the spectrum but the underlying physical processes are clearly different. For model scenarios where multi-layered clouds have been considered with coverages which yield mean Earth surface temperatures, the low-level clouds have only a small influence on the thermal emission spectra. In these cases the major differences are caused by high-level ice clouds. The largest effect was found for a planet orbiting the F-type star, where no absorption features can be distinguished in the low-resolution emission spectrum for high cloud coverages. However, for most central stars, planetary atmospheric absorption bands are present even at high cloud coverages. Clouds also affect the derivation of surface temperatures from

  1. X-Ray Emission Spectra and Electronic Structures of Red Phosphorus, 3d Transition-Metal Phosphides and III V Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara

    1995-07-01

    The P Kβ emission spectra in fluorescence from red amorphous phosphorus, 3d transition-metal phosphides TiP, CrP, FeP, Fe2P, Fe3P, CoP, Co2P, Ni5P4, Ni2P, Ni3P, Cu3P, ZnP2 (black) and Zn3P2, and the semiconducting phosphides of the III-V type, BP, AlP, GaP and InP are measured with a high-resolution two-crystal vacuum spectrometer equipped with Ge(111) crystals. The influence of the metal atoms appears distinctly on the P Kβ fluorescence emission spectra. The measured spectra are compared with available X-ray emission and XPS valence-band spectra and theoretical energy-band calculations on a common energy scale. It is shown that considerable p-d, s mixing occurs in the valence bands of the 3d transition-metal phosphides and the P 3p states mix fairly with the P 3s states in the valence bands of red phosphorus, Gap and InP

  2. Complex organic matter in space: about the chemical composition of carriers of the Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs) and protoplanetary emission spectra recorded from certain astrophysical objects.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco; Keheyan, Yeghis; Heymann, Dieter

    2004-02-01

    In this communication we present the basic concept that the pure PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) can be considered only the ideal carriers of the UIBs (Unidentified Infrared Bands), the emission spectra coming from a large variety of astronomical objects. Instead we have proposed that the carriers of UIBs and of protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) emission spectra are much more complex molecular mixtures possessing also complex chemical structures comparable to certain petroleum fractions obtained from the petroleum refining processes. The demonstration of our proposal is based on the comparison between the emission spectra recorded from the protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) IRAS 22272+ 5435 and the infrared absorption spectra of certain 'heavy' petroleum fractions. It is shown that the best match with the reference spectrum is achieved by highly aromatic petroleum fractions. It is shown that the selected petroleum fractions used in the present study are able to match the band pattern of anthracite coal. Coal has been proposed previously as a model for the PPNe and UIBs but presents some drawbacks which could be overcome by adopting the petroleum fractions as model for PPNe and UIBs in place of coal. A brief discussion on the formation of the petroleum-like fractions in PPNe objects is included.

  3. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. II. Diagnostic Tools for X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis to the 2 - 10 keV energy region, and in particular to the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe Ka with the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is approx. 800 eV for models with log Epsilon approx. 1.5, and decreases monotonically as Epsilon increases. For lower values of Epsilon the Fe K(alpha) EW decreases to a minimum near log Epsilon approx. 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low ionized, reflection dominated cases, the 2 -10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power-law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S L(alpha) lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca x K(alpha) line. In some cases the S xv blends with the He-like Si RRC producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  4. The ‘Excess’ Emission from the Warm Surface Adjacent to Active Fissures on Enceladus from Combined VIMS and CIRS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Howell, Robert R.

    2015-11-01

    The exciting discovery of thermal emission from the tiger stripe fissures at the S. pole of Enceladus is a major highlight of the Cassini mission. Both VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) detect the thermal ‘blackbody’ spectrum emitted from the warm fissure areas. The VIMS instrument is uniquely suited to measuring the hottest active locations because VIMS covers the 3 to 5 micron wavelength range where the rising edge of the Planck function for these T~200 K areas dominates the emission spectrum. At longer wavelengths, the spectrum is more complicated because contributions from small hot areas and larger cooler areas combine to form the broad emission spectrum that is detected by the CIRS instrument at wavelengths >6.7 microns. It is the combination of VIMS and CIRS spectra that paint a more complete portrait of the fissure heat transfer processes. Using spectra that span both the VIMS and CIRS wavelengths places a stronger constraint on the T distribution near the fissures than consideration of the spectra from either instrument alone.We show that when the best (= highest spatial resolution, 800 m/pixel and smaller) VIMS and CIRS spectra of the fissure thermal emission are considered together, there is a large (up to 400%) component of ‘excess’ emission spanning 7 to 17 microns that requires explanation. New analysis of ~2 km spatial resolution VIMS spectra of the Damascus hot spot on 8/13/2010 are similar to the highest resolution 4/14/2012 VIMS Baghdad spectra, confirming that differences in location or time between the best VIMS and CIRS spectra do not explain away the excess. The obvious interpretation is that there are processes that transfer heat from the fissure eruption to the surface within 400 m of the fissure center in addition to heat conduction through the fissure walls. Candidate heat transfer processes include fallback of large warm low velocity ice particles from the edges of the

  5. Physical properties, transmission and emission spectra of the WASP-19 planetary system from multi-colour photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Ciceri, S.; Chen, G.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Fortney, J. J.; Southworth, J.; Tan, T. G.; Burgdorf, M.; Calchi Novati, S.; Dominik, M.; Fang, X.-S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Hinse, T. C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Liebig, C.; Nikolov, N.; Ricci, D.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Wertz, O.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Dodds, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K.; Henning, Th.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M.; Madhusudhan, N.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Prof, S.; Rahvar, S.; Sahu, K.; Scarpetta, G.; Snodgrass, C.; Surdej, J.

    2013-11-01

    We present new ground-based, multi-colour, broad-band photometric measurements of the physical parameters, transmission and emission spectra of the transiting extrasolar planet WASP-19b. The measurements are based on observations of eight transits and four occultations through a Gunn i filter using the 1.54-m Danish Telescope, 14 transits through an Rc filter at the Perth Exoplanet Survey Telescope (PEST) observatory and one transit observed simultaneously through four optical (Sloan g', r', i', z') and three near-infrared (J, H, K) filters, using the Gamma Ray Burst Optical and Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope. The GROND optical light curves have a point-to-point scatter around the best-fitting model between 0.52 and 0.65 mmag rms. We use these new data to measure refined physical parameters for the system. We find the planet to be more bloated (Rb = 1.410 ± 0.017RJup; Mb = 1.139 ± 0.030MJup) and the system to be twice as old as initially thought. We also used published and archived data sets to study the transit timings, which do not depart from a linear ephemeris. We detected an anomaly in the GROND transit light curve which is compatible with a spot on the photosphere of the parent star. The starspot position, size, spot contrast and temperature were established. Using our new and published measurements, we assembled the planet's transmission spectrum over the 370-2350 nm wavelength range and its emission spectrum over the 750-8000 nm range. By comparing these data to theoretical models we investigated the theoretically predicted variation of the apparent radius of WASP-19b as a function of wavelength and studied the composition and thermal structure of its atmosphere. We conclude that: (i) there is no evidence for strong optical absorbers at low pressure, supporting the common idea that the planet's atmosphere lacks a dayside inversion; (ii) the temperature of the planet is not homogenized, because the high warming of

  6. Discovery of Rubidium, Cadmium, and Germanium Emission Lines in the Near-infrared Spectra of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, N. C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Kaplan, Kyle F.; Bautista, Manuel A.

    2016-03-01

    We identify [Rb iv] 1.5973 and [Cd iv] 1.7204 μm emission lines in high-resolution (R = 40,000) near-infrared spectra of the planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 7027 and IC 5117, obtained with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. We also identify [Ge vi] 2.1930 μm in NGC 7027. Alternate identifications for these features are ruled out based on the absence of other multiplet members and/or transitions with the same upper levels. Ge, Rb, and Cd can be enriched in PNe by s-process nucleosynthesis during the asymptotic giant branch stage of evolution. To determine ionic abundances, we calculate [Rb iv] collision strengths and use approximations for those of [Cd iv] and [Ge vi]. Our identification of [Rb iv] 1.5973 μm is supported by the agreement between Rb3+/H+ abundances found from this line and the 5759.55 Å feature in NGC 7027. Elemental Rb, Cd, and Ge abundances are derived with ionization corrections based on similarities in ionization potential ranges between the detected ions and O and Ne ionization states. Our analysis indicates abundances 2-4 times solar for Rb and Cd in both nebulae. Ge is subsolar in NGC 7027, but its abundance is uncertain due to the large and uncertain ionization correction. The general consistency of the measured relative s-process enrichments with predictions from models appropriate for these PNe (2.0-2.5 M⊙, [Fe/H] = -0.37) demonstrates the potential of using PN compositions to test s-process nucleosynthesis models. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  7. DISCOVERY OF RUBIDIUM, CADMIUM, AND GERMANIUM EMISSION LINES IN THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRA OF PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, N. C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Kaplan, Kyle F.; Bautista, Manuel A. E-mail: harriet@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu

    2016-03-01

    We identify [Rb iv] 1.5973 and [Cd iv] 1.7204 μm emission lines in high-resolution (R = 40,000) near-infrared spectra of the planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 7027 and IC 5117, obtained with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. We also identify [Ge vi] 2.1930 μm in NGC 7027. Alternate identifications for these features are ruled out based on the absence of other multiplet members and/or transitions with the same upper levels. Ge, Rb, and Cd can be enriched in PNe by s-process nucleosynthesis during the asymptotic giant branch stage of evolution. To determine ionic abundances, we calculate [Rb iv] collision strengths and use approximations for those of [Cd iv] and [Ge vi]. Our identification of [Rb iv] 1.5973 μm is supported by the agreement between Rb{sup 3+}/H{sup +} abundances found from this line and the 5759.55 Å feature in NGC 7027. Elemental Rb, Cd, and Ge abundances are derived with ionization corrections based on similarities in ionization potential ranges between the detected ions and O and Ne ionization states. Our analysis indicates abundances 2–4 times solar for Rb and Cd in both nebulae. Ge is subsolar in NGC 7027, but its abundance is uncertain due to the large and uncertain ionization correction. The general consistency of the measured relative s-process enrichments with predictions from models appropriate for these PNe (2.0–2.5 M{sub ⊙}, [Fe/H] = −0.37) demonstrates the potential of using PN compositions to test s-process nucleosynthesis models.

  8. Ultraviolet high-excitation Fe II fluorescence lines excited by O VI, C IV, and H I resonance emission as seen in IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, Walter A.; Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Johansson, Sveneric

    1991-01-01

    Archival high-dispersion spectra from the IUE are used in a search for Bowen emission lines of Fe II excited by the stronger transition of the O VI resonance doublet. The possibility of using these Fe II emission lines as a diagnostic of the strength of the far-ultraviolet emission of O VI at 1032 A is explored. It is found that the Fe II emission lines are quite common and strong in symbiotic stars, particularly those of the type known as 'symbiotic novae', as well as in normal novae. The lines are observed in central stars of some planetary nebulae of the O VI sequence besides a few central stars of type WR. High density, high excitation, and high temperature are suggested to be requirements for the excitation of the Fe II fluorescence lines. It is pointed out that while these lines were observed in PG 1159-035 and K1-16, they were not observed in AGNs.

  9. A theoretical study on the pH dependence of X-ray emission spectra for aqueous acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Naohiro; Tokushima, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    We performed theoretical calculations to reproduce the site-selective XES spectra for aqueous acetic acid at the oxygen K-edge. The shape of the experimental XES spectra obtained from aqueous acetic acid drastically changed when the pH value was high. Structure sampling of an aqueous acetic acid cluster model was performed by the ab initio molecular dynamics trajectory. Relative XES peak intensities for the core⿿hole excited state dynamics simulations were calculated using density functional theory. We found that the theoretical XES spectra reproduced well the experimental spectra and that these calculations gave us electronic and molecular structure information about aqueous acetic acid.

  10. A frequent kinase domain mutation that changes the interaction between PI3K[alpha] and the membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelker, Diana; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Zhu, Jiuxiang; Cheong, Ian; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in oncogenes often promote tumorigenesis by changing the conformation of the encoded proteins, thereby altering enzymatic activity. The PIK3CA oncogene, which encodes p110{alpha}, the catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase alpha (PI3K{alpha}), is one of the two most frequently mutated oncogenes in human cancers. We report the structure of the most common mutant of p110{alpha} in complex with two interacting domains of its regulatory partner (p85{alpha}), both free and bound to an inhibitor (wortmannin). The N-terminal SH2 (nSH2) domain of p85{alpha} is shown to form a scaffold for the entire enzyme complex, strategically positioned to communicate extrinsic signals from phosphopeptides to three distinct regions of p110{alpha}. Moreover, we found that Arg-1047 points toward the cell membrane, perpendicular to the orientation of His-1047 in the WT enzyme. Surprisingly, two loops of the kinase domain that contact the cell membrane shift conformation in the oncogenic mutant. Biochemical assays revealed that the enzymatic activity of the p110{alpha} His1047Arg mutant is differentially regulated by lipid membrane composition. These structural and biochemical data suggest a previously undescribed mechanism for mutational activation of a kinase that involves perturbation of its interaction with the cellular membrane.

  11. ARTICLES: Intermode scattering effects in laser emission spectra of platelet and acicular CdS-type single crystals subjected to one-photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodin, M. S.; Vitrikhovskiĭ, N. I.; Kipen', A. A.; Shevel', S. G.; Yanushevskiĭ, N. I.

    1982-12-01

    An investigation was made of the laser emission spectra of platelet CdS, Znx, Cd1-xS, and CdS1-xSex, single crystals and acicular CdS single crystals at T=4.2, 77, and 300 °K. Lasing developed in partial resonators (rectangular insulating microboxes or microprisms) and the emission consisted of total-internal-reflection modes characterized by the highest Q factor. Radiation emerged in vacuum as a result of intermode scattering of photons (without a change in the frequency) out of the total-internal-reflection modes into modes with lower Q factors, which could be emitted.

  12. Emission spectra of the cations of 1,3- and 1,4-dibromotetrafluorobenzene and of 1,3,5-tribromotrifluorobenzene in the gaseous phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, John Paul; Marthaler, O.; Mohraz, Manijeh; Shiley, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A search was made for radiative decay of electronically excited cations of 24 bromobenzenes and of their fluoro-substituted derivatives in the gaseous phase. The only emission spectra detected were for the cations of 1,3- and 1,4-dibromotetrafluorobenzene and of 1,3,5-tribromotrifluorobenzene. The band systems, which are found between 670 and 830 nm, are assigned to the B(??-1) ??? A(??-1), X(??-1) electronic transitions of these cations. The assignments are based on the Ne(I) photoelectron spectra which are also presented for some of the studied species. The interpretation for the absence of detectable emission is that the nature of the B cationic states is ??-1, except in the case of 1,3- and 1,4-dibromobenzene cations for which B states are still formed by ??-1 processes. Possible reasons for these observations are discussed. The symmetries of the lowest three electronic states of the studied cations are given. ?? 1980.

  13. Time-resolved emission spectra of 4-dimethylamino-4‧-cyano-stilbene and resveratrol in high viscosity solvents and silica matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiak, Małgorzata; Grobelna, Beata; Synak, Anna; Bojarski, Piotr; Kubicki, Aleksander A.

    2013-11-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra of 4-dimethylamino-4‧-cyano-stilbene (DMACS) and 3,5,4‧-trihydroxy-stilbene (resveratrol, RSV) in propylene glycol and in rigid silica xerogel matrix at 23 °C were studied. For the polar molecule DMACS in propylene glycol, a 66 nm shift of maximum wavelength of emission spectra was observed within 1 ns after excitation, and most of the shift occurred during the first 200 ps. For resveratrol in propylene glycol no such a shift was observed. The rigid silica environment eliminates some deactivation pathways and stabilizes spectroscopic properties of both molecules. Spectral properties of nonpolar and high dipole moment molecules in viscous liquids and rigid environments are compared. Results are explained on the basis of intramolecular processes and solute-solvent relaxation, as well.

  14. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Percolation and emission spectra of a laser plasma upon ablation of silicon and silicon-containing composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kask, Nikolai E.; Michurin, Sergei V.; Fedorov, Gennadii M.

    2006-05-01

    The emission spectra of plasmas produced near the surface of silicon and sulphur samples and their mixtures by nanosecond and millisecond laser pulses are studied in a broad range of pressures of buffer gases. The percolation dependences are obtained for composite Si—S, Si—SiO2, and SiO2—S targets. It is found that experimental percolation thresholds coincide with the typical threshold for three-dimensional continual percolation.

  15. Using Gamma-Ray and Neutron Emission to Determine Solar Flare Accelerated Particle Spectra and Composition and the Conditions Within the Flare Magnetic Loop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    computer codes we have cal- culated the yields of deexcitation lines, escaping neutron spec- tra and the neutron capture line for monoenergetic ...USING GAMMA-RAYAND NEUTRON EMISSION TO DETERMINE SOLAR FLARE ACCELERATED PARTICLE SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION AND THE CONDITIONS WITHIN THE FLARE...California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA Received 2006 May 4; accepted 2006 August 23 ABSTRACT The measurable quantities associated with -ray and neutron

  16. Revealing discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts: Line-intensity correlation analysis from laser-induced plasma emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yonghoon; Ham, Kyung-Sik; Han, Song-Hee; Yoo, Jonghyun; Jeong, Sungho

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). For the ten different sea salts from South Korea, China, Japan, France, Mexico and New Zealand, LIBS spectra were recorded in the spectral range between 190 and 1040 nm, identifying the presence of Na, Cl, K, Ca, Mg, Li, Sr, Al, Si, Ti, Fe, C, O, N, and H. Intensity correlation analysis of the observed emission lines provided a valuable insight into the discriminating power of the different elements in the sea salts. The correlation analysis suggests that the elements with independent discrimination power can be categorized into three groups; those that represent dissolved ions in seawater (K, Li, and Mg), those that are associated with calcified particles (Ca and Sr), and those that are present in soils contained in the sea salts (Al, Si, Ti, and Fe). Classification models using a few emission lines selected based on the results from intensity correlation analysis and full broadband LIBS spectra were developed based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and their performances were compared. Our results indicate that effective combination of a few emission lines can provide a dependable model for discriminating the edible sea salts and the performance is not much degraded from that based on the full broadband spectra. This can be rationalized by the intensity correlation results.

  17. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, Sebastian; Harris, D.E.; Marshall, H.L.; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  18. Computer-aided screening system for cervical precancerous cells based on field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray images and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusman, Yessi; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Hasikin, Khairunnisa; Kurnia, Rahmadi; Osman, Noor Azuan Bin Abu; Teoh, Kean Hooi

    2016-10-01

    The capability of field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDX) to scan material structures at the microlevel and characterize the material with its elemental properties has inspired this research, which has developed an FE-SEM/EDX-based cervical cancer screening system. The developed computer-aided screening system consisted of two parts, which were the automatic features of extraction and classification. For the automatic features extraction algorithm, the image and spectra of cervical cells features extraction algorithm for extracting the discriminant features of FE-SEM/EDX data was introduced. The system automatically extracted two types of features based on FE-SEM/EDX images and FE-SEM/EDX spectra. Textural features were extracted from the FE-SEM/EDX image using a gray level co-occurrence matrix technique, while the FE-SEM/EDX spectra features were calculated based on peak heights and corrected area under the peaks using an algorithm. A discriminant analysis technique was employed to predict the cervical precancerous stage into three classes: normal, low-grade intraepithelial squamous lesion (LSIL), and high-grade intraepithelial squamous lesion (HSIL). The capability of the developed screening system was tested using 700 FE-SEM/EDX spectra (300 normal, 200 LSIL, and 200 HSIL cases). The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity performances were 98.2%, 99.0%, and 98.0%, respectively.

  19. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectra of the Symbiotic Star SS73 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eze, R. N. C.; Luna, G. J. M.; Smith, R. K.

    2010-01-01

    SS73 17 was an innocuous Mira-type symbiotic star until the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory and Swift discovered its bright hard X-ray emission, adding it to the small class of "hard X-ray emitting symbiotics." Suzaku observations in 2006 then showed it emits three bright iron lines as well, with little to no emission in the 0.3-2.0 keV bandpass. We present here follow-up observations with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating and Suzaku that confirm the earlier detection of strong emission lines of Fe K(alpha) fluorescence, Fe XXV and Fe XXVI but also show significantly more soft X-ray emission. The high-resolution spectrum also shows emission lines of other highly ionized ions as Si xiv and possibly S XVI. In addition, a re-analysis of the 2006 Suzaku data using the latest calibration shows that the hard (15-50 keV) X-ray emission is brighter than previously thought and remains constant in both the 2006 and 2008 data. The G ratio calculated from the Fe xxv lines shows that these lines are thermal, not photoionized, in origin.With the exception of the hard X-ray emission, the spectra from both epochs can be fit using thermal radiation assuming a differential emission measure based on a cooling-flow model combined with a full and partial absorber. We show that acceptable fits can be obtained for all the data in the 1-10 keV band varying only the partial absorber. Based on the temperature and accretion rate, the thermal emission appears to be arising from the boundary layer between the accreting white dwarf and the accretion disk.

  20. Dynamics of carbohydrate residues of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) followed by red-edge excitation spectra and emission anisotropy studies of Calcofluor White.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Sillen, A; Coddeville, B; Plancke, Y D; Engelborghs, Y

    1999-11-23

    Dynamics studies on Calcofluor White bound to the carbohydrate residues of sialylated and asialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) have been performed. The interaction between the fluorophore and the protein was found to occur preferentially with the glycan residues with a dependence on their spatial conformation. In the presence of sialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum of calcofluor does not lead to a shift in the fluorescence emission maximum (440 nm) of the fluorophore. Thus, the emission of calcofluor occurs from a relaxed state. This is confirmed by anisotropy studies as a function of temperature (Perrin plot). In the presence of asialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, red-edge excitation spectra show an important shift (8 nm) of the fluorescence emission maximum of the probe. This reveals that emission of calcofluor occurs before relaxation of the surrounding carbohydrate residues occurs. Emission from a non-relaxed state means that Calcofluor molecules are bound tightly to the carbohydrate residues, a result confirmed by anisotropy studies.

  1. The Broad Iron K-alpha line of Cygnus X-1 as Seen by XMM-Newton in the EPIC-pn Modified Timing Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duro, Refiz; Dauser, Thomas; Wilms, Jorn; Pottschmidt, Katja; Nowak, Michael A.; Fritz, Sonja; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Kirsch, Marcus G. F.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Staubert, Rudiger

    2011-01-01

    We present the analysis of the broadened, flourescent iron K(alpha) line in simultaneous XMM-Newton and RXTE data from the black hole Cygnus X-I. The XMM-Newton data were taken in a modified version of the Timing Mode of the EPIC-pn camera. In this mode the lower energy threshold of the instrument is increased to 2.8 keV to avoid telemetry drop outs due to the brightness of the source, while at the same time preserving the signal to noise ratio in the Fe K(alpha) band. We find that the best-fit spectrum consists of the sum of an exponentially cut-off power-law and relativistically smeared, ionized reflection. The shape of the broadened Fe K(alpha) feature is due to strong Compton broadening combined with relativistic broadening. Assuming a standard, thin accretion disk, the black hole is close to maximally rotating. Key words. X-rays: binaries - black hole physics - gravitation

  2. Simulation of the A-X and B-X transition emission spectra of the InBr molecule for diagnostics in low-pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briefi, S.; Fantz, U.

    2011-04-01

    Inductively coupled low-pressure discharges containing InBr have been investigated spectroscopically. In order to obtain plasma parameters such as the vibrational and rotational temperature of the InBr molecule, the emission spectra of the A\\,^3\\!\\Pi_{0^+}\\rightarrow X\\,^1\\!\\Sigma_{0}^+ and the B\\,^3\\! \\Pi_{1}\\rightarrow X\\,^1\\!\\Sigma_{0}^+ transitions have been simulated. The program is based on the molecular constants and takes into account vibrational states up to v = 24. The required Franck-Condon factors and vibrationally resolved transition probabilities have been computed solving the Schrödinger equation using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The ground state density of the InBr molecule in the plasma has been determined from absorption spectra using effective transition probabilities for the A-X and B-X transition according to the vibrational population. The obtained densities agree well with densities derived from an Arrhenius type vapour pressure equation.

  3. Analysis of x-ray emission spectra in charge-exchange collisions of C6 + with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6 +-He and -H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method for low to intermediate projectile energies. Within the independent electron model, we calculate capture cross sections and perform a radiative cascade analysis to obtain Lyman line-emission ratios. Single capture is considered for the C6 +-He system, while both single capture and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6 +-H2 system. Effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of capture cross sections and the line-emission ratios are examined as well. Calculated line-emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are in satisfactory agreement with previous measurements.

  4. Ejecta patterns of Meteor Crater, Arizona derived from the linear un-mixing of TIMS data and laboratory thermal emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Michael S.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of thermal infrared data depends upon the understanding and removal of complicating effects. These effects may include physical mixing of various mineralogies and particle sizes, atmospheric absorption and emission, surficial coatings, geometry effects, and differential surface temperatures. The focus is the examination of the linear spectral mixing of individual mineral or endmember spectra. Linear addition of spectra, for particles larger than the wavelength, allows for a straight-forward method of deconvolving the observed spectra, predicting a volume percent of each endmember. The 'forward analysis' of linear mixing (comparing the spectra of physical mixtures to numerical mixtures) has received much attention. The reverse approach of un-mixing thermal emission spectra was examined with remotely sensed data, but no laboratory verification exists. Understanding of the effects of spectral mixing on high resolution laboratory spectra allows for the extrapolation to lower resolution, and often more complicated, remotely gathered data. Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data for Meteor Crater, Arizona were acquired in Sep. 1987. The spectral un-mixing of these data gives a unique test of the laboratory results. Meteor Crater (1.2 km in diameter and 180 m deep) is located in north-central Arizona, west of Canyon Diablo. The arid environment, paucity of vegetation, and low relief make the region ideal for remote data acquisition. Within the horizontal sedimentary sequence that forms the upper Colorado Plateau, the oldest unit sampled by the impact crater was the Permian Coconino Sandstone. A thin bed of the Toroweap Formation, also of Permian age, conformably overlays the Coconino. Above the Toroweap lies the Permian Kiabab Limestone which, in turn, is covered by a thin veneer of the Moenkopi Formation. The Moenkopi is Triassic in age and has two distinct sub-units in the vicinity of the crater. The lower Wupatki member is a fine

  5. The Equilibrium and Pre-equilibrium Triton Emission Spectra of Some Target Nuclei for ( n, xt) Reactions up to 45 MeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Özkorucuklu, S.; Büyükuslu, H.; Yıldırım, G.

    2010-08-01

    Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 59Co and 209Bi have been investigated up to 45 MeV incident neutron energy. In the calculations of the triton emission spectra, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  6. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Wen, Jin; Ma, Jing

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changes and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.

  7. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone-d0 and -d2 in n-octane at 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smulevich, Giulietta; Foggi, Paolo; Feis, Alessandro; Marzocchi, Mario P.

    1987-11-01

    The fluorescence excitation and emission spectra in n-octane of 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone-d0 and -d2 at 10 K have been measured. Dual excitation and emission were observed as a consequence of excited state intramolecular proton transfer. A model, based on the Lippincott-Schroeder potential function, is proposed to predict the observed energy gaps and relative intensities of the transition. The isotopic effects are also explained. The Shpolskii matrices in n-octane show only one main site allowing a detailed vibrational analysis of the ground and the excited states. This furnished further evidence for the existence of excited state tautomers. The occurrence of an extra fluorescence was explained in terms of the ν(OH) stretching mode of the high frequency transition enhanced via vibronic coupling between the two ground states.

  8. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  9. Unravelling thermal emissivity spectra of the main minerals on Mercury's surface by comparison with ab initio calculated IR-HT vibrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangarone, C.; Helbert, J.; Tribaudino, M.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Prencipe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral signatures of minerals are intimately related to the crystal structure; therefore they may represent a remote sensing model to determine surface composition of planetary bodies, by analysing their spectral reflectance and emission. However, one of the most critical point is data interpretation considering planetary surfaces, as Mercury, where the changes in spectral characteristics are induced by the high temperatures conditions (Helbert et al., 2013). The aim of this work is to interpret the experimental thermal emissivity spectra with an innovative approach: simulating IR spectra of the main mineral families that compose the surface of Mercury, focusing on pyroxenes (Sprague et al., 2002), both at room and high temperature, exploiting the accuracy of ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, by means of CRYSTAL14 code (Dovesi et al., 2014). The simulations will be compared with experimental emissivity measurements of planetary analogue samples at temperature up to 1000K, performed at Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) by Institute of Planetary Research (DLR, Berlin). Results will be useful to create a theoretical background to interpret HT-IR emissivity spectra that will be collected by the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS), a spectrometer developed by DLR that will be on board of the ESA BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) scheduled for 2017. The goal is to point out the most interesting spectral features for a geological mapping of Mercury and other rocky bodies, simulating the environmental conditions of the inner planets of Solar System. Dovesi R., Saunders V. R., Roetti C., Orlando R., Zicovich-Wilson C. M., Pascale F., Civalleri B., Doll K., Harrison N. M., Bush I. J., D'Arco P., Llunell M., Causà M. & Noël Y. 2014. CRYSTAL14 User's Manual, University of Torino. Sprague, A. L., Emery, J. P., Donaldson, K. L., Russell, R. W., Lynch, D. K., & Mazuk, A. L. (2002). Mercury: Mid-infrared (3-13.5

  10. Emissions and ambient distributions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) in a ponderosa pine ecosystem: interpretation of PTR-MS mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A.; Tyndall, G.; Orlando, J.; Harley, P.; Rasmussen, R.; Apel, E.

    2010-02-01

    Two proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry systems were deployed at the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen-Southern Rocky Mountain 2008 field campaign (BEACHON-SRM08; July to September, 2008) at the Manitou Forest Observatory in a ponderosa pine woodland near Woodland Park, Colorado USA. The two PTR-MS systems simultaneously measured BVOC emissions and ambient distributions of their oxidation products. Here, we present mass spectral analysis in a wide range of masses (m/z 40+ to 210+) to assess our understanding of BVOC emissions and their photochemical processing inside of the forest canopy. The biogenic terpenoids, 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO, 50.2%) and several monoterpenes (MT, 33.5%) were identified as the dominant BVOC emissions from a transmission corrected mass spectrum (PTR-MS), averaged over the daytime (11 a.m. to 3 p.m., local time) of three days. To assess contributions of oxidation products of local BVOC, we calculate an oxidation product spectrum with the OH- and ozone-initiated oxidation product distribution mass spectra of two major BVOC emissions at the ecosystem (MBO and β-pinene) that were observed from laboratory oxidation experiments. The majority (~76%) of the total signal in the transmission corrected PTR-MS spectra could be explained by identified compounds. The remainder are attributed to oxidation products of BVOC emitted from nearby ecosystems and transported to the site, and oxidation products of unidentified BVOC emitted from the ponderosa pine ecosystem.

  11. HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON-IMPACT EMISSION SPECTRA AND VIBRATIONAL EMISSION CROSS SECTIONS FROM 330-1100 nm FOR N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mangina, Rao S.; Ajello, Joseph M.; West, Robert A.; Dziczek, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Electron-impact emission cross sections for N{sub 2} were measured in the wavelength range of 330-1100 nm at 25 eV and 100 eV impact energies. Cross sections of several molecular emission bands of the first positive band system B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} A {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and the second positive band system C {sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} ({nu}'') of N{sub 2}, the first negative band (1NB) system B {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and Meinel band system A {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') of N{sub 2} {sup +} ions as well as line emissions of N (N I) and N{sup +} (N II) in the visible-optical-near-IR wavelength range reported in this work were measured for the first time in a single experimental setup at high spectral resolving power ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 10000) under single-collision-scattering geometry and optically thin conditions. Rotational emission lines of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2} {sup +} were observed for strong emission bands at a gas temperature of about 300 K. The absolute cross section of the strongest (0,0) vibrational band at 391.43 nm of 1NB was determined using the standard H{sub {alpha}} emission cross sections of H{sub 2} by electron impact at both 25 eV and 100 eV electron-impact energies, and the cross sections for the remainder of the emissions were determined using (0,0) 1NB value. A comparison of the present emission cross sections with the earlier published data from both electron energy loss and electron-impact-induced fluorescence emission is discussed.

  12. Cassini UVIS Observations of Titan Ultraviolet Airglow Spectra with Laboratory Modeling from Electron- and Proton-Excited N2 Emission Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, J. M.; West, R. A.; Malone, C. P.; Gustin, J.; Esposito, L. W.; McClintock, W. E.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Stevens, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    laboratory spectra, we have analyzed the intensity and identified each spectral feature from the limb or disk emission spectrum. The strongest dipole-allowed transitions of N2 occur in the EUV. The electronic transitions proceed from the X 1Σg+ ground-state to about seven closely spaced (~12-15 eV) Rydberg-valence (RV) states, which are the source of the molecular emissions in the EUV observed by spacecraft and have recently been studied in our laboratory at medium-to-high spectral resolution (delta-λ = 0.1 Å FWHM). Three of these RV states (b 1Πu, b' 1Σu+, and c4' 1Σu+) are highly-perturbed, weakly-to-strongly predissociated, and have significant emission cross sections, which will be summarized in this paper. We will also discuss our recently published proton and electron impact emission cross sections for the LBH (a 1Πg - X 1Σg+) band system of N2, and their significance to the modeling of the day and night FUV spectra of the atmospheres of Earth and Titan.

  13. The Early X-ray Emission From V382 Velorum (=Nove Vel 1999): An Internal Shock Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Koji; Ishida, Manabu

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of ASCA and RXTE observations of the early X-ray emission from the classical nova V382 Velorum. Its ASCA spectrum was hard (kT approximately 10 KeV) with a strong (10(exp 13)/sq cm) intrinsic absorption. In the subsequent RXTE data, the spectra became softer both due to a declining temperature and a diminishing column. We argue that this places the X-ray emission interior to the outermost ejecta produced by V382 Vel in 1999, and therefore must have been the result of a shock internal to the nova ejecta. The weakness of the Fe K.alpha lines probably indicates that the X-ray emitting plasmas are not in ionization equilibrium.

  14. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Colgan, J.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Abdallah, J.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. K.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  15. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S. B. E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com; Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J.; Faenov, A. Ya. E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Wagenaars, E.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C.; Booth, N.; Lancaster, K. L.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Kaempfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; and others

    2014-03-15

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  16. Simultaneous X-ray and Far-Ultraviolet Spectra of AGN with ASCA and HUT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.

    1997-01-01

    We obtained ASCA spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516 in March 1995. Simultaneous far-UV observations were obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope on the Astro-2 shuttle mission. The ASCA spectrum shows a lightly absorbed power law of energy index 0.78. The low energy absorbing column is significantly less than previously seen. Prominent 0 VII and 0 VIII absorption edges are visible, but, consistent with the much lower total absorbing column, no Fe K absorption edge is detectable. A weak, narrow Fe K(alpha) emission line from cold material is present as well as a broad Fe K(alpha) line. These features are similar to those reported in other Seyfert 1 galaxies. A single warm absorber model provides only an imperfect description of the low energy absorption. In addition to a highly ionized absorber with ionization parameter U = 1.66 and a total column density of 1.4 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm, adding a lower ionization absorber with U = 0.32 and a total column of 6.9 x 10(exp 21)/sq cm significantly improves the fit. The contribution of resonant line scattering to our warm absorber models limits the Doppler parameter to less than 160 km/s at 90% confidence. Turbulence at the sound speed of the photoionized gas provides the best fit. None of the warm absorber models fit to the X-ray spectrum can match the observed equivalent widths of all the UV absorption lines. Accounting for the X-ray and UV absorption simultaneously requires an absorbing region with a broad range of ionization parameters and column densities.

  17. A Bulk Comptonization Model for the Prompt GRB Emission and its Relation to the Fermi GRB Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2010-01-01

    We present a model in which the GRB prompt emission at E E(sub peak) is due to bulk Comptonization by the relativistic blast wave motion of either its own synchrotron photons of ambient photons of the stellar configuration that gave birth to the GRB. The bulk Comptonization process then induces the production of relativistic electrons of Lorentz factor equal to that of the blast wave through interactions with its ambient protons. The inverse compton emission of these electrons produces a power law component that extends to multi GeV energies in good agreement with the LAT GRB observations.

  18. Solvatochromic effect in absorption and emission spectra of star-shaped bipolar derivatives of 1,3,5-triazine and carbazole. A time-dependent density functional study.

    PubMed

    Baryshnikov, Gleb V; Bondarchuk, Sergey V; Minaeva, Valentina A; Ågren, Hans; Minaev, Boris F

    2017-02-01

    A series of three star-shaped compounds containing both donor (carbazole) and acceptor (2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine) moieties linked through various linking bridges was studied theoretically at the linear response TD-DFT level of theory to describe their absorption and fluorescence spectra. The concept of a localized charge-transfer excited state has been applied successfully to explain the observed strong solvatochromic effect in the emission spectra of the studied molecules, which can be utilized for the fabrication of color tunable solution-processable OLEDs. The concept is in particularly applicable to donor-acceptor species with a C 3 symmetry point group where the static dipole moment changes dramatically upon electronic excitation. An important peculiarity of the studied molecules is that they are characterized by non-zero values of the HOMO and LUMO orbitals in the same common part of molecular space that provides a large electric dipole transition moment for both light absorption and emission. Graphical abstract Star-shaped C 3 symmetry point group derivatives for color tunable OLEDs.

  19. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Haight, Robert Cameron; Jandel, Marian; Mosby, Shea Morgan; O'Donnell, John M.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Krticka, Milan

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  20. The 3D-HST Survey: Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/G141 Grism Spectra, Redshifts, and Emission Line Measurements for ~ 100,000 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Nelson, Erica J.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Maseda, Michael V.; Leja, Joel; Franx, Marijn; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bezanson, Rachel; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Dickey, Claire; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Illingworth, Garth; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Ulf Lange, Johannes; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; Oesch, Pascal; Pacifici, Camilla; Patel, Shannon G.; Price, Sedona; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2016-08-01

    We present reduced data and data products from the 3D-HST survey, a 248-orbit HST Treasury program. The survey obtained WFC3 G141 grism spectroscopy in four of the five CANDELS fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-S, and UDS, along with WFC3 H 140 imaging, parallel ACS G800L spectroscopy, and parallel I 814 imaging. In a previous paper, we presented photometric catalogs in these four fields and in GOODS-N, the fifth CANDELS field. Here we describe and present the WFC3 G141 spectroscopic data, again augmented with data from GO-1600 in GOODS-N (PI: B. Weiner). We developed software to automatically and optimally extract interlaced two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) spectra for all objects in the Skelton et al. (2014) photometric catalogs. The 2D spectra and the multi-band photometry were fit simultaneously to determine redshifts and emission line strengths, taking the morphology of the galaxies explicitly into account. The resulting catalog has redshifts and line strengths (where available) for 22,548 unique objects down to {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 24 (79,609 unique objects down to {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 26). Of these, 5459 galaxies are at z\\gt 1.5 and 9621 are at 0.7\\lt z\\lt 1.5, where Hα falls in the G141 wavelength coverage. The typical redshift error for {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 24 galaxies is {σ }z≈ 0.003× (1+z), i.e., one native WFC3 pixel. The 3σ limit for emission line fluxes of point sources is 2.1× {10}-17 erg s-1 cm-2. All 2D and 1D spectra, as well as redshifts, line fluxes, and other derived parameters, are publicly available.18

  1. A Blind Search for Ly-α Emission from Galaxies at z = 6-8 with Deep HST Grism Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Rebecca L.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Tilvi, Vithal; Jung, Intae; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.

    2017-01-01

    This project aims to detect Ly-α emission lines from z = 6-8 galaxies to probe the ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) during the epoch of reionization. We use extremely deep data from the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS; PI: Malhotra) which is currently the most sensitive G102 grism survey, targetting the high-redshift galaxies that were discovered in the CANDELS GOODS fields (Finkelstein et al. 2015). This dataset has already proven to be successful as one of these candidates, at redshift z=7.51, has been observed to have Ly-α emission detectable with the HST Grism (Tilvi et al 2016). The FIGS data uses five separate roll-angles of HST in an effort to reduce the overall contamination effects of nearby galaxies. We have created a method that accounts for and removes the contamination from surrounding galaxies, and also removes any residual continuum emission from each individual spectrum. We then utilize a MCMC routine to blindly search for 5σ emission lines in each individual spectrum. We compare the results for each galaxy across all roll angles and identify significant lines as those which are detected at the same wavelength in more than one roll angle. We have found several z > 7 candidates which, if confirmed, will increase the number of confirmed galaxies at this epoch by ~50%. The coarse spectral resolution of the G102 grism prevents us from measuring the expected asymmetric profile of the Ly-α emission line, so we have proposed for follow-up observations of our objects with ground based facilities.

  2. The radio-emission spectra of some extragalactic radio sources in the 11.6-36.8 GHz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtaoja, E.; Valtonen, M.; Lekhto, Kh.; Efanov, V. A.; Moiseev, I. G.

    Results are presented of coordinated observations of 20 extragalactic radio sources in the 11.6-3.8 GHz range. The measurements were carried out in 1980-1982 using the RT-22 and RT-14 radio telescopes at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and the Radio Laboratory of the Helsinki University of Technology, respectively. Quasi-simultaneous radiation spectra are presented for 12 sources and the magnetic field strength (MFS) is estimated for 0235+16, OH 471, OJ 287, and BL Lac. The MFS turns out to be in the 0.001-0.002 G range.

  3. K band SINFONI spectra of two z ~ 5 submillimeter galaxy systems: upper limits to the unobscured star formation from [O II] optical emission line searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Guilherme S.; Colina, Luis; López, Javier Piqueras; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Arribas, Santiago

    2016-10-01

    We present deep SINFONI K-band integral field spectra of two submillimeter galaxy systems (SMG): BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234, at z = 4.69 and 4.55, respectively. Spectra extracted for each object in the two systems do not show any signature of the [O ii]λλ3726, 29 Å emission-lines, placing upper flux limits of 3.9 and 2.5 × 10-18erg s-1 cm-2for BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234, respectively. Using the relation between the star formation rate (SFR) and the luminosity of the [O ii] doublet, we estimate unobscured SFR upper limits of ~ 10-15 M⊙ yr-1and ~30-40 M⊙ yr-1for the objects of the two systems, respectively. For the SMGs, these values are at least two orders of magnitude lower than those derived from SED and IR luminosities. The differences on the SFR values would correspond to internal extinction of, at least, 3.4-4.9 and 2.1-3.6 mag in the visual for BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234 SMGs, respectively. The upper limit for the [O ii]-derived SFR in one of the LAEs (Lyα2) in the BR1202-0725 system is at least one order of magnitude lower than the previous SFR derived from infrared tracers, while both estimates are in good agreement for Lyα1. The lower limits to the internal extinction in these two Lyman-alpha emitters are 0.6 mag and 1.3 mag, respectively. No evidence for [O ii] emission associated with Lyα1 is identified in our data, implying that residuals of the K-band sky emission lines after subtraction in medium-band imaging data could provide the adequate flux.

  4. On the Early-Time X-Ray Spectra of Swift Afterglows. I. Evidence for Anomalous Soft X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, N. R.

    2007-02-01

    We have conducted a thorough and blind search for emission lines in >70 Swift X-ray afterglows of total exposure ~107 s. We find that most afterglows are consistent with pure power laws plus extinction. Significant outliers to the population exist at the 5%-10% level and have anomalously soft, possibly thermal spectra. Four bursts are singled out via possible detections of two to five lines: GRB 060218, GRB 060202, GRB 050822, and GRB 050714B. Alternatively, a blackbody model with kT~0.1-0.5 keV can describe the soft emission in each afterglow. The most significant soft-component detections in the full data set of ~2000 spectra correspond to GRB 060218/SN 2006aj, with line significances ranging up to ~20 σ. A thermal plasma model fit to the data indicates that the flux is primarily due to L-shell transitions of Fe at roughly solar abundance. We associate (>4 σ significant) line triggers in the three other events with K-shell transitions in light metals. We favor a model where the possible line emission in these afterglows arises from the mildly relativistic cocoon of matter surrounding the GRB jet as it penetrates and exits the surface of the progenitor star. The emitting material in each burst is at a similar distance ~1012-1013 cm, a similar density ~1017 cm-3, and subject to a similar flux of ionizing radiation. The lines may correlate with the X-ray flaring. For the blackbody interpretation, the soft flux may arise from breakout of the GRB shock or plasma cocoon from the progenitor stellar wind, as recently suggested for GRB 060218 (Campana et al. 2006). Due to the low z of GRB 060218, bursts faint in gamma rays with fluxes dominated by this soft X-ray component could outnumber classical GRBs 100 to 1.

  5. The ultraviolet continuous and emission-line spectra of the Herbig-Haro objects HH 2 and HH 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.; Cardelli, J. A.; Nemec, J. M.; Boehm, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    Recent studies of the continuous spectrum of Herbig-Haro (HH) objects at optical and near-infrared wavelengths and the observation of continuous radiation in the ultraviolet have shown an unexpectedly steep increase of the flux toward shorter wavelengths. The present investigation provides the results of ultraviolet observations of HH 2. The obtained data are compared with the HH 1 data. It is found that HH 2 has an ultraviolet continuous and emission-line spectrum which is similar to that of HH 1. The UV line spectrum of HH 2H indicates an even somewhat larger ionization than does the HH 1 spectrum. As in HH1, the UV emission-line spectrum shows a much higher degree of ionization than that derived from the optical spectrum. Consequently, the same difficulty arises as in the case of HH 1. The complete UV plus optical spectrum cannot be explained by a single plane-parallel shock-wave model.

  6. The use of the bulk properties of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra for the study of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Adam

    The study of bulk spectral properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is important to understanding the physics behind these powerful explosions and may even be an aide in studying cosmology. The prompt emission spectral properties have long been studied by a growing community of researchers, and many theories have been developed since the discovery of GRBs. Even though the exact physics of these phenomena is not completely understood, GRBs have been proposed to give insight on other astrophysical phenomena from dark matter to the expansion of the universe. Obviously, using GRBs to study cosmology requires a large sample size to adequately constrain results and provide confident conjectures. For this reason, BATSE and GBM results are paramount to the study of the prompt emission of GRBs. Using results from both instruments, I study the bulk spectral properties of GRBs and describe analysis techniques that can be used to study cosmology.

  7. Ab initio calculation of X-ray emission and IR spectra of the hydrofullerene C 60H 36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Antich, A. V.; Lobach, A. S.

    2001-05-01

    Two isomers of the hydrofullerene C 60H 36 with T and D3 d symmetry were calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock self-consistent field (HF-SCF). The T symmetry isomer in which the benzenoid rings occupy tetrahedral positions is predicted to be lower in energy than the other considered isomer. Simulated CK α spectra of the isomers were compared with the X-ray fluorescence spectrum of the hydrofullerene C 60H 36 prepared by the transfer hydrogenation method. The short-wave maximum intensity of the CK α spectrum of C 60H 36 was shown to be sensitive to the number of π electrons in the high-occupied levels of the molecule. Although the theoretical spectra are similar in appearance, the T isomer seems to be in better accordance with the experiment. Furthermore, the computed infrared frequencies and intensities for this isomer were found to correlate well with features in the measured spectrum of C 60H 36. The most intense peak in the low-frequency spectral region was shown to correspond to the skeletal vibrations of the benzenoid rings.

  8. The ground-based H-, K-, and L-band absolute emission spectra of HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect

    Zellem, Robert T.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark R.; Waldmann, Ingo P.

    2014-11-20

    Here we explore the capabilities of NASA's 3.0 m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and SpeX spectrometer and the 5.08 m Hale telescope with the TripleSpec spectrometer with near-infrared H-, K-, and L-band measurements of HD 209458b's secondary eclipse. Our IRTF/SpeX data are the first absolute L-band spectroscopic emission measurements of any exoplanet other than the hot Jupiter HD 189733b. Previous measurements of HD 189733b's L band indicate bright emission hypothesized to result from non-LTE CH{sub 4} ν{sub 3} fluorescence. We do not detect a similar bright 3.3 μm feature to ∼3σ, suggesting that fluorescence does not need to be invoked to explain HD 209458b's L-band measurements. The validity of our observation and reduction techniques, which decrease the flux variance by up to 2.8 orders of magnitude, is reinforced by 1σ agreement with existent Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRAC1 observations that overlap the H, K, and L bands, suggesting that both IRTF/SpeX and Palomar/TripleSpec can measure an exoplanet's emission with high precision.

  9. Emissions and ambient distributions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) in a Ponderosa pine ecosystem: interpretation of PTR-MS mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A.; Tyndall, G.; Orlando, J.; Harley, P.; Rasmussen, R.; Apel, E.

    2009-10-01

    Two proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry systems were deployed at the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen-Southern Rocky Mountain 2008 field campaign (BEACHON-SRM08; July to September 2008) at the Manitou Forest observatory in a Ponderosa pine woodland near Woodland Park, Colorado USA to simultaneously measure BVOC emissions and ambient distributions of their oxidation products. Here, we present mass spectral analysis in a wide range of masses (m/z=40+ to 210+) to assess our understanding of BVOC emissions and their photochemical process inside of the forest canopy. The biogenic terpenoids, 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO, 50.2%) and several monoterpenes (MT, 33.5%) were identified as the dominant BVOC emissions from a transmission corrected mass spectrum, averaged over the daytime (11 am to 3 p.m., local time) of three days. To assess contributions of oxidation products of local BVOC, we calculate a oxidation product spectrum with the OH- and ozone-initiated oxidation product distribution mass spectra of two major BVOC at the ecosystem (MBO and β-pinene) that were observed from laboratory oxidation experiments. A majority (~73%) of the total signal could be explained by known compounds. The remainder are attributed to oxidation products of BVOC, emitted from nearby ecosystems and transported to the site, and oxidation products of unidentified BVOC emitted from the Ponderosa pine ecosystem.

  10. Cospatial Longslit UV-Optical Spectra of Ten Galactic Planetary Nebulae with HST STIS: Description of observations, global emission-line measurements, and empirical CNO abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, R. J.; Kwitter, K. B.; Shaw, R. A.; Balick, B.; Henry, R. B. C.; Miller, T. R.; Corradi, R. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    This poster describes details of HST Cycle 19 (program GO 12600), which was awarded 32 orbits of observing time with STIS to obtain the first cospatial UV-optical spectra of 10 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe). The observational goal was to measure the UV emission lines of carbon and nitrogen with unprecedented S/N and wavelength and spatial resolution along the disk of each object over a wavelength range 1150-10270 Ang . The PNe were chosen such that each possessed a near-solar metallicity but the group together spanned a broad range in N/O. This poster concentrates on describing the observations, emission-line measurements integrated along the entire slit lengths, ionic abundances, and estimated total elemental abundances using empirical ionization correction factors and the ELSA code. Related posters by co-authors in this session concentrate on analyzing CNO abundances, progenitor masses and nebular properties of the best-observed targets using photoionization modeling of the global emission-line measurements [Henry et al.] or detailed analyses of spatial variations in electron temperatures, densities, and abundances along the sub arcsecond resolution slits [Miller et al. & Shaw et al.]. We gratefully acknowledge AURA/STScI for the GO 12600 program support, both observational and financial.

  11. Emission spectra and radiative lifetimes of the Cameron bands of CO trapped in solid rare gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, J.; Mohammed, Hassan H.; Deson, J.; Vermeil, C.; Schamps, J.

    1980-12-01

    The emission spectrum of the Cameron bands (a 3Π→X1 Σ+) of CO molecules trapped in solid Ne, Ar, and Kr has been studied using Xe resonance lamp excitation (λ=147 nm). The lifetime of the a 3Π state has been measured in solid Ne and found to be 90 msec. The decay time of this state is exponential within the range of experimental errors. The lifetime has been calculated assuming spin-orbit mixing between 1Σ+ and 3Π0 states, and found to be 94 msec for J=0. The lifetime values in Ar and Kr matrices are found to be 7.2 and <1 msec, respectively; this is consistent with the matrix shifts in solid Ne, Ar, and Kr, which for the 0-0 bands have been found to be -305, -946, and -2812 cm-1, respectively.

  12. Low-temperature emission spectra of 9-alkylanthracene esters: Dimer photodecomposition and monomer pair interactions in polymer hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, K.; Scott, G.W. )

    1994-10-06

    Effects due to variation in the alkyl chain length of photodimers of 9-alkylanthracene esters on their photodecomposition efficiencies at 12 K and, by implication, the photoproduct migration as a function of temperature within polymer hosts are investigated. It is shown that dimers with longer alkyl chains have a lower photodecomposition efficiency. The extent of photoproduct migration within the polymer following photodecomposition was also studied as a function of alkyl chain length. This migration and its modulation of the interaction between the separating monomers is shown to affect the emission spectrum. Thus, monomer migration was studied in temperature cycling experiments. It was also found, for the polymer hosts investigated - poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl chloride), and polystyrene - that these properties are host dependent. This result is probably due to the void space differences that exist among these polymers. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence spectra for green light emission from InGaN/GaN multiple wells.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Zhao, D G; Jiang, D S; Chen, P; Liu, Z S; Zhu, J J; Shi, M; Zhao, D M; Li, X; Liu, J P; Zhang, S M; Wang, H; Yang, H; Zhang, Y T; Du, G T

    2015-06-15

    Three green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures with different In composition grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are investigated by the X-ray diffraction and the temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. It is found that when the In composition increases in the InGaN/GaN MQWs, the PL spectral bandwidth may anomalously decrease with increasing temperature. The reduction of PL spectral bandwidth may be ascribed to the enhanced non-radiative recombination process which may lower the light emission efficiency of the localized luminescent centers with shallow localization energy in the high-In-content InGaN quantum wells and also cause a reduction of integrated PL intensity.

  14. Palagonitic (Not Andesitic) Mars: Evidence from Thermal Emission and VNIR Spectra of Palgonitic Alteration Rinds on Basaltic Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Mertzman, S. A.; Lane, M. D.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    Visible and near-IR (VNIR) spectra of both Martian bright and dark regions are characterized by a ferric absorption edge extending from approx. 400 to 750 nm, with bright regions having about twice the reflectivity at 750 nm as dark regions. Between 750 nm to beyond 2000 nm, bright and dark regions have nearly constant and slightly negative spectral slopes, respectively. Depending on location, bright regions have shallow reflectivity minima in the range 850-910 nm that are attributed to ferric oxides. Similarly, dark regions have shallow reflectivity minima near approx. 950 and 1700-2000 nm that are attributed to ferrous silicate minerals (pyroxene). Among terrestrial geologic materials, the best spectral analogues for Martian bright regions are certain palagonitic tephras from Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii). By definition, palagonite is a "yellow or orange isotropic mineraloid formed by hydration and devitrification of basaltic glass". The ferric pigment in palagonite is nanometer-sized ferric oxide particles (np-Ox) dispersed throughout the hydrated basaltic glass matrix. The hydration state of the np-Ox particles is not known, but the best Martian spectral analogues contain allophane-like materials and not crystalline phyllosilicates.

  15. Emission spectra of a laser based on an In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, M. M. Buyalo, M. S.; Nevedomskiy, V. N.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Zolotareva, R. V.; Vasil’ev, A. P.; Ustinov, V. M.; Portnoi, E. L.

    2015-10-15

    The spectral characteristics of a laser with an active region based on a ten-layer system of In(Ga)As/GaAs vertically correlated quantum dots with 4.5-nm GaAs spacer layers between InAs quantum dots are studied under the conditions of spontaneous and stimulated emission, depending on the current and the duration of pump pulses. Data obtained by transmission electron microscopy and electroluminescence and absorption polarization anisotropy measurements make it possible to demonstrate that the investigated system of tunnel-coupled InAs quantum dots separated by thin GaAs barriers represents a quantum-dot superlattice. With an increase in the laser pump current, the electroluminescence intensity increases linearly and the spectral position of the electroluminescence maximum shifts to higher energies, which is caused by the dependence of the miniband density-of-states distribution on the pump current. Upon exceeding the threshold current, multimode lasing via the miniband ground state is observed. One of the lasing modes can be attributed to the zero-phonon line, and the other is determined by the longitudinal-optical phonon replica of quantum-dot emission. The results obtained give evidence that, under conditions of the laser pumping of an In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice, strong coupling between the discrete electron states in the miniband and optical phonons takes place. This leads to the formation of quantum-dot polarons, resulting from the resonant mixing of electronic states whose energy separation is comparable to the optical-phonon energy.

  16. Simulation of the A-X and B-X transition emission spectra of the InCl molecule in low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briefi, S.; Fantz, U.

    2014-01-01

    Low pressure plasmas containing indium halides as radiators are discussed for lighting applications as an efficient alternative to mercury-containing fluorescent lamps. To gain insight into plasma parameters like the vibrational and rotational temperature of the molecule, the near UV emission spectra of the indium halides arising from the A0+ 3Π → XΣ1+ and the BΠ31 → XΣ1+ transitions are simulated. Such a simulation requires Franck-Condon factors and vibrationally resolved transition probabilities which are not available in the literature for InCl. Therefore, they have been calculated by solving the Schrödinger equation using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The values of the Franck-Condon factors and the transition probabilities are presented. For the A-X transition a good match of the simulated and measured spectra could be achieved but for the B-X transition neither the relative intensity nor the wavelength could be reproduced. This indicates that for the B state the values of the molecular constants, the potential curve and/or the electronic dipole transition moment of the B-X transition are inaccurate. Despite this mismatch the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the molecule can still be determined using the A-X transition.

  17. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-08

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  18. Environmentally friendly Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA heterosystem nanocomposite: UV-stimulated emission and absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, N. G.; Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr

    2016-02-01

    Zn0.75Cd0.25S nanoparticles prepared at different temperatures were composited with polyvinyl alcohol for functionalization it in wide spectrum of applications such as in photocatalysis. The nanostructure of the Zn0.75Cd0.25S mother phase is confirmed by X-ray diffraction in addition to absorption and fluorescence spectra. UV/VIS. measurements show that, the transmittance coefficient of Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA nanocomposite is lesser than that of pure PVA by 0.33% and varies upon increasing the preparation temperature; reaching a maximum value for the sample prepared at 300 °C. It was found that the optical band gap tunes with annealing temperature which, in turns, with particle size. The refractive index of the Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA nanocomposite films decrease with increasing wavelength and saturates at high wavelengths. The optical conductivity increases with increasing photon energy which may be due to the excitation of electrons by photon energy. The optical conductivity of Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA nanocomposite is lesser than that of pure PVA and it decreases as the preparation temperature of Zn0.75Cd0.25S nanoparticles in PVA matrix increases which could be related to the decrease in the extinction coefficient and the density of localized states in the gap. Abroad peak deconvoluted, by Gaussian fitting function, into two violet and blue colors was observed in the fluorescence spectra under UV light irradiation. The two emission bands are attributed to band edge emission and neutral oxygen vacancies respectively. Analysis of fluorescence (FL) spectra reveals quenching in FL intensity and a peak shifting towards the lower wavelength side with increasing the preparation temperature of the mother phase. The results suggest that the 200 °C Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA nanocomposites have been regarded as a promising candidate in many technical fields, such as photocatalytic hydrogen production and/or photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes under UV irradiation due to its high optical

  19. Four micron high-resolution spectra of Jupiter in the North Equatorial Belt: H3(+) emissions and the C-12/C-13 ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marten, A.; De Bergh, C.; Owen, T.; Gautier, D.; Maillard, J. P.; Drossart, P.; Lutz, B. L.; Orton, G. S.

    1994-01-01

    Spectra of the North Equatorial Belt of Jupiter were obtained in March 1992 at an unapodized resolution of 0.1/cm between 2450 and 2600/cm with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer at the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) on Mauna Kea. Several emissions from the nu(sub 2) band of H3(+) were detected. The excitation temperature derived from the relative intensities of these emissions averaged over a wide range of longitudes is 800 +/- 100 K, and the H3(+) column density is 1.56(sup +1.0)(sub -0.5) x 10(exp 11)/sq. cm. In addition, several strong absorption features due to (13)CH4 were observed. A comparison between (12)CH4 and (13)CH4 absorptions allowed us to obtain a new measurement of the C-12/C-13 ratio. We found that this ratio, estimated for the first time in this spectral range, is 89 (+/- 25), in agreement with the terrestrial value.

  20. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; ...

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changesmore » and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.« less

  1. Modeling K- and L-shell Spectra from Cu Wire Array Implosions on ZR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. W.; Dasgupta, A.; Giuliani, J. L.; Ouart, N. D.; Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Coverdale, C. A.

    2012-10-01

    We will examine K- and L-shell data obtained from the copper nested wire-array SNL shot Z1975, and compare it with data obtained from a simulation using the 1-D DZAPP radiation-hydrodynamics code. In addition to Cu, lines of Ni, Fe and Cr were observed in the experimental spectra, and we performed the calculations with an appropriate mixture of these elements. In the present analysis, we find support for an alternative K-alpha model which competes with the better known e-beam generation mechanism, wherein K-shell photons from hot plasma on or near the axis are absorbed in a dense, cool annular envelope via inner-shell photoionization. The resulting electronic relaxation of the absorbing ions produces the K-alpha radiation. By generating radially resolved synthetic spectra from self-consistent calculations of K-shell vacancy formation, and characterizing the energies of the resulting K-alpha radiation, diagnostics are obtained which can help differentiate between beam generated and photon driven K-alpha radiation.

  2. Signal-to-noise ratios in IUE SWP-LO spectra of chromospheric emission-line sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1990-12-01

    The short-wavelength-prime (SWP) detector of the International Ultraviolet Explorer should operate near the photon-counting limit, but the noise levels in flat-field images are several times higher. The exaggerated noise can be traced to the incomplete removal of the pixel-to-pixel granularity of the television frames by the prevailing spectral image processing system. An empirical noise model for the current-epoch photometric linearization strategy and one for a hypothetical processing system that achieves complete flat fielding of the raw images are derived. A formula is then proposed to predict the signal-to-noise ratio in the measured flux of an emission line (possibly superimposed on a smooth continuum) in an IUE low-dispersion (5 A resolution) far-ultraviolet (1150 A-1950 A) spectrum as recorded with the SWP camera. For illustration, the formula is specialized to the important C IV 1549 A feature of F-K stars. The S/N relation permits one to determine sensitivity limits, upper limits in faint exposures, and optimum exposure times.

  3. Compressed shell conditions extracted from spectroscopic analysis of Ti K-shell absorption spectra with evaluation of line self-emission

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Nagayama, T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J.

    2014-08-15

    Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell at varying distances from the fuel-shell interface serve as a spectroscopic diagnostic for direct-drive experiments conducted at OMEGA. Detailed modeling of Ti K-shell absorption spectra produced in the tracer layer considers n = 1–2 transitions in F- through Li-like Ti ions in the 4400–4800 eV range, both including and excluding line self-emission. Testing the model on synthetic spectra generated from 1-D LILAC hydrodynamic simulations reveals that the model including self-emission best reproduces the simulation, while the model excluding self-emission overestimates electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} to a higher degree for layers closer to the core. The prediction of the simulation that the magnitude of T{sub e} and duration of Ti absorption will be strongly tied to the distance of the layer from the core is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions are less affected by it. The simulation predicts more time variation in the observed T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions in the compressed shell than is observed in the experiment, analysis of which reveals conditions remain in the range T{sub e} = 400–600 eV and N{sub e} = 3.0–10.0 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup −3} for all but the most distant Ti-doped layer, with error bars ∼5% T{sub e} value and ∼10% N{sub e} on average. The T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions of the simulation lead to a greater degree of ionization for zones close to the core than occurs experimentally, and less ionization for zones far from the core.

  4. H-bonding vs non-H-bonding in 100% pyrene methacrylate comb polymers: self-assembly probed by time-resolved emission spectra and temperature dependent fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kaushlendra, K; Asha, S K

    2014-05-08

    The differences in self-organization behavior in novel 100% pyrene labeled comb methacrylate polymers probed as a function of their varied origins of excimer formation are presented. The different structural variations in the polymers included the presence or absence of hydrogen bonding interactions in the form of urethane linkages, short or long alkyl spacer segments separating the pyrene units from the polymer backbone and linear versus kinked urethane linkage. The effect of variable concentration and temperature on the chemical shift of the NH proton of the urethane linkage was probed using (1)H NMR experiments conducted at temperatures varying from 25 to 70 °C at two different concentrations (2.5 and 25 mmol) in DMSO-d6 as solvent. The photophysical properties of the polymers in dilute DMF solutions were investigated by steady state emission, fluorescence decay studies, time-resolved emission spectra (TRES), and variable temperature emission studies. It was observed that the polymer poly(PBH) having a non-hydrogen-bondable ester linkage in the pendant chains formed an excimer completely via a static mechanism and the ground state aggregate species were not broken even at higher temperatures. The polymer poly(PIC) having a short hydrogen-bondable urethane linkage formed an excimer via a static as well as dynamic mechanism. The other hydrogen-bondable urethane methacrylate polymers having a linear linker poly(PHH) and kinked linker (PIHP) formed excimer mostly via a dynamic mechanism with a very small contribution from the static route. The TRES studies carried out for the polymers provided significant insight into the excimer formation mechanism in these polymers. The variable temperature fluorescence studies highlighted the differences in the H-bonded vs non-H-bonded polymer as a function of their excimer recovery upon cooling.

  5. Space-resolved visible spectroscopy for two-dimensional measurement of hydrogen and impurity emission spectra and of plasma flow in the edge stochastic layer of LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.

    2017-03-01

    A space-resolved visible spectrometer system has been developed for two-dimensional (2D) distribution measurements of hydrogen and impurity emission spectra and of plasma flow in the edge stochastic layer of Large Helical Device (LHD). Astigmatism of the spectrometer has been suppressed by introducing additional toroidal and spherical mirrors. A good focal image at the exit slit is realized in a wide wavelength range (75 nm) as well as in a wide slit height direction (26 mm) with a 300 grooves/mm grating. The capability of the spectrometer optical system for the 2D measurement and further possible improvements are discussed in detail. An optical fiber array of 130 channels with a lens unit is used to spatially resolve the edge plasma into different magnetic field structure components: divertor strike points, divertor legs, X-point of the legs, the stochastic layer, and the last closed flux surface. With a 300 grooves/mm grating, the 2D distributions of several hydrogen and impurity line emissions are simultaneously obtained with absolute intensities. A clear correlation is obtained between the magnetic field structure and the emission intensity. With a 2400 grooves/mm grating with a good spectral resolution (0.03 nm/pixel), the 2D distributions of impurity flow velocity are obtained from the Doppler shift measurement. The wavelength position is accurately calibrated by investigating the wavelength dispersion as well as by correcting a mechanical error of the optical setting in the spectrometer. The uncertainty in the velocity is reduced to less than 10% of a typical impurity velocity ˜104 m/s. A temporal change in the flow directions is observed at different spatial locations in divertor detachment plasma.

  6. Ga-In intermixing, intrinsic doping, and Wigner localization in the emission spectra of self-organized InP/GaInP quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapaldo, J.; Rouvimov, S.; Merz, J. L.; Oktyabrsky, S.; Blundell, S. A.; Bert, N.; Brunkov, P.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Nekrasov, S.; Saly, R.; Vlasov, A. S.; Mintairov, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    We present study of structural and optical properties of InP/GaInP quantum (QDs) providing a weak quantum confinement and creating a platform to study Wigner localization (WL) effects using high spatial resolution optical spectroscopy. Self-organized QD structures were grown using metal-organic chemical phase epitaxy by using different substrate misorientations and cap layer deposition temperatures. Using transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, we demonstrated a bimodal height distribution with peaks at ~5 and ~20 nm and a control of both the lateral size distribution, peaked from ~100 to ~160 nm, and the amount of Ga-In intermixing in the QDs (up to 20%). Using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy in combination with circular polarization degree and time resolved micro-PL measurements, we demonstrated control of the emission energy, the intrinsic doping, and the emission decay of these In(Ga)P QDs. Using high-spatial-resolution near-field PL spectra and imaging of single dots, we demonstrated WL effects in dots having a population of up to nine electrons and a parabolic confinement down to ħω 0 ~ 1 meV. We performed a self-consistent calculation of exciton transitions using an effective mass, mean field theory with an isotropic elasticity model to describe the effect of Ga-In intermixing on the emission properties of these dots; and we used calculations of shell splitting, using mean field Hartree-Fock approach and calculations of electron density distribution using configuration interaction approach, to described effects of enhancement of WL in non-circular dots with hard-wall potentials.

  7. Estimation of Mass-Loss Rates from Emission Line Profiles in the UV Spectra of Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. G.; Robinson, R. D.; Harper, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    The photon-scattering winds of cool, low-gravity stars (K-M giants and supergiants) produce absorption features in the strong chromospheric emission lines. This provides us with an opportunity to assess important parameters of the wind, including flow and turbulent velocities, the optical depth of the wind above the region of photon creation, and the star's mass-loss rate. We have used the Lamers et al. Sobolev with Exact Integration (SEI) radiative transfer code along with simple models of the outer atmospheric structure to compute synthetic line profiles for comparison with the observed line profiles. The SEI code has the advantage of being computationally fast and allows a great number of possible wind models to be examined. We therefore use it here to obtain initial first-order estimates of the wind parameters. More sophisticated, but more time-consuming and resource intensive calculations will be performed at a later date, using the SEI-deduced wind parameters as a starting point. A comparison of the profiles over a range of wind velocity laws, turbulence values, and line opacities allows us to constrain the wind parameters, and to estimate the mass-loss rates. We have applied this analysis technique (using lines of Mg II, 0 I, and Fe II) so far to four stars: the normal K5-giant alpha Tau, the hybrid K-giant gamma Dra, the K5 supergiant lambda Vel, and the M-giant gamma Cru. We present in this paper a description of the technique, including the assumptions which go into its use, an assessment of its robustness, and the results of our analysis.

  8. Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 eV ionization shift in Ir K{alpha}{sub 2} from a near-coincident Lu K-edge

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Weber, B. V.; Phipps, D.; Schumer, J. W.; Seely, J. F.; Carroll, J. J.; VanHoy, J. R.; Slabkowska, K.; Polasik, M.

    2012-10-15

    Close to an x-ray filter's K-edge the transmission depends strongly on the photon energy. For a few atom pairs, the K-edge of one is only a few tens of eV higher than a K-line energy of another, so that a small change in the line's energy becomes a measurable change in intensity behind such a matching filter. Lutetium's K-edge is Asymptotically-Equal-To 27 eV above iridium's K{alpha}{sub 2} line, Asymptotically-Equal-To 63.287 keV for cold Ir. A Lu filter reduces this line's intensity by Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 % when it is emitted by a plasma, indicating an ionization shift {Delta}E Asymptotically-Equal-To 10{+-}1 eV.

  9. Laboratory simulation of dust spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies of the IR spectra of interstellar dust are reviewed. Studies of the absorption spectra of dense molecular clouds are discussed, including methods to produce interstellar ice analogues, simulations of astronomical spectra, and IR absorption features caused by ices. Comparisons are made between observational and experimental results of interstellar dust studies. Also, the interstellar emission features associated with dusty regions exposed to UV radiation are examined, including bands related to PAHs and PAH-related materials. It is shown that interstellar spectra are more consistant with emission from free PAHs than with emission from particles.

  10. Core-Hole Effect in the Ce L3 X-Ray Absorption Spectra of CeO2 and CeFe2: New Examination by Using Resonant X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, A.

    2013-06-01

    We consider two different resonant X-ray emission spectra for Ce compounds: Ce 3d to 2p X-ray emission (denoted by 3d-RXES) and valence to 2p X-ray emission (v-RXES), both of which follow the Ce 2p to 5d resonant excitation. We propose that the comparison of the 3d- and v-RXES spectra is a new powerful method of directly detecting the core-hole effect in the final state of Ce L3 X-ray absorption spectra (XAS). We applied this method to recent experimental RXES spectra for CeO2 and CeFe2, and showed unambiguously that the core-hole effect should be essential in the XAS of both materials. This result is confirmed by theoretical calculations, which reproduce well the experimental RXES and XAS spectra. We conclude that the ground state of CeO2 is in the mixed state of 4f0 and 4f1_{L} configurations, where _{L} is a ligand hole, instead of a pure 4f0 configuration which was proposed recently by first-principles energy band calculations. Also, we conclude that the double peaks observed in L3 XAS of CeFe2 are caused by the 4f0 and 4f1 configurations, which are mixed in the ground state but separated in energy by the large core-hole potential in the final state of XAS.

  11. Effects of varying environmental conditions on emissivity spectra of bulk lunar soils: Application to Diviner thermal infrared observations of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Patterson, W. R.; Pieters, C. M.; Mustard, J. F.; Bowles, N. E.; Paige, D. A.; Glotch, T. D.; Thompson, C.

    2017-02-01

    Currently, few thermal infrared measurements exist of fine particulate (<63 μm) analogue samples (e.g. minerals, mineral mixtures, rocks, meteorites, and lunar soils) measured under simulated lunar conditions. Such measurements are fundamental for interpreting thermal infrared (TIR) observations by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (Diviner) onboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as well as future TIR observations of the Moon and other airless bodies. In this work, we present thermal infrared emissivity measurements of a suite of well-characterized Apollo lunar soils and a fine particulate (<25 μm) San Carlos olivine sample as we systematically vary parameters that control the near-surface environment in our vacuum chamber (atmospheric pressure, incident solar-like radiation, and sample cup temperature). The atmospheric pressure is varied between ambient (1000 mbar) and vacuum (<10-3 mbar) pressures, the incident solar-like radiation is varied between 52 and 146 mW/cm2, and the sample cup temperature is varied between 325 and 405 K. Spectral changes are characterized as each parameter is varied, which highlight the sensitivity of thermal infrared emissivity spectra to the atmospheric pressure and the incident solar-like radiation. Finally spectral measurements of Apollo 15 and 16 bulk lunar soils are compared with Diviner thermal infrared observations of the Apollo 15 and 16 sampling sites. This comparison allows us to constrain the temperature and pressure conditions that best simulate the near-surface environment of the Moon for future laboratory measurements and to better interpret lunar surface compositions as observed by Diviner.

  12. A combined optical and X-ray study of unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei - II. Relation between X-ray emission and optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chichuan; Ward, Martin; Done, Chris

    2012-06-01

    In this second paper in a series of three, we study the properties of the various emission features and underlying continuum in the optical spectra of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by using the unobscured hard X-ray emission as a diagnostic. We introduce the use of the 'correlation spectrum technique' (CST) for the first time. We use this to show the strength of the correlation between the hard X-ray luminosity and each wavelength of the optical spectrum. This shows that for broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies all the strong emission lines (the broad component of Hα and Hβ, [Ne III] λλ3869/3967, [O I] λλ6300/6364, [O II] λλ3726/3729 and [O III] λλ4959/5007) and the optical underlying continuum all strongly correlate with the hard X-ray emission. In contrast, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies show a stronger correlation in the optical continuum but a weaker correlation in the lines. A cross-correlation with luminosity between the various Balmer line components and the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) components shows that the best correlation exists between the hard X-ray component and the broad component (BC) of the Balmer lines. Such a correlation is weaker for the intermediate (IC) and narrow components, which supports the view that the broad-line region (BLR) has the closest link with the AGN's compact X-ray emission. The equivalent widths of the Balmer line IC and BC are found to correlate with ?, ?, Balmer line full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and black hole mass. There is a non-linear dependence of the Balmer line IC and BC luminosities with ? and L5100, which suggests that a second-order factor such as the intermediate-line region (ILR) and BLR covering factors affect the Balmer line component luminosities. The Balmer decrement is found to decrease from ˜5 in the line core to ˜2 in the extended wings, with mean decrements of 2.1 in the BLR and 4.8 in the ILR. This suggests different physical conditions in these regions, such as

  13. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 Micrometer PAH Emission Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    A population of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related materials are thought to be responsible for the family of infrared emission features that are seen towards a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons whose edges contain excess H atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs). While it has been suggested that this type of compound may be present in the interstellar population, it has been difficult to properly assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable infrared laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of the astronomical data. We present the 4000-500 cm(exp -1) (2.5-20 micrometers) infrared spectra of 23 H(sub n)-PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices, under conditions suitable for use in the interpretation of astronomical data. The spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show unique characteristics that distinguish them from their fully aromatic PAH equivalents. We discuss the changes to the spectra of these types of molecules as they transition from fully aromatic to fully aliphatic forms. The implications for the interpretation of astronomical spectra are discussed with specific emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 micrometer features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, in addition to IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 micrometer features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H(sub n)-PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  14. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 Impact Sites with UKIRT: CO Emission from the L Site and Additional 5-μm Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, T. Y.; Orton, G. S.; Crisp, D.; Friedson, A. J.; Bjoraker, G. L.

    1996-06-01

    CO emission lines in the 4.7-μm fundamental vibrational band were detected from Jupiter at the Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragment L impact site on July 20, 1994 UT, 4 to 5 hr after impact. For an atmospheric model with a single temperature for the emitting CO, which is assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), the CO temperature is estimated to beT(CO) = 280 ± 10 K. For this case, the CO column density isN(CO) = 1.2 × 1017cm-2and the estimated mass of CO in the L site is 1.6 × 1013g, with uncertainties of a factor five. The oxygen in this mass of CO can be plausibly explained as coming from material originally in the impactor. Larger amounts of cool CO below the emitting CO could have been present, however. The possible departure of the CO vibrational level populations from LTE and the effect on abundance estimates are discussed qualitatively. Spectra of other impact sites taken at times on the order of days after impact show no detectable changes in the CO absorption lines of impact sites vs nonimpact sites.

  15. Absorption and emission spectra of Ga1.7Ge25As8.3S65 glasses doped with rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupan, E. V.; Iaseniuc, O. V.; Ciornea, V. I.; Iovu, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Excellent optical properties of chalcogenide glasses make them interesting for optoelectronic devices in the visible (VIS) and, especially, in the near- and mid-infrared (NIR and MIR) spectral regions. The rare-earth (RE3+) doped Ga17Ge25As8.3S65 glasses were prepared in evacuated ( 10-5 Pa) silica-glass ampoules which were heated up to 1000 °C at 2-4°C min-1, and then the melt was quenched. The absorption and photoluminescence spectra in the visible and near IR regions for GA1.7Ge25As8.3S65 doped with rare-earth RE+) ions (Sm3+, Nd3+, Pr3+, Dy3+ and co-doped with Ho3++Dy3+) are investigated. The energy transfer of the absorbed light in the broad band Urbach region of the host glass to the RE3+ ions is suggested for increasing the emission efficiency. The investigated Ga17Ge25As8.3S65 glasses doped with RE3+ ions are promising materials for optical amplifiers operating at 1300 and 1500 nm telecommunication windows.

  16. Insights into the interaction between carbamazepine and natural dissolved organic matter in the Yangtze Estuary using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Manman; Fu, Jun; Li, Tingting; Wang, Jinggang; Fu, Yingyu

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between carbamazepine (CBZ) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from three zones (the nearshore, the river channel, and the coastal areas) in the Yangtze Estuary was investigated using fluorescence quenching titration combined with excitation emission matrix spectra and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The complexation between CBZ and DOM was demonstrated by the increase in hydrogen bonding and the disappearance of the C=O stretch obtained from the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. The results indicated that two protein-like substances (component 2 and component3) and two humic-like substances (component 1 and 4) were identified in the DOM from the Yangtze Estuary. The fluorescence quenching curves of each component with the addition of CBZ and the Ryan and Weber model calculation results both demonstrated that the different components exhibited different complexation activities with CBZ. The protein-like components had a stronger affinity with CBZ than did the humic-like substances. On the other hand, the autochthonous tyrosine-like C2 played an important role in the complexation with DOM from the river channel and coastal areas, while C3 influenced by anthropogenic activities showed an obvious effect in the nearshore area. DOMs from the river channel have the highest binding capacity for CBZ, which may ascribe to the relatively high phenol content group in the DOM.

  17. Vibration-rotation pattern in acetylene. II. Introduction of Coriolis coupling in the global model and analysis of emission spectra of hot acetylene around 3 microm.

    PubMed

    Amyay, Badr; Robert, Séverine; Herman, Michel; Fayt, André; Raghavendra, Balakrishna; Moudens, Audrey; Thiévin, Jonathan; Rowe, Bertrand; Georges, Robert

    2009-09-21

    A high temperature source has been developed and coupled to a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer to record emission spectra of acetylene around 3 mum up to 1455 K under Doppler limited resolution (0.015 cm(-1)). The nu(3)-ground state (GS) and nu(2)+nu(4)+nu(5) (Sigma(u) (+) and Delta(u))-GS bands and 76 related hot bands, counting e and f parities separately, are assigned using semiautomatic methods based on a global model to reproduce all related vibration-rotation states. Significantly higher J-values than previously reported are observed for 40 known substates while 37 new e or f vibrational substates, up to about 6000 cm(-1), are identified and characterized by vibration-rotation parameters. The 3 811 new or improved data resulting from the analysis are merged into the database presented by Robert et al. [Mol. Phys. 106, 2581 (2008)], now including 15 562 lines accessing vibrational states up to 8600 cm(-1). A global model, updated as compared to the one in the previous paper, allows all lines in the database to be simultaneously fitted, successfully. The updates are discussed taking into account, in particular, the systematic inclusion of Coriolis interaction.

  18. Franck-Condon Simulations including Anharmonicity of the Ã(1)A''-X̃(1)A' Absorption and Single Vibronic Level Emission Spectra of HSiCl and DSiCl.

    PubMed

    Mok, Daniel W K; Lee, Edmond P F; Chau, Foo-Tim; Dyke, John M

    2009-03-10

    RCCSD(T) and/or CASSCF/MRCI calculations have been carried out on the X̃(1)A' and Ã(1)A'' states of HSiCl employing basis sets of up to the aug-cc-pV5Z quality. Contributions from core correlation and extrapolation to the complete basis set limit were included in determining the computed equilibrium geometrical parameters and relative electronic energy of these two states of HSiCl. Franck-Condon factors which include allowance for anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation between these two states of HSiCl and DSiCl were calculated employing RCCSD(T) and CASSCF/MRCI potential energy functions, and were used to simulate the Ã(1)A'' ← X̃(1)A' absorption and Ã(1)A'' → X̃(1)A' single vibronic level (SVL) emission spectra of HSiCl and DSiCl. Simulated absorption and experimental LIF spectra, and simulated and observed Ã(1)A''(0,0,0) → X̃(1)A' SVL emission spectra, of HSiCl and DSiCl are in very good agreement. However, agreement between simulated and observed Ã(1)A''(0,1,0) → X̃(1)A' and Ã(1)A''(0,2,1) → X̃(1)A' SVL emission spectra of DSiCl is not as good. Preliminary calculations on low-lying excited states of HSiCl suggest that vibronic interaction between low-lying vibrational levels of the Ã(1)A'' state and highly excited vibrational levels of the ã(3)A'' is possible. Such vibronic interaction may change the character of the low-lying vibrational levels of the Ã(1)A'' state, which would lead to perturbation in the SVL emission spectra from these vibrational levels.

  19. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (Hn-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 µm PAH Emission Features

    PubMed Central

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (Hn-PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm−1 (2.5–20 µm) infrared spectra of 23 Hn-PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 µm weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 µm, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11–15 µm region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH2-deformation mode near 6.9 µm. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 µm features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 µm features. We show that ‘normal’ PAH emission objects contain relatively few Hn-PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules. PMID:26435553

  20. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (Hn-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 µm PAH Emission Features.

    PubMed

    Sandford, Scott A; Bernstein, Max P; Materese, Christopher K

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (Hn-PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm(-1) (2.5-20 µm) infrared spectra of 23 Hn-PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 µm weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 µm, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11-15 µm region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH2-deformation mode near 6.9 µm. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 µm features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 µm features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few Hn-PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  1. THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH EXCESS PERIPHERAL H ATOMS (H {sub n} -PAHs) AND THEIR RELATION TO THE 3.4 AND 6.9 {mu}m PAH EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (H {sub n} -PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm{sup -1} (2.5-20 {mu}m) infrared spectra of 23 H {sub n} -PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 {mu}m weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 {mu}m, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11-15 {mu}m region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH{sub 2}- deformation mode near 6.9 {mu}m. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 {mu}m features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 {mu}m features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H {sub n} -PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  2. (π−1) → (π−1), (π−1) emission spectra of chlorofluorobenzene cations in the gaseous phase and their lifetimes in the (0o) states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, John Paul; Marthaler, O.; Mohraz, Manijeh; Shiley, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The radiative decay of seventeen electronically excited chlorofluorobenzene cations in the gaseous phase has been detected. The reported emission spectra, which have been obtained using low energy electron beam excitation, are assigned to the B(??-1 ??? X(??-1 electronic transitions of these cations on the basis of their Ne(I) photoelectron spectra. In another sixteen chloroflourobenzene cations, the B ??? X radiative decay could not be detected, from which is inferred that the B states are now associated with Cl 3p(??-1 ionisation processes. The lifetimes of the studied cations in the lowest vibrational levels of the B(??-1 state have been measured. ?? 1980.

  3. F-GAMMA program: Unification and physical interpretation of the radio spectra variability patterns in Fermi blazars and detection of radio jet emission from NLSY1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakis, E.

    2012-01-01

    The F-GAMMA program aims at understanding the physics at work in AGN via a multi-frequency monitoring approach. A number of roughly 65 Fermi-GST detectable blazars are being monitored monthly since January 2007 at radio wavelengths. The core program relies on the 100-m Effelsberg telescope operating at 8 frequencies between 2.6 and 43 GHz, the 30-m IRAM telescope observing at 86, 145 and 240 GHz and the APEX 12-m telescope at 345 GHz. For the targeted sources the LAT instrument onboard Fermi-GST provides gamma-ray light curves sampled daily. Here we discuss two recent findings: A). On the basis of their variability pattern, the observed quasi-simultaneous broad-band spectra can be classified to merely 5 classes. The variability for the first 4 is clearly dominated by spectral-evolution. Sources of the last class vary self-similarly with almost no apparent shift of the peak frequency. The former classes can be attributed to a two-component principal system made of a quiescent optically thin spectrum and a super-imposed flaring event. The later class must be interpreted in terms of a completely different mechanism. The apparent differences among the classes are explained in terms of a redshift modulus and an intrinsic-source/flare parameters modulus. Numerical simulations have shown that a shock-in-jet model can very well describe the observed behavior. It is concluded therefore that only two mechanisms seem to be producing variability. None of the almost 90 sources used for this study show a switch of class indicating that the variability mechanism is either (a) a finger-print of the source, or (b) remains stable on timescales far longer than the monitoring period of almost 4 years. B). Recently it has been disclosed that Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies show gamma-ray emission. Within the F-GAMMA program radio jet emission has been detected from 3 such sources challenging the belief that jets are associated with elliptical galaxies. The recent findings in this area

  4. Combining single-molecule optical trapping and small-angle x-ray scattering measurements to compute the persistence length of a protein ER/K alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, S; Sung, J; Ali, M; Doniach, S; Flyvbjerg, H; Spudich, J A

    2009-12-02

    A relatively unknown protein structure motif forms stable isolated single alpha-helices, termed ER/K alpha-helices, in a wide variety of proteins and has been shown to be essential for the function of some molecular motors. The flexibility of the ER/K alpha-helix determines whether it behaves as a force transducer, rigid spacer, or flexible linker in proteins. In this study, we quantify this flexibility in terms of persistence length, namely the length scale over which it is rigid. We use single-molecule optical trapping and small-angle x-ray scattering, combined with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate that the Kelch ER/K alpha-helix behaves as a wormlike chain with a persistence length of approximately 15 nm or approximately 28 turns of alpha-helix. The ER/K alpha-helix length in proteins varies from 3 to 60 nm, with a median length of approximately 5 nm. Knowledge of its persistence length enables us to define its function as a rigid spacer in a translation initiation factor, as a force transducer in the mechanoenzyme myosin VI, and as a flexible spacer in the Kelch-motif-containing protein.

  5. Spectroscopic evidence of charge exchange X-ray emission from galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. D.; Liu, J.

    2012-04-01

    What are the origins of the soft X-ray line emission from non-AGN galaxies? XMM-Newton RGS spectra of nearby non-AGN galaxies (including starforming ones: M82, NGC 253, M51, M83, M61, NGC 4631, M94, NGC 2903, and the Antennae galaxies, as well as the inner bulge of M31) have been analyzed. In particular, the K\\alpha triplet of O VII shows that the resonance line is typically weaker than the forbidden and/or inter-combination lines. This suggests that a substantial fraction of the emission may not arise directly from optically thin thermal plasma, as commonly assumed, and may instead originate at its interface with neutral gas via charge exchange. This latter origin naturally explains the observed spatial correlation of the emission with various tracers of cool gas in some of the galaxies. However, alternative scenarios, such as the resonance scattering by the plasma and the relic photo-ionization by AGNs in the recent past, cannot be ruled out, at least in some cases, and are being examined. Such X-ray spectroscopic studies are important to the understanding of the relationship of the emission to various high-energy feedback processes in galaxies.

  6. Relativistically Skewed Iron Emission and Disk Reflection in Galactic Microquasar XTE J1748-288

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fox, D. W.; DiMatteo, T.; Wijnands, R.; Belloni, T.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2000-01-01

    We report evidence for an Fe K-alpha fluorescence line feature in the Very High, High, and Low state X-ray spectra of the galactic microquasar XTE JI748-288 during its June 1998 outburst. Spectral analyses were made on observations spread across the outburst, gathered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. Gaussian line. disk emission line, relativistic disk emission line, and disk reflection models are fit to the data. In the Very High State, the line profile is strongly redshifted and consistent with emission from the innermost radius of a maximally rotating Kerr black hole, 1.235 R(sub g). The line profile is less redshifted in the High State, but increasingly prominent. In the Low State, the line profile is very strong and centered af approx. 6.7 keV; disk line emission models constrain the inner edge of the disk to fluctuate between approx.20 and approx.59 R(sub g). We trace the disk reflection fraction across the full outburst of this source, and find well-constrained fractions below those observed in AGN in the Very High and High States, but consistent with other galactic sources in the Low State. We discuss the possible implications for black hole X-ray binary system dynamics and accretion flow geometry.

  7. Characterization of bound parts of the b30u+(53P1), c 31 u(5 3P2) and X10g+ states of Cd 2 revisited: Bound-bound excitation and dispersed emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M.; | M., Strojecki; | P., Krośnicki; | J., Zgoda; Koperski

    2010-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra of Cd 2 recorded using the c31(53P2)←X10g+ and b30u+(53P1)→X10g+ transitions, respectively are reported. In the excitation to the c 31 u state, red-shaded vibrational components of several υ' ← υ″ = 0, 1, 2, 3 progressions and Δ υ = 0,1 sequences were identified. In the emission from the b30u+ state, well resolved υ' = 0,1,2,3,4 → υ″ transitions were recorded using a spectrograph with CCD camera. Analyses of the spectra provided an improved characterization of the b30u+, c 31 u and X10g+ states involved in the transitions. The results were compared with our ab initio calculations and those obtained experimentally in earlier studies.

  8. Iron K-shell emission from NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Klein, Richard I.; Castor, John I.; Nash, J. K.

    1990-01-01

    The X-ray iron line emission from NGC 1068 is modeled using the new multiline, multilevel, non-LTE radiative transport code Altair and a detailed atomic model for Ne-like through-stripped iron. The X-rays passing through the ionized gas induce iron K-alpha line emission. The atomic model was constructed to describe in detail the K-shell ionization and K-alpha line emission, as well as to calculate the ionization state properly. A greater equivalent width than previously predicted is found because the observed K-alpha line is produced not only by fluorescence but also by line scattering of the continuum into the line of sight. The K-alpha equivalent width and energy are functions not only of the ionization parameter, but also of the column depth and temperature. For a likely model of NGC 1068, it is found that the iron abundance is about twice solar, but that modifications of this model may permit a smaller abundance.

  9. Possible Charge-Exchange X-Ray Emission in the Cygnus Loop Detected with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Hiroko; Kimura, Masashi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hewitt. John W.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2011-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopic measurements of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant indicate that metal abundances throughout most of the remnant s rim are depleted to approx.0.2 times the solar value. However, recent X-ray studies have revealed in some narrow regions along the outermost rim anomalously "enhanced" abundances (up to approx. 1 solar). The reason for these anomalous abundances is not understood. Here, we examine X-ray spectra in annular sectors covering nearly the entire rim of the Cygnus Loop using Suzaku (21 pointings) and XMM-Newton (1 pointing). We find that spectra in the "enhanced" abundance regions commonly show a strong emission feature at approx.0.7 keV. This feature is likely a complex of He-like O K(gamma + delta + epsilon), although other possibilities cannot be fully excluded. The intensity of this emission relative to He-like O K(alpha) appears to be too high to be explained as thermal emission. This fact, as well as the spatial concentration of the anomalous abundances in the outermost rim, leads us to propose an origin from charge-exchange processes between neutrals and H-like O. We show that the presence of charge-exchange emission could lead to the inference of apparently "enhanced" metal abundances using pure thermal emission models. Accounting for charge-exchange emission, the actual abundances could be uniformly low throughout the rim. The overall abundance depletion remains an open question. Subject headings: ISM: abundances ISM: individual objects (Cygnus Loop) ISM: supernova remnants X-rays: ISM atomic processes

  10. A gas-tight Cu K alpha x-ray transparent reaction chamber for high-temperature x-ray diffraction analyses of halide gas/solid reactions.

    PubMed

    Shian, Samuel; Sandhage, Kenneth H

    2009-11-01

    An externally heated, x-ray transparent reaction chamber has been developed to enable the dynamic high temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis of a gas/solid [TiF(4)(g)/SiO(2)(s)] reaction involving a halide gas reactant formed at elevated temperatures (up to 350 degrees C) from a condensed source (TiF(4) powder) sealed within the chamber. The reaction chamber possessed x-ray transparent windows comprised of a thin (13 microm) internal layer of Al foil and a thicker (125 microm) external Kapton film. After sealing the SiO(2) specimens (diatom frustules or Stober spheres) above TiF(4) powder within the reaction chamber, the chamber was heated to a temperature in the range of 160-350 degrees C to allow for internal generation of TiF(4)(g). The TiF(4)(g) underwent a metathetic reaction with the SiO(2) specimen to yield a TiOF(2)(s) product. HTXRD analysis, using Cu K alpha x rays passed through the Kapton/Al windows of the chamber, was used to track the extent of SiO(2) consumption and/or TiOF(2) formation with time. The Al foil inner layer of the windows protected the Kapton film from chemical attack by TiF(4)(g), whereas the thicker, more transparent Kapton film provided the mechanical strength needed to contain this gas. By selecting an appropriate combination of x-ray transparent materials to endow such composite windows with the required thermal, chemical, and mechanical performance, this inexpensive reaction chamber design may be applied to the HTXRD analyses of a variety of gas/solid reactions.

  11. X-RAY SPECTRA FROM MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF ACCRETING BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.; Noble, Scott C. E-mail: jhk@pha.jhu.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of a new global radiation transport code coupled to a general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an accreting, non-rotating black hole. For the first time, we are able to explain from first principles in a self-consistent way all the components seen in the X-ray spectra of stellar-mass black holes, including a thermal peak and all the features associated with strong hard X-ray emission: a power law extending to high energies, a Compton reflection hump, and a broad iron line. Varying only the mass accretion rate, we are able to reproduce a wide range of X-ray states seen in most galactic black hole sources. The temperature in the corona is T{sub e} {approx} 10 keV in a boundary layer near the disk and rises smoothly to T{sub e} {approx}> 100 keV in low-density regions far above the disk. Even as the disk's reflection edge varies from the horizon out to Almost-Equal-To 6M as the accretion rate decreases, we find that the shape of the Fe K{alpha} line is remarkably constant. This is because photons emitted from the plunging region are strongly beamed into the horizon and never reach the observer. We have also carried out a basic timing analysis of the spectra and find that the fractional variability increases with photon energy and viewer inclination angle, consistent with the coronal hot spot model for X-ray fluctuations.

  12. Relativistic Iron Emission and Disk Reflection in Galactic Microquasar XTE J1748-288

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fox, D. W.; Matteo, T. DI; Wijnands, R.; Belloni, T.; Pooley, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2001-01-01

    We report evidence for an Fe K(alpha) fluorescence line feature and disk reflection in the very high, high-, and low-state X-ray spectra of the Galactic microquasar XTE J1748-288 during its 1998 June outburst. Spectral analyses are made on data gathered throughout the outburst by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array. Gaussian line, relativistic disk emission line, and ionized disk reflection models are fitted to the data. In the very high state the line profile appears strongly redshifted, consistent with disk emission from the innermost stable orbits around a maximally rotating Kerr black hole. In the high state the line profile is less redshifted and increasingly prominent. The low-state line profile is very strong (approx. 0.5 keV equivalent width) and centered at 6.7 +/- 0.10 keV; disk line emission model fits indicate that the inner edge of the disk fluctuates between approx. 20Rg and approx. 100Rg in this state. The disk reflection fraction is traced through the outburst; reflection from an ionized disk is preferred in the very high and high states, and reflection from a relatively neutral disk is preferred in the low state. We discuss the implications of our findings for the binary system dynamics and accretion flow geometry in XTE J1748-288.

  13. Relativistic Iron Emission and Disk Reflection in Galactic Microquasar XTE J1748-288

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fox, D. W.; DiMatteo, T.; Wijnands, R.; Belloni, T.; Pooley, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2001-01-01

    We report evidence for an Fe K-alpha fluorescence line feature and disk reflection in the very high, high-, and low-state X-ray spectra of the Galactic microquasar XTE J1748 - 288 during its 1998 June outburst. Spectral analyses are made on data gathered throughout the outburst by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array. Gaussian line, relativistic disk emission line, and ionized disk reflection models are fitted to the data. In the very high state the line profile appears strongly redshifted, consistent with disk emission from the innermost stable orbits around a maximally rotating Kerr black hole. In the high state the line profile is less redshifted and increasingly prominent. The low-state line profile is very strong (approx. 0.5 keV equivalent width) and centered at 6.7 +/- 0.10 keV; disk line emission model fits indicate that the inner edge of the disk fluctuates between approx. 20R(sub g) and - approx. 100R(sub g) in this state. The disk reflection fraction is traced through the outburst; reflection from an ionized disk is preferred in the very high and high states, and reflection from a relatively neutral disk is preferred in the low state. We discuss the implications of our findings for the binary system dynamics and accretion flow geometry in XTE J1748 - 288.

  14. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  15. Effects of Palagonitic Dust Coatings on Thermal Emission Spectra of Rocks and Minerals: Implications for Mineralogical Characterization of the Martian Surface by MGS-TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R.; Christensen, P.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal emission measurements on dust-coated rocks and minerals show that a 300 5m thick layer is required to mask emission from the substrate and that non-linear effects are present. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Ligand-induced changes in the location of actin, myosin, 95K (alpha- actinin), and 120K protein in amebae of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    In this study we investigated concanavalin A (Con A) induced changes in the locations of actin, myosin, 120K, and 95K (alpha-actinin) to determine the extent to which actin and myosin are reorganized during capping and the roles that 120K and 95K might play in this reorganization. We observed the location of each protein by indirect immunofluorescence using affinity purified antibodies. Four morphological states were distinguished in vegetative Dictyostelium amebae: ameboid cells before Con A binding, patched cells, capped cells, and ameboid cells with caps. The location of each protein was distinct in ameboid cells both before and after capping Actin and 120K were found in the cell cortex usually associated with surface projections, and myosin and 95K were diffusely distributed. Myosin was excluded from surface projections in ameboid cells. During patching, all four proteins were localized below Con A patches. During capping, actin, myosin, and 95K protein moved with the Con A patches into the cap whereas 120K protein was excluded from the cap. During the late stages of cap formation actin and myosin were progressively lost from the cap, and 120K became concentrated in new actin-filled projections that formed away from the cap. However, 95K remained tightly associated with the cap. Poisoning cells with sodium azide inhibited capping but not patching of ligand. In azide-poisoned cells, myosin and 95K did not co-patch with Con A, whereas copatching of 120K and actin with Con A occurred as usual. Our results support the hypothesis that capping is an actomyosin-mediated motile event that involves a sliding interaction between actin filaments, which are anchored through the membrane to ligand patches, and myosin in the cortex. They are also consistent with a role for 120K in the formation of surface projections by promoting growth and/or cross-linking of actin filaments within projections, and with a role for 95K in regulating actomyosin-mediated contractility, earlier

  17. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-{alpha}1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju; Weber, Joseph; Mohanakumar, T.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. {yields} Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. {yields} Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. {yields} Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-{alpha}1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 {+-} 1.1-, 3.2 {+-} 0.9-, and 3.4 {+-} 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of {beta}-methyl cyclodextran ({beta}MCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 {+-} 0.3, vs {beta}MCD untreated being 6.4 {+-} 1.1-fold

  18. Inequality spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  19. Measurement of the 238U neutron-capture cross section and gamma-emission spectra from 10 eV to 100 keV using the DANCE detector at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John L; Couture, A J; Keksis, A L; Vieira, D J; O' Donnell, J M; Jandel, M; Haight, R C; Rundberg, R S; Kawano, T; Chyzh, A; Baramsai, B; Wu, C Y; Mitchell, G E; Becker, J A; Krticka, M

    2010-01-01

    A careful new measurement of the {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}) cross section from 10 eV to 100 keV has been made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. DANCE is a 4{pi} calorimetric scintillator array consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} crystals. Measurements were made on a 48 mg/cm{sup 2} depleted uranium target. The cross sections are in general good agreement with previous measurements. The gamma-ray emission spectra, as a function of gamma multiplicity, were also measured and compared to model calculations.

  20. DISSECTING THE POWER SOURCES OF LOW-LUMINOSITY EMISSION-LINE GALAXY NUCLEI VIA COMPARISON OF HST-STIS AND GROUND-BASED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, Anca; Castillo, Christopher A.; Shields, Joseph C.; Ho, Luis C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2015-12-01

    Using a sample of ∼100 nearby line-emitting galaxy nuclei, we have built the currently definitive atlas of spectroscopic measurements of Hα and neighboring emission lines at subarcsecond scales. We employ these data in a quantitative comparison of the nebular emission in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based apertures, which offer an order-of-magnitude difference in contrast, and provide new statistical constraints on the degree to which transition objects and low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are powered by an accreting black hole at ≲10 pc. We show that while the small-aperture observations clearly resolve the nebular emission, the aperture dependence in the line ratios is generally weak, and this can be explained by gradients in the density of the line-emitting gas: the higher densities in the more nuclear regions potentially flatten the excitation gradients, suppressing the forbidden emission. The transition objects show a threefold increase in the incidence of broad Hα emission in the high-resolution data, as well as the strongest density gradients, supporting the composite model for these systems as accreting sources surrounded by star-forming activity. The narrow-line LINERs appear to be the weaker counterparts of the Type 1 LINERs, where the low accretion rates cause the disappearance of the broad-line component. The enhanced sensitivity of the HST observations reveals a 30% increase in the incidence of accretion-powered systems at z ≈ 0. A comparison of the strength of the broad-line emission detected at different epochs implies potential broad-line variability on a decade-long timescale, with at least a factor of three in amplitude.

  1. Studies of electronic configurations in the emission spectra of lanthanides and actinides: application to the interpretation of Es I and Es II, predictions for Fm I

    SciTech Connect

    Wyart, Jean-Francois . E-mail: jean-francois.wyart@lac.u-psud.fr; Blaise, Jean; Worden, Earl F.

    2005-02-15

    The interpretation of the spectra of free atoms and gaseous ions in the 4f{sup N} and 5f{sup N} periods became less active after critical compilations of energy levels appeared. However, several spectra are still under study and the application of the Racah-Slater and HFR methods to extended sets of configurations leads to revisions and additions. In doubly charged ions of lanthanides, the treatment of configuration interaction by means of effective parameters and by extension of the basis of states are both important. Concerning actinides, calculations of several observables (Lande factors and isotope shifts in Pu I, hyperfine constants, transition probabilities) prove the quality of eigenfunctions. The classification of Es I and Es II has been extended and radial parameters for fine and hyperfine structures have been derived. Level predictions for the next element fermium are supported by parameter extrapolations.

  2. Energy transfer based photoluminescence spectra of co-doped (Dy3+ + Sm3+): Li2O-LiF-B2O3-ZnO glasses for orange emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, L.; Naveen Kumar, K.; Vijayalakshmi, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The present paper brings out the results concerning the preparation and optical properties of Sm3+ and Dy3+ each ion separately in different concentrations (0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol.%) and also together doped (x mol.% Dy3+ + 1.5 mol.% Sm3+): Li2O-LiF-B2O3-ZnO (where x = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol.%) glasses by a melt quenching method. Structural and thermal properties have been extensively studied for those glasses by XRD and TG/DTA. The compositional analysis has been carried out from FTIR spectral profile. Optical absorption spectral studies were also carried out. Sm3+: LBZ glasses have displayed an intense orange emission at 603 nm (4G5/2 → 6H7/2) with an excitation wavelength at 403 nm and Dy3+: LBZ glasses have shown two emissions located at 485 nm (4F9/2 → 6H15/2; blue) and 574 nm (4F9/2 → 6H13/2; yellow) with an excitation wavelength at 385 nm. Remarkably, it has been identified that the significant increase in the reddish orange emission of Sm3+ ions and diminished yellow emission pertaining to Dy3+ ions in the co-doped LBZ glass system under the excitation of 385 nm which relates to Dy3+ ions. This could be due energy transfer from Dy3+ to Sm3+. The non-radiative energy transfer from Dy3+ to Sm3+ is explained in terms of their emission spectra, donor lifetime, energy level diagram and energy transfer characteristic factors. These significantly enhanced orange emission exhibited glasses could be suggested as potential optical glasses for orange luminescence photonic devices.

  3. Effect of the design of the active region of monolithic multi-color LED heterostructures on their spectra and emission efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F. Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Sinitsyn, M. A.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Karpov, S. Y.

    2015-11-15

    The design features of light-emitting-diode heterostructures with a monolithic InGaN/GaN active region containing several InGaN quantum wells (QWs) emitting at different wavelengths, grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, are studied. It is shown that the number of emission bands can be raised to three by increasing the number of deposited InGaN QWs with different indium contents. The emission efficiency decreases by approximately 30% with increasing number of QWs at high currents. The dependences of the optical properties of the heterostructures on the number of QWs and types of barriers between the QWs (GaN layer or InGaN/GaN short-period superlattice) are analyzed. It is demonstrated that the ratio between the intensities of the emission lines widely varies with current flowing through the structure and greatly depends on the type and width of the barriers between the QWs.

  4. Electron cyclotron emission spectra in X- and O-mode polarisation at JET: Martin-Puplett interferometer, absolute calibration, revised uncertainties, inboard/outboard temperature profile, and wall properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Boom, J. E.; Meneses, L.; Abreu, P.; Belonohy, E.; Lupelli, I.

    2016-09-01

    At the tokamak Joint European Torus (JET), the electron cyclotron emission spectra in O-mode and X-mode polarisations are diagnosed simultaneous in absolute terms for several harmonics with two Martin-Puplett interferometers. From the second harmonic range in X-mode polarisation, the electron temperature profile can be deduced for the outboard side (low magnetic field strength) of JET but only for some parts of the inboard side (high magnetic field strength). This spatial restriction can be bypassed, if a cutoff is not present inside the plasma for O-mode waves in the first harmonic range. Then, from this spectral domain, the profile on the entire inboard side is accessible. The profile determination relies on the new absolute and independent calibration for both interferometers. During the calibration procedure, the antenna pattern was investigated as well, and, potentially, an increase in the diagnostic responsivity of about 5% was found for the domain 100-300 GHz. This increase and other uncertainty sources are taken into account in the thorough revision of the uncertainty for the diagnostic absolute calibration. The uncertainty deduced and the convolution inherent for Fourier spectroscopy diagnostics have implications for the temperature profile inferred. Having probed the electron cyclotron emission spectra in orthogonal polarisation directions for the first harmonic range, a condition is derived for the reflection and polarisation-scrambling coefficients of the first wall on the outboard side of JET.

  5. Generalized spectra model for 1-100 keV X-ray emission from Cygnus X-3 based on EXOSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, M. R.; Chitnis, V. R.; Rao, A. R.; Singh, K. P.

    1994-03-01

    The X-ray spectrum of the highly variable X-ray source, Cyg X-3, has so far defied a consistent explanation based on simple emission models. We have extracted two of the best data sets from the EXOSAT archives and performed a detailed spectral analysis for its 'high' and 'low' states. The analysis of the less frequently occurring 'low' state is presented for the first time for the EXOSAT data. Combining data from the medium-energy argon and xenon detectors and the gas scintillation proportional counter, with a better energy resolution, and carrying out a simultaneous fit, we find that the X-ray continuum in both the 'high' and 'low' state can be explained as a sum of a blackbody emission and emission from a Comptonized plasma cloud with a common absorption. The Comptonization model is sufficient as well as preferable to many other models, in explaining the observed X-ray emission up to 100 keV. In addition, we find an emission-line feature due to ionized iron (Fe XX-Fe XXVI) and absorption features due to cold iron (Fe I) as well as highly ionized iron (Fe XXV-Fe XXXVI). The presence of absorption due to Fe I has been shown for the first time here. This is the simplest and the most generalized spectral model for the 1-100 keV X-ray emission from Cyg X-3, to date. We find that the blackbody temperature derived in the 'high ' state (1.47 keV) is much lower than that derived for the 'low' state (2.40 keV) and is associated with an increase in the blackbodly radius in the 'high' state. The ratio of blackbody flux to the total flux is approximately 0.61 in the 'high' state and approximately 0.44 in the 'low' state. The Fe line energy is significantly higher in the 'high' state (approximately 6.95 keV) compared to the 'low' state (approximately 6.56 keV). The Comptonization parameter changes from 2 to approximately 15 in going from the 'high' to the 'low' state implying a highly saturated Comptonization in the 'low' state. The Comptonized region has high electron

  6. A responsivity-based criterion for accurate calibration of FTIR emission spectra: identification of in-band low-responsivity wavenumbers.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Penny M; Neshyba, Steven P; Cox, Christopher J; Walden, Von P

    2011-03-28

    Spectra measured by remote-sensing Fourier transform infrared spectrometers are often calibrated using two calibration sources. At wavenumbers where the absorption coefficient is large, air within the optical path of the instrument can absorb most calibration-source signal, resulting in extreme errors. In this paper, a criterion in terms of the instrument responsivity is used to identify such wavenumbers within the instrument bandwidth of two remote-sensing Fourier transform infrared spectrometers. Wavenumbers identified by the criterion are found to be correlated with strong absorption line-centers of water vapor. Advantages of using a responsivity-based criterion are demonstrated.

  7. Experimental study of emission Z-pinch spectra in the axial and radial directions at the Angara-5-1 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, V. V.; Volkov, G. S.; Grabovsky, E. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Mitrofanov, K. N.; Oleinik, G. M.; Shevelko, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    Data on the energy, power and spectra composition of the soft x-ray pulse of powerful Z-pinch plasmas in the axial and radial directions in the photon energy range of 0.02 - 2 keV are presented. The data are obtained from the analysis of experimental results on the implosion of cylindrical arrays with a diameter of 1.2 cm and a height of 1.6 cm of tungsten wires diameter of 6 μm, the linear mass of 220 μg/cm at a current in the range of 2.2 - 3.5 MA at the Angara-5-1 facility.

  8. A new highly selective, ratiometric and colorimetric fluorescence sensor for Cu(2+) with a remarkable red shift in absorption and emission spectra based on internal charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Sen, Debabrata; Das, Nirmal Kumar

    2010-02-19

    A new 1,8-diaminonaphthalene based ratiometric and highly selective colorimetric "off-on" type of fluorescent probe, receptor 2 has been designed and synthesized that senses only Cu(2+) among the other heavy and transition metal ions examined on the basis of internal charge transfer (ICT). The visual sensitivity of the receptor 2 is remarkable, showing dual color changes from colorless (receptor) to purple followed by blue and a large red shift in emission upon Cu(2+) complexation.

  9. Influence of CO2 pressure on the emission spectra and plasma parameters in underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goueguel, Christian L; McIntyre, Dustin L; Jain, Jinesh C

    2016-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopic studies have been carried out to investigate the pressure effect of CO2 on laser-produced underwater plasma. The plasma was generated by focusing 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser in a CO2-bearing solution. The temporal evolution of the continuum emission, Sr and Ba lines, and plasma electron density and temperature was characterized under CO2 pressure ranging from 10 to 300 bars. The electron density measurements were made using the Stark broadening of the 455.40 nm Ba II line, while the temperature measurements have been performed by the Saha-Boltzmann method using the Sr I-II lines at 460.73 and 407.77 nm, respectively. It was found that CO2 pressure has little effect on the emission line intensity and signal-to-background ratio. The electron density and the temperature are found to be independent of the CO2 pressure at early times. When time becomes longer, the electron density exhibits an appreciable rise as the CO2 pressure increases, while the temperature is found to be unchanged.

  10. Normal incidence X-ray telescope power spectra of X-ray emission from solar active regions. I - Observations. II - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Daniel O.; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Golub, Leon

    1993-01-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to very high resolution image of coronal active regions obtained by the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope is used to find a broad isotropic power-law spectrum of the spatial distribution of soft X-ray intensities. Magnetic structures of all sizes are present down to the resolution limit of the instrument. Power spectra for the X-ray intensities of a sample of topologically different active regions are found which fall off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. A model is presented that relates the basic features of coronal magnetic fluctuations to the subphotospheric hydrodynamic turbulence that generates them. The model is used to find a theoretical power spectrum for the X-ray intensity which falls off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. The implications of a turbulent regime in active regions are discussed.

  11. Theoretical modeling of UV-Vis absorption and emission spectra in liquid state systems including vibrational and conformational effects: Explicit treatment of the vibronic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    D’Abramo, Marco; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2014-04-28

    Here, we extend a recently introduced theoretical-computational procedure [M. D’Alessandro, M. Aschi, C. Mazzuca, A. Palleschi, and A. Amadei, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114102 (2013)] to include quantum vibrational transitions in modelling electronic spectra of atomic molecular systems in condensed phase. The method is based on the combination of Molecular Dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations within the Perturbed Matrix Method approach. The main aim of the presented approach is to reproduce as much as possible the spectral line shape which results from a subtle combination of environmental and intrinsic (chromophore) mechanical-dynamical features. As a case study, we were able to model the low energy UV-vis transitions of pyrene in liquid acetonitrile in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Palagonitic Mars from Rock Rinds to Dust: Evidence from Visible, Near-IR, and Thermal Emission Spectra of Poorly Crystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Mertzman, S. A.; Lane, M. D.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    Visible and near-IR (VNIR) spectral data for Martian bright regions are characterized by a general shape consisting of a ferric absorption edge extending from about 400 to 750 nm and relatively constant reflectivity extending from about 750 nm to beyond 2000 nm . Among terrestrial geologic materials, the best spectral analogues are certain palagonic tephras from Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii). By definition, palagonite is a yellow or orange isotropic mineraloid formed by hydration and devitrification of basaltic glass. The ferric pigment in palagonite is nanometer-sized ferric oxide particles (np-Ox) dispersed throughout the hydrated basaltic glass matrix. The hydration state of the np-Ox particles is not known, and the best Martian spectral analogues contain allophane-like materials and not crystalline phyllosilicates. We show here that laboratory VNIR and TES spectra of palagonitic alteration rinds developed on basaltic rocks are spectral endmembers that provide a consistent explanation for both VNIR and TES data of Martian dark regions.

  13. Matrix formalism for calculation of the light beam intensity in stratified multilayered films, and its use in the analysis of emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-06-01

    Matrix formulation to describe the light propagation in stratified multilayered films has been extended to a system with phase incoherence. Several equations for the reflectance, transmittance, and light beam intensity in the film system are derived from the formulation. Some formulas previously proposed are corrected in reference to the present method. The beam intensity description is used for the calculation of light emissive power from multilayered films having a temperature gradient. It is found that the equations derived here are exactly equivalent to those derived from the radiative transfer equation. However, the present method is more tractable, and can be readily used for a film system with any number of layers.

  14. Theoretical and experimental investigation of matrix effects observed in emission spectra of binary mixtures of sodium and copper and magnesium and copper pressed powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Elizabeth J.; Colgan, James; Campbell, Keri; Barefield, James E.; Johns, Heather M.; Kilcrease, David P.; Clegg, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this work was to investigate the matrix effect of copper in the presence of sodium or magnesium in a laser-induced plasma. Varying amounts of copper were mixed and pressed with a constant amount of sodium or magnesium and a stearic acid binder. Experimental parameters such as delay time and laser pulse energy were varied to observe trends in the emission intensity of the Na I 588.99 nm, Na I 589.59 nm, Mg I 277.98 nm, and Mg II 279.08 nm lines. Experimental observations are supported by theoretical calculations and modeling that show the Na I and Mg I emission intensities increase in the presence of copper while the Mg II line intensity decreases due to the increase in electron density (Ne) of the plasma when copper is added. The increase in electron density changes the population of the atomic species within the plasma through an increase in recombination of ions with electrons, shifting the populations toward more neutral states, providing an explanation for the observed matrix effects found in these, and many previous, studies.

  15. Structure of the spontaneous emission spectra of high-{gamma} free electron lasers as measured at the Darmstadt (S-Dalinac) FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Renz, G.; Spindler, G.; Schlott, V.

    1995-12-31

    Recent spontaneous emission measurements at the Darmstadt infrared FEL indicate a relatively broad (down-shifted) spectrum with several intensity maxima. The typical features of the measured spectrum can be well reproduced by a numerical simulation comprising the 3-d electron dynamics in a realizable planar wiggler field, the spontaneous radiation according to the well-known Jackson formula, as well as the detection of the radiation with a finite aperture detector. An analytical consideration attributes the observed down-shift to the reduced Doppler up-shift of the radiation as observed under a finite angle with respect to the axis. The intensity peaks appear as a consequence of a modulation of the transverse velocity amplitudes of the electrons due to the betatron oscillation. The spectral spacing of these {open_quote}sidebands{close_quote} are roughly given by the Doppler up-shifted betatron frequency. Consequences for very high energy FELs will be discussed.

  16. Analysis of the absorption spectra of gas emission of patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by laser optoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukreeva, Ekaterina B.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Kistenev, Yurii V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Tuzikov, Sergei A.; Yumov, Evgenii L.

    2013-02-01

    It is important to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer in the early stages of the disease. The method of laser opto-acoustic gas analysis, in this case, can act as a promising tool for diagnostics. The material for this study were the gas emission samples collected from patients and healthy volunteers - samples of exhaled air, swabs from teeth and cheeks. A set of material was formed three groups: healthy volunteers, patients with COPD, lung cancer patients. The resulting samples were analyzed by means of laser opto-acoustic gas analyzers: with intracavity location detector (ILPA-1), with extracavity location detector (LGA-2). Presentation of the results in an easy to visual form was performed using the method of elastic maps, based on the principal component analysis. The results of analysis show potentialities of usage of laser optoacoustic spectroscopy application to assess the status of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

  17. X-ray emission following K-L double ionization by electron impact and K capture: Vacancy-production probabilities and structure of the Kα satellite spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Scholz, Angela; Leiberich, A.; Scholz, W.

    1982-12-01

    Kα x-ray satellites following K-electron capture in 55Fe and electron impact on Mn have been measured with a high-resolution spectrometer. Ratios of double- to single-vacancy-production probability are found to be PKL=(2.5+/-0.5)×10-3 and (9.5+/-0.9)×10-3 for capture and impact, respectively. An evaluation of vacancy rearrangement in the L shell before satellite emission has been carried out with the use of published level widths. It is found that in electron impact, as distinct from K capture, essentially only satellites associated with a 2p spectator vacancy are observed. This observation is at variance with certain commonly used satellite assignments. Energies and intensities of the satellite transitions have been calculated in intermediate coupling and coordinations are proposed for the stronger lines.

  18. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of anti-tetrol and syn-tetrol dissolved in liquid chloroform II: infrared emission spectra, vibrational excited-state lifetimes, and nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2013-11-21

    The effect of vibrational excitation and relaxation of the hydroxyl stretch on the hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics of stereoselectively synthesized syn-tetrol and anti-tetrol dissolved in deuterated chloroform are investigated via a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation. Emphasis is placed on the changes in hydrogen-bond structure upon photoexcitation and the nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics that follows the subsequent relaxation from the excited to the ground vibrational state. The propensity to form hydrogen bonds is shown to increase upon photoexcitation of the hydroxyl stretch, thereby leading to a sizable red-shift of the infrared emission spectra relative to the corresponding absorption spectra. The vibrational excited state lifetimes are calculated within the framework of Fermi's golden rule and the harmonic-Schofield quantum correction factor, and found to be sensitive reporters of the underlying hydrogen-bond structure. The energy released during the relaxation from the excited to the ground state is shown to break hydrogen bonds involving the relaxing hydroxyl. The spectral signature of this nonequilibrium relaxation process is analyzed in detail.

  19. First theoretical global line lists of ethylene (12C2H4) spectra for the temperature range 50-700 K in the far-infrared for quantification of absorption and emission in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, M.; Delahaye, T.; Nikitin, A. V.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2016-10-01

    We present the construction of complete and comprehensive ethylene line lists for the temperatures 50-700 K based on accurate ab initio potential and dipole moment surfaces and extensive first-principle calculations. Three lists spanning the [0-6400] cm-1 infrared region were built at T = 80, 160, and 296 K, and two lists in the range [0-5200] cm-1 were built at 500 and 700 K. For each of these five temperatures, we considered possible convergence problems to ensure reliable opacity calculations. Our final list at 700 K was computed up to J = 71 and contains almost 60 million lines for intensities I > 5 × 10-27 cm/molecule. Comparisons with experimental spectra carried out in this study showed that for the most active infrared bands, the accuracy of band centers in our theoretical lists is better on average than 0.3 cm-1, and the integrated absorbance errors in the intervals relevant for spectral analyses are about 1-3%. These lists can be applied to simulations of absorption and emission spectra, radiative and non-LTE processes, and opacity calculations for planetary and astrophysical applications. The lists are freely accessible through the TheoReTS information system at http://theorets.univ-reims.fr and http://theorets.tsu.ru

  20. CO-SPATIAL LONG-SLIT UV/OPTIC AL SPECTRA OF 10 GALACTIC PLANETARY NEBULAE WITH HST/STIS. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE OBSERVATIONS, GLOBAL EMISSION-LINE MEASUREMENTS, AND CNO ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, Reginald J.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Shaw, Richard A.; Henry, Richard B. C.; Balick, Bruce; Corradi, Romano L. M.

    2015-04-10

    We present observations and initial analysis from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cycle 19 program using STIS to obtain the first co-spatial, UV–optical spectra of 10 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNs). Our primary objective was to measure the critical emission lines of carbon and nitrogen with unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and spatial resolution over the wavelength range 1150–10270 Å, with the ultimate goal of quantifying the production of these elements in low- and intermediate-mass stars. Our sample was selected from PNs with a near-solar metallicity, but spanning a broad range in N/O based on published ground-based and IUE spectra. This study, the first of a series, concentrates on the observations and emission-line measurements obtained by integrating along the entire spatial extent of the slit. We derived ionic and total elemental abundances for the seven PNs with the strongest UV line detections (IC 2165, IC 3568, NGC 2440, NGC 3242, NGC 5315, NGC 5882, and NGC 7662). We compare these new results with other recent studies of the nebulae and discuss the relative merits of deriving the total elemental abundances of C, N, and O using ionization correction factors (ICFs) versus summed abundances. For the seven PNs with the best UV line detections, we conclude that summed abundances from direct diagnostics of ions with measurable UV lines give the most accurate values for the total elemental abundances of C and N (although ICF abundances often produced good results for C). In some cases where significant discrepancies exist between our abundances and those from other studies, we show that the differences can often be attributed to their use of fluxes that are not co-spatial. Finally, we examined C/O and N/O versus O/H and He/H in well-observed Galactic, LMC, and SMC PNs and found that highly accurate abundances are essential for properly inferring elemental yields from their progenitor stars. Future papers will discuss photoionization modeling of

  1. Co-spatial Long-slit UV/Optical AL Spectra of 10 Galactic Planetary Nebulae with HST/STIS. I. Description of the Observations, Global Emission-line Measurements, and CNO Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Shaw, Richard A.; Henry, Richard B. C.; Balick, Bruce; Corradi, Romano L. M.

    2015-04-01

    We present observations and initial analysis from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cycle 19 program using STIS to obtain the first co-spatial, UV-optical spectra of 10 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNs). Our primary objective was to measure the critical emission lines of carbon and nitrogen with unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and spatial resolution over the wavelength range 1150-10270 Å, with the ultimate goal of quantifying the production of these elements in low- and intermediate-mass stars. Our sample was selected from PNs with a near-solar metallicity, but spanning a broad range in N/O based on published ground-based and IUE spectra. This study, the first of a series, concentrates on the observations and emission-line measurements obtained by integrating along the entire spatial extent of the slit. We derived ionic and total elemental abundances for the seven PNs with the strongest UV line detections (IC 2165, IC 3568, NGC 2440, NGC 3242, NGC 5315, NGC 5882, and NGC 7662). We compare these new results with other recent studies of the nebulae and discuss the relative merits of deriving the total elemental abundances of C, N, and O using ionization correction factors (ICFs) versus summed abundances. For the seven PNs with the best UV line detections, we conclude that summed abundances from direct diagnostics of ions with measurable UV lines give the most accurate values for the total elemental abundances of C and N (although ICF abundances often produced good results for C). In some cases where significant discrepancies exist between our abundances and those from other studies, we show that the differences can often be attributed to their use of fluxes that are not co-spatial. Finally, we examined C/O and N/O versus O/H and He/H in well-observed Galactic, LMC, and SMC PNs and found that highly accurate abundances are essential for properly inferring elemental yields from their progenitor stars. Future papers will discuss photoionization modeling of our

  2. Optimal fitting of Gaussian-apodized or under-resolved emission lines in Fourier transform spectra providing new insights on the velocity structure of NGC 6720

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Thomas B.; Prunet, Simon; Drissen, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    An analysis of the kinematics of NGC 6720 is performed on the commissioning data obtained with SITELLE, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope's new imaging Fourier transform spectrometer. In order to measure carefully the small broadening effect of a shell expansion on an unresolved emission line, we have determined a computationally robust implementation of the convolution of a Gaussian with a sinc instrumental line shape which avoids arithmetic overflows. This model can be used to measure line broadening of typically a few km s-1 even at low spectral resolution (R < 5000). We have also designed the corresponding set of Gaussian apodizing functions that are now used by ORBS, the SITELLE's reduction pipeline. We have implemented this model in ORCS, a fitting engine for SITELLE's data, and used it to derive the [S II] density map of the central part of the nebula. The study of the broadening of the [N II] lines shows that the main ring and the central lobe are two different shells with different expansion velocities. We have also derived deep and spatially resolved velocity maps of the halo in [N II] and Hα and found that the brightest bubbles are originating from two bipolar structures with a velocity difference of more than 35 km s-1 lying at the poles of a possibly unique halo shell expanding at a velocity of more than 15 km s-1.

  3. Solar-wind Ion-driven X-Ray Emission from Cometary and Planetary Atmospheres: Measurements and Theoretical Predictions of Charge-Exchange Cross-sections and Emission Spectra for O6+ + H2O, Co, Co2, Ch4, N2, NO, N2O, and Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Schultz, D. R.; Ralchenko, Yu.; Moradmand, A.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2015-08-01

    Relevant to modeling and understanding X-ray emission from cometary and planetary atmospheres, total cross-sections for 1.17 and 2.33 keV/u O6+ colliding with H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, N2, NO, N2O, and Ar have been measured for the processes of single, double, and triple charge exchanges. Using these measurements as benchmarks, synthetic emission spectra spanning the X-ray, UV, and visible range have been calculated based on theoretical treatment of the transfer of between one and six electrons from the target neutrals to the projectile ion, followed by radiative and non-radiative decay of the highly excited states produced in these collisions. The results help add to the base of knowledge required to simulate ion-neutral processes in astrophysical environments; refine the present understanding of these fundamental atomic processes; and guide future observations, laboratory measurements, and theoretical predictions.

  4. Photobleaching response of different sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter exposed to natural solar radiation using absorption and excitation-emission matrix spectra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN:TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN:TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0-9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%-5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  5. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    portion is defined by the day/night boundary (known as the terminator).

    These two images illustrate only a small fraction of the information contained in a single LEISA scan, highlighting just one aspect of the power of infrared spectra for atmospheric studies.

  6. Photobleaching Response of Different Sources of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Exposed to Natural Solar Radiation Using Absorption and Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L.; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN∶TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN∶TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0–9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%–5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  7. High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

  8. An analysis of middle ultraviolet dayglow spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, Billie S.

    1991-12-01

    Middle ultraviolet spectra from 1800 to 3400A are analyzed. These spectra were obtained from the March 1990 rocket flight of the NPS MUSTANG instrument over the altitudes 105km to 315km. The data were compared with computer generated synthetic spectra. A least squares fitting procedure was developed for this purpose. Each data point was weighted using the standard deviation of the means. Synthetic spectra were generated for the following emissions: N2 Vegard-Kaphan; N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield; NO gamma, delta, and epsilon; OI 2972A, OII 2470A; and NII 2143A. Altitude profiles for the emissions were obtained. Tentative identification was made of the OIII 2853A emission. A comparison of VK and LBH profiles demonstrates the process of N2 A-state quenching by atomic oxygen.

  9. Molecular Detectability in Exoplanetary Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessenyi, M.; Tinetti, G.; Savini, G.; Pascale, E.

    2013-09-01

    Of the many recently discovered worlds orbiting distant stars, very little is yet known of their chemical composition. With the arrival of new transit spectroscopy and direct imaging facilities, the question of molecular detectability as a function of signal-to-noise (SNR), spectral resolving power and type of planets has become critical. We study the detectability of key molecules in the atmospheres of a range of planet types, and report on the minimum detectable abundances at fixed spectral resolving power and SNR. The planet types considered — hot Jupiters, hot super-Earths, warm Neptunes, temperate Jupiters and temperate super-Earths — cover most of the exoplanets characterisable today or in the near future. We focus on key atmospheric molecules, such as CH4, CO, CO2, NH3, H2O, C2H2, C2H6, HCN, H2S and PH.

  10. Digital filtering of plume emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

  11. Infrared emission spectra or uranium and thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, B.A.; Phillips, M.V.; Engleman, R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The region between 1 and 5.5 ..mu..m has been observed with a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. See-through hollow cathode lamps with calcium fluoride windows were operated at high current. Special precautions were required to minimize interference by blackbody radiation from the hot cathode. Observed lines were measured to an absolute accuracy of about 0.001 cm/sup -1/ and about 5% relative intensity accuracy. The argon carrier gas lines were readily distinguished by their much wider Doppler-broadened linewidths. Many lines were assigned to neutral or singly-ionized thorium on the basis of predicted transition wavenumbers calculated from accurate level lists. However, many lines remain to be assigned. This new spectral data connects to, and extends similar, spectral information given in our uranium and thorium atlases which cover the ultraviolet and visible regions.

  12. Detailed non-LTE calculations of the iron emission from NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Klein, Richard I.; Castor, John I.; Nash, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray iron line emission from NGC 1068 observed by the Ginga satellite is modeled using the new multiline, multilevel, non-LTE radiative transport code ALTAIR and a detailed atomic model for Ne-like through stripped iron. The parameter space of the obscured type 1 Seyfert nucleus model for this object is studied. The equivalent width is greater than previously predicted. It is found that detailed radiative transfer can have a significant effect on the observed line flux both for the K alpha line and for the L-shell emission. The ionization of the iron increases with temperature. Therefore the K alpha equivalent width and energy is a function not only of the ionization parameter, but also of the column depth and temperature. For a likely model of NGC 1068 it is found that the iron abundance is about twice solar, but that modifications of this model may permit a smaller abundance.

  13. SOLAR-WIND ION-DRIVEN X-RAY EMISSION FROM COMETARY AND PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES: MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL PREDICTIONS OF CHARGE-EXCHANGE CROSS-SECTIONS AND EMISSION SPECTRA FOR O{sup 6+} + H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, NO, N{sub 2}O, AND Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Machacek, J. R.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Schultz, D. R.; Ralchenko, Yu.; Moradmand, A.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2015-08-10

    Relevant to modeling and understanding X-ray emission from cometary and planetary atmospheres, total cross-sections for 1.17 and 2.33 keV/u O{sup 6+} colliding with H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, NO, N{sub 2}O, and Ar have been measured for the processes of single, double, and triple charge exchanges. Using these measurements as benchmarks, synthetic emission spectra spanning the X-ray, UV, and visible range have been calculated based on theoretical treatment of the transfer of between one and six electrons from the target neutrals to the projectile ion, followed by radiative and non-radiative decay of the highly excited states produced in these collisions. The results help add to the base of knowledge required to simulate ion-neutral processes in astrophysical environments; refine the present understanding of these fundamental atomic processes; and guide future observations, laboratory measurements, and theoretical predictions.

  14. K[beta] spectra of heliumlike iron from TFTR plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.J. ); Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; Hill, K.W.; von Goeler, S.; Timberlake, J. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A. )

    1992-12-01

    K[beta] spectra of helium-like iron, Fe XXV, have been observed from TFTR plasmas with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. The wavelength range of the Fe K[beta] spectrum partially overlaps the spectrum of helium-like nickel (Ni XXVII), which is used on TFTR and JET for ion temperature measurements. The experimental arrangement made it possible to observe the Fe XXV K[beta] lines and their satellite transitions of the type 1s2l[prime]31[double prime] [yields] 1s[sup 2]21[prime], as well as the entire satellite spectrum of the Ni XXVII K [alpha] line simultaneously. In order to identify the features of the K[beta] spectra and to study their possible interference with the Ni XXVII spectrum, the intensity of the K[beta] spectrum was enhanced by injection of iron into the plasma. Accurate wavelengths and intensities have been obtained and compared with different theoretical calculations.

  15. K{beta} spectra of heliumlike iron from TFTR plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.J.; Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; Hill, K.W.; von Goeler, S.; Timberlake, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A.

    1992-12-01

    K{beta} spectra of helium-like iron, Fe XXV, have been observed from TFTR plasmas with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. The wavelength range of the Fe K{beta} spectrum partially overlaps the spectrum of helium-like nickel (Ni XXVII), which is used on TFTR and JET for ion temperature measurements. The experimental arrangement made it possible to observe the Fe XXV K{beta} lines and their satellite transitions of the type 1s2l{prime}31{double_prime} {yields} 1s{sup 2}21{prime}, as well as the entire satellite spectrum of the Ni XXVII K {alpha} line simultaneously. In order to identify the features of the K{beta} spectra and to study their possible interference with the Ni XXVII spectrum, the intensity of the K{beta} spectrum was enhanced by injection of iron into the plasma. Accurate wavelengths and intensities have been obtained and compared with different theoretical calculations.

  16. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  17. New LRS spectra for 356 bright IRAS sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Kevin; Cohen, Martin

    1989-01-01

    The low-resolution spectra of all IRAS point sources with F(nu) (12 microns) greater than 40 Jy that were not included in the Atlas of Low-Resolution Spectra are presented. These have been classified into eight groups based upon the spectral morphology. Silicate emission spectra and red-continuum spectra associated with H II region sources form about 60 percent of this sample. All types of spectra in the LRS Atlas are represented in the sample except for emission-line sources. The sample is used to test a recent classification scheme for IRAS sources based on broadband colors. The spectra is used to test a recent classification scheme for IRAS sources based on broadband colors. The spectra are consistent with the classifications from the colors in most cases.

  18. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  19. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  20. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  1. Quantum synchrotron spectra from semirelativistic electrons in teragauss magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron spectra are calculated from quantum electrodynamic transition rates for thermal and power-law electron distributions. It is shown that quantum effects appear in thermal spectra when the photon energy is greater than the electron temperature, and in power-law spectra when the electron energy in units of the electron rest mass times the magnetic field strength in units of the critical field strength is of order unity. These spectra are compared with spectra calculated from the ultrarelativistic approximation for synchrotron emission. It is found that the approximation for the power-law spectra is good, and the approximation for thermal spectra produces the shape of the spectrum accurately but fails to give the correct normalization. Single photon pair creation masks the quantum effects for power-law distributions, so only modifications to thermal spectra are important for gamma-ray bursts.

  2. The width of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Borgonovo, Luis

    2015-03-01

    The emission processes active in the highly relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain unknown. In this paper, we propose a new measure to describe spectra: the width of the EFE spectrum, a quantity dependent only on finding a good fit to the data. We apply this to the full sample of GRBs observed by Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The results from the two instruments are fully consistent. We find that the median widths of spectra from long and short GRBs are significantly different (chance probability <10-6). The width does not correlate with either duration or hardness, and this is thus a new, independent distinction between the two classes. Comparing the measured spectra with widths of spectra from fundamental emission processes - synchrotron and blackbody radiation - the results indicate that a large fraction of GRB spectra are too narrow to be explained by synchrotron radiation from a distribution of electron energies: for example, 78 per cent of long GRBs and 85 per cent of short GRBs are incompatible with the minimum width of standard slow cooling synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, with fast cooling spectra predicting even wider spectra. Photospheric emission can explain the spectra if mechanisms are invoked to give a spectrum much broader than a blackbody.

  3. Infrared emission from interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The mid-IR absorption and Raman spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the mechanisms determining them are reviewed, and the implications for observations of similar emission spectra in interstellar clouds are considered. Topics addressed include the relationship between PAHs and amorphous C, the vibrational spectroscopy of PAHs, the molecular emission process, molecular anharmonicity, and the vibrational quasi-continuum. Extensive graphs, diagrams, and sample spectra are provided, and the interstellar emission bands are attributed to PAHs with 20-30 C atoms on the basis of the observed 3.3/3.4-micron intensity ratios.

  4. Lily Pad Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the 'Lily Pad' bounce-mark area at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was acquired on the 3rd sol, or martian day, of Opportunity's mission (Jan.26, 2004). The upper left image is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera, showing regions from which spectra were extracted from the 'Lily Pad' area. As noted by the line graph on the right, the green spectra is from the undisturbed surface and the red spectra is from the airbag bounce mark.

  5. Algorithms for classification of astronomical object spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiewicz, P.; Szuppe, J.; Hryniewicz, K.

    2015-09-01

    Obtaining interesting celestial objects from tens of thousands or even millions of recorded optical-ultraviolet spectra depends not only on the data quality but also on the accuracy of spectra decomposition. Additionally rapidly growing data volumes demands higher computing power and/or more efficient algorithms implementations. In this paper we speed up the process of substracting iron transitions and fitting Gaussian functions to emission peaks utilising C++ and OpenCL methods together with the NOSQL database. In this paper we implemented typical astronomical methods of detecting peaks in comparison to our previous hybrid methods implemented with CUDA.

  6. Mid-infrared spectra of comet nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S. P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Reach, William T.; Harker, David E.

    2017-03-01

    Comet nuclei and D-type asteroids have several similarities at optical and near-IR wavelengths, including near-featureless red reflectance spectra, and low albedos. Mineral identifications based on these characteristics are fraught with degeneracies, although some general trends can be identified. In contrast, spectral emissivity features in the mid-infrared provide important compositional information that might not otherwise be achievable. Jovian Trojan D-type asteroids have emissivity features strikingly similar to comet comae, suggesting that they have the same compositions and that the surfaces of the Trojans are highly porous. However, a direct comparison between a comet and asteroid surface has not been possible due to the paucity of spectra of comet nuclei at mid-infrared wavelengths. We present 5-35 μm thermal emission spectra of comets 10P/Tempel 2, and 49P/Arend-Rigaux observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our analysis reveals no evidence for a coma or tail at the time of observation, suggesting the spectra are dominated by the comet nucleus. We fit each spectrum with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) and find sizes in agreement with previous values. However, the NEATM beaming parameters of the nuclei, 0.74-0.83, are systematically lower than the Jupiter-family comet population mean of 1.03 ± 0.11, derived from 16- and 22-μm photometry. We suggest this may be either an artifact of the spectral reduction, or the consequence of an emissivity low near 16 μm. When the spectra are normalized by the NEATM model, a weak 10-μm silicate plateau is evident, with a shape similar to those seen in mid-infrared spectra of D-type asteroids. A silicate plateau is also evident in previously published Spitzer spectra of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1. We compare, in detail, these comet nucleus emission features to those seen in spectra of the Jovian Trojan D-types (624) Hektor, (911) Agamemnon, and (1172) Aneas, as well

  7. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. I - Iron line fluorescence from a subrelativistic shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of Her X-1 was observed in the energy range from 2 to 24 keV from August 29 to September 3, 1975. Emission features are observed near the K-alpha iron-line energy which exhibit both broadening and a double line structure. The total luminosity in these features is about 4 by 10 to the 35th power ergs/s. Iron line fluorescence from an opaque cool (not exceeding 1 million K) shell of material at the Alfven surface provides the necessary luminosity in this feature. The double line structure and the line energy width can be due to Doppler shifts if the shell is forced to corotate with the pulsar at a radius of at least 800 million cm. Implications of this model regarding physical conditions near Her X-1 are discussed.

  8. The analysis of spectra of novae taken near maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stryker, L. L.; Hestand, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wehrse, R.; Hauschildt, P.; Spies, W.; Baschek, B.; Shaviv, G.

    1988-01-01

    A project to analyze ultraviolet spectra of novae obtained at or near maximum optical light is presented. These spectra are characterized by a relatively cool continuum with superimposed permitted emission lines from ions such as Fe II, Mg II, and Si II. Spectra obtained late in the outburst show only emission lines from highly ionized species and in many cases these are forbidden lines. The ultraviolet data will be used with calculations of spherical, expanding, stellar atmospheres for novae to determine elemental abundances by spectral line synthesis. This method is extremely sensitive to the abundances and completely independent of the nebular analyses usually used to obtain novae abundances.

  9. SYNTHESIZED SPECTRA OF OPTICALLY THIN EMISSION LINES PRODUCED BY THE BIFROST STELLAR ATMOSPHERE CODE, INCLUDING NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION EFFECTS: A STUDY OF THE INTENSITY, NONTHERMAL LINE WIDTHS, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Olluri, K.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.; Pontieu, B. De

    2015-03-20

    In recent years realistic 3D numerical models of the solar atmosphere have become available. The models attempt to recreate the solar atmosphere and mimic observations in the best way, in order to make it possible to couple complicated observations with physical properties such as the temperatures, densities, velocities, and magnetic fields. We here present a study of synthetic spectra created using the Bifrost code in order to assess how well they fit with previously taken solar data. A study of the synthetic intensity, nonthermal line widths, Doppler shifts, and correlations between any two of these three components of the spectra first assuming statistical equilibrium is made, followed by a report on some of the effects nonequilibrium ionization will have on the synthesized spectra. We find that the synthetic intensities compare well with the observations. The synthetic observations depend on the assumed resolution and point-spread function (PSF) of the instrument, and we find a large effect on the results, especially for intensity and nonthermal line width. The Doppler shifts produce the reported persistent redshifts for the transition region (TR) lines and blueshifts for the upper TR and corona lines. The nonthermal line widths reproduce the well-known turnoff point around (2–3) × 10{sup 5} K, but with much lower values than those observed. The nonthermal line widths tend to increase with decreasing assumed instrumental resolution, also when nonequilibrium ionization is included. Correlations between the nonthermal line width of any two TR line studies as reported by Chae et al. are reproduced, while the correlations of intensity to line width are reproduced only after applying a PSF to the data. Doppler shift correlations reported by Doschek for the TR lines and correlations of Doppler shift to nonthermal line width of the Fe xii{sub 19.5} line reported by Doschek et al. are reproduced.

  10. HOTSPUR: gamma ray emission from spheres pulsed with D-T neutrons. I. Calibration of improved NE213 detector assembly. II. Comparison of TART/SANDYL electron recoil spectra to experiment; preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, E.; Hansen, L.F.; Komoto, T.T.; Pohl, B.A.

    1986-09-01

    The NE213 scintillator detector was modified so that the pulse height would be linear with electron energy over the full range of interest - up to 7.1 MeV. Absolute calibration was done with four different calibrated gamma sources. An average correction factor is obtained which normalizes SANDYL calculations with respect to the calibration experiments. The procedure for calculating neutron-induced gamma-ray output and electron recoil spectra is described, and experimental data from a number of spherical assemblies are given and compared to TART/SANDYL calculations. (LEW)

  11. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio. PMID:22168896

  12. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Chang; Li, Guan-Hua; Lin, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Ching-Wen; Wadekar, Paritosh; Chen, Quark Yung-Sung; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François Henri; Tu, Li-Wei

    2011-12-14

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio.

  13. Analysis of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    which were previously not known. 1. RESEARCH The Infrared Astronomical Satellite , IRAS, surveyed the sky in four wavelength bands centered on 12, 25, 60...agree at 12 Am unless a linear baseline is subtracted from the usable portion of the spectrum. The IRAS science team characterized the LRS spectra...that have silicate dust grain emission features extending from about 8 -14 Am with a maximum around 10 Am are characterized as 2n where n= I to 9

  14. Spectra of Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-22

    with a wave follower during Marsen. J. Gophysical Res. 88, 9844-9849. 11. Hughes, B.A., 1978. The effects on internal waves on surface waves : 2...Spectra of Surface Waves K. Watson March 1989 JSR-88-130 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DTIC SELECTE JUN0 11989 0 JASONE The...Arlington, VA 22209 8503Z 11. TITLE (hlde Secvfty Cof.kaftn) SPECTRA OF SURFACE WAVES (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOfRS) K. Watson 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME

  15. IR Plasma Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    a current mailing list. Do not return copies of this report unless contractural obligations or notices on a specific document requires that it be...of the relatively cold 0? gas surrounding the fireball (i.e. 02(cold) + hv --> 20*) and the broad emission arises from shock heating of the emission...experimental data and calculations 14 and 0 data from other work35 ,36. Experimental spectra were acquired by Assous 33 in an inductively- heated

  16. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-22

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer was used to obtain spatially-resolved measurements of Ti K-$\\alpha$ emission. Density profiles were measured from K-$\\alpha$ intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-$\\alpha$ spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This study shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  17. Quantum spectra and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (1) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems. This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential-energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (2) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes -- Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  18. Quantum Spectra and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    1992-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (i) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems--This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential -energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (ii) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes --Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  19. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  20. Output tube emission characteristics of operational radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, R. J.; Smilley, J. D.; Falcon, G. D.; Lawrence, V. S.

    1982-01-01

    Measurement of the emission spectra and other characteristics of many radars operating in the government frequency bands is described. The emission spectra of 19 different types of radars, selected to show the different emission spectrum characteristics produced by a variety of radar output tube technologies are presented. The radars include examples of ground based search, airport surveillance, weather, and height finding radars operating in L band, S band, or C band. The RSMS, contained within a mobile van, is described, along with the measurement techniques used for obtaining radar emission characteristics. The emission limits imposed by the Radar Spectrum Engineering Criteria (RSEC) are displayed with each emission spectrum.

  1. Disk-Averaged Synthetic Spectra of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong ,William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  2. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  3. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  4. Camera artifacts in IUE low-dispersion spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. Michael; Norman, Dara J.; Bruegman, Otto W.

    1990-01-01

    Sky-background images obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) were analyzed to study artificial spectral features (camera artifacts) in low-dispersion spectra. The artifacts mimic emission features and have been present in long-exposure spectra since the launch of the IUE satellite. The camera artifacts are strong in spectra characterized by long exposure times because they scale in time-integrated flux with the background level, which increases during the exposure due to camera phosphorescence. The artifacts cannot be detected in spectra obtained from short, direct exposures of flat-field lamps or standard stars. Plots of average sky-background spectra for the three operational IUE cameras (SWP, LWP, and LWR) are given to aid scientists in the identification of artifacts in their spectra.

  5. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  6. High-energy thermal synchrotron emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, J. N.; Epstein, R. I.; Petrosian, V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown how the thermal synchrotron emission spectrum is modified when the photon energy is greater than the mean energy of the radiating particles. The effect if applying this energy conservation constraint is to produce spectra which have less high-energy photon emission than had been previously estimated. The thermal synchrotron spectra provide satisfactory fits to recently observed very high energy gamma ray spectra of certain burst sources.

  7. EMPCA and Cluster Analysis of Quasar Spectra: Construction and Application to Simulated Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, Adam; Leighly, Karen; Wagner, Cassidy; Macinnis, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Quasars have complex spectra with emission lines influenced by many factors. Therefore, to fully describe the spectrum requires specification of a large number of parameters, such as line equivalent width, blueshift, and ratios. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) aims to construct eigenvectors-or principal components-from the data with the goal of finding a few key parameters that can be used to predict the rest of the spectrum fairly well. Analysis of simulated quasar spectra was used to verify and justify our modified application of PCA.We used a variant of PCA called Weighted Expectation Maximization PCA (EMPCA; Bailey 2012) along with k-means cluster analysis to analyze simulated quasar spectra. Our approach combines both analytical methods to address two known problems with classical PCA. EMPCA uses weights to account for uncertainty and missing points in the spectra. K-means groups similar spectra together to address the nonlinearity of quasar spectra, specifically variance in blueshifts and widths of the emission lines.In producing and analyzing simulations, we first tested the effects of varying equivalent widths and blueshifts on the derived principal components, and explored the differences between standard PCA and EMPCA. We also tested the effects of varying signal-to-noise ratio. Next we used the results of fits to composite quasar spectra (see accompanying poster by Wagner et al.) to construct a set of realistic simulated spectra, and subjected those spectra to the EMPCA /k-means analysis. We concluded that our approach was validated when we found that the mean spectra from our k-means clusters derived from PCA projection coefficients reproduced the trends observed in the composite spectra.Furthermore, our method needed only two eigenvectors to identify both sets of correlations used to construct the simulations, as well as indicating the linear and nonlinear segments. Comparing this to regular PCA, which can require a dozen or more components, or to

  8. First dynamic spectra of stellar microwave flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Bookbinder, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The VLA has been used in the spectral-line mode at 1.4 GHz to obtain the first dynamic spectra of stellar sources other than the sun. Two very intense, highly circularly polarized, microwave outbursts were observed on the dMe flare star UV Cet, in addition to a slowly varying, unpolarized component. One outburst was purely left circularly polarized and showed no variations as a function of frequency across the 41 MHz band, whereas the other was as much as 70 percent right-circularly polarized and showed distinct variations with frequency. Although the slowly varying emission is probably due to incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission, the two flaring events are the result of coherent mechanisms. The coherent emission is interpreted in terms of plasma radiation and the cyclotron maser instability.

  9. EMPCA and Cluster Analysis of Quasar Spectra: Application to SDSS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen; Marrs, Adam; Wagner, Cassidy; Macinnis, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the quasar continuum is necessary to measure and analyze absorption lines. But quasar continua, in particular the emission lines, vary from object to object. Patterns in the variations allow a spectral principal component analysis (SPCA) approach using large samples of quasar spectra, e.g., from the SDSS. Then, a small number of the derived principal component spectra can be used to reconstruct an arbitrary quasar's continuum.A problem with this approach is that the number of principal components required to model an arbitrary quasar, usually 8 to 20 in the literature, is large. One reason why so many components are required is that SPCA implicitly assumes that spectra bins are independent. Quasar emission lines are spread over a range of spectral bins, and more importantly, can sometimes be blueshifted. So while the intrinsic variability may only be a function of a few physical parameters, the nonlinearity inherent in the variations from object to object requires a large number of prinicipal components to accurately model a quasar continuum.We present a modified approach. We perform a SPCA analysis, using an expectation-maximization algorithm by Bailey et al. 2012, which takes into account uncertainties and missing data. We project the sample spectra on the resulting eignevectors to obtain the projection coefficients. Reasoning that intriniscally similar spectra will have similar projection coefficients, we perform a cluster analysis on the projection coefficients. The results are used to divide the sample into groups of similar spectra. A second PCA analysis is then performed on each group. We find that many fewer eigenspectra are required to accurately model the spectra in each group. We apply this approach to several samples of quasars from the SDSS.

  10. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  11. IUE spectra of F and late A stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Marstad, N. C.

    1981-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of alpha CMi (F5 IV-V), beta Cas (F2 IV), alpha Car (F0 Ib), and gamma Boo (A7 III) in the context of the question as to whether chromospheres disappear in the early F late A portions of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Both alpha CMi (Procyon) and beta Cas show bright emission line spectra indicative of chromospheres and transition regions, but neither alpha Car (Canopus) nor gamma Boo show any evidence of emission in their SWP spectra or at the Mg II lines, despite very deep exposures. Alpha CMi has emission line fluxes roughly 6 times those of the quiet Sun, but the rapidly rotating delta Scuti type variable beta Cas has surface fluxes 10 to 50 times those of the quiet Sun. Upper limits on emission line fluxes for alpha Car are 4 to 20 and for gamma Boo 15 to 80 times the quiet Sun. It is concluded that the apparent absence of emission lines in the spectra of alpha Car and gamma Boo should not be interpreted as due to the absence of nonradiatively heated outer atmospheres in stars hotter than spectral type F0, but rather to the inability to see emission lines with IUE against a background of scattered light and a bright photospheric absorption line spectrum either in low or high dispersion.

  12. A database of synthetic molecular spectra for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cami, J.; Markwick-Kemper, A. J.

    We present an online database of molecular template spectra for astrophysical purposes. The initial database contains over 100,000 individual template spectra for 42 molecules totalling 97 isotopomers, and we provide an interface to the calculation of more spectra tailored to users' individual needs. Normalized absorption spectra are calculated in the LTE limit and presented for a wide range of astrophysically relevant temperature and column density regimes. For the same parameters, pure emission spectra are also calculated. The template spectra can be retrieved at different instrumental resolving powers, and can be combined together with different abundances interactively. Users can request additional spectra to be calculated for other parameters, the results of which become part of the database. These template spectra will be useful for identification of molecular absorption and emission bands over a wide range of spectroscopic observations, and allow a first estimate of temperatures and column densities in the regions where the molecular bands are formed. We highlight the different applications for which we believe this database and service to be useful, and offer some examples of how the templates can be used in various astrophysical contexts, and in particular for the analyis of observations with ISO and Spitzer.

  13. RELATIVISTIC BROADENING OF IRON EMISSION LINES IN A SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, Laura W.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2009-09-10

    We present a uniform X-ray spectral analysis of eight type-1 active galactic nuclei that have been previously observed with relativistically broadened iron emission lines. Utilizing data from the XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC-pn) we carefully model the spectral continuum, taking complex intrinsic absorption and emission into account. We then proceed to model the broad Fe K{alpha} feature in each source with two different accretion disk emission line codes, as well as a self-consistent, ionized accretion disk spectrum convolved with relativistic smearing from the inner disk. Comparing the results, we show that relativistic blurring of the disk emission is required to explain the spectrum in most sources, even when one models the full reflection spectrum from the photoionized disk.

  14. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  15. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  16. Afterpulse time spectra of high-speed photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress of understanding of the afterpulse time spectra of high-speed photon detectors using photoemission and secondary emission processes is reviewed and summarized. Furthermore, the afterpulse time spectra of high-gain conventionally designed and microchannel plate photon detectors was investigated. Specifically, the devices studied included RCA 8850, RCA 8854 and ITT F 4129g photomultipliers. Descriptions are given of the measuring techniques.

  17. SPECTRA. September 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Transportation Services program with the Dragon capsule. (Credit: SpaceX /Chris Thompson) S p a c e c r a f t e n g in e e r in g spectra NRL...secondary payloads on board a Space Exploration Technologies ( SpaceX ), Inc., Falcon 9 launch vehicle. NRL’s nanosatellites are part of the CubeSat...Maryland. The primary payload launched aboard the SpaceX Falcon 9 was the Dragon capsule. Developed by SpaceX and sponsored by NASA’s Commercial Orbital

  18. Determinations of Photon Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    COVERED O14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 115. PAGE COUNT THESIS/ftFROW*W FROM TO 1989 1 54 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION A ?RQVk;U kOR 3UB LIC RELEASE...IAW AFR 190- 1 ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, 1st Lt, USAF Executive Officer, Civilian Institution ProQrams 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on...spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with

  19. Novel insights into anoxic/aerobic(1)/aerobic(2) biological fluidized-bed system for coke wastewater treatment by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hua-Se; Wei, Chao-Hai; Mo, Ce-Hui; Wu, Hai-Zhen; Ren, Yuan; Feng, Chun-Hua

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was applied to investigate the contaminant removal efficiency and fluorescent characteristic variations in a full scale coke wastewater (CWW) treatment plant with a novel anoxic/aerobic(1)/aerobic(2) (A/O(1)/O(2)) process, which combined with internal-loop fluidized-bed reactor. Routine monitoring results indicated that primary contaminants in CWW, such as phenols and free cyanide, were removed efficiently in A/O(1)/O(2) process (removal efficiency reached 99% and 95%, respectively). Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and PARAFAC identified three fluorescent components, including two humic-like fluorescence components (C1 and C3) and one protein-like component (C2). Principal component analysis revealed that C1 and C2 correlated with COD (correlation coefficient (r)=0.782, p<0.01 and r=0.921, p<0.01), respectively) and phenols (r=0.796, p<0.01 and r=0.914, p<0.01, respectively), suggesting that C1 and C2 might be associated with the predominating aromatic contaminants in CWW. C3 correlated with mixed liquor suspended solids (r=0.863, p<0.01) in fluidized-bed reactors, suggesting that it might represent the biological dissolved organic matter. In A/O(1)/O(2) process, the fluorescence intensities of C1 and C2 consecutively decreased, indicating the degradation of aromatic contaminants. Correspondingly, the fluorescence intensity of C3 increased in aerobic(1) stage, suggesting an increase of biological dissolved organic matter.

  20. Control spectra for Quito

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Roberto; Rivas-Medina, Alicia; Caiza, Pablo; Quizanga, Diego

    2017-03-01

    The Metropolitan District of Quito is located on or very close to segments of reverse blind faults, Puengasí, Ilumbisí-La Bota, Carcelen-El Inca, Bellavista-Catequilla and Tangahuilla, making it one of the most seismically dangerous cities in the world. The city is divided into five areas: south, south-central, central, north-central and north. For each of the urban areas, elastic response spectra are presented in this paper, which are determined by utilizing some of the new models of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) NGA-West2 program. These spectra are calculated considering the maximum magnitude that could be generated by the rupture of each fault segment, and taking into account the soil type that exists at different points of the city according to the Norma Ecuatoriana de la Construcción (2015). Subsequently, the recurrence period of earthquakes of high magnitude in each fault segment is determined from the physical parameters of the fault segments (size of the fault plane and slip rate) and the pattern of recurrence of type Gutenberg-Richter earthquakes with double truncation magnitude (Mmin and Mmax) is used.

  1. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  2. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  3. Multibubble Sonoluminescence Spectra of Water which Resemble Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, Y. T.; Gordeychuk, T. V.

    2000-06-01

    Multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) spectra of water from cavitation clouds were collected in the presence of different noble gases and at different acoustic intensities. Results show that at high acoustic intensity and with xenon as a dissolved gas the emission of the OH* radical becomes indiscernible from the continuum. These spectra resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) spectra. It is concluded that the source of emission in MBSL and SBSL can be the same, the difference in spectra is due to the higher temperature inside the bubble during SBSL.

  4. Multibubble sonoluminescence spectra of water which resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence

    PubMed

    Didenko; Gordeychuk

    2000-06-12

    Multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) spectra of water from cavitation clouds were collected in the presence of different noble gases and at different acoustic intensities. Results show that at high acoustic intensity and with xenon as a dissolved gas the emission of the OH* radical becomes indiscernible from the continuum. These spectra resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) spectra. It is concluded that the source of emission in MBSL and SBSL can be the same, the difference in spectra is due to the higher temperature inside the bubble during SBSL.

  5. Catalog of total excitation-emission and total synchronous fluorescence maps with synchronous fluorescence spectra of homologated fluorescent pesticides in large use in Morocco: development of a spectrometric low cost and direct analysis as an alert method in case of massive contamination of soils and waters by fluorescent pesticides.

    PubMed

    Foudeil, S; Hassoun, H; Lamhasni, T; Ait Lyazidi, S; Benyaich, F; Haddad, M; Choukrad, M; Boughdad, A; Bounakhla, M; Bounouira, H; Duarte, R M B O; Cachada, A; Duarte, A C

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a direct spectrometric approach to monitor soils and waters, at a lower cost than the widely used chromatographic techniques; a spectrometric approach that is effective, reliable, fast, easy to implement, and without any use of organic solvents whose utilization is subject to law limitation. It could be suitable at least as an alert method in case of massive contamination. Here, we present for the first time a catalog of excitation-emission and total synchronous fluorescence maps that may be considered as fingerprints of a series of homologated pesticides, in large use in Morocco, aiming at a direct detection of their remains in agricultural soils and neighboring waters. After a large survey among farmers, agricultural workers and product distributors in two important agricultural regions of Morocco (Doukkala-Abda and Sebou basin), 48 commercial pesticides, which are fluorescent, were chosen. A multi-component spectral database of these targeted commercial pesticides was elaborated. For each pesticide, dissolved in water at the lowest concentration giving a no-noise fluorescence spectrum, the total excitation-emission matrix (TEEM), the total synchronous fluorescence matrix (TSFM) in addition to synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) at those offsets giving the highest fluorescence intensity were recorded. To test this preliminary multi-component database, two real soil samples, collected at a wheat field and at a vine field in the region of Doukkala, were analyzed. Remains of the commercial Pirimor (Carbamate) and Atlantis (Sulfonylurea) were identified by comparison of the recorded TEEM, TSFM, and SFS to those of the preliminary catalog at one hand, and on the basis of the results of a field pre-survey. The developed approach seems satisfactory, and the fluorimetric fingerprint database is under extension to a higher number of fluorescent pesticides in common use among the Moroccan agricultural regions.

  6. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  7. Sequencing BPS spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  8. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; ...

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  9. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  10. An analysis of scattered light in low dispersion IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basri, G.; Clarke, J. T.; Haisch, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of light scattering from the low-resolution grating in the short wavelength spectrograph of the IUE Observatory was developed, in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of scattering on both continuum and line emission spectra. It is found that: (1) the redistribution of light by grating scattering did not appreciably alter either the shape or the absolute flux level of continuum spectra for A-F stars; (2) late-type stellar continua showed a tendency to flatten when observed in scattered light toward the shorter wavelengths; and (3) the effect of grating scattering on emission lines is to decrease measured line intensities by an increasing percentage toward the shorter wavelengths. The spectra obtained from scattering experiments for solar-type and late type stars are reproduced in graphic form.

  11. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  12. OVI absorbers in SDSS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan

    with the ubiquitous Lya forest lines, and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber and the measured S/N of the spectrum by modelling typical Ly forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the 'incompleteness and S/N corrected' redshift number densities of O VI absorbers. We can place a secure lower limit for the contribution of O VI to the closure mass density at the redshifts probed here: O OV I (2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 1.9 × 10 - 8 h -1 . We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionisation fraction, [Special characters omitted.] , and adopting the Anders & Grevesse (1989) solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicty of the gas probed in our search : z(2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 3.6 × 10 -4 h , in good agreement with other studies. These results demonstrate that large spectroscopic datasets such as SDSS can play an important role in QSO absorption line studies, in spite of the relatively low resolution. Lastly, we have performed a stacking analysis whereby we shift individual spectra back to the rest-frame of the absorber candidate, and derive a mean absorption spectrum for various subsamples. Besides further validating the reality of the absorbers themselves, i.e. ruling out spurious interlopers and other misclassifications, we can use these stacked spectra for a variety of purposes. First of all, we can judge the effects of additional cut criteria like a minimal strength for associated CIV absorption, and hence produce cleaner and better defined subsamples, increasing the strength of future proposals for high-resolution studies. Secondly, the stack itself contains valuable information about the gas probed in our search. We have

  13. AKN 564: An Unusual Component in the X-ray Spectra of NLSy1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; George, I. M.; Netzer, Hagai

    1999-01-01

    We present an ASCA observation of the narrow-line Seyfert l (NLSyl) Arakelian 564. The X-ray light curve shows rapid variability, but no evidence for energy-dependence to these variations, within the 0.6 - 10 keV bandpass. A strong (EW approximately 70 eV) spectral feature is observed close to 1 keV. A similar feature has been observed in TON S180, another member of the NLSyl class of objects, but has not been observed in broad-line Seyfert galaxies. The feature energy suggests a large contribution from Fe L-shell lines but its intensity is difficult to explain in terms of emission and/or absorption from photoionized gas. The models which predict most emission at 1 keV are characterized by extreme values of column density, Fe abundance and ionization parameter. Models based on gas in thermal equilibrium with kT approximately l keV provide an alternative parameterization of the soft spectrum. The latter may be interpreted as the hot intercloud medium, undergoing rapid cooling and producing strong Fe L-shell recombination lines. In all cases the physical conditions are rather different from those observed in broad-line Seyferts. The hard X-ray spectrum shows a broad and asymmetric Fe K(alpha) line of large equivalent width (approximately 550 eV) suggestive of significant emission from the inner accretion disk. The profile can be explained by a neutral disk viewed at approximately 60 deg to the line-of-sight, contrary to the hypothesis that NLSyls are viewed pole-on. The large EW of this line, the strong 1 keV emission and the strong optical Fe emission lines all suggest an extreme Fe abundance in this and perhaps other NLSyls.

  14. Investigating the Near-Infrared Properties of Planetary Nebulae II. Medium Resolution Spectra. 2; Medium Resolution Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hora, Joseph L.; Latter, William B.; Deutsch, Lynne K.

    1998-01-01

    We present medium-resolution (R approximately 700) near-infrared (lambda = 1 - 2.5 micrometers) spectra of a sample of planetary nebulae (PNe). A narrow slit was used which sampled discrete locations within the nebulae; observations were obtained at one or more positions in the 41 objects included in the survey. The PN spectra fall into one of four general categories: H1 emission line-dominated PNe, H1 and H2 emission line PNe, H2 emission line-dominated PNe, and continuum-dominated PNe. These categories correlate with morphological type, with the elliptical PNe falling into the first group, and the bipolar PNe primarily in the H2 and continuum emission groups. The categories also correlate with C/O ratio, with the O-rich objects falling into the first group and the C-rich objects in the groups. Other spectral features were observed in all catagories, such as continuum emission from the central star, and warm dust continuum emission towards the long wavelength end of the spectra. H2 was detected in four PNe in this survey for the first time. An analysis was performed using the H2 line ratios in all of the PN spectra in the survey where a sufficient number of lines were observed to determine the ortho-to-para ratio and the rotational and vibrational excitation temperatures of the H-2 in those objects. One unexpected result from this analysis is that the H-2 is excited by absorption of ultraviolet photons in most of the PNe, although there are several PNe in which collisional excitation plays an important role. The correlation between bipolar morphology and H2 emission has been strengthened with the new detections of H2 in this survey.

  15. Emissions Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page describes the role of emission inventories in the air quality management process, a description of how emission inventories are developed, and where U.S. emission inventory information can be found.

  16. CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA WITH LOCAL LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew; Vanderplas, Jake; Schneider, Jeff; Xiong Liang

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the use of dimensionality reduction techniques for the classification of stellar spectra selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using local linear embedding (LLE), a technique that preserves the local (and possibly nonlinear) structure within high-dimensional data sets, we show that the majority of stellar spectra can be represented as a one-dimensional sequence within a three-dimensional space. The position along this sequence is highly correlated with spectral temperature. Deviations from this 'stellar locus' are indicative of spectra with strong emission lines (including misclassified galaxies) or broad absorption lines (e.g., carbon stars). Based on this analysis, we propose a hierarchical classification scheme using LLE that progressively identifies and classifies stellar spectra in a manner that requires no feature extraction and that can reproduce the classic MK classifications to an accuracy of one type.

  17. Polarization effects in cutaneous autofluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Genova, Ts.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    Used polarized light for fluorescence excitation one could obtain response related to the anisotropy features of extracellular matrix. The fluorophore anisotropy is attenuated during lesions' growth and level of such decrease could be correlated with the stage of tumor development. Our preliminary investigations are based on in vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from healthy volunteers skin on different ages and from different anatomical places using linear polarizer and analyzer for excitation and emission light detected. Measurements were made using spectrofluorimeter FluoroLog 3 (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) with fiber-optic probe in steady-state regime using excitation in the region of 280-440 nm. Three different situations were evaluated and corresponding excitation-emission matrices were developed - with parallel and perpendicular positions for linear polarizer and analyzer, and without polarization of excitation and fluorescence light detected from a forearm skin surface. The fluorescence spectra obtained reveal differences in spectral intensity, related to general attenuation, due to filtering effects of used polarizer/analyzer couple. Significant spectral shape changes were observed for the complex autofluorescence signal detected, which correlated with collagen and protein cross-links fluorescence, that could be addressed to the tissue extracellular matrix and general condition of the skin investigated, due to morphological destruction during lesions' growth. A correlation between volunteers' age and the fluorescence spectra detected was observed during our measurements. Our next step is to increase developed initial database and to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescent polarization effects and found if they are significantly altered from normal skin to cancerous state of the tissue, this way to develop a non-invasive diagnostic tool for dermatological practice.

  18. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  19. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  20. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.