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Sample records for k3cddtpa k2cdh2o4cdedtah2o2 centre

  1. Science Learning Centres Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres aims to raise the quality of science teaching from Key Stage 1 through post-16 (ages 5-19). Short courses are provided locally through the regional Science Learning Centres and longer, more intensive programmes are available at the National Science Learning Centre in York. There are a growing number…

  2. Pretoria Centre Reaches Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    On 5 July 2014 six members of the Pretoria Centre of ASSA braved the light pollution of one of the shopping malls in Centurion to reach out to shoppers a la John Dobson and to show them the moon, Mars and Saturn. Although the centre hosts regular monthly public observing evenings, it was felt that we should take astronomy to the people rather than wait for the people to come to us.

  3. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  4. Wycheproof Education Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetnam and Godfrey, Melbourne (Australia).

    The Wycheproof township in New South Wales (Australia) is the regional center for a grain farming community. The Wycheproof Education Centre was formed by the merger of a separate primary and secondary school (on one site with existing buildings), into a single governing body that is educationally structured into junior, middle, and senior…

  5. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  6. The GSO Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, F.; Glorian, J.-M.; Génot, V.; Rouillard, A.; Petit, P.; Palacios, A.; Caux, E.; Wakelam, V.

    2015-12-01

    Hereafter we describe the activities of the Grand Sud-Ouest Data Centre operated for INSU (CNRS) by the OMP--IRAP and the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, in a collaboration with the OASU--LAB in Bordeaux and OREME--LUPM in Montpellier.

  7. Discovering a Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullagh, John; Stewart, James; Greenwood, Julian

    2007-01-01

    There has recently been a growth in the popularity of "science centres" and this development provides an excellent opportunity to support the primary science curriculum. Their use is therefore well worth including within initial teacher education courses. Hence, undergraduate student teachers at Stranmillis University College Belfast may now…

  8. The Iranian Documentation Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    The purpose of the Iranian Documentation Centr (Irandoc) was to collect that portion of the world's literature which was pertinent to Iran's research interests, to organize that material, and to promote its use by Iranian researchers. Stated more succinctly, Irandoc's purpose was to obtain ready access to the world's scientific literature in order…

  9. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  10. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  11. Elderly Care Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  12. International Seismological Centre

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.; Hughes, A.

    1979-01-01

    The International Seismological Centre had its origins when the British seismologist Professor John Milne returned to England from Japan in 1895 to retire at Shide on the Isle of Eight. In cooperation with the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Milne had set up a number of seismographic stations around the world and, while Tokyo, had published a Catalogue of 8,33 Earthquakes Recorded in Japan, 1885-1892. 

  13. Vision ergonomics at recycling centres.

    PubMed

    Hemphälä, Hillevi; Kihlstedt, Annika; Eklund, Jörgen

    2010-05-01

    All municipalities in Sweden offer their inhabitants a service for disposing of large-size and hazardous waste at local recycling centres. Opening hours at these centres include hours of darkness. The aims of this study were to 1) describe user and employee experiences of lighting and signs at Swedish recycling centres, 2) measure and assess the lighting system at the two recently built recycling centres in Linköping and to assess the legibility and visibility of the signs used and 3) propose recommendations regarding lighting and signs for recycling centres. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess experiences of employees and users, and light measurements were performed. By observing users, activities with different visual demands at different areas within the recycling centres were identified. Based on the literature, standards and stakeholder experiences, recommendations regarding lighting systems and sign design, illuminance, luminance and uniformity are proposed for recycling centres.

  14. Centrosomes as signalling centres

    PubMed Central

    Arquint, Christian; Gabryjonczyk, Anna-Maria; Nigg, Erich A.

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes—as well as the related spindle pole bodies (SPBs) of yeast—have been extensively studied from the perspective of their microtubule-organizing roles. Moreover, the biogenesis and duplication of these organelles have been the subject of much attention, and the importance of centrosomes and the centriole–ciliary apparatus for human disease is well recognized. Much less developed is our understanding of another facet of centrosomes and SPBs, namely their possible role as signalling centres. Yet, many signalling components, including kinases and phosphatases, have been associated with centrosomes and spindle poles, giving rise to the hypothesis that these organelles might serve as hubs for the integration and coordination of signalling pathways. In this review, we discuss a number of selected studies that bear on this notion. We cover different processes (cell cycle control, development, DNA damage response) and organisms (yeast, invertebrates and vertebrates), but have made no attempt to be comprehensive. This field is still young and although the concept of centrosomes and SPBs as signalling centres is attractive, it remains primarily a concept—in need of further scrutiny. We hope that this review will stimulate thought and experimentation. PMID:25047618

  15. Should "Teacher Centred Teaching" Replace "Student Centred Learning"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Patrick D.

    2008-01-01

    Mission statements of most HEIs across the UK support "student centred learning". In this paper, it is suggested that "teacher centred teaching" should also have a major role to play, improving the quality of the learning experience in higher education. Students are extremely diverse in their skills, weaknesses, and learning styles, but lecturers…

  16. CMCC Data Distribution Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, Giovanni; Fiore, Sandro; Negro, A.

    2010-05-01

    The CMCC Data Distribution Centre (DDC) is the primary entry point (web gateway) to the CMCC. It is a Data Grid Portal providing a ubiquitous and pervasive way to ease data publishing, climate metadata search, datasets discovery, metadata annotation, data access, data aggregation, sub-setting, etc. The grid portal security model includes the use of HTTPS protocol for secure communication with the client (based on X509v3 certificates that must be loaded into the browser) and secure cookies to establish and maintain user sessions. The CMCC DDC is now in a pre-production phase and it is currently used only by internal users (CMCC researchers and climate scientists). The most important component already available in the CMCC DDC is the Search Engine which allows users to perform, through web interfaces, distributed search and discovery activities by introducing one or more of the following search criteria: horizontal extent (which can be specified by interacting with a geographic map), vertical extent, temporal extent, keywords, topics, creation date, etc. By means of this page the user submits the first step of the query process on the metadata DB, then, she can choose one or more datasets retrieving and displaying the complete XML metadata description (from the browser). This way, the second step of the query process is carried out by accessing to a specific XML document of the metadata DB. Finally, through the web interface, the user can access to and download (partially or totally) the data stored on the storage device accessing to OPeNDAP servers and to other available grid storage interfaces. Requests concerning datasets stored in deep storage will be served asynchronously.

  17. National Centre of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Gy

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the social, political and economic background which led to the establishment of the Hungarian National Centre of Educational Technology and made essential the development of a national network of bases for promoting educational technology. (Author)

  18. Contemporary design for 'landmark' centre.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    As one of the UK's largest builders of healthcare facilities, construction company Morgan Ashurst is accustomed to delivering complex, challenging hospital projects. The construction of a new oncology centre at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton for Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust-- said to be the first new stand-alone radiotherapy centre to be built in the UK for almost 20 years--was no exception. Health Estate Journal reports. PMID:19711668

  19. RTEMS Centre - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Constantino, A.; Freitas, D.; Coutinho, M.; Faustino, S.; Mota, M.; Colaço, P.; Sousa, J.; Dias, L.; Damjanovic, B.; Zulianello, M.; Rufino, J.

    2009-05-01

    RTEMS CENTRE - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System is a joint ESA/Portuguese Task Force initiative to develop a support and maintenance centre to the Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS). This paper gives a high level visibility of the progress, the results obtained and the future work in the RTEMS CENTRE [6] and in the RTEMS Improvement [7] projects. RTEMS CENTRE started officially in November 2006, with the RTEMS 4.6.99.2 version. A full analysis of RTEMS operating system was produced. The architecture was analysed in terms of conceptual, organizational and operational concepts. The original objectives [1] of the centre were primarily to create and maintain technical expertise and competences in this RTOS, to develop a website to provide the European Space Community an entry point for obtaining support (http://rtemscentre.edisoft.pt), to design, develop, maintain and integrate some RTEMS support tools (Timeline Tool, Configuration and Management Tools), to maintain flight libraries and Board Support Packages, to develop a strong relationship with the World RTEMS Community and finally to produce some considerations in ARINC-653, DO-178B and ECSS E-40 standards. RTEMS Improvement is the continuation of the RTEMS CENTRE. Currently the RTEMS, version 4.8.0, is being facilitated for a future qualification. In this work, the validation material is being produced following the Galileo Software Standards Development Assurance Level B [5]. RTEMS is being completely tested, errors analysed, dead and deactivated code removed and tests produced to achieve 100% statement and decision coverage of source code [2]. The SW to exploit the LEON Memory Management Unit (MMU) hardware will be also added. A brief description of the expected implementations will be given.

  20. The digital eczema centre utrecht.

    PubMed

    van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Veelen, Carien; Hover, Maaike; Eland-de Kok, Petra; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Sonnevelt, Gert-Jan; Mensing, Geert; Pasmans, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMC Utrecht) has developed an eczema portal that combines e-consulting, monitoring and self-management training by a dermatology nurse online for patients and parents of young children with atopic dermatitis (AD). Patient satisfaction with the portal was high. It could be extended to become a Digital Eczema Centre for multidisciplinary collaboration between health-care providers from different locations and the patient. Before starting the construction of the Digital Eczema Centre, the feasibility was examined by carrying out a business case analysis. The purposes, strength and weaknesses showed that the Digital Eczema Centre offered opportunities to improve care for patients with AD. The financial analysis resulted in a medium/best case scenario with a positive result of euro50-240,000 over a period of five years. We expect that the Digital Eczema Centre will increase the accessibility and quality of care. The web-based patient record and the digital chain-of-care promote the involvement of patients, parents and multidisciplinary teams as well as the continuity and coordination of care.

  1. Some Models of Mathematics Teachers' Centres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B.

    There are two types of teacher centres in Great Britain, multi-purpose centres designed for all subjects of the curriculum, and topical centres which deal specifically with one area of subject matter such as mathematics, English, etc. In this paper, the five mathematics centres in London are analyzed for purpose, materials available, and…

  2. Women's Information Centre, Bangkok, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1988

    1988-01-01

    The Women's Information Centre in Bangkok, Thailand, focuses on the creation of modules for professional skills training, awareness-building, organizing, and self-determination of women in rural areas, urban areas, and factories. It also supports women-related research. (JOW)

  3. The Tehran Book Processing Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    Establishment of the Tehran Book Processing Centre (Tebroc) was proposed in the Spring of 1968. This document is a descriptive and historical account of the center, and a description of its contributions to Iranian processing development. The center was modeled, to a certain extent, after Bro-Dart's Alanar in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Tebroc was…

  4. EAC: The European Astronauts Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, Andres

    The newly established European Astronauts Centre (EAC) in Cologne represents the European Astronauts Home Base and will become a centre of expertise on European astronauts activities. The paper gives an overview of the European approach to man-in-space, describes the European Astronauts Policy and presents the major EAC roles and responsibilities including the management of selection, recruitment and flight assignment of astronauts; the astronauts support and medical surveillance; the supervision of the astronauts' non-flight assignments; crew safety; the definition of the overall astronauts training programme; the scheduling and supervision of the training facilities; the implementation of Basic Training; the recruitment, training and certification of instructors, and the interface to NASA in the framework of the Space Station Freedom programme. An overview is given on the organisation of EAC, and on the European candidate astronauts selection performed in 1991.

  5. Communicating astronomy by the Unizul Science Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesham, A.; Beesham, N.

    2015-03-01

    The University of Zululand, situated along the east coast of KwaZulu-Natal, has a thriving Science Centre (USC) situated in the developing port city of Richards Bay. Over 30 000 learners visit the centre annually, and it consists of an exhibition area, an auditorium, lecture areas and offices. The shows consist of interactive games, science shows, competitions, quizzes and matriculation workshops. Outreach activities take place through a mobile science centre for schools and communities that cannot visit the centre.

  6. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  7. Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, G.; Potukuchi, P.; Roy, A.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne is collaborating with the Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), New Delhi, to develop a new type of superconducting accelerating structure for low-velocity heavy ions. A copper model has been evaluated and tests on the niobium prototype are currently in progress. Some technical details of this project are described in the Superconducting Linac Development section of this report. All funding for the prototype has come from the NSC, and they have also stationed two staff members at ATLAS for the past two years to gain experience and work on this project. Additional NSC personnel visited ATLAS for extended periods during 1994 for electronics and cryogenics experience and training. Two NSC staff members are scheduled to spend several months at ANL during 1995 to continue tests and developments of the prototype resonators and to initiate fabrication of the production models for their linac project.

  8. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Faheem

    2008-07-01

    This talk traces in brief the genesis of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, as one of Prof. Abdus Salam's major achievements. It outlines why Salam felt the necessity for establishing such a centre to help physicists in the developing world. It situates the founding of the Centre within Salam's broader vision of the causes of underdevelopment and of science as an engine for scientific, technological, economic and social development. The talk reviews the successes and failures of the ICTP and gives a brief overall view of the current status of the Centre.

  9. The European NEO Coordination Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Borgia, B.; Micheli, M.

    An operational approach to NEO (Near-Earth Object) hazard monitoring has been developed at European level within the framework of the Space Situational Awareness Program (SSA) of the European Space Agency (ESA). Through federating European assets and profiting of the expertise developed in European Universities and Research Centers, it has been possible to start the deployment of the so-called SSA NEO Segment. This initiative aims to provide a significant contribution to the worldwide effort to the discovery, follow-up and characterization of the near-Earth object population. A major achievement has been the inauguration in May 2013 of the ESA NEO Coordination Centre located at ESRIN (Frascati, Italy). The goal of the NEOCC Precursor Service operations is twofold: to make available updated information on the NEO population and the associated hazard and to contribute to optimize the NEO observational efforts. This is done by maintaining and improving a Web Portal publicly available at http://neo.ssa.esa.int and by performing follow-up observations through a network of collaborating telescopes and facilities. An overview of the SSA-NEO System and a summary of the first two years of NEOCC operations is presented.

  10. The Irish Centre for Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilheany, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Conducting potency tests on penicillin, discussing rocket technology with a NASA astronaut, analysing animal bone fragments from medieval times, these are just some of the activities which occupy the time of students at The Irish Centre for Talented Youth. The Centre identifies young students with exceptional academic ability and then provides…

  11. Promotion in Call Centres: Opportunities and Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorjup, Maria Tatiana; Valverde, Mireia; Ryan, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the quality of jobs in call centres by focusing on the opportunities for promotion in this sector. More specifically, the research questions focus on discovering whether promotion is common practise in the call centre sector and on identifying the factors that affect this.…

  12. Student Centred Approaches: Teachers' Learning and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, Colleen; Davies, Anne; Weaven, Mary; Hooley, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Student centred approaches to teaching and learning in mathematics is one of the reforms currently being advocated and implemented to improve mathematics outcomes for students from low socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds. The models, meanings and practices of student centred approaches explored in this paper reveal that a constructivist model…

  13. The European Centre for Leisure and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Supported by UNESCO, the European Centre for Leisure and Education is an establishment of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences. The task of the Centre lies in the search for common trends of leisure and education in Europe, involving four types of activity: research, editorial, bibliographic, and documentary. It has sponsored conferences, and has…

  14. The role of the sexual assault centre.

    PubMed

    Eogan, Maeve; McHugh, Anne; Holohan, Mary

    2013-02-01

    Sexual Assault Centres provide multidisciplinary care for men and women who have experienced sexual crime. These centres enable provision of medical, forensic, psychological support and follow-up care, even if patients chose not to report the incident to the police service. Sexual Support Centres need to provide a ring-fenced, forensically clean environment. They need to be appropriately staffed and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to allow prompt provision of medical and supportive care and collection of forensic evidence. Sexual Assault Centres work best within the context of a core agreed model of care, which includes defined multi-agency guidelines and care pathways, close links with forensic science and police services, and designated and sustainable funding arrangements. Additionally, Sexual Assault Centres also participate in patient, staff and community education and risk reduction. Furthermore, they contribute to the development, evaluation and implementation of national strategies on domestic, sexual and gender-based violence. PMID:22975433

  15. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  16. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  17. Centre for human development, stem cells & regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    The Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration (CHDSCR) was founded in 2004 as a cross-disciplinary research and translational program within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton. The Centre undertakes fundamental research into early development and stem cells together with applied translational research for patient benefit. The Centre has vibrant and thriving multidisciplinary research programs that harness the translational strength of the Faculty together with an innovative Stem Cell PhD program, outstanding clinical infrastructure and enterprise to deliver on this vision.

  18. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  19. Towards Human-Centred Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  20. Identity Theft: A Study in Contact Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Iain; Weir, George R. S.

    This paper explores the recent phenomenon of identity theft. In particular, it examines the contact centre environment as a mechanism for this to occur. Through a survey that was conducted amongst forty-five contact centre workers in the Glasgow area we determined that contact centres can and do provide a mechanism for identity theft. Specifically, we found a particularly high incidence of agents who had previously dealt with phone calls that they considered suspicious. Furthermore, there are agents within such environments who have previously been offered money in exchange for customers' details, or who know of fellow workers who received such offers. Lastly, we identify specific practices within contact centres that may contribute to the likelihood of identity theft.

  1. The Western European Union Satellite Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasani, Bhupendra; Mara, Simon

    1993-06-01

    In January 1993, the FALCON consortium of 13 European companies, led by Cray Systems, won the contract to supply a turnkey satellite image processing facility to the Western European Union. The project started immediately and will be installed at WEU's Data Centre in Torrejon near Madrid in December 1993. This paper discusses the development of an idea for a Regional Satellite Monitoring Agency (RSMA) which will be realized in December 1993 when the Centre becomes fully operational.

  2. Dublin centre sees light of day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John

    2008-01-01

    An innovative new centre designed to get the public interested in science and technology will open at Trinity College Dublin later this month. The centre, known as the Science Gallery, will allow scientists and the public to debate and exchange ideas through a variety of interactive exhibitions, workshops and other events. The first exhibition will be “Lightwave” - a nine-day, city-wide festival about the principles of light and the technologies used to control it.

  3. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    PubMed

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist. PMID:26826952

  4. Transmission of HIV in dialysis centre.

    PubMed

    Velandia, M; Fridkin, S K; Cárdenas, V; Boshell, J; Ramirez, G; Bland, L; Iglesias, A; Jarvis, W

    1995-06-01

    In August, 1993, 13 dialysis patients at one dialysis centre in Colombia, South America, were found to be HIV positive, and this prompted an epidemiological investigation. We carried out a cohort study of all dialysis centre patients during January, 1992 to December, 1993 (epidemic period) to determine risk factors for HIV seroconversion. Haemodialysis and medical records were reviewed, dialysis centre staff and surviving patients were interviewed, and dialysis practices were observed. Stored sera from all dialysis centre patients were tested for HIV antibody. 12 (52%) of 23 patients tested positive for HIV antibody by enzyme immunoassay and western blot during the epidemic period. Of the 23 tested, 9 (39%) converted from HIV antibody negative to positive (seroconverters) and 10 (44%) remained HIV negative (seronegatives). The HIV seroconversion rate was higher among patients dialysed at the centre while a new patient, who was HIV seropositive, was dialysed there (90% vs 0%; p < 0.01), or when the dialysis centre reprocessed access needles, dialysers, and bloodlines (60% vs 0%). While 2 of 9 HIV seroconverters had had sex with prostitutes, none had received unscreened blood products or had other HIV risk factors. No surgical or dental procedures were associated with HIV seroconversion. Dialysers were reprocessed separately with 5% formaldehyde and were labelled for use on the same patient. Access needles were reprocessed by soaking them in a common container with a low-level disinfectant, benzalkonium chloride; 4 pairs of needles were placed in one pan creating the potential for cross-contamination or use of one patient's needles on another patient. HIV transmission at the dialysis centre was confirmed. Improperly reprocessed patient-care equipment, most probably access needles, is the likely mechanism of transmission. This outbreak was discovered by accident and similar transmission may be occurring in many other countries where low-level disinfectants are used to

  5. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  6. Data Centres In The Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, F.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy has been at the forefront for the development of on-line services, and astronomers routinely retrieve data from observatory archives, information from value-added services provided by data centres, and bibliography from the ADS and electronic journals. The Virtual Observatory aims at going one step further by providing astronomers with seamless and transparent access to data and services, and data centres with a framework to publish their data and services. Many teams size the opportunity and express their willingness to provide VO services in their domains of expertise, such as data compilations or specific tools, including theory data and services. The VO allows astronomers to discover and use resources of interest for their research, and specific tools can be interfaced with more general VO portals. This means that even small teams can have a significant contribution if they choose the proper niche. VO projects are organising themselves to help these new data centres to uptake the VO framework. Traditional data centres also have a role to play in explaining the constraints linked to service quality and sustainability. The VO "Data Centre Alliance" opens exciting new prospects for increasing the sharing of knowledge throughout the community.

  7. Incident and Emergency Centre of the IAEA.

    PubMed

    Baciu, Florian; Buglova, Elena; Martincic, Rafael; Spiegelberg Planer, Rejane; Stern, Warren; Winkler, Guenther

    2010-06-01

    The Incident and Emergency Centre of the International Atomic Emergency Agency is the global focal point for preparedness, event reporting, and response to nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies irrespective of their cause. The Centre continuously works to develop standards and guidance for strengthening Member States' preparedness; develops practical tools and training programs to assist Member States in promptly applying the standards and guidance; and organizes a variety of training events and exercises. The Centre evaluates national plans and assists in their development; facilitates effective communication between countries; develops response procedures; and supports national exercises. The Centre provides access to multiple information resources; assesses trends that may influence crisis and consequence management plans and response; and develops and continuously enhances methodology for identifying conditions needed for early warning and response. The Centre provides around-the-clock assistance to Member States in dealing with nuclear and radiological events, including security related events through timely and efficient services and the provision of a coordinated international response to such emergencies. PMID:20445379

  8. Optimizing Data Centre Energy and Environmental Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikema, David Hendrik

    Data centres use an estimated 2% of US electrical power which accounts for much of their total cost of ownership. This consumption continues to grow, further straining power grids attempting to integrate more renewable energy. This dissertation focuses on assessing and reducing data centre environmental and financial costs. Emissions of projects undertaken to lower the data centre environmental footprints can be assessed and the emission reduction projects compared using an ISO-14064-2-compliant greenhouse gas reduction protocol outlined herein. I was closely involved with the development of the protocol. Full lifecycle analysis and verifying that projects exceed business-as-usual expectations are addressed, and a test project is described. Consuming power when it is low cost or when renewable energy is available can be used to reduce the financial and environmental costs of computing. Adaptation based on the power price showed 10--50% potential savings in typical cases, and local renewable energy use could be increased by 10--80%. Allowing a fraction of high-priority tasks to proceed unimpeded still allows significant savings. Power grid operators use mechanisms called ancillary services to address variation and system failures, paying organizations to alter power consumption on request. By bidding to offer these services, data centres may be able to lower their energy costs while reducing their environmental impact. If providing contingency reserves which require only infrequent action, savings of up to 12% were seen in simulations. Greater power cost savings are possible for those ceding more control to the power grid operator. Coordinating multiple data centres adds overhead, and altering at which data centre requests are processed based on changes in the financial or environmental costs of power is likely to increase this overhead. Tests of virtual machine migrations showed that in some cases there was no visible increase in power use while in others power use

  9. From serenity to halcyon birth centre.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This article follows the journey of Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust quest for improving normal birth outcomes for a complex and diverse population. The opportunities that led to commissioning a colocated and freestanding birth centre are explored and how the design was influenced by less clinical beliefs about birth. Through the story of both birth centre developments, Kathryn Gutteridge shows the changes that have been seen in both clinical outcomes and families'comments. From a failing maternity service to a beacon of light where midwifery care and a belief that 'your birth in our home' really matters.

  10. Journey to the Centre of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Using the film "Journey to the Centre of a Triangle" with a group of 15-year-old pupils, the author describes how they had done some work on constructions such as angle bisector and perpendicular bisector. The pupils were given A3 papers, rulers, compasses and pencils and they were asked to recreate their favourite scence from the film. The film…

  11. Self Assessment and Student-Centred Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to show how self assessment facilitates student-centred learning (SCL) and fills a gap in the literature. Two groups of students were selected from a single class in a tertiary educational institution. The control group of 25 was selected randomly by the tossing of an unbiased coin (heads = control group). They were trained in the…

  12. Crystallographic Data Centre Services and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Univ. (England). Chemical Lab.

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data based on diffraction methods. The source of input is almost entirely primary journals. Bibliographic information and numeric data on crystal and molecular structures are on magnetic tapes. The bibliographic file…

  13. The Centre Program for Project Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, William H., III

    Reported is a research and development program, Project Opportunity, which involved 11 high schools in eight Southern states. Sponsors and participants were the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the Ford Foundation, Berea, Centre, and Transylvania Colleges, the schools systems of Breathitt and Lee Counties and the Princeton, N.J., High…

  14. Myanmar: The Community Learning Centre Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middelborg, Jorn; Duvieusart, Baudouin, Ed.

    A community learning centre (CLC) is a local educational institution outside the formal education system, usually set up and managed by local people. CLCs were first introduced in Myanmar in 1994, and by 2001 there were 71 CLCs in 11 townships. The townships are characterized by remoteness, landlessness, unemployment, dependency on one cash crop,…

  15. In the Field: The Canadian Ecology Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Clare

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Ecology Centre (Ontario) offers year-round residential and day programs in outdoor and environmental education for secondary students, field placement and internship opportunities for college students, and ecotourism programs, while providing employment and tax revenues to the local community. Dubbed consensus environmentalism, the…

  16. UV LED lighting for automated crystal centring.

    PubMed

    Chavas, Leonard M G; Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2011-01-01

    A direct outcome of the exponential growth of macromolecular crystallography is the continuously increasing demand for synchrotron beam time, both from academic and industrial users. As more and more projects entail screening a profusion of sample crystals, fully automated procedures at every level of the experiments are being implemented at all synchrotron facilities. One of the major obstacles to achieving such automation lies in the sample recognition and centring in the X-ray beam. The capacity of UV light to specifically react with aromatic residues present in proteins or with DNA base pairs is at the basis of UV-assisted crystal centring. Although very efficient, a well known side effect of illuminating biological samples with strong UV sources is the damage induced on the irradiated samples. In the present study the effectiveness of a softer UV light for crystal centring by taking advantage of low-power light-emitting diode (LED) sources has been investigated. The use of UV LEDs represents a low-cost solution for crystal centring with high specificity.

  17. Student-Centred Learning: A Humanist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangney, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The notion of student-centred learning is often not defined; within the pedagogic literature it is generally associated with constructivism or principles associated with a constructivist environment such as building on prior knowledge, purposeful active learning and sense-making. An informal enquiry into conceptions of university staff prior to…

  18. [The coordination of care in health centres].

    PubMed

    Ribardière, Olivia

    2016-06-01

    Health centres are structurally designed to facilitate the coordination of care. However, evolutions in society have resulted in forms of consumption of health care which are not necessarily compatible with efficient care coordination. On a local level, teams are nevertheless organising and structuring themselves to offer the right form of care, to the right patient and at the right time.

  19. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  20. Learning Skills Centre--Department Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Pat

    This report on an internal evaluation, which was conducted for developmental purposes, describes services provided at the Learning Skills Centres (LSC) on three separate campuses of Grant MacEwan Community College, in Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). The key questions of the evaluation addressed student and staff awareness of the existence of the LSC;…

  1. Writing Centre Tutoring Sessions: Addressing Students' Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winder, Roger; Kathpalia, Sujata S.; Koo, Swit Ling

    2016-01-01

    The guiding principle behind university writing centres is to focus on the process of writing rather than the finished product, prioritising higher order concerns related to organisation and argumentation of texts rather than lower order concerns of grammar and punctuation. Using survey-based data, this paper examines students' concerns regarding…

  2. Cactus: The Centres of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of two articles which describe how to use "JavaSketchPad" to explore the centres of a triangle. This introductory exercise is suggested in the GSP "Workshop Guide". Students can use "JavaSketchPad Interactive Geometry" (JSP) at home at no cost. They are likely to impress their parents with their enthusiasm for geometry and all…

  3. Collaborating at a distance: operations centres, tools, and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Successful operation of the LHC and its experiments is crucial to the future of the worldwide high-energy physics program. Remote operations and monitoring centres have been established for the CMS experiment in several locations around the world. The development of remote centres began with the LHC{at}FNAL ROC and has evolved into a unified approach with distributed centres that are collectively referred to as 'CMS Centres Worldwide'. An overview of the development of remote centres for CMS will be presented, along with a synopsis of collaborative tools that are used in these centres today and trends in the development of remote operations capabilities for high-energy physics.

  4. Effects of unstratified and centre-stratified randomization in multi-centre clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of randomization effects in multi-centre clinical trials. The two randomization schemes most often used in clinical trials are considered: unstratified and centre-stratified block-permuted randomization. The prediction of the number of patients randomized to different treatment arms in different regions during the recruitment period accounting for the stochastic nature of the recruitment and effects of multiple centres is investigated. A new analytic approach using a Poisson-gamma patient recruitment model (patients arrive at different centres according to Poisson processes with rates sampled from a gamma distributed population) and its further extensions is proposed. Closed-form expressions for corresponding distributions of the predicted number of the patients randomized in different regions are derived. In the case of two treatments, the properties of the total imbalance in the number of patients on treatment arms caused by using centre-stratified randomization are investigated and for a large number of centres a normal approximation of imbalance is proved. The impact of imbalance on the power of the study is considered. It is shown that the loss of statistical power is practically negligible and can be compensated by a minor increase in sample size. The influence of patient dropout is also investigated. The impact of randomization on predicted drug supply overage is discussed.

  5. [The development process of colon cancer centres].

    PubMed

    Sahm, M; Wesselmann, S; Kube, R; Schöffel, N; Pross, M; Lippert, H; Kahl, S

    2013-02-01

    Colon carcinomas are the most common malignant tumours in the Western world. Important findings about the overall quality of medical care have been reported in multi-centre observational studies. A quality enhancement of therapeutic care can be achieved by an additional increase in diagnostic and therapeutic measures in the interdisciplinary setting. The development of colon cancer centres improves the chance to objectively observe the results of medical care induced by the development of an interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral unit that includes a comprehensive medical care for patients. The implementation of the current medical findings based on evidence in clinical routine, the inspection of the usage of guidelines by external specialists as part of an audit and the continuous correction of analysed deficits in the course of treatment guarantee a continuous improvement of service.

  6. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-12-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC has established a network of more than fifty inter-connected "CMS Centres" at CERN and in institutes in the Americas, Asia, Australasia, and Europe. These facilities are used by people doing CMS detector and computing grid operations, remote shifts, data quality monitoring and analysis, as well as education and outreach. We present the computing, software, and collaborative tools and videoconferencing systems. These include permanently running "telepresence" video links (hardware-based H.323, EVO and Vidyo), Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  7. User-Centred Design Using Gamestorming.

    PubMed

    Currie, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    User-centered design (UX) is becoming a standard in software engineering and has tremendous potential in healthcare. The purpose of this tutorial will be to demonstrate and provide participants with practice in user-centred design methods that involve 'Gamestorming', a form of brainstorming where 'the rules of life are temporarily suspended'. Participants will learn and apply gamestorming methods including persona development via empathy mapping and methods to translate artefacts derived from participatory design sessions into functional and design requirements.

  8. 12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FIRST CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE, LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FIRST CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE, LATER FARMER DEACON'S SHOP, WITH SECOND CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE IN BACKGROUND - Shaker Centre Family Dwelling House (First), North side of Village Road, North of U.S. Route 68 & State Route 33 intersection, Shakertown, Mercer County, KY

  9. Centre-Based Child Care Quality in Urban Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishimine, Karin; Wilson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of childcare centres in urban Australian communities designated according to different bands of Centre Location Demographics (CLD). Childcare centres were assessed using the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- Revised Edition (ECERS-R) and the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Extension (ECERS-E).…

  10. Canadian Educational Development Centre Websites: More Ebb than Flow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines information portrayed on Canadian educational development (ED) centre websites and, in particular, whether information that corresponds to questions compiled from a literature search of ED centre practices is readily available from centre websites. This study phase is part of a larger national study of Canadian educational…

  11. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life.

    PubMed

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London's East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell's first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory.

  12. Reaching the Students that Student-Centred Learning Cannot Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockings, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Student-centred learning has the potential to engage a more academically diverse student body than the more conventional teacher-centred approaches. In spite of the evidence in favour of student-centred learning, a recent study showed that it was ineffective for around 30% of undergraduates in a large and diverse group studying business operations…

  13. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London’s East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell’s first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory. PMID:26340279

  14. The "Magic" of Tutorial Centres in Hong Kong: An Analysis of Media Marketing and Pedagogy in a Tutorial Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask…

  15. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    PubMed Central

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  16. Hunting for hardware changes in data centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho dos Santos, M.; Steers, I.; Szebenyi, I.; Xafi, A.; Barring, O.; Bonfillou, E.

    2012-12-01

    With many servers and server parts the environment of warehouse sized data centres is increasingly complex. Server life-cycle management and hardware failures are responsible for frequent changes that need to be managed. To manage these changes better a project codenamed “hardware hound” focusing on hardware failure trending and hardware inventory has been started at CERN. By creating and using a hardware oriented data set - the inventory - with detailed information on servers and their parts as well as tracking changes to this inventory, the project aims at, for example, being able to discover trends in hardware failure rates.

  17. Nicotine levels in indoor athletic centres.

    PubMed

    Michael, C M; Demetriou, E; Kosmas, V; Krashia, A; Akkelidou, D

    1996-12-01

    The levels of nicotine during athletic events were measured at six indoor athletic centres in Cyprus. Samples of air were pumped through a tube containing XAD-4 resin. Quantitation of nicotine was carried out by GC with a method detection limit of 0.03 microgram of nicotine, recovery ranged between 99.5 and 100.5%. Confirmation of the nicotine presence was carried out by GC/MS. The concentrations of nicotine measured were between 3.6 and 39.0 micrograms/Nm3 with a geometric mean range 6.5-28.3 micrograms/Nm3.

  18. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary ‘build to apply’ and ‘build to understand’ approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  19. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia.

  20. KNMI Data Centre: Easy access for all

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vegte, John; Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Spit, Jasper; Mastop, Joeri; Klos, Olaf; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu-Siu; van Moosel, Wim; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    KNMI is the Dutch institute for weather, climate research and seismology. It disseminates weather information to the public at large, the government, aviation and the shipping industry in the interest of safety, the economy and a sustainable environment. To gain insight into long-term developments KNMI conducts research on climate change. Making the knowledge, data and information on hand at KNMI accessible is one core activity. A huge part of the KNMI information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project these issues are tackled. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM was chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven open source technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) resulted in a first release in December 2012 This presentation will focus on the aspects of KDC relating to its technical challenges, the development strategy and the initial usage results of the data centre.

  1. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  2. The Curriculum Development Centre of Malaysia. Studies of Curriculum Development Centres in Asia 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oon-Chye, Yeoh; And Others

    The Curriculum Development Centre (CDC) of Malaysia became an operating agency in January 1973 and became a division of the Malaysia Ministry of Education in May 1974. Its establishment was the culmination of over a decade of curriculum development efforts by the Ministry of Education. The CDC was an outgrowth of both the First and Second Malaysia…

  3. The obtaining relative position of lunar centre masses and centre of the figure in selenocentric catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedjev, Yu. A.; Valeev, S. G.; Rizvanov, N. G.; Mikeev, R. R.; Varaksina, N. Yu.

    2010-05-01

    The relative position of lunar center masses relative to center of the figure in Kazan and Kiev selenocentric catalogues was customized. The expansions by spherical harmonics N=5 degree and order of the lunar function h(λ, β) with using the package ASNI USTU were executed. Module of the expansion of the local area to surfaces to full sphere was used. The parameters of cosmic missions are given for comparison (SAI; Bills, Ferrari). The normalized coefficients from expansions for eight sources hypsometric information are obtained: - Clementine (N=40), - Kazan (N=5), - Kiev (N=5), - SAI (N=10; Chuikova (1975)), - Bills, Ferrari, - Каguуа (Selena, Japan mission), - ULCN (The Uuified Lunaz Control Network 2005). The displacements of the lunar centre figure relative to lunar centre of the masses were defined from equations (Chuikova (1975)). The results of the obtaining relative position of the lunar centre masses and centre of the figure in Kazan selenocentric catalogue give good agreement with modern cosmic mission data.

  4. Children's Centre "3 in 1 - together"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancheva, Hristina

    2013-04-01

    "There are only two ways to life your live. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle." Albert Einstein Children's Centre "3 in 1" is an extracurricular unit linked to the High School of Zlatartitsa, St. Cyril and St. Methodius, accomplished with the help of the municipality and many volunteers from the local community. With its activity it forms in children patriotic spirit, love for nature, active citizenship, and an impulse for a healthy life through communication with nature, saving the traditions and history, insurance of equality of the kids of the local five ethnicities and participation in activities in the sphere of science, art, sport and tourism. The educational work is mainly directed towards kids with difficulties with communication, hyperactivity, aggression, problems in their families, or those deprived of parental care. For a few years in the Children's Centre there have been clubs of interests: "Gardeners" - kids cultivate a garden. They plow, dig, plant, put in, irrigate and weed under the watch of Ms Stafka Nikolova, parents, and volunteers of the local community. The ecologically clean products - vegetables and fruits, kids use to cook delicious meals, sell, or give away. Weeds are also utilized; they are making herbarium out of them. "Cooks" - "What to have for lunch, when mom is out?". One can learn a lot of wonderful recipes from the club "Cooks". Products are own made, raised with love. In 2010, on the on the annual traditional holiday of the garden soup in Zlataritsa, the little cooks won third prize for making a delicious vegetable soup. On the same day, the 26 years old Nadezhda Savova, Cultural and Social Anthropology PhD in Princeton, founded the second community bakery in Bulgaria in Children's Centre "3 in1". Nadezhda Savova was declared traveler of 2012 by National Geographic. After the baking house in Gabrovo and Zlataritsa, Nadezhda also founded such projects in Sofia, Varna and Ruse

  5. Microsatellite instability in follicle centre cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Randerson, J; Cawkwell, L; Jack, A; Child, J A; Lewis, F; Hall, N; Johnson, P; Evans, P; Barrans, S; Morgan, G J

    1996-04-01

    Fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to assay 12 microsatellite markers (APC x 2, DCC, P53 x 2, RB1, NM23, WT1, D6S260, D6S262, D6S281 and TNFa) to look for evidence of microsatellite instability in 40 cases of follicle centre cell lymphoma (FCC). Evidence of novel alleles seen in the tumour tissue but not the normal uninvolved tissue was seen in seven cases (17%). In only two of these cases (5%) was more than one locus involved but in these cases multiple affected loci were seen (4/12 and 7/12 respectively). The detection of microsatellite instability indicates a DNA repair defect such as that which would be predicted to occur in cells with mutated mismatch repair genes, a novel finding in FCC lymphoma. PMID:8611453

  6. Surviving stroke in an Ebola Treatment Centre.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Paul; McCarthy, Sinead; Gibbs, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A middle aged woman presented to an Ebola Treatment Centre in West Africa with a 4-day history of fever, fatigue, joint pain and vomiting. She tested positive for Ebola virus disease (EVD) and a standard treatment platform of care was started. On day 3 of her admission, she was found to have suffered a left-sided CVA of unknown aetiology. Treatment was largely supportive within a resource-constrained environment and the added layer of providing care with extensive personal protective equipment, and human resource and safety constraints. The patient was able to clear the EVD and did regain some functional use of her arm and leg. She was discharged on day 15 of her stay, as a survivor of both stroke and Ebola. PMID:26516244

  7. Launch of the London Centre for Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Aeppli, Gabriel; Pankhurst, Quentin

    2006-12-01

    Is nanomedicine an area with the promise that its proponents claim? Professors Gabriel Aeppli and Quentin Pankhurst explore the issues in light of the new London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN)--a joint enterprise between Imperial College and University College London--opened on November 7, 2006. The center is a multidisciplinary research initiative that aims to bridge the physical, engineering and biomedical sciences. In this interview, Professor Gabriel Aeppli, LCN co-Director, and Deputy Director Professor Quentin Pankhurst discuss the advent and future role of the LCN with Nanomedicine's Morag Robertson. Professor Aeppli was formerly with NEC, Bell Laboratories and MIT and has more than 15 years' experience in the computer and telecommunications industry. Professor Pankhurst is a physicist with more than 20 years' experience of working with magnetic materials and nanoparticles, who now works closely with clinicians and medics on innovative healthcare applications. He also recently formed the new start-up company Endomagnetics Inc.

  8. Person-centred (deictic) expressions and autism.

    PubMed

    Hobson, R Peter; García-Pérez, Rosa M; Lee, Anthony

    2010-04-01

    We employed semi-structured tests to determine whether children with autism produce and comprehend deictic (person-centred) expressions such as 'this'/'that', 'here'/'there' and 'come'/'go', and whether they understand atypical non-verbal gestural deixis in the form of directed head-nods to indicate location. In Study 1, most participants spontaneously produced deictic terms, often in conjunction with pointing. Yet only among children with autism were there participants who referred to a location that was distal to themselves with the terms 'this' or 'here', or made atypical points with unusual precision, often lining-up with an eye. In Study 2, participants with autism were less accurate in responding to instructions involving contrastive deictic terms, and fewer responded accurately to indicative head nods. PMID:19888642

  9. Academic health sciences centres laid bare.

    PubMed

    Lozon, Jeffrey C; Fox, Robert M

    2002-01-01

    Academic Health Sciences Centres (AHSCs) are an enduring feature of health systems in all developed countries. In Canada, despite the lack of precise definition and standardized organizational arrangements, the educational services and programs in health sciences offered by AHSCs, and the caregiving organizations they embrace, are critical components of the national health system. Yet, the past decade has been a period of profound change in the Canadian health system. The pace of this change and the nature of the demands on the system are unlikely to abate in the near future. Given that many of these changes have directly impacted on AHSCs, or their component parts, it is timely to review these entities and to understand more fully how these organizations have been, or may be, affected in the future. PMID:12811128

  10. Initial experience with an Underwater Manifold Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    In July 1983 comingled production from the first two completed wells of the Shell/Esso Underwater Manifold Centre (the UMC), reached the Cormorant Alpha platform. This moment was the culmination of design and development effort which had begun as early as the spring of 1975. But being both the largest subsea system to become operational in the North Sea, and the first designed to the production of several subsea wells, whilst injecting into others, how would the UMC continue to perform. This paper details the operational experience gained to date with the UMC, tracing its brief history since it was first powered up in September 1982 to the present. This is discussed in the main body of the paper under the headings: Commissioning Experience; Operating Experience; Reliability and Maintenance.

  11. Beef quality assessed at European research centres.

    PubMed

    Dransfield, E; Nute, G R; Roberts, T A; Boccard, R; Touraille, C; Buchter, L; Casteels, M; Cosentino, E; Hood, D E; Joseph, R L; Schon, I; Paardekooper, E J

    1984-01-01

    Loin steaks and cubes of M. semimembranosus from eight (12 month old) Galloway steers and eight (16-18 month old) Charolais cross steers raised in England and from which the meat was conditioned for 2 or 10 days, were assessed in research centres in Belgium, Denmark, England, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands. Laboratory panels assessed meat by grilling the steaks and cooking the cubes in casseroles according to local custom using scales developed locally and by scales used frequently at other research centres. The meat was mostly of good quality but with sufficient variation to obtain meaningful comparisons. Tenderness and juiciness were assessed most, and flavour least, consistently. Over the 32 meats, acceptability of steaks and casseroles was in general compounded from tenderness, juiciness and flavour. However, when the meat was tough, it dominated the overall judgement; but when tender, flavour played an important rôle. Irish and English panels tended to weight more on flavour and Italian panels on tenderness and juiciness. Juciness and tenderness were well correlated among all panels except in Italy and Germany. With flavour, however, Belgian, Irish, German and Dutch panels ranked the meats similarly and formed a group distinct from the others which did not. The panels showed a similar grouping for judgements of acceptability. French and Belgian panels judged the steaks from the older Charolais cross steers to have more flavour and be more juicy than average and tended to prefer them. Casseroles from younger steers were invariably preferred although the French and Belgian panels judged aged meat from older animals equally acceptable. These regional biases were thought to be derived mainly from differences in cooking, but variations in experience and perception of assessors also contributed. PMID:22055992

  12. Distant Operational Care Centre: Design Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to outline the design of the Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC), a modular medical facility to maintain human health and performance in space, that is adaptable to a range of remote human habitats. The purpose of this project is to outline a design, not to go into a complete technical specification of a medical facility for space. This project involves a process to produce a concise set of requirements, addressing the fundamental problems and issues regarding all aspects of a space medical facility for the future. The ideas presented here are at a high level, based on existing, researched, and hypothetical technologies. Given the long development times for space exploration, the outlined concepts from this project embodies a collection of identified problems, and corresponding proposed solutions and ideas, ready to contribute to future space exploration efforts. In order to provide a solid extrapolation and speculation in the context of the future of space medicine, the extent of this project's vision is roughly within the next two decades. The Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC) is a modular medical facility for space. That is, its function is to maintain human health and performance in space environments, through prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Furthermore, the DOCC must be adaptable to meet the environmental requirements of different remote human habitats, and support a high quality of human performance. To meet a diverse range of remote human habitats, the DOCC concentrates on a core medical capability that can then be adapted. Adaptation would make use of the DOCC's functional modularity, providing the ability to replace, add, and modify core functions of the DOCC by updating hardware, operations, and procedures. Some of the challenges to be addressed by this project include what constitutes the core medical capability in terms of hardware, operations, and procedures, and how DOCC can be adapted to different remote

  13. The Centre of Mass of a Triangular Plate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusarenko, Viktor; Rojas, Roberto; Fuster, Gonzalo

    2008-01-01

    We present a derivation for the coordinates of the centre of mass--or centre of gravity--of a homogeneous triangular plate by using scaling and symmetry. We scale the triangular plate by a factor of 2 and divide its area into four plates identical to the original. By symmetry, we assert that the centre of mass of two identical masses lies at the…

  14. The development and operation of Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre`s summer scholarship programme

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.V.; MacDonald, N.B.; Thornborrow, C.; Brough, C.M.

    1994-12-31

    Between 1987 and 1994, more than 100 students in a broad range of disciplines worked as summer scholars at Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre. Many of these students have since taken their parallel computing skills into graduate work and industry, and over a quarter of EPCC`s technical staff are alumni of the Programme. This report describes the evolution and present operation of the Summer Scholarship Programme, and its costs and benefits.

  15. ACTRIS Data Centre: An atmospheric data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, C. Lund; Fahre Vik, A.; Logna, R.; Torseth, K.; Linné, H.; O'Connor, E.

    2012-04-01

    ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) is a European Project aiming at integrating European ground-based stations equipped with advanced instrumentation for studying aerosols, clouds, and short-lived gas-phase species. The ACTRIS activities result in improved atmospheric measurements data made at more than 60 European sites, from numerous instruments and includes variables measured by ground based in situ and remote sensing technologies. Core variables are in situ aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties, short-lived trace gases (volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides), aerosol scattering and extinction profiles, and cloud properties. The ACTRIS data centre (ACTRIS DC) is giving free and open access to all data resulting from the activities of the infrastructure network, complemented with data from other relevant networks and data bases. The overall goal is to facilitate scientists and other user groups access to atmospheric observational data, and to provide mature products for analysis and interpretation of atmospheric composition change. The ACTRIS DC aims at substantially increasing the number of high-quality data by providing long-term observational data relevant to climate and air quality research produced with standardized or comparable procedures throughout the network. The backbone of the ACTRIS DC is the three core data bases: - EARLINET Data Base hosting aerosol lidar data from more than 30 European sites - EBAS hosting ground based atmospheric in situ data from more than 1000 sites globally - Cloudnet hosting remote sensing cloud data and products from 5 European sites Furthermore, a joint portal is developed combining information from various data sources to gain new information not presently available from standalone databases or networks. The data centre will provide tools and services to facilitate the use of measurements for broad user communities. Higher level and integrated products will be

  16. A SDMS Model: Early Warning Coordination Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Reyes, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Following the tsunami disaster in 2004, the General Secretary of the United Nations (UN) Kofi Annan called for a global early warning system for all hazards and for all communities. He also requested the ISDR (International Strategy fort Disaster Reduction) and its UN partners to conduct a global survey of capacities, gaps and opportunities in relation to early warning systems. The produced report, "Global survey of Early Warning Systems", concluded that there are many gaps and shortcomings and that much progress has been made on early warning systems and great capabilities are available around the world. However, it may be argued that an early warning system (EWS) may not be enough to prevent fatalities due to a natural hazard; i.e., it should be seen as part of a ‘wider' or total system. Furthermore, an EWS may work very well when assessed individually but it is not clear whether it will contribute to accomplish the purpose of the ‘total disaster management system'; i.e., to prevent fatalities. For instance, a regional EWS may only work if it is well co-ordinated with the local warning and emergency response systems that ensure that the warning is received, communicated and acted upon by the potentially affected communities. It may be argued that without these local measures being in place, a regional EWS will have little impact in saving lives. Researchers argued that unless people are warned in remote areas, the technology is useless; for instance McGuire [5] argues that: "I have no doubt that the technical element of the warning system will work very well,"…"But there has to be an effective and efficient communications cascade from the warning centre to the fisherman on the beach and his family and the bar owners." Similarly, McFadden [6] states that: "There's no point in spending all the money on a fancy monitoring and a fancy analysis system unless we can make sure the infrastructure for the broadcast system is there,"… "That's going to require a lot

  17. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  18. The young centre of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggerhøj, U. I.; Mikkelsen, R. E.; Faye, J.

    2016-05-01

    We treat, as an illustrative example of gravitational time dilation in relativity, the observation that the centre of the Earth is younger than the surface by an appreciable amount. Richard Feynman first made this insightful point and presented an estimate of the size of the effect in a talk; a transcription was later published in which the time difference is quoted as ‘one or two days’. However, a back-of-the-envelope calculation shows that the result is in fact a few years. In this paper we present this estimate alongside a more elaborate analysis yielding a difference of two and a half years. The aim is to provide a fairly complete solution to the relativity of the ‘aging’ of an object due to differences in the gravitational potential. This solution—accessible at the undergraduate level—can be used for educational purposes, as an example in the classroom. Finally, we also briefly discuss why exchanging ‘years’ for ‘days’—which in retrospect is a quite simple, but significant, mistake—has been repeated seemingly uncritically, albeit in a few cases only. The pedagogical value of this discussion is to show students that any number or observation, no matter who brought it forward, must be critically examined.

  19. The Charles Perkins Centre's Twins Research Node.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas C; Craig, Jeffrey M; Hopper, John L; Carrick, Susan E

    2016-08-01

    Twins can help researchers disentangle the roles of genes from those of the environment on human traits, health, and diseases. To realize this potential, the Australian Twin Registry (ATR), University of Melbourne, and the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC), University of Sydney, established a collaboration to form the Twins Research Node, a highly interconnected research facility dedicated specifically to research involving twins. This collaboration aims to foster the adoption of twin designs as important tools for research in a range of health-related domains. The CPC hosted their Twins Research Node's launch seminar entitled 'Double the power of your research with twin studies', in which experienced twin researchers described how twin studies are supporting scientific discoveries and careers. The launch also featured twin pairs who have actively participated in research through the ATR. Researchers at the CPC were surveyed before the event to gauge their level of understanding and interest in utilizing twin research. This article describes the new Twins Research Node, discusses the survey's main results and reports on the launch seminar. PMID:27302367

  20. Optimizing revenue at a cosmetic surgery centre

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Joanna M; Verheyden, Charles N; Mahabir, Raman C

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for cosmetic surgery and services has diminished with recent fluctuations in the economy. To stay ahead, surgeons must appreciate and attend to the fiscal challenges of private practice. A key component of practice economics is knowledge of the common methods of payment. OBJECTIVE: To review methods of payment in a five-surgeon group practice in central Texas, USA. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of the financial records of a cosmetic surgery centre in Texas was conducted. Data were collected for the five-year period from 2003 to 2008, and included the method of payment, the item purchased (product, service or surgery) and the dollar amount. RESULTS: More than 11,000 transactions were reviewed. The most common method of payment used for products and services was credit card, followed by check and cash. For procedures, the most common form of payment was personal check, followed by credit card and financing. Of the credit card purchases for both products and procedures, an overwhelming majority of patients (more than 75%) used either Visa (Visa Inc, USA) or MasterCard (MasterCard Worldwide, USA). If the amount of the individual transaction surpassed US$1,000, the most common method of payment transitioned from credit card to personal check. CONCLUSIONS: In an effort to maximize revenue, surgeons should consider limiting the credit cards accepted by the practice and encourage payment through personal check. PMID:22942656

  1. Examination and Evaluation of Websites of Science Centres in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Bozdogan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    Science centres which have a considerable importance and functions in developed countries are intended to be popularized in Turkey. At this point considering the fact that the first contact between science centres and visitors is usually provided with websites, it is quite important that the content of these websites should be designed and…

  2. National survey of the injury prevention activities of children's centres

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael C; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Kendrick, Denise; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol; Hayes, Mike; Wynn, Persephone

    2014-01-01

    Children's centres were established across England to provide a range of services including early education, social care and health to pre-school children and their families. We surveyed children's centres to ascertain the activities they were undertaking to prevent unintentional injuries in the under fives. A postal questionnaire was sent to a sample of children's centre managers (n = 694). It included questions on current activities, knowledge and attitudes to injury prevention, health priorities and partnership working. Responses were received from 384 (56%) children's centres. Overall, 58% considered unintentional injury prevention to be one of the three main child health priorities for their centre. Over half the respondents (59%) did not know if there was an injury prevention group in their area, and 21% did not know if there was a home safety equipment scheme. Knowledge of how child injury deaths occur in the home was poor. Only 11% knew the major cause of injury deaths in children under five. Lack of both staff time and funding were seen as important barriers by children's centre staff to undertake injury prevention activities. Nearly all stated that training (97%) and assistance with planning injury prevention (94%) would be helpful to their centres. Children's centres need further support if they are to effectively tackle this important public health area. PMID:23837887

  3. Centre Computer Base for Visually Handicapped Children, Students and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The Centre Computer Base is a list of hardware which can effectively operate the software of the Research Centre for the Education of the Visually Handicapped. Essential hardware contained on the list is described, along with a variety of "add-on" devices such as joysticks, touch-screens, speech synthesizers, braille embossers, etc. (Author/JDD)

  4. Research Informed Science Enrichment Programs at the Gravity Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venville, Grady; Blair, David; Coward, David; Deshon, Fred; Gargano, Mark; Gondwe, Mzamose; Heary, Auriol; Longnecker, Nancy; Pitts, Marina; Zadnik, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Excursions to museums and science centres generally are great fun for students and teachers. The potential educational benefits beyond enjoyment, however, are rarely realised or analysed for their efficacy. The purpose of this paper is to describe four educational enrichment programs delivered at the Gravity Discovery Centre (GDC), near Gingin,…

  5. Investigating Teachers' Views of Student-Centred Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seng, Ernest Lim Kok

    2014-01-01

    Conventional learning is based on low levels of students' participation where students are rarely expected to ask questions or to challenge the theories of the academic. A paradigm shift in curriculum has resulted in implementing student-centred learning (SCL) approach, putting students as the centre of the learning process. This mode of…

  6. Opportunity Centred Learning: An Innovation in Enterprise Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an approach called opportunity centred learning that has been developed by the author and applied in the field of enterprise education. The relationship between opportunity centred learning and existing theory and practice in learning and education is outlined in comparison with problem-based learning and action learning, and…

  7. Educational Development Centres: From Educational to Organisational Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havnes, Anton; Stensaker, Bjorn

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to investigate the role of educational development centres, and their potential for playing a broader and more central role in quality and organisational development. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on the results of three external evaluations of educational development centres in Denmark and Norway,…

  8. Interventional cardiology. Nonprimary PCI at centres without onsite surgical backup.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Hiroki; Kimura, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    A new systematic review and meta-analysis by Lee and colleagues confirms the safety of nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at centres without onsite surgical backup. In daily clinical practice at PCI centres without onsite surgical facilities, quality assurance and improvement programmes are important to ensure high-quality care.

  9. Leading an Effective Improvement and Development Programme for Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Gill; Tyler, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the process and achievements of leadership of an improvement and development programme for children's centres in the context of public value and Ofsted inspection. It analyses how the capacity has been developed of children's centre managers to work more strategically and collectively. Distributed leadership theory is applied…

  10. Is "Object-Centred Neglect" a Homogeneous Entity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainotti, Guido; Ciaraffa, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The nature of object-centred (allocentric) neglect and the possibility of dissociating it from egocentric (subject-centred) forms of neglect are controversial. Originally, allocentric neglect was described by and in patients who reproduced all the elements of a multi-object scene, but left unfinished the left side of one or more of them. More…

  11. Problems and Prospects of Education Resource Centres in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekanem, Johnson Efiong

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria has good policies on Education and one of such policies is the establishment of Education Resource Centres in every State of the Federation, including the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja. The need is clearly articulated in the National Policy on Education. Despite the lofty plan, most of the centres are not fulfilling the need for their…

  12. Girls' Groups and Boys' Groups at a Municipal Technology Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen-Karlsson, Minna

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Swedish initiative of municipal technology centres from a gender point of view. These centres provide after-school technology education for children aged 6-16. By means of an ethnographic study, the effects of the use of single-sex groups in increasing the interest of girls and boys in technical activities have been…

  13. National Centre for Research on Rural Education. Report for 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Research on Rural Education, Nedlands (Western Australia).

    The Centre was originally funded in 1980 for three years to undertake research on major issues and problems in rural education, to publish and disseminate results, and to act as a source of advice to government and private authorities as well as communities. Funding for the Centre has been extended through 1985, and its activities continue to be…

  14. Science Centres: A Resource for School and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilo, Miranda; Mantero, Alfonso; Marasco, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    We present a science centre established in Genoa on an agreement between Municipality of Genoa and Department of Physics of University of Genoa. The aim is to offer children, young people and community an opportunity to approach science in a playful way. The centre staffs guide the visitors through the exhibits, attracting their interests towards…

  15. Centre for Applied Language Research at the University of Southampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Robert; Hyde-Simon, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    The Centre for Applied Language Research at the University of Southampton is one of two research centres within the discipline of Modern Languages. Established in 2004, CALR now has more than 50 members, predominantly faculty members working in the School of Humanities/Modern Languages, as well as growing number of postgraduate researchers. The…

  16. Different Images of Science at Nordic Science Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidsson, Eva; Jakobsson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Science centres aim to present science in ways that will attract visitors and enhance public interest in, and knowledge of, science. But what images and different aspects of science are visitors confronted with at Nordic science centres? This study aims to explore the different aspects of science that are displayed and the ways in which these…

  17. Child-Centred Inquiry Learning: How Mathematics Understanding Emerges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calder, Nigel; Brough, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how mathematical understandings might emerge through student-centred inquiry. Data is drawn from a research project on student-centred curriculum integration that situated mathematics within authentic problem-solving contexts and involved students in collaboratively constructed curriculum. The project involved case studies in…

  18. "Getting Practical" and the National Network of Science Learning Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Georgina; Langley, Mark; Skilling, Gus; Walker, John

    2011-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres is a co-ordinating partner in the Getting Practical--Improving Practical Work in Science programme. The principle of training provision for the "Getting Practical" programme is a cascade model. Regional trainers employed by the national network of Science Learning Centres trained the cohort of local…

  19. Recognizing a Centre of Excellence in Ontario's Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwin, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The term "Centre of Excellence" is increasingly used by Ontario's colleges with the expectation of portraying a superior level of proficiency, expertise, or investment in a particular academic discipline or program cluster. This paper proposes that the term Centre of Excellence should have a clearer definition so that when one of Ontario's…

  20. Rediscovering the Teacher within Indian Child-Centred Pedagogy: Implications for the Global Child-Centred Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smail, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Child-Centred Approach (CCA) is increasingly promoted within India and internationally as a response to the challenge of delivering quality education. From identifying and examining Indian indigenous and global concepts of CCA within traditional and contemporary child-centred pedagogic discourse, this paper reveals the complexities of…

  1. Student-Centred and Teacher-Centred Learning Environment in Pre-Vocational Secondary Education: Psychological Needs, and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Karin; de Brabander, Cornelis J.; Martens, Rob L.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the perception of psychological needs and motivation in a student-centred and a teacher-centred learning environment are compared, using Self Determination Theory as a framework. The self-report Intrinsic Motivation Inventory was completed by 230 students (mean age 16.1 years) in pre-vocational secondary education. School records on…

  2. The Repositioning of Language Centres: An Appreciation of David Ingram's "Language Centres--Their Roles, Functions and Management"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussex, Roland

    2004-01-01

    David Ingram's "Language Centres" (2001) offers a descriptive and analytical study of meta-centres, their constitution, operation and engagement with their constituencies. This article is a combination of a review and an appreciation of Ingram's study, and--benefiting from the latitude offered by the genre of the review article--a set of…

  3. The "magic" of tutorial centres in Hong Kong: An analysis of media marketing and pedagogy in a tutorial centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-12-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask these questions. This paper examines the phenomenon of tutorial centres in Hong Kong and seeks to understand what draws students to these centres. Combining theories of marketing semiotics and emotion studies, the author investigates the pivotal role of media marketing in generating the "magic" of tutorial centres, whose advertising strategy includes, for example, a display of billboard posters featuring stylishly-dressed "celebrity teachers". The author reviews some of the literature available on the subject of tutorial centres. In a case study approach, he then maps out the pedagogy he observed in an English tutorial class, seeking heuristic insights into the kind of teaching students in the study were looking for. He argues that part of the "magical" attraction of what are essentially "cram schools" is their formulaic pedagogy of teaching and reinforcing exam skills. Finally, the paper considers the social implications of the tutorial centre industry in terms of media marketing of education and unequal access to tutorial services.

  4. Cold GMC cores in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, D. C.; Li, Y.; Dowell, C. D.; Menten, K. M.

    1999-03-01

    We have used the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) aboard the Infrared Space Observatory in grating mode to map the far-infrared continuum emission (45-175 mic) toward several massive Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) cores located near the Galactic center. These sources are observed in emission at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths (>100 mic). However, at mid-infrared wavelengths (<70 mic) they are seen in absorption against the general Galactic centre background. Gray-body fits to the observed far-infrared and submillimeter spectral energy distributions give low temperatures (about 13-20 K) for the bulk of the dust in all the sources. This indicates external heating of the dust by the diffuse ISRF and suggests that the cores do not harbor high-mass star-formation sites, in spite of their large molecular mass. In addition, the grain emissivity in these sources is a very steep function of frequency (β > 2.4). The high grain emissivity exponent is consistent with the presence of dust grains covered with thick ice mantles. Molecular line observations carried out with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) show a large velocity gradient across the most massive core, GCM0.25+0.11, indicative of streaming motions of the gas or of the presence of multiple, spatially overlapping velocity components. The observed gas kinematics may indicate that the GCM0.25+0.11 core is in an early stage of a cloud-cloud collision that may result in a future star formation episode. Recent MSX observations indicate that cold GMC cores similar to those studied with ISO are ubiquitous in the Galactic center and throughout the Galaxy. The observed intensities of the OI and CII fine structure lines imply a radiation field intensity of about 1000 times the standard ISRF intensity and a hydrogen density of about 1000 pccm\\ for the diffuse gas component in the Galactic center.

  5. Hillary Clinton impressed by the Centre's work.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994, US First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, her daughter Chelsea, the Bangladesh Minister for Women and Children's Affairs, and the US Ambassador to Bangladesh visited the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B). The First Lady remarked that ICDDR,B's research programs on health and family planning have many important lessons for the developing and developed regions alike. She noted the development successes in Bangladesh that can be applied in the US and other countries: the Grameen Bank, oral rehydration solution (ORS), and the community outreach programs for health and family planning services. The First Lady was especially interested in ORS and its cost-effectiveness. Most of the 220,000 children hospitalized each year in the US for severe gastrointestinal illness are treated with expensive intravenous (IV) drips (average cost = $2300), while a few ORS packets would be a small fraction of the cost. The average cost of treatment per patient at ICDDR,B was only $12. Patients receive care free of charge. Less than 0.6% of the patients die. The previous year, a USAID administrator asked ICDDR,B for its expertise in fighting cholera at the Rwandan refugee camps in Goma, Zaire. ICDDR,B staff developed diagnostic antisera for the new cholera strain responsible for the epidemic in the Americas, described its pathophysiology, and established its mode of transmission in surface waters. ICDDR,B also provides technical support to the national family planning and maternal and child health programs. In the Matlab, ICDDR,B's work has contributed to a high contraceptive prevalence rate of more than 64% among poor and largely illiterate persons.

  6. Safe motherhood partners -- the International Children's Centre.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The International Children's Centre (ICC) works worldwide to improve child health in the least developed countries. In its training and research projects the agency contributes to the Safe Motherhood Initiative to improve the health of mothers and infants. ICC is based in Paris, it was established in 1949, and the agency has cooperated with governments, nongovernmental organizations and international bodies like the World Health Organization (WHO) in child care. ICC's activities reflect concern for the health of women before and during pregnancy and the rest of their lives. The center's work comprises training, research, local projects, and information and documentation. Following the 1987 Nairobi conference on safe motherhood, ICC organized a seminar in Paris on maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan francophone Africa, which led to participation in the Safe Motherhood Initiative with a variety of training and research programs. ICC training is integrated, community-based, and multidisciplinary. Anthropology, psychology, economics and management have played a role in ICC training courses. The center runs an international course on maternal and child health from January to April each year and also organizes distance training courses on problem solving in health care. ICC training programs have taken place in Laos, Senegal, and Vietnam to strengthen the work of maternal and child health training centers there. A 4-week course on economic evaluation of health programs is held in Paris each July. In 1989 and 1990, ICC organized in collaboration with WHO safe motherhood workshops on research methodology in Benin and in Burkina Faso with participants from 6 francophone African countries. One research project in Benin is on risk factors for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and the other in Cameroon on improving surveillance of pregnancy, delivery, and the postnatal period. ICC focuses on long-term planning and action for the benefit of mothers and children.

  7. Hillary Clinton impressed by the Centre's work.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994, US First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, her daughter Chelsea, the Bangladesh Minister for Women and Children's Affairs, and the US Ambassador to Bangladesh visited the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B). The First Lady remarked that ICDDR,B's research programs on health and family planning have many important lessons for the developing and developed regions alike. She noted the development successes in Bangladesh that can be applied in the US and other countries: the Grameen Bank, oral rehydration solution (ORS), and the community outreach programs for health and family planning services. The First Lady was especially interested in ORS and its cost-effectiveness. Most of the 220,000 children hospitalized each year in the US for severe gastrointestinal illness are treated with expensive intravenous (IV) drips (average cost = $2300), while a few ORS packets would be a small fraction of the cost. The average cost of treatment per patient at ICDDR,B was only $12. Patients receive care free of charge. Less than 0.6% of the patients die. The previous year, a USAID administrator asked ICDDR,B for its expertise in fighting cholera at the Rwandan refugee camps in Goma, Zaire. ICDDR,B staff developed diagnostic antisera for the new cholera strain responsible for the epidemic in the Americas, described its pathophysiology, and established its mode of transmission in surface waters. ICDDR,B also provides technical support to the national family planning and maternal and child health programs. In the Matlab, ICDDR,B's work has contributed to a high contraceptive prevalence rate of more than 64% among poor and largely illiterate persons. PMID:12289844

  8. Type I photosynthetic reaction centres: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Peter; Jones, Michael R; Fyfe, Paul K

    2003-01-01

    We review recent advances in the study of the photosystem I reaction centre, following the determination of a spectacular 2.5 A resolution crystal structure for this complex of Synechococcus elongatus. Photosystem I is proving different to type II reaction centres in structure and organization, and the mechanism of transmembrane electron transfer, and is providing insights into the control of function in reaction centres that operate at very low redox potentials. The photosystem I complex of oxygenic organisms has a counterpart in non-oxygenic bacteria, the strictly anaerobic phototrophic green sulphur bacteria and heliobacteria. The most distinctive feature of these type I reaction centres is that they contain two copies of a large core polypeptide (i.e. a homodimer), rather than a heterodimeric arrangement of two related, but different, polypeptides as in the photosystem I complex. To compare the structural organization of the two forms of type I reaction centre, we have modelled the structure of the central region of the reaction centre from green sulphur bacteria, using sequence alignments and the structural coordinates of the S. elongatus Photosystem I complex. The outcome of these modelling studies is described, concentrating on regions of the type I reaction centre where important structure-function relationships have been demonstrated or inferred. PMID:12594931

  9. Visualization in a Climate Computing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier-Fleischer, Karin; Röber, Niklas; Böttinger, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Today, the extensive numerical simulations of climate models require elaborate visualization for understanding and communicating the results. Typical data sets of climate models are 3-dimensional, multivariate and time dependent, and can hence be very large. Interactive visual data analysis improves and accelerates the comprehension of these vast amounts of data. At DKRZ, the German Climate Computing Centre, a central high end visualization server, various domain specific visualization applications, and a remote 3D rendering solution enable users to interactively visualize their extensive model results right at their desktops. The DKRZ's visualization server is a heterogeneous Linux cluster, currently consisting of 10 state of the art visualization nodes equipped with 96 -256 GB RAM and high end NVidia GPUs. Since the parallel file system of the DKRZ's supercomputer is directly mounted over a powerful network, the model data can directly be analyzed and visualized. VirtualGL and TurboVNC are used for utilizing the server's GPUs for 3D rendering, while the TurboVNC client on the user's local computer continuously displays the resulting video stream. By using this central visualization server instead of a local computer, three main benefits are achieved: Time consuming transfers of large data sets from the supercomputer to the local computer are not needed. The hardware of the user's local workstation doesn't need to be powerful, no expensive GPU is required. Users don't have to install or buy visualization software. On the visualization server, a wide range of visualization software is installed. Avizo Green, a powerful commercial software customized for interactive 3D visualization of climate model data, is available, as well as SimVis and ParaView, which focus more on an exploratory visualization of data. SimVis and ParaView provide techniques like Linking & Brushing to emphasize or de-emphasize portions of the data. Furthermore, some domain specific 2D graphics

  10. An enhanced Planetary Radar Operating Centre (PROC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using GPRs is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are successfully operating: MARSIS on-board MEX, SHARAD on-board MRO and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft: the missions have been further extended . Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the missions beginning to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how the new PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation aiding scientists to increase their knowledge in the field of surface

  11. PROC: a new Planetary Radars Operating Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Alberti, G.; Flamini, E.; Olivieri, A.; Orosei, R.

    2009-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Actually three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are operating in the frame of an extended missions : MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the starting of the missions in order In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and

  12. L'asthme allergique au centre tunisien

    PubMed Central

    Joobeur, Samah; Mhamed, Saousen Cheikh; Saad, Ahmed Ben; Mribah, Hathami; Dekhil, Asma; Rouatbi, Naceur; El Kamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    L'asthme allergique pose un réel problème de santé publique vu sa prévalence et son coût de prise en charge élevés. Etudier le profil clinique, fonctionnel respiratoire, allergologique, thérapeutique et évolutif de l'asthme allergique dans une région du centre tunisien. Etude rétrospective portant sur 1132 dossiers de patients porteurs d'asthme allergique suivis dans le service de pneumologie et d'allergologie à l'hôpital de Monastir (Tunisie). L’âge moyen est de 27 ± 12,5 ans. 61,1% des patients sont âgés entre 16 et 39 ans. Une prédominance féminine est notée (56,7%). L'identification de l'allergène en cause s'est basée essentiellement sur les tests cutanés allergologiques (99,4%). Les principaux pneumallergènes identifiés sont les acariens (91,2%), suivis par les pollens (22,8%) et les phanères des animaux (12%). La classification selon la sévérité a conclu à un asthme intermittent à persistant léger chez 87.1% de nos patients. Le traitement s'est basé essentiellement sur la corticothérapie inhalée (67,6%). L'asthme dans notre étude a été jugé contrôlé dans 68,3% des cas, partiellement contrôlé dans 24,8% et non contrôlé dans 6,9% des cas. L'asthme allergique est une affection répandue qui touche essentiellement le sujet jeune en pleine activité. Une prise en charge adéquate permet de contrôler la maladie et de réduire ses répercussions sur le patient et la collectivité. PMID:26097637

  13. Strengthening patient-centred communication in rural Ugandan health centres: A theory-driven evaluation within a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Nayiga, Susan; DiLiberto, Deborah; Taaka, Lilian; Nabirye, Christine; Haaland, Ane; Staedke, Sarah G.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a theory-driven evaluation of one component of an intervention to improve the quality of health care at Ugandan public health centres. Patient-centred services have been advocated widely, but such approaches have received little attention in Africa. A cluster randomized trial is evaluating population-level outcomes of an intervention with multiple components, including ‘patient-centred services.’ A process evaluation was designed within this trial to articulate and evaluate the implementation and programme theories of the intervention. This article evaluates one hypothesized mechanism of change within the programme theory: the impact of the Patient Centred Services component on health-worker communication. The theory-driven approach extended to evaluation of the outcome measures. The study found that the proximal outcome of patient-centred communication was rated 10 percent higher (p < 0.008) by care seekers consulting with the health workers who were at the intervention health centres compared with those at control health centres. This finding will strengthen interpretation of more distal trial outcomes. PMID:25983612

  14. Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education and ICG Information Centres affiliated to the United Nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadimova, S.; Haubold, H. J.

    2009-06-01

    Based on resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly, Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education were established in India, Morocco, Nigeria, Brazil and Mexico. Simultaneously, education curricula were developed for the core disciplines of remote sensing, satellite communications, satellite meteorology, and space and atmospheric science. This paper provides a brief summary on the status of the operation of the regional centres with a view to use them as information centres of the International Committee on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG), and draws attention to their educational activities.

  15. World Health and the Oxford International Biomedical Centre.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Charles A

    2004-04-01

    Some of the problems associated with World Health are considered. The Oxford International Biomedical Centre (OIBC) was launched in 1992 to respond to those challenges. Its mission and goals, track record, and new programmes are described.

  16. Enantiomeric resolution of multiple chiral centres racemates by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Suhail, Mohd; Al-Othman, Zeid A; Alwarthan, Abdulrahman; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2016-05-01

    Enantiomeric resolution of multichiral centre racemates is an important area as some multichiral centre racemates are of great medicinal importance. However, enantioseparation of such types of racemates is a challenging task. Amongst many analytical techniques, capillary electrophoresis is a powerful technique and may be used to resolve such racemates. Only few papers are available describing enantiomeric resolution of such racemates. Therefore, efforts have been made to describe the enantiomeric resolution of multichiral centre racemates by capillary electrophoresis. This article discusses the importance of multichiral racemates, the need for capillary electrophoresis in enantiomeric resolution and chiral resolution of multichiral centre racemates using various chiral selectors. Further, attempts have been made to discuss the future challenges and prospects of enantiomeric resolution of multichiral racemates. The various chiral selectors used for the purpose are chiral crown ether, cyclodextrins, polysaccharides, macrocyclic glycopeptide antibiotics and ligand exchange.

  17. Protein-lipid interactions in the purple bacterial reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael R; Fyfe, Paul K; Roszak, Aleksander W; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2002-10-11

    The purple bacterial reaction centre uses the energy of sunlight to power energy-requiring reactions such as the synthesis of ATP. During the last 20 years, a combination of X-ray crystallography, spectroscopy and mutagenesis has provided a detailed insight into the mechanism of light energy transduction in the bacterial reaction centre. In recent years, structural techniques including X-ray crystallography and neutron scattering have also been used to examine the environment of the reaction centre. This mini-review focuses on recent studies of the surface of the reaction centre, and briefly discusses the importance of the specific protein-lipid interactions that have been resolved for integral membrane proteins.

  18. The Italian institutional accreditation model for Haemophilia Centres

    PubMed Central

    Calizzani, Gabriele; Candura, Fabio; Menichini, Ivana; Arcieri, Romano; Castaman, Giancarlo; Lamanna, Alessandro; Tamburrini, Maria R.; Fortino, Antonio; Lanzoni, Monica; Profili, Samantha; Pupella, Simonetta; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Background In Italy, basic health needs of patients with inherited bleeding disorders are met by a network of 50 haemophilia centres belonging to the Italian Association of Haemophilia Centres. Further emerging needs, due to the increased life expectancy of this patient group, require a multi-professional clinical management of the disease and provide a challenge to the organisation of centres. In order to achieve harmonised quality standards of haemophilia care across Italian Regions, an institutional accreditation model for haemophilia centres has been developed. Material and methods To develop an accreditation scheme for haemophilia centres, a panel of experts representing medical and patient bodies, the Ministry of Health and Regional Health Authorities has been appointed by the National Blood Centre. Following a public consultation, a technical proposal in the form of recommendations for Regional Health Authorities has been formally submitted to the Ministry of Health and has formed the basis for a proposal of Agreement between the Government and the Regions. Results The institutional accreditation model for Haemophilia Centres was approved as an Agreement between the Government and the Regions in March 2013. It identified 23 organisational requirements for haemophilia centres covering different areas and activities. Discussion The Italian institutional accreditation model aims to achieve harmonised quality standards across Regions and to implement continuous improvement efforts, certified by regional inspection systems. The identified requirements are considered as necessary and appropriate in order to provide haemophilia services as “basic healthcare levels” under the umbrella of the National Health Service. This model provides Regions with a flexible institutional accreditation scheme that can be potentially extended to other rare diseases. PMID:24922290

  19. Melano-macrophage centres and their role in fish pathology.

    PubMed

    Agius, C; Roberts, R J

    2003-09-01

    Melano-macrophage centres, also known as macrophage aggregates, are distinctive groupings of pigment-containing cells within the tissues of heterothermic vertebrates. In fish they are normally located in the stroma of the haemopoietic tissue of the spleen and the kidney, although in amphibians and reptiles, and some fish, they are also found in the liver. They may also develop in association with chronic inflammatory lesions elsewhere in the body and during ovarian atresia. In higher teleosts, they often exist as complex discrete centres, containing lymphocytes and macrophages, and may be primitive analogues of the germinal centres of lymph nodes. Melano-macrophage centres usually contain a variety of pigments, including melanins, and these increase in range and volume in older fish or in the presence of cachectic disease. Melano-macrophage centres act as focal depositories for resistant intracellular bacteria, from which chronic infections may develop. Iron capture and storage in haemolytic diseases appears to be a primary function, but antigen trapping and presentation to lymphocytes, sequestration of products of cellular degradation and potentially toxic tissue materials, such as melanins, free radicals and catabolic breakdown products are among other functions that have been ascribed. Recent work suggests that they are a site of primary melanogenesis rather than mere storage. Melano-macrophage centres increase in size or frequency in conditions of environmental stress and have been suggested as reliable biomarkers for water quality in terms of both deoxygenation and iatragenic chemical pollution. PMID:14575368

  20. CMS centres for control, monitoring, offline operations and prompt analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, L.; Gottschalk, E.; Maeshima, K.; McBride, P.

    2008-07-01

    The CMS experiment is about to embark on its first physics run at the LHC. To maximize the effectiveness of physicists and technical experts at CERN and worldwide and to facilitate their communications, CMS has established several dedicated and inter-connected operations and monitoring centres. These include a traditional 'Control Room' at the CMS site in France, a 'CMS Centre' for up to fifty people on the CERN main site in Switzerland, and remote operations centres, such as the 'LHC@FNAL' centre at Fermilab. We describe how this system of centres coherently supports the following activities: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, prompt sub-detector calibrations, and time-critical data analysis of express-line and calibration streams; and (2) operation of the CMS computing systems for processing, storage and distribution of real CMS data and simulated data, both at CERN and at offsite centres. We describe the physical infrastructure that has been established, the computing and software systems, the operations model, and the communications systems that are necessary to make such a distributed system coherent and effective.

  1. A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure funds. Despite being widely cited as a core component of research capacity building, infrastructure as a discrete concept has been rather analytically neglected, often treated as an implicit feature of research environments with little specification or relegated to a narrow category of physical or administrative inputs. The terms research infrastructure, capacity, and culture, among others, are deployed in overlapping and inconsistent ways, further obfuscating the crucial functions of infrastructure specifically and its relationships with associated concepts. The case is made for an expanded conceptualisation of research infrastructure, one that moves beyond conventional 'hardware' notions. Drawing on a case analysis of NEXUS, a multidisciplinary health research centre based at the University of British Columbia, Canada, a conceptual framework is proposed that integrates the tangible and intangible structures that interactively underlie research centre functioning. A relational approach holds potential to allow for more comprehensive accounting of the returns on infrastructure investment. For those developing new research centres or seeking to reinvigorate existing ones, this framework may be a useful guide for both centre design and evaluation. PMID:20925953

  2. Comparison of planned menus and centre characteristics with foods and beverages served in New York City child-care centres

    PubMed Central

    Breck, Andrew; Dixon, L Beth; Khan, Laura Kettel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The present study evaluated the extent to which child-care centre menus prepared in advance correspond with food and beverage items served to children. The authors identified centre and staff characteristics that were associated with matches between menus and what was served. Design Menus were collected from ninety-five centres in New York City (NYC). Direct observation of foods and beverages served to children were conducted during 524 meal and snack times at these centres between April and June 2010, as part of a larger study designed to determine compliance of child-care centres with city health department regulations for nutrition. Setting Child-care centres were located in low-income neighbourhoods in NYC. Results Overall, 87% of the foods and beverages listed on the menus or allowed as substitutions were served. Menu items matched with foods and beverages served for all major food groups by > 60%. Sweets and water had lower match percentages (40 and 32%, respectively), but water was served 68% of the time when it was not listed on the menu. The staff person making the food and purchasing decisions predicted the match between the planned or substituted items on the menus and the foods and beverages served. Conclusions In the present study, child-care centre menus included most foods and beverages served to children. Menus planned in advance have potential to be used to inform parents about which child-care centre to send their child or what foods and beverages their enrolled children will be offered throughout the day. PMID:27280341

  3. The Yale Cost Model and cost centres: servant or master?

    PubMed

    Rigby, E

    1993-01-01

    Cost accounting describes that aspect of accounting which collects, allocates and controls the cost of producing a service. Costing information is primarily reported to management to enable control of costs and to ensure the financial viability of units, departments and divisions. As costing studies continue to produce estimates of Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) costs in New South Wales hospitals, as well as in other states, costs for different hospitals are being externally compared, using a tool which is usually related to internal management and reporting. Comparability of costs is assumed even though accounting systems differ. This paper examines the cost centre structures at five major teaching hospitals in Sydney. It describes the similarities and differences in how the cost centres were constituted, and then details the line items of expenditure that are charged to each cost centre. The results of a comparative study of a medical specialty are included as evidence of different costing methodologies in the hospitals. The picture that emerged from the study is that the hospitals are constituting their cost centres to meet their internal management needs, that is, to know the cost of running a ward or nursing unit, a medical specialty, department and so on. The rationale for the particular cost centre construction was that cost centre managers could manage and control costs and assign responsibility. There are variations in procedures for assigning costs to cost centres, and the question is asked 'Do these variations in procedures make a material difference to our ability to compare costs per Diagnosis Related Group at the various hospitals?' It is contended that the accounting information, which is produced as a result of different practices, is primarily for internal management, not external comparison. It would be better for hospitals to compare their estimated costs per Diagnosis Related Group to an internal standard cost rather than the costs from other

  4. Sure Start Children's Centres: time to make them better known.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Health services have traditionally been available to local communities through general practices, health visitors and midwives. Since the introduction of the Sure Start Local programme in 1997 and Sure Start Children's Centres in 2004, an increasing number of children's centres are working with their local NHS to provide health services for the under fives, and improve the accessibility of these services to local families. Sure Start Children's Centres were set up in England as part of the Department for Children, Schools and Families' Children's Plan to improve outcomes for children and their families and contribute to the strategic objectives of Every Child Matters. Children's centres offer a range of integrated services from child health and maternity services to parenting and childcare provisions. They also deliver key health promotion activities and programmes that contribute to the public health priorities of Primary Care Trusts, e.g. breast-feeding, smoking in pregnancy, physical activity and healthy eating. There are now 3,500 children's centres offering easily accessible services to more than 2.4 million children and families across England. Health professionals are asked work proactively together to raise awareness of these among local communities so that more families can benefit from the services they offer. PMID:20518370

  5. Student-centred instruction and learning processes in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welzel, Manuela

    1997-09-01

    During the 1970s, student-centred instruction—that is, “play orientation in physics education” (Spielorientierter Unterricht)—was at the centre of curriculum development at the Institute of Physics Education in Bremen. During the past decade, we investigated this kind of instruction with a particular focus on students' learning processes using a situated cognition perspective. Our research group at the Institute conducted several empirical studies of physics learning for different age groups. The aim of these case studies was to construct detailed understandings of how individual learning processes unfold. On the basis of these studies, we attempt to design physics lessons more effectively than they have been in the past. This paper exemplifies our approach providing information about the theoretical and methodological frameworks, the main outcomes of our studies; and reflections about the possibilities for “more effective” student-centred instruction.

  6. The place for children's centres for New Zealand children.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Karen J; Wilson, Denise L

    2007-02-01

    This paper examines the experience of poverty and child maltreatment among New Zealand's children as compared with international statistics. New Zealand was a signatory to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1993, yet indicators suggest that implementation of the Articles of the Convention is limited. In the league of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries it ranks 23rd out of 26 for child poverty and 24th out of 27 for the child maltreatment death rate. A case will be made for coordination of existing and new services for children and families through a dedicated children's centre, modelled on the United Kingdom's Sure Start and Children's Centre program that was modelled in part on the Head Start program of the United States. The paper reports on Wellsford, a rural community north of Auckland, which has embraced the children's centre concept and is investigating ways to obtain funding to implement the idea. PMID:17266496

  7. Centre of Excellence For Simulation Education and Innovation (CESEI).

    PubMed

    Qayumi, A Karim

    2010-01-01

    Simulation is becoming an integral part of medical education. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) was the first organization to recognize the value of simulation-based learning, and to award accreditation for educational institutions that aim to provide simulation as part of the experiential learning opportunity. Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation (CESEI) is a multidisciplinary and interprofessional educational facility that is based at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Vancouver Costal Health Authority (VCH). Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation's goal is to provide excellence in education, research, and healthcare delivery by providing a technologically advanced environment and learning opportunity using simulation for various groups of learners including undergraduate, postgraduate, nursing, and allied health professionals. This article is an attempt to describe the infrastructure, services, and uniqueness of the Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation.

  8. CADC and CANFAR: Extending the role of the data centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudet, Severin

    2015-12-01

    Over the past six years, the CADC has moved beyond the astronomy archive data centre to a multi-service system for the community. This evolution is based on two major initiatives. The first is the adoption of International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) standards in both the system and data architecture of the CADC, including a common characterization data model. The second is the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), a digital infrastructure combining the Canadian national research network (CANARIE), cloud processing and storage resources (Compute Canada) and a data centre (Canadian Astronomy Data Centre) into a unified ecosystem for storage and processing for the astronomy community. This talk will describe the architecture and integration of IVOA and CANFAR services into CADC operations, the operational experiences, the lessons learned and future directions

  9. CCall--healthy and successful work in call centres.

    PubMed

    Benninghoven, Alfred; Bindzius, Fritz; Braun, Detlef; Cramer, Jutta; Ellegast, Rolf; Flowerday, Udo; Genz, Andreas; von der Heyden, Thomas; Pfeiffer, Wolfgang; Schittly, Dagmar; Schweer, Ralf; Stamm, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Call centre workplaces are in many ways a challenge to occupational health and safety. The occupation itself can be described as an IT information technology-supported, communication-intensive form of work with often unusual working hours and a high rate of part-time employment. Data on the employee turnover as well as absenteeism related to occupational disability is quite contradictory. Occupational safety and its proponents still have to find new ways into the corporate structures and cultures of this relatively new and rapidly growing branch of industry. In a 2-year research and development project, using a holistic approach and under consideration of all the relevant disciplines, call centre workplaces were studied, and organisational measures were developed and field tested by putting them into practice. Practical help was developed for a sustainable strategy for successful and healthy work in call centres.

  10. Home as a hybrid centre of medication practice.

    PubMed

    Dew, Kevin; Chamberlain, Kerry; Hodgetts, Darrin; Norris, Pauline; Radley, Alan; Gabe, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This article presents research that explores how medications are understood and used by people in everyday life. An intensive process of data collection from 55 households was used in this research, which included photo-elicitation and diary-elicitation interviews. It is argued that households are at the very centre of complex networks of therapeutic advice and practice and can usefully be seen as hybrid centres of medication practice, where a plethora of available medications is assimilated and different forms of knowledge and expertise are made sense of. Dominant therapeutic frameworks are tactically manipulated in households in order for medication practices to align with the understandings, resources and practicalities of households. Understanding the home as a centre of medication practice decentralises the role of health advisors (whether mainstream or alternative) in wellness practices. PMID:23909467

  11. Height of centre of body mass during osteoarthritic gait.

    PubMed

    Khodadadeh, S; Whittle, M W; Bremble, G R

    1986-05-01

    Early attempts to locate the position of the centre of mass of the body during walking involved the use of cinematography, followed by kinetic analysis of the forces and couples acting about three axes at the ground and centre of mass. These methods, requiring data on the individual body segments, are too lengthy and complex for routine clinical use. A method is described which estimates both the trajectory and the mean height of the centre of mass, using only dynamic data from a single walk across one pair of force plates. Relating a possible trajectory height to the measured force vectors gives a profile for the horizontal velocity. The correct height is determined by seeking the smooth profile corresponding to the known horizontal velocity obtained by integration. Results are presented for 42 osteoarthritic patients undergoing total hip replacement operations. PMID:23906357

  12. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Tim; Reist, Dan; Macdonald, Scott; Benoit, Cecilia; Jansson, Mikael

    2010-02-01

    The Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia (CARBC) was established as a multi-campus and multi-disciplinary research centre administered by the University of Victoria (UVic) in late 2003. Its core funding is provided from interest payments on an endowment of CAD 10.55 million dollars. It is supported by a commitment to seven faculty appointments in various departments at UVic. The Centre has two offices, an administration and research office in Victoria and a knowledge exchange unit in Vancouver. The two offices are collaborating on the implementation of CARBC's first 5-year plan which seeks to build capacity in British Columbia for integrated multi-disciplinary research and knowledge exchange in the areas substance use, addictions and harm reduction. Present challenges include losses to the endowment caused by the 2008/2009 economic crisis and difficulties negotiating faculty positions with the university administration. Despite these hurdles, to date each year has seen increased capacity for the Centre in terms of affiliated scientists, funding and staffing as well as output in terms of published reports, electronic resources and impacts on policy and practice. Areas of special research interest include: drug testing in the work-place, epidemiological monitoring, substance use and injury, pricing and taxation policies, privatization of liquor monopolies, polysubstance use, health determinants of indigenous peoples, street-involved youth and other vulnerable populations at risk of substance use problems. Further information about the Centre and its activities can be found on http://www.carbc.ca. PMID:20078479

  13. Reconciling evidence-based medicine and patient-centred care: defining evidence-based inputs to patient-centred decisions.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based and patient-centred health care movements have each enhanced the discussion of how health care might best be delivered, yet the two have evolved separately and, in some views, remain at odds with each other. No clear model has emerged to enable practitioners to capitalize on the advantages of each so actual practice often becomes, to varying degrees, an undefined mishmash of each. When faced with clinical uncertainty, it becomes easy for practitioners to rely on formulas for care developed explicitly by expert panels, or on the tacit ones developed from experience or habit. Either way, these tendencies towards 'cookbook' medicine undermine the view of patients as unique particulars, and diminish what might be considered patient-centred care. The sequence in which evidence is applied in the care process, however, is critical for developing a model of care that is both evidence based and patient centred. This notion derives from a paradigm for knowledge delivery and patient care developed over decades by Dr. Lawrence Weed. Weed's vision enables us to view evidence-based and person-centred medicine as wholly complementary, using computer tools to more fully and reliably exploit the vast body of collective knowledge available to define patients' uniqueness and identify the options to guide patients. The transparency of the approach to knowledge delivery facilitates meaningful practitioner-patient dialogue in determining the appropriate course of action. Such a model for knowledge delivery and care is essential for integrating evidence-based and patient-centred approaches.

  14. Energy efficiency in U.K. shopping centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiarotti, Michela

    Energy efficiency in shopping centres means providing comfortable internal environment and services to the occupants with minimum energy use in a cost-effective and environmentally sensitive manner. This research considers the interaction of three factors affecting the energy efficiency of shopping centres: i) performance of the building fabric and services ii) management of the building in terms of operation, control, maintenance and replacement of the building fabric and services, and company's energy policy iii) occupants' expectation for comfort and awareness of energy efficiency. The aim of the investigation is to determine the role of the above factors in the energy consumption and carbon emissions of shopping centres and the scope for reducing this energy usage by changing one or all the three factors. The study also attempts to prioritize the changes in the above factors that are more cost-effective at reducing that energy consumption and identify the benefits and main economic and legal drivers for energy efficiency in shopping centres. To achieve these targets, three case studies have been analysed. Using energy data from bills, the performance of the selected case studies has been assessed to establish trends and current energy consumption and carbon emissions of shopping centres and their related causes. A regression analysis has attempted to break down the energy consumption of the landlords' area by end-use to identify the main sources of energy usage and consequently introduce cost-effective measures for saving energy. A monitoring and occupants' survey in both landlords' and tenants' areas have been carried out at the same time to compare the objective data of the environmental conditions with the subjective impressions of shoppers and shopkeepers. In particular, the monitoring aimed at assessing the internal environment to identify possible causes of discomfort and opportunities for introducing energy saving measures. The survey looked at

  15. General practice observed. A do-it-yourself medical centre.

    PubMed

    Ganner, A N; Lockie, A C

    1979-11-17

    A group practice commissioned a local building company to build their own medical centre comprising 370 m2 (4000 ft2) of building with an adequate car park at a total cost of 60 000 pounds with design to completion in nine months. A bank loan for 10 years was assigned to the partnership and each partner made his own arrangements for repayment. The updated cost for June 1979 is 80 000-85 000 pounds. Building a centre in this way is professionally and financially rewarding.

  16. User satisfaction with commuter walk-in centres.

    PubMed

    Coster, Joanne; O'Cathain, Alicia; Nicholl, Jon; Salisbury, Chris

    2009-12-01

    Pilot commuter walk-in centres have been located close to national rail stations in major English cities, provided by private healthcare companies for the NHS, and offering access to doctors and nurses. This study used a survey to evaluate user satisfaction levels with this new service. Thirty-three per cent (1828/5574) of users completed a questionnaire. Centres demonstrated high levels of user satisfaction (69% 'very satisfied', 95% confidence interval = 58% to 79%) overall, but satisfaction was lower for some aspects of care such as waiting times. PMID:20875252

  17. An African-Centred Approach to Land Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel-Di Mauro, Salvatore; Carroll, Karanja Keita

    2014-01-01

    Approaches to environmental education which are engaging with place and critical pedagogy have not yet broadly engaged with the African world and insights from Africana Studies and Geography. An African-centred approach facilitates people's reconnection to places and ecosystems in ways that do not reduce places to objects of conquest and…

  18. Student Experience of a Scenario-Centred Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sarah; Galilea, Patricia; Tolouei, Reza

    2010-01-01

    In 2006 UCL implemented new scenario-centred degree programmes in Civil and Environmental Engineering. The new curriculum can be characterised as a hybrid of problem-based, project-based and traditional approaches to learning. Four times a year students work in teams for one week on a scenario which aims to integrate learning from lecture and…

  19. Evaluation of the Centres of Excellence in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettunen, Juha Matti

    2011-01-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the centres of excellence in higher education in Finland. This approach is an example of enhancement-led evaluation aiming to improve the long-term development of education. The study presents the Degree Programme in Civil Engineering of the Turku University of Applied Sciences, which was awarded the…

  20. Constructing Learning Spaces? Videoconferencing at Local Learning Centres in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logdlund, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    This article explores videoconferencing in the context of local learning centres in Sweden. The practice is described as a "learning space" in which adult learners construct socio-spatial relations. The study goes beyond a sociological apprehension of actors and opposes the idea of the material as neutral, passive and conformed by practice. On the…

  1. Frambu Health Centre: Promoting Family Focused Care for Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storhaug, Kari; Vandvik, Inger Helene

    1983-01-01

    The article describes services of the Frambu Health Centre in Norway, which has evolved during the past 30 years from a summer camp for children with poliomyelitis to a modern information and treatment center for families with disabled members, and offers fortnightly courses for patients with rare congenital and/or hereditary disorders. (Author/MC)

  2. Aotearoa, New Zealand and the Centre for Human Care.

    PubMed

    Martin, M

    1997-01-01

    Aotearoa, New Zealand, is a small South Pacific nation in which the concept of the Centre for Human Care has been shared and explored through the writings and visits of Professor Jean Watson. This article expresses this experience personally and makes comments about the value universally of such a concept and vision.

  3. Analytical model of peptide mass cluster centres with applications

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Witold E; Farrow, Malcolm; Emde, Anne-Katrin; Lehrach, Hans; Lalowski, Maciej; Reinert, Knut

    2006-01-01

    Background The elemental composition of peptides results in formation of distinct, equidistantly spaced clusters across the mass range. The property of peptide mass clustering is used to calibrate peptide mass lists, to identify and remove non-peptide peaks and for data reduction. Results We developed an analytical model of the peptide mass cluster centres. Inputs to the model included, the amino acid frequencies in the sequence database, the average length of the proteins in the database, the cleavage specificity of the proteolytic enzyme used and the cleavage probability. We examined the accuracy of our model by comparing it with the model based on an in silico sequence database digest. To identify the crucial parameters we analysed how the cluster centre location depends on the inputs. The distance to the nearest cluster was used to calibrate mass spectrometric peptide peak-lists and to identify non-peptide peaks. Conclusion The model introduced here enables us to predict the location of the peptide mass cluster centres. It explains how the location of the cluster centres depends on the input parameters. Fast and efficient calibration and filtering of non-peptide peaks is achieved by a distance measure suggested by Wool and Smilansky. PMID:16995952

  4. Providing a Flexible, Learner-Centred Programme: Challenges for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Sarah; Gordon, Carole

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the implementation of a flexible learner-centred programme of study which blends face-to-face and online learning. The programme was developed to be flexible in terms of content and study strategies, whilst remaining within more rigid organisational structures and processes. This paper outlines the programme and…

  5. Examining Whiteness in a Children's Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Verity; Watson, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    This article utilises critical whiteness theory to explore the ethnic discourses observed in a children's centre in South London. Whilst critical whiteness has been used as a framework to understand race, racism and multiculturalism in a number of settings, including education, there are few studies that have sought to understand ethnicity in…

  6. Automation of (64)Cu production at Turku PET Centre.

    PubMed

    Elomaa, Viki-Veikko; Jurttila, Jori; Rajander, Johan; Solin, Olof

    2014-07-01

    At Turku PET Centre automation for handling solid targets for the production of (64)Cu has been built. The system consists of a module for moving the target from the irradiation position into a lead transport shield and a robotic-arm assisted setup for moving the target within radiochemistry laboratory. The main motivation for designing automation arises from radiation hygiene.

  7. Physical Activity Promotion in Call Centres: Employers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renton, Sheila J.; Lightfoot, Nancy E.; Maar, Marion A.

    2011-01-01

    This study followed a predominantly qualitative approach to explore the perspectives of employers in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, call centres (CCs) regarding physical activity (PA) promotion in workplaces, by identifying current practices and employers' motivation to promote PA, as well as perceived facilitators and barriers. In-depth interviews…

  8. Toward a Student-Centred Process of Teaching Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Gota

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a way toward a student-centred process of teaching arithmetic, where the content is harmonized with the students' conceptual levels. At school start, one classroom teacher is guided in recurrent teaching development meetings in order to develop teaching based on the students' prerequisites and to successively learn the…

  9. The Shell Science Centre Curriculum Extension Programme 1987-1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziervogel, A., Comp.; Lewy, A., Ed.

    The curriculum extension program (CEP) of the Shell Science Centre provided group tutoring to small groups of secondary school pupils using qualified teachers. This evaluation report presents articles discussing various aspects of the program and its effectiveness. The first article by A. Ziervogel provides a review of the program. The following…

  10. Student-Centred Pedagogy in Turkey: Conceptualisations, Interpretations and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altinyelken, Hulya Kosar

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore recent curricular reforms to advocate student-centred pedagogy (SCP) in primary schools in Turkey. By using a case study approach, the article examines teacher views on SCP, classroom practices and perceived challenges in implementation process. The study highlights some of the unintended consequences of…

  11. Introduction of ICT and Multimedia into Cambodia's Teacher Training Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionys, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the integration of ICT in the teacher training centres of Cambodia. It focuses on the collaboration between the Teacher Training Department of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MoEYS) of Cambodia and VVOB (Flemish Association for Development Cooperation and Technical Assistance), which is aimed at improving ICT…

  12. Teaching and Assessment for an Organisation-Centred Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Sarojni

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to discuss the teaching and assessment strategies for an organisation-centred curriculum. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a case study. Data were collected from interviews and a focus group with worker-learners enrolled in a Graduate Certificate in Education (Educational Leadership) course. Findings: The…

  13. Openness--A Way Forward: Development Education Research Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare-Heremia, Mahora

    2014-01-01

    Education is a vital aspect in the lives of humankind. It contributes and shapes our future as citizens of the world. To understand it is to discover the many hidden talents the world has in store for all. The Development Education Research Centre (DERC) holds many resources that aid in the development of education at a global level. With the…

  14. Al-Manakh. Language Centre Journal, Volume 4, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Manakh, Journal of The Language Centre, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This issue of a journal devoted primarily to teaching English as a second language to engineering students contains the following articles: (1) "The Contribution of Educational Technology to ELT [English Language Teaching]" by Mike Laflin; (2) "Looking Again at Student-Centred Study Skills" by Andrew E. Seymour; (3) "Troublesome English T" by…

  15. H3+ towards and within the Galactic centre.

    PubMed

    Geballe, T R

    2006-11-15

    High-resolution spectroscopy of bright infrared sources in the centre of the Galaxy has resulted in the detection of H3+ in a remarkable array of dense and diffuse clouds along the 8000 parsec long line of sight, at a wide range of distances from the centre. Most prominent among these is a previously undetected, but very large amount of warm (T approximately 250 K) and diffuse (n approximately 100 cm2) gas within a few hundred parsecs of the centre. The key to understanding the environment of the H3+ in this region is an H3+ absorption line at 3.53 microm from the metastable (3,3) rotational level, which has not been detected in dense or diffuse clouds outside of the Galactic centre (GC). We have used spectroscopy of this line along with other lines of H3+ and CO to characterize all of the clouds along the line of sight to the GC. The high abundance of H3+ in the central few hundred parsecs implies an ionization rate there that is several times larger than estimated for diffuse clouds outside the GC, and nearly two orders of magnitude greater than originally predicted for diffuse clouds.

  16. Centre for Applied Language Studies, University of Limerick, Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Angela; Atkinson, David; Farr, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Applied Language Studies (CALS), founded in 1997, brings together researchers and postgraduate students from several disciplines in language studies, and is structured in three research clusters: New learning environments; Discourse, society and identity; and Plurilingualism and language policy. There is a certain amount of…

  17. Service Climate in New Zealand English Language Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on the findings of a study into staff perceptions of service climate in New Zealand English language centres (ELCs) offering ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) courses. Design/methodology/approach: A 71-item questionnaire based on a Likert scale was used to survey non-management teaching and…

  18. Centres for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Attendees' Perceptions of Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gajewska, Urszula; Trigg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Day and community learning centres aim to provide intellectually disabled (ID) people with social support, life skills and greater control over their lives. However, there is little research exploring the benefits of attendance from the perspective of attendees and whether these goals are met. Materials and methods: Unstructured…

  19. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre Bulletin No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Instructions for the construction of the following apparatus for the secondary school science laboratory are included in this issue of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre Bulletin: a cheap water purifier using an expendable deionizer can; a simple amplifier suitable for detecting or displaying D. C. currents of 1 microamp or…

  20. Galileo's Treatment for the Centre of Gravity of Solids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worner, C. H.; Iommi-Amunategui, G.

    2007-01-01

    The appendix on the centres of gravity that appears at the end of Galileo's book, "Two New Sciences", is analysed. It is shown that the method used by Galileo in this work has an interesting reasoning and also shows preliminary ideas about scaling and advances some ideas about series convergence. In addition, we note that the geometrical language…

  1. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2009 Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2009

    2009-01-01

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) was established in 1981 as a not-for-profit company owned by the Commonwealth and state and territory ministers with responsibility for vocational education and training (VET). It is a professional, independent body at arm's length from government. The company initially conducted research…

  2. Language Experiences of Preverbal Children in Australian Childcare Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyland, Berenice

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the language experiences of preverbal infants in Australian childcare centres with the aim of examining cultural regulation within the childcare context. Language is defined as a social and communicative act that is related to the development of voluntary action (Vygotsky 1962; Lock 1980; Leontiev 1994). The study uses…

  3. New insights, new challenges; person centred transport design.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Andree

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses the Hexagon Spindle model of ergonomics to provide a framework for the development of person centred approaches to vehicle and transport design. The benefits of taking this approach, and the factors that might be included under a more inclusive definition of automotive and Transport ergonomics are explained.

  4. Learner Centred Design for a Hybrid Interaction Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Simon; Romero, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Learner centred design methods highlight the importance of involving the stakeholders of the learning process (learners, teachers, educational researchers) at all stages of the design of educational applications and of refining the design through an iterative prototyping process. These methods have been used successfully when designing systems…

  5. Final Report and Recommendations on Regional Computing Centre Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee of Presidents of Universities of Ontario, Toronto.

    The Draft Report of the Joint Ad Hoc Subcommittee on Regional Computing Centres of the Committee of Presidents of Universities of Ontario made a tentative recommendation that a regional computer center should be developed for the use of Ontario universities. However, on further investigation it was found that such a computer center would be…

  6. Radiation from an off-centred rotating dipole in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-08-01

    When a neutron star forms, after the collapse of its progenitor, a strong magnetic field survives in its interior. This magnetic topology is usually assumed to be well approximated by a dipole located right at the centre of the star. However, there is no particular reason why this dipole should be attached to this very special point. A slight shift from the stellar centre could have strong implications for the surrounding electromagnetic field configuration leading to clear observational signatures. We study the effect of the most general off-centred dipole anchored in the neutron star interior. Exact analytical solutions are given in vacuum outside the star to any order of accuracy in the small parameter ɛ = d/R, where d is the displacement of the dipole from the stellar centre and R the neutron star radius. As a simple diagnostic of this decentred dipole, the spin-down luminosity and the torque exerted on its crust are computed to the lowest leading order in ɛ. Results are compared to earlier works and a discussion on repercussions on pulsar braking index and multi-wavelength light curves is proposed.

  7. Democratising Turkey through Student-Centred Pedagogy: Opportunities and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altinyelken, Hülya Kosar

    2015-01-01

    Global reform talk on pedagogy has been converging around student-centred pedagogy (SCP) in recent decades. One of the significant appeals of this pedagogical model is its democratisation potentials. This article seeks to empirically study SCP's role in democratising learning and promoting social democratisation by taking the case of Turkey, a…

  8. Clinical pathway for thoracic surgery in an Italian centre

    PubMed Central

    Salati, Michele; Tiberi, Michela; Sabbatini, Armando; Gentili, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Clinical care pathways are developed to standardize postoperative patient care and the main impetus is to improve quality of care, decrease variation in care and reduce costs. We report the clinical pathway of care adopted at our centre since the introduction of Uniportal VATS program for major lung resections. PMID:26941966

  9. A Centre for Excellence in Education for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Alan; Selby, David; Chalkley, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The English higher education landscape has recently experienced a significant change with the addition of 74 Centres for Excellence in Teaching & Learning (CETLs), each one devoted to a particular educational issue or theme. This paper highlights a CETL which is of special interest to geographers in that it is focused on the promotion of education…

  10. Developing a tool to assess person-centred continence care.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jayne

    2006-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the first phase of a study to determine the contextual indicators that enable or hinder evidence-based continence care and management. The main focus of the article is to provide an insight into the value of understanding practice 'context' and its impact on the provision of person-centred continence care.

  11. Identifying Centres of Plant Biodiversity in South Australia

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Greg R.; Biffin, Ed; Baruch, Zdravko; Lowe, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify regional centres of plant biodiversity in South Australia, a sub-continental land area of 983,482 km2, by mapping a suite of metrics. Broad-brush conservation issues associated with the centres were mapped, specifically climate sensitivity, exposure to habitat fragmentation, introduced species and altered fire regimes. We compiled 727,417 plant species records from plot-based field surveys and herbarium records and mapped the following: species richness (all species; South Australian endemics; conservation-dependent species; introduced species); georeferenced weighted endemism, phylogenetic diversity, georeferenced phylogenetic endemism; and measures of beta diversity at local and state-wide scales. Associated conservation issues mapped were: climate sensitivity measured via ordination and non-linear modelling; habitat fragmentation represented by the proportion of remnant vegetation within a moving window; fire prone landscapes assessed using fire history records; invasive species assessed through diversity metrics, species distribution and literature. Compared to plots, herbarium data had higher spatial and taxonomic coverage but records were more biased towards major transport corridors. Beta diversity was influenced by sampling intensity and scale of comparison. We identified six centres of high plant biodiversity for South Australia: Western Kangaroo Island; Southern Mount Lofty Ranges; Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands; Southern Flinders Ranges; Southern Eyre Peninsula; Lower South East. Species composition in the arid-mediterranean ecotone was the most climate sensitive. Fragmentation mapping highlighted the dichotomy between extensive land-use and high remnancy in the north and intensive land-use and low remnancy in the south. Invasive species were most species rich in agricultural areas close to population centres. Fire mapping revealed large variation in frequency across the state. Biodiversity scores were not always

  12. Identifying Centres of Plant Biodiversity in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Guerin, Greg R; Biffin, Ed; Baruch, Zdravko; Lowe, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify regional centres of plant biodiversity in South Australia, a sub-continental land area of 983,482 km2, by mapping a suite of metrics. Broad-brush conservation issues associated with the centres were mapped, specifically climate sensitivity, exposure to habitat fragmentation, introduced species and altered fire regimes. We compiled 727,417 plant species records from plot-based field surveys and herbarium records and mapped the following: species richness (all species; South Australian endemics; conservation-dependent species; introduced species); georeferenced weighted endemism, phylogenetic diversity, georeferenced phylogenetic endemism; and measures of beta diversity at local and state-wide scales. Associated conservation issues mapped were: climate sensitivity measured via ordination and non-linear modelling; habitat fragmentation represented by the proportion of remnant vegetation within a moving window; fire prone landscapes assessed using fire history records; invasive species assessed through diversity metrics, species distribution and literature. Compared to plots, herbarium data had higher spatial and taxonomic coverage but records were more biased towards major transport corridors. Beta diversity was influenced by sampling intensity and scale of comparison. We identified six centres of high plant biodiversity for South Australia: Western Kangaroo Island; Southern Mount Lofty Ranges; Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands; Southern Flinders Ranges; Southern Eyre Peninsula; Lower South East. Species composition in the arid-mediterranean ecotone was the most climate sensitive. Fragmentation mapping highlighted the dichotomy between extensive land-use and high remnancy in the north and intensive land-use and low remnancy in the south. Invasive species were most species rich in agricultural areas close to population centres. Fire mapping revealed large variation in frequency across the state. Biodiversity scores were not always

  13. Penile cancer: Perspective from a Canadian tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Beech, Benjamin; Izawa, Jonathan; Pautler, Stephen; Chin, Joseph; Power, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare in North America; however, the morbidity can be devastating. This analysis represents the first reported penile cancer experience at a tertiary care centre in Canada. Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of all patients who received care at our centre for penile SCC from 2005 until the present time. Epidemiological and clinical data were collected for all patients. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier methods with log-rank test and Cox regression for univariate and multivariate analysis, respectively. Results: We identified 42 patients who were treated at our centre for penile SCC. Of these, 29% underwent excisional biopsy, 38% had partial penectomy, and 33% had total penectomy. Five patients with high-risk tumours underwent modified inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND), while 7 patients had radical ILND for clinically palpable disease. Overall, the median cancer specific survival (CSS) was undefined, with a 60% survival at 102 months. However CSS was significantly correlated to pT stage, pN stage, and tumour grade. The median follow-up was 25 months (interquartile range: 11–48). Conclusion: These findings confirm the poor CSS of patients with positive lymph nodes in penile SCC. Patients with pN0 after ILND had a durable CSS. Risk factors for penile SCC were confirmed as elevated body mass index, positive smoking history, and lack of circumcision. This first epidemiologic report on penile SCC from a Canadian tertiary care centre should be expanded to other national centres. PMID:26644802

  14. Identifying Centres of Plant Biodiversity in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Guerin, Greg R; Biffin, Ed; Baruch, Zdravko; Lowe, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify regional centres of plant biodiversity in South Australia, a sub-continental land area of 983,482 km2, by mapping a suite of metrics. Broad-brush conservation issues associated with the centres were mapped, specifically climate sensitivity, exposure to habitat fragmentation, introduced species and altered fire regimes. We compiled 727,417 plant species records from plot-based field surveys and herbarium records and mapped the following: species richness (all species; South Australian endemics; conservation-dependent species; introduced species); georeferenced weighted endemism, phylogenetic diversity, georeferenced phylogenetic endemism; and measures of beta diversity at local and state-wide scales. Associated conservation issues mapped were: climate sensitivity measured via ordination and non-linear modelling; habitat fragmentation represented by the proportion of remnant vegetation within a moving window; fire prone landscapes assessed using fire history records; invasive species assessed through diversity metrics, species distribution and literature. Compared to plots, herbarium data had higher spatial and taxonomic coverage but records were more biased towards major transport corridors. Beta diversity was influenced by sampling intensity and scale of comparison. We identified six centres of high plant biodiversity for South Australia: Western Kangaroo Island; Southern Mount Lofty Ranges; Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands; Southern Flinders Ranges; Southern Eyre Peninsula; Lower South East. Species composition in the arid-mediterranean ecotone was the most climate sensitive. Fragmentation mapping highlighted the dichotomy between extensive land-use and high remnancy in the north and intensive land-use and low remnancy in the south. Invasive species were most species rich in agricultural areas close to population centres. Fire mapping revealed large variation in frequency across the state. Biodiversity scores were not always

  15. 3 or 1? - 3D cone-sheet architecture provides insight into the centre(s) of Ardnamurchan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Mathieu, Lucie; Emeleus, Henry C.; Donaldson, Colin H.

    2013-04-01

    The Palaeogene Ardnamurchan igneous centre, NW Scotland, was a defining place for the development of classic concepts of cone-sheet, ring-dyke, and dyke emplacement. It holds therefore an iconic status among geologists and has influenced our understanding of subvolcanic structures fundamentally. We have used historic geological maps of Ardnamurchan to project the underlying three-dimensional (3D) cone-sheet structure. The results illustrate that a single elongate magma chamber likely acted as the source of the cone-sheet swarms, instead of the traditionally accepted model of three successive centres. Our finding is moreover consistent with recent sedimentological, geochemical, geophysical, and structural investigations that all support a ridge-like morphology for the Ardnamurchan volcano. This challenges the static model of cone-sheet emplacement that involves successive but independent centres in favour of a dynamical one that involves a single, but elongate magma chamber that is progressively evolving. The latter model reduces the lifetime required for the Ardnamurchan centre considerably.

  16. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre, India--a profile.

    PubMed

    Ray, Rajat; Dhawan, Anju; Chopra, Anita

    2013-10-01

    The National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre (NDDTC) is a part of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, a premier autonomous medical university in India. This article provides an account of its origin and its contribution to the field of substance use disorder at the national and international levels. Since its establishment, the NDDTC has played a major role in the development of various replicable models of care, the training of post-graduate students of psychiatry, research, policy development and planning. An assessment of the magnitude of drug abuse in India began in the early 1990s and this was followed by a National Survey on Extent, Patterns and Trends of Drug Abuse in 2004. Several models of clinical care have been developed for population subgroups in diverse settings. The centre played an important role in producing data and resource material which helped to scale up opioid substitution treatment in India. A nationwide database on the profile of patients seeking treatment (Drug Abuse Monitoring System) at government drug treatment centres has also been created. The centre has provided valuable inputs for the Government of India's programme planning. Besides clinical studies, research has also focused on pre-clinical studies. Capacity-building is an important priority, with training curricula and resource material being developed for doctors and paramedical staff. Many of these training programmes are conducted in collaboration with other institutions in the country. The NDDTC has received funding from several national and international organizations for research and scientific meetings, and, most recently (2012), it has been designated as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Substance Abuse.

  17. Reconciling evidence-based medicine and patient-centred care: defining evidence-based inputs to patient-centred decisions.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based and patient-centred health care movements have each enhanced the discussion of how health care might best be delivered, yet the two have evolved separately and, in some views, remain at odds with each other. No clear model has emerged to enable practitioners to capitalize on the advantages of each so actual practice often becomes, to varying degrees, an undefined mishmash of each. When faced with clinical uncertainty, it becomes easy for practitioners to rely on formulas for care developed explicitly by expert panels, or on the tacit ones developed from experience or habit. Either way, these tendencies towards 'cookbook' medicine undermine the view of patients as unique particulars, and diminish what might be considered patient-centred care. The sequence in which evidence is applied in the care process, however, is critical for developing a model of care that is both evidence based and patient centred. This notion derives from a paradigm for knowledge delivery and patient care developed over decades by Dr. Lawrence Weed. Weed's vision enables us to view evidence-based and person-centred medicine as wholly complementary, using computer tools to more fully and reliably exploit the vast body of collective knowledge available to define patients' uniqueness and identify the options to guide patients. The transparency of the approach to knowledge delivery facilitates meaningful practitioner-patient dialogue in determining the appropriate course of action. Such a model for knowledge delivery and care is essential for integrating evidence-based and patient-centred approaches. PMID:26456314

  18. Reconciling evidence‐based medicine and patient‐centred care: defining evidence‐based inputs to patient‐centred decisions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Evidence‐based and patient‐centred health care movements have each enhanced the discussion of how health care might best be delivered, yet the two have evolved separately and, in some views, remain at odds with each other. No clear model has emerged to enable practitioners to capitalize on the advantages of each so actual practice often becomes, to varying degrees, an undefined mishmash of each. When faced with clinical uncertainty, it becomes easy for practitioners to rely on formulas for care developed explicitly by expert panels, or on the tacit ones developed from experience or habit. Either way, these tendencies towards ‘cookbook’ medicine undermine the view of patients as unique particulars, and diminish what might be considered patient‐centred care. The sequence in which evidence is applied in the care process, however, is critical for developing a model of care that is both evidence based and patient centred. This notion derives from a paradigm for knowledge delivery and patient care developed over decades by Dr. Lawrence Weed. Weed's vision enables us to view evidence‐based and person‐centred medicine as wholly complementary, using computer tools to more fully and reliably exploit the vast body of collective knowledge available to define patients’ uniqueness and identify the options to guide patients. The transparency of the approach to knowledge delivery facilitates meaningful practitioner–patient dialogue in determining the appropriate course of action. Such a model for knowledge delivery and care is essential for integrating evidence‐based and patient‐centred approaches. PMID:26456314

  19. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of cardiovascular disease world-wide is one of great concern to patients and health care agencies alike. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes compared with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health-related quality of life and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Search methods We updated the search of a previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from 2001 to January 2008. We checked reference lists and sought advice from experts. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes, in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected independently by two reviewers, and data extracted by a single reviewer and checked by a second one. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results Twelve studies (1,938 participants) met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies recruited a lower risk patient following an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularisation. There was no difference in outcomes of home- versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation in mortality risk ratio (RR) was 1.31 (95% confidence interval (C) 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.11 (95% CI −0.35 to 0.13), as well

  20. Skills development at a paramedic accident simulation centre.

    PubMed

    Donaghy, John

    2016-02-01

    Practice simulation in acute and pre-hospital care settings is a growing area of interest for clinicians and health educationalists, and there is much evidence to support its use (Pike and O'Donnell 2010). Most simulation is delivered through computer-aided software or in virtual environments, however last year the University of Hertfordshire opened an accident simulation centre which is an outdoor facility that offers pre- and post-registration paramedics the opportunity to experience a range of scenarios in a 'real life' but secure environment. This article describes how the centre enables students to apply theory to practice in complex situations, such as managing patients injured in road traffic collisions. PMID:26853672

  1. Optimising the person-centred management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    Type 2 diabetes is increasing in prevalence at a worrying rate and has been exacerbated by the worldwide obesity epidemic. The number of people in the UK diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has soared by 60% in the past 10 years. Type 2 diabetes is a very serious condition, with significant associated risks, and is the leading cause of avoidable macro- and microvascular complications. Health professionals have a key role in enabling and optimising person-centred approaches, educating and augmenting the essential skills every person, whatever his or her individual circumstances, requires for the successful self-management of this lifelong condition. This article reviews approaches to care for the management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, which includes optimising person-centred targets, promoting individualised care, minimising the risk of complications and promoting education from diagnosis onwards.

  2. Skills development at a paramedic accident simulation centre.

    PubMed

    Donaghy, John

    2016-02-01

    Practice simulation in acute and pre-hospital care settings is a growing area of interest for clinicians and health educationalists, and there is much evidence to support its use (Pike and O'Donnell 2010). Most simulation is delivered through computer-aided software or in virtual environments, however last year the University of Hertfordshire opened an accident simulation centre which is an outdoor facility that offers pre- and post-registration paramedics the opportunity to experience a range of scenarios in a 'real life' but secure environment. This article describes how the centre enables students to apply theory to practice in complex situations, such as managing patients injured in road traffic collisions.

  3. Plans for a German Grid Operations and Support Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reißer, Sabin

    The German grid initiative D-Grid brings together various scientific and commercial projects in fields like medicine, engineering, banking, meteorology using the same grid infrastructure. In this infrastructure, which comprises more than 30 computing centres, three middleware stacks (gLite, Globus and Unicore) are deployed and used by the various communities. This variety of applications as well as of middleware calls for well organised operations and support. The German Grid Operations and Support Centre (GOSC) aim to answer this challenge and also provides an uplink to international activities like EGI. The GOSC will provide middleware services like reference installations for the various middleware flavours. It will manage the national grid operations (regional monitoring, SLA enforcement) and will be responsible for providing VO and user services, like application support and a helpdesk.

  4. Safety Assurances at Space Test Centres: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon Ruiz, Raul; O'Neil, Sean; Valls, Rafel Prades

    2010-09-01

    The European Space Agency’s(ESA) experts in quality, cleanliness and contamination control, safety, test facilities and test methods have accumulated valuable experience during the performance of dedicated audits of space test centres in Europe over a period of 10 years. This paper is limited to a summary of the safety findings and provides a valuable reference to the lessons learned, identifying opportunities for improvement in the areas of risk prevention measures associated to the safety of all test centre personnel, the test specimen, the test facilities and associated infrastructure. Through the analysis of the audit results the authors present what are the main lessons learned, and conclude how an effective safety management system will contribute to successful test campaigns and have a positive impact on the cost and schedule of space projects.

  5. Children as service users of a children's centre.

    PubMed

    James, Joan

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish what is important to pre-school children as service users of a children's centre. This research was conducted as part of a range of service users' perspectives in one inner city children's centre. This study shows that young children as service users are capable of contributing their views. The participants enjoyed private spaces. Nature and the environment were important to these children, as was watching their friends playing happily A mosaic approach was used in this qualitative study of five children aged three to four years. The mosaic approach uses observation and interviewing with participatory use of cameras by the children. It is a strengths-based approach, which extends to all children irrespective of ability and background. If adults are to understand children they need to look for opportunities for their voices to be heard.

  6. The Contribution of OLG Data and Analysis Centre to EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangl, Günter; Krauss, Sandro

    2013-04-01

    OLG (Observatory Lustbuehel Graz) as a joint venture of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying works as a GNSS data centre and analyses GNSS data for reference maintenance, geokinematics and ionosphere research. Due to the change from epoch to permanent sites regions in Africa, Asia and Europe are investigated since 1995. Presently, observations from about 300 GNSS stations are used for analysis. Most of the stations are public and are retrieved from different global, regional and local data centres. In addition some institutions provide their private data to the OLG. After presenting the main regions Austria, Central Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean and the Western Indian Ocean the question will be how these data and products could be included into EPOS.

  7. The European Micropaleontological Reference Centre in Kraków

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Michael; Waskowska, Anna; Bebenek, Slawomir; Pilarz, Monika

    2016-04-01

    We are pleased to announce the establishment of the European Micropaleontological Reference Centre, housed in the offices of Micropress Europe at the AGH University of Science & Technology in Krakow, Poland. The new European Micropaleontological Reference Centre is an initiative of the Grzybowski Foundation and Micropress Europe. The centre is designed to serve the micropaleontological community by providing a permanent repository or "museum" for published microfossil collections. The centre houses a growing collection of microfossils picked into faunal slides, as well as a well-stocked library of micropaleontological books, journals, and reprints. We have the only up-to-date paper copy of the Ellis & Messina Catalogue of Foraminifera in Central Europe. Currently, the slide collections include: - Type slides of benthic foraminifera from Poland (the collection of I. Heller from the Polish oil company GEONAFTA), - Carboniferous foraminifera from Germany and Poland (collections of G. Eickhoff and Z. Alexandrowicz), - IODP sites in the Arctic, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans (collections of M. Kaminski, E. Setoyama, A. Holborn), - Exploration wells in the Boreal seas: North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Western Barents Sea, Labrador Sea, Bering Sea, Spitsbergen, Western Siberia (collections of M. Kaminski, J. Nagy, T. Van Den Akker, V. Podobina, and others), - Paratethyan Foraminifera (collections of E. Luczkowska, C. Beldean, F. Szekely), - Mesozoic-Paleogene Foraminifera from Gubbio, Italy (collections of M. Kaminski, C. Cetean, and students) and the Polish Carpathians (collection of A. Waskowska), - Caribbean (collection of M. Kaminski, R. Preece), West Africa (collection of R. Preece, S. Kender, C. Cetean), - We have a separate collection of type specimens of species (paratypes). Slides are housed in cabinet drawers together with the relevant publication. Researchers are welcome to visit the offices of Micropress Europe to view the archived microfossil collections. The center

  8. Planetary nebulae near the Galactic Centre: chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavichia, O.; Costa, R. D. D.; Maciel, W. J.; Mollá, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report physical parameters and abundances derived for a sample of high extinction planetary nebulae located in the Galactic bulge, near the Galactic Centre, based on low dispersion spectroscopy secured at the SOAR telescope using the Goodman spectrograph. The results show that the abundances of our sample are similar to those from other regions of the bulge. Nevertheless, the average abundances of the Galactic bulge do not follow the observed trend of the radial abundance gradient in the disk.

  9. Vitamin D deficiency: Diagnosis and patient centred management.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Aggarwal, Sameer

    2015-05-01

    This comprehensive review addresses the issue of Vitamin D deficiency and its management in adults. Briefly describing the history of Vitamin D development and its role in human physiology, it discusses D deficiency in adults. Pragmatic suggestion for diagnosis, choice of therapy, and monitoring are presented from a patient-centred viewpoint, keeping socioeconomic realities in perspective. The review adds to current medical literature by collating evidence in a format that will be useful to practicing clinicians.

  10. Winning cancer centre has 'hotel-like' quality.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2009-04-01

    A "highly effective" three-way partnership between architects Anshen + Allen, the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and Laing O'Rourke, has created a non-institutional and welcoming new cancer treatment and renal services centre in Newcastle upon Tyne which, despite the gruelling nature of some of the therapies set to be offered, has a character and feel early users describe as "more like a four-star hotel" than a conventional healthcare facility. Jonathan Baillie reports. PMID:19452798

  11. The Burundi Heart Centre: From concept to design.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Julia; Yacoub, Lisa; Kambaris, Angelique; Wright, Gavin; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2015-01-01

    Burundi is one of the world's poorest nations, which is also reflected in its relative lack of cardiac facilities, particularly those catering to young children and adults. The authors discuss current efforts to build "The Burundi Heart Centre" to help address this challenge. In particular, they highlight how the project can act as a case study for a sustainable architecture that involves local people and uses locally available materials in a contemporary and innovative way.

  12. Underwater manifold centre-drilled cuttings disposal system

    SciTech Connect

    Biddlestone, P.A.

    1983-09-01

    During the construction of the Central Cormorant Underwater Manifold Centre (UMC), it was recognised that the cuttings produced during the drilling of template wells would interfere with UMC operations, if deposited on top of the structure. A dual system was developed and installed on the Stadrill (the unit planned to drill the wells) to remove the cuttings from the rig to the seabed away from the UMC.

  13. The Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC) in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P.

    2009-09-01

    The Met Office and the Environment Agency in the UK have set up a joint Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC), based at the London offices of the Met Office. This partnership will improve the UK's ability to respond to flooding events by providing an earlier national forecasting and alert service to central and local government departments so as to give them more time to prepare for floods and reduce the risk of loss of life and damage to property. The creation of the centre is in response to a key recommendation of Sir Michael Pitt's Review following the summer 2007 floods over the UK. For the first time, the FFC combines the Environment Agency's expertise in flood risk management and the Met Office's expertise in weather forecasting under one roof. My presentation will describe the benefits it will bring to the emergency responder community. It will also cover the tools available to the centre such as the new generation of high resolution weather models now coming on line. As a result, flood forecasting and warning systems, (which historically have been based on the lack of sufficiently fine scale rainfall information), need to be revisited in the light of the new meteorological modelling capabilities. This is particularly true for surface water flooding, where these new capabilities offer, for the first time, the possibility of providing credible alerts.

  14. Ancient deuterostome origins of vertebrate brain signalling centres.

    PubMed

    Pani, Ariel M; Mullarkey, Erin E; Aronowicz, Jochanan; Assimacopoulos, Stavroula; Grove, Elizabeth A; Lowe, Christopher J

    2012-03-14

    Neuroectodermal signalling centres induce and pattern many novel vertebrate brain structures but are absent, or divergent, in invertebrate chordates. This has led to the idea that signalling-centre genetic programs were first assembled in stem vertebrates and potentially drove morphological innovations of the brain. However, this scenario presumes that extant cephalochordates accurately represent ancestral chordate characters, which has not been tested using close chordate outgroups. Here we report that genetic programs homologous to three vertebrate signalling centres-the anterior neural ridge, zona limitans intrathalamica and isthmic organizer-are present in the hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii. Fgf8/17/18 (a single gene homologous to vertebrate Fgf8, Fgf17 and Fgf18), sfrp1/5, hh and wnt1 are expressed in vertebrate-like arrangements in hemichordate ectoderm, and homologous genetic mechanisms regulate ectodermal patterning in both animals. We propose that these genetic programs were components of an unexpectedly complex, ancient genetic regulatory scaffold for deuterostome body patterning that degenerated in amphioxus and ascidians, but was retained to pattern divergent structures in hemichordates and vertebrates.

  15. Cytology training in the UK: a training centre prospective.

    PubMed

    Dudding, N

    2016-10-01

    Training in both cervical and non-gynaecological cytology in the UK has never faced a more challenging environment. A national reconfiguration of cervical cytology services has focussed resources on large centres and damaged the traditional links and overlapping roles within non-gynaecological cytology. The UK is now at significant risk of falling behind most European countries in the use of non-gynaecological cytology. The UK currently has five training centres which are approved by the NHS Screening programme for training in cervical cytology; the planned introduction of HPV primary screening and the subsequent dramatic reduction in cervical cytology workload will increase pressure on the remaining training schools. Funding is variable across the country as is the degree of diversification that training schools have undertaken to try to ensure a viable future. It is vital for the future of cytology in the UK that the strong network of training schools remain to ensure the quality of the laboratory service as the UK moves towards HrHPV primary screening. There is no doubt that the training school roles will change and new technology embraced to deliver training fit for the changing role of cytology in healthcare but this will require funding and recognition of the vital role the training centres play in the delivery of high quality training in both cervical and non-gynaecological cytology. PMID:27650600

  16. Centre of pressure correlates with pyramid performance in acrobatic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Floría, Pablo; Gómez-Landero, Luis Arturo; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Acrobatic gymnasts need excellent balance control to execute pyramids where one gymnast is supported by another. The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe balance performance by assessing the centre of pressure displacement in a group of acrobatic gymnasts executing pyramids; (2) to determine the relationship between the parameters describing the centre of pressure oscillations and pyramid score; and (3) to examine the role of each foot in providing a solid base of support to maintain the balance of the pyramid. Sixteen acrobatic gymnasts grouped in pairs performed a Half pyramid and a Straddle pyramid held for 7 s on two force platforms. Path length, variance, range trajectory, and surface area of the centre of pressure of each foot were examined to analyse the balance of the pyramid. The path length was correlated with the pyramid score (Straddle: p = 0.692 [large]; Half: p = 0.407 [moderate]). There were differences in the functions of each leg to maintain balance, with the non-preferred leg supporting a higher weight of the pyramid while the preferred leg performed control movements to maintain balance. The results suggested that quantitative analysis of balance can provide important information on pyramid performance.

  17. Role of operation centres in the future exploration programme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, C.; Moreau, D.; Daerden, F.; Michel, A.

    2009-04-01

    In the Apollo programme, the role of ground operations was at the minimum due to limited communication means. The absence of support to the astronaut limited the science return of the missions by imposing very coarse operations. The Space Shuttle era saw the implementation of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite Systems which since 1983 leads to unprecedented ground monitoring and commanding capabilities and presently allows ground operation centres to conduct experiments on the ISS either independently or in support of the crew. These aspects of telescience on the ISS are currently exercised in Europe by the USOC's (User support and Operation Centres) and a few examples of the successes of this concept on external payloads will be described. The extension of this telescience aspect to robotic exploration brings some of the advantages of manned flight to automatic missions. The advantages of testing dedicated exploration operation centres during automatic missions are of different orders: direct science enhancement, increase of the exploration manned base, direct involvement of scientists in exploration operations and finally training for the operations of the manned flights. Examples in the current and near future Mars missions will be shown. In the final stage of exploration: manned flight, the role of ground support will increase crew efficiency and limit the dangers of astronaut exhaustion. The necessary infrastructure to fulfil this role will be described.

  18. Source apportionment of indoor PM10 in Elderly Care Centre.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Silva, M; Faria, T; Saraga, D; Maggos, T; Wolterbeek, H T; Almeida, S M

    2016-04-01

    Source contribution to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) has been exhaustively modelled. However, people spend most of their time indoors where this approach is less explored. This evidence worsens considering elders living in Elderly Care Centres, since they are more susceptible. The present study aims to investigate the PM composition and sources influencing elderly exposure. Two 2-week sampling campaigns were conducted-one during early fall (warm phase) and another throughout the winter (cold phase). PM10 were collected with two TCR-Tecora(®) samplers that were located in an Elderly Care Centre living room and in the correspondent outdoor. Chemical analysis of the particles was performed by neutron activation analysis for element characterization, by ion chromatography for the determination of water soluble ions and by a thermal optical technique for the measurement of organic and elemental carbon. Statistical analysis showed that there were no statistical differences between seasons and environments. The sum of the indoor PM10 components measured in this work explained 57 and 53 % of the total PM10 mass measured by gravimetry in warm and cold campaigns, respectively. Outdoor PM10 concentrations were significantly higher during the day than night (p value < 0.05), as well as Ca(2+), Fe, Sb and Zn. The contribution of indoor and outdoor sources was assessed by principal component analysis and showed the importance of the highways and the airport located less than 500 m from the Elderly Care Centre for both indoor and outdoor air quality. PMID:26758302

  19. Galactic Centre hypershell model for the North Polar Spurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Y.; Habe, A.; Kataoka, J.; Totani, T.; Inoue, Y.; Nakashima, S.; Matsui, H.; Akita, M.

    2016-06-01

    The bipolar-hypershell (BHS) model for the North Polar Spurs (NPS-E, -W, and Loop I) and counter southern spurs (SPS-E and -W) is revisited based on numerical hydrodynamical simulations. Propagations of shock waves produced by energetic explosive events in the Galactic Centre are examined. Distributions of soft X-ray brightness on the sky at 0.25, 0.7, and 1.5 keV in the ±50° × ±50° region around the Galactic Centre are modelled by thermal emission from high-temperature plasma in the shock-compressed shell considering shadowing by the interstellar H I and H2 gases. The result is compared with the ROSAT wide field X-ray images in R2, 4, and 6 bands. The NPS and southern spurs are well reproduced by the simulation as shadowed dumbbell-shaped shock waves. We discuss the origin and energetics of the event in relation to the starburst and/or active galactic nucleus activities in the Galactic Centre.

  20. An operational centre for managing major chemical industrial accidents.

    PubMed

    Kiranoudis, C T; Kourniotis, S P; Christolis, M; Markatos, N C; Zografos, K G; Giannouli, I M; Androutsopoulos, K N; Ziomas, I; Kosmidis, E; Simeonidis, P; Poupkou, N

    2002-01-28

    The most important characteristic of major chemical accidents, from a societal perspective, is their tendency to produce off-site effects. The extent and severity of the accident may significantly affect the population and the environment of the adjacent areas. Following an accident event, effort should be made to limit such effects. Management decisions should be based on rational and quantitative information based on the site specific circumstances and the possible consequences. To produce such information we have developed an operational centre for managing large-scale industrial accidents. Its architecture involves an integrated framework of geographical information system (GIS) and RDBMS technology systems equipped with interactive communication capabilities. The operational centre was developed for Windows 98 platforms, for the region of Thriasion Pedion of West Attica, where the concentration of industrial activity and storage of toxic chemical is immense within areas of high population density. An appropriate case study is given in order to illuminate the use and necessity of the operational centre. PMID:11744201

  1. A New Acoustic Test Facility at Alcatel Space Test Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurat, A.; Jezequel, L.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the obsolescence of its acoustic test facility, Alcatel Space has initiated the investment of a large acoustic chamber on its test centre located in Cannes, south of France. This paper presents the main specification elaborated to design the facility, and the solution chosen : it will be located on a dedicated area of the existing test centre and will be based on technical solution already used in similar facilities over the world. The main structure consists in a chamber linked to an external envelope (concrete building) through suspension aiming at decoupling the vibration and preventing from seismic risks. The noise generation system is based on the use of Wyle modulators located on the chamber roof. Gaseous nitrogen is produced by a dedicated gas generator developed by Air-Liquide that could deliver high flow rate with accurate pressure and temperature controls. The control and acquisition system is based on existing solution implemented on the vibration facilities of the test centre. With the start of the construction in May 2004, the final acceptance tests are planned for April 2005, and the first satellites to be tested are planned for May 2005.

  2. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands in the Galactic Centre region.

    PubMed

    Geballe, T R; Najarro, F; Figer, D F; Schlegelmilch, B W; de la Fuente, D

    2011-11-02

    The spectrum of any star viewed through a sufficient quantity of diffuse interstellar material reveals a number of absorption features collectively called 'diffuse interstellar bands' (DIBs). The first DIBs were reported about 90  years ago, and currently well over 500 are known. None of them has been convincingly identified with any specific element or molecule, although recent studies suggest that the DIB carriers are polyatomic molecules containing carbon. Most of the DIBs currently known are at visible and very near-infrared wavelengths, with only two previously known at wavelengths beyond one micrometre (10,000 ångströms), the longer of which is at 1.318 micrometres (ref. 6). Here we report 13 diffuse interstellar bands in the 1.5-1.8 micrometre interval on high-extinction sightlines towards stars in the Galactic Centre. We argue that they originate almost entirely in the Galactic Centre region, a considerably warmer and harsher environment than where DIBs have been observed previously. The relative strengths of these DIBs towards the Galactic Centre and the Cygnus OB2 diffuse cloud are consistent with their strengths scaling mainly with the extinction by diffuse material.

  3. Centre of pressure correlates with pyramid performance in acrobatic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Floría, Pablo; Gómez-Landero, Luis Arturo; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Acrobatic gymnasts need excellent balance control to execute pyramids where one gymnast is supported by another. The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe balance performance by assessing the centre of pressure displacement in a group of acrobatic gymnasts executing pyramids; (2) to determine the relationship between the parameters describing the centre of pressure oscillations and pyramid score; and (3) to examine the role of each foot in providing a solid base of support to maintain the balance of the pyramid. Sixteen acrobatic gymnasts grouped in pairs performed a Half pyramid and a Straddle pyramid held for 7 s on two force platforms. Path length, variance, range trajectory, and surface area of the centre of pressure of each foot were examined to analyse the balance of the pyramid. The path length was correlated with the pyramid score (Straddle: p = 0.692 [large]; Half: p = 0.407 [moderate]). There were differences in the functions of each leg to maintain balance, with the non-preferred leg supporting a higher weight of the pyramid while the preferred leg performed control movements to maintain balance. The results suggested that quantitative analysis of balance can provide important information on pyramid performance. PMID:26715236

  4. Source apportionment of indoor PM10 in Elderly Care Centre.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Silva, M; Faria, T; Saraga, D; Maggos, T; Wolterbeek, H T; Almeida, S M

    2016-04-01

    Source contribution to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) has been exhaustively modelled. However, people spend most of their time indoors where this approach is less explored. This evidence worsens considering elders living in Elderly Care Centres, since they are more susceptible. The present study aims to investigate the PM composition and sources influencing elderly exposure. Two 2-week sampling campaigns were conducted-one during early fall (warm phase) and another throughout the winter (cold phase). PM10 were collected with two TCR-Tecora(®) samplers that were located in an Elderly Care Centre living room and in the correspondent outdoor. Chemical analysis of the particles was performed by neutron activation analysis for element characterization, by ion chromatography for the determination of water soluble ions and by a thermal optical technique for the measurement of organic and elemental carbon. Statistical analysis showed that there were no statistical differences between seasons and environments. The sum of the indoor PM10 components measured in this work explained 57 and 53 % of the total PM10 mass measured by gravimetry in warm and cold campaigns, respectively. Outdoor PM10 concentrations were significantly higher during the day than night (p value < 0.05), as well as Ca(2+), Fe, Sb and Zn. The contribution of indoor and outdoor sources was assessed by principal component analysis and showed the importance of the highways and the airport located less than 500 m from the Elderly Care Centre for both indoor and outdoor air quality.

  5. The science centre movement in India: a conspectus.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Ingit Kumar

    2005-01-01

    The present article is about the development of the science museum net in India started in 1956, when the government of that country created the Industry and Technology Museum in Calcutta. In the 1960's and 1970's, due to the need of simple programs for rural communities and small villages, the idea of Mobile Science Exhibits (MSE) started. In order to take universal scientific concepts to those who could not visit museums, the Museobus was projected. At that time, the educational focus in museums changes from exhibiting artifacts to encouraging learning through "doing". The Exploratorium in San Francisco influenced the approach of museums in India. While the first Science Centre was built in Mumbai, the Planning COmmission of the Indian government created a task force to study the development of Sciences Museums. In 1978, the National Council of Science Museums (NCSM) was created as an independent institution, which later became part of the Ministry of Education and Social Welfare. Twenty-five years after the creation of the Council, the movement for informal science teaching had acquired a solid background. In 1978, their priority was to expand the net of science Centres and Museums. Now, the priority is to achieve better quality and more efficient communication. Nowadays, Indian Science Centres evaluate the impact their activities have on individual, social and economic reality. With new technologies and approaches, they try to emphasize their relevance in a society that is characterized by having a great number of languages and poor education in science.

  6. Investigation of the bulk pinning force in YBCO superconducting films with nano-engineered pinning centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A.; Dang, V. S.; Yearwood, G.; Mikheenko, P.; Huhtinen, H.; Paturi, P.

    2014-08-01

    For practical applications of superconducting materials in applied magnetic fields, artificial pinning centres in addition to natural ones are required to oppose the Lorentz force. These pinning centres are actually various types of defects in the superconductor matrix. The pinning centres can be categorised on their dimension (volume, surface, or point) and on their character (normal cores or Δκ cores). We have used the Dew Hughes approach to determine the types of pinning centres present in various samples, with various thicknesses, temperatures and nanostructured additions to the superconducting matrix. Results show that normal surface pinning centres are present throughout almost all the samples, as dominant pinning mechanism. Such 2D extended pinning centres are mainly due to dislocations, grain boundaries, nanorods. Strong normal point pinning centres were found to be common in BZO doped YBCO samples. Other types of pinning centres, in various (minor) concentrations were also found in some of the samples.

  7. INTEGRAL Science Data Centre to be presented to the press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    The task of INTEGRAL, the most sensitive gamma-ray observatory ever launched, will be to gather some of the most energetic radiation that comes from space. It will pinpoint and study gamma-ray sources in unprecedented detail and will help to solve some of the biggest mysteries in astronomy: INTEGRAL will investigate the origin of enigmatic gamma-ray bursts, brief but extremely powerful releases of energy, and will bring much new information on stellar explosions and black holes. Not only does INTEGRAL tell us about places where we could not live, it also tell us about the processes that made the Universe habitable, such as the formation of chemical elements. The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre (ISDC), located near Geneva, represents the key element in the exploitation and analysis of the data that will come from INTEGRAL during the two years planned for in-orbit operations. In the centre, the data will be analysed, formatted and made accessible to the worldwide astronomical community. Such fundamental work on INTEGRAL data guarantees that data can be exploited by a wide community of astronomers, including those who are not familiar with the instrumentation used for gamma-ray observations. The ISDC is supported and funded by a dozen institutes in Europe and the United States (the ISDC consortium). The press conference on 11 April marks the end of the centre's development phase and the start of its operational phase. The presence of the ISDC in Switzerland represents a particular opportunity for Swiss scientists, who will participate in a special way to the development of high-energy particle astrophysics, as a result of having privileged access to INTEGRAL data. Speakers at the press conference will include Professor T. Courvoisier (Geneva Observatory, Principal Investigator of the INTEGRAL Science Data Centre), Doctor P. Creola, (Head of Swiss Space Office), and Professor D. Southwood (Director of Science at the European Space Agency). Note to editors INTEGRAL, ESA

  8. From gene to structure: The protein factory of the NBICS Centre of Kurchatov Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Boyko, K. M.; Lipkin, A. V.; Popov, V. O. Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-05-15

    The Protein Factory was established at the Centre for Nano, Bio, Info, Cognitive, and Social Sciences and Technologies (NBICS Centre) of the National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute' in 2010. The Protein Factory, together with the Centre for Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology, promote research on structural biology. This paper presents the technology platforms developed at the Protein Factory and the facilities available for researchers. The main projects currently being performed at the Protein Factory are briefly described.

  9. Expert Panel: A New Strategy for Creating a Student-Centred Learning Environment for Software Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Sy-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    Education reforms from teacher-centred to student-centred courses usually come with the adoption of new teaching strategies. However, following the growing design and development of student-centred teaching and learning innovations in many fields of study, not many efforts have been found in the field of software application teaching. Therefore,…

  10. Inquiry-Based Learning: An Educational Reform Based upon Content-Centred Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoughlin, M. Padraig M. M.

    2009-01-01

    The author of this paper posits that inquiry-based learning (IBL) enacted via a modified Moore method (MMM) is a content-driven pedagogy; as such it is content-centred not instructor-centred or student-centred. The MMM is a philosophy of education where student must master material by doing; not simply discussing, reading, or seeing it and that…

  11. Rapid health assessments of evacuation centres in areas affected by Typhoon Haiyan

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, Vikki Carr; Sucaldito, Ma Nemia; Tayag, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Typhoon Haiyan caused thousands of deaths and catastrophic destruction, leaving many homeless in Region 8 of the Philippines. A team from the Philippine Field Epidemiology Training Program conducted a rapid health assessment survey of evacuation centres severely affected by Haiyan. Methods A descriptive study was conducted whereby a convenience sample of evacuation centres were assessed on the number of toilets per evacuee, sanitation, drinking-water, food supply source and medical services. Results Of the 20 evacuation centres assessed, none had a designated manager. Most were located in schools (70%) with the estimated number of evacuees ranging from 15 to 5000 per centre. Only four (20%) met the World Health Organization standard for number of toilets per evacuee; none of the large evacuation centres had even half the recommended number of toilets. All of the evacuation centres had available drinking-water. None of the evacuation centres had garbage collection, vector control activities or standby medical teams. Fourteen (70%) evacuation centres had onsite vaccination activities for measles, tetanus and polio virus. Many evacuation centres were overcrowded. Conclusion Evacuation centres are needed in almost every disaster. They should be safely located and equipped with the required amenities. In disaster-prone areas such as the Philippines, schools and community centres should not be designated as evacuation centres unless they are equipped with adequate sanitation services. PMID:26767134

  12. A Brief History of the J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobsey, Dick

    2008-01-01

    The J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre celebrated its 40th anniversary on September 1, 2007, followed by The University of Alberta's 100th anniversary in 2008. The year 2008 also brought the appointment of a new Director for the Centre. As the immediate past Director of the Centre, the author recounts some of the history of the J.P. Das…

  13. Changing Perspectives: Teaching and Learning Centres' Strategic Contributions to Academic Development in Australian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Dale; Palmer, Stuart; Challis, Di

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study of Australian teaching and learning centres to identify factors that contribute to their effective strategic leadership. These centres remain in a state of flux, with seemingly endless reconfiguration. The drivers for such change appear to lie in decision makers' search for their centres to add more strategic value…

  14. Developing a Partnership between the Riverina Environmental Education Centre and Charles Sturt University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Colin; Collin, Keith

    2006-01-01

    A collaborative partnership has evolved between the Riverina Environmental Education Centre (REEC) and Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga. The Riverina Environmental Education Centre (REEC) is one of 24 Department of Education and Training environmental education centres in New South Wales (see www.reec.nsw.edu.au). As part of this…

  15. Childcare Workers' and Centre Directors' Beliefs about Infant Childcare Quality and Professional Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, J.; Berthelsen, D.; Segaran, N.

    2009-01-01

    While there has been extensive research exploring quality in childcare programs for children older than three years, less attention has been directed to the nature of infants' experiences in centre-based childcare programs. In this study, six childcare workers and six centre directors located in centre-based childcare programs in metropolitan…

  16. Policy in Practice: Enabling and Inhibiting Factors for the Success of Suspension Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Alison J.

    2014-01-01

    Suspension centres are a government initiative to help address disruptive student beahviour in NSW government schools. The centres are for students on long suspension from school and have not been formally evaluated. Stakeholders were asked their opinions regarding: what are the best things happening with suspension centres or what should be…

  17. CCS-MIP: Low cost Customizable Control Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labezin, Christian; Vielcanet, Pierre

    1994-01-01

    The positioning and station keeping of French national satellites are among the main missions of CNES French Space Agency CNES. The related experience and skills of the Toulouse Space Centre are reknown and often required at international level for a wide range of missions. CISI, a software engineering company, has been contributing during the last 20 years to the development of the French space programs, particularly in the field of space missions ground control segments. The CCS-MIP system, presented here, is a satellite positioning and station-keeping system designed to answer the CNES multi-mission needs, easily adaptable for a wide range of applications.

  18. Towards Human Centred Manufacturing Systems in the Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anezaki, Takashi; Hata, Seiji

    Nowadays agile market is in common, and the fundamental technology supporting next-generation production system requires further development of machine and information technologies to establish “human friendly technology" and a bridging of these technologies together. IMS-HUTOP project proposes a new product life cycle that respects the human nature of individuals, and establishes the elemental technologies necessary for acquiring, modelling and evaluating various human factors in an effort to achieve the HUTOP cycle. In this paper we propose a human centred and human friendly manufacturing system, which has been proposed in the IMS-HUTOP project.

  19. JINR Tier-1 centre for the CMS experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, N. S.; Baginyan, A. S.; Belov, S. D.; Dolbilov, A. G.; Golunov, A. O.; Gorbunov, I. N.; Gromova, N. I.; Kadochnikov, I. S.; Kashunin, I. A.; Korenkov, V. V.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Pelevanyuk, I. S.; Shmatov, S. V.; Strizh, T. A.; Tikhonenko, E. A.; Trofimov, V. V.; Voitishin, N. N.; Zhiltsov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    An overview of the JINR Tier-1 centre for the CMS experiment at the LHC is given. Special emphasis is placed on the main tasks and services of the CMS Tier-1 at JINR. In February 2015 the JINR CMS Tier-1 resources were increased to the level that was outlined in JINR's rollout plan: CPU 2400 cores (28800 HEP-Spec06), 2.4 PB disks, and 5.0 PB tapes. The first results of the Tier-1 operations received during the LHC Run-2 start are presented.

  20. Cognitive behavioural therapy and client-centred counselling.

    PubMed

    Collins, Findlay; Deady, David

    This article reviews the potential for combining cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and client-centred counselling (CCC) in nurse education and practice. Currently, CBT and CCC are practiced independently of one another within mental health care. This project attempted to bring together the unique qualities of each intervention while encouraging a synergistic approach. This was undertaken by developing and delivering a three-day pilot study workshop. The experiential workshops were evaluated using two sets of structured questionnaires and six semi-structured interviews with randomly selected participants. A follow-up questionnaire was used to review the combined approach in practice.

  1. Preparing for space - EVA training at the European Astronaut Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolender, Hans; Stevenin, Hervé; Bessone, Loredana; Torres, Antonio

    2006-11-01

    The European Astronaut Centre has developed an Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training course for ESA astronauts to bridge the gap between their scuba diving certification and the spacesuit qualification provided by NASA. ESA astronauts André Kuipers and Frank De Winne have already completed this "EVA Pre-Familiarisation Training Programme" before their training at NASA. In June 2006, an international crew of experienced EVA astronauts approved the course as good preparation for suited EVA training; they recommended that portions of it be used to help maintain EVA proficiency for astronauts.

  2. Enhancing private sector engagement: Louisiana's business emergency operations centre.

    PubMed

    Day, Jamison M; Strother, Shannon; Kolluru, Ramesh; Booth, Joseph; Rawls, Jason; Calderon, Andres

    2010-07-01

    Public sector emergency management is more effective when it coordinates its efforts with private sector companies that can provide useful capabilities faster, cheaper and better than government agencies. A business emergency operations centre (EOC) provides a space for private sector and non-governmental organisations to gather together in support of government efforts. This paper reviews business-related EOC practices in multiple US states and details the development of a new business EOC by the State of Louisiana, including lessons learned in response to the May 2010 oil spill.

  3. INFOMAT: The international materials assessment and application centre's internet gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branquinho, Carmen Lucia; Colodete, Leandro Tavares

    2004-08-01

    INFOMAT is an electronic directory structured to facilitate the search and retrieval of materials science and technology information sources. Linked to the homepage of the International Materials Assessment and Application Centre, INFOMAT presents descriptions of 392 proprietary databases with links to their host systems as well as direct links to over 180 public domain databases and over 2,400 web sites. Among the web sites are associations/unions, governmental and non-governmental institutions, industries, library holdings, market statistics, news services, on-line publications, standardization and intellectual property organizations, and universities/research groups.

  4. Saskatchewan Forest Fire Control Centre Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Funk, Barry; Strub, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Forest Fire Control Centre (SFFCC) provided surface meteorological data to BOREAS from its archive. This data set contains hourly surface meteorological data from 18 of the Meteorological stations located across Saskatchewan. Included in these data are parameters of date, time, temperature, relative humidity, wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation. Temporally, the data cover the period of May through September of 1994 and 1995. The data are provided in comma-delimited ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. The moving centre of mass of a leaking bob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, P.

    2010-07-01

    The evaluation of variation in the oscillation time period of a simple pendulum as its mass varies proves a rich source of discussion in a physics classroom, overcoming erroneous notions carried forward by students as to what constitutes the pendulum's length, by picking up only the results of approximations and ignoring the rigorous definition. The discussion also presents an exercise for evaluating the centre of mass of geometrical shapes and system of bodies. In all, the pedagogical value of the problem is worth both theoretical and experimental efforts. This paper discusses the theoretical considerations.

  6. Balloon Programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Sushanta Kumar; Palit, Sourav; Sarkar, Ritabrata; Bhowmick, Debashis

    2012-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has an independent balloon programme which includes launch, recovery, instrumentation and data analysis. So far, 20 missions have been sent and important data on Cosmic rays, muon detection and X-rays from the Sun have been obtained. We concentrate on weather balloons and miniature payloads. We present the feasibility of science with weather balloons by presenting data from on board accelerometers, gyroscopes, geiger counters, muon detectors and X-ray detectors. We also present examples of photos of cloud coverage, lunar shadow on earth during eclipse, etc. We claim that serious science could be done using our low cost approach.

  7. Anisotropic Kepler and anisotropic two fixed centres problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Przybylska, Maria; Szumiński, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we show that the anisotropic Kepler problem is dynamically equivalent to a system of two point masses which move in perpendicular lines (or planes) and interact according to Newton's law of universal gravitation. Moreover, we prove that generalised version of anisotropic Kepler problem as well as anisotropic two centres problem are non-integrable. This was achieved thanks to investigation of differential Galois groups of variational equations along certain particular solutions. Properties of these groups yield very strong necessary integrability conditions.

  8. Maintaining health: proactive client-oriented community day treatment centres for the chronic mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Yurkovich, E; Smyer, T; Dean, L

    1999-02-01

    This grounded theory study compared the definition of health by clients of two rural mental health day treatment centres, Big Sky Centre and Montana Centre. Based on an original grounded theory study of seven chronic mentally ill/disabled clients in Big Sky Centre (Yurkovich et al. 1997), the core variable, 'preventing loss of control' and related properties, were validated with nine residents of Montana Centre. While establishing a 'fit' with previous research findings, differences emerged between these two centres. These differences related to the staffs' philosophical approaches in providing treatment to the chronic mentally ill. Big Sky Centre care providers empowered their clients to learn new behaviours from their peers and assume new roles such as newcomer, member and leader. They also encouraged a prosocial attitude, and created a sense of belonging through valued involvement in their treatment. Montana Centre clients were not empowered to try out new behaviours in the treatment environment, or seek social support networks among their peers at the centre, which would foster a sense of belonging. The result was that clients from Montana Centre relied on the formal healthcare system more often than clients from the Big Sky Centre. The competing forces in healthcare today--family members, mental health providers, and insurance or managed care providers--make it easy to lose sight of or fail to gain the client's perspective about their health status and maintenance, particularly as it concerns day treatment centres. The importance of the day treatment centre as a therapeutic community which requires educational processes, innovative nursing practice, and client-centred interventions will be discussed. PMID:10336739

  9. [Physical activity centre VSTJ MEDICINA Prague--rehabilitation for diabetics].

    PubMed

    Fábin, P; Matoulek, M

    2007-05-01

    Physical activity is the basic non-pharmacological instrument in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Nevertheless, only a small number of diabetics take regular physical exercise. One of the reasons why diabetics "do not exercise" is that they have little opportunity to try physical stress under expert supervision and to get to know its effects on, for example, sugar levels. It is a very complex matter to define the optimal intensity of physical activity of, for example, a diabetic who suffers from obesity. In 2001 VSTJ MEDICINA Prague opened its first physical activity centre at the First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, in cooperation with the Third Internal Clinic and the Institute of Sports Medicine of the First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague. It now has over 2000 members, of whom around 60% are patients with metabolic syndrome. Over 150 patients exercise every day under the supervision of expert instructors. The main objective of the Physical Activity Centre is to teach patients the correct principles of physical exercise to enable them to continue carrying out their trainers' instructions at home. A correct understanding of the importance of physical exercise and practical experience under the supervision of experienced instructors improves compliance and has a strong effect on the compensation of diabetes, thereby improving the prognoses of these patients.

  10. A powerful bursting radio source towards the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Scott D; Lazio, T Joseph W; Kassim, Namir E; Ray, Paul S; Markwardt, Craig B; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2005-03-01

    Transient astronomical sources are typically powered by compact objects and usually signify highly explosive or dynamic events. Although high-time-resolution observations are often possible in radio astronomy, they are usually limited to quite narrow fields of view. The dynamic radio sky is therefore poorly sampled, in contrast to the situation in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands in which wide-field instruments routinely detect transient sources. Here we report a transient radio source, GCRT J1745-3009, which was detected during a moderately wide-field monitoring programme of the Galactic Centre region at 0.33 GHz. The characteristics of its bursts are unlike those known for any other class of radio transient. If located in or near the Galactic Centre, its brightness temperature (approximately 10(16) K) and the implied energy density within GCRT J1745-3009 vastly exceed those observed in most other classes of radio astronomical sources, and are consistent with coherent emission processes that are rarely observed. We conclude that it represents a hitherto unknown class of transient radio sources, the first of possibly many new classes that may be discovered by emerging wide-field radio telescopes.

  11. Giant magnetized outflows from the centre of the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Carretti, Ettore; Crocker, Roland M; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Haverkorn, Marijke; Purcell, Cormac; Gaensler, B M; Bernardi, Gianni; Kesteven, Michael J; Poppi, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the Milky Way is known to harbour regions of intense star formation activity as well as a supermassive black hole. Recent observations have revealed regions of γ-ray emission reaching far above and below the Galactic Centre (relative to the Galactic plane), the so-called 'Fermi bubbles'. It is uncertain whether these were generated by nuclear star formation or by quasar-like outbursts of the central black hole and no information on the structures' magnetic field has been reported. Here we report observations of two giant, linearly polarized radio lobes, containing three ridge-like substructures, emanating from the Galactic Centre. The lobes each extend about 60 degrees in the Galactic bulge, closely corresponding to the Fermi bubbles, and are permeated by strong magnetic fields of up to 15 microgauss. We conclude that the radio lobes originate in a biconical, star-formation-driven (rather than black-hole-driven) outflow from the Galaxy's central 200 parsecs that transports a huge amount of magnetic energy, about 10(55) ergs, into the Galactic halo. The ridges wind around this outflow and, we suggest, constitute a 'phonographic' record of nuclear star formation activity over at least ten million years.

  12. Biologically inspired pteridine redox centres for rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jihyun; Lee, Minah; Lee, Byungju; Seo, Dong-Hwa; Park, Chan Beum; Kang, Kisuk

    2014-10-01

    The use of biologically occurring redox centres holds a great potential in designing sustainable energy storage systems. Yet, to become practically feasible, it is critical to explore optimization strategies of biological redox compounds, along with in-depth studies regarding their underlying energy storage mechanisms. Here we report a molecular simplification strategy to tailor the redox unit of pteridine derivatives, which are essential components of ubiquitous electron transfer proteins in nature. We first apply pteridine systems of alloxazinic structure in lithium/sodium rechargeable batteries and unveil their reversible tautomerism during energy storage. Through the molecular tailoring, the pteridine electrodes can show outstanding performance, delivering 533 Wh kg-1 within 1 h and 348 Wh kg-1 within 1 min, as well as high cyclability retaining 96% of the initial capacity after 500 cycles at 10 A g-1. Our strategy combined with experimental and theoretical studies suggests guidance for the rational design of organic redox centres.

  13. VLF Science at Indian Centre for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has been monitoring VLF signals from stations around the world at its laboratories at Kolkata and Sitapur (Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre) as well as at several places throughout India when in a campaign mode. We have been interested to study high energy events from space, such as solar flares and gamma ray bursts. We have made studies during multiple solar eclipses and most importantly made substantial progress in the problem of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling while understanding various types of anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Other effects such as AGWs and LEPs are being studied. We have experience of two antarctic expedition and obtained VLF data from both Maitri and Bharati stations of India, which revealed, among other things, how the signal attenuation can indicate the extent of ice mass in Antarctica. We have been able to reproduce various VLF perturbation events using Atmospheric Chemical evolution model coupled with LWPC code. For instance we have reproduced solar flare induced VLF amplitude perturbation pattern by completely ab initio calculation. We also targeted the inverse problem, namely, deduction of the injected radiation spectra from space from the VLF signal alone, thereby establishing that the Earth can be used as a gigantic detector. These interesting results would be presented in my review talk.

  14. Experiences of involuntary admission in an approved mental health centre.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, D; Dowling, M; Trimble, T

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of what it means to have an involuntary hospital admission. A sample of six people who were detained at an approved Irish mental health centre consented to recount their experiences were interviewed. The interview transcripts were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Three superordinate themes were identified: 'The early days', 'Experiences of treatment' and 'Moving on?'. 'The early days' represented participants' initial feelings and opinions of the experience of coming into the approved centre. 'Experiences of treatment' refers to participants' experiences of medication and relationships with staff. Finally, the theme 'Moving on?' represented participants' views on how they adjusted to involuntary admission. 'Learning the way' was central to the participants' notion of moving on. The findings suggest that the meaning of detention is a varied one that evokes an array of emotional responses for participants and highlights the need for a renewed way of thinking and doing concerning those subject to involuntary. PMID:23106908

  15. Singlet levels of the NV- centre in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, L. J.; Doherty, M. W.; Barson, M. S. J.; Onoda, S.; Ohshima, T.; Manson, N. B.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic transition of the N{{V}-} centre at 637 nm is between 3{{A}2} and 3E triplet states. There are also intermediate 1{{A}1} and 1E singlet states, and the infrared transition at 1042 nm between these singlets is studied here using uniaxial stress. The stress shift and splitting parameters are determined, and the physical interaction giving rise to the parameters is considered within the accepted electronic model of the centre. It is established that this interaction for the infrared transition is due to a modification of electron-electron Coulomb repulsion interaction. This is in contrast to the visible 637 nm transition where shifts and splittings arise from modification to the one-electron Coulomb interaction. It is also established that a dynamic Jahn-Teller interaction is associated with the singlet 1E state, which gives rise to a vibronic level 115 cm-1 above the 1E electronic state. Arguments associated with this level are used to provide experimental confirmation that the 1{{A}1} is the upper singlet level and 1E is the lower singlet level.

  16. Science Archives at the ESAC Science Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    The ESAC Science Data Centre (ESDC) provides services and tools to access and retrieve science data from all ESA space science missions (astronomy, planetary and solar heliospheric). The ESDC consists of a team of scientists and engineers working together and in very close collaboration with Science Ground Segments teams. The large set of science archives located at ESAC represent a major research asset for the community, as well as a unique opportunity to provide multi missions and multi wavelength science exploitation services. ESAC Science Archives long term strategy is set along the main three axes: (1) enable maximum scientific exploitation of data sets; (2) enable efficient long-term preservation of data, software and knowledge, using modern technology and, (3) enable cost-effective archive production by integration in, and across, projects The author wants to thanks all the people from the ESAC Science Data Centre and the mission archive scientists who have participated to the development of the archives and services presented in this paper.

  17. Proposal for a Brazilian centre on alternative test methods.

    PubMed

    Eskes, Chantra; Sá-Rocha, Vanessa de Moura; Nunes, Jadir; Presgrave, Octavio; de Carvalho, Dermeval; Masson, Philippe; Rivera, Ekaterina; Coecke, Sandra; Kreysa, Joachim; Hartung, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Several initiatives have recently taken place in Brazil in order to foster the creation of centers dedicated to alternatives to animal testing. In 2008, Vanessa Sá-Rocha organized a meeting with Brazilian regulatory authorities and the major stakeholders in the field of testing to foster discussions on the process of funding, development, and validation of alternative methods in Brazil. Octavio Presgrave published a scientific article on "The Need for the Establishment of a Brazilian Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods." Also in 2008, Jadir Nunes, together with Dermeval de Carvalho, prepared and presented a proposal to the Brazilian National Agency of Health Surveillance (ANVISA) for the creation of a Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods. ECVAM and other European stakeholders have been involved in the initiatives. Furthermore, also in 2008, a new legislation has been adopted in Brazil regarding the use of animals for scientific purposes ("lei Arouca"). The legislation establishes, among other provisions, the task of monitoring and evaluating the introduction of alternative methods. However, the legislation does not provide for promotion of or information about, existing alternative methods to the larger Brazilian scientific community. In order to streamline the different activities, Chantra Eskes acted as a facilitator by establishing a new joint proposal with the current Brazilian stakeholders, aimed at setting up a Brazilian Center on Alternative Test Methods. PMID:20383476

  18. The European Astronaut Centre prepares for International Space Station operations.

    PubMed

    Messerschmid, E; Haignere, J P; Damian, K; Damann, V

    2004-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) contribution to the International Space Station (ISS) goes much beyond the delivery of hardware like the Columbus Laboratory, its payloads and the Automated Transfer Vehicles. ESA Astronauts will be members of the ISS crew. ESA, according to its commitments as ISS international partner, will be responsible to provide training on its elements and payloads to all ISS crewmembers and medical support for ESA astronauts. The European Astronaut Centre (EAC) in Cologne has developed over more than a decade into the centre of expertise for manned space activities within ESA by contributing to a number of important co-operative spaceflight missions. This role will be significantly extended for ISS manned operations. Apart from its support to ESA astronauts and their onboard operations, EAC will have a key role in training all ISS astronauts on ESA elements and payloads. The medical support of ISS crew, in particular of ESA astronauts has already started. This paper provides an overview on status and further plans in building up this homebase function for ESA astronauts and on the preparation towards Training Readiness for ISS crew training at EAC, Cologne. Copyright 2001 by the European Space Agency. Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., with permission. Released to IAF/IAA/AIAA to publish in all forms.

  19. Snowmobile trauma: 10 years' experience at Manitoba's tertiary trauma centre

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rena L.; Black, G. Brian

    2004-01-01

    Introduction According to the literature, the increased recreational use of the snowmobile has resulted in an increasing number of musculoskeletal injuries. We wished to examine whether previously described risk factors continue to be associated with snowmobile trauma and to identify previously unrecognized risks and specific patterns of injury. Methods We carried out a chart review of all snowmobile-related injuries over a 10-year period at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg, the only level 1 trauma centre serving the Province of Manitoba, with particular attention to the risk factors of suboptimal lighting, excessive speed and alcohol consumption. Results We identified 480 injuries in 294 patients, and 81 (27.6%) of these patients died. Collisions accounted for 72% of the injury mechanisms. Of the injuries sustained, 31% occurred on roads. Excessive speed was a risk factor in 54% of patients, suboptimal lighting in 86% and a blood alcohol level greater than 0.08 in 70%. Musculoskeletal injuries accounted for 57% of those recorded. There were also brachial plexus injuries (3%) and knee dislocations (2%). To our knowledge, this is the largest study detailing injury associated with recreational use of snowmobiles in Canada. Conclusions Because snowmobile trauma is caused principally by human errors, it is potentially preventable. Efforts aimed at prevention must focus on the driver, who controls the common risk factors. The danger of snowmobiling while intoxicated must be emphasized. Trail-side monitoring is likely to be ineffective, as the majority of accidents do not occur on designated snowmobile trails. PMID:15132460

  20. Acid-rock drainage at Skytop, Centre County, Pennsylvania, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Brady, Keith; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent construction for Interstate Highway 99 (I?99) exposed pyrite and associated Zn-Pb sulfide minerals beneath a >10-m thick gossan to oxidative weathering along a 40-60-m deep roadcut through a 270-m long section of the Ordovician Bald Eagle Formation at Skytop, near State College, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Nearby Zn-Pb deposits hosted in associated sandstone and limestone in Blair and Centre Counties were prospected in the past; however, these deposits generally were not viable as commercial mines. The pyritic sandstone from the roadcut was crushed and used locally as road base and fill for adjoining segments of I?99. Within months, acidic (pH1,000 mg/L), seep waters at the base of the cut contain >100 mg/L dissolved Zn and >1 mg/L As, Co, Cu, and Ni. Lead is relatively immobile (<10 ?g/L in seep waters). The salts sequester metals and acidity between rainfall events. Episodic salt dissolution then contributes pulses of contamination including acid to surface runoff and ground water. The Skytop experience highlights the need to understand dynamic interactions of mineralogy and hydrology in order to avoid potentially negative environmental impacts associated with excavation in sulfidic rocks.

  1. Conceptual Framework for Educational Disaster Centre "save the Children Life"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrova, T.; Kouteva, M.; Pashova, L.; Savova, D.; Marinova, S.

    2015-08-01

    Millions of people are affected by natural and man-made disasters each year, among which women, children, elderly persons, people with disabilities or special needs, prisoners, certain members of ethnic minorities, people with language barriers, and the impoverished are the most vulnerable population groups in case of emergencies. Many national and international organizations are involved in Early Warning and Crisis Management training, particularly focused on the special target to safe children and improve their knowledge about disasters. The success of these efforts is based on providing the specific information about disaster preparedness and emergency in adapted for children educational materials, accompanied with simple illustrative explanations for easy and fast understanding of the disasters. The active participation of the children in the educational activities through appropriate presenting the information, short training seminars and entertaining games will increase their resilience and will contribute significantly to their preparedness and adequate response in emergency situations. This paper aims to present the conceptual framework of a project for establishing an Educational Disaster Centre (EDC) "Save the children life" at University of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Geodesy (UACEG), providing relevant justification of the necessity to organize such centre in Bulgaria and discussing good practices in Europe and worldwide for children' education and training in case of disastrous event. General concepts for educational materials and children training are shared. Appropriate equipment for the EDC is shortly described.

  2. Giant magnetized outflows from the centre of the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Carretti, Ettore; Crocker, Roland M; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Haverkorn, Marijke; Purcell, Cormac; Gaensler, B M; Bernardi, Gianni; Kesteven, Michael J; Poppi, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the Milky Way is known to harbour regions of intense star formation activity as well as a supermassive black hole. Recent observations have revealed regions of γ-ray emission reaching far above and below the Galactic Centre (relative to the Galactic plane), the so-called 'Fermi bubbles'. It is uncertain whether these were generated by nuclear star formation or by quasar-like outbursts of the central black hole and no information on the structures' magnetic field has been reported. Here we report observations of two giant, linearly polarized radio lobes, containing three ridge-like substructures, emanating from the Galactic Centre. The lobes each extend about 60 degrees in the Galactic bulge, closely corresponding to the Fermi bubbles, and are permeated by strong magnetic fields of up to 15 microgauss. We conclude that the radio lobes originate in a biconical, star-formation-driven (rather than black-hole-driven) outflow from the Galaxy's central 200 parsecs that transports a huge amount of magnetic energy, about 10(55) ergs, into the Galactic halo. The ridges wind around this outflow and, we suggest, constitute a 'phonographic' record of nuclear star formation activity over at least ten million years. PMID:23282363

  3. A powerful bursting radio source towards the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Scott D; Lazio, T Joseph W; Kassim, Namir E; Ray, Paul S; Markwardt, Craig B; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2005-03-01

    Transient astronomical sources are typically powered by compact objects and usually signify highly explosive or dynamic events. Although high-time-resolution observations are often possible in radio astronomy, they are usually limited to quite narrow fields of view. The dynamic radio sky is therefore poorly sampled, in contrast to the situation in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands in which wide-field instruments routinely detect transient sources. Here we report a transient radio source, GCRT J1745-3009, which was detected during a moderately wide-field monitoring programme of the Galactic Centre region at 0.33 GHz. The characteristics of its bursts are unlike those known for any other class of radio transient. If located in or near the Galactic Centre, its brightness temperature (approximately 10(16) K) and the implied energy density within GCRT J1745-3009 vastly exceed those observed in most other classes of radio astronomical sources, and are consistent with coherent emission processes that are rarely observed. We conclude that it represents a hitherto unknown class of transient radio sources, the first of possibly many new classes that may be discovered by emerging wide-field radio telescopes. PMID:15744294

  4. Recognising and Managing Refractory Coeliac Disease: A Tertiary Centre Experience.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Ikram; Nasr, Iman; Beyers, Carl; Chang, Fuju; Donnelly, Suzanne; Ciclitira, Paul J

    2015-12-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a rare complication of coeliac disease (CD) and involves malabsorption and villous atrophy despite adherence to a strict gluten-free diet (GFD) for at least 12 months in the absence of another cause. RCD is classified based on the T-cells in the intra-epithelial lymphocyte (IEL) morphology into type 1 with normal IEL and type 2 with aberrant IEL (clonal) by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for T cell receptors (TCR) at the β/γ loci. RCD type 1 is managed with strict nutritional and pharmacological management. RCD type 2 can be complicated by ulcerative jejunitis or enteropathy associated lymphoma (EATL), the latter having a five-year mortality of 50%. Management options for RCD type 2 and response to treatment differs across centres and there have been debates over the best treatment option. Treatment options that have been used include azathioprine and steroids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, campath (an anti CD-52 monoclonal antibody), and cladribine or fluadribine with or without autologous stem cell transplantation. We present a tertiary centre's experience in the treatment of RCD type 2 where treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine was used, and our results show good response with histological recovery in 56.6% of treated individuals.

  5. Wild at Heart: the particle astrophysics of the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, R. M.; Jones, D. I.; Aharonian, F.; Law, C. J.; Melia, F.; Oka, T.; Ott, J.

    2011-05-01

    We consider the high-energy astrophysics of the inner ˜200 pc of the Galaxy. Our modelling of this region shows that the supernovae exploding here every few thousand years inject enough power to (i) sustain the steady-state, in situ population of cosmic rays (CRs) required to generate the region’s non-thermal radio and TeV γ-ray emission; (ii) drive a powerful wind that advects non-thermal particles out of the inner Galactic Centre; (iii) supply the low-energy CRs whose Coulombic collisions sustain the temperature and ionization rate of the anomalously warm envelope ? detected throughout the Central Molecular Zone; (iv) accelerate the primary electrons which provide the extended, non-thermal radio emission seen over ˜150 pc scales above and below the plane (the Galactic Centre lobe); and (v) accelerate the primary protons and heavier ions which, advected to very large scales (up to ˜10 kpc), generate the recently identified Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) haze and corresponding Fermi haze/bubbles. Our modelling bounds the average magnetic field amplitude in the inner few degrees of the Galaxy to the range 60 < B/μ G < 40 0 (at 2σ confidence) and shows that even TeV CRs likely do not have time to penetrate into the cores of the region’s dense molecular clouds before the wind removes them from the region. This latter finding apparently disfavours scenarios in which CRs - in this starburst-like environment - act to substantially modify the conditions of star formation. We speculate that the wind we identify plays a crucial role in advecting low-energy positrons from the Galactic nucleus into the bulge, thereby explaining the extended morphology of the 511 keV line emission. We present extensive appendices reviewing the environmental conditions in the Galactic Centre, deriving the star formation and supernova rates there, and setting out the extensive prior evidence that exists, supporting the notion of a fast outflow from the region.

  6. Educational role of nurse practitioners in a family practice centre

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Allyn; Moore, Ainsley; Barber, Anne; Opsteen, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) as educators of family medicine residents in order to better understand the interprofessional educational dynamics in a clinical teaching setting. Design A qualitative descriptive approach, using purposive sampling. Setting A family practice centre that is associated with an academic department of family medicine and is based in an urban area in southern Ontario. Participants First-year (8 of 9) and second-year (9 of 10) family medicine residents whose training program was based at the family practice centre, and all NPs (4 of 4) who worked at the centre. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted, which were audiotaped and transcribed. An iterative approach was used for coding and analysis. Data management software guided organization and analysis of the data. Main findings Four interconnected themes were identified: role clarification, professional identity formation, factors that enhance the educational role of NPs, and factors that limit the educational role of NPs. Although residents recognized NPs’ value in team functioning and areas of specialized knowledge, they were unclear about NPs’ scope of practice. Depending on residents’ level of training, residents tended to respond differently to teaching by NPs. More of the senior residents believed they needed to think like physicians and preferred clinical teaching from physician teachers. Junior residents valued the step-by-step instructional approach used by NPs, and they had a decreased sense of vulnerability when being taught by NPs. Training in teaching skills was helpful for NPs. Barriers to providing optimal education included opportunity, time, and physician attitudes. Conclusion The lack of an intentional orientation of family medicine residents to NPs’ scope of practice and educational role can lead to difficulties in interprofessional education. More explicit recognition of the evolving professional identity of family

  7. Standards of care for obsessive-compulsive disorder centres.

    PubMed

    Menchón, José M; van Ameringen, Michael; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Denys, Damiaan; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E; Hollander, Eric; Marazziti, Donatella; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Ruck, Christian; Shavitt, Roseli; Stein, Dan J; Andersson, Erik; Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Cath, Danielle C; Drummond, Lynne; Feusner, Jamie; Geller, Daniel A; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Matsunaga, Hisato; McCabe, Randy E; Mpavaenda, Davis; Nakamae, Takashi; O'Kearney, Richard; Pasquini, Massimo; Pérez Rivera, Ricardo; Poyurovsky, Michael; Real, Eva; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Soreni, Noam; Swinson, Richard P; Vulink, Nienke; Zohar, Joseph; Fineberg, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, many assessment and care units for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been set up in order to detect, diagnose and to properly manage this complex disorder, but there is no consensus regarding the key functions that these units should perform. The International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) together with the Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Network (OCRN) of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Section of the World Psychiaric Association (WPA) has developed a standards of care programme for OCD centres. The goals of this collaborative initiative are promoting basic standards, improving the quality of clinical care and enhance the validity and reliability of research results provided by different facilities and countries. PMID:27359333

  8. Standards of care for obsessive–compulsive disorder centres

    PubMed Central

    Menchón, José M.; van Ameringen, Michael; Dell’Osso, Bernardo; Denys, Damiaan; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E.; Hollander, Eric; Marazziti, Donatella; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Ruck, Christian; Shavitt, Roseli; Stein, Dan J.; Andersson, Erik; Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Cath, Danielle C.; Drummond, Lynne; Feusner, Jamie; Geller, Daniel A.; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Matsunaga, Hisato; McCabe, Randy E.; Mpavaenda, Davis; Nakamae, Takashi; O'Kearney, Richard; Pasquini, Massimo; Pérez Rivera, Ricardo; Poyurovsky, Michael; Real, Eva; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Soreni, Noam; Swinson, Richard P.; Vulink, Nienke; Zohar, Joseph; Fineberg, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, many assessment and care units for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) have been set up in order to detect, diagnose and to properly manage this complex disorder, but there is no consensus regarding the key functions that these units should perform. The International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) together with the Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Network (OCRN) of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Section of the World Psychiaric Association (WPA) has developed a standards of care programme for OCD centres. The goals of this collaborative initiative are promoting basic standards, improving the quality of clinical care and enhance the validity and reliability of research results provided by different facilities and countries. PMID:27359333

  9. Prenatal screening of Cystic Fibrosis: a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Bizzoco, Domenico; Mesoraca, Alvaro; Cima, Antonella; Sarti, Monica; Di Giacomo, Gianluca; Scerra, Giovanna; Barone, Maria Antonietta; Di Natale, Manuela; Gabrielli, Ivan; Tamburino, Caterina; Scargiali, Claudia; Ernandez, Cristina; D’Aleo, Maria Pia; Todini, Michele; Pompili, Rita; Mobili, Luisa; Mangiafico, Lucia; Carcioppolo, Ornella; Coco, Claudio; Cignini, Pietro; D’Emidio, Laura; Girgenti, Alessandra; Brizzi, Cristiana; Cavaliere, Alessandro; Giorlandino, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The gene responsible for the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis has been known for over 15 years and represent the most common autosomal recessive disease in the european population. We aimed to investigate the incidence of this condition during fetal life. Methods: In the past 10 years we examined in our centre 25393 fetuses of women underwent to amniocentesis. We carried out the examination of the most frequent mutations which enable, according to the literature data, the identification of almost 80% of the affected alleles. Result: We identified 922 heterozygous and 9 homozygous for the mutation. The frequency of heterozygousin the examined sample was 1/27,5 while that of the affected was 1/2821. Conclusion: We encourage new thoughts regarding the diagnostic validity of the most frequent panel of mutations among the italian population in order to exclude never encountered mutations and the insertion of other more significant mutations. PMID:22439019

  10. Some observations on perinatal mortality in rural health centre.

    PubMed

    Damodar; Mathur, H N; Sharma, P N

    1983-01-01

    A 4-year study of perinatal mortality in Rural Health Training Centre, Vallabhnagar, affiliated to R.N.T. Medical College, Udaipur was conducted. The chief objective of the study was to analyze underlying causes of perinatal deaths. The perinatal mortality rate was calculated to be 74.19/100 births. Age and parity of mother and sex of the child did not affect perinatal mortality significantly. Antenatal care of mother had a significant role in determining fetal outcome and 1st week survival. Fate of the newborn was substantially affected by birth weight less than 2 kg. Training of "dais" in view of identification of "at risk" cases and nutrition education, better facilities in terms of personnel and equipment, and improvement in referral services emerged as necessary steps needed to plan strategy for lowering perinatal mortaltiy in rural areas. PMID:6680112

  11. Family-centred care: review of opinions among staff.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Kieran; Melby, Vidar; Coates, Vivien

    2013-02-01

    The sudden admission to an emergency department (ED) of a patient requiring resuscitation can be a traumatic experience for families, who often require a great deal of support from ED staff. The needs of such staff must be considered too, if the care of patients and families during resuscitation attempts is to be improved. This article discusses the findings of a systematic review of the literature on family-centred care during and after resuscitation attempts, and reveals that, although families appear to favour witnessed resuscitation, the practice remains controversial among healthcare professionals. Chaotic workloads, time restraints, lack of education and poor coping abilities all appear to affect wider implementation of the practice in EDs.

  12. Information security requirements in patient-centred healthcare support systems.

    PubMed

    Alsalamah, Shada; Gray, W Alex; Hilton, Jeremy; Alsalamah, Hessah

    2013-01-01

    Enabling Patient-Centred (PC) care in modern healthcare requires the flow of medical information with the patient between different healthcare providers as they follow the patient's treatment plan. However, PC care threatens the stability of the balance of information security in the support systems since legacy systems fall short of attaining a security balance when sharing their information due to compromises made between its availability, integrity, and confidentiality. Results show that the main reason for this is that information security implementation in discrete legacy systems focused mainly on information confidentiality and integrity leaving availability a challenge in collaboration. Through an empirical study using domain analysis, observations, and interviews, this paper identifies a need for six information security requirements in legacy systems to cope with this situation in order to attain the security balance in systems supporting PC care implementation in modern healthcare.

  13. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  14. Standards of care for obsessive-compulsive disorder centres.

    PubMed

    Menchón, José M; van Ameringen, Michael; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Denys, Damiaan; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E; Hollander, Eric; Marazziti, Donatella; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Ruck, Christian; Shavitt, Roseli; Stein, Dan J; Andersson, Erik; Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Cath, Danielle C; Drummond, Lynne; Feusner, Jamie; Geller, Daniel A; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Matsunaga, Hisato; McCabe, Randy E; Mpavaenda, Davis; Nakamae, Takashi; O'Kearney, Richard; Pasquini, Massimo; Pérez Rivera, Ricardo; Poyurovsky, Michael; Real, Eva; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Soreni, Noam; Swinson, Richard P; Vulink, Nienke; Zohar, Joseph; Fineberg, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, many assessment and care units for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been set up in order to detect, diagnose and to properly manage this complex disorder, but there is no consensus regarding the key functions that these units should perform. The International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) together with the Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Network (OCRN) of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Section of the World Psychiaric Association (WPA) has developed a standards of care programme for OCD centres. The goals of this collaborative initiative are promoting basic standards, improving the quality of clinical care and enhance the validity and reliability of research results provided by different facilities and countries.

  15. The anterior centre-edge angle. A cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Crockarell, J R; Trousdale, R T; Guyton, J L

    2000-05-01

    The anterior centre-edge (VCA) angle quantifies the anterior cover of the femoral head, and angles of less than 20 degrees are considered abnormal. We have measured the VCA angles in hips without osteoarthritic changes. We took bilateral false-profile radiographs of nine female and 30 male cadavers without signs of osteoarthritis. The mean age at the time of death was 72 years (46 to 92). The mean VCA angle was 32.8 degrees (17.7 to 53.6). The SD was 7.9 degrees. Our findings suggest that the threshold of abnormality of the VCA angle may be slightly lower than previously thought. This information may be useful in counselling patients with asymptomatic acetabular dysplasia.

  16. Factors predicting drop-out in community mental health centres

    PubMed Central

    RENESES, BLANCA; MUÑOZ, ELENA; LÓPEZ-IBOR, JUAN JOSÉ

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to identify treatment, therapist and patient factors associated with dropping out of treatment in four outpatient mental health services. The experimental group comprised all 789 individuals who attended for the first time the mental health services during one year and dropped out of treatment in the same year or during the two following ones. The control group consisted of the same number of individuals, chosen at random from patients who, in the same year, attended for the first time the services and did not subsequently drop out of treatment. The overall drop-out rate was 33.2%. According to logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of dropping out were: being treated in a particular centre, the involvement of more than one therapist in treatment, having no previous history of psychiatric disorders, being young and being male. PMID:19812755

  17. Research in subsea welding technology at the National Hyperbaric Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.E.; Liddle, D.; Richardson, I.M.

    1993-12-31

    The National Hyperbaric Centre in Aberdeen is a testing facility used by diving contractors, manufacturers and offshore operators for testing of their equipment and procedures. The onshore saturation diving system is used for the qualification of hyperbaric welding procedures and diver welders. Research and development projects are also ongoing at NHC. During the past year, work has focused on the development of synergic MIG and Fluxcored wire welding parameters for the subsea repair of offshore structures. A robot welding system has been installed for operation in the large test chamber. Various aspects of health and safety in hyperbaric welding have also been addressed. These include a survey of current practice by contractors regarding welding fumes and gases and the development of an ozone monitoring system suitable for use in welding habitats.

  18. Landtesting the underwater Manifold Centre for the Central Cormorant field

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.M.

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes the commissioning on land prior to installation of the Underwater Manifold Centre (UMC) for the Central Cormorant field. The test programme was unique in its scope and depth requiring 15 months and 11 million pounds to complete. Included in the paper are guidelines to assist future projects as well as summaries of technical results and a list of the principal problems that were encountered. Management practices utilised to guide the programme to its successful completion are emphasised throughout. Finally, the paper concludes that the landtest programme was a cost-effective and indispensable step which resulted in the UMC being installed in May, 1982 with full confidence, especially in the essential high technology components.

  19. Underwater Manifold Centre - drilled-cuttings disposal system

    SciTech Connect

    Biddlestone, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    During the construction of the Central Cormorant Underwater Manifold Centre (UMC), it was recognized that the cuttings produced during the drilling of template wells would interfere with UMC operations, if deposited on top of the structure. A dual system was developed and installed on the Stadrill (the unit planned to drill the wells) to remove the cuttings from the rig to the seabed away from the UMC. The system as conceived and designed has been successful; it fulfills the requirements for flexibility, reliability, and efficiency. Its dependence on equipment external to the rig is minimal and after the capital outlay, the running costs are only for extra crew to operate the equipment and for maintenance. However, the system has been tailor-made for the UMC, the Stadrill, and the conditions prevailing in the Cormorant area.

  20. Computational toxicology at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre.

    PubMed

    Mostrag-Szlichtyng, Aleksandra; Zaldívar Comenges, José-Manuel; Worth, Andrew P

    2010-07-01

    The methods and tools of computational toxicology form an essential and integrating pillar in the new paradigm of predictive toxicology, which seeks to develop more efficient and effective means of assessing chemical toxicity, while also reducing animal testing. The increasingly prominent role of computational toxicology in the implementation of European chemicals' legislation is described, along with initiatives by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre to promote the acceptance and use of computational methods. Outstanding needs and scientific challenges are also outlined. In recent years, there have been impressive scientific and technological advances in computational toxicology. However, considerable progress is still needed to increase the acceptance of computational methods, and in particular to develop a deeper and common understanding of how to apply computational toxicology in regulatory decision making.

  1. The ESA Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre - Phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poedts, Stefaan

    The ESA ITT project (AO/1-6738/11/NL/AT) to develop Phase 1 of a Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre has the following objectives and scope: 1. The construction of a long term (~10 yrs) plan for the future development of a European virtual space weather modelling centre consisting of a new ‘open’ and distributed framework for the coupling of physics based models for space weather phenomena; 2. The assessment of model capabilities and the amount of work required to make them operational by integrating them in this framework and the identification of computing and networking requirements to do so. 3. The design of a system to enable models and other components to be installed locally or geographically distributed and the creation of a validation plan including a system of metrics for testing results. The consortium that took up this challenge involves: 1)the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Prime Contractor, coordinator: Prof. S. Poedts); 2) the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB); 3) the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB); 4) the Von Karman Institute (VKI); 5) DH Consultancy (DHC); 6) Space Applications Services (SAS). The project started on May 14 2012, and will finish in May 2014. Thus, by the time of the meeting, both Phase 1A and Phase 1B (the development of the prototype) will be finished. The final report will be presented incl. the architecture decisions made, the framework, the current models integrated already as well as the model couplers installed. The prototype VSWMC will be demonstrated.

  2. An inventory of trees in Dublin city centre.

    PubMed

    Ningal, Tine; Mills, Gerald; Smithwick, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    While urban areas are often considered to be comprised chiefly of artificial surfaces, they can contain a substantial portion of green space and a great diversity of natural habitats. These spaces include public parks, private gardens and street trees, all of which can provide valuable environmental services, such as improved air quality. Trees play a particular role in cities as they are often placed along roadsides and in the median strip of busy streets. As such they regulate access to sunshine, restrict airflow, provide shelter, scavenge air pollutants and manage noise at the street level. A tree planting policy can be an important part of a broader environmental strategy aimed at improving the quality of life in urban areas but this requires up-to-date knowledge of the current tree stock, which does not exist for Dublin. This article presents an inventory of trees in Dublin's city centre, defined as the area between the Grand and Royal canals. The results show that there are over 10,000 trees in the study area representing a density of 684 trees km-2 or one tree to approximately every 50 residents of the city centre. The tree canopy extent when in full foliage was nearly 1 km2 in extent or 6% of the study area. A more detailed analysis of those trees planted along streets shows little species variation but clear distinction in the sizes of trees, which is indicative of the age of planting. These data are used to estimate the carbon stored in Dublin's trees.

  3. An inventory of trees in Dublin city centre.

    PubMed

    Ningal, Tine; Mills, Gerald; Smithwick, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    While urban areas are often considered to be comprised chiefly of artificial surfaces, they can contain a substantial portion of green space and a great diversity of natural habitats. These spaces include public parks, private gardens and street trees, all of which can provide valuable environmental services, such as improved air quality. Trees play a particular role in cities as they are often placed along roadsides and in the median strip of busy streets. As such they regulate access to sunshine, restrict airflow, provide shelter, scavenge air pollutants and manage noise at the street level. A tree planting policy can be an important part of a broader environmental strategy aimed at improving the quality of life in urban areas but this requires up-to-date knowledge of the current tree stock, which does not exist for Dublin. This article presents an inventory of trees in Dublin's city centre, defined as the area between the Grand and Royal canals. The results show that there are over 10,000 trees in the study area representing a density of 684 trees km-2 or one tree to approximately every 50 residents of the city centre. The tree canopy extent when in full foliage was nearly 1 km2 in extent or 6% of the study area. A more detailed analysis of those trees planted along streets shows little species variation but clear distinction in the sizes of trees, which is indicative of the age of planting. These data are used to estimate the carbon stored in Dublin's trees. PMID:21197800

  4. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HESS Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dewilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemiére, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Lui, R.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seyffert, A. S.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Valerius, K.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Żywucka, N.

    2016-03-01

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 1015 electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators (‘PeVatrons’), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 1013 electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators—not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays—has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 106-107 years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  5. Monitoring the Galactic Centre with the Australia Telescope Compact Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, A.; Eckart, A.; Straubmeier, C.; Kunneriath, D.; Jalali, B.; Sabha, N.; Shahzamanian, B.; García-Marín, M.; Valencia-S, M.; Sjouwerman, L.; Britzen, S.; Karas, V.; Dovčiak, M.; Donea, A.; Zensus, A.

    2016-05-01

    The supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), at the centre of the Milky Way undergoes regular flaring activity, which is thought to arise from the innermost region of the accretion flow. Between 2010 and 2014, we performed monitoring observations of the Galactic Centre to study the flux-density variations at 3 mm using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We obtain light curves of Sgr A* by subtracting the contributions from the extended emission around it, and the elevation and time-dependent gains of the telescope. We perform structure function analysis and the Bayesian blocks representation to detect flare events. The observations detect six instances of significant variability in the flux density of Sgr A* in three observations, with variations between 0.5 and 1.0 Jy, which last for 1.5-3 h. We use the adiabatically expanding plasmon model to explain the short time-scale variations in the flux density. We derive the physical quantities of the modelled flare emission, such as the source expansion speed vexp, source sizes, spectral indices and the turnover frequency. These parameters imply that the expanding source components are either confined to the immediate vicinity of Sgr A* by contributing to the corona or the disc, or have a bulk motion greater than vexp. No exceptional flux-density variation on short flare time-scales was observed during the approach and the flyby of the dusty S-cluster object (DSO/G2). This is consistent with its compactness and the absence of a large bow shock.

  6. A hot bubble at the centre of M 81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T. V.; Steiner, J. E.; Giansante, L.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Messier 81 has the nearest active nucleus with broad Hα emission. A detailed study of this galaxy's centre is important for understanding the innermost structure of the AGN phenomenon. Aims: Our goal is to seek previously undetected structures using additional techniques to reanalyse a data cube obtained with the GMOS-IFU installed on the Gemini North telescope (Schnorr Müller et al. 2011, MNRAS, 413, 149). Methods: We analysed the data cube using techniques of noise reduction, spatial deconvolution, starlight subtraction, PCA tomography, and comparison with HST images. Results: We identified a hot bubble with T> 43 500 K that is associated with strong emission of [N II]λ5755 Å and a high [O I]λ6300/Hα ratio; the bubble displays a bluish continuum, surrounded by a thin shell of Hα + [N II] emission. We also reinterpret the outflow found by Schnorr Müller et al. (2011), showing that the blueshifted cone nearly coincides with the radio jet, as expected. Conclusions: We interpret the hot bubble as having been caused by post starburst events that left one or more clusters of young stars, similar to the ones found at the centre of the Milky Way, such as the Arches and the IRS 16 clusters. Shocked structures from combined young stellar winds or supernova remnants are probably the cause of this hot gas and the low ionization emission. The reduced datacube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/576/A58 Warning, no authors found for 2015A&A...576L...8.

  7. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    2016-03-24

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 10(15) electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators ('PeVatrons'), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 10(13) electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators--not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays--has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 10(6)-10(7) years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  8. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    2016-03-24

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 10(15) electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators ('PeVatrons'), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 10(13) electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators--not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays--has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 10(6)-10(7) years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays. PMID:26982725

  9. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-25

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  10. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  11. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions. PMID:26108369

  12. [Health centres, a new mode of practice for private practice nurses].

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Health centres group together health professionals within the same complex. They work in collaboration, have a shared information system and regularly come together around a common project, while being remunerated for treatments not covered by the French social security system by grants from regional health authorities. The advantage of health centres in terms of the multi-professional follow-up of patients is undeniable. Such centres represent a real opportunity for nurses. PMID:27596493

  13. Health assessment for Centre County Kepone, State College, Centre County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD000436261. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-02

    The Centre County Kepone site is an active chemical manufacturing plant that produced Kepone and Mirex from the 1950s until the 1970s. Wastes were stored in a lagoon and drum storage area. The lagoon waste was chemically stabilized and buried. However, the waste did not solidify properly, and hazardous materials presently are leaching into the groundwater and surface water. The environmental contamination on-site consists of toxaphene, trichloroethylene, benzene, chlorobenzene, carbon tetrachloride, and chrysene in groundwater; and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including benzo(a)pyrene in sediment. The environmental contamination off-site consists of benzene, chlorobenzene, dichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethane in surface water; chrysene in drainage ditch sediment; and tetrachloroethylene in groundwater. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated groundwater, surface water, sediment, soil, and fish.

  14. Regional centres for space science and technology education (affiliated to the united nations): education curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H.

    Since 1988, the United Nations, through the Programme on Space Applications, is supporting the establishment and operation of regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Western Asia. Simultaneously, education curricula have been developed for remote sensing, satellite communications, satellite meteorology, and space science. The paper reviews briefly these developments and highlights the most recent updated education curricula in the four disciplines that will be made available in 2002, in the six official languages of the United Nations, for implementation at the regional Centres and beyond. WWW: http://www.oosa.unvienna.org/SAP/centres/centres.htm

  15. Operational flood forecasting system of Umbria Region "Functional Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, N.; Pandolfo, C.; Stelluti, M.; Ponziani, F.; Viterbo, A.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrometeorological alert office (called "Decentrate Functional Centre" - CFD) of Umbria Region, in central Italy, is the office that provides technical tools able to support decisions when significant flood/landslide events occur, furnishing 24h support for the whole duration of the emergency period, according to the national directive DPCM 27 February 2004 concerning the "Operating concepts for functional management of national and regional alert system during flooding and landslide events for civil protection activities purposes" that designs, within the Italian Civil Defence Emergency Management System, a network of 21 regional Functional Centres coordinated by a central office at the National Civil Protection Department in Rome. Due to its "linking" role between Civil Protection "real time" activities and environmental/planning "deferred time" ones, the Centre is in charge to acquire and collect both real time and quasi-static data: quantitative data from monitoring networks (hydrometeorological stations, meteo radar, ...), meteorological forecasting models output, Earth Observation data, hydraulic and hydrological simulation models, cartographic and thematic GIS data (vectorial and raster type), planning studies related to flooding areas mapping, dam managing plans during flood events, non instrumental information from direct control of "territorial presidium". A detailed procedure for the management of critical events was planned, also in order to define the different role of various authorities and institutions involved. Tiber River catchment, of which Umbria region represents the main upper-medium portion, includes also regional trans-boundary issues very important to cope with, especially for what concerns large dam behavior and management during heavy rainfall. The alert system is referred to 6 different warning areas in which the territory has been divided into and based on a threshold system of three different increasing critical levels according

  16. Seismological investigation of the National Data Centre Preparedness Exercise 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Hartmann, Gernot; Ross, J. Ole; Ceranna, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) prohibits all kinds of nuclear explosions conducted on Earth - underground, underwater or in the atmosphere. The verification regime of the CTBT is designed to detect any treaty violation. While the data of the International Monitoring System (IMS) is collected, processed and technically analyzed at the International Data Centre (IDC) of the CTBT-Organization, National Data Centres (NDC) of the member states provide interpretation and advice to their government concerning suspicious detections. The NDC Preparedness Exercises (NPE) are regularly performed dealing with fictitious treaty violations to practice the combined analysis of CTBT verification technologies. These exercises should help to evaluate the effectiveness of analysis procedures applied at NDCs and the quality, completeness and usefulness of IDC products for example. The exercise trigger of NPE2013 is a combination of a tempo-spatial indication pointing to a certain waveform event and simulated radionuclide concentrations generated by forward Atmospheric Transport Modelling based on a fictitious release. For the waveform event the date (4 Sept. 2013) is given and the region is communicated in a map showing the fictitious state of "Frisia" at the Coast of the North Sea in Central Europe. The potential connection between the waveform and radionuclide evidence remains unclear for exercise participants. The verification task was to identify the waveform event and to investigate potential sources of the radionuclide findings. The final question was whether the findings are CTBT relevant and justify a request for On-Site-Inspection in "Frisia". The seismic event was not included in the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) of the IDC. The available detections from the closest seismic IMS stations lead to a epicenter accuracy of about 24 km which is not sufficient to specify the 1000 km2 inspection area in case of an OSI. With use of data from local stations and

  17. Talc Chimneys on the Mid Cayman Rise Spreading Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, M.; Murton, B. J.; Roberts, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Von Damm Vent Field, located at a depth of 2300 metres on the Mid-Cayman Rise Spreading Centre, features an 80 metre, steep sided, conical mound. Hosted in ultramafic/mafic intrusives it is one of the few known off-axis vent sites, and is located on the Mount Dent Oceanic Core Complex. There are two main fluid orifices, which vent shimmering fluid, located at the top of the main mound with contrasting morphologies. The highest temperature fluid at 230oC is emanating from a wide-based spire approximately 3 metres high, with a wide 1-metre diameter hole on the western side of the spire, venting fluids at around 125oC. The chimneys are composed of talc (75%), silica (15%) and sufides (10%), with chalcopyrite representing the most common sulfide phase, despite the relatively low T and colourless plumes. In the chimneys, talc occurs as botryoidal and colloform masses indicating primary precipitation into pore space and is intergrown with silica in a very fine grained groundmass. Sulfides occur disseminated in both talc and silica, with minor pyrite and sphalerite present as well as the chalcopyrite. To our knowledge no other sea floor hydrothermal vent sites feature the concentrations of talc observed at Von Damm, which likely represents a third, new type of hydrothermal system after conventional black smoker systems and lower temperature, serpentinisation driven carbonate occurrences. During hydrothermal circulation of seawater at seafloor spreading centres magnesium is sequestered into clays and chlorite in the upper oceanic crust resulting in complete removal of Mg and absence of Mg in the emanating vent fluid. However, the presence of Mg-bearing silicates in mound and chimney material is not uncommon, but not in the volumes reported here, with the magnesium thought to originate from seawater, pore water, or sediments. Experimental studies confirm that on reaction with mafic and in particular pyroxene dominated lithologies, Mg is preferentially removed from the

  18. Service architecture challenges in building the KNMI Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som de Cerff, Wim; van de Vegte, John; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu Siu; van Moosel, WIm; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    One of the objectives of KNMI is to act as a National Data centre for weather, climate and seismological data. KNMI has experience in curation of data for many years however important scientific data is not well accessible. New technologies also are available to improve the current infrastructure. Therefore a data curation program is initiated with two main goals: setup a Satellite Data Platform (SDP) and a KNMI data centre (KDC). KDC will provide, besides curation, data access, and storage and retrieval portal for KNMI data. In 2010 first requirements were gathered, in 2011 the main architecture was sketched, KDC was implemented in 2012 and is available on: http://data.knmi.nl KDC is built with the data providers involved with as key challenge: 'adding a dataset should be as simple as creating an HTML page'. This is enabled by a three step process, in which the data provider is responsible for two steps: 1. Provide dataset metadata: An easy to use web interface for providing metadata, with automated validation. Metadata consists of an ISO 19115 profile (matching INSPIRE and WMO requirements) and additional technical metadata regarding the data structure and access rights to the data. The interface hides certain metadata fields, which are filed by KDC automatically. 2. Provide data: after metadata has been entered, an upload location for uploading the dataset is provided. Also scripts for pushing large datasets are available. 3. Process and publish: once files are uploaded, they are processed for metadata (e.g., geolocation, time, version) and made available in KDC. The data is put into archive and made available using the in-house developed Virtual File System, which provides a persistent virtual path to the data. For the end-user of the data, KDC provides a web interface with search filters on key words, geolocation and time. Data can be downloaded using HTTP or FTP and can be scripted. Users can register to gain access to restricted datasets. The architecture

  19. Establishing a malaria diagnostics centre of excellence in Kisumu, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ohrt, Colin; Obare, Peter; Nanakorn, Ampon; Adhiambo, Christine; Awuondo, Ken; O'Meara, Wendy Prudhomme; Remich, Shon; Martin, Kurt; Cook, Earnest; Chretien, Jean-Paul; Lucas, Carmen; Osoga, Joseph; McEvoy, Peter; Owaga, Martin Lucas; Odera, James Sande; Ogutu, Bernhards

    2007-01-01

    Background Malaria microscopy, while the gold standard for malaria diagnosis, has limitations. Efficacy estimates in drug and vaccine malaria trials are very sensitive to small errors in microscopy endpoints. This fact led to the establishment of a Malaria Diagnostics Centre of Excellence in Kisumu, Kenya. The primary objective was to ensure valid clinical trial and diagnostic test evaluations. Key secondary objectives were technology transfer to host countries, establishment of partnerships, and training of clinical microscopists. Case description A twelve-day "long" and a four-day "short" training course consisting of supervised laboratory practicals, lectures, group discussions, demonstrations, and take home assignments were developed. Well characterized slides were developed and training materials iteratively improved. Objective pre- and post-course evaluations consisted of 30 slides (19 negative, 11 positive) with a density range of 50–660 parasites/μl, a written examination (65 questions), a photographic image examination (30 images of artifacts and species specific characteristics), and a parasite counting examination. Discussion and Evaluation To date, 209 microscopists have participated from 11 countries. Seventy-seven experienced microscopists participated in the "long" courses, including 47 research microscopists. Sensitivity improved by a mean of 14% (CI 9–19%) from 77% baseline (CI 73–81 %), while specificity improved by a mean of 17% (CI 11–23%) from 76% (CI 70–82%) baseline. Twenty-three microscopists who had been selected for a four-day refresher course showed continued improvement with a mean final sensitivity of 95% (CI 91–98%) and specificity of 97% (CI 95–100%). Only 9% of those taking the pre-test in the "long" course achieved a 90% sensitivity and 95% specificity, which increased to 61% of those completing the "short" course. All measures of performance improved substantially across each of the five organization types and in

  20. Regional centres for space science and technology education affiliated to the United Nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadimova, Sharafat

    Capacity-building efforts in space science and technology are a major focus of the activities of the Office of Outer Space Affairs. Such efforts include providing support to the regional centres for space science and technology education, affiliated to the United Nations, whose goal is to develop, through in-depth education, an indigenous capability for research and applications in the core disciplines of: (a) remote sensing and geographical information systems; (b) satellite communications; (c) satellite meteorology and global climate; and (d) space and atmospheric sciences and data management. The regional centres are located in Morocco and Nigeria for Africa, in Brazil and Mexico for Latin America and the Caribbean and in India for Asia and the Pacific. The overall policy-making body of each Centre is its Governing Board and consists of member States (within the region where the Centre is located), that have agreed, through their endorsement of the Centre's agreement, to the goals and objectives of the Centre. The United Nations Programme on Space Applications, with the support of prominent educators, has developed standard education curricula, which were adopted by the Centres for teaching each of the four core disciplines. Within the framework of the International Committee on global navigation satellite systems (ICG), which is established as an informal body for the purpose of promoting the use and application of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) on a global basis, the Regional Centres will also be acting as the ICG Information Centres. The ICG Information Centres aim to foster a more structured approach to information exchange in order to fulfil the reciprocal expectations of a network between ICG and Regional Centres.

  1. Recognising and Managing Refractory Coeliac Disease: A Tertiary Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Ikram; Nasr, Iman; Beyers, Carl; Chang, Fuju; Donnelly, Suzanne; Ciclitira, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a rare complication of coeliac disease (CD) and involves malabsorption and villous atrophy despite adherence to a strict gluten-free diet (GFD) for at least 12 months in the absence of another cause. RCD is classified based on the T-cells in the intra-epithelial lymphocyte (IEL) morphology into type 1 with normal IEL and type 2 with aberrant IEL (clonal) by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for T cell receptors (TCR) at the β/γ loci. RCD type 1 is managed with strict nutritional and pharmacological management. RCD type 2 can be complicated by ulcerative jejunitis or enteropathy associated lymphoma (EATL), the latter having a five-year mortality of 50%. Management options for RCD type 2 and response to treatment differs across centres and there have been debates over the best treatment option. Treatment options that have been used include azathioprine and steroids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, campath (an anti CD-52 monoclonal antibody), and cladribine or fluadribine with or without autologous stem cell transplantation. We present a tertiary centre’s experience in the treatment of RCD type 2 where treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine was used, and our results show good response with histological recovery in 56.6% of treated individuals. PMID:26633478

  2. Embedded planar glass waveguide optical interconnect for data centre applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitwon, Richard; Schröder, Henning; Brusberg, Lars; Graham-Jones, Jasper; Wang, Kai

    2013-02-01

    Electro-optical printed circuit boards (EOCB) based on planar multimode polymer channels are limited by dispersion in the step-index waveguide structures and increased optical absorption at the longer telecom wavelengths [1]. We present a promising technology for large panel EOCB based on holohedrally integrated glass foils. The planar multimode glass waveguides patterned into these glass foils have a graded-index structure, thereby giving rise to a larger bandwidthlength product compared to their polymer waveguide counterparts and lower absorbtion at the longer telecom wavelengths. This will allow glass waveguide based EOCBs to support the future bandwidth requirements inherent to large scale data centre and high performance computer subsystems while not incurring the same dispersion driven penalties on interconnect length or loss dependence on wavelength. To this end glass foil structuring technologies have been developed that are compatible with industrial PCB manufacturing processes. Established processes as well as new approaches were analysed for their eligibility and have been applied to the EOCB process. In addition a connector system has been designed, which would allow optical pluggability to glass waveguide EOCBs.

  3. Evaluation of a diabetes specialty centre: structure, process and outcome.

    PubMed

    Basa, R P; McLeod, B

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a diabetes specialty centre in assisting clients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus to improve their metabolic control and quality of life. A single-subject repeated measures design was used where data was collected on entry to the program, immediately following the 2-day education sessions, and at both 3- and 6-month follow-up visits. Structure and process were taken into consideration, and the main outcome variables measured were knowledge, attitudes, metabolic control (hemoglobin A1c) and perceived quality of life. These variables were chosen in the belief that many factors can influence behaviour and it is the combination of these factors which results in behavioural change and ultimately improvement in metabolic control and quality of life. The main findings were that the facilities and documentation records were adequate, the clients perceived that the primary function of the center was medical management rather than education, and knowledge, metabolic control and quality of life improved significantly after the program. For clients, perceived happiness and quality of life were primary issues. Therefore, improvement in quality of life should be one of the primary goals of diabetes education programs. PMID:7603930

  4. SECONDARY NEUTRON DOSES IN A PROTON THERAPY CENTRE.

    PubMed

    De Saint-Hubert, M; Saldarriaga Vargas, C; Van Hoey, O; Schoonjans, W; De Smet, V; Mathot, G; Stichelbaut, F; Manessi, G; Dinar, N; Aza, E; Cassell, C; Silari, M; Vanhavere, F

    2016-09-01

    The formation of secondary high-energy neutrons in proton therapy can be a concern for radiation protection of staff. In this joint intercomparative study (CERN, SCK•CEN and IBA/IRISIB/ULB), secondary neutron doses were assessed with different detectors in several positions in the Proton Therapy Centre, Essen (Germany). The ambient dose equivalent H(*)(10) was assessed with Berthold LB 6411, WENDI-2, tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and Bonner spheres (BS). The personal dose equivalent Hp(10) was measured with two types of active detectors and with bubble detectors. Using spectral and basic angular information, the reference Hp(10) was estimated. Results concerning staff exposure show H(*)(10) doses between 0.5 and 1 nSv/monitoring unit in a technical room. The LB 6411 showed an underestimation of H(*)(10), while WENDI-2 and TEPC showed good agreement with the BS data. A large overestimation for Hp(10) was observed for the active personal dosemeters, while the bubble detectors showed only a slight overestimation.

  5. A model to forecast data centre infrastructure costs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernet, R.

    2015-12-01

    The computing needs in the HEP community are increasing steadily, but the current funding situation in many countries is tight. As a consequence experiments, data centres, and funding agencies have to rationalize resource usage and expenditures. CC-IN2P3 (Lyon, France) provides computing resources to many experiments including LHC, and is a major partner for astroparticle projects like LSST, CTA or Euclid. The financial cost to accommodate all these experiments is substantial and has to be planned well in advance for funding and strategic reasons. In that perspective, leveraging infrastructure expenses, electric power cost and hardware performance observed in our site over the last years, we have built a model that integrates these data and provides estimates of the investments that would be required to cater to the experiments for the mid-term future. We present how our model is built and the expenditure forecast it produces, taking into account the experiment roadmaps. We also examine the resource growth predicted by our model over the next years assuming a flat-budget scenario.

  6. 'Underclassism' and access to healthcare in urban centres.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sannie Y; Browne, Annette J; Mussell, Bill; Smye, Victoria L; Rodney, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we draw on findings from an ethnographic study that explored experiences of healthcare access from the perspectives of Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients seeking services at the non-urgent division of an urban emergency department (ED) in Canada. Our aim is to critically examine the notion of 'underclassism' within the context of healthcare in urban centres. Specifically, we discuss some of the processes by which patients experiencing poverty and racialisation are constructed as 'underclass' patients, and how assumptions of those patients as social and economic Other (including being seen as 'drug users' and 'welfare dependents') subject them to marginalisation, discrimination, and inequitable treatment within the healthcare system. We contend that healthcare is not only a clinical space; it is also a social space in which unequal power relations along the intersecting axes of 'race' and class are negotiated. Given the largely invisible roles that healthcare plays in controlling access to resources and power for people who are marginalised, we argue that there is an urgent need to improve healthcare inequities by challenging the taken-for-granted assumption that healthcare is equally accessible for all Canadians irrespective of differences in social and economic positioning.

  7. Experimental Forecasts of Wildfire Pollution at the Canadian Meteorological Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Radenko; Beaulieu, Paul-Andre; Chen, Jack; Landry, Hugo; Cousineau, Sophie; Moran, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Environment and Climate Change Canada's Canadian Meteorological Centre Operations division (CMCO) has been running an experimental North American air quality forecast system with near-real-time wildfire emissions since 2014. This system, named FireWork, also takes anthropogenic and other natural emission sources into account. FireWork 48-hour forecasts are provided to CMCO forecasters and external partners in Canada and the U.S. twice daily during the wildfire season. This system has proven to be very useful in capturing short- and long-range smoke transport from wildfires over North America. Several upgrades to the FireWork system have been made since 2014 to accommodate the needs of operational AQ forecasters and to improve system performance. In this talk we will present performance statistics and some case studies for the 2014 and 2015 wildfire seasons. We will also describe current limitations of the FireWork system and ongoing and future work planned for this air quality forecast system.

  8. Mechanical properties for irradiated face-centred cubic nanocrystalline metals

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, X. Z.; Song, D. K.; Chu, H. J.; Xue, J. M.; Duan, H. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a self-consistent plasticity theory is proposed to model the mechanical behaviours of irradiated face-centred cubic nanocrystalline metals. At the grain level, a tensorial crystal model with both irradiation and grain size effects is applied for the grain interior (GI), whereas both grain boundary (GB) sliding with irradiation effect and GB diffusion are considered in modelling the behaviours of GBs. The elastic-viscoplastic self-consistent method with considering grain size distribution is developed to transit the microscopic behaviour of individual grains to the macroscopic properties of nanocrystals (NCs). The proposed theory is applied to model the mechanical properties of irradiated NC copper, and the feasibility and efficiency have been validated by comparing with experimental data. Numerical results show that: (i) irradiation-induced defects can lead to irradiation hardening in the GIs, but the hardening effect decreases with the grain size due to the increasing absorption of defects by GBs. Meanwhile, the absorbed defects would make the GBs softer than the unirradiated case. (ii) There exists a critical grain size for irradiated NC metals, which separates the grain size into the irradiation hardening dominant region (above the critical size) and irradiation softening dominant region (below the critical size). (iii) The distribution of grain size has a significant influence on the mechanical behaviours of both irradiated and unirradiated NCs. The proposed model can offer a valid theoretical foundation to study the irradiation effect on NC materials. PMID:27547091

  9. The African Laser Centre: Transforming the Laser Community in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtingwa, Sekazi

    2012-02-01

    We describe the genesis and programs of the African Laser Centre (ALC), which is an African nonprofit network of laser users that is based in Pretoria, South Africa. Composed of over thirty laboratories from countries throughout the continent of Africa, the ALC has the mission of enhancing the application of lasers in research and education. Its programs include grants for research and training, equipment loans and donations, student scholarships, faculty grants for visits to collaborators' institutions, conferences, and technician training. A long-term goal of the ALC is to bring a synchrotron light source to Africa, most probably to South Africa. One highly popular program is the biennial conference series called the US-Africa Advanced Studies Institute, which is funded by the ALC in collaboration with the U.S. National Science Foundation and the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste. The Institutes typically bring about thirty faculty and graduate students from the U.S. to venues in Africa in order to introduce U.S. and African graduate students to major breakthroughs in targeted areas that utilize lasers. In this presentation, we will summarize the ALC achievements to date and comment on the path forward.

  10. Updates to the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Christian; Tennyson, Jonathan; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Dubernet, Marie-Lise

    2014-06-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) has established a set of standards for the storage and transmission of atomic and molecular data and an SQL-based query language (VSS2) for searching online databases, known as nodes. The project has also created an online service, the VAMDC Portal, through which all of these databases may be searched and their results compared and aggregated. Since its inception four years ago, the VAMDC e-infrastructure has grown to encompass over 40 databases, including HITRAN, in more than 20 countries and engages actively with scientists in six continents. Associated with the portal are a growing suite of software tools for the transformation of data from its native, XML-based, XSAMS format, to a range of more convenient human-readable (such as HTML) and machinereadable (such as CSV) formats. The relational database for HITRAN1, created as part of the VAMDC project is a flexible and extensible data model which is able to represent a wider range of parameters than the current fixed-format text-based one. Over the next year, a new online interface to this database will be tested, released and fully documented - this web application, HITRANonline2, will fully replace the ageing and incomplete JavaHAWKS software suite.

  11. The Davao Teen Centre empowers the youth of Mindanao. Philippines.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    This article discusses the Development and Family Life Education for the Youth (DAFLEY) Project in Davao City, Philippines. The DAFLEY aimed to make the youth enlightened citizens of the future by educating them on reproductive health care services, gender equality, and responsible parenthood. It was established by the Family Planning Organization of the Philippines and is being carried out through the Davao Teen Centre (DTC), which provides reproductive and sexual health care services through counseling, face-to-face or by telephone. In an effort to reach out to more teenagers in Mindanao, the DTC introduced radio programs offering on-the-air advice to adolescents with problems ranging from boy-girl relationships and unplanned pregnancies to more complex and serious problems. Public response to the programs has been enthusiastic. The youth that have benefited from the DTC counseling refute a conservative belief that sex education leads to promiscuity and sexual experimentation. They state the respect they have for their bodies and their sense of responsibility as proof of the value of the reproductive health education and services that they have received.

  12. UK Solar System Data Centre: Data Archive for Ionospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Matthew; James, Sarah; Bogdanova, Yulia; Crothers, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The UK Solar System Data Centre (UKSSDC) has been working to improve access to its extensive holdings of historical ionospheric data. In our archive, ionospheric data from 200 stations worldwide (1930s-present), such as ionograms and scaled ionospheric parameters (e.g., foF2, fmin, h'F2), is held on both digital and physical media. From the 1990s these data sets are available in digital form and can be downloaded from our web-interface. Thanks to a Natural Environment Research Council grant we are in the process of digitising a selection, 2,200 out of ~27,000, of UK ionosonde film data to be made available via the web interface. It is hoped that more funding will be made available to continue this exercise over the next few years. The UKSSDC also provides real-time ionospheric data retrieval from two RAL Space ionosondes, Chilton and Port Stanley, alongside other European observatories. The UKSSDC is part of RAL Space based at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the electronic address: http://www.ukssdc.ac.uk. This is a UK national data archive facility with open data access and can be used by scientists around the globe.

  13. Modelling of dynamic targeting in the Air Operations Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Edward H. S.; Au, T. Andrew

    2007-12-01

    Air Operations Centres (AOCs) are high stress multitask environments for planning and executing of theatre-wide airpower. Operators have multiple responsibilities to ensure that the orchestration of air assets is coordinated to maximum effect. AOCs utilise a dynamic targeting process to immediately prosecute time-sensitive targets. For this process to work effectively, a timely decision must be made regarding the appropriate course of action before the action is enabled. A targeting solution is typically developed using a number of inter-related processes in the kill chain - the Find, Fix, Track, Target, Engage, and Assess (F2T2EA) model. The success of making a right decision about dynamic targeting is ultimately limited by the cognitive and cooperative skills of the team prosecuting the mission and their associated workload. This paper presents a model of human interaction and tasks within the dynamic targeting sequence. The complex network of tasks executed by the team can be analysed by undertaking simulation of the model to identify possible information-processing bottlenecks and overloads. The model was subjected to various tests to generate typical outcomes, operator utilisation, duration as well as rates of output in the dynamic targeting process. This capability will allow for future "what-if" evaluations of numerous concepts for team formation or task reallocation, complementing live exercises and experiments.

  14. Preliminary analysis of the International Data Centre pipeline.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, John Henry

    2009-07-01

    The International Data Centre of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization relies on automatic data processing as the first step in identifying seismic events from seismic waveform data. However, more than half of the automatically identified seismic events are eliminated by IDC analysts. Here, an IDC dataset is analyzed to determine if the number of automatically generated false positives could be reduced. Data that could be used to distinguish false positives from analyst-accepted seismic events includes the number of stations, the number of phases, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the pick error. An empirical method is devised to determine whether an automatically identified seismic event is acceptable, and the method is found to identify a significant number of the false positives in IDC data. This work could help reduce seismic analyst workload and could help improve the calibration of seismic monitoring stations. This work could also be extended to address identification of seismic events missed by automatic processing.

  15. 'Underclassism' and access to healthcare in urban centres.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sannie Y; Browne, Annette J; Mussell, Bill; Smye, Victoria L; Rodney, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we draw on findings from an ethnographic study that explored experiences of healthcare access from the perspectives of Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients seeking services at the non-urgent division of an urban emergency department (ED) in Canada. Our aim is to critically examine the notion of 'underclassism' within the context of healthcare in urban centres. Specifically, we discuss some of the processes by which patients experiencing poverty and racialisation are constructed as 'underclass' patients, and how assumptions of those patients as social and economic Other (including being seen as 'drug users' and 'welfare dependents') subject them to marginalisation, discrimination, and inequitable treatment within the healthcare system. We contend that healthcare is not only a clinical space; it is also a social space in which unequal power relations along the intersecting axes of 'race' and class are negotiated. Given the largely invisible roles that healthcare plays in controlling access to resources and power for people who are marginalised, we argue that there is an urgent need to improve healthcare inequities by challenging the taken-for-granted assumption that healthcare is equally accessible for all Canadians irrespective of differences in social and economic positioning. PMID:25720520

  16. Burnout among faculty physicians in an academic health science centre

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James Gardner; Khetani, Nicole; Stephens, Derek

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Burnout experienced by physicians is concerning because it may affect quality of care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of burnout among physicians at an academic health science centre and to test the hypothesis that work hours are related to burnout. METHODS: All 300 staff physicians, contacted through their personal e-mail, were provided an encrypted link to an anonymous questionnaire. The primary outcome measure, the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, has three subscales: personal, work related and patient related. RESULTS: The response rate for the questionnaire was 70%. Quantitative demands, insecurity at work and job satisfaction affected all three components of burnout. Of 210 staff physicians, 22% (n=46) had scores indicating personal burnout, 14% (n=30) had scores indicating work-related burnout and 8% (n=16) had scores indicating patient-related burnout. The correlation between total hours worked and total burnout was only 0.10 (P=0.14) DISCUSSION: Up to 22% of academic paediatric physicians had scores consistent with mild to severe burnout. A simple reduction in work hours is unlikely to be successful in reducing burnout and, therefore, quantitative demands, job satisfaction and work insecurity may require attention to address burnout among academic physicians. PMID:22851895

  17. Re-cataloging Joint Astronomy Centre (JAC) Library Book Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, A.; Zhang, X.

    2007-10-01

    The Joint Astronomy Centre operates two telescopes: the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. In the JAC's 25-year history, their library was maintained by a number of staff ranging from scientists to student assistants. This resulted in an inconsistent and incomplete catalog as well as a mixture of typed, hand written, and inaccurate call number labels. Further complicating the situation was a backlog of un-cataloged books. In the process of improving the library system, it became obvious that the entire book collection needed to be re-cataloged and re-labeled. Readerware proved to be an inexpensive and efficient tool for this project. The software allows for the scanning of barcodes or the manual input of ISBNs, LCCNs and UPCs. It then retrieves the cataloging records from a number of pre-selected websites. The merged information is then stored in a database that can be manipulated to perform tasks such as printing call number labels. Readerware is also ideal for copy cataloging and has become an indispensable tool in maintaining the JAC's collection of books.

  18. Low Cost Balloon programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has launched 89 Missions to near space using single or multiple weather balloons or very light plastic balloons. Basic goal was to capitalize miniaturization of equipments in modern ages. Our typical payload of less than 4kg weight consists of GPS, video camera, cosmic ray detectors, Attitude measurement unit, sunsensor and most importantly a 50-100sqcm X-ray/Gamma-ray detector (usually a scintillator type). The main purpose of the latter is to study spectra of secondary cosmic ray spectra (till our ceiling altitude of 36-42km) over the years and their seasonal variation or variation with solar cycle. We also study solar X-ray spectra, especially of solar flares. We have detected a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) and pulsars. Our observation of black hole candidates did not yield satisfactory result yet mainly because of poor collimation (~ 10 deg x 10 deg) by lead collimator which introduces strong background also. Our effort with multiple balloon flights enabled us to have long duration flights. We believe that our procedure is very futuristic and yet at an affordable cost.

  19. Measuring information technology investment among Canadian academic health sciences centres.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Lorraine; Leonard, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Many recent studies have attempted to accurately measure the expenditure by hospitals in the area of new information technology (IT), for example see Leonard 1998 and Pink et al. 2001. This is usually done as an exercise to compare the healthcare sector with other industries that have had much more success in implementing and leveraging their IT investment (Willcocks 1992; Chan 2000). It is normally hoped that such investigation would help explain some of the differences among the various industries and provide insight into where (and how much) future IT spending should occur in healthcare (Leonard 2004). Herein, we present the results from a study of eight Canadian academic health sciences centres that contributed data in order to analyze the amount of information technology spending in their organizations. Specifically, we focus on one specific indicator: the IT spend ratio. This ratio is defined as the percentage of total IT net costs to total hospital net operating costs, and aims to provide a "relative (or percentage) measure of spending" so as to make the comparisons meaningful. One such comparison shows that hospitals spend only 55% of the amount the financial services sector spends.

  20. Royal Rehabilitation Centre Sydney: towards Clinical Development Units (Nursing).

    PubMed

    Parsons, Myra; Mott, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    Clinical Development Units (Nursing), also known as Practice Development Units and Nursing Development Units, are nursing units that continually strive for excellence in nursing practice. Nursing units endeavouring to attain, or having achieved, the standards required of a Clinical Development Unit (Nursing)--CDU(N)--provide a very motivating and stimulating environment for nursing professional development. This paper provides readers with an understanding of the underpinnings of a CDU(N) along with why and how a nursing unit would strive for this status. A priority of senior nurse management at a rehabilitation facility in Sydney, the Royal Rehabilitation Centre, has been working towards the upgrading of every nursing unit in their facility to the level of a CDU(N) over the past three years. By way of an innovative course, the Clinical Development and Leadership course developed by Professor Jennifer Greenwood in 1997, senior nurses are being provided with the knowledge and skills to enable them to work towards their goal of becoming part of a Clinical Development Unit (Nursing).

  1. Photoluminescence of monovalent indium centres in phosphate glass

    PubMed Central

    Masai, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okumura, Shun; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Ina, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Valence control of polyvalent cations is important for functionalization of various kinds of materials. Indium oxides have been used in various applications, such as indium tin oxide in transparent electrical conduction films. However, although metastable In+ (5 s2 configuration) species exhibit photoluminescence (PL), they have attracted little attention. Valence control of In+ cations in these materials will be important for further functionalization. Here, we describe In+ species using PL and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. Three absorption bands in the UV region are attributed to the In+ centre: two weak forbidden bands (1S0 → 3P1, 1S0 → 3P2) and a strong allowed band (1S0 → 1P1). The strongest PL excitation band cannot be attributed to the conventional allowed transition to the singlet excited state. Emission decay of the order of microseconds suggests that radiative relaxation occurs from the triplet excitation state. The XAFS analysis suggests that these In+ species have shorter In–O distances with lower coordination numbers than in In2O3. These results clearly demonstrate that In+ exists in a metastable amorphous network, which is the origin of the observed luminescent properties.

  2. PôDET: A Centre for Earth Dynamical Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestroffer, D.; Deleflie, F.

    2013-11-01

    The monitoring of the Earth space environment has gained some importance these last decades, in particular at the European level, partly because the phenomenon which origin come from space can have socio-economic consequences; and also because our understanding of those phenomenon - their associated prediction and risks - is still limited. For instance, the Space Situational Awareness programme (SSA) at ESA has set up in 2013 a centre and network for aspects connected to space debris (SST), to space weather (SW), and to near-Earth objects (NEO). At IMCCE, the Pôle sur la dynamique de l'environnement terrestre} (PODET, \\url{podet.imcce.fr}) for the Earth dynamical environment is studying effects and prediction for natural and artificial objects gravitating in the Earth vicinity. These studies englobe near-Earth objects, asteroids, comets, meteoroids, meteorite streams, and space debris. For all object types that are concerned, a general scheme of a functional analysis has been developed. It encompasses data acquisition with dedicated observations--essentially astrometric--or database queries, orbit determination or adjustment, prediction and ephemerides, and eventually impact probability computation and data dissemination. We develop here the general context of this action, the PôDET project, its scientific objectives, interaction with other disciplines, and the development in progress for dedicated tools.

  3. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. J.; Wang, H.; Du, K.; Zhang, W.; Sui, M. L.; Mao, S. X.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama–Wassermann and Kurdjumov–Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions. PMID:24603655

  4. Leading a Learning Organisation: Australian Early Years Centres as Learning Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmer, Kaye

    2008-01-01

    Established in 1940, Lady Gowrie Child Centres in Australia provide integrated early childhood programs and develop and share project work, information, resources and training at local and national levels. While changes in social policy compromised their provision of integrated programs, the centre in Adelaide has made real strides towards moving…

  5. The Nature of Exhibits about Acoustics in Science and Technology Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afonso, Ana S.; Gilbert, John K.

    2008-01-01

    This is a study of the opportunities currently provided by interactive science and technology centres for visitors' engagement in the field of acoustics. E-mails, requesting a description of exhibits on acoustics (sound and hearing) in use, were sent to members of staff of interactive science and technology centres around the world as well as to…

  6. Business Models of High Performance Computing Centres in Higher Education in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eurich, Markus; Calleja, Paul; Boutellier, Roman

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing (HPC) service centres are a vital part of the academic infrastructure of higher education organisations. However, despite their importance for research and the necessary high capital expenditures, business research on HPC service centres is mostly missing. From a business perspective, it is important to find an answer to…

  7. "Less than a Dog": Interrogating Theatre for Debate in Westville Female Correctional Centre, Durban South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young-Jahangeer, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Incarcerated women at Westville Female Correctional Centre in Durban, South Africa have been using popular participatory theatre (PPT) to create a space to generate debate about aspects of prison life for over 10 years. This article explores how these women engaged the issue of lesbianism in the Correctional Centre and how the process and form was…

  8. Negotiating and Creating Intercultural Relations: Chinese Immigrant Children in New Zealand Early Childhood Education Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Karen; Dalli, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A multiple-case study investigation of the experiences of eight Chinese immigrant children in New Zealand early childhood centres suggested that the immigrant children's learning experiences in their first centre can be understood as a process of negotiating and creating intercultural relations. The children's use of family cultural tools, such as…

  9. If Person-Centred Planning Did Not Exist, "Valuing People" Would Require Its Invention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, John

    2004-01-01

    Person-centred planning is one important tool in making the culture change necessary to realize the Government's promise in "Valuing People." Some potential dangers in large scale implementation are identified, a logic for local action is described, the criteria for effective person-centred planning are defined in terms of supporting personal…

  10. Exploring ICT Integration as a Tool to Engage Young People at a Flexible Learning Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kimberley Luanne; Boldeman, Suzi Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The Edmund Rice Education Australia (EREA) Flexible Learning Centres aim to provide a supportive learning environment for young people who find themselves outside of the mainstream secondary schooling system. Drawing on twenty first Century learning principles, the Centres aim to deliver a personalised learning experience with an emphasis on…

  11. Being Subject-Centred: A Philosophy of Teaching and Implications for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Hobson, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Being subject-centred as a higher education teacher offers a rich and illuminating philosophical and practical understanding of learning. Building upon previous research on subject-centred learning, we draw on reflection, literature review and a phenomenological approach to show how our ways of being infuse the teaching and learning environment.…

  12. Professionalism--A Breeding Ground for Struggle. The Example of the Finnish Day-Care Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinos, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the Finnish day-care centre out of a neo-Weberian-Bourdieuan frame of reference. The leading idea is that the day-care centre field is continuously shaping as a result of both inner struggles and struggles with other fields. The state, the education system, and trade unions act as the dealers of professional playing cards.…

  13. Daily Welcoming in Childcare Centre as a Microtransition: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venturelli, Elena; Cigala, Ada

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the everyday morning microtransition in childcare centres that involves child-parent separation. This moment involves the contemporary presence of the child, caregiver and parent in the day-care centre. This coexistence is considered extremely relevant and full of important meanings for the interactive patterns they will…

  14. Staff Morale in Day Care Centres for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascha, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    Background: Levels of burnout, job satisfaction and intended turnover of staff working in day care centres for adults with intellectual disabilities are investigated in relation to role clarity, staff support and supervision, and coping strategies used by staff. Materials and methods: Thirty six direct-care staff of four day care centres in the UK…

  15. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Wang, H; Du, K; Zhang, W; Sui, M L; Mao, S X

    2014-03-07

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama-Wassermann and Kurdjumov-Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions.

  16. Women Returning to the Labour Force: A First Report, Women's Bureau Careers Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Linda

    This first report of the Women's Bureau Careers Centre of the Ontario Department of Labour provides statistical data on the personal and social characteristics of the women who came to them as clients (women who wished to return to work), and discusses these clients and the Centre's program for them. Sections of the report are devoted to reasons…

  17. No Place: Small Children in Norwegian Asylum-Seeker Reception Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeberg, Marie Louise; Bagge, Cecilie; Enger, Truls Andre

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on empirical material from fieldwork among young children living with their families in two Norwegian reception centres for asylum-seekers, this article compares their realities to the norms and realities for other children in Norway. Children's spatial and social situations within the centres stand out in stark contrast to Norwegian…

  18. Marketing, Management and Performance: Multilingualism as Commodity in a Tourism Call Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchene, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the ways an institution of the new economy--a tourism call centre in Switzerland--markets, manages and performs multilingual services. In particular, it explores the ways multilingualism operates as a strategic and managerial tool within tourism call centres and how the institutional regulation of language practices…

  19. Active Support Is Person-Centred by Definition: A Response to Harman and Sanderson (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Edwin; Lowe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to Harman and Sanderson (2008) who address the important question of how person-centred active support is. The authors' intention is not to disagree with Harman and Sanderson's general point that combining active support (AS) with person-centred planning (PCP) is better than either approach being…

  20. Children's Preferences for Group Musical Activities in Child Care Centres: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural research study of children's preferences for group musical activities in child care centres. A total of 228 young children aged 4-5 years in seven child care centres in Hong Kong and in the Adelaide City of South Australia participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected via a…

  1. Hands-On versus Teacher-Centred Experiments in Soil Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph; Hulde, Madeleine

    2007-01-01

    This study focused on differences between teacher-centred and learner-centred experiments in soil ecology. After a pilot study, we selected three experiments simple enough to be carried out by pupils even with little experience in self-determined learning and hands-on practice. The sample comprised 123 fifth and sixth graders from a middle school…

  2. What a Difference a Writing Centre Makes: A Small Scale Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeats, Rowena; Reddy, Peter; Wheeler, Anne; Senior, Carl; Murray, John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Academic writing is often considered to be a weakness in contemporary students, while good reporting and writing skills are highly valued by graduate employers. A number of universities have introduced writing centres aimed at addressing this problem; however, the evaluation of such centres is usually qualitative. The paper seeks to…

  3. Clarifying the Subject Centred Approach to Vocational Learning Theory: Negotiated Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Workplace learning research has taken what could be termed a turn to the subjective. This brings the person and agency of workers to the centre of work learning theory. Within sociocultural perspectives that emphasise participative practice as the basis of vocational learning, a key concept that emerges from this subject centred approach is…

  4. Putting Children at the Centre: Making Policy as if Children Mattered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Susan

    2014-01-01

    What do we mean when we say we want to put children at the centre of policy? What are the moral justifications for this approach? Has it become harder for us to understand this concept, when in practice paid work has been at the centre? In part confusion arises because the unpaid work of caring for children is invisible until it is marketized. In…

  5. Clarifying the role of mean centring in multicollinearity of interaction effects.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2011-11-01

    Moderated multiple regression (MMR) is frequently employed to analyse interaction effects between continuous predictor variables. The procedure of mean centring is commonly recommended to mitigate the potential threat of multicollinearity between predictor variables and the constructed cross-product term. Also, centring does typically provide more straightforward interpretation of the lower-order terms. This paper attempts to clarify two methodological issues of potential confusion. First, the positive and negative effects of mean centring on multicollinearity diagnostics are explored. It is illustrated that the mean centring method is, depending on the characteristics of the data, capable of either increasing or decreasing various measures of multicollinearity. Second, the exact reason why mean centring does not affect the detection of interaction effects is given. The explication shows the symmetrical influence of mean centring on the corrected sum of squares and variance inflation factor of the product variable while maintaining the equivalence between the two residual sums of squares for the regression of the product term on the two predictor variables. Thus the resulting test statistic remains unchanged regardless of the obvious modification of multicollinearity with mean centring. These findings provide a clear understanding and demonstration on the diverse impact of mean centring in MMR applications.

  6. Student-Centred Learning: The Role and Responsibility of the Lecturer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Alan; O'Connor, Una

    2014-01-01

    A student-centred approach to learning encourages students to have more responsibility for their learning and is a process that relies heavily on professional confidence to "let-go" of traditional teaching responsibilities. This paper describes the introduction of a student-centred approach within one further education college in…

  7. How Person-Centred Counselling Trainers Understand and Experience Their Role in the Current British Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballinger, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a qualitative study into the experience of person-centred training from the viewpoint of the trainer. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was the adopted approach. The researcher conducted a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews with five person-centred trainers with experience across a range of…

  8. A Person-Centred Analysis of Teacher-Child Relationships in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Kathleen; Bullock, Amanda; Coplan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previously, the nature of teacher-child relationships (TCRs) has been explored through dimensions of close, conflicted, and dependent. However, this "variable-centred" approach is limited, as many relationships can be characterized by more than one characteristic or trait. A "person-centred" approach would allow for…

  9. On the nature of near-IR emitting Bi centres in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Dianov, Evgenii M

    2010-06-23

    Based on analysis of the structure and optical properties of Tl, Pb and Bi centres in crystals and comparison of their spectra with the near-IR luminescence spectra of bismuth-doped glasses, a model is proposed for the near-IR emitting bismuth centres in glass. Experimental evidence is presented in support of the model. (letters)

  10. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Wang, H; Du, K; Zhang, W; Sui, M L; Mao, S X

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama-Wassermann and Kurdjumov-Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions. PMID:24603655

  11. Challenges and Potentials for Writing Centres in South African Tertiary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, A.

    2010-01-01

    There are many challenges involved in developing and running Writing Centres in tertiary contexts in South Africa. These challenges include recognizing the role Writing Centres need to play in the redress of basic academic literacies. They also involve emphasizing writing as a mode of learning where higher cognitive functions such as analysis and…

  12. Training Opportunities and Employee Exhaustion in Call Centres: Mediation by Psychological Contract Fulfilment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambel, Maria Jose; Castanheira, Filipa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse psychological contract fulfilment as a mechanism through which training affects stress in call centres. The hypotheses were tested on a sample of 412 call centre operators, using structural equation modelling to analyse their survey responses. Our results demonstrated that training is negatively related to…

  13. The Role of Science and Discovery Centres in the Public Understanding of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Daniel B.; Weis, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The number of science and discovery centres has grown exponentially over the last two centuries. Science and discovery centres are one of the top five stimuli that influence a career choice in science. Their history, growth, impact and role in the public understanding of science are discussed. (Contains 2 tables, 7 figures, and 21 online…

  14. Learner-Centred Education Reforms in India: The Missing Piece of Teachers' Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkmann, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Recent international education trends have witnessed a widespread push for promoting Western-originating "learner-centred" approaches, often without adequately considering the challenges involved in crossing cultures. Like many developing countries, India has been attempting to bring a paradigm shift from "teacher-centred" to…

  15. Impact of Patient and Procedure Mix on Finances of Perinatal Centres - Theoretical Models for Economic Strategies in Perinatal Centres.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, T; Kraml, F; Wagner, S; Hack, C C; Thiel, F C; Kehl, S; Winkler, M; Frobenius, W; Faschingbauer, F; Beckmann, M W; Lux, M P

    2013-08-01

    Introduction: In Germany, cost and revenue structures of hospitals with defined treatment priorities are currently being discussed to identify uneconomic services. This discussion has also affected perinatal centres (PNCs) and represents a new economic challenge for PNCs. In addition to optimising the time spent in hospital, the hospital management needs to define the "best" patient mix based on costs and revenues. Method: Different theoretical models were proposed based on the cost and revenue structures of the University Perinatal Centre for Franconia (UPF). Multi-step marginal costing was then used to show the impact on operating profits of changes in services and bed occupancy rates. The current contribution margin accounting used by the UPF served as the basis for the calculations. The models demonstrated the impact of changes in services on costs and revenues of a level 1 PNC. Results: Contribution margin analysis was used to calculate profitable and unprofitable DRGs based on average inpatient cost per day. Nineteen theoretical models were created. The current direct costing used by the UPF and a theoretical model with a 100 % bed occupancy rate were used as reference models. Significantly higher operating profits could be achieved by doubling the number of profitable DRGs and halving the number of less profitable DRGs. Operating profits could be increased even more by changing the rates of profitable DRGs per bed occupancy. The exclusive specialisation on pathological and high-risk pregnancies resulted in operating losses. All models which increased the numbers of caesarean sections or focused exclusively on c-sections resulted in operating losses. Conclusion: These theoretical models offer a basis for economic planning. They illustrate the enormous impact potential changes can have on the operating profits of PNCs. Level 1 PNCs require high bed occupancy rates and a profitable patient mix to cover the extremely high costs incurred due to the services

  16. Impact of Patient and Procedure Mix on Finances of Perinatal Centres – Theoretical Models for Economic Strategies in Perinatal Centres

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, T.; Kraml, F.; Wagner, S.; Hack, C. C.; Thiel, F. C.; Kehl, S.; Winkler, M.; Frobenius, W.; Faschingbauer, F.; Beckmann, M. W.; Lux, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In Germany, cost and revenue structures of hospitals with defined treatment priorities are currently being discussed to identify uneconomic services. This discussion has also affected perinatal centres (PNCs) and represents a new economic challenge for PNCs. In addition to optimising the time spent in hospital, the hospital management needs to define the “best” patient mix based on costs and revenues. Method: Different theoretical models were proposed based on the cost and revenue structures of the University Perinatal Centre for Franconia (UPF). Multi-step marginal costing was then used to show the impact on operating profits of changes in services and bed occupancy rates. The current contribution margin accounting used by the UPF served as the basis for the calculations. The models demonstrated the impact of changes in services on costs and revenues of a level 1 PNC. Results: Contribution margin analysis was used to calculate profitable and unprofitable DRGs based on average inpatient cost per day. Nineteen theoretical models were created. The current direct costing used by the UPF and a theoretical model with a 100 % bed occupancy rate were used as reference models. Significantly higher operating profits could be achieved by doubling the number of profitable DRGs and halving the number of less profitable DRGs. Operating profits could be increased even more by changing the rates of profitable DRGs per bed occupancy. The exclusive specialisation on pathological and high-risk pregnancies resulted in operating losses. All models which increased the numbers of caesarean sections or focused exclusively on c-sections resulted in operating losses. Conclusion: These theoretical models offer a basis for economic planning. They illustrate the enormous impact potential changes can have on the operating profits of PNCs. Level 1 PNCs require high bed occupancy rates and a profitable patient mix to cover the extremely high costs incurred due to the services

  17. Frailty modelling for survival data from multi-centre clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ha, Il Do; Sylvester, Richard; Legrand, Catherine; Mackenzie, Gilbert

    2011-07-30

    Despite the use of standardized protocols in, multi-centre, randomized clinical trials, outcome may vary between centres. Such heterogeneity may alter the interpretation and reporting of the treatment effect. Below, we propose a general frailty modelling approach for investigating, inter alia, putative treatment-by-centre interactions in time-to-event data in multi-centre clinical trials. A correlated random effects model is used to model the baseline risk and the treatment effect across centres. It may be based on shared, individual or correlated random effects. For inference we develop the hierarchical-likelihood (or h-likelihood) approach which facilitates computation of prediction intervals for the random effects with proper precision. We illustrate our methods using disease-free time-to-event data on bladder cancer patients participating in an European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer trial, and a simulation study. We also demonstrate model selection using h-likelihood criteria.

  18. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    PubMed Central

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  19. Measuring the defect structure orientation of a single NV- centre in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, M. W.; Michl, J.; Dolde, F.; Jakobi, I.; Neumann, P.; Manson, N. B.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2014-06-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centre in diamond has many exciting applications in quantum nano-metrology, including magnetometry, electrometry, thermometry and piezometry. Indeed, it is possible for a single NV- centre to measure the complete three-dimensional vector of the local electric field or the position of a single fundamental charge in ambient conditions. However, in order to achieve such vector measurements, near complete knowledge of the orientation of the centre's defect structure is required. Here, we demonstrate an optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique employing rotations of static electric and magnetic fields that precisely determines the orientation of the centre's major and minor trigonal symmetry axes. Thus, our technique is an enabler of the centre's existing vector sensing applications and also motivates new applications in multi-axis rotation sensing, NV growth characterization and diamond crystallography.

  20. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition.

  1. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  2. New directions for patient-centred care in scleroderma: the Scleroderma Patient-centred Intervention Network (SPIN)

    PubMed Central

    Thombs, Brett D.; Jewett, Lisa R.; Assassi, Shervin; Baron, Murray; Bartlett, Susan J.; Costa Maia, Angela; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; Furst, Daniel E.; Gottesman, Karen; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hudson, Marie; Ann Impens, PhD; Korner, Annett; Leite, Catarina; Mayes, Maureen D.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Motivala, Sarosh J.; Mouthon, Luc; Nielson, Warren R.; Plante, Diane; Poiraudeau, Serge; Poole, Janet L.; Pope, Janet; Sauve, Maureen; Steele, Russell J.; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.; Taillefer, Suzanne; van den Ende, Cornelia H.; Erin Arthurs, BSc; Bassel, Marielle; Delisle, Vanessa; Milette, Katherine; Leavens, Allison; Razykov, Ilya; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc), or scleroderma, is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disorder characterised by thickening and fibrosis of the skin and by the involvement of internal organs such as the lungs, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. Because there is no cure, feasibly-implemented and easily accessible evidence-based interventions to improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are needed. Due to a lack of evidence, however, specific recommendations have not been made regarding non-pharmacological interventions (e.g. behavioural/psychological, educational, physical/occupational therapy) to improve HRQoL in SSc. The Scleroderma Patient-centred Intervention Network (SPIN) was recently organised to address this gap. SPIN is comprised of patient representatives, clinicians, and researchers from Canada, the USA, and Europe. The goal of SPIN, as described in this article, is to develop, test, and disseminate a set of accessible interventions designed to complement standard care in order to improve HRQoL outcomes in SSc. PMID:22244687

  3. New directions for patient-centred care in scleroderma: the Scleroderma Patient-centred Intervention Network (SPIN).

    PubMed

    Thombs, Brett D; Jewett, Lisa R; Assassi, Shervin; Baron, Murray; Bartlett, Susan J; Maia, Angela Costa; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; Furst, Daniel E; Gottesman, Karen; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Hudson, Marie; Impens, Ann; Korner, Annett; Leite, Catarina; Mayes, Maureen D; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Motivala, Sarosh J; Mouthon, Luc; Nielson, Warren R; Plante, Diane; Poiraudeau, Serge; Poole, Janet L; Pope, Janet; Sauve, Maureen; Steele, Russell J; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Taillefer, Suzanne; van den Ende, Cornelia H; Arthurs, Erin; Bassel, Marielle; Delisle, Vanessa; Milette, Katherine; Leavens, Allison; Razykov, Ilya; Khanna, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc), or scleroderma, is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disorder characterised by thickening and fibrosis of the skin and by the involvement of internal organs such as the lungs, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. Because there is no cure, feasibly-implemented and easily accessible evidence-based interventions to improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are needed. Due to a lack of evidence, however, specific recommendations have not been made regarding non-pharmacological interventions (e.g. behavioural/psychological, educational, physical/occupational therapy) to improve HRQoL in SSc. The Scleroderma Patient-centred Intervention Network (SPIN) was recently organised to address this gap. SPIN is comprised of patient representatives, clinicians, and researchers from Canada, the USA, and Europe. The goal of SPIN, as described in this article, is to develop, test, and disseminate a set of accessible interventions designed to complement standard care in order to improve HRQoL outcomes in SSc.

  4. Evolution and diversification of National Cleaner Production Centres (NCPCs).

    PubMed

    Van Berkel, Rene

    2010-07-01

    Since 1994 UNIDO and UNEP cooperate in a Programme to establish National Cleaner Production Centres (NCPCs) as a mechanism for delivery of Cleaner Production (CP) services to businesses, governments and other organisations. In 2007, 38 NCPCs were operational in 37 developing and transition countries. While initially set up in near-identical ways in each country, over time NCPCs evolved in response to both programme-internal and country-level factors. The resulting diversity among NCPCs is described and analysed here. Differentiation and specialisation had occurred in service areas or topics both within and between NCPCs, however without a clear strategy for integration and synergy. NCPCs were becoming part of expanding networks of business services providers nationally forcing some to focus on audit and training services (tier 1), and others on specialist services in CP technology and/or policy (tier 2) and/or networking services (tier 3). All NCPCs were on a trajectory from a project management organisation to a nationally-owned entity. The different management requirements were not proactively managed and technical aspects of CP service delivery overshadowed institutional and governance aspects of establishing and operating the NCPC institution. Differences in service delivery methods between NCPCs are most evident in three service areas: CP assessments; policy advice; and transfer of Environmentally Sound Technologies. It is argued here that understanding root causes and benefits of this presently-observed differentiation, could lay the foundation for capturing and advancing best practice CP concepts, methods and policies. This in turn would enable strategic planning for customised interventions and support at the national level.

  5. Hand Mycetoma: The Mycetoma Research Centre Experience and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Omer, Rowa Fathelrahman; Seif El Din, Nancy; Abdel Rahim, Fadwa Awad; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2016-08-01

    Mycetoma is a devastating, neglected tropical disease characterised by extensive tissue involvement resulting in destruction, deformities and disabilities in the affected patients. The hand is commonly affected by mycetoma thus compromises its functionality and hinder the patient's daily activities of living. In this communication, we report on 533 patients with hand mycetoma managed over a period of 24 years at the Mycetoma Research Centre, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan. Eumycetoma was the commonest type of mycetoma (83.3%) encountered. Males were predominately affected (69.2%) with a sex ratio of 2.2:1. The majority of the patients (84%) were young adult below the age of 40 years old at presentation. The generality of patients (86.4%) were from the Sudan mycetoma belt. Children and adolescents (28.1%), farmers (18.2%) and workers (17.4%) were more frequently affected. The majority of patients (67.4%) had disease duration of less than 5 years at presentation. The study, did not document significant history of local trauma, familial tendency, concomitant medical diseases or other predisposing cause for mycetoma in this population. Pain (23.1%) was not a disease feature in this series and 52% of patients had past surgery for mycetoma and recurrence. The right hand was affected most (60.4%), and 64% of them had small lesion at presentation. Conventional x-ray was only helpful in patients with advanced disease and the MRI accurately determined the disease extension. Cytological smears, surgical biopsies histopathological examination and grains culture were the principal diagnostic tools for causative organisms' identification. In the present series it was difficult to determine the treatment outcome due to high patients follow up dropout. PMID:27483367

  6. Urological manifestations of Chikungunya fever: A single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Baishya, Ramen; Jain, Vikas; Ganpule, Arvind; Muthu, Veeramani; Sabnis, Ravindra B.; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Chikungunya is a viral infection often associated with lower urinary tract dysfunction. This study evaluates the urological squeal of Chikungunya fever in a single centre after an epidemic in 2006–2007 in India. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of medical records of 13 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms after Chikungunya fever was evaluated and outcome following intervention assessed. Results: A total of 13 patients (M:F=9:4), with age ranging from 30 to 72 years, were included in the study. They presented with chronic urinary retention (n=9, 69.23%) of which two had paraparesis, voiding symptoms alone (n=7, 53.8%), storage symptoms alone (n=3, 23%), and acute urinary retention (n=1, 7.6%). Presentation with lower urinary tract symptoms after an episode of Chikungunya fever was after a mean period of 163 days (range 30-360 days). Mean serum creatinine on presentation was 1.8 mg/dl (0.6–6.5 mg/dl). Evaluation revealed dilated upper tract in four (30.7%) patients. Cystometrography showed acontractile detrusor (n=3, 37.5%), hypocontractile detrusor (n=3, 37.5%), overactive detrusor (n=1, 12.5%) and normal study (n=1, 12.5%). At the mean follow up of 11 months, 11 patients (84.6%) had satisfactory functional outcome after intervention, namely supra pubic diversion and bladder training (n=5, 38.4%), alpha blocker (n=3, 23%), timed frequent voiding (n=2, 15.3%), clean intermittent catheterization (n=2, 15.3%), trial void with alpha blocker (n=1, 7.6%) while two are on continuing supra pubic diversion due to persistent neurological deficit. Conclusions: Chikungunya fever is an uncommon entity in urological practice, often associated with urinary symptoms. An accurate assessment of the symptoms and timely intervention prevents upper tract deterioration and improves the quality of life. PMID:20981198

  7. Placing contraception at the centre of the HIV prevention agenda.

    PubMed

    Crankshaw, Tamaryn L; Smit, Jennifer A; Beksinska, Mags E

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, the global response to the HIV epidemic has been unprecedented, and enormous progress has been made. Significant investment in the roll out of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and efforts to increase treatment coverage have greatly reduced the number of AIDS-related deaths worldwide. There are a growing number of promising innovations to expand the HIV prevention mix. However, the reach of these interventions is still very limited in adolescent girls and young women (15-24 years) and the full realisation of the intervention mandates has not yet been achieved. The HIV prevention field has been criticised for the tendency to adopt a narrow focus. The Fast-Track Strategy offers a unique opportunity for the HIV prevention field to broaden its gaze and to begin to identify synergies (and efficiencies) with prevention approaches from other global development priorities, namely sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). This paper applies a SRHR lens to HIV prevention by highlighting the critical relationship between unintended pregnancy and HIV, and seeks to expand on earlier debates that prevention of HIV and prevention of unintended pregnancy are inextricably linked, complementary activities with interrelated and common goals. We call for the prioritisation of prevention of unintended pregnancy amongst two overlapping population groups - girls and young women (15-24 years old) and women living with HIV - as a key tactic to accomplish the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) Fast-Track Strategy and as a way to fully realise existing HIV prevention efforts. We discuss the intersecting pathways between HIV prevention and unintended pregnancy prevention and build a case for contraception to be placed at the centre of the HIV prevention agenda. PMID:27399045

  8. Improved location procedures at the International Seismological Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondár, István; Storchak, Dmitry

    2011-09-01

    The International Seismological Centre (ISC) is a non-governmental, non-profit organization with the primary mission of producing the definitive account of the Earth's seismicity. The ISC Bulletin covers some 50 yr (1960-2011) of seismicity. The recent years have seen a dramatic increase both in the number of reported events and especially in the number of reported phases, owing to the ever-increasing number of stations worldwide. Similar ray paths will produce correlated traveltime prediction errors due to unmodelled heterogeneities in the Earth, resulting in underestimated location uncertainties, and for unfavourable network geometries, location bias. Hence, the denser and more unbalanced the global seismic station coverage becomes, the less defensible is the assumption (that is the observations are independent), which is made by most location algorithms. To address this challenge we have developed a new location algorithm for the ISC that accounts for correlated error structure, and uses all IASPEI standard phases with a valid ak135 traveltime prediction to obtain more accurate event locations. In this paper we describe the new ISC locator, and present validation tests by relocating the ground truth events in the IASPEI Reference Event List, as well as by relocating the entire ISC Bulletin. We show that the new ISC location algorithm provides small, but consistent location improvements, considerable improvements in depth determination and significantly more accurate formal uncertainty estimates. We demonstrate that the new algorithm, through the use of later phases and testing for depth resolution, considerably clusters event locations more tightly, thus providing an improved view of the seismicity of the Earth.

  9. Interdisciplinary collaboration within Quebec Community Health Care Centres.

    PubMed

    Sicotte, Claude; D'Amour, Danielle; Moreault, Marie-Pierre

    2002-09-01

    Central to the success of many recent health system reforms is the implementation of new primary health care delivery models. The central characteristic common to these new models usually emphasises interdisciplinary collaboration. Using empirical research, this paper studies interdisciplinary collaboration among various groups of professionals within an original Canadian primary health care delivery model, the Quebec Community Health Care Centres (CCHCs). The entire population of more than 150 CHCCs have been surveyed. The goals of this study are (1) to measure the achieved intensity of inter-professional collaboration among Quebec CHCCs, and (2) to identify the organisational and professional factors fostering or limiting interdisciplinary collaboration. The results show that Quebec CHCCs have reached modest results in achieving interdisciplinary collaboration especially since interdisciplinary collaboration is a central objective that has been pursued for more than 25 years. This study demonstrates that the main factors associated with interdisciplinary collaboration are closely linked to work group internal dynamics. Interdisciplinary collaboration is linked to the simultaneous and antagonistic effect of some central intragroup process factors. Conflicting values and beliefs are present that both enhance and limit interdisciplinary collaboration. The presence of conflicting stimuli seriously undermines the strength of the CHCC work group's shared beliefs and strongly limits interdisciplinary collaboration. The results also stress the importance of administrative formalisation initiatives to enhance collaboration among different professions. The efficacy of formalisation in this context is based on its capacity to offer an articulated and operative interdisciplinary framework that can generate a counteractive effect to the traditional professional framework. It offers concrete rules that help align the work group beliefs with interdisciplinary values. The

  10. Hand Mycetoma: The Mycetoma Research Centre Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Rowa Fathelrahman; Seif EL Din, Nancy; Abdel Rahim, Fadwa Awad; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Mycetoma is a devastating, neglected tropical disease characterised by extensive tissue involvement resulting in destruction, deformities and disabilities in the affected patients. The hand is commonly affected by mycetoma thus compromises its functionality and hinder the patient’s daily activities of living. In this communication, we report on 533 patients with hand mycetoma managed over a period of 24 years at the Mycetoma Research Centre, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan. Eumycetoma was the commonest type of mycetoma (83.3%) encountered. Males were predominately affected (69.2%) with a sex ratio of 2.2:1. The majority of the patients (84%) were young adult below the age of 40 years old at presentation. The generality of patients (86.4%) were from the Sudan mycetoma belt. Children and adolescents (28.1%), farmers (18.2%) and workers (17.4%) were more frequently affected. The majority of patients (67.4%) had disease duration of less than 5 years at presentation. The study, did not document significant history of local trauma, familial tendency, concomitant medical diseases or other predisposing cause for mycetoma in this population. Pain (23.1%) was not a disease feature in this series and 52% of patients had past surgery for mycetoma and recurrence. The right hand was affected most (60.4%), and 64% of them had small lesion at presentation. Conventional x-ray was only helpful in patients with advanced disease and the MRI accurately determined the disease extension. Cytological smears, surgical biopsies histopathological examination and grains culture were the principal diagnostic tools for causative organisms’ identification. In the present series it was difficult to determine the treatment outcome due to high patients follow up dropout. PMID:27483367

  11. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity. Monitoring the European drug situation: the ongoing challenge for the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul; Mounteney, Jane; Lopez, Dominique; Zobel, Frank; Götz, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) is the designated hub for drug-related information in the European Union. The organization's role is to provide the European Union (EU) and its Member States with a factual overview of European drug problems and a common information framework to support the drugs debate. In order to achieve its mission, the EMCDDA coordinates and relies on a network of 30 national monitoring centres, the Reitox National Focal Points. The Centre publishes on a wide range of drug-related topics, across epidemiology, interventions, laws and policies. Every November, the EMCDDA publishes its Annual Report, providing a yearly update on the European drug situation, translated into 23 EU languages. In line with its founding regulation, the EMCDDA has a role acting as an interface between the worlds of science and policy. While not a research centre in the formal sense, the results the Centre generates serve as catalysts for new research questions and help to identify priorities. Current challenges facing the agency include continuing to increase scientific standards while maintaining a strong institutional role, as well as supporting European efforts to identify, share and codify best practice in the drugs field.

  12. Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats; Eklund, Mats; Eklund, Jörgen; Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    2011-06-01

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste

  13. Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats; Eklund, Mats; Eklund, Jörgen; Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    2011-06-01

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste

  14. Establishing a network of specialist Porphyria centres - effects on diagnostic activities and services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of rare metabolic diseases. The full spectrum of porphyria diagnostics is usually performed by specialized porphyria laboratories or centres. The European Porphyria Initiative (EPI), a collaborative network of porphyria centres formed in 2001, evolved in 2007 into the European Porphyria Network (EPNET), where participating centres are required to adhere to agreed quality criteria. The aim of this study was to examine the state and distribution of porphyria diagnostic services in 2009 and to explore potential effects of increased international collaboration in the field of these rare diseases in the period 2006–2009. Methods Data on laboratory, diagnostic and clinical activities and services reported to EPI/EPNET in yearly activity reports during 2006 through 2009 were compared between reporting centres, and possible time trends explored. Results Thirty-five porphyria centres from 22 countries, five of which were non-European associate EPNET members, filed one or more activity reports to EPI/EPNET during the study period. Large variations between centres were observed in the analytical repertoire offered, numbers of analyses performed and type and number of staff engaged. The proportion of centres fulfilling the minimum criteria set by EPNET to be classified as a specialist porphyria centre increased from 80% to 94% during the study period. Conclusions Porphyria services are unevenly distributed, and some areas are probably still lacking in specialized porphyria services altogether. However, improvements in the quality of diagnostic services provided by porphyria centres participating in EPI/EPNET were observed during 2006 through 2009. PMID:23227998

  15. Centre for Space Science and Technology Education forLatin America and the Caribbean—The Brazil Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sausen, Tania Maria

    2004-01-01

    We briefly describe the general objectives of the Centres for Space Science and Technology Education associated with the United Nations, concentrating on the establishment and activities of the Centre for Latin America and the Caribbean.

  16. Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32: Patterns in Soil-Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, S. J.; Simmer, C.; Masbou, M.; Boessenkool, K.; Crewell, S.; Diekkruger, B.; Huber, K.; Klitzsch, N.; Koyama, C. N.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    The soil, vegetation and the lower atmosphere (SVA) are key compartments of the Earth, where almost all activities of mankind take place. This region is characterized by extremely complex patterns, structures and processes that act at different temporal and spatial scales. While the exchange of energy, water and carbon is continuous between the different compartments, the pertinent fluxes are strongly heterogeneous and variable in space and time. The overarching TR32 paradigm is that the characterisation of structures and patterns will lead to a deeper qualitative and quantitative understanding of the SVA system, and ultimately to better predictions of the SVA state. The TR32 combines research groups in the field of soil and plant science, remote sensing, hydrology, meteorology and mathematics located at the Universities of Aachen, Bonn, Braunschweig and Cologne and the Research Centre Juelich study the soil-vegetation atmosphere system under the novel holistic paradigm of patterns. To understand the mechanisms leading to spatial and temporal patterns in energy and matter fluxes of the SVA system we link experiments and theory via model-observation integration. Focusing our research on the Rur Catchment (Germany), patterns are monitored since 2006 continuously using existing and novel geophysical and remote sensing techniques from the local to the catchment scale based on ground penetrating radar methods, induced polarization, radiomagnetotellurics, electrical resistivity tomography, boundary layer scintillometry, lidar techniques, microwave radiometry, and precipitation radars with polarization diversity. Modeling approaches involve high resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP; 400m) and hydrological models (few meters). Example work from the first phase includes the transfer of laboratory methods to the field; the measurements of patterns of soil-carbon, evapotranspiration and respiration measured in the field; catchment-scale modeling of exchange processes

  17. Experiences of person-centred care - patients’ perceptions: qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient care models have been implemented and documented worldwide. Many studies have focused on features that hinder and facilitate the shift to such models, including the implementation process, staff involvement, resistance to new models and cultural dimensions. However, few studies have identified the potential effects of such new care models from a patient perspective. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether patients did in fact perceive the intentions of partnership in the new care model 1 year after its implementation. Methods Sixteen participants were interviewed, selected from two wards in a medical department where a new care model had been implemented 1 year earlier. A directed deductive content analysis was selected. The aim of the directed approach to content analysis was to investigate to what extent the new care model had been implemented, using patients’ perspectives to describe the level of implementation. A coding framework was developed based on a theoretical paper that described the key features of the new care model. Results The implementation of person-centred care had clearly occurred to a large degree, even if some patients appeared not to have been exposed to the model at all. Aspects of the newly implemented care model were obvious; however, it was also clear that implementation was not complete. The analysis showed that patients felt listened to and that their own perception of the situation had been noted. Patients spontaneously expressed that they felt that the staff saw them as persons and did not solely focus on their disease. It was also stated that not every ailment or aspect of a patient’s illness needed to be addressed or resolved for open listening to be perceived as a positive experience. Conclusions The findings indicate that even though some patients were not interested in participating and playing an active role in their own care, this might relate to a lack of understanding on how to invite

  18. Germinal centres seen through the mathematical eye: B-cell models on the catwalk.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Figge, Marc Thilo; Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2009-04-01

    Germinal centres are receiving renewed attention following recent intravital multi-photon imaging studies. These data have shed new light on longstanding questions about the spatial organisation of germinal centres, B-cell migration, selection and differentiation. Mathematical models have proven invaluable in the analysis of intravital motility data, and have predicted novel B-cell selection mechanisms that are now supported by experimental findings. We argue that mathematical modelling adds a different vantage point to experimental data and provides a quantitative and systematic analysis of hypotheses and theories in immunology. Furthermore, the well-characterised nature of the germinal centre provides an excellent proving ground for mathematical modelling. PMID:19282244

  19. Fluorescence Polarization Switching from a Single Silicon Vacancy Colour Centre in Diamond

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Gengxu; Rong, Youying; McGuinness, Liam Paul; Jelezko, Fedor; Tamura, Syuto; Tanii, Takashi; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Isoya, Junichi; Shinada, Takahiro; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Single-photon emitters with stable and uniform photoluminescence properties are important for quantum technology. However, in many cases, colour centres in diamond exhibit spectral diffusion and photoluminescence intensity fluctuation. It is therefore essential to investigate the dynamics of colour centres at the single defect level in order to enable the on-demand manipulation and improved applications in quantum technology. Here we report the polarization switching, intensity jumps and spectral shifting observed on a negatively charged single silicon-vacancy colour centre in diamond. The observed phenomena elucidate the single emitter dynamics induced by photoionization of nearby electron donors in the diamond. PMID:26202940

  20. Swan Hills Special Waste Treatment Centre human health impact assessment. Volume 2: Technical appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Appendices to a study of human health impacts of the Swan Hills Waste Treatment Centre in Alberta include: Background information on the Centre, including site characteristics, operational history, environmental incidents, and land use; protocols for sampling of locally obtained meat and fish; data on levels of polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in meat and fish samples; protocols for human blood monitoring and sampling; congener profiles for deer, fish, and human blood samples; survey questionnaires and news releases related to possible impacts of a contaminant release from the Centre; and information on databases used.

  1. Swan Hills Special Waste Treatment Centre human health impact assessment. Volume 2: Technical appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1997-01-01

    Appendices to a study of human health impacts of the Swan Hills Waste Treatment Centre in Alberta include: Background information on the Centre, including site characteristics, operational history, environmental incidents, and land use; protocols for sampling of locally obtained meat and fish; data on levels of polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in meat and fish samples; protocols for human blood monitoring and sampling; congener profiles for deer, fish, and human blood samples; survey questionnaires and news releases related to possible impacts of a contaminant release from the Centre; and information on databases used.

  2. The Centre for History in Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London (LSHTM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the origin of the Centre for History in Public Health and the significance of its location in a leading school of public health. It is in three parts: (1) A brief history of how the AIDS programme became the History Centre; (2) The distinctive approach of the Centre's staff as historians: their contribution and its…

  3. Ontario Universities' Application Centre (sic). The First Three Years 1971-74. Report No. 74-16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This document presents reports covering the first 3 years of the Ontario Universities' Application Centre (OUAC). The first is an account by the board chairman of the activities of OUAC Board of Management. The second, by the director of the Application Centre, recounts the development of the centre and of the undergraduate applications system.…

  4. When Is a Linguist Not a Linguist: The Multifarious Activities and Expectations for a Linguist in an Australian Language Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truscott, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    The role of linguists employed in Aboriginal community language centres requires three considerations to be addressed by the language centres themselves, by the linguists and by the organisations that prepare them: what is required of the linguist by language centres; to what extent does the linguist's own skills, interests and ideology match what…

  5. 1500 cases of renal and ureteric calculi treated in an integrated stone centre.

    PubMed

    Das, G; Dick, J; Bailey, M J; Fletcher, M S; Birch, B; Coptcoat, M J; Webb, D R; Kellett, M J; Whitfield, H N; Wickham, J E

    1988-10-01

    Fifteen hundred consecutive cases of renal and ureteric calculi were treated in an integrated stone centre; 1464 of these were treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureterorenoscopy and ureteroscopic lasertripsy. Only 36 (2.4%) required open surgery.

  6. Wear simulation for the centre plate arrangement of a freight car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevskiy, Alexander; Kim, Chang-Wan; Yang, Hyun-Ik; Olshevskiy, Alexey

    2015-06-01

    The bodies of many railway freight cars in many countries of the world are coupled to the running gear by means of a body centre plate that makes a friction pair with a centre bowl. During motion, the bogie is rotated and moved with respect to the car body. This leads to wear on the contact surfaces. Lubrication is inexpedient in this case because the friction forces damp the vibrations (so-called bogie hunting) during motion. Usually, centre plates exhibit noticeable wear after two years of operation. Reducing wear requires knowing details of the wear process which, in turn, requires computer simulation of freight car motion for an operation period of 10-15 years. The purpose of this paper is to develop a universal method for wear simulation of friction pairs that could be used, in particular, for the centre plate of a freight car.

  7. Efficacy of a Regional Poisoning Treatment Centre in Preventing Further Suicidal Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Peter

    1972-01-01

    A survey of parasuicide (attempted suicide) in general practice in Edinburgh allowed comparison of the rates of further suicidal behaviour in patients treated for their initial episode in the Edinburgh Regional Poisoning Treatment Centre and in those referred to psychiatrists elsewhere or not referred at all. Further suicidal behaviour was only one-third as common among those treated in the treatment centre as among non-admitted patients; patients referred to other psychiatric services did no better than those who were not referred to a psychiatrist at all. The difference in repetition frequencies could not be accounted for in terms of selection of patients in the treatment centre who were less likely to repeat. The tentative conclusion is made that crisis intervention of the kind available at the Edinburgh centre is effective in secondary prevention. The findings add support to Government recommendations that special units like the one in Edinburgh should be set up in other regions. PMID:5083883

  8. Evaluation Of Levels Of Climate Favorability For Viticulture In Breasta Viticultural Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzatu, Gilda-Diana; Mărăcineanu, Liviu Cristian

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this present research was to evaluate the climatic conditions of a viticultural centre, as there are always needed studies to determine the climate favorability of the vine cultivation and the varieties resistant to heat and water stress, especially when climate change affects globally viticulture. The present research was made using the interpretation of Craiova Regional Weather Centre's meteorological records for the year of 2014, for Breasta viticultural centre. The climatic factors permitted the determination of several indexes used in viticultural climatology for the appreciation of the viticultural biotope characteristics. Assessment of climatic resources through synthetic climatic indexes, clearly express the generous heliothermic offer available for Breasta viticultural centre, the guarantee of quality and specificity of vine products obtained in this area.

  9. Sneeze related area in the medulla: localisation of the human sneezing centre?

    PubMed Central

    Seijo‐Martínez, M; Varela‐Freijanes, A; Grandes, J; Vázquez, F

    2006-01-01

    Sneezing is a rarely explored symptom in neurological practice. In the cat, a sneeze evoking centre is located in the medulla. The existence of a sneezing centre has not been confirmed in humans. A case with abnormal sneezing secondary to a strategic infarct in the right latero‐medullary region is presented. A 66 year old man suddenly presented paroxysmal sneezing followed by ataxia, right sided motor and sensory symptoms, and hoarseness. The application of stimuli to the right nasal fossa did not evoke sneezing nor the wish to sneeze. The same stimuli to the contralateral nasal fossa evoked normal sneezing. The preservation of the superficial sensitivity of the nasal fossa indicates that the lesion was localised in the hypothetical human sneezing centre, very close to the spinal trigeminal tract and nucleus. This centre appears to be bilateral and functionally independent on both sides. PMID:16354739

  10. Porphyrin-quinone compounds as synthetic models of the reaction centre in photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkov, V. V.; Evstigneeva, Rima P.; Strekova, L. N.; Filippovich, E. I.

    1989-06-01

    Data on the synthesis, steric structure, and photochemical properties of porphyrin-quinone compounds as synthetic models of the reaction centre in photosynthesis are examined and described systematically. The bibliography includes 113 references.

  11. Low-temperature investigations of single silicon vacancy colour centres in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, Elke; Hepp, Christian; Hauschild, Michael; Gsell, Stefan; Fischer, Martin; Sternschulte, Hadwig; Steinmüller-Nethl, Doris; Schreck, Matthias; Becher, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    We study single silicon vacancy (SiV) centres in chemical vapour deposition (CVD) nanodiamonds on iridium as well as an ensemble of SiV centres in a high-quality, low-stress CVD diamond film by using temperature-dependent luminescence spectroscopy in the temperature range 5-295 K. We investigate in detail the temperature-dependent fine structure of the zero-phonon line (ZPL) of the SiV centres. The ZPL transition is affected by inhomogeneous as well as temperature-dependent homogeneous broadening and blue shifts by about 20 cm-1 upon cooling from room temperature to 5 K. We employ excitation power-dependent g(2) measurements to explore the temperature-dependent internal population dynamics of single SiV centres and infer mostly temperature-independent dynamics.

  12. Integrating peritoneal and home haemodialysis: a nurse's perspective from a single centre.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Carol; Beech, Nicola; Chesterton, Lindsay; Fluck, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Home based dialytic therapy is underutilized in most renal centres. This article describes a nurse led and delivered approach to problem solving from a patient perspective, resulting in an increase in prevalent and incident patient numbers on home HD and peritoneal dialysis. Overall, between 2004 and 2010 home-based therapies have risen from 61 to 119 prevalent patients, with a fall in in-centre patient numbers.

  13. Integrating peritoneal and home haemodialysis: a nurse’s perspective from a single centre

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Carol; Beech, Nicola; Chesterton, Lindsay; Fluck, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Home based dialytic therapy is underutilized in most renal centres. This article describes a nurse led and delivered approach to problem solving from a patient perspective, resulting in an increase in prevalent and incident patient numbers on home HD and peritoneal dialysis. Overall, between 2004 and 2010 home-based therapies have risen from 61 to 119 prevalent patients, with a fall in in-centre patient numbers. PMID:25949509

  14. Centre-related variability in hospital admissions of patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Mariano; Sivera, Francisca; Pérez-Vicente, Sabina; Carmona, Loreto; Vela, Paloma

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the variability in hospital admissions of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) in Spain, and the centre factors that may influence that variability. Descriptive cross-sectional study, part of the emAR II study, performed in Spain (2009-2010). Health records of patients with a diagnosis of SpA and at least one visit to the rheumatology units within the previous 2 years were reviewed. Variables related to hospital admissions, to the SpA, and to the patient and centre were collected. A multilevel logistic regression analysis of random intercept with non-random slopes was performed to assess variability between centres. From 45 centres, 1168 patients' health records were reviewed. Main SpA forms were ankylosing spondylitis (55.2 %) and psoriatic arthritis (22.2 %). A total of 248 admissions were registered for 196 patients (19.2 %, n = 1020). An adjusted variability of 17.6 % in hospitalizations between centres was noted. The following hospital-related factors showed a significant association with admissions: the total number of admissions of the centre, the existence of electronic admission, and the availability of ultrasound in rheumatology. However, these factors only explained 42.9 % of the inter-centre variability. The risk of a patient with SpA of being admitted could double (median OR 2.09), depending on the hospital where the patient was being managed. Hospital admissions of patients with SpA varied between hospitals due to centre characteristics. Further studies are needed to ascertain which specific factors may be causing the variation, as studied variables explained less than half of the variability.

  15. Optical detection of paramagnetic centres: From crystals to glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogulis, Uldis

    2016-07-01

    An unambiguous attribution of the absorption spectra to definite paramagnetic centres identified by the EPR techniques in the most cases is problematic. This problem may be solved by applying of a direct measurement techniques—the EPR detected via the magnetic circular dichroism, or briefly MCD-EPR. The present survey reports on the advantages and disadvantages applying the MCD-EPR techniques to simple and complex paramagnetic centres in crystals as well as glasses and glass-ceramics.

  16. Resistance to antibiotics at medical centres in different parts of the world.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T F

    1986-10-01

    The diameters of the zones of inhibition of consecutive clinical isolates around antibiotic susceptibility test discs at medical centres in different parts of the world were computer filed and analysed by a series of programs that evaluate test quality and compare results. Percentages of isolates resistant to ampicillin at 18 centres ranged from 16 to 73 for Escherichia coli and from 3 to 56 for Proteus mirabilis. Percentages resistant to chloramphenicol ranged from 2 to 48 for E. coli, from 5 to 52 for Klebsiella pneumoniae, and from 8 to 67 for Serratia marcescens. Gentamicin resistance did not exceed 4% at any of 18 centres and was less than 1 at 14 of them for isolates of E. coli, while K. pneumoniae showed less than 2% resistance at six centres but averaged 22% at another eight. Multi-resistant isolates were ten-fold more frequent at eight centres than at the remaining six. Too few centres were sampled to characterize individual countries except in the United States where resistance seemed generally less prevalent.

  17. Safer sex at holiday centres: providing contraceptive services to seasonal workers.

    PubMed

    Hennink, M; Cooper, P; Diamond, I

    1999-07-01

    Many seasonal workers experience an increase in sexual activity whilst employed at a holiday centre. Evidence of sexual risk-taking while at a holiday centre has important social and health implications for purchasers and providers of sexual health services in areas which experience an annual influx of seasonal workers. This research investigates the contraceptive behaviour of seasonal workers and focuses on their access to contraception and sexual health services. In-depth interviews were conducted with seasonal workers at holiday centres along the south coast of England. Respondents were, interviewed at the beginning of the season and again, five months later at the end of the season. This longitudinal methodology enabled changes in contraceptive behaviour to be identified as well as the strategies for seeking contraception and sexual health services throughout the season. The results of this study show that there are a range of different motivations which influence seasonal worker' use of contraception and sexual risk-taking while at a holiday centre. Categories of contraceptive protection are developed to assist purchasers and providers to identify the variety of sexual health needs of workers at holiday centres and determine the most effective strategies for delivering contraceptive and sexual health services to these workers. The paper describes the motivations which influence contraceptive use and sexual risk-taking amongst seasonal workers, identifies the contraceptive and sexual health needs of these workers, and discusses the difficulties workers experienced in meeting these needs while at a holiday centre.

  18. A probabilistic approach to determine volcanic eruption centres of degraded volcanic edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, B.; Karátson, D.

    2009-04-01

    It is often a difficult problem to determine the position of original eruption centres of degraded volcanic edifices. Beside of the destructive processes acting during the volcanic activity, subsequent erosion, mass movements and tectonic motions modify the spatial distribution of the volcanic features. The observations including dipping strata, clast orientations, lava flows, etc. made on the present surface are therefore biased by the post-eruptive processes making the reconstruction of the original volcanic pattern problematic. The different types of observations and their various error levels complicate the problem further. We propose a probabilistic approach to evaluate the different types of observations. Each observation type or even each observation may have their own error bars which can be taken into account in this scheme. The only assumption is that it is possible to determine the relative direction of the original volcanic centre based on the specific observation within a given angular accuracy. In our scheme a spatial probability density function (PDF) is assigned to each observation and the weighted sum of these PDFs results in a map. This integrated PDF map then can be evaluated to determine one or multiple eruption centres. In case of multiple centres further decision can be made on whether the various centres are only virtual, caused by subsequent tectonism or, on the contrary, the original setting had several eruption vents. This decision can be made on targeted grouping of PDFs of different types of observations or spatial selection. The resulting compound PDF maps may outline individual centres.

  19. Client perspectives on occupational therapy practice: are we truly client-centred?

    PubMed

    Rebeiro, K L

    2000-02-01

    In Canada, the guidelines for the practice of occupational therapy are named and framed as client-centred. Two in-depth interviews were conducted with clients of mental health services about their experiences with a hospital-based occupational therapy service. These occupational therapy clients described their experiences as prescriptive, and as less than client-centred. With the publication of Enabling occupation: A Canadian occupational therapy perspective (Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists [CAOT], 1997) and an increasingly refined focus on being client-centred, these interviews highlight the challenges of a client-centred practice within the current health care environment. These occupational therapy clients raise issues of importance for occupational therapy. The participants stated that the prescription of 'activity', a lack of choice, and a focus upon the illness as opposed to the individual, served to diminish any collaborative partnership with the client and eliminate the client from any decision-making process. This distancing from the client, in their opinion, served to greatly diminish any therapeutic value of occupation. The participants recommended a greater focus upon occupational choice, consideration of the individual within the client, providing accepting, supportive environments, and using professional expertise on occupation to guide the client towards participation in meaningful occupation. These recommendations are strikingly similar to the most recent guidelines for the client-centred practice of occupational therapy in Canada. A discussion of the implications of these findings for the client-centred practice of occupational therapy is offered. PMID:10695164

  20. Person Centred Planning "In Action": Exploring the Use of Person Centred Planning in Supporting Young People's Transition and Re-integration to Mainstream Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Emma

    2014-01-01

    This study, by Emma Corrigan of the Plymouth Excellence Cluster and Community Psychology Service, explores the use of person centred planning (PCP) in supporting young people who have experienced school exclusion, in their transition and re-integration to mainstream settings. Young people of different ages participated in the PCP process and…

  1. Is Student-Centred Learning a Western Concept? Lessons from an Academic Development Programme to Support Student-Centred Learning in Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, L.; Bovill, C.; Othman, S. M.; Saleh, A. M.; Shabila, N. P.; Watters, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the idea that student-centred learning (SCL) is a concept and an approach that is internationally useful and transferable to a range of higher education settings. We present details of a British Council funded collaborative project between Hawler Medical University (HMU), in Erbil in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq and…

  2. Outcomes of Cryoballoon Ablation in High- and Low-Volume Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Centres: A Russian Pilot Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylov, Evgeny N.; Lebedev, Dmitry S.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Davtyan, Karapet V.; Ivanitskii, Eduard A.; Nechepurenko, Anatoly A.; Kosonogov, Alexey Ya.; Kolunin, Grigory V.; Morozov, Igor A.; Termosesov, Sergey A.; Maykov, Evgeny B.; Khomutinin, Dmitry N.; Eremin, Sergey A.; Mayorov, Igor M.; Romanov, Alexander B.; Shabanov, Vitaliy V.; Shatakhtsyan, Victoria; Tsivkovskii, Viktor; Revishvili, Amiran Sh.; Shlyakhto, Evgeny V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The results of cryoballoon ablation (CBA) procedure have been mainly derived from studies conducted in experienced atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation centres. Here, we report on CBA efficacy and complications resulting from real practice of this procedure at both high- and low-volume centres. Methods. Among 62 Russian centres performing AF ablation, 15 (24%) used CBA technology for pulmonary vein isolation. The centres were asked to provide a detailed description of all CBA procedures performed and complications, if encountered. Results. Thirteen sites completed interviews on all CBAs in their centres (>95% of CBAs in Russia). Six sites were high-volume AF ablation (>100 AF cases/year) centres, and 7 were low-volume AF ablation. There was no statistical difference in arrhythmia-free rates between high- and low-volume centres (64.6 versus 60.8% at 6 months). Major complications developed in 1.5% of patients and were equally distributed between high- and low-volume centres. Minor procedure-related events were encountered in 8% of patients and were more prevalent in high-volume centres. Total event and vascular access site event rates were higher in women than in men. Conclusions. CBA has an acceptable efficacy profile in real practice. In less experienced AF ablation centres, the major complication rate is equal to that in high-volume centres. PMID:26640789

  3. What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?

    PubMed

    Diebolt, Vincent; Lang, Marie; Thoby, Frédérique

    2016-02-01

    The Giens 2015 Workshop Round Table entitled "What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?" took a viewpoint distinct from earlier work and studies on changes in clinical research activities in France. The purpose of the present work was to identify, starting from concrete examples, the main strengths and advantages of clinical research activity in France related, in part, to the background environment and also to the specific characteristics of the investigation centres considered to be among the most high-performance units in activity. The criteria retained were grouped into a set of specifications that could be used to establish a "label of excellence" upon which the different teams and clinical research centres could model themselves. It was thus considered that belonging to a centre or structured network with at least a national configuration, when this is possible for the medial topic in question, constitutes a real advantage. Four benchmarks were identified: the scientific and clinical expertise of the head investigator, as well as the qualification and operational capacity of the centre's team; definition and measurement of performance using clearly displayed indicators and evaluation procedures; the quality of the overall trial "process" and of each of its component steps; communication, because know-how and promotion go hand in hand, with the main objective of informing the professional and general public about the value of the research centre meeting the above-mentioned criteria, about its networks of competencies, and more generally, about the important assets of the background of clinical research in France. This sector of research is funded by the public authorities via calls for public grants, financial aids for structures supporting clinical research in the University Hospital Centres and other healthcare institutions allowing for a professionalization of the research occupations, and the national public health

  4. Disaster preparedness of Canadian trauma centres: the perspective of medical directors of trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, David; Haas, Barbara; Ahmed, Najma; Tien, Homer; Nathens, Avery

    2011-01-01

    Background Owing to their constant readiness to treat injured patients, trauma centres are essential to regional responses to mass casualty incidents (MCIs). Reviews of recent MCIs suggest that trauma centre preparedness has frequently been limited. We set out to evaluate Canadian trauma centre preparedness and the extent of their integration into a regional response to MCIs. Methods We conducted a survey of Canadian level-1 trauma centres (n = 29) to characterize their existing disaster-response plans and to identify areas where pre-paredness could be improved. The survey was directed to the medical director of trauma at each centre. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses. Results Twenty-three (79%) trauma centres in 5 provinces responded. Whereas most (83%) reported the presence of a committee dedicated to disaster preparedness, only half of the medical directors of trauma were members of these committees. Almost half (43%) the institutions had not run any disaster drill in the previous 2 years. Only 70% of trauma centres used communications assets designed to function during MCIs. Additionally, more than half of the trauma directors (59%) did not know if their institutions had the ability to sustain operations for at least 72 hours during MCIs. Conclusion The results of this study suggest important opportunities to better prepare Canadian trauma centers to respond to an MCI. The main areas identified for potential improvement include the need for the standardization of MCI planning and response at a regional level and the implementation of strategies such as stockpiling of resources and novel communication strategies to avoid functional collapse during an MCI. PMID:21251427

  5. Comparative dosimetry study of three UK centres implementing total skin electron treatment through external audit

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, R; McGovern, M; Greener, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the external audit measurements conducted in two UK centres implementing total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) and the results obtained. Methods: Measurements of output, energy, beam flatness and symmetry at a standard distance (95 or 100 cm SSD) were performed using a parallel plate chamber in solid water. Similarly, output and energy measurements were also performed at the treatment plane for single and dual fields. Clinical simulations were carried out using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic® film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) on an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: Extended distance measurements confirmed that local values for the beam dosimetry at Centres A and B were within 2% for outputs and 1-mm agreement of the expected depth at which the dose is 50% of the maximum for the depth–dose curve in water (R50,D) value. Clinical simulation using TLDs) showed an agreement of −1.6% and −6.7% compared with the expected mean trunk dose for each centre, respectively, and a variation within 10% (±1 standard deviation) across the trunk. The film results confirmed that the delivery of the treatment technique at each audited centre complies with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations. Conclusion: This audit methodology has proven to be a successful way to confirm the agreement of dosimetric parameters for TSEBT treatments at both audited centres and could serve as the basis for an audit template to be used by other audit groups. Advances in knowledge: TSEBT audits are not established in the UK owing to a limited number of centres carrying out the treatment technique. This article describes the audits performed at two UK centres prior to their clinical implementation. PMID:25761213

  6. What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?

    PubMed

    Diebolt, Vincent; Lang, Marie; Thoby, Frédérique

    2016-02-01

    The Giens 2015 Workshop Round Table entitled "What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?" took a viewpoint distinct from earlier work and studies on changes in clinical research activities in France. The purpose of the present work was to identify, starting from concrete examples, the main strengths and advantages of clinical research activity in France related, in part, to the background environment and also to the specific characteristics of the investigation centres considered to be among the most high-performance units in activity. The criteria retained were grouped into a set of specifications that could be used to establish a "label of excellence" upon which the different teams and clinical research centres could model themselves. It was thus considered that belonging to a centre or structured network with at least a national configuration, when this is possible for the medial topic in question, constitutes a real advantage. Four benchmarks were identified: the scientific and clinical expertise of the head investigator, as well as the qualification and operational capacity of the centre's team; definition and measurement of performance using clearly displayed indicators and evaluation procedures; the quality of the overall trial "process" and of each of its component steps; communication, because know-how and promotion go hand in hand, with the main objective of informing the professional and general public about the value of the research centre meeting the above-mentioned criteria, about its networks of competencies, and more generally, about the important assets of the background of clinical research in France. This sector of research is funded by the public authorities via calls for public grants, financial aids for structures supporting clinical research in the University Hospital Centres and other healthcare institutions allowing for a professionalization of the research occupations, and the national public health

  7. Feasibility of a call-in centre to deliver colorectal cancer screening in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Sewitch, Maida J.; Jiang, Mengzhu; Grad, Roland; Yaffe, Mark; Pavilanis, Alan; Joseph, Lawrence; Barkun, Alan N.; Roper, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a call-in centre to deliver colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in primary care through self-administered fecal occult blood testing (FOBT). Design Four-month intervention study (September 2010 to January 2011) with randomly selected follow-up interviews. Setting The family medicine clinics of 3 hospitals in Montreal, Que. Participants Letters from doctors invited their patients to contact the call-in centre (N = 761). Eligible patients agreeing to FOBT were sent testing kits that could be returned by mail (N = 100). Randomly selected patients (N = 36) were interviewed to explore the reasons why they did not contact the call-in centre, or why they did or did not adhere to FOBT. Main outcome measures Feasibility was assessed by the proportions of patients who contacted the call-in centre, who were eligible for FOBT, and who adhered to FOBT; and by the time between invitation mail-out and contact with the call-in centre, initial telephone contact and receipt of the signed consent form, and FOBT kit mail-out and receipt of the kit by the laboratory. Hierarchical logistic regression evaluated the effect of patient characteristics on feasibility indicators, adjusting for clustering by physician and centre. Results Of 761 patients (61.6% female, mean age 61.0 years), 250 (32.9%) contacted the call-in centre, of whom 100 (40.0%) were eligible for and consented to FOBT; 62 (62.0%) of these patients adhered to FOBT. Median (interquartile range) time from invitation mail-out to call-in centre contact was 21 (7 to 29) days, from initial telephone contact to receipt of the signed consent form was 24 (10 to 38) days, and from FOBT kit mail-out to receipt at the laboratory was 23 (18 to 32) days. With the exception of previous cancer diagnosis, patient characteristics were not associated with feasibility indicators. Of the 115 (46.0%) patients determined to be ineligible for FOBT screening, 111 (96.5%) were up to date with or

  8. 'Smashed by the National Health'? A Closer Look at the Demise of the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham.

    PubMed

    Conford, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Pioneer Health Centre, based in South London before and after the Second World War, remains a source of interest for advocates of a positive approach to health promotion in contrast with the treatment of those already ill. Its closure in 1950 for lack of funds has been blamed on the then recently established National Health Service, but this article argues that such an explanation is over-simplified and ignores a number of other factors. The Centre had struggled financially during the 1930s and tried to gain support from the Medical Research Council. The Council appeared interested in the Centre before the war, but was less sympathetic in the 1940s. Around the time of its closure and afterwards, the Centre was also involved in negotiations with London County Council; these failed because the Centre's directors would not accept the changes which the Council would have needed to make. Unpublished documents reveal that the Centre's directors were uncompromising and that their approach to the situation antagonised their colleagues. Changes in medical science also worked against the Centre. The success of sulphonamide drugs appeared to render preventive medicine less significant, while the development of statistical techniques cast doubt on the Centre's experimental methods. The Centre was at the heart of the nascent organic farming movement, which opposed the rapid growth of chemical cultivation. But what might be termed 'chemical triumphalism' was on the march in both medicine and agriculture, and the Centre was out of tune with the mood of the times. PMID:26971599

  9. Hardware design of the cortical-diencephalic centre of the lower urinary tract neuroregulator system.

    PubMed

    Maciá-Pérez, Francisco; Zambrano-Mendez, Leandro; Berna-Martínez, José-Vicente; Sepúlveda-Lima, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The neuroregulator system in humans controls organ and system functioning. This system comprises a set of neural centres that are distributed along the spinal cord and act independently together with their nerve interconnections. The centres involved in this task were isolated in previous studies through investigations of the functioning and composition of the neuroregulator system of the lower urinary tract to elucidate their individual performances and enable the creation of a general neuroregulator system model capable of operating at the neuronal level. Although the long-term goal of our research is the development of a system on chip (SoC) capable of behaving as a fully programmable neuroregulator system, this work is another step in which we test the viability of the hardware design of one of these neuroregulator centres (specifically the cortical-diencephalic centre) to achieve a first prototype and architectural proposal. To this end, the behaviour of this centre has been isolated, a hardware design implemented on FPGA has been proposed to create a prototype, a simulation environment has been built for the evaluation, and finally, the results have been analysed. This system verified that the functional behaviour corresponded to the expected behaviour in humans and that the operational requirements for the implementation were technically and architecturally viable.

  10. Wiener index on rows of unit cells of the face-centred cubic lattice.

    PubMed

    Mujahed, Hamzeh; Nagy, Benedek

    2016-03-01

    The Wiener index of a connected graph, known as the `sum of distances', is the first topological index used in chemistry to sum the distances between all unordered pairs of vertices of a graph. The Wiener index, sometimes called the Wiener number, is one of the indices associated with a molecular graph that correlates physical and chemical properties of the molecule, and has been studied for various kinds of graphs. In this paper, the graphs of lines of unit cells of the face-centred cubic lattice are investigated. This lattice is one of the simplest, the most symmetric and the most usual, cubic crystal lattices. Its graphs contain face centres of the unit cells and other vertices, called cube vertices. Closed formulae are obtained to calculate the sum of shortest distances between pairs of cube vertices, between cube vertices and face centres and between pairs of face centres. Based on these formulae, their sum, the Wiener index of a face-centred cubic lattice with unit cells connected in a row graph, is computed.

  11. Functionalised Oximes: Emergent Precursors for Carbon-, Nitrogen- and Oxygen-Centred Radicals.

    PubMed

    Walton, John C

    2016-01-07

    Oxime derivatives are easily made, are non-hazardous and have long shelf lives. They contain weak N-O bonds that undergo homolytic scission, on appropriate thermal or photochemical stimulus, to initially release a pair of N- and O-centred radicals. This article reviews the use of these precursors for studying the structures, reactions and kinetics of the released radicals. Two classes have been exploited for radical generation; one comprises carbonyl oximes, principally oxime esters and amides, and the second comprises oxime ethers. Both classes release an iminyl radical together with an equal amount of a second oxygen-centred radical. The O-centred radicals derived from carbonyl oximes decarboxylate giving access to a variety of carbon-centred and nitrogen-centred species. Methods developed for homolytically dissociating the oxime derivatives include UV irradiation, conventional thermal and microwave heating. Photoredox catalytic methods succeed well with specially functionalised oximes and this aspect is also reviewed. Attention is also drawn to the key contributions made by EPR spectroscopy, aided by DFT computations, in elucidating the structures and dynamics of the transient intermediates.

  12. Overlapping spreading centres: new accretion geometry on the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ken C.

    1983-03-01

    In a detailed Seabeam investigation of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) from 8°N to 18°N, a new kind of volcano-tectonic geometry associated with fast-spreading centres has been discovered (Figs 1, 2). At several locations along the rise axis the neovolcanic zone is discontinuous, and is laterally offset a short distance (1-15 km). In contrast to a classic ridge-transform-ridge plate boundary, however, the offset ridge terminations overlap each other by a distance approximately equal to or greater than the offset. They curve sharply towards each other and often merge into one another along strike. Separating the overlapping spreading centres (OSCs) is a closed contour depression up to several hundred metres deep which is sub-parallel to the trend of the OSCs. The region between the OSCs is a complex zone of both shear and rotational deformation with no obvious transform parallel structures. Based on wax model studies of spreading centres, we suggest here that transform faults fail to develop at fast spreading centres where the lateral offsets are small (<15 km), because the lithosphere is too thin and weak to maintain a classic, rigid plate spreading centre-transform fault pattern. The OSC geometry is unstable and evolves rapidly. One of the two OSCs prevails while the other is abandoned. A significant area of sea floor created at fast spreading rates may bear the imprint of this newly observed process.

  13. Conducting a paediatric multi-centre RCT with an industry partner: challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Jessica; Newcombe, Peter; Martin, Graham; Kimble, Roy

    2012-11-01

    There are many benefits of multi-centred research including large sample sizes, statistical power, timely recruitment and generalisability of results. However, there are numerous considerations when planning and implementing a multi-centred study. This article reviews the challenges and successes of planning and implementing a multi-centred prospective randomised control trial involving an industry partner. The research investigated the impact on psychosocial functioning of a cosmetic camouflage product for children and adolescents with burn scarring. Multi-centred studies commonly have many stakeholders. Within this study, six Australian and New Zealand paediatric burn units as well as an industry partner were involved. The inclusion of an industry partner added complexities as they brought different priorities and expectations to the research. Further, multifaceted ethical and institutional approval processes needed to be negotiated. The challenges, successes, lessons learned and recommendations from this study regarding Australian and New Zealand ethics and research governance approval processes, collaboration with industry partners and the management of differing expectations will be outlined. Recommendations for future multi-centred research with industry partners include provision of regular written reports for the industry partner; continual monitoring and prompt resolution of concerns; basic research practices education for industry partners; minimisation of industry partner contact with participants; clear roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders and utilisation of single ethical review if available.

  14. Exergaming in retirement centres and the integration of media and physical literacies.

    PubMed

    Millington, Brad

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on a multi-method analysis of a recently emergent, though still understudied, trend: the use of exercise-themed video games (i.e., 'exergames') in retirement centres. The study in question specifically featured participant observation and interviews with residents and members of staff at retirement centres in Ontario, Canada. Data collection was aimed at understanding how games such as Wii Bowling are being put to use in retirement centre contexts and the implications of such activity. Findings on the one hand suggest that exergames are deemed valuable in the process of promoting both social engagement and physical activity. 'Virtual' bowling can bring people together in communal spaces while also 'getting them up' and active. On the other hand, however, exergaming presents challenges. For retirement centre residents, it engenders health risks while also demanding the deft synchronization of media and physical literacies. For activities coordinators and other members of staff responsible for residents' care, it means they too must stay abreast of the technology sector's latest innovations; they must develop media and physical literacies of their own. These findings are used as a platform for a broader discussion of aging, embodiment, and media in the paper's final section. Against the backdrop of existing conceptualizations of the third age, the use of exergames in retirement centres is deemed conducive not to independence and consumerism fully-fledged, but rather to the manifestation of 'quasi-consumerism' and 'quasi-independence' instead. Third age logic is thus both reinforced and subtly undermined. PMID:26568225

  15. Functionalised Oximes: Emergent Precursors for Carbon-, Nitrogen- and Oxygen-Centred Radicals.

    PubMed

    Walton, John C

    2016-01-01

    Oxime derivatives are easily made, are non-hazardous and have long shelf lives. They contain weak N-O bonds that undergo homolytic scission, on appropriate thermal or photochemical stimulus, to initially release a pair of N- and O-centred radicals. This article reviews the use of these precursors for studying the structures, reactions and kinetics of the released radicals. Two classes have been exploited for radical generation; one comprises carbonyl oximes, principally oxime esters and amides, and the second comprises oxime ethers. Both classes release an iminyl radical together with an equal amount of a second oxygen-centred radical. The O-centred radicals derived from carbonyl oximes decarboxylate giving access to a variety of carbon-centred and nitrogen-centred species. Methods developed for homolytically dissociating the oxime derivatives include UV irradiation, conventional thermal and microwave heating. Photoredox catalytic methods succeed well with specially functionalised oximes and this aspect is also reviewed. Attention is also drawn to the key contributions made by EPR spectroscopy, aided by DFT computations, in elucidating the structures and dynamics of the transient intermediates. PMID:26751437

  16. Wiener index on rows of unit cells of the face-centred cubic lattice.

    PubMed

    Mujahed, Hamzeh; Nagy, Benedek

    2016-03-01

    The Wiener index of a connected graph, known as the `sum of distances', is the first topological index used in chemistry to sum the distances between all unordered pairs of vertices of a graph. The Wiener index, sometimes called the Wiener number, is one of the indices associated with a molecular graph that correlates physical and chemical properties of the molecule, and has been studied for various kinds of graphs. In this paper, the graphs of lines of unit cells of the face-centred cubic lattice are investigated. This lattice is one of the simplest, the most symmetric and the most usual, cubic crystal lattices. Its graphs contain face centres of the unit cells and other vertices, called cube vertices. Closed formulae are obtained to calculate the sum of shortest distances between pairs of cube vertices, between cube vertices and face centres and between pairs of face centres. Based on these formulae, their sum, the Wiener index of a face-centred cubic lattice with unit cells connected in a row graph, is computed. PMID:26919376

  17. Exergaming in retirement centres and the integration of media and physical literacies.

    PubMed

    Millington, Brad

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on a multi-method analysis of a recently emergent, though still understudied, trend: the use of exercise-themed video games (i.e., 'exergames') in retirement centres. The study in question specifically featured participant observation and interviews with residents and members of staff at retirement centres in Ontario, Canada. Data collection was aimed at understanding how games such as Wii Bowling are being put to use in retirement centre contexts and the implications of such activity. Findings on the one hand suggest that exergames are deemed valuable in the process of promoting both social engagement and physical activity. 'Virtual' bowling can bring people together in communal spaces while also 'getting them up' and active. On the other hand, however, exergaming presents challenges. For retirement centre residents, it engenders health risks while also demanding the deft synchronization of media and physical literacies. For activities coordinators and other members of staff responsible for residents' care, it means they too must stay abreast of the technology sector's latest innovations; they must develop media and physical literacies of their own. These findings are used as a platform for a broader discussion of aging, embodiment, and media in the paper's final section. Against the backdrop of existing conceptualizations of the third age, the use of exergames in retirement centres is deemed conducive not to independence and consumerism fully-fledged, but rather to the manifestation of 'quasi-consumerism' and 'quasi-independence' instead. Third age logic is thus both reinforced and subtly undermined.

  18. Presence of contagious agalactia causing mycoplasmas in Spanish goat artificial insemination centres.

    PubMed

    Amores, J; Gómez-Martín, A; Corrales, J C; Sánchez, A; Contreras, A; De la Fe, C

    2011-04-15

    Male goats admitted to artificial insemination centres come from herds that have shown no clinical symptoms of contagious agalactia (CA) for the last 6 mo. However, prior reports suggest that this control measure may not be completely effective. This study was designed to detect the presence of CA-causing mycoplasmas in 9 Spanish centres, comprising 159 goats (147 males and 12 teaser does) of 8 different breeds. A microbiological study was conducted during 8 mo on 448 samples (318 ear swabs, 119 semen samples and 11 milk samples). In 86 samples (84 swabs, 1 semen sample and 1 milk sample), CA-causative mycoplasmas were detected by PCR or culture, and 52 animals (49 goat males and 3 teaser does) tested positive. Most of these positive animals were auricular carriers (n = 50), mainly of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc), although some M. agalactiae (Ma) and, interestingly, M. capricolum subsp. capricolum (Mcc) carriers were also identified. At least 1 animal infected by CA-causing mycoplasmas was detected in 8 of the 9 centres (88.8%) although in most (66.7%) no infected animals or only 1 or 2 positive animals were identified. Our results indicate the presence of CA carriers as asymptomatic animals in reproductive programmes. These findings have already prompted efficient measures to detect and avoid the entry of these carriers in Spanish centres. We recommend similar measures for all centres in areas where CA is endemic.

  19. Person-centred care: clarifying the concept in the context of inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Zingmark, Karin

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports an analysis of the concept of person-centred care in the context of inpatient psychiatry. It has been suggested that person-centred care in inpatient psychiatry might differ from person-centred care in other contexts, indicating a need to clarify the concept in this specific context. Scholarly papers from health-related disciplines were identified following a systematic search of the electronic databases CINAHL, PUBMED and PsycINFO, covering records indexed up until March 2014. An evolutionary approach to concept analysis was applied, integrating principles for data extraction and analysis in integrative reviews. The concept of person-centred care was defined as cultural, relational and recovery-oriented. It aspires to improve care and calls for a transformation of inpatient psychiatry. The concept is closely related to the concepts of recovery and interpersonal nursing. The result is described in terms of attributes, antecedents, consequences and related concepts. It is concluded that the further development of the concept needs to consider the contexts of the concept at both conceptual and praxis levels. Further research should explore the nature of and relationships between context, culture, care practice and outcomes in inpatient psychiatry from a perspective of person-centred care. The results of this analysis can provide a framework for such research.

  20. Photoelectric detection of electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, E.; Jarmola, A.; Siyushev, P.; Gulka, M.; Hruby, J.; Jelezko, F.; Budker, D.; Nesladek, M.

    2015-01-01

    The readout of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centre electron spins is essential for applications in quantum computation, metrology and sensing. Conventional readout protocols are based on the detection of photons emitted from nitrogen-vacancy centres, a process limited by the efficiency of photon collection. We report on an alternative principle for detecting the magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centres, allowing the direct photoelectric readout of nitrogen-vacancy centres spin state in an all-diamond device. The photocurrent detection of magnetic resonance scheme is based on the detection of charge carriers promoted to the conduction band of diamond by two-photon ionization of nitrogen-vacancy centres. The optical and photoelectric detection of magnetic resonance are compared, by performing both types of measurements simultaneously. The minima detected in the measured photocurrent at resonant microwave frequencies are attributed to the spin-dependent ionization dynamics of nitrogen-vacancy, originating from spin-selective non-radiative transitions to the metastable singlet state. PMID:26486014

  1. Short-stay daycare laparoscopic cholecystectomy at a dedicated daycare centre: Feasible or futile

    PubMed Central

    Zirpe, Dinesh; Swain, Sudeepta K.; Das, Somak; Gopakumar, CV; Kollu, Sriharsha; Patel, Darshan; Patta, Radhakrishna; Balachandar, Tirupporur G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the last decade, laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has become a regular daycare surgery at many centres across the world. However, only a few centres in India have a dedicated daycare surgery centre, and very few of them have reported their experience. Concerns remain regarding the feasibility, safety and acceptability of the introduction of daycare laparoscopic cholecystectomy (DCLC) in India. There is a need to assess the safety and acceptability of the implementation of short-stay DCLC service at a centre completely dedicated to daycare surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Comprehensive care and operative data were retrospectively collected from a daycare centre of our hospital. Postoperative recovery was monitored by telephone questionnaire on days 0, 1 and 5 postoperatively, including adverse outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 211 patients were admitted for DCLC during the period from November 2011 till November 2014, of whom 211 were discharged on the day of surgery. Two hundred and two patients could be discharged within 6 h of surgery. Mean operation time was 72 min. No patient required admission. No patient needed conversion to open surgery. Only 1 patient was re-admitted due to bilioma formation and was managed with minimal intervention. CONCLUSION: The introduction of short-stay DCLC in India is feasible and acceptable to patients. High body mass index (BMI) in otherwise healthy patients and selective additional procedures are not contraindications for DCLC. PMID:27251816

  2. Educational inequalities in patient-centred care: patients' preferences and experiences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Educational attainment is strongly related to specific health outcomes. The pathway in which individual patient-provider interactions contribute to (re)producing these inequalities has yet to be studied. In this article, the focus is on differences between less and more highly educated patients in their preferences for and experiences with patient-centred care., e.g. shared decision making, receiving understandable explanations and being able to ask questions. Methods Data are derived from several Consumer Quality-index (CQ-index) studies. The CQ-index is a family of standardized instruments which are used in the Netherlands to measure quality of care from the patient’s perspective. Results The educational level of patients is directly related to the degree of importance patients attribute to specific aspects of patient-centred care. It has a minor influence on the experienced level of shared decision making, but not on experiences regarding other aspects of patient-centred care. Conclusions All patients regard patient-centred care as important and report positive experiences. However, there is a discrepancy between patient preferences for patient-centred care on one hand and the care received on the other. Less educated patients might receive ‘too much’, and more highly educated patients ‘too little’ in the domains of communication, information and shared decision making. PMID:22900589

  3. Person-centred rehabilitation: what exactly does it mean? Protocol for a scoping review with thematic analysis towards framing the concept and practice of person-centred rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Felicity; Kayes, Nicola; Cott, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Person-centredness is a philosophy for organising and delivering healthcare based on patients’ needs, preferences and experiences. Although widely endorsed, the concept suffers from a lack of detail and clarification, in turn accounting for ambiguous implementation and outcomes. While a conceptual framework based on a systematic review defines person/patient-centred care components (Scholl et al, 2014), it applies across healthcare contexts and may not be sensitive to the nuances of the rehabilitation of adults with physical impairments. Accordingly, this study aims to build a conceptual framework, based on existing literature, of what person-centredness means in the rehabilitation of adults with physical impairments in the clinical encounter and broader health service delivery. Methods and analysis We will use a scoping review methodology. Searches on relevant databases will be conducted first, combining keywords for ‘rehabilitation’, ‘person-centered’ and associated terms (including patient preferences/experiences). Next, snowball searches (citation tracking, references lists) will be performed. Papers will be included if they fall within predefined selection categories (seen as most likely informative on elements pertaining to person-centred rehabilitation) and are written in English, regardless of design (conceptual, qualitative, quantitative). Two reviewers will independently screen titles and abstracts, followed by screening of the full text to determine inclusion. Experts will then be consulted to identify relevant missing papers. This can include elements other than the peer-reviewed literature (eg, book chapters, policy/legal papers). Finally, information that helps to build the concept and practice of person-centred rehabilitation will be abstracted independently by two reviewers and analysed by inductive thematic analysis to build the conceptual framework. Dissemination The resulting framework will aid clarification regarding

  4. Assessment and determinants of airborne bacterial and fungal concentrations in different indoor environments: Homes, child day-care centres, primary schools and elderly care centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João Cavaleiro; Pereira, Cristiana; Teixeira, João Paulo; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    Until now the influence of risk factors resulting from exposure to biological agents in indoor air has been far less studied than outdoor pollution; therefore the uncertainty of health risks, and how to effectively prevent these, remains. This study aimed (i) to quantify airborne cultivable bacterial and fungal concentrations in four different types of indoor environment as well as to identify the recovered fungi; (ii) to assess the impact of outdoor bacterial and fungal concentrations on indoor air; (iii) to investigate the influence of carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature and relative humidity on bacterial and fungal concentrations; and (iv) to estimate bacterial and fungal dose rate for children (3-5 years old and 8-10 years old) in comparison with the elderly. Air samples were collected in 68 homes, 9 child day-care centres, 20 primary schools and 22 elderly care centres, in a total of 264 rooms with a microbiological air sampler and using tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar culture media for bacteria and fungi growth, respectively. For each building, one outdoor representative location were identified and simultaneously studied. The results showed that child day-care centres were the indoor microenvironment with the highest median bacterial and fungal concentrations (3870 CFU/m3 and 415 CFU/m3, respectively), whereas the lowest median concentrations were observed in elderly care centres (222 CFU/m3 and 180 CFU/m3, respectively). Indoor bacterial concentrations were significantly higher than outdoor concentrations (p < 0.05); whereas the indoor/outdoor ratios for the obtained fungal concentrations were approximately around the unit. Indoor CO2 levels were associated with the bacterial concentration, probably due to occupancy and insufficient ventilation. Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most frequently occurring fungi. Children's had two times higher dose rate to biological pollutants when compared to adult individuals. Thus, due to children

  5. Demonstration of asymmetric electron conduction in pseudosymmetrical photosynthetic reaction centre proteins in an electrical circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran, Muhammad; Friebe, Vincent M.; Delgado, Juan D.; Aartsma, Thijs J.; Frese, Raoul N.; Jones, Michael R.

    2015-03-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres show promise for biomolecular electronics as nanoscale solar-powered batteries and molecular diodes that are amenable to atomic-level re-engineering. In this work the mechanism of electron conduction across the highly tractable Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre is characterized by conductive atomic force microscopy. We find, using engineered proteins of known structure, that only one of the two cofactor wires connecting the positive and negative termini of this reaction centre is capable of conducting unidirectional current under a suitably oriented bias, irrespective of the magnitude of the bias or the applied force at the tunnelling junction. This behaviour, strong functional asymmetry in a largely symmetrical protein-cofactor matrix, recapitulates the strong functional asymmetry characteristic of natural photochemical charge separation, but it is surprising given that the stimulus for electron flow is simply an externally applied bias. Reasons for the electrical resistance displayed by the so-called B-wire of cofactors are explored.

  6. 'Just send them all to a burn centre': managing burn resources in a mass casualty incident.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Kathe M; Martin, Shawn

    2011-06-01

    Burn experts estimate that 20-30 per cent of injuries from mass casualty events result in serious burns, many requiring specialised care only available at burn centres. Yet, in the USA there are less then 1,850 burn beds available to provide such a level and quality of care. To address this concern, burn centres are beginning to put into practice new mass casualty triage and transport guidelines that must coordinate with local, regional and federal response plans, while still adhering to an accepted standard of care. This presentation describes how one US burn centre developed and implemented a Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) designed mass casualty incident (MCI) exercise focused on coordinating 'the right patient to the right facility at the right time', based upon acuity and bed availability. Discussion will enable planners to identify methodologies adaptable for incorporation into catastrophic emergency management operations within their regions.

  7. Integrating public health and medical intelligence gathering into homeland security fusion centres.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Brienne; Albanese, Joseph; Halstead, William; Schlegelmilch, Jeffrey; Paturas, James

    Homeland security fusion centres serve to gather, analyse and share threat-related information among all levels of governments and law enforcement agencies. In order to function effectively, fusion centres must employ people with the necessary competencies to understand the nature of the threat facing a community, discriminate between important information and irrelevant or merely interesting facts and apply domain knowledge to interpret the results to obviate or reduce the existing danger. Public health and medical sector personnel routinely gather, analyse and relay health-related inform-ation, including health security risks, associated with the detection of suspicious biological or chemical agents within a community to law enforcement agencies. This paper provides a rationale for the integration of public health and medical personnel in fusion centres and describes their role in assisting law enforcement agencies, public health organisations and the medical sector to respond to natural or intentional threats against local communities, states or the nation as a whole.

  8. Spectral behaviour of bismuth centres in different steps of the FCVD process

    SciTech Connect

    Zlenko, Alexander S; Mashinsky, Valerii M; Iskhakova, L D; Ermakov, R P; Semjonov, S L; Koltashev, V V

    2013-07-31

    The behaviour of bismuth ions in silica glass free of other dopants has been studied in different steps of the furnace chemical vapour deposition (FCVD) process. Porous layers annealed and consolidated in different atmospheres, a bismuth chloride solution in acetone for porous layer impregnation, the resultant glass preform and holey fibres drawn out under various conditions have been characterised by spectroscopic techniques and X-ray diffraction. Active bismuth centres present in the preform and luminescing in the visible and IR spectral regions persist during drawing under reducing conditions, whereas drawing under oxidising conditions eliminates such centres. Annealing under reducing conditions produces absorption bands of IR-emitting bismuth centres (IRBCs) in spectra of fibres drawn out under oxidising conditions and concurrently increases the background loss. Under the annealing conditions of this study (argon atmosphere, T{sub max} = 1100 Degree-Sign C, 30 min), the IRBC concentration reaches a maximum and then decreases, whereas the background loss increases monotonically. (fiber optics)

  9. Doping strategies to control A-centres in silicon: insights from hybrid density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Chroneos, A; Londos, C A; Sgourou, E N; Schwingenschlögl, U

    2014-05-14

    Hybrid density functional theory is used to gain insights into the interaction of intrinsic vacancies (V) and oxygen-vacancy pairs (VO, known as A-centres) with the dopants (D) germanium (Ge), tin (Sn), and lead (Pb) in silicon (Si). We determine the structures as well as binding and formation energies of the DVO and DV complexes. The results are discussed in terms of the density of states and in view of the potential of isovalent doping to control A-centres in Si. We argue that doping with Sn is the most efficient isovalent doping strategy to suppress A-centres by the formation of SnVO complexes, as these are charge neutral and strongly bound.

  10. Users' perceptions of an African and Caribbean mental health resource centre.

    PubMed

    Secker, Jenny; Harding, Caroline

    2002-07-01

    It has been suggested that well-documented differences in African and African-Caribbean people's contact with mental health services may stem from a spiral of disaffection, reluctance to seek help and re-admission to hospital in times of crisis. In 1997, an African and Caribbean mental health resource centre was established in the London borough of Kensington and Chelsea with the aim of ensuring that the needs of this group were better met. As part of an evaluation of the study, interviews were carried out with 26 clients of the resource centre. This article presents their perceptions of the service provided and its impact on their lives. The clients' accounts indicate that the resource centre was providing a valued service that was successful in reducing their sense of social isolation, enabling them to address issues of identity and self-worth associated with racism and working with other service providers to better meet their needs.

  11. Ultrafast electronic readout of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres coupled to graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneis, Andreas; Gaudreau, Louis; Seifert, Max; Karl, Helmut; Brandt, Martin S.; Huebl, Hans; Garrido, Jose A.; Koppens, Frank H. L.; Holleitner, Alexander W.

    2015-02-01

    Non-radiative transfer processes are often regarded as loss channels for an optical emitter because they are inherently difficult to access experimentally. Recently, it has been shown that emitters, such as fluorophores and nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, can exhibit a strong non-radiative energy transfer to graphene. So far, the energy of the transferred electronic excitations has been considered to be lost within the electron bath of the graphene. Here we demonstrate that the transferred excitations can be read out by detecting corresponding currents with a picosecond time resolution. We detect electronically the spin of nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond and control the non-radiative transfer to graphene by electron spin resonance. Our results open the avenue for incorporating nitrogen-vacancy centres into ultrafast electronic circuits and for harvesting non-radiative transfer processes electronically.

  12. Using practice development methodology to develop children's centre teams: ideas for the future.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Ann; Cowdell, Fiona

    2009-09-01

    The Children's Centre Programme is a recent development in the UK and brings together multi-agency teams to work with disadvantaged families. Practice development methods enable teams to work together in new ways. Although the term practice development remains relatively poorly defined, its key properties suggest that it embraces engagement, empowerment, evaluation and evolution. This paper introduces the Children's Centre Programme and practice development methods and aims to discuss the relevance of using this method to develop teams in children's centres through considering the findings from an evaluation of a two-year project to develop inter-agency public health teams. The evaluation showed that practice development methods can enable successful team development and showed that through effective facilitation, teams can change their practice to focus on areas of local need. The team came up with their own process to develop a strategy for their locality. PMID:19788167

  13. An automatic method for determining the centre of rotation of a mechanically scanned reflection UCT system.

    PubMed

    Jago, J R

    1994-12-01

    A method will be described for determining the centre of rotation of a mechanically scanned reflection ultrasound computed tomography system. It is based on the principle of obtaining opposing images of a test object containing many point targets. The method is automatic in the sense that the centre of rotation is calculated by a computer without the need for an operator to make direct measurements on the mechanical system. For the particular reflection UCT system described here, the centre of rotation is obtained in 3-5 min with a repeatability (+/-2 SD) of +/-0.3 mm. Ways in which even higher accuracy can be obtained are discussed. The basic principle of the method is applicable to any concentric imaging system for which a good approximation to an ideal point target can be produced.

  14. Demonstration of asymmetric electron conduction in pseudosymmetrical photosynthetic reaction centre proteins in an electrical circuit

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Muhammad; Friebe, Vincent M.; Delgado, Juan D.; Aartsma, Thijs J.; Frese, Raoul N.; Jones, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres show promise for biomolecular electronics as nanoscale solar-powered batteries and molecular diodes that are amenable to atomic-level re-engineering. In this work the mechanism of electron conduction across the highly tractable Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre is characterized by conductive atomic force microscopy. We find, using engineered proteins of known structure, that only one of the two cofactor wires connecting the positive and negative termini of this reaction centre is capable of conducting unidirectional current under a suitably oriented bias, irrespective of the magnitude of the bias or the applied force at the tunnelling junction. This behaviour, strong functional asymmetry in a largely symmetrical protein–cofactor matrix, recapitulates the strong functional asymmetry characteristic of natural photochemical charge separation, but it is surprising given that the stimulus for electron flow is simply an externally applied bias. Reasons for the electrical resistance displayed by the so-called B-wire of cofactors are explored. PMID:25751412

  15. A birth centre's encounters with discourses of childbirth: how resistance led to innovation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Denis J

    2007-03-01

    An ethnographic study of a free-standing birth centre uncovered a site of intense contestation. Two prominent childbirth discourses attempting to inscribe their orthodoxies on staff and women users encountered stern and persistent resistance. Using postmodern theory, this resistance is conceptualised as nomadic activity, as space is made at the margins of discourse for a difference and diversity to manifest. The relationship between discourse and women's agency is layered and non-linear as the presence of dissonant data indicates. The birth centre, however, actualises a number of contrasting ways of 'being' and 'doing' that appear to serve the interests of staff and women well. In particular, 'nomadic' midwifery practice and a 'care as gift' orientation challenges the biomedical model that defines the parameters of normal and the 'vigil of care' discourse that regulates the professional/patient relationship. Birth centres may encourage novel and eclectic ways of providing childbirth care.

  16. The role of the APM centre to support Columbus Precursor Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rum, Giovanni; Canu, Claudio; Battocchio, Luciano; Cardano, Mario

    1993-03-01

    The APM Centre will be one of the most important European ground facilities for the support of the Columbus Attached Laboratory: it will act as system reference, it will support the on-board operations through the engineering and logistics support functions and it will play a key-role for the payload integration, performing both the payload analytical integration and the final acceptance of the Payload Elements before shipping to the U.S. for the integration on the Logistic Carrier. As the Spacelab mission E-1 is a Columbus Precursor Flight, it will be a unique opportunity to test at least two of the main functions of the APM Centre, namely the payload integration support and the engineering support. This paper describes in detail the above mentioned tasks performed by the APM Centre in the frame of Spacelab mission E-1, making comparison to the corresponding Columbus activities, as applicable.

  17. The daily life of a medium-size Data Centre. The CAB astronomical data center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    The Centro de Astrobiología (CAB) Data Centre is the most important astronomical data centre managed by a Spanish institution. Among others, it contains the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and the Calar Alto (CAHA) scientific archives. Nevertheless, our activities go well beyond data curation. Generation of high level data products (reduced datasets, catalogues,...), knowledge transfer to other Spanish data centres, development of tools to publish astronomical data in VO-compliant archives and services, development of data mining and analysis tools for an optimum scientific exploitation of our data collections and collaboration with scientific groups with research lines using CAB archive data are some of the topics that will be described in this presentation.

  18. Cheminformatics Research at the Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics Cambridge

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E; Bender, Andreas; Glen, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Molecular Informatics, formerly Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics (UCMSI), at the University of Cambridge is a world-leading driving force in the field of cheminformatics. Since its opening in 2000 more than 300 scientific articles have fundamentally changed the field of molecular informatics. The Centre has been a key player in promoting open chemical data and semantic access. Though mainly focussing on basic research, close collaborations with industrial partners ensured real world feedback and access to high quality molecular data. A variety of tools and standard protocols have been developed and are ubiquitous in the daily practice of cheminformatics. Here, we present a retrospective of cheminformatics research performed at the UCMSI, thereby highlighting historical and recent trends in the field as well as indicating future directions. PMID:26435758

  19. A person-centred segmentation study in elderly care: towards efficient demand-driven care.

    PubMed

    Eissens van der Laan, M R; van Offenbeek, M A G; Broekhuis, H; Slaets, J P J

    2014-07-01

    Providing patients with more person-centred care without increasing costs is a key challenge in healthcare. A relevant but often ignored hindrance to delivering person-centred care is that the current segmentation of the population and the associated organization of healthcare supply are based on diseases. A person-centred segmentation, i.e., based on persons' own experienced difficulties in fulfilling needs, is an elementary but often overlooked first step in developing efficient demand-driven care. This paper describes a person-centred segmentation study of elderly, a large and increasing target group confronted with heterogeneous and often interrelated difficulties in their functioning. In twenty-five diverse healthcare and welfare organizations as well as elderly associations in the Netherlands, data were collected on the difficulties in biopsychosocial functioning experienced by 2019 older adults. Data were collected between March 2010 and January 2011 and sampling took place based on their (temporarily) living conditions. Factor Mixture Model was conducted to categorize the respondents into segments with relatively similar experienced difficulties concerning their functioning. First, the analyses show that older adults can be empirically categorized into five meaningful segments: feeling vital; difficulties with psychosocial coping; physical and mobility complaints; difficulties experienced in multiple domains; and feeling extremely frail. The categorization seems robust as it was replicated in two population-based samples in the Netherlands. The segmentation's usefulness is discussed and illustrated through an evaluation of the alignment between a segment's unfulfilled biopsychosocial needs and current healthcare utilization. The set of person-centred segmentation variables provides healthcare providers the option to perform a more comprehensive first triage step than only a disease-based one. The outcomes of this first step could guide a focused and

  20. A person-centred segmentation study in elderly care: towards efficient demand-driven care.

    PubMed

    Eissens van der Laan, M R; van Offenbeek, M A G; Broekhuis, H; Slaets, J P J

    2014-07-01

    Providing patients with more person-centred care without increasing costs is a key challenge in healthcare. A relevant but often ignored hindrance to delivering person-centred care is that the current segmentation of the population and the associated organization of healthcare supply are based on diseases. A person-centred segmentation, i.e., based on persons' own experienced difficulties in fulfilling needs, is an elementary but often overlooked first step in developing efficient demand-driven care. This paper describes a person-centred segmentation study of elderly, a large and increasing target group confronted with heterogeneous and often interrelated difficulties in their functioning. In twenty-five diverse healthcare and welfare organizations as well as elderly associations in the Netherlands, data were collected on the difficulties in biopsychosocial functioning experienced by 2019 older adults. Data were collected between March 2010 and January 2011 and sampling took place based on their (temporarily) living conditions. Factor Mixture Model was conducted to categorize the respondents into segments with relatively similar experienced difficulties concerning their functioning. First, the analyses show that older adults can be empirically categorized into five meaningful segments: feeling vital; difficulties with psychosocial coping; physical and mobility complaints; difficulties experienced in multiple domains; and feeling extremely frail. The categorization seems robust as it was replicated in two population-based samples in the Netherlands. The segmentation's usefulness is discussed and illustrated through an evaluation of the alignment between a segment's unfulfilled biopsychosocial needs and current healthcare utilization. The set of person-centred segmentation variables provides healthcare providers the option to perform a more comprehensive first triage step than only a disease-based one. The outcomes of this first step could guide a focused and

  1. Processes of patient-centred care in Family Health Teams: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; Ryan, Bridget L.; Thorpe, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient-centred care, access to care, and continuity of and coordination of care are core processes in primary health care delivery. Our objective was to evaluate how these processes are enacted by 1 primary care model, Family Health Teams, in Ontario. Methods: Our study used grounded theory methodology to examine these 4 processes of care from the perspective of health care providers. Twenty Family Health Team practice sites in Ontario were selected to represent maximum variation (e.g., location, year of Family Health Team approval). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with each participant. A constant comparative approach was used to analyze the data. Results: Our final sample population involved 110 participants from 20 Family Health Teams. Participants described how their Family Health Team strived to provide patient-centred care, to ensure access, and to pursue continuity and coordination in their delivery of care. Patient-centred care was provided through a variety of means forging the links among the other processes of care. Participants from all teams articulated a commitment to timely access, spontaneously expressing the importance of access to mental health services. Continuity of care was linked to both access and patient-centred care. Coordination of care by the team was perceived to reduce unnecessary walk-in clinic and emergency department visits, and facilitated a smoother transition from hospital to home. Interpretation: These 4 processes of patient care were inextricably linked. Patient-centred care was the focal point, and these processes in turn served to enhance the delivery of patient-centred care. PMID:27398373

  2. Technical efficiency of public district hospitals and health centres in Ghana: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Daniel; d'Almeida, Selassi; George, Melvill O; Kirigia, Joses M; Mensah, Ayayi Omar; Kainyu, Lenity H

    2005-01-01

    Background The Government of Ghana has been implementing various health sector reforms (e.g. user fees in public health facilities, decentralization, sector-wide approaches to donor coordination) in a bid to improve efficiency in health care. However, to date, except for the pilot study reported in this paper, no attempt has been made to make an estimate of the efficiency of hospitals and/or health centres in Ghana. The objectives of this study, based on data collected in 2000, were: (i) to estimate the relative technical efficiency (TE) and scale efficiency (SE) of a sample of public hospitals and health centres in Ghana; and (ii) to demonstrate policy implications for health sector policy-makers. Methods The Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) approach was used to estimate the efficiency of 17 district hospitals and 17 health centres. This was an exploratory study. Results Eight (47%) hospitals were technically inefficient, with an average TE score of 61% and a standard deviation (STD) of 12%. Ten (59%) hospitals were scale inefficient, manifesting an average SE of 81% (STD = 25%). Out of the 17 health centres, 3 (18%) were technically inefficient, with a mean TE score of 49% (STD = 27%). Eight health centres (47%) were scale inefficient, with an average SE score of 84% (STD = 16%). Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated to policy-makers the versatility of DEA in measuring inefficiencies among individual facilities and inputs. There is a need for the Planning and Budgeting Unit of the Ghana Health Services to continually monitor the productivity growth, allocative efficiency and technical efficiency of all its health facilities (hospitals and health centres) in the course of the implementation of health sector reforms. PMID:16188021

  3. Understanding the dynamic interactions driving Zambian health centre performance: a case-based health systems analysis

    PubMed Central

    Topp, Stephanie M; Chipukuma, Julien M; Hanefeld, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite being central to achieving improved population health outcomes, primary health centres in low- and middle-income settings continue to underperform. Little research exists to adequately explain how and why this is the case. This study aimed to test the relevance and usefulness of an adapted conceptual framework for improving our understanding of the mechanisms and causal pathways influencing primary health centre performance. Methods A theory-driven, case-study approach was adopted. Four Zambian health centres were purposefully selected with case data including health-care worker interviews (n = 60); patient interviews (n = 180); direct observation of facility operations (2 weeks/centre) and key informant interviews (n = 14). Data were analysed to understand how the performance of each site was influenced by the dynamic interactions between system ‘hardware’ and ‘software’ acting on mechanisms of accountability. Findings Structural constraints including limited resources created challenging service environments in which work overload and stockouts were common. Health workers’ frustration with such conditions interacted with dissatisfaction with salary levels eroding service values and acting as a catalyst for different forms of absenteeism. Such behaviours exacerbated patient–provider ratios and increased the frequency of clinical and administrative shortcuts. Weak health information systems and lack of performance data undermined providers’ answerability to their employer and clients, and a lack of effective sanctions undermined supervisors’ ability to hold providers accountable for these transgressions. Weak answerability and enforceability contributed to a culture of impunity that masked and condoned weak service performance in all four sites. Conclusions Health centre performance is influenced by mechanisms of accountability, which are in turn shaped by dynamic interactions between system hardware and system software. Our

  4. Effect of variable valence impurities on the formation of bismuth-related optical centres in a silicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Galagan, B I; Denker, B I; Lili Hu; Sverchkov, S E; Shulman, I L; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2012-10-31

    We have studied the effect of variable valence impurities (cerium and iron) on the formation of bismuth-related IR luminescence centres and the optical loss between 1000 and 1300 nm in a magnesium aluminosilicate glass. The results demonstrate that additional doping of the glass with ceria leads to effective bleaching in a wide spectral range, including the luminescence range of the bismuth centres. At the same time, ceria reduces the concentration of luminescence centres. Gamma irradiation of the glass bleached by cerium restores the luminescence centres but leads to a background loss in a wide spectral range. Iron is shown to be a very harmful impurity in bismuth-doped active media: even trace levels of iron prevent the formation of bismuth-related active centres in the glass and produce a strong, broad absorption band centred near 1 {mu}m. (luminescence of glasses)

  5. BrisSynBio: a BBSRC/EPSRC-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sedgley, Kathleen R.; Race, Paul R.; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2016-01-01

    BrisSynBio is the Bristol-based Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)/Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre. It is one of six such Centres in the U.K. BrisSynBio's emphasis is on rational and predictive bimolecular modelling, design and engineering in the context of synthetic biology. It trains the next generation of synthetic biologists in these approaches, to facilitate translation of fundamental synthetic biology research to industry and the clinic, and to do this within an innovative and responsible research framework. PMID:27284028

  6. High-Accuracy Measurements of the Centre of Gravity of Avalanches in Proportional Chambers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Charpak, G.; Jeavons, A.; Sauli, F.; Stubbs, R.

    1973-09-24

    In a multiwire proportional chamber the avalanches occur close to the anode wires. The motion of the positive ions in the large electric fields at the vicinity of the wires induces fast-rising positive pulses on the surrounding electrodes. Different methods have been developed in order to determine the position of the centre of the avalanches. In the method we describe, the centre of gravity of the pulse distribution is measured directly. It seems to lead to an accuracy which is limited only by the stability of the spatial distribution of the avalanches generated by the process being measured.

  7. A complete and explicit solution to the three-dimensional problem of two fixed centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscani, Francesco; Izzo, Dario

    2016-02-01

    We present for the first time an explicit, complete and closed-form solution to the three-dimensional problem of two fixed centres, based on Weierstrass elliptic and related functions. With respect to previous treatments of the problem, our solution is exact, valid for all initial conditions and physical parameters of the system (including unbounded orbits and repulsive forces), and expressed via a unique set of formulae. Various properties of the three-dimensional problem of two fixed centres are investigated and analysed, with a particular emphasis on quasi-periodic and periodic orbits, regions of motion and equilibrium points.

  8. Academic drug discovery centres: the economic and organisational sustainability of an emerging model.

    PubMed

    Schultz Kirkegaard, Henriette; Valentin, Finn

    2014-11-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic and organisational sustainability. We take that angle in an in-depth study of four prominent ADDCs. Our findings indicate that there are clear similarities in the way sustainable centres are organised, managed and financed. We also identify factors in the frameworks of academia and research funding affecting their performance.

  9. Person-centred web-based support - development through a Swedish multi-case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Departing from the widespread use of the internet in modern society and the emerging use of web applications in healthcare this project captures persons’ needs and expectations in order to develop highly usable web recourses. The purpose of this paper is to outline a multi-case research project focused on the development and evaluation of person-centred web-based support for people with long-term illness. To support the underlying idea to move beyond the illness, we approach the development of web support from the perspective of the emergent area of person-centred care. The project aims to contribute to the ongoing development of web-based supports in health care and to the emerging field of person-centred care. Methods/Design The research design uses a meta-analytical approach through its focus on synthesizing experiences from four Swedish regional and national cases of design and use of web-based support in long-term illness. The cases include children (bladder dysfunction and urogenital malformation), young adults (living close to persons with mental illness), and two different cases of adults (women with breast cancer and childbearing women with type 1 diabetes). All of the cases are ongoing, though in different stages of design, implementation, and analysis. This, we argue, will lead to a synthesis of results on a meta-level not yet described. Discussion To allow valid comparisons between the four cases we explore and problematize them in relation to four main aspects: 1) The use of people’s experiences and needs; 2) The role of use of theories in the design of person-centred web-based supports; 3) The evaluation of the effects of health outcomes for the informants involved and 4) The development of a generic person-centred model for learning and social support for people with long-term illness and their significant others. Person-centred web-based support is a new area and few studies focus on how web-based interventions can contribute to the

  10. The Women's Centre in Jamaica: an innovative project for adolescent mothers.

    PubMed

    McNeil, P; Olafson, F; Powell, D L; Jackson, J

    1983-05-01

    In 1978 the Jamaican Women's Bureau established the Women's Centre, the first project in the developing world to help pregnant teenagers avoid the usual hardships of poverty and dependence. The women take courses in academic subjects and prenatal and postnatal health, and receive good medical care. Fathers and parents are involved in counseling sessions where practical life skills, including family planning, are emphasized. The young mothers improve dramatically in self-confidence, self-esteem, and in their ability to take care of their babies. The Centre's success has helped to loosen the policies of the Jamaican government on the education of pregnant school-age women.

  11. Assessment of accuracy of adopted centre of mass corrections for the Etalon geodetic satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Graham; Dunn, Peter; Otsubo, Toshimichi; Rodriguez, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Accurate centre-of-mass corrections are key parameters in the analysis of satellite laser ranging observations. In order to meet current accuracy requirements, the vector from the reflection point of a laser retroreflector array to the centre of mass of the orbiting spacecraft must be known with mm-level accuracy. In general, the centre-of-mass correction will be dependent on the characteristics of the target (geometry, construction materials, type of retroreflectors), the hardware employed by the tracking station (laser system, detector type), the intensity of the returned laser pulses, and the post-processing strategy employed to reduce the observations [1]. For the geodetic targets used by the ILRS to produce the SLR contribution to the ITRF, the LAGEOS and Etalon satellite pairs, there are centre-of-mass correction tables available for each tracking station [2]. These values are based on theoretical considerations, empirical determination of the optical response functions of each satellite, and knowledge of the tracking technology and return intensity employed [1]. Here we present results that put into question the accuracy of some of the current values for the centre-of-mass corrections of the Etalon satellites. We have computed weekly reference frame solutions using LAGEOS and Etalon observations for the period 1996-2014, estimating range bias parameters for each satellite type along with station coordinates. Analysis of the range bias time series reveals an unexplained, cm-level positive bias for the Etalon satellites in the case of most stations operating at high energy return levels. The time series of tracking stations that have undergone a transition from different modes of operation provide the evidence pointing to an inadequate centre-of-mass modelling. [1] Otsubo, T., and G.M. Appleby, System-dependent centre-of-mass correction for spherical geodetic satellites, J Geophys. Res., 108(B4), 2201, 2003 [2] Appleby, G.M., and T. Otsubo, Centre of Mass

  12. Can a satellite galaxy merger explain the active past of the Galactic Centre?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, M.; Holley-Bockelmann, K.; Bogdanović, T.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Sesana, A.; Sinha, M.

    2013-04-01

    Observations of the Galactic Centre (GC) have accumulated a multitude of `forensic' evidence indicating that several million years ago the centre of the Milky Way galaxy was teeming with star formation and accretion-powered activity - this paints a rather different picture from the GC as we understand it today. We examine a possibility that this epoch of activity could have been triggered by the infall of a satellite galaxy into the Milky Way which began at the redshift of z = 8 and ended a few million years ago with a merger of the Galactic supermassive black hole with an intermediate-mass black hole brought in by the inspiralling satellite.

  13. Zone centre mode behavior of ternary mixed nitrides InxGa1-xN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Daljit; Sinha, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the transverse optical phonon mode behavior of the ternary mixed InxGa1-xN at zone centre using de Launey Angular force constant model. The phonon frequency at zone centre has been calculated for InxGa1-xN for all composition. The present calculation predicts one mode behavior in this ternary mixed compound. The zone center phonons frequency varies linearly from one end member to other. The calculated results are in good agreement with the existing experimental and theoretical results.

  14. Between-centre differences and treatment effects in randomized controlled trials: A case study in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), large between-centre differences in outcome exist and many clinicians believe that such differences influence estimation of the treatment effect in randomized controlled trial (RCTs). The aim of this study was to assess the influence of between-centre differences in outcome on the estimated treatment effect in a large RCT in TBI. Methods We used data from the MRC CRASH trial on the efficacy of corticosteroid infusion in patients with TBI. We analyzed the effect of the treatment on 14 day mortality with fixed effect logistic regression. Next we used random effects logistic regression with a random intercept to estimate the treatment effect taking into account between-centre differences in outcome. Between-centre differences in outcome were expressed with a 95% range of odds ratios (OR) for centres compared to the average, based on the variance of the random effects (tau2). A random effects logistic regression model with random slopes was used to allow the treatment effect to vary by centre. The variation in treatment effect between the centres was expressed in a 95% range of the estimated treatment ORs. Results In 9978 patients from 237 centres, 14-day mortality was 19.5%. Mortality was higher in the treatment group (OR = 1.22, p = 0.00010). Using a random effects model showed large between-centre differences in outcome (95% range of centre effects: 0.27- 3.71), but did not substantially change the estimated treatment effect (OR = 1.24, p = 0.00003). There was limited, although statistically significant, between-centre variation in the treatment effect (OR = 1.22, 95% treatment OR range: 1.17-1.26). Conclusion Large between-centre differences in outcome do not necessarily affect the estimated treatment effect in RCTs, in contrast to current beliefs in the clinical area of TBI. PMID:21867540

  15. [Interdisciplinary healthcare centres--a way of organising healthcare in the future from a health insurer's perspective].

    PubMed

    Hecke, Torsten L; Hoyer, Jens Martin

    2009-01-01

    The German healthcare system modernization act enables healthcare providers to fund interdisciplinary healthcare centres. The Techniker Krankenkasse (TK) is a statutory health sickness fund that has contracted with some of the interdisciplinary healthcare centres named ATRIO-MED to achieve high-quality medical care and healthcare management. A range of patient-centred services is described in the cooperation agreement; in addition to central medical patient records one of the core competencies includes integrated pathways for defined diagnosis. The concept of the interdisciplinary healthcare centre is highly accepted among patients. It will serve as a platform for future TK healthcare policies.

  16. The Centre of High-Performance Scientific Computing, Geoverbund, ABC/J - Geosciences enabled by HPSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, Stefan; Görgen, Klaus; Vereecken, Harry; Gasper, Fabian; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Keune, Jessica; Kulkarni, Ketan; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Sharples, Wendy; Shrestha, Prabhakar; Simmer, Clemens; Sulis, Mauro; Vanderborght, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The Centre of High-Performance Scientific Computing (HPSC TerrSys) was founded 2011 to establish a centre of competence in high-performance scientific computing in terrestrial systems and the geosciences enabling fundamental and applied geoscientific research in the Geoverbund ABC/J (geoscientfic research alliance of the Universities of Aachen, Cologne, Bonn and the Research Centre Jülich, Germany). The specific goals of HPSC TerrSys are to achieve relevance at the national and international level in (i) the development and application of HPSC technologies in the geoscientific community; (ii) student education; (iii) HPSC services and support also to the wider geoscientific community; and in (iv) the industry and public sectors via e.g., useful applications and data products. A key feature of HPSC TerrSys is the Simulation Laboratory Terrestrial Systems, which is located at the Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) and provides extensive capabilities with respect to porting, profiling, tuning and performance monitoring of geoscientific software in JSC's supercomputing environment. We will present a summary of success stories of HPSC applications including integrated terrestrial model development, parallel profiling and its application from watersheds to the continent; massively parallel data assimilation using physics-based models and ensemble methods; quasi-operational terrestrial water and energy monitoring; and convection permitting climate simulations over Europe. The success stories stress the need for a formalized education of students in the application of HPSC technologies in future.

  17. Implementation of Integrated Services--The Example of Family Centres in North Rhine-Westphalia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stöbe-Blossey, Sybille

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the implementation of integrated services providing early support for young children and their families. The integration of services is considered to have highly positive effects on the development of children and on the prevention of child neglect and maltreatment. Therefore, childcare centres have been developed into family…

  18. Community Rehabilitation: "Home versus Centre" Guidelines for Choosing the Optimal Treatment Location

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Lauren N.; Ziino, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to produce indicators and guidelines for clinician use in determining whether individual therapy sessions for community rehabilitation services should be delivered in a home/community-based setting or centre-based setting within a flexible service delivery model. Concept mapping techniques as described by Tochrim and Kane (2005)…

  19. Celebration of the Success of Distributed Research with Schools: The CEM Centre, Durham

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tymms, Peter; Coe, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The Curriculum, Evaluation and Management (CEM) Centre has grown in just 25 years to become the largest educational research unit in a UK university. It has influenced schools and teachers in unprecedented numbers and has had a considerable impact on policy and practice both directly and indirectly in the UK and beyond. This article summarises…

  20. Understanding and Achieving Quality in Sure Start Children's Centres: Practitioners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottle, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on some of the issues that shape understandings of professional practice in the rapidly expanding context of children's centres in England. Drawing on data from an ESRC-funded project exploring practitioners' understandings of quality and success, the perspectives of 115 practitioners working in 11 Sure Start Children's…

  1. [Using money as a therapeutic tool in a therapeutic day centre].

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Stéphane; Amiel-Masse, Pascale; Deplanterose, Elisa; Allilat, Yolande; Serra, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Can money be used as a tool in the resocialisation of patients? Other than the clinical and institutional issues which its use within a therapeutic day centre raises, it can nevertheless help the caregiver bring projects to fruition and the patients to become engaged in them.

  2. How Learning English Facilitates Integration for Adult Migrants: The Jarrah Language Centre Experience. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, Meaghan

    2012-01-01

    Building the research capacity of the vocational education and training (VET) sector is a key concern for the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER). To assist with this objective, NCVER supported an academic scholarship program, whereby VET practitioners are sponsored to undertake university study at honours, master's, or…

  3. A Social Semiotic Analysis of Knowledge Construction and Games Centred Approaches to Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jan; Forrest, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Background: Games centred approaches (GCA) such as TGfU, Game Sense, and Tactical Games are widely promoted as alternatives to traditional forms of teaching games within physical education. These approaches are promoted on the basis of their capacity to engage students in meaningful and enjoyable physical activity and to promote problem-solving…

  4. Infusing Evaluative Thinking as Process Use: The Case of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carden, Fred; Earl, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Until the recent introduction of a dynamic interview-based process, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), a Canadian development research funding agency, faced a challenge: project completion reports (PCRs) were not being completed in a timely and quality manner. This is a common problem many organizations face in completing…

  5. Re-Shaping Teacher Identity? The Liverpool Teachers' Centre 1973-1976

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Between 1972 and 1975 Eric Midwinter, Principal of the Liverpool Teachers' Centre, established a unified organisational structure responsible for delivering continuing professional development (CPD) to Liverpool schools. His ambition was to embed community education practices across the city's entire teaching force. However, during a…

  6. How to Determine the Centre of Mass of Bodies from Image Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Marco Adriano; Carvalho, Paulo Simeão; Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Image modelling is a recent technique in physics education that includes digital tools for image treatment and analysis, such as digital stroboscopic photography (DSP) and video analysis software. It is commonly used to analyse the motion of objects. In this work we show how to determine the position of the centre of mass (CM) of objects with…

  7. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Bulletin No. 64, July, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Edinburgh.

    This bulletin of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre provides information to teachers on a variety of topics relating to the use of equipment in science instruction. The introductory remarks deal with an assessment of electronic calculators suitable for use in schools. The section entitled "Physics Notes" lists surplus physics…

  8. Learning Resource Centres at Sir Sandford Fleming College. LRC Project Team Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markanen, Susan; And Others

    Developed by the Learning Resource Centres (LRC) Project Team at Sir Sanford Fleming College, in Ontario, Canada, this report presents a model for establishing LRCs at the college. The first section reviews the need for LRCs, including the provision of lifelong learning and expected funding decreases for traditional operations. The next sections…

  9. Cooperative Working towards Family-Centred Health Education in Acute Care: Improvement in Client Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastani, Farideh; Golaghaie, Farzaneh; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Rafeie, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish family-centred health education for patients in a neurosurgery unit and to evaluate its impact on patients' and families' satisfaction. Design: Cooperative participatory research through which a group of clinical nurses and an academic researcher engaged in cycles of action and reflection. Setting: The study was…

  10. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Bulletin No. 61, February 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Edinburgh.

    This bulletin of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre provides information to teachers regarding the use of newly produced equipment such as an economical soldering iron, nickel cadmium cell, and a desk calculator. Useful information is also included for teachers on the use of electric coils and bicarbonate indicators. A detailed…

  11. Guiding Documents for Environmental Education Centres: An Analysis in the Spanish Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medir, Rosa Maria; Heras, Raquel; Geli, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Guiding documents under the "PEC" acronym are commonly used in environmental education centres (EECs) in Spain. They are written documents that are seen as necessary tools to safeguard quality. In this study, we analyse the guiding documents of twenty-three EECs in the province of Girona (Catalonia, Spain) in order to understand their…

  12. A Foreign Model of Teacher Education and Its Local Appropriation: The English Teachers' Centres in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the implementation of the English model of teachers' centres in the context of 1980s Spain. Originally it was a top-down plan initiated by a national government. However, from the very beginning its fate was dependent on a bottom-up educational project carried out by pedagogical social movements. The first part of the article…

  13. Leadership Challenges of Strategic Research Centres in Relation to Degree of Institutionalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomqvist, Christine; Agrell, Cecilia; Sandahl, Christer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse leadership challenges in the organisation of strategic research centres, focusing on the relationship between organisation and the level of institutionalisation. Four main themes of leadership challenges were identified: (1) the "changing university context," including relationships…

  14. The Role of the Self-Access Centre in the Tertiary Language Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of the self-access centre (SAC) in tertiary language learning and teaching, a role which has developed out of the changes that have occurred within the disciplines of Applied Linguistics and Education as well as from wider changes in technology and society itself. As the focus in language learning has moved, over the…

  15. Group Supervision: Supporting Practitioners in Their Work with Children and Families in Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soni, Anita

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how group supervision can be used to support the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of those working with children and families in early years provision in England. It is based on research conducted in 2008 with a cluster of four Children's Centres in the West Midlands in England, UK. The research evaluated group…

  16. Open Innovation, Triple Helix and Regional Innovation Systems: Exploring CATAPULT Centres in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerry, Christopher; Danson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Through the lens of UK CATAPULT Centres this conceptual paper presents an examination of the links between open innovation, the Triple Helix model and regional innovation systems. Highlighting the importance of boundary-spanning intermediaries, the combined role of these concepts is explored in detail. A conceptual model is then proposed which…

  17. "Learner-Centred" Assessment Policies in Further Education: Putting Teachers' Time under Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Gillian; Colley, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Since incorporation of further education (FE) in England in 1992, much research has critiqued the performative pressures on FE teachers created by a managerialist audit culture. These critiques have demonstrated the detrimental effects of the technicised delivery of learning outcomes on more learner-centred pedagogies. However, FE policies now…

  18. A National Benchmarking Survey of Student Counselling Centres/Units in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cilliers, C. D.; Pretorius, K.; van der Westhuizen, L. R.

    2010-01-01

    Students experience various challenges during their studies, such as personal problems, academic difficulties and mental health problems. Therefore, student counselling centres/units play a valuable role in providing support systems for students in need. The most frequent problems South African students experience are relationship problems and…

  19. The Impact of Dramatic Play Centre on Promoting the Development of Children's Early Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of dramatic play centre (DPC) on promoting the development of children's early writing skills in the Jordanian context. It also intends to investigate the forms of children's writing skills that emerge through the use of dramatic play. Observations and interviews were conducted to obtain…

  20. Using Q-Methodology to Involve People with Intellectual Disability in Evaluating Person-Centred Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combes, Helen; Hardy, Gillian; Buchan, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Person-centred approaches do not easily lend themselves to standard methods of evaluation. This study develops a technique that will involve service users and their circle of support in making individual plans. Methodology: Q-methodology is a phenomenological approach, which enables the researcher to co-construct the stories of many…

  1. Exploring Dimensions of Social Inclusion among Alternative Learning Centres in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Dawn X.; Barnes, Rachelle Redmond

    2016-01-01

    Increasing disparities in out-of-school suspension and dropout rates have led a number of school districts to develop alternative models of education to include alternative learning centres (ALCs). Using an exploratory mixed methods design, this study explores dimensions of social inclusion among ALCs, located in the southeastern region of the…

  2. Leading Highly Performing Children's Centres: Supporting the Development of the "Accidental Leaders"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Andy; Sharp, Caroline; Handscomb, Graham

    2016-01-01

    There is wide recognition that early childhood experiences are critical to a child's development and their subsequent life chances. However, little research has been undertaken into leadership in early years settings, which is so influential in this regard. This article summarizes research into the leadership of Sure Start Children's Centres,…

  3. Calculation of the Centre of Gravity of the Cone Utilizing the Method of Archimedes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnaghi, C. P.; Assis, A. K. T.

    2012-01-01

    Archimedes calculated the centre of gravity of the cone but the proof of this theorem is not extant in his works. Knorr made a reconstruction of this proof utilizing geometrical arguments. This paper proves this theorem by means of a physical demonstration utilizing the law of the lever, and by adapting from Archimedes the method of mechanical…

  4. 75 FR 22578 - Application To Export Electric Energy; Centre Lane Trading Limited

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Application To Export Electric Energy; Centre Lane Trading Limited AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and... applied for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada pursuant to section 202... application from CLT for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada as a...

  5. A Child-Centred Evaluation Model: Gaining the Children's Perspective in Evaluation Studies in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In recent times there has been a major international push for giving voice to children in the provision of services for early education and development particularly among researchers and non-government organisations. However, what has been missing from this body of literature and activity is the children's perspective when centres and services are…

  6. Universities, Catapult Centres and the 2014 Hauser Review. Innovation and Growth Factsheet Series. No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This factsheet, the second in a series on innovation and growth, provides an overview of Catapult centres and how universities engage with them, with reference to the recommendations of the second Hauser review into the future of the Catapult network. The factsheet draws on a review of existing literature as well as the perspectives of businesses,…

  7. Knowledge Wisdom and Networks: A Project Management Centre of Excellence Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Derek H. T.; Christenson, Dale

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This conceptual paper aims to explain how "project management centres of excellence (CoEs)", a particular class of knowledge network, can be viewed as providing great potential for assisting project management (PM) teams to make wise decisions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents a range of knowledge network types and…

  8. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Bulletin No. 58, September 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Edinburgh.

    This issue of the bulletin contains four major topics. The first is a discussion of problems involved in establishing good communication with science teachers concerning the activities of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre (SSSERC) via exhibitions throughout Scotland. The second, headed "Biology Notes," presents a discussion of…

  9. "Learning to Play with New Friends": Systematic Quality Development Work in a Leisure-Time Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lager, Karin

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the recontextualisation of systematic quality development work (Sqdw) in a leisure-time centre. Two teachers' processes of planning, organisation, documentation and evaluation were investigated, the aim being to explore the recontextualisation of Sqdw in practice. The study is thus a case study of these teachers' practice…

  10. Lively Bureaucracy? The ESRC's Doctoral Training Centres and UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunt, Ingrid; McAlpine, Lynn; Mills, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the changing relationships between the UK government, its research councils and universities, focusing on the governing, funding and organisation of doctoral training. We use the Doctoral Training Centres (DTCs) funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as a prism through which to study the shifting nature of…

  11. Framework for Developing Leadership Skills in Child Care Centres in Queensland, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nupponen, Hanna

    2006-01-01

    There has been minimal Australian research focused on leadership and management aspects of directors' work in centre-based child care to date. In Australia, practices in early education have been drawn largely from studies in other cultural contexts, particularly research undertaken in the United States. It is timely that Australian research…

  12. Saskatchewan's (Canada) Regional Centre of Expertise on Education for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahms, Tanya; McMartin, Dena; Petry, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the unique collaborative process initiated at the University of Regina in Saskatchewan, Canada, to develop a Regional Centre of Expertise (RCE) on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) through the United Nations University-Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS). Design/methodology/approach:…

  13. Showing Your Pride: A National Survey of Queer Student Centres in Canadian Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecker, John; Rae, Jennifer; Bassi, Amandeep

    2015-01-01

    The presence of queer student centres (QSCs) across Canadian universities and colleges is largely unknown. It is an important area of investigation since queer-identified students have previously identified several benefits of these services, including receiving support from other queer individuals. The focus of the current study was to determine…

  14. Constructing the "Ideal" Family for Family-Centred Practice: Challenges for Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Jenny; Saggers, Sherry; Wildy, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Family-centred practice positions families as the key decision-makers, central to and experts in the wants and needs of their child. This paper discusses how families interviewed for a Western Australian study describe their relationships with a range of allied health professionals in the paediatric disability sector. The allied health…

  15. Two-Dimensional Work: Workplace Literacy in the Aged Care and Call Centre Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterhouse, Peter; Virgona, Crina

    2004-01-01

    A key challenge of Australia's vocational education and training (VET) system is to serve the broad needs of individuals, communities, and industries. This includes the provision of literacy and generic skills which meet the needs of all groups. This study investigates and documents workplace literacy in aged care facilities and call centres,…

  16. Evidence of public engagement with science: visitor learning at a zoo-housed primate research centre.

    PubMed

    Waller, Bridget M; Peirce, Kate; Mitchell, Heidi; Micheletta, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Primate behavioural and cognitive research is increasingly conducted on direct public view in zoo settings. The potential of such facilities for public engagement with science is often heralded, but evidence of tangible, positive effects on public understanding is rare. Here, the effect of a new zoo-based primate research centre on visitor behaviour, learning and attitudes was assessed using a quasi-experimental design. Zoo visitors approached the primate research centre more often when a scientist was present and working with the primates, and reported greater awareness of primates (including conservation) compared to when the scientist was not present. Visitors also reported greater perceived learning when the scientist was present. Installation of information signage had no main effect on visitor attitudes or learning. Visitors who interacted with the signage, however, demonstrated increased knowledge and understanding when asked about the specific information present on the signs (which was related to the ongoing facial expression research at the research centre). The findings show that primate behaviour research centres on public view can have a demonstrable and beneficial effect on public understanding of science.

  17. The O-(Al2) centre in topaz and its relation to the blue colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, D. N.; Guedes, K. J.; Pinheiro, M. V. B.; Schweizer, S.; Spaeth, J.-M.; Krambrock, K.

    2005-01-01

    Colour-enhanced blue topaz is one of the most traded gemstones. Naturally very rare, mostly topaz is irradiated by neutrons, electrons, gamma radiation and combinations of them. The colour centre is still not identified. It was speculated that it is related to a Si dangling bond defect occupied by two electrons with spin S = 0. We investigated natural blue as well as colourless topaz from different regions in Brazil by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The results are compared with neutron and gamma-irradiated blue topaz. By EPR two paramagnetic defects are identified in all samples: (i) the peroxy radical (O2-) measured at room temperature and (ii) an (O-) hole centre interacting with two equivalent Al neighbours measured at low temperature. Blue samples show an absorption band centred at 620 nm which is responsible for the blue colour. From our investigation we find that the O-(Al2) hole centre has nearly the same thermal stability as the optical absorption band. However, we cannot say whether it is responsible for the absorption band and the blue colour. We suggest that at least it plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the blue colour.

  18. Identifying Professional Development Environment for Mentor Teachers at a Learning Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, May May-hung; Yeung, Yau-Yuen

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues with evidence that conditions for teacher professional development can be enhanced for mentor teachers through a Learning Centre (LC) project which has been introduced in Hong Kong as a collaborative project between the government, a primary school, a secondary school, and the Hong Kong Institute of Education. The LC teachers…

  19. Having, Loving, and Being: Children's Narrated Well-Being in Finnish Day Care Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila; Syrjala, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to answer the following question: what do children tell about their well-being in Finnish day care centres? The theoretical and methodological framework of this study is based on a narrative approach. The research material was collected by participating in the everyday life of three groups of children and listening to…

  20. Does Santa Exist? Children's Everyday Narratives as Dynamic Meeting Places in a Day Care Centre Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila; Syrjala, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The article attempts to answer the question: What is the nature of children's everyday narratives in a day care centre context? The theoretical framework of this study is based on a narrative approach. The research material was gathered through applying the methodology of narrative ethnography. The article is based on observational material…