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Sample records for ka-band photonic microwave

  1. The Ka-band microwave generation using the Smith-Purcell effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, C. A.; Davis, H. A.

    The CERETRON microwave generator concept relies on the conversion of intense relativistic electron beam (REB) energy into highpower microwave emission through the Smith-Purcell effect. Initial results from experiments with the production of Ka-band Smith-Purcell radiation generated by a 50-kA, 2.8-MeV propagated through a cylindrical transmission grating with lambda 0 = 1 cm were reported. These experiments were performed without a quasi-optical resonator, and the output was limited by breakdown of the grating and by limited access through the 90-kG magnet coil. Nevertheless, the measured power output from these initial experiments was about 7 kW in the Ka band.

  2. Ka-band microwave generation using the Smith-Purcell effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C.A.; Davis, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    The CERETRON microwave generator concept relies on the conversion of intense relativistic electron beam (REB) energy into highpower microwave emission through the Smith-Purcell effect. We report initial results from experiments with the production of Ka-band Smith-Purcell radiation generated by a 50-kA, 2.8-MeV beam propagated through a cylindrical transmission grating with lambda/sub 0/ = 1 cm. These experiments were performed without a quasi-optical resonator, and the output was limited by breakdown of the grating and by limited access through the 90-kG magnet coil. Nevertheless, the measured power output from these initial experiments was about 7 kW in the Ka band.

  3. Progress in GaAs Metamorphic HEMT Technology for Microwave Applications. High Efficiency Ka-Band MHEMT Power MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. M.; Dugas, D.; Chu, K.; Nichols, K.; Duh, K. H.; Fisher, J.; MtPleasant, L.; Xu, D.; Gunter, L.; Vera, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the development of GaAs metamorphic HEMT (MHEMT) technology for microwave applications. Commercialization has begun, while efforts to further improve performance, manufacturability and reliability continue. We also report the first multi-watt MHEMT MMIC power amplifiers, demonstrating up to 3.2W output power and record power-added efficiency (PAE) at Ka-band.

  4. Coherent summation of Ka-band microwave beams produced by sub-gigawatt superradiance backward wave oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharypov, K. A.; El'chaninov, A. A.; Mesyats, G. A.; Pedos, M. S.; Romancheko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Rukin, S. N.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2013-09-01

    Coherent summation of microwave beams has been demonstrated for two superradiance Ka-band backward wave oscillators producing over 700 MW of power. The explosive emission cathodes of the e-beam injectors were powered by stable splitted voltage pulses produced by an all-solid-state modulator. The voltage fronts were shortened to 300 ps in controlled delay shock-excited ferrite lines. The standard deviation of the phase difference between the microwave pulses was less than 2% of the oscillations period. The power flux density of the summarized radiation was the same as that of a single generator producing an output power of ˜3 GW.

  5. Multichannel Ka-Band Microwave Oscillator Based on Frequency-Shifted Relativistic Backward-Wave Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalandin, M. I.; Sharypov, K. A.; Pedos, M. S.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Rukin, S. N.; Ul'maskulov, M. R.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Experiments on summation of linearly polarized Gaussian wave beams in free space from two and four synchronous nanosecond Ka-band relativistic backward wave oscillators (BWOs), each having an output power of about 200 MW with controllably shifted oscillator frequencies have been carried out. An about 0.5% frequency shift in one of the channels was equivalent to a one-period phase delay of the carrier frequency. In a two-channel version of the device, a full beat cycle was obtained for a pulse with quadratic (with respect to the number of sources) enhancement of the power flux density at the interference maximum of the integral directional pattern (DP). In the case of a four-channel device, a diagonal displacement of the DP lobes has been demonstrated.

  6. Digital Processing of Passive Ka-Band Microwave Images for Sea-Ice Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Development Activity »’ NSTL, Mississippi 39529 Foreword Field trials of an airborne passive-microwave imaging system (MICRAD) in April 1976 demonstrated...Ross Williams). Engineering field tests of the KRMS were completed in December 1982. First use of the KRMS in support of an Arctic research...brightness temperature 6 Numerical approach to image classification 11 Field data 13 Histograms 14 Training regions 14 Open water 14 Old ice 15 First

  7. a KA-BAND Chirped-Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Muckle, Matthew T.; Pate, Brooks H.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus

    2010-06-01

    The design and performance of a new chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometer operating from 25-40 GHz will be discussed. A 10.5-3 GHz linear frequency sweep, generated by a 24 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator, is upconverted by a 23.00 GHz phase-locked oscillator, then fed into an active doubler to create a 25-40 GHz chirped pulse. After amplification with a 60-80 W pulsed traveling wave tube amplifier, the pulse is broadcast across a molecular beam chamber where it interacts with a molecular sample. The molecular FID signal is downconverted with the 23 GHz oscillator so that it can be digitized on a 50 GS/s oscilloscope with 16 GHz hardware bandwidth. The sensitivity and phase stability of this spectrometer is comparable to that of the previously reported 6.5-18.5 CP-FTMW spectrometer. On propyne (μ=0.78 D), a single-shot signal to noise ratio of approximately 200:1 is observed on the J=2-1 rotational transition at 34183 MHz when the full bandwidth is swept; optimal excitation is observed for this transition with a 250 MHz bandwidth sweep. The emission has a T_2 lifetime of 4 μs. Early results from this spectrometer, particularly in the study of species of astrochemical interest, will be presented. G.G. Brown et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 (2008) 053103.

  8. Thickness and Composition Tailoring of K- and Ka-Band Microwave Absorption of BaCo x Ti x Fe(12-2 x)O19 Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Sukhleen Bindra; Pubby, Kunal; Singh, Charanjeet

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties of M-type barium hexaferrites with chemical formula BaCo x Ti x Fe(12-2 x)O19 ( x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) in K and Ka band. Characterization techniques such as x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were applied to confirm ferrite formation. The frequency dependence of the complex permittivity and complex permeability was studied for prepared ferrite samples in the frequency range from 18 GHz to 40 GHz. Factors such as the quarter-wavelength condition, impedance matching, high dielectric-magnetic losses, as well as ferromagnetic resonance were investigated to determine their contribution to the absorption characteristics. It was found that the quarter-wavelength ( λ/4) model could be successfully applied to predict and understand the position as well as number of reflection peaks in the microwave absorption spectrum. The origin of the reflection loss peaks is explained and verified based on calculations of input impedance, loss tangent, and ferromagnetic resonance. Reflection loss analysis revealed that all six compositions exhibited reflection loss peaks (absorption >90%) at their matching thicknesses and frequencies. Therefore, these ferrites are potential candidates for use in electromagnetic shielding applications requiring low reflectivity in K and Ka band.

  9. Ka-band study: 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Horttor, R. L.; Clauss, R. C.; Wilcher, J. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Mudgway, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Ka-band study team was chartered in late 1987 to bring together all the planning elements for establishing 32 GHz (Ka-band) as the primary downlink frequency for deep-space operation, and to provide a stable baseline from which to pursue that development. This article summarizes the results of that study at its conclusion in mid-1988, and corresponds to material presented to NASA's Office of Space Operations on July 14, 1988. For a variety of reasons, Ka-band is the right next major step in deep-space communications. It offers improved radio metric accuracy through reduced plasma sensitivity and increased bandwidth. Because of these improvements, it offers the opportunity to reduce costs in the flight radio system or in the DSN by allocating part of the overall benefits of Ka-band to this cost reduction. A mission scenario is being planned that can drive at least two and possibly all three of the DSN subnets to provide a Ka-band downlink capability by the turn of the century. The implementation scenario devised by the study team is believed to be feasible within reasonable resource expectations, and capable of providing the needed upgrade as a natural follow-on to the technology development which is already underway.

  10. Ka-band MMIC microstrip array for high rate communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Raquet, C. A.; Tolleson, J. B.; Sanzgiri, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    In a recent technology assessment of alternative communication systems for the space exploration initiative (SEI), Ka-band (18 to 40 GHz) communication technology was identified to meet the mission requirements of telecommunication, navigation, and information management. Compared to the lower frequency bands, Ka-band antennas offer higher gain and broader bandwidths; thus, they are more suitable for high data rate communications. Over the years, NASA has played an important role in monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array technology development, and currently, has an ongoing contract with Texas Instrument (TI) to develop a modular Ka-band MMIC microstrip subarray (NAS3-25718). The TI contract emphasizes MMIC integration technology development and stipulates using existing MMIC devices to minimize the array development cost. The objective of this paper is to present array component technologies and integration techniques used to construct the subarray modules.

  11. MMIC's for Ka-band multibeam satellite transponder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Haruhiko; Araki, Katsuhiko

    The key monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs), such as a 30-GHz amplifier, frequency converter, multiplier, voltage-controlled oscillator, 15-GHz analog frequency divider and 1-GHz IF switch, that comprise a Ka-band full MMIC transponder are described. Some elements unsuitable for MMIC implementation, such as filters, dielectric resonators, and IF hybrid couplers, have been completely eliminated by novel designs. A Ka-band receiver and a 1-GHz 16 x 16 IF switch matrix using these MMICs have been assembled, and their performance was evaluated. The test data indicate the feasibility of a full MMIC transponder that weighs approximately 1/3 as much as conventional hybrid-IC transponders.

  12. K/Ka-Band Aeronautical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, Martin J.; Connally, Michael J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses a series of aeronautical experiments that utilize the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT). These experiments were designed to explore the uses of K and Ka-band for aeronautical applications. Planned experiments are also discussed.

  13. Modulation transfer functions at Ka band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesany, Vahid; Sistani, Bita; Salam, Asif; Haimov, Samuel; Gogineni, Prasad; Moore, Richard K.

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is often used to describe the modulation of the radar signal by the long waves. MTFs were measured at 35 GHz (Ka band) with a switched-beam vector slope gauge/scatterometer on the research platform NORDSEE as part of the SAXON-FPN experiment. Three independent measurements of the scattering were available for each height measurement. This provided the opportunity to average the time series to reduce the effects of fading noise and sea spikes, or, alternatively, to append the time series to achieve more degrees of freedom in the spectral estimates. For upwind measurements, the phase of the VV-polarized Ka-band MTF was always positive, which implies that the maximum of the radar return originates from the forward face of the long-scale waves. This phase increases with increasing wind speed. The magnitude of the MTF decreases with increasing wind speed.

  14. Integrated Microphotonic Receiver for Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levi, A. F. J.

    2005-01-01

    This report consists of four main sections. Part I: LiNbO3 microdisk resonant optical modulator. Brief review of microdisk optical resonator and RF ring resonator. Microwave and photonic design challenges for achieving simultaneous RF-optical resonance are addressed followed by our solutions. Part II: Experimental demonstration of LiNbO3 microdisk modulator performance in wired and wireless RF-optical links. Part III: Microphotonic RF receiver architecture that exploits the nonlinear modulation in the LiNbO3 microdisk modulator to achieve direct photonic down-conversion from RF carrier without using any high-speed electronic elements. Part IV: Ultimate sensitivity of the microdisk photonic receiver and the future road map toward a practical device.

  15. High-power Ka-band amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Development of a high-power tube suitable to power a Ka-band (34.5-GHz) antenna transmitter located at the Goldstone, California, tracking station is continuing. The University of Maryland Laboratory for Plasma Research and JPL are conducting a joint effort to test the feasibility of phase locking a second-harmonic gyrotron both by direct injection at the output cavity and by using a priming cavity to bunch the electrons in the beam. This article describes several design options and the results of computer simulation testing.

  16. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Link Experiment Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, David

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents The Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Link Experimental Results in viewgraph form. Topics include: 1) Deep Space Ka-band Link Advantage; 2) Deep Space Ka-band Telecommunications; 3) Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Signal Levels and Ka-band Top for Clear Weather Pass; 4) MGS Signal Levels and Ka-band Top for Rainy Weather Pass; 5) MGS Ka-band to X-band Link Advantage; and 6) Conclusion. A 6 to 8 dB link advantage can be realized by using Ka band (32 GHz) as a telecommunications link frequency in place of X-band (8.4 GHz). This link advantage was demonstrated using two years worth of Mars Global Surveyor simultaneous Ka/X data after correcting for known equipment deficiencies.

  17. Steerable K/Ka-Band Antenna For Land-Mobile Satellite Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, Arthur; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Woo, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    Prototype steerable microwave antenna tracks and communicates with geostationary satellite. Designed to mount on roof of vehicle and only 10 cm tall. K/Ka-band antenna rugged and compact to suit rooftop mobile operating environment. More-delicate signal-processing and control equipment located inside vehicle.

  18. Ka-band MMIC subarray technology program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottenger, Warren

    1995-01-01

    The broad objective of this program was to demonstrate a proof of concept insertion of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) device technology into an innovative (tile architecture) active phased array antenna application supporting advanced EHF communication systems. Ka-band MMIC arrays have long been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in close proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments.

  19. Ka-band MMIC subarray technology program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottenger, Warren

    1995-06-01

    The broad objective of this program was to demonstrate a proof of concept insertion of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) device technology into an innovative (tile architecture) active phased array antenna application supporting advanced EHF communication systems. Ka-band MMIC arrays have long been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in close proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments.

  20. Performance of a Ka-Band Transponder Breadboard for Deep-Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Lane, J. P.; Kayalar, S.; Kermode, A. W.

    1995-04-01

    This article summarizes the design concepts applied in the development of an advanced Ka-band (34.4 GHz/32 GHz) transponder breadboard for the next generation of space communications systems applications. The selected architecture upgrades the X-band (7.2 GHz/8.4 GHz) deep-space transponder (DST) to provide Ka-band up/Ka- and X-band down capability. In addition, it can also be configured to provide X-band up/Ka- and X-band down capability. The Ka-band transponder breadboard incorporates several state-of-the-art components, including sampling mixers, a Ka-band dielectric resonator oscillator, and microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs). The MMICs that were tested in the breadboard include upconverters, downconverters, automatic gain control circuits, mixers, phase modulators, and amplifiers. The measured receiver dynamic range, tracking range, acquisition rate, static phase error, and phase jitter characteristics of the Ka-band breadboard interfaced to the advanced engineering model X-band DST are in good agreement with the expected performance. The results show a receiver tracking threshold of -149 dBm with a dynamic range of 80 dB and a downlink phase jitter of 7-deg rms. The analytical results of phase noise and Allan standard deviation are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Aeronautical applications of steerable K/Ka-band antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmken, Henry; Prather, Horton

    1995-01-01

    The expected growth of wideband data and video transmission via satellite will press existing satellite Ku-band services and push development of the Ka-band region. Isolated ground based K/Ka-band terminals can experience severe fading due to rain and weather phenomena. However, since aircraft generally fly above the severe weather, they are attractive platforms for developing commercial K/Ka-band communication links.

  2. Ka-Band Multibeam Aperture Phased Array Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems offer many advantages to low-Earth-orbiting satellite systems. Their large scan angles and multibeam capabilities allow for vibration-free, rapid beam scanning and graceful degradation operation for high rate downlink of data to users on the ground. Technology advancements continue to reduce the power, weight, and cost of these systems to make phased arrays a competitive alternative in comparison to the gimbled reflector system commonly used in science missions. One effort to reduce the cost of phased arrays is the development of a Ka-band multibeam aperture (MBA) phased array by Boeing Corporation under a contract jointly by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Office of Naval Research. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a space-qualifiable dual-beam Ka-band (26.5-GHz) phased-array antenna. The goals are to advance the state of the art in Ka-band active phased-array antennas and to develop and demonstrate multibeam transmission technology compatible with spacecraft in low Earth orbit to reduce the cost of future missions by retiring certain development risks. The frequency chosen is suitable for space-to-space and space-to-ground communication links. The phased-array antenna has a radiation pattern designed by combining a set of individual radiating elements, optimized with the type of radiating elements used, their positions in space, and the amplitude and phase of the currents feeding the elements. This arrangement produces a directional radiation pattern that is proportional to the number of individual radiating elements. The arrays of interest here can scan the main beam electronically with a computerized algorithm. The antenna is constructed using electronic components with no mechanical parts, and the steering is performed electronically, without any resulting vibration. The speed of the scanning is limited primarily by the control electronics. The radiation performance degrades gracefully if a portion of the elements

  3. Silicon nitride microwave photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Zhuang, Leimeng; Taddei, Caterina; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René G; van Dijk, Paulus W L; Oldenbeuving, Ruud M; Marpaung, David A I; Burla, Maurizio; Boller, Klaus-J

    2013-09-23

    We present an overview of several microwave photonic processing functionalities based on combinations of Mach-Zehnder and ring resonator filters using the high index contrast silicon nitride (TriPleX™) waveguide technology. All functionalities are built using the same basic building blocks, namely straight waveguides, phase tuning elements and directional couplers. We recall previously shown measurements on high spurious free dynamic range microwave photonic (MWP) link, ultra-wideband pulse generation, instantaneous frequency measurements, Hilbert transformers, microwave polarization networks and demonstrate new measurements and functionalities on a 16 channel optical beamforming network and modulation format transformer as well as an outlook on future microwave photonic platform integration, which will lead to a significantly reduced footprint and thereby enables the path to commercially viable MWP systems.

  4. Ka-Band Autonomous Formation Flying Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, Jeffrey; Purcell, George, Jr.; Srinivasan, Jeffrey; Ciminera, Michael; Srinivasan, Meera; Meehan, Thomas; Young, Lawrence; Aung, MiMi; Amaro, Luis; Chong, Yong; Quirk, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Ka-band integrated range and bearing-angle formation sensor called the Autonomous Formation Flying (AFF) Sensor has been developed to enable deep-space formation flying of multiple spacecraft. The AFF Sensor concept is similar to that of the Global Positioning System (GPS), but the AFF Sensor would not use the GPS. The AFF Sensor would reside in radio transceivers and signal-processing subsystems aboard the formation-flying spacecraft. A version of the AFF Sensor has been developed for initial application to the two-spacecraft StarLight optical-interferometry mission, and several design investigations have been performed. From the prototype development, it has been concluded that the AFF Sensor can be expected to measure distances and directions with standard deviations of 2 cm and 1 arc minute, respectively, for spacecraft separations ranging up to about 1 km. It has also been concluded that it is necessary to optimize performance of the overall mission through design trade-offs among the performance of the AFF Sensor, the field of view of the AFF Sensor, the designs of the spacecraft and the scientific instruments that they will carry, the spacecraft maneuvers required for formation flying, and the design of a formation-control system.

  5. Advanced components for microwave photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonjallaz, Pierre-Yves; Gunnarsson, Ola; Popov, Mikhail; Margulis, Walter; Petermann, Ingemar; Berlemont, David; Carlsson, Fredrik

    2003-04-01

    This persentation gives an overveiw of the field of microwave photonics with an emphasis on new fiber based devices which we belive have a real practical potential. Microwave photonics can be considered as the fruitful meeting point bewteen optics and microwave engineering, where optoelectronic devices and systems are used both for processing at microwave rates and for signal handling in microwave systems. The use of specialty fibers, glass poling and naturally fiber Bragg gratings opens new perspectives for the realization of low-cost devices with appropriate functionality. The application field for optical microwave transmission and processing spans from radar technology to cable TV and mobile communications systems. Over the last few years very much attention has been directed towards radio-over-fiber systems for the next-generation mobile communications infrastructure as well as hybrid fiber radio for picocell systems at 60 GHz or above. As a matter of fact, the higher the microwave frequencies, the greater are the similarities with the optical carrier and the more there is to be gained by processing the microwave signal in the optical domain. Other important application examples are beamforming networks for phased array antennas and subcarrier processing for routing in optical networks.

  6. Performance of a Ka-band transponder breadboard for deep-space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Lane, J. P.; Kayalar, S.; Kermode, A. W.

    1995-01-01

    This article summarizes the design concepts applied in the development of and advanced Ka-band (34.4 GHz/32 GHz) transponder breadboard for the next generation of space communications systems applications. The selected architecture upgrades the X-band (7.2 GHz/8.4 GHz) deep-space transponder (DST) to provide Da-band up/Ka- and X-band down capability. The Ka-band transponder breadboard incorporates several state-of-the-art components, including sampling mixers, a Ka-band dielectric resonator oscillator, and microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs). The MMICs that were tested in the breadboard include upconverters, downconverters, automatic gain control circuits, mixers, phase modulators, and amplifiers. The measured receiver dynamic range, tracking range, acquisition rate, static phase error, and phase jitter characteristics of the Ka-band breadboard interfaced to the advanced engineering model X-band DST are in good agreement with the expected performance. The results show a receiver tracking threshold of -149 dBm with a dynamic range of 80 dB and a downlink phase jitter of 7 deg rms. The analytical results of phase noise and Allan standard deviation are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Performance of a Ka-band transponder breadboard for deep-space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Lane, J. P.; Kayalar, S.; Kermode, A. W.

    1995-08-01

    This article summarizes the design concepts applied in the development of and advanced Ka-band (34.4 GHz/32 GHz) transponder breadboard for the next generation of space communications systems applications. The selected architecture upgrades the X-band (7.2 GHz/8.4 GHz) deep-space transponder (DST) to provide Da-band up/Ka- and X-band down capability. The Ka-band transponder breadboard incorporates several state-of-the-art components, including sampling mixers, a Ka-band dielectric resonator oscillator, and microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs). The MMICs that were tested in the breadboard include upconverters, downconverters, automatic gain control circuits, mixers, phase modulators, and amplifiers. The measured receiver dynamic range, tracking range, acquisition rate, static phase error, and phase jitter characteristics of the Ka-band breadboard interfaced to the advanced engineering model X-band DST are in good agreement with the expected performance. The results show a receiver tracking threshold of -149 dBm with a dynamic range of 80 dB and a downlink phase jitter of 7 deg rms. The analytical results of phase noise and Allan standard deviation are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Design of a Ka-band gyro-TWT amplifier for broadband operation

    SciTech Connect

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K.; Choyal, Y.

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, the design of a Ka-band periodically ceramic loaded gyro-TWT amplifier has been carried out. The design predict that the interaction structure can produce more than 80 kW output power, 50 dB saturated gain, and 3 dB bandwidth for 65 kV and 5 A electron beam with velocity ratio (α) of 1.2. This paper describes the design and simulation of a high performance 35 GHz TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWT that applies the same technique of employing a periodic dielectric loaded interaction structure to achieve stability and wide bandwidth. The design of input coupler with loaded interaction structure for Ka-band Gyro-TWT has been carried out using Ansoft hfss. The return loss (S{sub 11}) and transmission loss (S{sub 21}) of the Ka-band gyro-TWT input coupler have been found to be −27.3 dB and −0.05 dB, respectively. The design of output window for Ka-band Gyro-TWT has been carried out using cst microwave studio.

  9. Highly Efficient Amplifier for Ka-Band Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    An amplifier developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract will have applications for both satellite and terrestrial communications. This power amplifier uses an innovative series bias arrangement of active devices to achieve over 40-percent efficiency at Ka-band frequencies with an output power of 0.66 W. The amplifier is fabricated on a 2.0- by 3.8-square millimeter chip through the use of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology, and it uses state-of-the-art, Pseudomorphic High-Electron-Mobility Transistor (PHEMT) devices. Although the performance of the MMIC chip depends on these high-performance devices, the real innovations here are a unique series bias scheme, which results in a high-voltage chip supply, and careful design of the on-chip planar output stage combiner. This design concept has ramifications beyond the chip itself because it opens up the possibility of operation directly from a satellite power bus (usually 28 V) without a dc-dc converter. This will dramatically increase the overall system efficiency. Conventional microwave power amplifier designs utilize many devices all connected in parallel from the bias supply. This results in a low-bias voltage, typically 5 V, and a high bias current. With this configuration, substantial I(sup 2) R losses (current squared times resistance) may arise in the system bias-distribution network. By placing the devices in a series bias configuration, the total current is reduced, leading to reduced distribution losses. Careful design of the on-chip planar output stage power combiner is also important in minimizing losses. Using these concepts, a two-stage amplifier was designed for operation at 33 GHz and fabricated in a standard MMIC foundry process with 0.20-m PHEMT devices. Using a 20-V bias supply, the amplifier achieved efficiencies of over 40 percent with an output power of 0.66 W and a 16-dB gain over a 2-GHz bandwidth centered at 33 GHz. With a 28-V bias, a power

  10. A Ka-band radial relativistic backward wave oscillator with GW-class output power

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xiaoping Dang, Fangchao

    2016-07-15

    A novel radial relativistic backward wave oscillator with a reflector is proposed and designed to generate GW-level high power microwaves at Ka-band. The segmented radial slow wave structure and the reflector are matched to enhance interaction efficiency. We choose the volume wave TM{sub 01} mode as the working mode due to the volume wave characteristic. The main structural parameters of the novel device are optimized by particle-in-cell simulation. High power microwaves with power of 2 GW and a frequency of 29.4 GHz are generated with 30% efficiency when the electron beam voltage is 383 kV, the beam current is 17 kA, and the guiding magnetic field is only 0.6 T. Simultaneously, the highest electric field in the novel Ka-band device is just about 960 kV/cm in second slow wave structure.

  11. Detecting itinerant single microwave photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, Sankar Raman; Stace, Thomas M.; Johansson, Göran

    2016-08-01

    Single-photon detectors are fundamental tools of investigation in quantum optics and play a central role in measurement theory and quantum informatics. Photodetectors based on different technologies exist at optical frequencies and much effort is currently being spent on pushing their efficiencies to meet the demands coming from the quantum computing and quantum communication proposals. In the microwave regime, however, a single-photon detector has remained elusive, although several theoretical proposals have been put forth. In this article, we review these recent proposals, especially focusing on non-destructive detectors of propagating microwave photons. These detection schemes using superconducting artificial atoms can reach detection efficiencies of 90% with the existing technologies and are ripe for experimental investigations.

  12. Mars Telecommunications Orbiter Ka-band system design and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noreen, Gary; Komarek, Tomas; Diehl, Roger; Shambayati, Shervin; Breidenthal, Julian; Lopez, Saturnino; Jordan, Frank

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Mars Telecommunications Orbiter (MTO) will relay broadband communications from landers, rovers and spacecraft in the vicinity of Mars to Earth. This paper describes the MTO communications system and how the MTO Ka-band system will be operated.

  13. Deep space propagation experiments at Ka-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butman, Stanley A.

    1990-01-01

    Propagation experiments as essential components of the general plan to develop an operational deep space telecommunications and navigation capability at Ka-band (32 to 35 GHz) by the end of the 20th century are discussed. Significant benefits of Ka-band over the current deep space standard X-band (8.4 GHz) are an improvement of 4 to 10 dB in telemetry capacity and a similar increase in radio navigation accuracy. Propagation experiments are planned on the Mars Observer Mission in 1992 in preparation for the Cassini Mission to Saturn in 1996, which will use Ka-band in the search for gravity waves as well as to enhance telemetry and navigation at Saturn in 2002. Subsequent uses of Ka-band are planned for the Solar Probe Mission and the Mars Program.

  14. The Mars Observer Ka-band link experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebold, T. A.; Kwok, A.; Wood, G. E.; Butman, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Ka-Band Link Experiment was the first demonstration of a deep-space communications link in the 32- to 35-GHz band (Ka-band). It was carried out using the Mars Observer spacecraft while the spacecraft was in the cruise phase of its mission and using a 34-meter beam-waveguide research and development antenna at the Goldstone complex of the DSN. The DSN has been investigating the performance benefits of a shift from X-band (8.4 GHz) to Ka-band (32 GHz) for deep-space communications. The fourfold increase in frequency is expected to offer a factor of 3 to 10 improvement (5 to 10 dB) in signal strength for a given spacecraft transmitter power and antenna size. Until recently, the expected benefits were based on performance studies, with an eye to implementing such a link, but theory was transformed to reality when a 33.7-GHz Ka-band signal was received from the spacecraft by DSS 13. This article describes the design and implementation of the Ka-Band Link Experiment from the spacecraft to the DSS-13 system, as well as results from the Ka-band telemetry demonstration, ranging demonstration, and long-term tracking experiment. Finally, a preliminary analysis of comparative X- and Ka-band tracking results is included. These results show a 4- to 7-dB advantage for Ka-band using the system at DSS 13, assuming such obstacles as antenna pointing loss and power conversion loss are overcome.

  15. Ka-Band MMIC Subarray Technology Program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottinger, W.

    1995-01-01

    Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) arrays have been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in closed proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the 'tile' array packaging architecture at EHF via the insertion of 1990 MMIC technology into a functional tile array or subarray module. The means test of this objective was to demonstrate and deliver to NASA a minimum of two 4 x 4 (16 radiating element) subarray modules operating in a transmit mode at 29.6 GHz. Available (1990) MMIC technology was chosen to focus the program effort on the novel interconnect schemes and packaging requirements rather than focusing on MMIC development. Major technical achievements of this program include the successful integration of two 4 x 4 subarray modules into a single antenna array. This 32 element array demonstrates a transmit EIRP of over 300 watts yielding an effective directive power gain in excess of 55 dB at 29.63 GHz. The array has been actively used as the transmit link in airborne/terrestrial mobile communication experiments accomplished via the ACTS satellite launched in August 1993.

  16. Ka-band MMIC subarray technology program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottinger, W.

    1995-09-01

    Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) arrays have been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in closed proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the 'tile' array packaging architecture at EHF via the insertion of 1990 MMIC technology into a functional tile array or subarray module. The means test of this objective was to demonstrate and deliver to NASA a minimum of two 4 x 4 (16 radiating element) subarray modules operating in a transmit mode at 29.6 GHz. Available (1990) MMIC technology was chosen to focus the program effort on the novel interconnect schemes and packaging requirements rather than focusing on MMIC development. Major technical achievements of this program include the successful integration of two 4 x 4 subarray modules into a single antenna array. This 32 element array demonstrates a transmit EIRP of over 300 watts yielding an effective directive power gain in excess of 55 dB at 29.63 GHz. The array has been actively used as the transmit link in airborne/terrestrial mobile communication experiments accomplished via the ACTS satellite launched in August 1993.

  17. Harmonic distortion in microwave photonic filters.

    PubMed

    Rius, Manuel; Mora, José; Bolea, Mario; Capmany, José

    2012-04-09

    We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of nonlinear microwave photonic filters. Far from the conventional condition of low modulation index commonly used to neglect high-order terms, we have analyzed the harmonic distortion involved in microwave photonic structures with periodic and non-periodic frequency responses. We show that it is possible to design microwave photonic filters with reduced harmonic distortion and high linearity even under large signal operation.

  18. ACTS Ka-Band Earth Stations: Technology, Performance, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Struharik, Steven J.; Diamond, John J.; Stewart, David

    2000-01-01

    stations successfully demonstrated many services and applications at Ka-band in three different modes of operation: circuit switched TDMA using the satellite on-board processor, satellite switched SS-TDMA applications using the on-board Microwave Switch Matrix (MSM), and conventional transponder (bent-pipe) operation. Data rates ranged from 4.8 kbps up to 622 Mbps. Experiments included: 1) low rate (4.8- 1 00's kbps) remote data acquisition and control using small earth stations, 2) moderate rate (1-45 Mbps) experiments included full duplex voice and video conferencing and both full duplex and asymmetric data rate protocol and network evaluation using mid-size ground stations, and 3) link characterization experiments and high data rate (155-622 Mbps) terrestrial and satellite interoperability application experiments conducted by a consortium of experimenters using the large transportable ground stations.

  19. Photon Statistics of Propagating Thermal Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J.; Pogorzalek, S.; Deppe, F.; Fedorov, K. G.; Eder, P.; Fischer, M.; Wulschner, F.; Xie, E.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.

    2017-03-01

    In experiments with superconducting quantum circuits, characterizing the photon statistics of propagating microwave fields is a fundamental task. We quantify the n2+n photon number variance of thermal microwave photons emitted from a blackbody radiator for mean photon numbers, 0.05 ≲n ≲1.5 . We probe the fields using either correlation measurements or a transmon qubit coupled to a microwave resonator. Our experiments provide a precise quantitative characterization of weak microwave states and information on the noise emitted by a Josephson parametric amplifier.

  20. X-/Ka-band dichroic plate noise temperature reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veruttipong, W.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    The X-/Ka-band (8.4 GHz/32.0 GHz) dichroic plate installed as DSS 13 contributes an estimated 3 K to the system noise temperature at 32.0 GHz. Approximately 1 percent of the Ka-band incident field is reflected by the plate into the 300-K environment of the DSS-13 pedestal room. A low-cost, easily implemented method of reducing the noise temperature is presented. Using a curved reflector, the reflected field can be re-focused into an 80-K cold load, reducing the noise temperature contribution of the dichroic plate by about 2 K.

  1. X-/Ka-Band Dichroic Plate Noise Temperature Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veruttipong, W.; Lee, P.

    1994-07-01

    The X-/Ka-band (8.4-GHz/32.0-GHz) dichroic plate installed at DSS 13 contributes an estimated 3 K to the system noise temperature at 32.0 GHz. Approximately 1 percent of the Ka-band incident field is reflected by the plate into the 300-K environment of the DSS-13 pedestal room. A low-cost, easily implemented method of reducing the noise temperature is presented. Using a curved reflector, the reflected field can be refocused into an 80-K cold load, reducing the noise temperature contribution of the dichroic plate by about 2 K.

  2. X-/Ka-band dichroic plate noise temperature reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veruttipong, W.; Lee, P.

    1994-11-01

    The X-/Ka-band (8.4 GHz/32.0 GHz) dichroic plate installed as DSS 13 contributes an estimated 3 K to the system noise temperature at 32.0 GHz. Approximately 1 percent of the Ka-band incident field is reflected by the plate into the 300-K environment of the DSS-13 pedestal room. A low-cost, easily implemented method of reducing the noise temperature is presented. Using a curved reflector, the reflected field can be re-focused into an 80-K cold load, reducing the noise temperature contribution of the dichroic plate by about 2 K.

  3. Packaging Considerations for Integrated RF Microphotonic Receiver at Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Pouch, John; Lee, Richard; Miranda, Felix; Hossein-Zadeh, Mani; Harriague, Ferando; Levi, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program is supporting the development of an RF microphotonic Ka-band receiver. The receiver consists of a lithium niobate micro-disk that enables the incoming RF signal (up to Ka-band) to be coupled to the optical signal (approx. 200 THz). The modulated optical signal is detected by the high-speed photonic signal processing electronics. When compared with an all-electronic approach, the microphotonic receiver technology offers 1 Ox smaller volume, smaller weight, and smaller power consumption, greater sensitivity, and optical isolation for applications in extreme environments. It could potentially be implemented to support planetary surface-to-surface and surface-to-relay communications, as well as high-data-rate inter-satellite links. We are currently studying a number of fabrication and integration issues that could result as this technology is advanced for potential insertion into a NASA mission. The results of our preliminary effort to integrate the RF microphotonic receiver components (e.g., the lithium niobate micro-disk, the optical elements, and the Ka-band patch antenna) on an etched silicon wafer will be presented, In addition, the concomitant integration and packaging issues, and the potential NASA applications will be discussed.

  4. Cassini Downlink Ka-Band Carrier Signal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D. D.; Kahan, D.; Oudrhiri, K.; Lee, C.-A.

    2017-02-01

    Lower frequency telemetry bands are becoming more limited in bandwidth with more competition between flight projects and other entities. Higher frequency bands offer significantly more bandwidth and hence the prospect of much higher data rates. Future or prospective flight projects considering Ka-band (32-GHz) telemetry data links are interested in past flight experience with received Ka-band data. Over 10 years of Cassini closed-loop received Ka-band carrier data involving over 2 million individual measurements were acquired at all three Deep Space Network (DSN) sites. We analyzed these data to characterize link performance over a wide range of weather conditions and as a function of elevation angle. Based on this analysis, we have derived a recommendation for telecommunications link margin for preflight planning purposes. These results suggest that a 4-dB margin will ensure a 94 percent data return at a minimum 20-deg elevation angle under 90 percent weather conditions at 32 GHz (Ka-band).

  5. Experimental radio frequency link for Ka-band communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Conray, Martin J.; Saunders, Alan L.; Pope, Dale E.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental radio frequency link has been demonstrated to provide two-way communication between a remote user ground terminal and a ground-based Ka-band transponder. Bit-error-rate performance and radio frequency characteristics of the communication link were investigated.

  6. K/Ka-band Antenna for Broadband Aeronautical Mobile Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, A.

    1994-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has recently begun the development of a Broadband Aeronauical Terminal (BAT) for duplex video satellite communications on commercial or business class aircraft. The BAT is designed for use with NASA's K/Ka-band Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS).

  7. Ka-Band Waveguide Hybrid Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers with Unequal and Arbitrary Power Output Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2009-01-01

    The design, simulation and characterization of a novel Ka-band (32.05 +/- 0.25 GHz) rectangular waveguide branchline hybrid unequal power combiner is presented. The manufactured combiner was designed to combine input signals, which are nearly in phase and with an amplitude ratio of two. The measured return loss and isolation of the branch-line hybrid are better than 22 and 27 dB, respectively. The application of the branch-line hybrid for combining two monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers with output power ratio of two is demonstrated. The measured combining efficiency is 92.9% at the center frequency of 32.05 GHz.

  8. Simulation and measurement of a Ka-band HTS MMIC Josephson junction mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Pegrum, Colin; Du, Jia; Guo, Yingjie Jay

    2017-01-01

    We report modeling and simulation results for a Ka band high-temperature superconducting (HTS) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) Josephson junction mixer. A Verilog-A model of a Josephson junction is established and imported into the system simulator to realize a full HTS MMIC circuit simulation containing the HTS passive circuit models. Impedance matching optimization between the junction and passive devices is investigated. Junction DC I-V characteristics, current and local oscillator bias conditions and mixing performance are simulated and compared with the experimental results. Good agreement is obtained between the simulation and measurement results.

  9. Evaluation of Deep Space Ka-Band Data Transfer using Radiometeorological Forecasts and Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Biscarini, Marianna; Milani, Luca; Cimini, Domenico; De Sanctis, Klaide; Di Fabio, Saverio

    2016-04-01

    Deep space exploration is aimed at acquiring information about the solar system. In this scenario, telecommunications links between Earth ground receiving stations and extra-terrestrial satellite platforms have to be designed in order to ensure the optimal transfer of the acquired scientific data back to the Earth. A significant communication capacity has to be planned when very large distances, as those characterising deep space links, are involved thus fostering more ambitious scientific mission requirements. At the current state of the art, two microwave channel frequencies are used to perform the deep space data transfer: X band (~ 8.4 GHz) and Ka band (~ 32 GHz) channel. Ka-band transmission can offer an advantage over X-band in terms of antenna performance with the same antenna effective area and an available data transfer bandwidth (50 times higher at Ka band than X band). However, Earth troposphere-related impairments can affects the space-to-Earth carrier signals at frequencies higher than 10 GHz by degrading its integrity and thus reducing the deep space channel temporal availability. Such atmospheric impairments, especially in terms of path attenuation, their statistic and the possibility to forecast them in the next 24H at the Earth's receiving station would allow a more accurate design of the deep space link, promoting the mitigation of the detrimental effects on the link availability. To pursue this aim, meteorological forecast models and in situ measurements need to be considered in order to characterise the troposphere in terms of signal path attenuation at current and future time. In this work, we want to show how the synergistic use of meteorological forecasts, radiative transfer simulations and in situ measurements such as microwave radiometry observations, rain gauges and radiosoundings, can aid the optimisation of a deep space link at Ka band and improve its performance with respect to usual practices. The outcomes of the study are in the

  10. A monolithic integrated photonic microwave filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandiño, Javier S.; Muñoz, Pascual; Doménech, David; Capmany, José

    2016-12-01

    Meeting the increasing demand for capacity in wireless networks requires the harnessing of higher regions in the radiofrequency spectrum, reducing cell size, as well as more compact, agile and power-efficient base stations that are capable of smoothly interfacing the radio and fibre segments. Fully functional microwave photonic chips are promising candidates in attempts to meet these goals. In recent years, many integrated microwave photonic chips have been reported in different technologies. To the best of our knowledge, none has monolithically integrated all the main active and passive optoelectronic components. Here, we report the first demonstration of a tunable microwave photonics filter that is monolithically integrated into an indium phosphide chip. The reconfigurable radiofrequency photonic filter includes all the necessary elements (for example, lasers, modulators and photodetectors), and its response can be tuned by means of control electric currents. This is an important step in demonstrating the feasibility of integrated and programmable microwave photonic processors.

  11. A monolithic integrated photonic microwave filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandiño, Javier S.; Muñoz, Pascual; Doménech, David; Capmany, José

    2017-02-01

    Meeting the increasing demand for capacity in wireless networks requires the harnessing of higher regions in the radiofrequency spectrum, reducing cell size, as well as more compact, agile and power-efficient base stations that are capable of smoothly interfacing the radio and fibre segments. Fully functional microwave photonic chips are promising candidates in attempts to meet these goals. In recent years, many integrated microwave photonic chips have been reported in different technologies. To the best of our knowledge, none has monolithically integrated all the main active and passive optoelectronic components. Here, we report the first demonstration of a tunable microwave photonics filter that is monolithically integrated into an indium phosphide chip. The reconfigurable radiofrequency photonic filter includes all the necessary elements (for example, lasers, modulators and photodetectors), and its response can be tuned by means of control electric currents. This is an important step in demonstrating the feasibility of integrated and programmable microwave photonic processors.

  12. Ka-band MMIC arrays for ACTS Aero Terminal Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, C.; Zakrajsek, R.; Lee, R.; Turtle, J.

    1992-01-01

    An antenna system consisting of three experimental Ka-band active arrays using GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification is presented. The MMIC arrays are to be demonstrated in the ACTS Aeronautical Terminal Experiment, planned for early 1994. The experiment is outlined, with emphasis on a description of the antenna system. Attention is given to the way in which proof-of-concept MMIC arrays featuring three different state-of-the-art approaches to Ka-band MMIC insertion are being incorporated into an experimental aircraft terminal for the demonstration of an aircraft-to-satellite link, providing a basis for follow-on MMIC array development.

  13. Interim Findings of ACTS Ka-Band Propagation Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, N.

    1997-01-01

    The ACTS propagation campaign is focusing on two broad areas: 1) Rain/signal attenuation data collection at seven sites in North America, 2) Theoretical and empirical consideratons for a global model to predict first & second order temporal and spatial statistics on attenuation, scintillation, conherence bandwidth, and depolarization due to weather (precipitation and atmospheric including interaction of weather with the antenna) for satellite systems at Ka-band.

  14. Interim Findings of ACTS Ka-Band Propagation Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, N.

    1997-01-01

    The ACTS propagation campaign is focusing on two broad areas: 1) Rain/signal attenuation data collection at seven sites in North America, 2) Theoretical and empirical consideratons for a global model to predict first & second order temporal and spatial statistics on attenuation, scintillation, conherence bandwidth, and depolarization due to weather (precipitation and atmospheric including interaction of weather with the antenna) for satellite systems at Ka-band.

  15. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Frequency Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4 GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-in diameter parabolic high gain antenna (HGA) on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) R&D 34-meter antenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. The projected 5-dB link advantage of Ka-band relative to X-band was confirmed in previous reports using measurements of MGS signal strength data acquired during the first two years of the link experiment from December 1996 to December 1998. Analysis of X-band and Ka-band frequency data and difference frequency (fx-fka)/3.8 data will be presented here. On board the spacecraft, a low-power sample of the X-band downlink from the transponder is upconverted to 32 GHz, the Ka-band frequency, amplified to I-W using a Solid State Power Amplifier, and radiated from the dual X/Ka HGA. The X-band signal is amplified by one of two 25 W TWTAs. An upconverter first downconverts the 8.42 GHz X-band signal to 8 GHz and then multiplies using a X4 multiplier producing the 32 GHz Ka-band frequency. The frequency source selection is performed by an RF switch which can be commanded to select a VCO (Voltage Controlled Oscillator) or USO (Ultra-Stable Oscillator) reference. The Ka-band frequency can be either coherent with the X-band downlink reference or a hybrid combination of the USO and VCO derived frequencies. The data in this study were chosen such that the Ka-band signal is purely coherent with the X-band signal, that is the downconverter is driven by the same frequency source as the X-band downlink). The ground station used to acquire the data is DSS-13, a 34-meter BWG antenna which incorporates a series of mirrors inside beam waveguide tubes which guide the energy to a subterranean pedestal room, providing a stable environment

  16. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Frequency Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4 GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-in diameter parabolic high gain antenna (HGA) on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) R&D 34-meter antenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. The projected 5-dB link advantage of Ka-band relative to X-band was confirmed in previous reports using measurements of MGS signal strength data acquired during the first two years of the link experiment from December 1996 to December 1998. Analysis of X-band and Ka-band frequency data and difference frequency (f(sub x)-f(sub ka)/3.8) data will be presented here. On board the spacecraft, a low-power sample of the X-band downlink from the transponder is upconverted to 32 GHz, the Ka-band frequency, amplified to I-W using a Solid State Power Amplifier, and radiated from the dual X/Ka HGA. The X-band signal is amplified by one of two 25 W TWTAs. An upconverter first downconverts the 8.42 GHz X-band signal to 8 GHz and then multiplies using a X4 multiplier producing the 32 GHz Ka-band frequency. The frequency source selection is performed by an RF switch which can be commanded to select a VCO (Voltage Controlled Oscillator) or USO (Ultra-Stable Oscillator) reference. The Ka-band frequency can be either coherent with the X-band downlink reference or a hybrid combination of the USO and VCO derived frequencies. The data in this study were chosen such that the Ka-band signal is purely coherent with the X-band signal, that is the downconverter is driven by the same frequency source as the X-band downlink). The ground station used to acquire the data is DSS-13, a 34-meter BWG antenna which incorporates a series of mirrors inside beam waveguide tubes which guide the energy to a subterranean pedestal room, providing a stable

  17. Rain Fade Compensation Alternatives for Ka Band Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    1997-01-01

    Future satellite communications systems operating in Ka-band frequency band are subject to degradation produced by the troposphere which is much more severe than those found at lower frequency bands. These impairments include signal absorption by rain, clouds and gases, and amplitude scintillation's arising from refractive index irregularities. For example, rain attenuation at 20 GHz is almost three times that at 11 GHz. Although some of these impairments can be overcome by oversizing the ground station antennas and high power amplifiers, the current trend is using small (less than 20 inches apertures), low-cost ground stations (less than $1000) that can be easily deployed at user premises. As a consequence, most Ka-band systems are expected to employ different forms of fade mitigation that can be implemented relatively easily and at modest cost. The rain fade mitigation approaches are defined by three types of Ka-band communications systems - a low service rate (less than 1.5 Mb/s), a moderate service rate (1.5 to 6 Mb/s) system and a high service rate (greater than 43 Mb/s) system. The ACTS VSAT network, which includes an adaptive rain fade technique, is an example of a moderate service rate.

  18. Wideband Electroabsorption Modulator for Microwave Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    modulators (TWEAMs) for use in microwave transmission systems exceeding frequencies of 50 GHz. Potential monolithic integration of these modulators...exceeding frequencies of 50 GHz. Potential monolithic integration of these modulators with low noise lasers is promising for insertion into future...AFRL-SN-RS-TR-2004-281 Final Technical Report October 2004 WIDEBAND ELECTROABSORPTION MODULATOR FOR MICROWAVE PHOTONICS

  19. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} for hidden photon masses between 10{sup -14} eV and 10{sup -7} eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained.

  20. Transmission characteristic of graphene/TiO2 paper measured at Ka-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agusu, La; Mitsudo, Seitaro; Ahmad, La Ode; Herdianto, Fujii, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Yuya; Furuya, Takahashi; Ramadhan, La Ode Ahmad Nur

    2017-01-01

    The commercial telecommunication system in future would explore the electromagnetic spectrum with higher frequency than used now, because it requires higher speed of transmission data. Using the millimeter waves (mmW) with frequency ranging from 30 to 300 GHz, such requirement could be fulfilled. The upcoming 5G cellular technology is expected to use frequency 30 GHz or higher. Then materials with a specific characteristic at the mmW range are interesting to be explored and investigated. Here, we report the synthesis process of graphene/TiO2 deposited on paper and their transmission characteristics to the electromagnetic energy at frequency 27-40 GHz (Ka-Band). The reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was synthesized by a modified Hummers method with introduction of microwave irradiation in the process. rGO and TiO2 were mixed in ethanol solution and deposited on the paper by a spraying technique. Transmission coefficient of electromagnetic wave energy at Ka-Band was measured by using the millimeter vector network analyzer. Conductivity of rGO is 1.89 Scm-1 and for the graphene/TiO2 with TiO2 content is up to 50%, conductivity is down to Scm-1 Graphene/TiO2 layer with thickness of 60).lm and TiO2 loading up to 25% can has the transmission coefficient of -4 dB at the middle frequency of 31 GHz and bandwidth of 2.2 GHz. This can be useful as the electromagnetic interference shielding material at Ka-band.

  1. Generating single microwave photons in a circuit.

    PubMed

    Houck, A A; Schuster, D I; Gambetta, J M; Schreier, J A; Johnson, B R; Chow, J M; Frunzio, L; Majer, J; Devoret, M H; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2007-09-20

    Microwaves have widespread use in classical communication technologies, from long-distance broadcasts to short-distance signals within a computer chip. Like all forms of light, microwaves, even those guided by the wires of an integrated circuit, consist of discrete photons. To enable quantum communication between distant parts of a quantum computer, the signals must also be quantum, consisting of single photons, for example. However, conventional sources can generate only classical light, not single photons. One way to realize a single-photon source is to collect the fluorescence of a single atom. Early experiments measured the quantum nature of continuous radiation, and further advances allowed triggered sources of photons on demand. To allow efficient photon collection, emitters are typically placed inside optical or microwave cavities, but these sources are difficult to employ for quantum communication on wires within an integrated circuit. Here we demonstrate an on-chip, on-demand single-photon source, where the microwave photons are injected into a wire with high efficiency and spectral purity. This is accomplished in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, with a microwave transmission line cavity that enhances the spontaneous emission of a single superconducting qubit. When the qubit spontaneously emits, the generated photon acts as a flying qubit, transmitting the quantum information across a chip. We perform tomography of both the qubit and the emitted photons, clearly showing that both the quantum phase and amplitude are transferred during the emission. Both the average power and voltage of the photon source are characterized to verify performance of the system. This single-photon source is an important addition to a rapidly growing toolbox for quantum optics on a chip.

  2. Ferroelectric switch for a high-power Ka-band active pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  3. Four-Way Ka-Band Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul; Li, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    A waveguide structure for combining the outputs of four amplifiers operating at 35 GHz (Ka band) is based on a similar prior structure used in the X band. The structure is designed to function with low combining loss and low total reflected power at a center frequency of 35 GHz with a 160 MHz bandwidth. The structure (see figure) comprises mainly a junction of five rectangular waveguides in a radial waveguide. The outputs of the four amplifiers can be coupled in through any four of the five waveguide ports. Provided that these four signals are properly phased, they combine and come out through the fifth waveguide port.

  4. Ka-band mobile and personal systems development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessouky, K.; Estabrook, P.; Jedrey, T.; Sue, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Expanding the commercial applications of space is one of the primary goals of NASA. Throughout the eighties NASA has pursued this objective by sponsoring and undertaking the development of system concepts, enabling high risk technologies, and actual proof of concept demonstration hardware. In the mobile and personal arena, or the so-called low data rate applications area, JPL is NASA's lead center. JPL's focus of activities has been the Mobile Satellite-Experiment (MSAT-X) project, which developed mobile communication technologies at L-band, and its present successors, which aim to expand the mobile arena by exploiting Ka-band.

  5. NASA SCaN Overview and Ka-Band Actvities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, James D.; Midon, Marco Mario; Davarian, Faramaz; Geldzahler, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The Ka- and Broadband Communications Conference is an international forum attended by worldwide experts in the area of Ka-Band Propagation and satellite communications. Since its inception, NASA has taken the initiative of organizing and leading technical sections on RF Propagation and satellite communications, solidifying its worldwide leadership in the aforementioned areas. Consequently, participation in this conference through the contributions described below will maintain NASA leadership in Ka- and above RF Propagation as it relates to enhancing current and future satellite communication systems supporting space exploration.

  6. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-03-06

    The Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) is a zenith-pointing Doppler cloud radar operating at approximately 35 GHz. The KAZR is an evolutionary follow-on radar to ARM's widely successful millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). The main purpose of the KAZR is to provide vertical profiles of clouds by measuring the first three Doppler moments: reflectivity, radial Doppler velocity, and spectra width. At the sites where the dual-polarization measurements are made, the Doppler moments for the cross-polarization channel are also available. In addition to the moments, velocity spectra are also continuously recorded for each range gate.

  7. Design of High Power Density Amplifiers: Application to Ka Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passi, Davide; Leggieri, Alberto; Di Paolo, Franco; Bartocci, Marco; Tafuto, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Recent developments in the design of high-power-high-frequency amplifiers are assessed in this paper by the analysis and measurements of a high power density amplifier operating in the Ka Band. Design procedure is presented and a technical investigation is reported. The proposed device has shown over 23% of useful frequency bandwidth. It is an ensemble of 16 monolithic solid state power amplifiers that employees mixed technologies as spatial and planar combiners. Test performed have given maximum delivered power of 47.2 dBm.

  8. K/Ka-band channel characterization for mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinck, Deborah S.; Rice, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    Mobile satellite systems allow truly ubiquitous wireless communications to users anywhere and anytime. NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides an ideal space-based platform for the measurement of K/Ka band propagation characteristics in a land mobile satellite application. Field tests conducted in Southern California during the first seven months of 1994 using JPL's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) provided channel characterization data for the K/Ka-band link. A pilot tone was transmitted from a fixed station in Cleveland, Ohio through the satellite and downlinked at 20 GHz in the Southern California spot beam. The AMT was equipped with a narrow beam, high gain antenna which tracked the satellite in azimuth for a fixed elevation angle (46 degrees for this case). The field tests were conducted in three basic environments: clear line-of-sight (LOS) highways, lightly shadowed suburban, and heavily shadowed suburban. Preliminary results of these field tests indicate very little multipath for rural environments and for clear LOS links (as expected with a narrow beam antenna). Deep fades were experienced in shadowed areas, especially those where tree canopies covered the road.

  9. Ka-Band, Multi-Gigabit-Per-Second Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Smith, Francis J.; Harris, Johnny M.; Landon, David G.; Haddadin, Osama S.; McIntire, William K.; Sun, June Y.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a multi-Gigabit-per-second, Ka-band transceiver with a software-defined modem (SDM) capable of digitally encoding/decoding data and compensating for linear and nonlinear distortions in the end-to-end system, including the traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA). This innovation can increase data rates of space-to-ground communication links, and has potential application to NASA s future spacebased Earth observation system. The SDM incorporates an extended version of the industry-standard DVB-S2, and LDPC rate 9/10 FEC codec. The SDM supports a suite of waveforms, including QPSK, 8-PSK, 16-APSK, 32- APSK, 64-APSK, and 128-QAM. The Ka-band and TWTA deliver an output power on the order of 200 W with efficiency greater than 60%, and a passband of at least 3 GHz. The modem and the TWTA together enable a data rate of 20 Gbps with a low bit error rate (BER). The payload data rates for spacecraft in NASA s integrated space communications network can be increased by an order of magnitude (>10 ) over current state-of-practice. This innovation enhances the data rate by using bandwidth-efficient modulation techniques, which transmit a higher number of bits per Hertz of bandwidth than the currently used quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) waveforms.

  10. ACTS propagation experiment discussion: Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the CSU-CHILL and Space Communications Technology Center Florida propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.; Mueller, Eugene A.; Turk, Joseph; Beaver, John; Helmken, Henry F.; Henning, Rudy

    1993-01-01

    Papers on Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the Colorado State University CHILL multiparameter radar and on Space Communications Technology Center Florida Propagation Program are discussed. Topics covered include: microwave radiative transfer and propagation models; NASA propagation terminal status; ACTS channel characteristics; FAU receive only terminal; FAU terminal status; and propagation testbed.

  11. Frequency Agile Microwave Photonic Notch Filter in a Photonic Chip

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-21

    frequency measurement (IFM) system was also explored. 4. Results and discussions: a. High extinction tunable notch filter in a chalcogenide chip [Optica...Microwave photonic filters based on SBS have shown excellent properties in terms of high resolution and extinction . Although efficiently generated in soft...sidebands’ spectra. d. High resolution microwave frequency measurement with on-chip SBS [Optica 3, 30 (2016)] The high extinction cancellation

  12. High Efficiency Ka-Band Solid State Power Amplifier Waveguide Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    A novel Ka-band high efficiency asymmetric waveguide four-port combiner for coherent combining of two Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Solid State Power Amplifiers (SSPAs) having unequal outputs has been successfully designed, fabricated and characterized over the NASA deep space frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The measured combiner efficiency is greater than 90 percent, the return loss greater than 18 dB and input port isolation greater than 22 dB. The manufactured combiner was designed for an input power ratio of 2:1 but can be custom designed for any arbitrary power ratio. Applications considered are NASA s space communications systems needing 6 to 10 W of radio frequency (RF) power. This Technical Memorandum (TM) is an expanded version of the article recently published in Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Electronics Letters.

  13. Dielectric Resonator for Ka-Band Pulsed EPR Measurements at Cryogenic Temperatures: Probehead Construction and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Astashkin, A.; Enemark, J. H.; Blank, A.; Twig, Y.; Song, Y.; Meade, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    The construction and performance of a Ka-band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) cryogenic probehead that incorporates dielectric resonator (DR) is presented. We demonstrate that the use of DR allows one to optimize pulsed double electron–electron resonance (DEER) measurements utilizing large resonator bandwidth and large amplitude of the microwave field B1. In DEER measurements of Gd-based spin labels, use of this probe finally allows one to implement the potentials of Gd-based labels in distance measurements. Evidently, this DR is well suited to any applications requiring large B1-fields and resonator bandwidths, such as electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy of nuclei having low magnetic moments and strong hyperfine interactions and double quantum coherence dipolar spectroscopy as was recently demonstrated in the application of a similar probe based on an loop-gap resonator and reported by Forrer et al. (J Magn Reson 190:280, 2008). PMID:23626406

  14. Ka-band IQ vector modulator employing GaAs HBTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuxiong, Cao; Danyu, Wu; Gaopeng, Chen; Zhi, Jin; Xinyu, Liu

    2011-06-01

    The importance of high-performance, low-cost and millimeter-wave transmitters for digital communications and radar applications is increasing. The design and performance of a Ka-band balanced in-phase and quadrature-phase (I-Q) type vector modulator, using GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) as switching elements, are presented. The balanced technique is used to remove the parasitics of the HBTs to result in near perfect constellations. Measurements of the monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) chip with a size of 1.89 × 2.26 mm2 demonstrate an amplitude error below 1.5 dB and the phase error within 3° between 26 and 40 GHz except for a singular point at 35.6 GHz. The results show that the technique is suitable for millimeter-wave digital communications.

  15. Low-loss microstrip MEMS technology for passive components design in the Ka-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martoglio, L.; Richalot, E.; Picon, O.

    2002-04-01

    The development of Wireless Local Loop applications require low-cost technologies in the Ka-band. As transmission lines and passive circuit components on standard low-resistivity silicon substrates have high loss in this frequency range, a new microstrip MEMS technology is proposed for high- frequency applications. It has many advantages as the low cost of the substrates (glass and standard silicon), the simple technological process, the good electrical performances, and the low sensitivity to electromagnetic radiation. This technology consists in inverted microstrip lines, either on low loss silicon or on glass, which can be combined to obtain compact circuits associating active and passive components. Moreover, this technology seems suitable for current microwave and radiofrequency applications because it could be easily adapted to silicon fabrication technologies dedicated to planar circuits.

  16. Ka-Band SiGe Receiver Front-End MMIC for Transponder Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, Jaikrishna; Mysoor, Narayan R.; Hashemi, Hassein; Aflatouni, Firooz

    2010-01-01

    A fully integrated, front-end Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) was developed that houses an LNA (low noise amplifier) stage, a down-conversion stage, and output buffer amplifiers. The MMIC design employs a two-step quadrature down-conversion architecture, illustrated in the figure, which results in improved quality of the down-converted IF quadrature signals. This is due to the improved sensitivity of this architecture to amplitude and phase mismatches in the quadrature down-conversion process. Current sharing results in reduced power consumption, while 3D-coupled inductors reduce the chip area. Improved noise figure is expected over previous SiGe-based, frontend designs

  17. A personal communications network using a Ka-band satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Larry C.; Laborde, Enrique; Stern, Alan; Sohn, Philip Y.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of a personal communications network using portable terminals that can provide 4.8-kb/s voice communications to a hub station via a Ka-band geosynchronous satellite has been investigated. Tradeoffs are examined so that the combined system of hub and gateway earth stations, the satellite, and the personal terminals can provide a competitive service in terms of cost, availability, and quality. A baseline system that uses a spacecraft with approximately 140 spot beams to cover the contiguous US (CONUS) and 5-W power amplifiers in each beam is described. Satellite access in both the forward and return directions uses frequency-division multiple-access/code-division multiple-access (FDMA/CDMA) with a chip rate of 2.5 Mchip/s.

  18. A personal communications network using a Ka-band satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, L. C.; Stern, A.; Sohn, P. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of portable communications terminals that can provide 4.8-kbps voice communications to a hub station via a Ka-band geosynchronous satellite was investigated. Tradeoffs are examined so that the combined system of the hub and gateway earth stations, the satellite, and the personal terminals can provide a competitive service in terms of cost, availability, and quality. A baseline system is described using a spacecraft with approximately 140 spot beams that cover CONUS with 5-watt power amplifiers in each beam. Satellite access in both the forward and return directions uses Frequency Division Multiple Access/Code Division Multiple Access (FDMA/CDMA) with a chip rate of 2.5 Mchip/sec. An experiment is recommended using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to demonstrate some of the features of the portable terminal concept.

  19. Advanced Ka-Band Transceiver With Monopulse Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Abdur; Hoppe, Dan; Epp, Larry; Perez, Raul

    2006-01-01

    A proposed Ka-band transmitting/ receiving system would embody a unique combination of established and semi-proven design features. The proposed system (see figure) would include a monopulse receiving feedback loop and a mirror that could be moved by piezoelectric actuators in the feedback loop to adjust the aim of the transmitted and received radio beams. Unlike in a phased-array tracking system, phase shifters (which can be complex and expensive) would not be needed in this monopulse tracking system. Moreover, the monopulse-tracking loop could be combined with other subsystems used in established subreflector and antenna designs. The final transmitter power amplifier in the proposed system would be a quasi-optical power amplifier (QOPA) -- a combination of a planar array of 25 amplifiers and corresponding planar arrays of antenna elements, such that free-space power combining would take place at the output.

  20. A personal communications network using a Ka-band satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, L. C.; Stern, A.; Sohn, P. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of portable communications terminals that can provide 4.8-kbps voice communications to a hub station via a Ka-band geosynchronous satellite was investigated. Tradeoffs are examined so that the combined system of the hub and gateway earth stations, the satellite, and the personal terminals can provide a competitive service in terms of cost, availability, and quality. A baseline system is described using a spacecraft with approximately 140 spot beams that cover CONUS with 5-watt power amplifiers in each beam. Satellite access in both the forward and return directions uses Frequency Division Multiple Access/Code Division Multiple Access (FDMA/CDMA) with a chip rate of 2.5 Mchip/sec. An experiment is recommended using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to demonstrate some of the features of the portable terminal concept.

  1. A Ka-band GaAs monolithic phase shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J. J.; Contolatis, A.; Bauhahn, P. E.; Chao, C.

    1983-01-01

    The design and performance of a GaAs monolithic 180-degree one-bit switched line phase shifter test circuit for Ka-band operation is presented. A self-aligned gate (SAG) fabrication technique is also described that reduces resistive parasitics in the switching FET's. Over the 27.5-30 GHz band, typical measured differential insertion phase is within 10-20 deg of the ideal time delay characteristic. Over the same band, the insertion loss for the SAG phase shifter is about 2.5-3 dB per bit. The SAG fabrication technique holds promise in reducing phase shifter insertion loss to about 1.5 dB/bit for 30-GHz operation.

  2. A personal communications network using a Ka-band satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Larry C.; Laborde, Enrique; Stern, Alan; Sohn, Philip Y.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of a personal communications network using portable terminals that can provide 4.8-kb/s voice communications to a hub station via a Ka-band geosynchronous satellite has been investigated. Tradeoffs are examined so that the combined system of hub and gateway earth stations, the satellite, and the personal terminals can provide a competitive service in terms of cost, availability, and quality. A baseline system that uses a spacecraft with approximately 140 spot beams to cover the contiguous US (CONUS) and 5-W power amplifiers in each beam is described. Satellite access in both the forward and return directions uses frequency-division multiple-access/code-division multiple-access (FDMA/CDMA) with a chip rate of 2.5 Mchip/s.

  3. Miniaturized Ka-Band Dual-Channel Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James P.; Moussessian, Alina; Jenabi, Masud; Custodero, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Smaller (volume, mass, power) electronics for a Ka-band (36 GHz) radar interferometer were required. To reduce size and achieve better control over RFphase versus temperature, fully hybrid electronics were developed for the RF portion of the radar s two-channel receiver and single-channel transmitter. In this context, fully hybrid means that every active RF device was an open die, and all passives were directly attached to the subcarrier. Attachments were made using wire and ribbon bonding. In this way, every component, even small passives, was selected for the fabrication of the two radar receivers, and the devices were mounted relative to each other in order to make complementary components isothermal and to isolate other components from potential temperature gradients. This is critical for developing receivers that can track each other s phase over temperature, which is a key mission driver for obtaining ocean surface height. Fully hybrid, Ka-band (36 GHz) radar transmitter and dual-channel receiver were developed for spaceborne radar interferometry. The fully hybrid fabrication enables control over every aspect of the component selection, placement, and connection. Since the two receiver channels must track each other to better than 100 millidegrees of RF phase over several minutes, the hardware in the two receivers must be "identical," routed the same (same line lengths), and as isothermal as possible. This level of design freedom is not possible with packaged components, which include many internal passive, unknown internal connection lengths/types, and often a single orientation of inputs and outputs.

  4. Nanomechanical coupling between microwave and optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochmann, Joerg; Vainsencher, Amit; Awschalom, David D.; Cleland, Andrew N.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of nanomechanical systems can now operate at the quantum limit, making quantum phenomena more accessible for applications and providing new opportunities for exploring the fundamentals of quantum physics. Such mechanical quantum devices offer compelling opportunities for quantum-enhanced sensing and quantum information. Furthermore, mechanical modes provide a versatile quantum bus for coupling hybrid quantum systems, supporting a quantum-coherent connection between different physical degrees of freedom. Here, we demonstrate a nanomechanical interface between optical photons and microwave electrical signals, using a piezoelectric optomechanical crystal. We achieve coherent signal transfer between itinerant microwave and optical fields by parametric electro-optical coupling using a localized phonon mode. We perform optical tomography of electrically injected mechanical states and observe coherent interactions between microwave, mechanical and optical modes, manifested as electromechanically induced optical transparency. Our on-chip approach merges integrated photonics with microwave nanomechanics and is fully compatible with superconducting quantum circuits, potentially enabling microwave-to-optical quantum state transfer, and photonic networks of superconducting quantum bits.

  5. Ka-Band Waveguide Three-Way Serial Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2012-01-01

    In this innovation, the three-way combiner consists internally of two branch-line hybrids that are connected in series by a short length of waveguide. Each branch-line hybrid is designed to combine input signals that are in phase with an amplitude ratio of two. The combiner is constructed in an E-plane split-block arrangement and is precision machined from blocks of aluminum with standard WR-28 waveguide ports. The port impedances of the combiner are matched to that of a standard WR-28 waveguide. The component parts include the power combiner and the MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) power amplifiers (PAs). The three-way series power combiner is a six-port device. For basic operation, power that enters ports 3, 5, and 6 is combined in phase and appears at port 1. Ports 2 and 4 are isolated ports. The application of the three-way combiner for combining three PAs with unequal output powers was demonstrated. NASA requires narrow-band solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) at Ka-band frequencies with output power in the range of 3 to 5 W for radio or gravity science experiments. In addition, NASA also requires wideband, high-efficiency SSPAs at Ka-band frequencies with output power in the range of 5 to 15 W for high-data-rate communications from deep space to Earth. The three-way power combiner is designed to operate over the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz, which is NASA s deep-space frequency band.

  6. Microwave photonic distributed sensing in harsh environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baokai; Hua, Liwei; Zhu, Wenge; Song, Yang; Yuan, Lei; Li, Yanjun; Xiao, Hai

    2016-05-01

    We report a new distributed fiber optic sensing technique using optical carrier based microwave interferometry. The concept has been demonstrated using different types of optical fibers including singlemode fiber, multimode fiber, single crystal sapphire fiber and polymer fiber. Using the microwave-photonic technique, many fiber interferometers with the same or different optical path differences were interrogated and their locations could be unambiguously determined. The distributed sensing capability was demonstrated using cascaded low-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometers fabricated by fs laser micromachining. Spatially continuous, fully distributed temperature and strain measurements were used as examples to demonstrate the capability of the proposed concept.

  7. Ka-Band Transponder for Deep-Space Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Matthew S.; Mysoor, Narayan R.; Folkner, William M.; Mendoza, Ricardo; Venkatesan, Jaikrishna

    2008-01-01

    A one-page document describes a Ka-band transponder being developed for use in deep-space radio science. The transponder receives in the Deep Space Network (DSN) uplink frequency band of 34.2 to 34.7 GHz, transmits in the 31.8- to 32.3 GHz DSN downlink band, and performs regenerative ranging on a DSN standard 4-MHz ranging tone subcarrier phase-modulated onto the uplink carrier signal. A primary consideration in this development is reduction in size, relative to other such transponders. The transponder design is all-analog, chosen to minimize not only the size but also the number of parts and the design time and, thus, the cost. The receiver features two stages of frequency down-conversion. The receiver locks onto the uplink carrier signal. The exciter signal for the transmitter is derived from the same source as that used to generate the first-stage local-oscillator signal. The ranging-tone subcarrier is down-converted along with the carrier to the second intermediate frequency, where the 4-MHz tone is demodulated from the composite signal and fed into a ranging-tone-tracking loop, which regenerates the tone. The regenerated tone is linearly phase-modulated onto the downlink carrier.

  8. Ku/Ka band observations over polar ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibaut, Pierre; Lasne, Yannick; Guillot, Amandine; Picot, Nicolas; Rémy, Frédérique

    2015-04-01

    For the first time, comparisons between Ku and Ka altimeter measurements are possible thanks to the new AltiKa instrument embarked onboard the Saral mission launched on February 25, 2013. This comparison is of particular interest when dealing with ice sheet observations because both frequencies have different penetration characteristics. We propose in this paper to revisit the estimation of the ice sheet topography (and other related parameters) with altimeter systems and to present illustrations of the differences observed in Ku and Ka bands using AltiKa, Envisat/RA-2 but also Cryosat-2 measurements. Working on AltiKa waveforms in the frame of the PEACHI project has allowed us to better understand the impact of the penetration depth on the echo shape, to improve the estimation algorithm and to compare its output with historical results obtained on Envisat and ERS missions. In particular, analyses at cross-overs of the Cryosat-2 and Saral data will be presented. Sentinel-3 mission should be launch during 2015. Operating in Ku band and in delay/doppler mode, it will be crucial to account for penetration effects in order to accurately derive the ice sheet heights and trends. The results of the work presented here, will benefit to the Sentinel-3 mission.

  9. Ka-band (32 GHz) benefits to planned missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, D. M.; Kliore, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The benefits of using 32 GHz downlinks for a set of deep space missions, as well as the implications to radio science and the Deep Space Network (DSN) are documented. The basic comparison is between the use of the current X-band (8.4 GHz) and a 32 GHZ (Ka-band) downlink. There was shown to be approximately an 8 dB (about 600%) link advantage for 32 GHz. This 8 dB advantage would be able to either reduce mission cost or improve mission science return. Included here are studies on how the 8 dB advantage would be used for the Cassini and Mars Sample Return missions. While the work is preliminary, it shows that the 8 dB advantage can be exploited to provide large benefits to future deep space missions. There can be significant mass and/or power savings to the spacecraft, which can translate into cost savings. Alternatively, the increased downlink telecommunications performance can provide a greater science return.

  10. Rain Fade Compensation for Ka-Band Communications Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, W. Carl; Nguyen, Lan; Dissanayake, Asoka; Markey, Brian; Le, Anh

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a review and evaluation of rain fade measurement and compensation techniques for Ka-band satellite systems. This report includes a description of and cost estimates for performing three rain fade measurement and compensation experiments. The first experiment deals with rain fade measurement techniques while the second one covers the rain fade compensation techniques. The third experiment addresses a feedback flow control technique for the ABR service (for ATM-based traffic). The following conclusions were observed in this report; a sufficient system signal margin should be allocated for all carriers in a network, that is a fixed clear-sky margin should be typically in the range of 4-5 dB and should be more like 15 dB in the up link for moderate and heavy rain zones; to obtain a higher system margin it is desirable to combine the uplink power control technique with the technique that implements the source information rate and FEC code rate changes resulting in a 4-5 dB increase in the dynamic part of the system margin. The experiments would assess the feasibility of the fade measurements and compensation techniques, and ABR feedback control technique.

  11. High-Efficiency Ka-Band Waveguide Two-Way Asymmetric Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Freeman, J. C.; Chevalier, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is planning a number of Space Exploration, Earth Observation and Space Science missions where Ka-band solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) could have a role. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) based SSPAs with output powers on the order of 10 W at Ka-band frequencies would be adequate to satisfy the data transmission rate requirements at the distances involved. MMICs are a type of integrated circuit fabricated on a GaAs wafer, which operates at micro wave frequencies and performs the function of signal amplification. The highest power Ka-band (31.8 to 32.3 GHz) SSPA to have flown in space had an output power of 2.6 W with an overall efficiency of 14.3 percent. This SSPA was built around discrete GaAs pHEMT (high electron mobility transistor) devices and flew aboard the Deep Space One spacecraft. State-of-the-art GaAs pHEMT-based MMIC power amplifiers (PAs) can deliver RF power at Ka-band frequencies anywhere from 3 W with a power added efficiency (PAE) of 32 percent to 6 W with a PAE of 26 percent. However, to achieve power levels higher than 6 W, the output of several MMIC PAs would need to be combined using a high-efficiency power combiner. Conventional binary waveguide power combiners, based on short-slot and magic-T circuits, require MMIC PAs with identical amplitude and phase characteristics for high combining efficiency. However, due to manufacturing process variations, the output powers of the MMIC PAs tend to be unequal, and hence the need to develop unequal power combiners. A two-way asymmetric magic-T based power combiner for MMIC power amplifiers, which can take in unequal inputs, has been successfully designed, fabricated, and characterized over NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) frequency range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The figure is a transparent view of the a sym - metric combiner that shows the 4-port configuration and the internal structure. The rod, post, and iris are positioned by design to achieve the desired asymmetric power ratio

  12. Reconfigurable Microwave Photonic Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-12-01

    Using full 3D finite-element simulation and underlining Hamiltonian models, we demonstrate reconfigurable photonic analogues of topological insulators on a regular lattice of tunable posts in a reentrant 3D lumped element-type system. The tunability allows a dynamical in situ change of media chirality and other properties via the alteration of the same parameter for all posts, and as a result, great flexibility in the choice of bulk-edge configurations. Additionally, one-way photon transport without an external magnetic field is demonstrated. The ideas are illustrated by using both full finite-element simulation as well as simplified harmonic oscillator models. Dynamical reconfigurability of the proposed systems paves the way to a class of systems that can be employed for random access, topological signal processing, and sensing.

  13. X/X/Ka-band prime focus feed antenna for the Mars Observer beacon spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P.; Reilly, H.; Esquivel, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an X/X/Ka-band feed design concept demonstration are presented. The purpose is to show the feasibility of adding a Ka-band beacon to the Mars Observer spacecraft. Scale model radiation patterns were made and analyzed.

  14. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  15. Microwave Photonics: current challenges towards widespread application.

    PubMed

    Capmany, José; Li, Guifang; Lim, Christina; Yao, Jianping

    2013-09-23

    Microwave Photonics, a symbiotic field of research that brings together the worlds of optics and radio frequency is currently facing several challenges in its transition from a niche to a truly widespread technology essential to support the ever-increasing values for speed, bandwidth, processing capability and dynamic range that will be required in next generation hybrid access networks. We outline these challenges, which are the subject of the contributions to this focus issue.

  16. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Ka-band (32 GHz) Demonstration: Cruise Phase Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin; Morabito, David; Border, James S.; Davarian, Faramaz; Lee, Dennis; Mendoza, Ricardo; Britcliffe, Michael; Weinreb, Sander

    2006-01-01

    The X-band (8.41 GHz) frequency currently used for deep space telecommunications is too narrow (50 MHz) to support future high rate missions. Because of this NASA has decided to transition to Ka-band (32 GHz) frequencies. As weather effects cause much larger fluctuations on Ka-band than on X-band, the traditional method of using a few dBs of margin to cover these fluctuations is wasteful of power for Ka-band; therefore, a different operations concept is needed for Ka-band links. As part of the development of the operations concept for Ka-band, NASA has implemented a fully functioning Ka-band communications suite on its Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). This suite will be used during the primary science phase to develop and refine the Ka-band operations concept for deep space missions. In order to test the functional readiness of the spacecraft and the Deep Space Network's (DSN) readiness to support the demonstration activities a series of passes over DSN 34-m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas were scheduled during the cruise phase of the mission. MRO was launched on August 12, 2005 from Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, USA and went into Mars Orbit on March 10, 2006. A total of ten telemetry demonstration and one high gain antenna (HGA) calibration passes were allocated to the Ka-band demonstration. Furthermore, a number of "shadow" passes were also scheduled where, during a regular MRO track over a Ka-band capable antenna, Ka-band was identically configured as the X-band and tracked by the station. In addition, nine Ka-band delta differential one way ranging ((delta)DOR) passes were scheduled. During these passes, the spacecraft and the ground system were put through their respective paces. Among the highlights of these was setting a single day record for data return from a deep space spacecraft (133 Gbits) achieved during one 10-hour pass; achieving the highest data rate ever from a planetary mission (6 Mbps) and successfully demonstrating Ka-band DDOR

  17. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Ka-band (32 GHz) Demonstration: Cruise Phase Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin; Morabito, David; Border, James S.; Davarian, Faramaz; Lee, Dennis; Mendoza, Ricardo; Britcliffe, Michael; Weinreb, Sander

    2006-01-01

    The X-band (8.41 GHz) frequency currently used for deep space telecommunications is too narrow (50 MHz) to support future high rate missions. Because of this NASA has decided to transition to Ka-band (32 GHz) frequencies. As weather effects cause much larger fluctuations on Ka-band than on X-band, the traditional method of using a few dBs of margin to cover these fluctuations is wasteful of power for Ka-band; therefore, a different operations concept is needed for Ka-band links. As part of the development of the operations concept for Ka-band, NASA has implemented a fully functioning Ka-band communications suite on its Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). This suite will be used during the primary science phase to develop and refine the Ka-band operations concept for deep space missions. In order to test the functional readiness of the spacecraft and the Deep Space Network's (DSN) readiness to support the demonstration activities a series of passes over DSN 34-m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas were scheduled during the cruise phase of the mission. MRO was launched on August 12, 2005 from Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, USA and went into Mars Orbit on March 10, 2006. A total of ten telemetry demonstration and one high gain antenna (HGA) calibration passes were allocated to the Ka-band demonstration. Furthermore, a number of "shadow" passes were also scheduled where, during a regular MRO track over a Ka-band capable antenna, Ka-band was identically configured as the X-band and tracked by the station. In addition, nine Ka-band delta differential one way ranging ((delta)DOR) passes were scheduled. During these passes, the spacecraft and the ground system were put through their respective paces. Among the highlights of these was setting a single day record for data return from a deep space spacecraft (133 Gbits) achieved during one 10-hour pass; achieving the highest data rate ever from a planetary mission (6 Mbps) and successfully demonstrating Ka-band DDOR

  18. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASA's Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  19. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David; Reinhart, Richard; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Mike

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASAs Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  20. Microwave Photon Detector in Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose; Romero, Guillermo; Solano, Enrique

    2009-03-01

    In this work we propose a design for a microwave photodetector based on elements from circuit QED such as the ones used in qubit designs. Our proposal consists on a microwave guide in which we embed circuital elements that can absorb photons and irreversibly change state. These incoherent absorption processes constitute the measurement itself. We first model this design using a general master equation for the propagating photons and the absorbing elements. We find that the detection efficiency for a single absorber is limited to 50%, and that this efficiency can be quickly increased by adding more elements with a moderate separation, obtaining 80% and 90% for two and three absorbers. Our abstract design has at least one possible implementation in which the absorbers are current biased Josephson junction. We demonstrate that the coupling between the guide and the junctions is strong enough, irrespectively of the microwave guide size, and derivate realistic parameters for high fidelity operation with current experiments. Patent pending No. 200802933, Oficina Espanola de Patentes y Marcas, 17/10/2008.

  1. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  2. A Prototype Ka-/Ka-Band Dichroic Plate With Stepped Rectangular Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Stanton, P. H.; Reilly, H. F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A prototype five-layer Ka-/Ka-band dichroic plate was fabricated and measured. This dichroic plate was designed to pass Ka-band uplink (34.2-34.7 GHz) and to reflect Ka-band downlink (31.8-32.3 GHz) for dual-frequency operation in the Deep Space Network to support the future Cassini mission. The theoretical calculation and the experimental measurement of the reflected resonant frequencies were within 0.24 percent for circular polarization. The computer program, which was used to design the dichroic plate with stepped apertures, was then verified.

  3. A prototype Ka-/Ka-band dichroic plate with stepped rectangular apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Stanton, P. H.; Reilly, H. F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A prototype five-layer Ka-/Ka-band dichroic plate was fabricated and measured. This dichroic plate was designed to pass Ka-band uplink (34.2-34.7 GHz) and to reflect Ka-band downlink (31.8-32.3 GHz) for dual-frequency operation in the Deep Space Network to support the future Cassini mission. The theoretical calculation and the experimental measurement of the reflected resonant frequencies were within 0.24 percent for circular polarization. The computer program, which was used to design the dichroic plate with stepped apertures, was then verified.

  4. A Ka-band (32 GHz) beacon link experiment (KABLE) with Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, A. L.; Hansen, D. M.; Mileant, A.; Hartop, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    A proposal for a Ka-Band (32 GHz) Link Experiment (KABLE) with the Mars Observer mission was submitted to NASA. The experiment will rely on the fourth harmonic of the spacecraft X-band transmitter to generate a 33.6 GHz signal. The experiment will rely also on the Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving station equipped to simultaneously receive X- and Ka-band signals. The experiment will accurately measure the spacecraft-to-Earth telecommunication link performance at Ka-band and X-band (8.4 GHz).

  5. Ka-band Ga-As FET noise receiver/device development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schellenberg, J. M.; Feng, M.; Hackett, L. H.; Watkins, E. T.; Yamasaki, H.

    1982-01-01

    The development of technology for a 30 GHz low noise receiver utilizing GaAs FET devices exclusively is discussed. This program required single and dual-gate FET devices, low noise FET amplifiers, dual-gate FET mixers, and FET oscillators operating at Ka-band frequencies. A 0.25 micrometer gate FET device, developed with a minimum noise figure of 3.3 dB at 29 GHz and an associated gain of 7.4 dB, was used to fabricate a 3-stage amplifier with a minimum noise figure and associated gain of 4.4 dB and 17 dB, respectively. The 1-dB gain bandwidth of this amplifier extended from below 26.5 GHz to 30.5 GHz. A dual-gate mixer with a 2 dB conversion loss and a minimum noise figure of 10 dB at 29 GHz as well as a dielectric resonator stabilized FET oscillator at 25 GHz for the receiver L0. From these components, a hybrid microwave integrated circuit receiver was constructed which demonstrates a minimum single-side band noise figure of 4.6 dB at 29 GHz with a conversion gain of 17 dB. The output power at the 1-dB gain compression point was -5 dBm.

  6. Design of a KA-Band Image Rejection Sub-Harmonic Down-Converter MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Yang, Tao; Yang, Ziqiang

    2010-12-01

    A Ka band image rejection sub-harmonic down-converter monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) is proposed. It contains a radio frequency (RF) amplifier, a broadband Lange coupler and two balanced mixers with two compact Marchand Baluns. The converter is fabricated by a commercial GaAs 0.2 μm pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (pHEMT) process, the size of which is 1.5 mm × 2 mm. Moreover, an improved nonlinear stability analysis method is presented in this paper. Based on the auxiliary generator (AG) technology, the method can analyze the nonlinear stability of circuits under the terminal impedance mismatched condition by setting the terminal load impedances as optimized variables. This method is applied to the sub-harmonic down-converter and is validated by the simulation and experiment. Experimental results show that from 30 GHz to 40 GHz, the conversion loss (CL) of the converter is less than 10 dB, and the image refection ratio (IMRR) is more than 15 dB.

  7. Ka-band full-360° analog phase shifter with low insertion loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengyi, Cao; Yang, Lu; Jiaxing, Wei; Jiaxin, Zheng; Xiaohua, Ma; Yue, Hao

    2014-10-01

    A new reflection-type wideband 360° monolithic-microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) analog phase shifter at the Ka-band is proposed. The phase shifter is designed based on the principle of vector synthesis. Three Lange couplers are employed in the phase shifter, which is fabricated by the standard 0.25-μm GaAs process. We use four 4 × 40 μm GaAs HEMTs as the reflection loads. A microstrip line in parallel with the device is used as an inductance to counteract the parasitic capacitance of the device so that the reflection load performs like a pure resistance and the insertion loss can be decreased. In this phase shifter, a folded Lange coupler is utilized to reduce the size of the chip. The size of the proposed MMIC phase shifter is only 2.0 × 1.2 mm2. The measurement results show that the insertion loss is 5.0 ± 0.8 dB and a 360° continuously tunable range across 27-32 GHz is obtained with miniscule DC power consumption.

  8. Nonlinear Equalization of Microwave Photonic Links

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-31

    electrooptic modulators," in IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, vol. 43, no. 9, pp. 2184-2197, Sep 1995. -110 -100 -90 -80 -70 -60 -50 -40... IEEE Trans. Microw. Theory Tech., vol. 42, no. 12, pp. 2642– 2649, Dec. 1994. [3] T. R. Clark and M. L. Dennis, “Coherent optical phase...modulation link,” IEEE Photon Technol. Lett., vol. 19, no. 16, pp. 1206–1208, Aug. 15, 2007. [4] M. Nazarathy, J. Berger, A. J. Ley, I.M. Levi, and Y. Kagan

  9. Advances in Ka-Band Communication System for CubeSats and SmallSats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegege, Obadiah; Wong, Yen F.; Altunc, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed that evaluated the feasibility of Ka-band communication system to provide CubeSat/SmallSat high rate science data downlink with ground antennas ranging from the small portable 1.2m/2.4m to apertures 5.4M, 7.3M, 11M, and 18M, for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Lunar CubeSat missions. This study included link analysis to determine the data rate requirement, based on the current TRL of Ka-band flight hardware and ground support infrastructure. Recent advances in Ka-band transceivers and antennas, options of portable ground stations, and various coverage distances were included in the analysis. The link/coverage analysis results show that Cubesat/Smallsat missions communication requirements including frequencies and data rates can be met by utilizing Near Earth Network (NEN) Ka-band support with 2 W and high gain (>6 dBi) antennas.

  10. Design and Validation of High Date Rate Ka-Band Software Defined Radio for Small Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The Design and Validation of High Date Rate Ka- Band Software Defined Radio for Small Satellite project will develop a novel Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) that is capable of establishing high data rate inter-satellite links with a throughput of 500 megabits per second (Mb/s) and providing millimeter ranging precision. The system will be designed to operate with high performance and reliability that is robust against various interference effects and network anomalies. The Ka-band radio resulting from this work will improve upon state of the art Ka-band radios in terms of dimensional size, mass and power dissipation, which limit their use in small satellites.

  11. NASA's Evolution to Ka-Band Space Communications for Near-Earth Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, Kevin; Stocklin, Frank; Geldzahler, Barry; Friedman, Daniel; Celeste, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the exploration of NASA using a Ka-band system for spacecraft communications in Near-Earth orbits. The reasons for changing to Ka-band are the higher data rates, and the current (X-band spectrum) is becoming crowded. This will require some modification to the current ground station antennas systems. The results of a Request for Information (RFI) are discussed, and the recommended solution is reviewed.

  12. Experiments for Ka-band mobile applications: The ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Dessouky, Khaled; Jedrey, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    To explore the potential of Ka-band to support mobile satellite services, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has initiated the design and development of a Ka-band land-mobile terminal to be used with the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The planned experimental setup with ACTS is described. Brief functional descriptions of the mobile and fixed terminals are provided. The inputs required from the propagation community to support the design activities and the planned experiments are also discussed.

  13. A Ka-Band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. Eric; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Sotuela, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of approximately 200 micro-arcsec in alpha cos(delta) and approximately 300 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  14. The Potential for a Ka-band (32 GHz) Worldwide VLBI Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Bach, U.; Colomer, F.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.; Gulyaev, S.; Horiuchi, S.; Ichikawa, R.; Kraus, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, J. A.; Lovell, J.; Majid, W.; Natusch, T.; Neidhardt, A.; Phillips, C.; Porcas, R.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Saldana, L.; Schreiber, U.; Sotuela, I.; Takeuchi, H.; Trinh, J.; Tzioumis, A.; deVincente, P.

    2012-01-01

    Ka-band (32 GHz, 9mm) Very Long Baseline Interferometric (VLBI) networking has now begun and has tremendous potential for expansion over the next few years. Ka-band VLBI astrometry from NASA's Deep Space Network has already developed a catalog of 470 observable sources with highly accurate positions. Now, several antennas worldwide are planning or are considering adding Ka-band VLBI capability. Thus, there is now an opportunity to create a worldwide Ka-band network with potential for high resolution imaging and astrometry. With baselines approaching a Giga-lambda, a Ka-band network would be able to probe source structure at the nano-radian (200 as) level ( 100X better than Hubble) and thus gain insight into the astrophysics of the most compact regions of emission in active galactic nuclei. We discuss the advantages of Ka-band, show the known sources and candidates, simulate projected baseline (uv) coverage, and discuss potential radio frequency feeds. The combination of these elements demonstrates the feasibility of a worldwide Ka network within the next few years!

  15. The Potential for a Ka-band (32 GHz) Worldwide VLBI Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Bach, U.; Colomer, F.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.; Gulyaev, S.; Horiuchi, S.; Ichikawa, R.; Kraus, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Ka-band (32 GHz, 9mm) Very Long Baseline Interferometric (VLBI) networking has now begun and has tremendous potential for expansion over the next few years. Ka-band VLBI astrometry from NASA's Deep Space Network has already developed a catalog of 470 observable sources with highly accurate positions. Now, several antennas worldwide are planning or are considering adding Ka-band VLBI capability. Thus, there is now an opportunity to create a worldwide Ka-band network with potential for high resolution imaging and astrometry. With baselines approaching a Giga-lambda, a Ka-band network would be able to probe source structure at the nano-radian (200 as) level ( 100X better than Hubble) and thus gain insight into the astrophysics of the most compact regions of emission in active galactic nuclei. We discuss the advantages of Ka-band, show the known sources and candidates, simulate projected baseline (uv) coverage, and discuss potential radio frequency feeds. The combination of these elements demonstrates the feasibility of a worldwide Ka network within the next few years!

  16. Pre-Flight Testing and Performance of a Ka-Band Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, Joseph A.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed a space-qualified, reprogrammable, Ka-band Software Defined Radio (SDR) to be utilized as part of an on-orbit, reconfigurable testbed. The testbed will operate on the truss of the International Space Station beginning in late 2012. Three unique SDRs comprise the testbed, and each radio is compliant to the Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard. The testbed provides NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop communications, navigation, and networking applications in the laboratory and space environment, while at the same time advancing SDR technology, reducing risk, and enabling future mission capability. Designed and built by Harris Corporation, the Ka-band SDR is NASA's first space-qualified Ka-band SDR transceiver. The Harris SDR will also mark the first NASA user of the Ka-band capabilities of the Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) for on-orbit operations. This paper describes the testbed's Ka-band System, including the SDR, travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA), and antenna system. The reconfigurable aspects of the system enabled by SDR technology are discussed and the Ka-band system performance is presented as measured during extensive pre-flight testing.

  17. A Ka-band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. E.; García-Miró, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Sotuela, I.

    2011-10-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of ~200 micro-arcsec (μas) in α cos δ and ~300 μas in δ. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 μas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  18. Frequency-Agile Monolithic Ka-Band Filter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-18

    nGimat 5. FABRICATION/TESTING nGimat/GT 6. OPTIMIZE FERRITE FILMS nGimat 7. FERRITE FILTERS nGimat/GT 8...frequencies are measured by HP 4285A Precision LCR meter. Microwave properties at high frequencies are measured by a network analyzer at Georgia Tech...Optimize Ferrite Films 60% 7. Ferrite Filters 35% 8. Prototyping 90% 9. Scale-up 80% 10. Customer Relations 70% 11. Report 100%

  19. An optically controlled Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, Richard Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, Alan N.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1992-08-01

    The design and development of a small, optically controlled phased array antenna suitable for communication satellite applications are discussed. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 GHz, four-bit monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shifters in customized quartz packages with corresponding optoelectronic interface circuits (OEIC's) for control signal reception.

  20. An optically controlled Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, Richard Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, Alan N.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1992-01-01

    The design and development of a small, optically controlled phased array antenna suitable for communication satellite applications are discussed. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 GHz, four-bit monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shifters in customized quartz packages with corresponding optoelectronic interface circuits (OEIC's) for control signal reception.

  1. Toward Graphene-Based Microwave Photon Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Kin

    2013-03-01

    Graphene is a material with remarkable electronic properties. However, the thermal properties of this two-dimensional Dirac Fermions, that determine the characteristics of photo detectors, plasmonic devices, and bolometers, are less explored. Here, we present our measurement of specific heat capacity, Wiedemann-Franz (WF), and electron-phonon (e-ph) thermal conductance from 0.3 to 100 K using the novel single layer graphene bolometer. These measurements suggest that graphene-based devices can generate substantial advances in the areas of ultra-sensitive bolometry, calorimetry, microwave, and terahertz single photon detection for applications in areas such as observational astronomy, quantum information and measurement. The physics of the e-ph coupling and the possible violation of Wiedemann-Franz Law near the charge neutrality point in single layer graphene will be discussed. This work is a collaboration with Emma Wollman, Harish Ravi, and K. C. Schwab of Caltech.

  2. Ka-Band Waveguide Two-Way Hybrid Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    The design, simulation, and characterization of a novel Ka-band (32.05 0.25 GHz) rectangular waveguide two-way branch-line hybrid unequal power combiner (with port impedances matched to that of a standard WR-28 waveguide) has been created to combine input signals, which are in phase and with an amplitude ratio of two. The measured return loss and isolation of the branch-line hybrid are better than 22 and 27 dB, respectively. The measured combining efficiency is 92.9 percent at the center frequency of 32.05 GHz. This circuit is efficacious in combining the unequal output power from two Ka-band GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (pHEMT) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) with high efficiency. The component parts include the branch-line hybrid-based power combiner and the MMIC-based PAs. A two-way branch-line hybrid is a four-port device with all ports matched; power entering port 1 is divided in phase, and into the ratio 2:1 between ports 3 and 4. No power is coupled to port 2. MMICs are a type of integrated circuit fabricated on GaAs that operates at microwave frequencies, and performs the function of signal amplification. The power combiner is designed to operate over the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz, which is NASA's deep space frequency band. The power combiner would have an output return loss better than 20 dB. Isolation between the output port and the isolated port is greater than 25 dB. Isolation between the two input ports is greater than 25 dB. The combining efficiency would be greater than 90 percent when the ratio of the two input power levels is two. The power combiner is machined from aluminum with E-plane split-block arrangement, and has excellent reliability. The flexibility of this design allows the combiner to be customized for combining the power from MMIC PAs with an arbitrary power output ratio. In addition, it allows combining a low-power GaAs MMIC with a high-power GaN MMIC. The arbitrary

  3. Rainfall estimation with a commercial tool for satellite internet in Ka band: concept and preliminary data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnai, Clio; Cuccoli, Fabrizio; Sermi, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    This work presents a real time method for rainfall estimation based on attenuation data acquired via Ka-band satellite link and discusses some results of its application. Data to be processed are recorded with a commercial kit for satellite web supplied by a European provider and operating above the urban area of Florence (Italy). Since the system automatically performs a continuous adjustment of the transmitted power in function of the intensity of the received signal, this information is being exploited to estimate the entity of the precipitation within the area. The adopted model for the attenuation of a microwave link due to hydrometeors is the one suggested by Olsen and Hodge and recommended by the ITU. The results are interpreted together with registered rain-rate measurements provided by three rain gauges dislocated within the area.

  4. Ka-band MMIC receiver with ion-implanted technology for high-volume and low-cost application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, J.; Geddes, J.; Detry, J.; Carlson, D.

    1991-10-01

    A monolithic-microwave-integrated-circuit (MMIC) receiver in ion implantation technology, with LNA and mixer integrated circuits (ICs) shows 4.7-dB noise figure and 6.8-dB conversion gain at 35 GHz with a low IF frequency of 10-50 MHz. The data reported are for a receiver in the Ka-band. The results are for two separate amplifier and mixer ICs combined to form a receiver or down converter. The authors have successfully demonstrate viable and manufacturable technology that is useful for high volume and cost-effective applications. The measured results show the technology is able to deliver high performance with very good yield.

  5. A comparison of MESFET and HEMT MMIC technologies using a compact Ka-band voltage-controlled oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swirhun, S.; Geddes, J.; Sokolov, Vladimir; Bosch, D.; Gawronski, M.; Anholt, R.

    1991-07-01

    To compare the capability of MESFET and HEMT technologies for monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) implementation we have fabricated and tested discrete field-effect transistors (FETs) and a novel Ka-band monolithic voltage controlled oscillator (VCO). We implemented the circuit with three different active devices: moderate- and high-doped ion-implanted MESFETs (metal-semiconductor FETs) and AlGaAs/GaAs HEMTs (high electron mobility transistors). A comparison of the measured oscillator phase-noise and an independent comparison of the temperature dependence of MESFET and HEMT RF equivalent circuits yields two general guidelines: MESFETs are preferred over HEMTs for applications requiring low phase-noise and temperature insensitive operation.

  6. Gigawatt-class radiation generated by a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dapeng Shu, Ting; Ju, Jinchuan; Peng, Shengren

    2015-08-15

    Particle simulation and experimental results are presented about a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator in this paper. The relativistic electron beam with peak current of 8.4 kA was generated by a pulsed power accelerator working at the voltage of 625 kV, which was guided by an axial magnetic field of 1.05 T and transported through the beam-wave interaction structures. After careful calibration, the microwave power radiated in the far field was as high as about 500 MW, with a frequency of 32.1 GHz and a pulse width of 20 ns. The radiation mode was well controlled to be TM{sub 0n} mode.

  7. Gigawatt-class radiation generated by a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dapeng; Shu, Ting; Ju, Jinchuan; Peng, Shengren

    2015-08-01

    Particle simulation and experimental results are presented about a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator in this paper. The relativistic electron beam with peak current of 8.4 kA was generated by a pulsed power accelerator working at the voltage of 625 kV, which was guided by an axial magnetic field of 1.05 T and transported through the beam-wave interaction structures. After careful calibration, the microwave power radiated in the far field was as high as about 500 MW, with a frequency of 32.1 GHz and a pulse width of 20 ns. The radiation mode was well controlled to be TM(0n) mode.

  8. Ka-band Technologies for Small Spacecraft Communications via Relays and Direct Data Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.; Niederhaus, Charles; Reinhart, Richard; Downey, Joe; Roberts, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    As the scientific capabilities and number of small spacecraft missions in the near Earth region increase, standard yet configurable user spacecraft terminals operating in Ka-band are needed to lower mission cost and risk and enable significantly higher data return than current UHF or S-band terminals. These compact Ka-band terminals are intended to operate with both the current and next generation of Ka-band relay satellites and via direct data communications with near Earth tracking terminals. This presentation provides an overview of emerging NASA-sponsored and commercially provided technologies in software defined radios (SDRs), transceivers, and electronically steered antennas that will enable data rates from hundreds of kbps to over 1 Gbps and operate in multiple frequency bands (such as S- and X-bands) and expand the use of NASA's common Ka-bands frequencies: 22.55-23.15 GHz for forward data or uplink; and 25.5-27.0 GHz for return data or downlink. Reductions in mass, power and volume come from integration of multiple radio functions, operations in Ka-band, high efficiency amplifiers and receivers, and compact, flat and vibration free electronically steered narrow beam antennas for up to + 60 degrees field of regard. The software defined near Earth space transceiver (SD-NEST) described in the presentation is intended to be compliant with NASA's space telecommunications radio system (STRS) standard for communications waveforms and hardware interoperability.

  9. Overview of Ka-band communications technology requirements for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Edward F.

    1991-12-01

    In the Space Exploration Initiative, Ka-band frequencies are likely to carry the bulk of the communications traffic both in the vicinity of and on the return links from the moon and Mars. The four exploration architectures identified by the Synthesis Group are examined and Ka-band technology requirements to meet the data traffic needs and schedule are identified. Specific Ka-band technology requirements identified are: transmitters - 0.5 to 200 W with high efficiency; antennas - 5m and 9m diameter, with multiple beams and/or scanning beams; and spacecraft receivers - noise figure of 2 dB. For each component, the current state of technology is assessed and needed technology development programs are identified. It is concluded that to meet the schedules of lunar and Mars precursor missions beginning in approximately the year 2000, aggressive technology development and advanced development programs are required immediately for Ka-band communications systems components. Additionally, the greater data transmission rates for the cargo and piloted phases of the exploration program require further Ka-band communications technology developments targeted for operations beginning in about 2010.

  10. Overview of Ka-band communications technology requirements for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    In the Space Exploration Initiative, Ka-band frequencies are likely to carry the bulk of the communications traffic both in the vicinity of and on the return links from the moon and Mars. The four exploration architectures identified by the Synthesis Group are examined and Ka-band technology requirements to meet the data traffic needs and schedule are identified. Specific Ka-band technology requirements identified are: transmitters - 0.5 to 200 W with high efficiency; antennas - 5m and 9m diameter, with multiple beams and/or scanning beams; and spacecraft receivers - noise figure of 2 dB. For each component, the current state of technology is assessed and needed technology development programs are identified. It is concluded that to meet the schedules of lunar and Mars precursor missions beginning in approximately the year 2000, aggressive technology development and advanced development programs are required immediately for Ka-band communications systems components. Additionally, the greater data transmission rates for the cargo and piloted phases of the exploration program require further Ka-band communications technology developments targeted for operations beginning in about 2010.

  11. Ka-band monopulse antenna-pointing systems analysis and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, V. Y.

    1996-01-01

    NASA 's Deep Space Network (DSN) has been using both 70-m and 34-m reflector antennas to communicate with spacecraft at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.45 GHz). To improve the quality of telecommunication and to meet future mission requirements, JPL has been developing 34-m Ka-band (32-GHz) beam waveguide antennas. Presently, antenna pointing operates in either the open-loop mode with blind pointing using navigation predicts or the closed-loop mode with conical scan (conscan). Pointing accuracy under normal conscan operating conditions is in the neighborhood of 5 mdeg. This is acceptable at S- and X-bands, but not enough at Ka-band. Due to the narrow beamwidth at Ka-band, it is important to improve pointing accuracy significantly (approximately 2 mdeg). Monopulse antenna tracking is one scheme being developed to meet the stringent pointing-accuracy requirement at Ka-band. Other advantages of monopulse tracking include low sensitivity to signal amplitude fluctuations as well as single-pulse processing for acquisition and tracking. This article presents system modeling, signal processing, simulation, and implementation of Ka-band monopulse tracking feed for antennas in NASA/DSN ground stations.

  12. A Microwave Photonic Interference Canceller: Architectures, Systems, and Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Matthew P.

    This thesis is a comprehensive portfolio of work on a Microwave Photonic Self-Interference Canceller (MPC), a specialized optical system designed to eliminate interference from radio-frequency (RF) receivers. The novelty and value of the microwave photonic system lies in its ability to operate over bandwidths and frequencies that are orders of magnitude larger than what is possible using existing RF technology. The work begins, in 2012, with a discrete fiber-optic microwave photonic canceller, which prior work had demonstrated as a proof-of-concept, and culminates, in 2017, with the first ever monolithically integrated microwave photonic canceller. With an eye towards practical implementation, the thesis establishes novelty through three major project thrusts. (Fig. 1): (1) Extensive RF and system analysis to develop a full understanding of how, and through what mechanisms, MPCs affect an RF receiver. The first investigations of how a microwave photonic canceller performs in an actual wireless environment and a digital radio are also presented. (2) New architectures to improve the performance and functionality of MPCs, based on the analysis performed in Thrust 1. A novel balanced microwave photonic canceller architecture is developed and experimentally demonstrated. The balanced architecture shows significant improvements in link gain, noise figure, and dynamic range. Its main advantage is its ability to suppress common-mode noise and reduce noise figure by increasing the optical power. (3) Monolithic integration of the microwave photonic canceller into a photonic integrated circuit. This thrust presents the progression of integrating individual discrete devices into their semiconductor equivalent, as well as a full functional and RF analysis of the first ever integrated microwave photonic canceller.

  13. Ka-band MMIC beam steered transmitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascoe, D. L.; Riley, A. L.; Huang, J.; Lubecke, V.; Duffy, L.

    1989-08-01

    A 32-GHz six-element linear transmitter array utilizing monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shifters and power amplifiers was designed and tested as part of the development of a spacecraft array feed for NASA deep-space communications applications. Measurements of the performance of individual phase shifters, power amplifiers, and microstrip radiators were carried out, and electronic beam steering of the linear array was demonstrated. The switched-line phase shifters were accurate to within 7 percent on average and the power amplifier 1-dB compressed output power varied over 0.3 dB. The array had a beamwidth of 7.5 deg and demonstrated acceptable beam steering over + or - 8 deg. From the results, it can be concluded that this MMIC phased array has adequate beam-scanning capability for use in the two-dimensional array. The areas that need to be improved are the efficiency of the MMIC power amplifier and the insertion loss of the MMIC phase shifter.

  14. NASA's K/Ka-Band Broadband Aeronautical Terminal for Duplex Satellite Video Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, A.; Agan, M.

    1994-01-01

    JPL has recently begun the development of a Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT) for duplex video satellite communications on commercial or business class aircraft. The BAT is designed for use with NASA's K/Ka-band Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The BAT system will provide the systems and technology groundwork for an eventual commercial K/Ka-band aeronautical satellite communication system. With industry/government partnerships, three main goals will be addressed by the BAT task: 1) develop, characterize and demonstrate the performance of an ACTS based high data rate aeronautical communications system; 2) assess the performance of current video compression algorithms in an aeronautical satellite communication link; and 3) characterize the propagation effects of the K/Ka-band channel for aeronautical communications.

  15. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Clark, J. E.; Heflin, M. B.; Skjerve, L. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Moll, V. E.; Horiuchi, S.

    2011-01-01

    A celestial reference frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) has been constructed using fifty-one 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network. We report on observations which have detected 436 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of 200 micro-arcsec in a cos delta and 290 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for zonal errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. The motivations for extending the ICRF to frequencies above 8 GHz are to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability, to provide calibrators for phase referencing, and to support spacecraft navigation at Ka-band.

  16. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Clark, J. E.; Heflin, M. B.; Skjerve, L. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Moll, V. E.; Horiuchi, S.

    2011-01-01

    A celestial reference frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) has been constructed using fifty-one 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network. We report on observations which have detected 436 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of 200 micro-arcsec in a cos delta and 290 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for zonal errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. The motivations for extending the ICRF to frequencies above 8 GHz are to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability, to provide calibrators for phase referencing, and to support spacecraft navigation at Ka-band.

  17. Optomechanical transducer for microwave-to-optical photon conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochmann, J.; Vainsencher, A.; Awschalom, D. D.; Cleland, A. N.

    2013-03-01

    Mechanical resonators with highly confined optical and mechanical modes exhibit strong interaction between phonons and photons. At GHz mechanical frequencies and low temperature, nanomechanical resonators enter the quantum regime and can be interfaced with superconducting quantum circuits [2]. Here, we present the concept of a quantum transducer between microwave and optical photons. In our approach, the piezoelectric effect maps microwave quantum states to nanomechanical excitations which are up-converted to optical photons by optomechanical interaction. The exceptional properties of aluminum nitride allow the required photonic, nanomechanical and piezoelectric functionality to be integrated in one platform. Experimental progress towards this goal will be presented. This work is funded through DARPA/DSO.

  18. Photonics for microwave systems and ultra-wideband signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, W.

    2016-08-01

    The advantages of using the broadband and low-loss distribution attributes of photonics to enhance the signal processing and sensing capabilities of microwave systems are well known. In this paper, we review the progress made in the topical areas of true-time-delay beamsteering, photonic-assisted analog-to-digital conversion, RF-photonic filtering and link performances. We also provide an outlook on the emerging field of integrated microwave photonics (MWP) that promise to reduce the cost of MWP subsystems and components, while providing significantly improved form-factors for system insertion.

  19. Delay of a microwave pulse in a photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babitski, V. S.; Baryshevsky, V. G.; Gurinovich, A. A.; Gurnevich, E. A.; Molchanov, P. V.; Simonchik, L. V.; Usachonak, M. S.; Zuyeuski, R. F.

    2017-08-01

    Propagation of a nanosecond microwave pulse through a photonic crystal placed into an X-band waveguide is investigated. The nanosecond pulse is produced via shortening of the microsecond microwave pulse by the plasma electromagnetic band gap structure, which is formed in the waveguide by microwave breakdown ignited discharges inside three neon-filled glass tubes. Measured delay time for nanosecond microwave pulse propagation through the photonic crystal is about 23 ns that is in good agreement with the value obtained by numerical simulation. This time delay value corresponds to the group velocity of microwave pulses in the photonic crystal vgr ≈ 0.11c, where c is the speed of light in vacuum.

  20. Phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Chen, Zhengyu; Xu, Zhiguo; Gao, Yingjie

    2015-10-01

    Microwave photonic links (MPLs) can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial and waveguide solutions due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth, superior stability and immunity to external interference. It has been considered in various applications such as: the transmission of radio frequency (RF) signal over optical carriers, video television transmission, radar and communication systems. Stability of phase of the microwave photonic links is a critical issue in several realistic applications. The delay line technique for phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links is measured for the first time. Using this approach, the input signal noise and power supply noise can be effectively cancelled, and it does not require phase locking. The phase noise of a microwave photonic links with a 10 GHz sinusoidal signal is experimentally demonstrated.

  1. A portfolio of fine resolution Ka-band SAR images : part l.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Martin; Gutierrez, Vivian Dee; Dubbert, Dale Francis; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories designs and builds Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems capable of forming high-quality exceptionally fine resolution images. During the spring of 2004 a series of test flights were completed with a Ka-band testbed SAR on Sandia's DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft. A large data set was collected including real-time fine-resolution images of a variety of target scenes. This paper offers a sampling of high quality images representative of the output of Sandia's Ka-band testbed radar with resolutions as fine as 4 inches. Images will be annotated with descriptions of collection geometries and other relevant image parameters.

  2. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  3. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: Ka Band Radio Science Experiments and the Effect of the Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami W.; Morabito, David

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the possibilities of utilizing the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and polarization of radio signals to investigate, specifically for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)mission utilizes X-band coherent (uplink and downlink) carrier Doppler and range for its gravity investigation Gravity team will also take advantage of Ka-band downlink signal Tropospheric calibration data from Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) will be used. The calibration of the received Ka band signal for the effect of the troposphere is discussed.

  4. The Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Link Experiment (MGS/KaBLE-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4-GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-m-diameter parabolic antenna on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) research and development (R&D) 34-meter a ntenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. This Ka-band link experiment (KaBLE-II) allows the performances of the Ka-band and X-band signals to be compared under nearly identical conditions. The two signals have been regularly tracked during the past 2 years. This article presents carrier-signal-level data (P_c/N_o) for both X-band and Ka-band acquired over a wide range of station elevation angles, weather conditions, and solar elongation angles. The cruise phase of the mission covered the period from launch (November 7, 1996) to Mars orbit capture (September 12, 1997). Since September 12, 1997, MGS has been in orbit around Mars. The measurements confirm that Ka-band could increase data capacity by at least a factor of three (5 dB) as compared with X-band. During May 1998, the solar corona experiment, in which the effects of solar plasma on the X-band and Ka-band links were studied, was conducted. In addition, frequency and difference frequency (f_x - f_(Ka)/3.8), ranging, and telemetry data results are presented. MGS/KaBLE-II measured signal strengths (for 54 percent of the experiments conducted) that were in reasonable agreement with predicted values based on preflight knowledge, and frequency residuals that agreed between bands and whose statistics were consistent with expected noise sources. For passes in which measured signal strengths disagreed with predicted values, the problems were traced to known deficiencies, for example, equipment operating under certain conditions, such as a cold Ka-band solid-state power amplifier (SSPA

  5. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: Ka Band Radio Science Experiments and the Effect of the Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami W.; Morabito, David

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the possibilities of utilizing the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and polarization of radio signals to investigate, specifically for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)mission utilizes X-band coherent (uplink and downlink) carrier Doppler and range for its gravity investigation Gravity team will also take advantage of Ka-band downlink signal Tropospheric calibration data from Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) will be used. The calibration of the received Ka band signal for the effect of the troposphere is discussed.

  6. Microvibrations in a 20 M Long Ka-Band SAR Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriques, G.; Ludwig, M.; Santiago-Prowald, J.

    2014-06-01

    Interferometric SAR operating at Ka-band has the potential for offering high-resolution 3D images of the surface of the Earth taken from a single-platform.The stability of the mechanical baseline of such an instrument has been considered as a key critical area for the feasibility of the concept.This paper is devoted to the analysis of the micro- vibrations in a 20-m long Ka-band SAR interferometer arising during typical attitude changing manoeuvers and the mechanical noise transmitted from reaction wheels. It is preliminarily concluded that the expected microvibration levels are within the requirements of the instrument.

  7. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  8. Design of a Ka-Band Propagation Terminal for Atmospheric Measurements in Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a Ka-Band beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed alongside an existing Ka-Band Radiometer [2] located at the east end of the Svalbard Near Earth Network (NEN) complex. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation [3] receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation by directly measuring the propagated signal from the satellite Thor 7.

  9. Design of a Ka-band Propagation Terminal for Atmospheric Measurements in Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a Ka-Band beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed alongside an existing Ka-Band Radiometer located at the east end of the Svalbard Near Earth Network (NEN) complex. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation by directly measuring the propagated signal from the satellite Thor 7.

  10. A photonic microwave source for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Cada, Michael; Seregelyi, Joe; Paquet, Stephane; Mihailov, Stephen; Lu, Ping; Bélisle, Claude

    2005-09-01

    Wireless technology is a cost-effective means to bring broadband communications to both mobile users and home consumers; however, deploying next generation, multi-GHz wireless systems is currently too expensive. For these systems, photonic technologies can bring cost reduction as well as an increase in performance, mainly due to the ultra low-loss property of optical fibers. One approach to signal distribution is to capitalise on the vast fibre-optic distribution networks deployed within and between cities. A microwave carrier can be optically deployed from central offices to remote antenna sites using these optical links. This paper will discuss the generation of such a microwave carrier using a dual-wavelength, external-cavity laser (ECL). Two different dual-wavelength ECL's, constructed with fiber-Bragg-gratings (FBG's), have been investigated. One uses a semiconductor gain chip with a dual-FBG acting as an external reflector. The other uses two similar dual-FBG reflectors on each side of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). In both cases the wavelength separation between the gratings is 0.25 nm. We will demonstrate that a dual-wavelength emission can be temporarily stabilized in the gain-chip ECL if a specific phase relation, between the external feedback from the FBG's and the residual feedback from the gain chip, is satisfied at both lasing wavelengths. The power of the RF beat signal generated by the dual-wavelength optical signal was typically 25 dB above the noise floor. The 3-dB linewidth of the RF signal was approximately 2 MHz and it can be tuned over a frequency range of 200 MHz. The physical mechanisms underlying the observed laser instability will be briefly discussed.

  11. High-power photodetector modules for microwave photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kejia; Xie, Xiaojun; Rouvalis, Efthymios; Fedderwitz, Sascha; Steffan, Andreas G.; Li, Qinglong; Yang, Zhanyu; Beling, Andreas; Campbell, Joe C.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, microwave photonic techniques have emerged to address the challenges that microwave systems face under high-frequency or wideband conditions. To a large extent, the performance of microwave photonic systems depends on the performance of individual optoelectronics devices, such as high power photodiodes. Here, we report a fullypackaged photodetector module based on InGaAs/InP modified uni-traveling carrier (MUTC) photodiode. The modules demonstrated a 3-dB bandwidth up to 50GHz and a record-high output power of 14.0 dBm at 50GHz.

  12. The Status of Ka-Band Communications for Future Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, C.; Deutsch, L.; Gatti, M.; Layland, J.; Perret, J.; Stelzried, C.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Telecommunications and Mission Operations Directorate has invested in a variety of technologies, targeted at both the flight and ground sides of the communications link, with the goal of developing a Ka-band (32 GHz) communications capability for future deep space missions.

  13. A dual-cavity ruby maser for the Ka-band link experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J.; Quinn, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    A 33.68-GHz dual-cavity ruby maser was built to support the Ka-Band Link Experiment (KABLE) conducted with the Mars Observer spacecraft. It has 25 dB of net gain and a 3-dB bandwidth of 85 MHz. Its noise temperature in reference to the cooled feedhorn aperture is 5 K.

  14. High Power High Efficiency Ka-Band Power Combiners for Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    Wide-band power combining units for Ka-band are simulated for use as MMIC amplifier applications. Short-slot couplers as well as magic-tees are the basic elements for the combiners. Wide bandwidth (5 GHz) and low insertion (approx.0.2 dB) and high combining efficiencies (approx.90 percent) are obtained.

  15. Ka-Band High-Rate Telemetry System Upgrade for the NASA Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBelle, Remi; Bernardo, Abner; Bowen, James; Britcliffe, Michael; Bucknam, Neil; Link, Christopher; Long, Ezra; Manalo, Leslie; O'Dea, James A.; Rochblatt, David; Sosnowski, John; Veruttipong, Watt

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) has a new requirement to support high-data-rate Category A (Cat A) missions (within 2 million kilometers of Earth) with simultaneous S-band uplink, S-band downlink and Ka-band downlink. The S-band links are required for traditional TT&C (Telemetry, Tracking, and Command) support to the spacecraft, while the Ka-band link is intended for high-data-rate science returns. The new Ka-band system combines the use of proven DSN cryogenic designs, for low system temperature, and high data rate capability using commercial telemetry receivers. The initial Cat A support is required for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in 2013 and possibly other missions. The upgrade has been implemented into 3 different 34-meter Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas in the DSN, one at each of the complexes in Canberra (Australia), Goldstone (California) and Madrid (Spain). System test data is presented to show that the requirements were met and the DSN is ready for Cat A Ka-band operational support.

  16. A Satellite-Tracking K and Ka Band Mobile Vehicle Antenna System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, A.; Jamnejad, V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the K/Ka-band, satellite-tracking mobile-vehicular antenna system for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. ACTS is NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite, which will be launched into its geostationary orbit in 1993.

  17. Results from Two Years of Ka-Band Propagation Characterization at Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Zemba, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Over the several years, NASA plans to launch several earth science missions which are expected to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day transmitted from low earth orbiting spacecraft to ground stations. The current S-band and X-band frequency allocations in use by NASA, however, are incapable of supporting the data rates required to meet this demand. As such, NASA is in the planning stages to upgrade its existing Near Earth Network (NEN) Polar ground stations to support Ka-band (25.5-27 GHz) operations. Consequently, it becomes imperative that characterization of propagation effects at these NEN sites is conducted to determine expected system performance, particularly at low elevation angles ((is) less than 10 deg) where spacecraft signal acquisition typically occurs. Since May 2011, NASA Glenn Research Center has installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the NEN site located in Svalbard, Norway. The Ka-band radiometer monitors the water vapor line, as well as 6 frequencies around 26.5 GHz at multiple elevation angles: 45 deg, 20 deg, and 10 deg. Two year data collection results indicate comparable performance to previously characterized northern latitude sites in the United States, i.e., Fairbanks, Alaska. It is observed that cloud cover at the Svalbard site remains the dominant loss mechanism for Ka-band links, resulting in a margin requirement of 4.1 dB to maintain link availability of 99% at 10 deg elevation.

  18. A Satellite-Tracking K and Ka Band Mobile Vehicle Antenna System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, A.; Jamnejad, V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the K/Ka-band, satellite-tracking mobile-vehicular antenna system for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. ACTS is NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite, which will be launched into its geostationary orbit in 1993.

  19. Ka-Band, RF MEMS Switches on CMOS Grade Silicon with a Polyimide Interface Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.; Papapolymerou, John

    2003-01-01

    For the first time, RF MEMS switcbes on CMOS grade Si witb a polyimide interface layer are fabricated and characterized. At Ka-Band (36.6 GHz), an insertion loss of 0.52 dB and an isolation of 20 dB is obtained.

  20. Ka-Band High-Rate Telemetry System Upgrade for the NASA Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBelle, Remi; Bernardo, Abner; Bowen, James; Britcliffe, Michael; Bucknam, Neil; Link, Christopher; Long, Ezra; Manalo, Leslie; O'Dea, James A.; Rochblatt, David; hide

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) has a new requirement to support high-data-rate Category A (Cat A) missions (within 2 million kilometers of Earth) with simultaneous S-band uplink, S-band downlink and Ka-band downlink. The S-band links are required for traditional TT&C (Telemetry, Tracking, and Command) support to the spacecraft, while the Ka-band link is intended for high-data-rate science returns. The new Ka-band system combines the use of proven DSN cryogenic designs, for low system temperature, and high data rate capability using commercial telemetry receivers. The initial Cat A support is required for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in 2013 and possibly other missions. The upgrade has been implemented into 3 different 34-meter Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas in the DSN, one at each of the complexes in Canberra (Australia), Goldstone (California) and Madrid (Spain). System test data is presented to show that the requirements were met and the DSN is ready for Cat A Ka-band operational support.

  1. A circularly polarized Ka-band stacked patch antenna with increased gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawadzki, M.

    2002-01-01

    Stacking layers of microstrip patches is a technique often used to improve the bandwidth of a patch antenna, but rarely used to increase its gain. The work presented here scales the three-layer S-band work done in to Ka-band.

  2. Computer Aided Design of Ka-Band Waveguide Power Combining Architectures for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaden, Karl R.

    2006-01-01

    Communication systems for future NASA interplanetary spacecraft require transmitter power ranging from several hundred watts to kilowatts. Several hybrid junctions are considered as elements within a corporate combining architecture for high power Ka-band space traveling-wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs). This report presents the simulated transmission characteristics of several hybrid junctions designed for a low loss, high power waveguide based power combiner.

  3. Ka-Band, RF MEMS Switches on CMOS Grade Silicon with a Polyimide Interface Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.; Papapolymerou, John

    2003-01-01

    For the first time, RF MEMS switcbes on CMOS grade Si witb a polyimide interface layer are fabricated and characterized. At Ka-Band (36.6 GHz), an insertion loss of 0.52 dB and an isolation of 20 dB is obtained.

  4. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment. PMID:28067332

  5. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment.

  6. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter.

    PubMed

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-09

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment.

  7. Results from Three Years of Ka-Band Propagation Characterization at Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Zemba, Michael; Morse, Jacquelynne

    2015-01-01

    Over the next several years, NASA plans to launch several earth science missions which are expected to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day transmitted from low earth orbiting spacecraft to ground stations. The current S-band and X-band frequency allocations in use by NASA, however, are incapable of supporting the data rates required to meet this demand. As such, NASA is in the planning stages to upgrade its existing Near Earth Network (NEN) polar ground stations to support Ka-band (25.5-27 GHz) operations. Consequently, it installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the Svalbard site. Svalbard was chosen as the appropriate site for two primary reasons: (1) Svalbard will be the first site to be upgraded to Ka-band operations within the NEN Polar Network enhancement plan, and (2) there exists a complete lack of Ka-band propagation data at this site (as opposed to the Fairbanks, AK NEN site, which has 5 years of characterization collected during the Advanced Communications Technology becomes imperative that characterization of propagation effects at these NEN sites is conducted to determine expected system Satellite (ACTS) campaign). processing and provide the Herein, we discuss the data three-year measurement results performance, particularly at low elevation angles ((is) less than 10 deg) from the ongoing Ka-band propagation characterization where spacecraft signal acquisition typically occurs. Since May 2011, NASA Glenn Research Center has installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the NEN site located in Svalbard, Norway. The Ka-band radiometer monitors the water vapor line, as well as 4 frequencies around 26.5 GHz at a fixed 10 deg elevation angle. Three-year data collection results indicate good campaign at Svalbard, Norway. Comparison of these results with the ITU models and existing ERA profile data indicates very good agreement when the 2010 rain maps and cloud statistics are used. Finally, the Svalbard data is used to derive the expected

  8. Results from Three Years of Ka-band Propagation Characterization at Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael; Morse, Jacquelynne

    2015-01-01

    Over the next several years, NASA plans to launch several earth science missions which are expected to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day transmitted from low earth orbiting spacecraft to ground stations. The current S-band and X-band frequency allocations in use by NASA, however, are incapable of supporting the data rates required to meet this demand. As such, NASA is in the planning stages to upgrade its existing Near Earth Network (NEN) polar ground stations to support Ka-band (25.5-27 GHz) operations. Consequently, it installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the Svalbard site. Svalbard was chosen as the appropriate site for two primary reasons: (1) Svalbard will be the first site to be upgraded to Ka-band operations within the NEN Polar Network enhancement plan, and (2) there exists a complete lack of Ka-band propagation data at this site (as opposed to the Fairbanks, AK NEN site, which has 5 years of characterization collected during the Advanced Communications Technology becomes imperative that characterization of propagation effects at these NEN sites is conducted to determine expected system Satellite (ACTS) campaign). processing and provide the Herein, we discuss the data three-year measurement results performance, particularly at low elevation angles ((is) less than 10 deg) from the ongoing Ka-band propagation characterization where spacecraft signal acquisition typically occurs. Since May 2011, NASA Glenn Research Center has installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the NEN site located in Svalbard, Norway. The Ka-band radiometer monitors the water vapor line, as well as 4 frequencies around 26.5 GHz at a fixed 10 deg elevation angle. Three-year data collection results indicate good campaign at Svalbard, Norway. Comparison of these results with the ITU models and existing ERA profile data indicates very good agreement when the 2010 rain maps and cloud statistics are used. Finally, the Svalbard data is used to derive the expected

  9. Dichroic Filter for Separating W-Band and Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry W.; Durden, Stephen L.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Long, Ezra M.; Sosnowski, John B.; Higuera, Raymond J.; Chen, Jacqueline C.

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems (ACEs) mission development would advance cloud profiling radar from that used in CloudSat by adding a 35-GHz (Ka-band) channel to the 94-GHz (W-band) channel used in CloudSat. In order to illuminate a single antenna, and use CloudSat-like quasi-optical transmission lines, a spatial diplexer is needed to add the Ka-band channel. A dichroic filter separates Ka-band from W-band by employing advances in electrical discharge machining (EDM) and mode-matching analysis techniques developed and validated for designing dichroics for the Deep Space Network (DSN), to develop a preliminary design that both met the requirements of frequency separation and mechanical strength. First, a mechanical prototype was built using an approximately 102-micron-diameter EDM process, and tolerances of the hole dimensions, wall thickness, radius, and dichroic filter thickness measured. The prototype validated the manufacturing needed to design a dichroic filter for a higher-frequency usage than previously used in the DSN. The initial design was based on a Ka-band design, but thicker walls are required for mechanical rigidity than one obtains by simply scaling the Ka-band dichroic filter. The resulting trade of hole dimensions for mechanical rigidity (wall thickness) required electrical redesign of the hole dimensions. Updates to existing codes in the linear solver decreased the analysis time using mode-matching, enabling the electrical design to be realized quickly. This work is applicable to missions and instruments that seek to extend W-band cloud profiling measurements to other frequencies. By demonstrating a dichroic filter that passes W-band, but reflects a lower frequency, this opens up the development of instruments that both compare to and enhance CloudSat.

  10. Current status of Dual Ka-band radar field campaign in Japan for GPM/DPR mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Nakamura, Kenji; Fujiyoshi, Yasushi; Hanado, Hiroshi; Minda, Haruya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Oki, Riko; Furukawa, Kinji

    2013-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an expanded follow-on mission to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) and a GPM core satellite will carry dual frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a GPM Microwave Imager on board. The DPR, which is being developed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), consists of two radars; Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band radar (KaPR). The DPR is expected to advance precipitation science by expanding the coverage of observations to higher latitudes than those of the TRMM/PR, measuring snow and light rain by the KaPR, and providing drop size distribution information based on the differential attenuation of echoes at two frequencies. In order to secure the quality of precipitation estimates, ground validation (GV) of satellite data and retrieval algorithms is essential. Since end-to-end comparisons between instantaneous precipitation data observed by satellite and ground-based instruments is not enough to improve the algorithms. The error of various physical parameters in the precipitation retrieval algorithms (e.g. attenuation factor, drop size distribution, terminal velocity, density of the snow particles, etc.) will be estimated by the comparison with the ground-based observation data. A dual Ka-band radar system is developed by the JAXA for the GPM/DPR algorithm development. The dual Ka-radar system which consists of two identical Ka-band radars can measure both the specific attenuation and the equivalent radar reflectivity at Ka-band. Those parameters are important particularly for snow measurement. Using the dual Ka-radar system along with other instruments, such as a polarimetric precipitation radar, a wind-profiler radar, ground-based precipitation measurement systems, the uncertainties of the parameters in the DPR algorithm can be reduced. The verification of improvement of rain retrieval with the DPR algorithm is

  11. ACTS Ka-band Propagation Research in a Spatially Diversified Network with Two USAT Ground Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, Alex; Acousta, R.; Durand, S.; Emrich, Carol; Ventre, G.; Wilson, W.

    1999-01-01

    Congestion in the radio spectrum below 18 GHz is stimulating greater interest in the Ka (20/30 GHz) frequency band. Transmission at these shorter wavelengths is greatly influenced by rain resulting in signal attenuation and decreased link availability. The size and projected cost of Ultra Small Aperture Terminals (USATS) make site diversity methodology attractive for rain fade compensation. Separation distances between terminals must be small to be of interest commercially. This study measures diversity gain at a separation distance <5 km and investigates utilization of S-band weather radar reflectivity in predicting diversity gain. Two USAT ground stations, separated by 2.43 km for spatial diversity, received a continuous Ka-band tone sent from NASA Glenn Research Center via the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) steerable antenna beam. Received signal power and rainfall were measured, and Weather Surveillance Radar-1998 Doppler (WSR-88D) data were obtained as a measure of precipitation along the USAT-to-ACTS slant path. Signal attenuation was compared for the two sites, and diversity gain was calculated for fades measured on eleven days. Correlation of WSR-88D S-band reflectivity with measured Ka-band attenuation consisted of locating radar volume elements along each slant path, converting reflectivity to Ka-band attenuation with rain rate calculation as an intermediate step. Specific attenuation for each associated path segment was summed, resulting in total attenuation along the slant path. Derived Ka-band attenuation did not correlate closely with empirical data (r = 0.239), but a measured signal fade could be matched with an increase in radar reflectivity in all fade events. Applying a low pass filter to radar reflectivity prior to deriving Ka-band attenuation improved the correlation between measured and derived signal attenuation (r = 0.733). Results indicate that site diversity at small separation distances is a viable means of rain fade

  12. Delay-Throughput Performance the Deep-Space Ka-Band Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, performance of a first-in, first-out (FIFO), selective retransmission scheme for the deep-space Ka-band link is presented and compared to the performance of a comparable X-band link. In this analysis, 16 months of water vapor radiometer (WVR) and advanced water vapor radiometer (AWVR) data from the three Deep Space Network (DSN) Communication Complexes (DSCC) were used to emulate weather effects on X-band and Ka-band links from Mars. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) X-band and Ka-band telecommunications parameters were used for spacecraft telecommunications capabilities. One pass per week per complex was selected from MRO's Deep Space Network (DSN) schedule from April 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007 for a total of 207 passes (69 passes per complex) for this analysis. For each pass both X-band and Ka-band links were designed using at most two data rates so that the expected pass capacity would be maximized subject to a minimum availability requirement (MAR). In conjunction with the WVR/AWVR data, elevation profiles of the selected passes and models for the performance of the antennas in the DSN were used to emulate the performance of both links. It was assumed that the retransmission of the data takes place not on the same pass as the original transmission but during subsequent passes. The data collected before a pass was assumed to be a fraction of the expected capacity of the pass as calculated through the link design process. Infinite spacecraft storage was assumed to obtain an upper bound on the spacecraft storage requirement. The independent parameters of this analysis were MAR and the ratio of data collected before a pass to the expected pass capacity. Since the selected passes did not occur at regular intervals, the delay in this analysis was measured in terms of number of passes. The throughput was measured in terms of number of bits received successfully on the ground. The results indicate that reasonable delay performance could be achieved with

  13. Delay-Throughput Performance of the Deep-Space Ka-band Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, performance of a first-in, first-out (FIFO), selective retransmission scheme for the deep-space Ka-band link is presented and compared to the performance of a comparable X-band link. In this analysis, 16 months of water vapor radiometer (WVR) and advanced water vapor radiometer (AWVR) data from the three Deep Space Network (DSN) Communication Complexes (DSCC) were used to emulate weather effects on X-band and Ka-band links from Mars. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) X-band and Ka-band telecommunications parameters were used for spacecraft telecommunications capabilities. One pass per week per complex was selected from MRO's Deep Space Network (DSN) schedule from April 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007 for a total of 207 passes (69 passes per complex) for this analysis. For each pass both X-band and Ka-band links were designed using at most two data rates so that the expected pass capacity would be maximized subject to a minimum availability requirement (MAR). In conjunction with the WVR/AWVR data, elevation profiles of the selected passes and models for the performance of the antennas in the DSN were used to emulate the performance of both links. It was assumed that the retransmission of the data takes place not on the same pass as the original transmission but during subsequent passes. The data collected before a pass was assumed to be a fraction of the expected capacity of the pass as calculated through the link design process. Infinite spacecraft storage was assumed to obtain an upper bound on the spacecraft storage requirement. The independent parameters of this analysis were MAR and the ratio of data collected before a pass to the expected pass capacity. Since the selected passes did not occur at regular intervals, the delay in this analysis was measured in terms of number of passes. The throughput was measured in terms of number of bits received successfully on the ground. The results indicate that reasonable delay performance could be achieved with

  14. Delay-Throughput Performance the Deep-Space Ka-Band Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, performance of a first-in, first-out (FIFO), selective retransmission scheme for the deep-space Ka-band link is presented and compared to the performance of a comparable X-band link. In this analysis, 16 months of water vapor radiometer (WVR) and advanced water vapor radiometer (AWVR) data from the three Deep Space Network (DSN) Communication Complexes (DSCC) were used to emulate weather effects on X-band and Ka-band links from Mars. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) X-band and Ka-band telecommunications parameters were used for spacecraft telecommunications capabilities. One pass per week per complex was selected from MRO's Deep Space Network (DSN) schedule from April 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007 for a total of 207 passes (69 passes per complex) for this analysis. For each pass both X-band and Ka-band links were designed using at most two data rates so that the expected pass capacity would be maximized subject to a minimum availability requirement (MAR). In conjunction with the WVR/AWVR data, elevation profiles of the selected passes and models for the performance of the antennas in the DSN were used to emulate the performance of both links. It was assumed that the retransmission of the data takes place not on the same pass as the original transmission but during subsequent passes. The data collected before a pass was assumed to be a fraction of the expected capacity of the pass as calculated through the link design process. Infinite spacecraft storage was assumed to obtain an upper bound on the spacecraft storage requirement. The independent parameters of this analysis were MAR and the ratio of data collected before a pass to the expected pass capacity. Since the selected passes did not occur at regular intervals, the delay in this analysis was measured in terms of number of passes. The throughput was measured in terms of number of bits received successfully on the ground. The results indicate that reasonable delay performance could be achieved with

  15. Delay-Throughput Performance of the Deep-Space Ka-band Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, performance of a first-in, first-out (FIFO), selective retransmission scheme for the deep-space Ka-band link is presented and compared to the performance of a comparable X-band link. In this analysis, 16 months of water vapor radiometer (WVR) and advanced water vapor radiometer (AWVR) data from the three Deep Space Network (DSN) Communication Complexes (DSCC) were used to emulate weather effects on X-band and Ka-band links from Mars. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) X-band and Ka-band telecommunications parameters were used for spacecraft telecommunications capabilities. One pass per week per complex was selected from MRO's Deep Space Network (DSN) schedule from April 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007 for a total of 207 passes (69 passes per complex) for this analysis. For each pass both X-band and Ka-band links were designed using at most two data rates so that the expected pass capacity would be maximized subject to a minimum availability requirement (MAR). In conjunction with the WVR/AWVR data, elevation profiles of the selected passes and models for the performance of the antennas in the DSN were used to emulate the performance of both links. It was assumed that the retransmission of the data takes place not on the same pass as the original transmission but during subsequent passes. The data collected before a pass was assumed to be a fraction of the expected capacity of the pass as calculated through the link design process. Infinite spacecraft storage was assumed to obtain an upper bound on the spacecraft storage requirement. The independent parameters of this analysis were MAR and the ratio of data collected before a pass to the expected pass capacity. Since the selected passes did not occur at regular intervals, the delay in this analysis was measured in terms of number of passes. The throughput was measured in terms of number of bits received successfully on the ground. The results indicate that reasonable delay performance could be achieved with

  16. ACTS Ka-band Propagation Research in a Spatially Diversified Network with Two USAT Ground Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, Alex; Acousta, R.; Durand, S.; Emrich, Carol; Ventre, G.; Wilson, W.

    1999-01-01

    Congestion in the radio spectrum below 18 GHz is stimulating greater interest in the Ka (20/30 GHz) frequency band. Transmission at these shorter wavelengths is greatly influenced by rain resulting in signal attenuation and decreased link availability. The size and projected cost of Ultra Small Aperture Terminals (USATS) make site diversity methodology attractive for rain fade compensation. Separation distances between terminals must be small to be of interest commercially. This study measures diversity gain at a separation distance <5 km and investigates utilization of S-band weather radar reflectivity in predicting diversity gain. Two USAT ground stations, separated by 2.43 km for spatial diversity, received a continuous Ka-band tone sent from NASA Glenn Research Center via the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) steerable antenna beam. Received signal power and rainfall were measured, and Weather Surveillance Radar-1998 Doppler (WSR-88D) data were obtained as a measure of precipitation along the USAT-to-ACTS slant path. Signal attenuation was compared for the two sites, and diversity gain was calculated for fades measured on eleven days. Correlation of WSR-88D S-band reflectivity with measured Ka-band attenuation consisted of locating radar volume elements along each slant path, converting reflectivity to Ka-band attenuation with rain rate calculation as an intermediate step. Specific attenuation for each associated path segment was summed, resulting in total attenuation along the slant path. Derived Ka-band attenuation did not correlate closely with empirical data (r = 0.239), but a measured signal fade could be matched with an increase in radar reflectivity in all fade events. Applying a low pass filter to radar reflectivity prior to deriving Ka-band attenuation improved the correlation between measured and derived signal attenuation (r = 0.733). Results indicate that site diversity at small separation distances is a viable means of rain fade

  17. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Clark, J. E.; Heflin, M. B.; Skjerve, L. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Moll, V. E.; Horiuchi, S.

    2010-01-01

    A celestial reference frame at X/Kaband (8.4/32 GHz) has been constructed using fiftyone 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network. We report on observations which have detected 436 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of 200 micro-arcsec ( mu as) in alpha cos delta and 290 mu as in delta. There is evidence for zonal errors at the 100 mu as level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. The motivations for extending the ICRF to frequencies above 8 GHz are to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability, to provide calibrators for phase referencing, and to support spacecraft navigation at Ka-band.

  18. Ka-band Digitally Beamformed Airborne Radar Using SweepSAR Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Chuang, Chung-Lun; Ghaemi, Hirad; Heavey, Brandon A.; Lin, Lung-Sheng S.; Quaddus, Momin

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes a frequency-scaled SweepSAR demonstration that operates at Ka-Band (35.6 GHz), and closely approximates the DESDynl mission antenna geometry, scaled by 28. The concept relies on the SweepSAR measurement technique. An array of digital receivers captures waveforms from a multiplicity of elements. These are combined using digital beamforming in elevation and SAR processing to produce imagery. Ka-band (35.6 GHz) airborne SweepSAR using array-fed reflector and digital beamforming features eight simultaneous receive beams generated by a 40-cm offset-fed reflector and eight-element active array feed, and eight digital receiver channels with all raw data recorded and later used for beamforming. Illumination of the swath is accomplished using a slotted-waveguide antenna radiating 250 W peak power. This experiment has been used to demonstrate digital beamforming SweepSAR systems.

  19. Experiments on Tree Reflectivity at C, X, K and Ka-bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskelinen, Pekka; Ylinen, Juhana

    2014-07-01

    Dedicated field portable radars have been used to measure the reflectivity of identified deciduous and coniferous trees at C to Ka frequency bands with perpendicular illumination. Actual test radars, their electrical parameters including antennas and calibration devices are described. First results show summer time reflectivities from -30 to -10 dB (m2/m2) for deciduous trees and from -30 to 0 dB (2/m2) for coniferous samples, depending on frequency band. Late autumn and spring measurements show particularly well in Ka-band the absence of leaves. Variations in histogram detail, from one frequency to another, exceed 10 dB despite the cumulative probabilities for all bands are quite similar. The measured power spectral density of deciduous trees in the spring was typically 20 dB/Hz at X-band and 30 dB/Hz in Ka-band. Midsummer tests gave values close to 15 and 25 dB/Hz.

  20. Link Design and Planning for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Ka-band (32 GHz) Telecom Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin; Davarian, Faramaz; Morabito, David

    2004-01-01

    NASA is planning an engineering telemetry demonstration with Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Capabilities of Ka-band (32 GHz) for use with deep space mission are demonstrated using the link optimization algorithms and weather forecasting. Furthermore, based on the performance of previous deep space missions with Ka-band downlink capabilities, experiment plans are developed for telemetry operations during superior solar conjunction. A general overview of the demonstration is given followed by a description of the mission planning during cruise, the primary science mission and superior conjunction. As part of the primary science mission planning the expected data return for various data optimization methods is calculated. These results indicate that, given MRO's data rates, a link optimized to use of at most two data rates, subject to a minimum availability of 90%, performs almost as well as a link with no limits on the number of data rates subject to the same minimum availability.

  1. Silicon-Germanium Films Grown on Sapphire for Ka-Band Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Mueller, Carl H.; Croke, Edward T.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's vision in the space communications area is to develop a broadband data network in which there is a high degree of interconnectivity among the various satellite systems, ground stations, and wired systems. To accomplish this goal, we will need complex electronic circuits integrating analog and digital data handling at the Ka-band (26 to 40 GHz). The purpose of this project is to show the feasibility of a new technology for Ka-band communications applications, namely silicon germanium (SiGe) on sapphire. This new technology will have several advantages in comparison to the existing silicon-substrate- based circuits. The main advantages are extremely low parasitic reactances that enable much higher quality active and passive components, better device isolation, higher radiation tolerance, and the integration of digital and analog circuitry on a single chip.

  2. A Gigabit-per-Second Ka-Band Demonstration Using a Reconfigurable FPGA Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dennis; Gray, Andrew A.; Kang, Edward C.; Tsou, Haiping; Lay, Norman E.; Fong, Wai; Fisher, Dave; Hoy, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Gigabit-per-second communications have been a desired target for future NASA Earth science missions, and for potential manned lunar missions. Frequency bandwidth at S-band and X-band is typically insufficient to support missions at these high data rates. In this paper, we present the results of a 1 Gbps 32-QAM end-to-end experiment at Ka-band using a reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) baseband modulator board. Bit error rate measurements of the received signal using a software receiver demonstrate the feasibility of using ultra-high data rates at Ka-band, although results indicate that error correcting coding and/or modulator predistortion must be implemented in addition. Also, results of the demonstration validate the low-cost, MOS-based reconfigurable modulator approach taken to development of a high rate modulator, as opposed to more expensive ASIC or pure analog approaches.

  3. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Clark, J. E.; Heflin, M. B.; Skjerve, L. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Moll, V. E.; Horiuchi, S.

    2010-01-01

    A celestial reference frame at X/Kaband (8.4/32 GHz) has been constructed using fiftyone 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network. We report on observations which have detected 436 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of 200 micro-arcsec ( mu as) in alpha cos delta and 290 mu as in delta. There is evidence for zonal errors at the 100 mu as level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. The motivations for extending the ICRF to frequencies above 8 GHz are to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability, to provide calibrators for phase referencing, and to support spacecraft navigation at Ka-band.

  4. Link Design and Planning for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Ka-band (32 GHz) Telecom Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin; Davarian, Faramaz; Morabito, David

    2004-01-01

    NASA is planning an engineering telemetry demonstration with Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Capabilities of Ka-band (32 GHz) for use with deep space mission are demonstrated using the link optimization algorithms and weather forecasting. Furthermore, based on the performance of previous deep space missions with Ka-band downlink capabilities, experiment plans are developed for telemetry operations during superior solar conjunction. A general overview of the demonstration is given followed by a description of the mission planning during cruise, the primary science mission and superior conjunction. As part of the primary science mission planning the expected data return for various data optimization methods is calculated. These results indicate that, given MRO's data rates, a link optimized to use of at most two data rates, subject to a minimum availability of 90%, performs almost as well as a link with no limits on the number of data rates subject to the same minimum availability.

  5. Reconfigurable phased antenna array for extending cubesat operations to Ka-band: Design and feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttazzoni, G.; Comisso, M.; Cuttin, A.; Fragiacomo, M.; Vescovo, R.; Vincenti Gatti, R.

    2017-08-01

    Started as educational tools, CubeSats have immediately encountered the favor of the scientific community, subsequently becoming viable platforms for research and commercial applications. To ensure competitive data rates, some pioneers have started to explore the usage of the Ka-band beside the conventional amateur radio frequencies. In this context, this study proposes a phased antenna array design for Ka-band downlink operations consisting of 8×8 circularly polarized subarrays of microstrip patches filling one face of a single CubeSat unit. The conceived structure is developed to support 1.5 GHz bandwidth and dual-task missions, whose feasibility is verified by proper link budgets. The dual-task operations are enabled by a low-complexity phase-only control algorithm that provides pattern reconfigurability in order to satisfy both orbiting and intersatellite missions, while remaining adherent to the cost-effective CubeSat paradigm.

  6. Low-cost Ka band SAR/ISAR for UAV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Hwoon; Pergande, Albert N.; Hughen, James H.

    2004-08-01

    Growing interest in low cost unattended observations has lead Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control to examine and demonstrate feasibility of a small inexpensive SAR/ISAR system at Ka band. By trading off state of the art performance for cost and volume, system performance for UAV applications is still adequate to provide important tactical information to battle field commanders in real time while reducing the exposure of war fighters to hostile fire. As RF and millimeterwave component become cheaper and more robust, system costs are expected to fall further. To demonstrate this concept, we have built a portable system with 500 Mhz instantaneous bandwidth, and have used to it gather SAR and ISAR data along with conventional HRR and LFM target data at Ka Band. Here we present sample data collected with our system along with supporting system performance supporting the use of such inexpensive systems in near term applications.

  7. Quantum efficiency of a double quantum dot microwave photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement; Vavilov, Maxim

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we study charge transfer through a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting cavity subject to a microwave field. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and determine the optimal parameter regime for complete absorption of radiation and efficient conversion of microwave photons to electric current. For experimentally available DQD systems, we show that the cavity-coupled DQD operates as a photon-to-charge converter with quantum efficiencies up to 80% C.W. acknowledges support by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program.

  8. Multiple access capacity trade-offs for a Ka-band personal access satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessouky, Khaled; Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    System capability is critical to the economic viability of a personal satellite communication system. Ka band has significant potential to support a high capacity multiple access system because of the availability of bandwidth. System design tradeoffs are performed and multiple access schemes are compared with the design goal of achieving the highest capacity and efficiency. Conclusions regarding the efficiency of the different schemes and the achievable capacities are given.

  9. A High Performance Frequency Standard and Distribution System for Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    spacecraft in a series of occultation measurements performed over a 78 day period from March to June 2005. I. INTRODUCTION The Cassini - Huygens project...successful Huygens landing on the moon Titan, the Cassini Spacecraft has begun a 3 year mission of continued moon flybys and observations. During this time...A High Performance Frequency Standard and Distribution System for Cassini Ka-Band Experiment R. T. WANG, M. D. CALHOUN, A. KIRK, W. A. DIENER

  10. A satellite system for multimedia personal communications at Ka-band and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatalaro, F.; Losquadro, G.

    1995-01-01

    The main characteristics of the satellite extremely high frequency (EHF) communication of multimedia mobile services (SECOMS) system are given and the results of the preliminary analysis are included. The SECOMS provides a first generation Ka band system with coverage over Western Europe, in order to satisfy business user needs of very large bandwidths and terminal mobility. The satellite system also provides a second generation EHF enhanced system with increased capacity and enlarged coverage, to serve all of Europe and the nearby countries.

  11. A satellite system for multimedia personal communications at Ka-band and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatalaro, F.; Losquadro, G.

    1995-01-01

    The main characteristics of the satellite extremely high frequency (EHF) communication of multimedia mobile services (SECOMS) system are given and the results of the preliminary analysis are included. The SECOMS provides a first generation Ka band system with coverage over Western Europe, in order to satisfy business user needs of very large bandwidths and terminal mobility. The satellite system also provides a second generation EHF enhanced system with increased capacity and enlarged coverage, to serve all of Europe and the nearby countries.

  12. First Experiments at the Yale University Ka-band Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaPointe, M. A.; Jiang, Y.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Kazakov, S. Yu.; Vikharev, A. L.; Vikharev, A. A.; Ivanov, O. A.; Gorbachev, A.; Lobaev, M.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    User experiments aimed toward discovering pathways towards development of high gradient accelerator structures have begun in the Ka-Band Test Facility at Yale University. This facility is based on use of the Yale/Omega-P 34.3 GHz magnicon. The first two experiments, a quasi-optical active pulse compressor and an RF breakdown cavity test cell, have been installed and are undergoing initial testing. The status of these experiments and others awaiting installation will be reviewed.

  13. Spectral hole burning and its application in microwave photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putz, Stefan; Angerer, Andreas; Krimer, Dmitry O.; Glattauer, Ralph; Munro, William J.; Rotter, Stefan; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Majer, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Spectral hole burning, used in inhomogeneously broadened emitters, is a well-established optical technique, with applications from spectroscopy to slow light and frequency combs. In microwave photonics, electron spin ensembles are candidates for use as quantum memories with potentially long storage times. Here, we demonstrate long-lived collective dark states by spectral hole burning in the microwave regime. The coherence time in our hybrid quantum system (nitrogen-vacancy centres strongly coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity) becomes longer than both the ensemble's free-induction decay and the bare cavity dissipation rate. The hybrid quantum system thus performs better than its individual subcomponents. This opens the way for long-lived quantum multimode memories, solid-state microwave frequency combs, spin squeezed states, optical-to-microwave quantum transducers and novel metamaterials. Beyond these, new cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments will be possible where spin-spin interactions and many-body phenomena are directly accessible.

  14. A novel large-orbit electron beam generated by a Cuccia coupler for a Ka-band third-harmonic slotted peniotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoyun; Li, Jiayin; Zou, Huan; Wang, Haiyang; Wu, Xinhui; Hu, Biao; Li, Hao; Li, Tianming

    2010-12-01

    In this work, a novel large-orbit electron beam generated by a Cuccia coupler for a Ka-band third-harmonic slotted is proposed. The Cuccia coupler was originally used in the electron coupler for amplitude modulation and power control at ultrahigh frequencies. It is demonstrated by the 3D-PIC simulation that a 6 kV, 0.5 A beam will be gyroresonantly accelerated when a microwave power of 16 kW at 10 GHz is injected into the coupler, from which a 37 kV, 0.5 A large-orbit electron beam will be obtained; it is characterized by a relative velocity spread lower than 1% and a velocity ratio α (υ⊥/υz) up to 2.3. Moreover, other electron beam parameters including transverse velocity (υ⊥), longitudinal velocity (υz) and deviation of guiding center could be adjusted independently, whereas these are rather difficult for the cusp gun. Finally, the Ka-band third-harmonic slotted peniotron in 2π mode driven by such a beam is verified by 3D-PIC simulation, which is predicted to yield an output power of 8 kW at 30 GHz, with a microwave power conversion efficiency up to 50% and a device efficiency up to 43%, respectively.

  15. A novel large-orbit electron beam generated by a Cuccia coupler for a Ka-band third-harmonic slotted peniotron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Xiaoyun; Li Jiayin; Zou Huan; Wang Haiyang; Wu Xinhui; Hu Biao; Li Hao; Li Tianming

    2010-12-15

    In this work, a novel large-orbit electron beam generated by a Cuccia coupler for a Ka-band third-harmonic slotted is proposed. The Cuccia coupler was originally used in the electron coupler for amplitude modulation and power control at ultrahigh frequencies. It is demonstrated by the 3D-PIC simulation that a 6 kV, 0.5 A beam will be gyroresonantly accelerated when a microwave power of 16 kW at 10 GHz is injected into the coupler, from which a 37 kV, 0.5 A large-orbit electron beam will be obtained; it is characterized by a relative velocity spread lower than 1% and a velocity ratio {alpha} ({upsilon}{sub perpendicular}/{upsilon}{sub z}) up to 2.3. Moreover, other electron beam parameters including transverse velocity ({upsilon}{sub perpendicular}), longitudinal velocity ({upsilon}{sub z}) and deviation of guiding center could be adjusted independently, whereas these are rather difficult for the cusp gun. Finally, the Ka-band third-harmonic slotted peniotron in 2{pi} mode driven by such a beam is verified by 3D-PIC simulation, which is predicted to yield an output power of 8 kW at 30 GHz, with a microwave power conversion efficiency up to 50% and a device efficiency up to 43%, respectively.

  16. Retrieval of Snow Properties for Ku- and Ka-Band Dual-Frequency Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert; Tokay, Ali; Bliven, Larry F.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the estimation of snow microphysical properties and the associated bulk parameters such as snow water content and water equivalent snowfall rate for Ku- and Ka-band dual-frequency radar. This is done by exploring a suitable scattering model and the proper particle size distribution (PSD) assumption that accurately represent, in the electromagnetic domain, the micro-macrophysical properties of snow. The scattering databases computed from simulated aggregates for small-to-moderate particle sizes are combined with a simple scattering model for large particle sizes to characterize snow-scattering properties over the full range of particle sizes. With use of the single-scattering results, the snow retrieval lookup tables can be formed in a way that directly links the Ku- and Ka-band radar reflectivities to snow water content and equivalent snowfall rate without use of the derived PSD parameters. A sensitivity study of the retrieval results to the PSD and scattering models is performed to better understand the dual-wavelength retrieval uncertainties. To aid in the development of the Ku- and Ka-band dual-wavelength radar technique and to further evaluate its performance, self-consistency tests are conducted using measurements of the snow PSD and fall velocity acquired from the Snow Video Imager Particle Image Probe (SVIPIP) during the winter of 2014 at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility site in Wallops Island, Virginia.

  17. Retrieval of Snow Properties for Ku- and Ka-band Dual-Frequency Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert; Tokay, Ali; Bliven, Larry F.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the estimation of snow microphysical properties and the associated bulk parameters such as snow water content and water equivalent snowfall rate for Ku- and Ka-band dual-frequency radar. This is done by exploring a suitable scattering model and the proper particle size distribution (PSD) assumption that accurately represent, in the electromagnetic domain, the micro/macro-physical properties of snow. The scattering databases computed from simulated aggregates for small-to-moderate particle sizes are combined with a simple scattering model for large particle sizes to characterize snow scattering properties over the full range of particle sizes. With use of the single-scattering results, the snow retrieval lookup tables can be formed in a way that directly links the Ku- and Ka-band radar reflectivities to snow water content and equivalent snowfall rate without use of the derived PSD parameters. A sensitivity study of the retrieval results to the PSD and scattering models is performed to better understand the dual-wavelength retrieval uncertainties. To aid in the development of the Ku- and Ka-band dual-wavelength radar technique and to further evaluate its performance, self-consistency tests are conducted using measurements of the snow PSD and fall velocity acquired from the Snow Video Imager Particle Image Probe (SVIPIP) duringthe winter of 2014 at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility site in Wallops Island, Virginia.

  18. ACTS Ka-Band Earth Stations: Technology, Performance, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Struharik, Steven J.; Diamond, John J.; Stewart, David

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project invested heavily in prototype Ka-band satellite ground terminals to conduct an experiments program with ACTS. The ACTS experiments program proposed to validate Ka-band satellite and ground-station technology, demonstrate future telecommunication services, demonstrate commercial viability and market acceptability of these new services, evaluate system networking and processing technology, and characterize Ka-band propagation effects, including development of techniques to mitigate signal fading. This paper will present a summary of the fixed ground terminals developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center and its industry partners, emphasizing the technology and performance of the terminals and the lessons learned throughout their 6-year operation, including the inclined orbit phase-of-operations. The fixed ground stations used for experiments by government, academic, and commercial entities used reflector-based offset-fed antenna systems with antennas ranging in size from 0.35 to 3.4 in. in diameter. Gateway earth stations included two systems referred to as the NASA Ground Station (NGS) and the Link Evaluation Terminal (LET).

  19. Microwave photon Fock state generation by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premaratne, Shavindra P.; Wellstood, F. C.; Palmer, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    The deterministic generation of non-classical states of light, including squeezed states, Fock states and Bell states, plays an important role in quantum information processing and exploration of the physics of quantum entanglement. Preparation of these non-classical states in resonators is non-trivial due to their inherent harmonicity. Here we use stimulated Raman adiabatic passage to generate microwave photon Fock states in a superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics system comprised of a fixed-frequency transmon qubit in a three-dimensional microwave cavity at 20 mK. A two-photon process is employed to overcome a first order forbidden transition and the first, second and third Fock states are demonstrated. We also demonstrate how this all-microwave technique can be used to generate an arbitrary superposition of Fock states. Simulations of the system are in excellent agreement with the data and fidelities of 89%, 68% and 43% are inferred for the first three Fock states respectively.

  20. A low-noise K-Ka band oscillator using AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihian, Mohammad; Takahashi, Hideki

    1991-01-01

    The design considerations, fabrication process, and performance of the first K-Ka-band oscillator implemented using a self-aligned AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) are described. A large-signal time-domain-based design approach has been used which applies a SPICE-F simulator for optimization of the oscillator circuit parameters for maximum output power. The oscillator employs a 2 x 10 sq mm emitter AlGaAs/GaAs HBT that was fabricated using a pattern inversion technology. The HBT has a base current 1/f noise power density lower than 1 x 10 to the -20th sq A/Hz at 1 kHz and lower than 1 x 10 to the -22nd sq A/Hz at 100 kHz for a collector current of 1 mA. The oscillator, which is composed of only low-Q microstrip transmission lines, has a phase noise of -80 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz off carrier when operated at 26.6 GHz. These results indicate the applicability of the HBTs to low-phase-noise monolithic oscillators at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, where both Si bipolar transistors and GaAs FETs are absent.

  1. Ka-Band Site Characterization of the NASA Near Earth Network in Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Morse, J.; Nessel, J.; Zemba, M.; Tuttle, K.; Caroglanian, A.; Younes, B.; Pedersen, Sten-Chirstian

    2011-01-01

    Critical to NASA s rapid migration toward Ka-Band is the comprehensive characterization of the communication channels at NASA's ground sites to determine the effects of the atmosphere on signal propagation and the network's ability to support various classes of users in different orbits. Accordingly, NASA has initiated a number of studies involving the ground sites of its Near Earth and Deep Space Networks. Recently, NASA concluded a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the Norwegian Space Centre of the Kingdom of Norway and began a joint site characterization study to determine the atmospheric effects on Ka-Band links at the Svalbard Satellite Station in Norway, which remains a critical component of NASA s Near Earth Communication Network (NEN). System planning and design for Ka-band links at the Svalbard site cannot be optimally achieved unless measured attenuation statistics (e.g. cumulative distribution functions (CDF)) are obtained. In general, the CDF will determine the necessary system margin and overall system availability due to the atmospheric effects. To statistically characterize the attenuation statistics at the Svalbard site, NASA has constructed a ground-based monitoring station consisting of a multi-channel total power radiometer (25.5 - 26.5 GHz) and a weather monitoring station to continuously measure (at 1 second intervals) attenuation and excess noise (brightness temperature). These instruments have been tested in a laboratory environment as well as in an analogous outdoor climate (i.e. winter in Northeast Ohio), and the station was deployed in Svalbard, Norway in May 2011. The measurement campaign is planned to last a minimum of 3 years but not exceeding a maximum of 5 years.

  2. A low-power, high-efficiency Ka-band TWTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Dayton, James A., Jr.; Palmer, Raymond W.; Force, Dale A.; Tamashiro, Rodney N.; Wilson, John F.; Dombro, Louis; Harvey, Wayne L.

    1992-01-01

    NASA has developed a new class of Ka-band TWT amplifiers (TWTAs) which achieve their high efficiency/low power performance goals by means of an advanced dynamic velocity taper (DVT). The DVT is characterized by a continuous, nonlinear reduction in helix pitch from its initial synchronous value in the output section of the TWT to near the end of the helix. Another efficiency-maximizing feature is the inclusion of a multistage depressed collector employing oxygen-free, high-conductivity Cu electrodes treated for secondary electron emission suppression by means of ion bombardment. An efficiency of 43 percent is expected to be reached.

  3. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles <30° due to specular reflection from regular surface. At larger incidence angles, the relative non-polarized contribution decreases, but grows again at HH-polarization approaching 0.7-0.8 at 65° for 10 m/s wind speed, suggesting that backscattering from breaking waves dominates HH NRCS at low grazing angles. At high incidence angles (>60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on

  4. Use of elliptical orbits for a Ka-band personal access satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motamedi, Masoud; Estabrook, Polly

    1990-01-01

    The use of satellites in elliptical orbits for a Ka-band personal communications system application designed to provide voice and data service within the continental U.S. is examined. The impact of these orbits on system parameters such as signal carrier-to-noise ratio, roundtrip delay, Doppler shift, and satellite antenna size is quantized for satellites in two elliptical orbits, the Molniya and the ACE orbits. The number of satellites necessary for continuous CONUS coverage has been determined for the satellites in these orbits. The increased system complexity brought about by the use of satellites at such altitudes is discussed.

  5. Economic comparison of FDMA and TDMA options for communications by Ka-band multiple beam satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the feasibility of providing low data rate service to small earth stations by satellite at Ka-band. Technological as well as economic factors are considered. The results of NASA-sponsored contractual studies are compared and results of internal NASA studies are presented. Several FDMA and TDMA scenarios are critically examined with the objective of establishing the relative utility of such systems to end users. It is shown that FDMA has no advantage over TDMA in a multibeam scenario for 56 Kbs of data by voice, video, or the equivalent. For the same assumptions, significant weight and power advantages are realized in the space segment using TDMA.

  6. Ka-band Dielectric Waveguide Antenna Array for Millimeter Wave Active Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Weihai; Fei, Peng; Nian, Feng; Yang, Yujie; Feng, Keming

    2014-11-01

    Ka-band compact dielectric waveguide antenna array for active imaging system is given. Antenna array with WR28 metal waveguide direct feeding is specially designed with small size, high gain, good radiation pattern, easy realization, low insertion loss and low mutual coupling. One practical antenna array for 3-D active imaging system is shown with theoretic analysis and experimental results. The mutual coupling of transmitting and receiving units is less than -30dB, the gain from 26.5GHz to 40GHz is (12-16) dB. The results in this paper provide guidelines for the designing of millimeter wave dielectric waveguide antenna array.

  7. Weather related continuity and completeness on Deep Space Ka-band links: statistics and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the concept of link 'stability' as means of measuring the continuity of the link is introduced and through it, along with the distributions of 'good' periods and 'bad' periods, the performance of the proposed Ka-band link design method using both forecasting and long-term statistics has been analyzed. The results indicate that the proposed link design method has relatively good continuity and completeness characteristics even when only long-term statistics are used and that the continuity performance further improves when forecasting is employed. .

  8. Ka-Band Waveguide Hybrid Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers With Unequal and Arbitrary Power Output Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2009-01-01

    The design, simulation and characterization of a novel Ka-band (32.05 +/- 0.25 GHz) rectangular waveguide branch-line hybrid unequal power combiner is presented. The manufactured combiner was designed to combine input signals, which are in phase and with an amplitude ratio of two. The measured return loss and isolation of the branch-line hybrid are better than 22 and 27 dB, respectively. The application of the branch-line hybrid for combining two MMIC power amplifiers with output power ratio of two is demonstrated. The measured combining efficiency is approximately 93 percent over the above frequency band.

  9. Advanced mobile satellite communications using COMETS satellite in MM-wave and Ka-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Isobe, Shunkichi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Naito, Hideyuki

    1993-01-01

    Early in the 21st century, the demand for personal communications using mobile, hand-held, and VSAT terminals will rapidly increase. In a future system, many different types of services should be provided with one-hop connection. The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) has studied a future advanced mobile satellite communications system using millimeter wave and Ka band. In 1990, CRL started the Communications and Broadcasting Engineering Test Satellite (COMETS) project. The satellite has been developed in conjunction with NASDA and will be launched in 1997. This paper describes the COMETS payload configuration and the experimental system for the advanced mobile communications mission.

  10. Megawatt-power Ka-band gyroklystron oscillator with external feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guznov, Y. M.; Danilov, Y. Y.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Novozhilova, Y. V.; Shevchenko, A. S.; Zaitsev, N. I.; Ryskin, N. M.

    2013-10-01

    We report design and experimental demonstration of a high-power regenerative oscillator based on the gyroklystron amplifier with external delayed feedback. The oscillator operates on axially non-symmetric TE7.1.1 and TE7.3.1 modes in the input and output cavity, respectively. Peak output power of 1.5-2.0 MW with nearly 1 μs pulse duration in Ka-band is observed experimentally. Application of the selective delayed feedback not only overcomes the mode competition problem but also provides controlled mode switching within 1-2 GHz frequency band.

  11. Proposal for a Joint NASA/KSAT Ka-band RF Propagation Terminal at Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volosin, Jeffrey; Acosta, Roberto; Nessel, James; McCarthy, Kevin; Caroglanian, Armen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses the placement of a Ka-band RF Propagation Terminal at Svalbard, Norway. The Near Earth Network (NEN) station would be managed by Kongsberg Satellite Services (KSAT) and would benefit NASA and KSAT. There are details of the proposed NASA/KSAT campaign, and the responsibilities each would agree to. There are several reasons for the placement, a primary reason is comparison with the Alaska site, Based on climatological similarities/differences with Alaska, Svalbard site expected to have good radiometer/beacon agreement approximately 99% of time.

  12. Ka-band dual frequency array feed for a low cost ACTS ground terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Simons, Rainee N.; Sil, Ajit K.

    1992-01-01

    Because of low cost and ease of fabrication, microstrip arrays are attractive as feeds for reflector antenna systems. The development of a 4 x 4 microstrip array which will be used as a feed for a low cost Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) ground terminal is described. The array feed consisting of four 2 x 2 subarrays is fed with coplanar waveguide power dividing networks. The patch radiator is designed to excite two orthogonal, linearly polarized waves at Ka-band frequencies (around 20 and 30 GHz). Test results for the developed array are presented.

  13. Ka-Band Dual Frequency Array Feed for a Low Cost ACTS Ground Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Simons, Rainee N.; Sil, Ajit K.

    1992-01-01

    Because of low cost and ease of fabrication, microstrip arrays are attractive as feeds for reflector antenna systems. This paper describes the development of a 4x4 microstrip array which will be used as a feed for a low cost ACTS ground terminal. The array feed consisting of four 2x2 subarrays is fed with coplanar waveguide power dividing networks. The patch radiator is designed to excite two orthogonal, linearly polarized waves at Ka-band frequencies (around 20 and 30 GHz). Test results for the developed array are presented.

  14. A low-power, high-efficiency Ka-band TWTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Dayton, James A., Jr.; Palmer, Raymond W.; Force, Dale A.; Tamashiro, Rodney N.; Wilson, John F.; Dombro, Louis; Harvey, Wayne L.

    1992-03-01

    NASA has developed a new class of Ka-band TWT amplifiers (TWTAs) which achieve their high efficiency/low power performance goals by means of an advanced dynamic velocity taper (DVT). The DVT is characterized by a continuous, nonlinear reduction in helix pitch from its initial synchronous value in the output section of the TWT to near the end of the helix. Another efficiency-maximizing feature is the inclusion of a multistage depressed collector employing oxygen-free, high-conductivity Cu electrodes treated for secondary electron emission suppression by means of ion bombardment. An efficiency of 43 percent is expected to be reached.

  15. Weather related continuity and completeness on Deep Space Ka-band links: statistics and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the concept of link 'stability' as means of measuring the continuity of the link is introduced and through it, along with the distributions of 'good' periods and 'bad' periods, the performance of the proposed Ka-band link design method using both forecasting and long-term statistics has been analyzed. The results indicate that the proposed link design method has relatively good continuity and completeness characteristics even when only long-term statistics are used and that the continuity performance further improves when forecasting is employed. .

  16. Deep-Space Ka-Band Link Priority Data Protection: Pre-Emptive Retransmission vs. Margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the performance of two preemptive retransmission schemes for protection of priority data over deep-space Ka-band links is evaluated. The first scheme merges the correctly received bit from each transmission to create the most complete set of priority data for each pass (bit merge). The second scheme (symbol combining) combines the soft symbols received from each transmission of the priority data to increase the priority data's signal to noise ratio (SNR), thus increasing the liklihood of the correct reception.

  17. Validation Studies for CHRISTINE-CC Using a Ka-Band Coupled-Cavity TWT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Cavity TWT for 29-31 GHz Figure 3: Output power vs. input power at f=30.0 Communications Systems," I Ith Ka and Broadband GHz for the VTA-6430A1 Ka...Coupled-Cavity TWT DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: 2006 IEEE...Studies for CHRISTINE-CC Using a Ka-Band Coupled-Cavity TWT * D. Chernin, D. Dialetis, T. M. Antonsen, Jr.t, Science Applications International Corp McLean

  18. Stabilizing Microwave Frequency of a Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong

    2006-01-01

    A scheme for stabilizing the frequency of a microwave signal is proposed that exploits the operational characteristics of a coupled optoelectronic oscillator (COEO) and related optoelectronic equipment. An essential element in the scheme is a fiber mode-locked laser (MLL), the optical frequency of which is locked to an atomic transition. In this scheme, the optical frequency stability of the mode-locked laser is transferred to that of the microwave in the same device. Relative to prior schemes for using wideband optical frequency comb to stabilize microwave signals, this scheme is simpler and lends itself more readily to implementation in relatively compact, rugged equipment. The anticipated development of small, low-power, lightweight, highly stable microwave oscillators based on this scheme would afford great benefits in communication, navigation, metrology, and fundamental sciences. COEOs of various designs, at various stages of development, in some cases called by different names, have been described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. A COEO is an optoelectronic apparatus that generates both short (picosecond) optical pulses and a steady microwave signal having an ultrahigh degree of spectral purity. The term "coupled optoelectronic" in the full name of such an apparatus signifies that its optical and electronic oscillations are coupled to each other in a single device. The present frequency-stabilization scheme is best described indirectly by describing the laboratory apparatus used to demonstrate it. The apparatus (see figure) includes a COEO that generates a comb-like optical spectrum, the various frequency components of which interfere, producing short optical pulses. This spectrum is centered at a nominal wavelength of 1,560 nm. The spectrum separation of this comb is about 10 GHz, as determined primarily by the length of an optical loop and the bandpass filter in the microwave feedback loop. The optical loop serves as microwave resonator

  19. Wide-Band Microwave Receivers Using Photonic Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Yu, Nan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2008-01-01

    In wide-band microwave receivers of a type now undergoing development, the incoming microwave signals are electronically preamplified, then frequency-up-converted to optical signals that are processed photonically before being detected. This approach differs from the traditional approach, in which incoming microwave signals are processed by purely electronic means. As used here, wide-band microwave receivers refers especially to receivers capable of reception at any frequency throughout the range from about 90 to about 300 GHz. The advantage expected to be gained by following the up-conversion-and-photonic-processing approach is the ability to overcome the limitations of currently available detectors and tunable local oscillators in the frequency range of interest. In a receiver following this approach (see figure), a preamplified incoming microwave signal is up-converted by the method described in the preceeding article. The frequency up-converter exploits the nonlinearity of the electromagnetic response of a whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator made of LiNbO3. Up-conversion takes place by three-wave mixing in the resonator. The WGM resonator is designed and fabricated to function simultaneously as an electro-optical modulator and to exhibit resonance at the microwave and optical operating frequencies plus phase matching among the microwave and optical signals circulating in the resonator. The up-conversion is an efficient process, and the efficiency is enhanced by the combination of microwave and optical resonances. The up-converted signal is processed photonically by use of a tunable optical filter or local oscillator, and is then detected. Tunable optical filters can be made to be frequency agile and to exhibit high resonance quality factors (high Q values), thereby making it possible to utilize a variety of signal-processing modalities. Therefore, it is anticipated that when fully developed, receivers of this type will be compact and will be capable of both

  20. Tunable superconducting qudit mediated by microwave photons

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sung Un; Bae, Myung-Ho; Kim, Nam; Kang, Kicheon

    2015-08-15

    We have investigated the time-domain characteristics of the Autler-Townes doublet in a superconducting circuit. The transition probabilities between the ground state and the Autler-Townes doublet states are shown to be controlled in a phase-coherent manner using a well-known microwave pulse pattern technique. The experimental results are well explained by a numerical simulation based on the Markovian master equation. Our result indicates that the Autler-Townes doublet states might be useful as a tunable qudit for implementation of quantum information processing, in particular as a multivalued quantum logic element.

  1. Counting near infrared photons with microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.; Liu, X.; Wang, Y.; Wei, Q.; Wei, L. F.; Hubmayr, J.; Fowler, J.; Ullom, J.; Vale, L.; Vissers, M. R.; Gao, J.

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate photon counting at 1550 nm wavelength using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) made from TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer films with superconducting transition temperature T c ≈ 1.4 K. The detectors have a lumped-element design with a large interdigitated capacitor covered by aluminum and inductive photon absorbers whose volume ranges from 0.4 μm3 to 20 μm3. The energy resolution improves as the absorber volume is reduced. We achieved an energy resolution of 0.22 eV and resolved up to 7 photons per optical pulse, both greatly improved from previously reported results at 1550 nm wavelength using MKIDs. Further improvements are possible by optimizing the optical coupling to maximize photon absorption into the inductive absorber.

  2. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 2: Tests on the antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    In part one of this article, a description was given of a Ka-band test package developed to enable testing of the Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 34-m beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna at 32 GHz. Test results were given for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration. This article is a companion article concerned with Ka-band test results for the test package in an on-the-antenna test configuration. Included are Ka-band zenith noise-temperature values, tipping-curve data, and subreflector test results obtained at the Cassegrain focal point, as well as at the final BWG focal point (located in a subterranean pedestal room). Test results show that, through the use of the Ka-band test package, the BWG antenna performance was successfully evaluated at Ka-band. The Ka-band test package operated well in all of the different antenna test configurations.

  3. Amplitude Scintillation due to Atmospheric Turbulence for the Deep Space Network Ka-Band Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C.; Wheelon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Fast amplitude variations due to atmospheric scintillation are the main concerns for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Ka-band downlink under clear weather conditions. A theoretical study of the amplitude scintillation variances for a finite aperture antenna is presented. Amplitude variances for weak scattering scenarios are examined using turbulence theory to describe atmospheric irregularities. We first apply the Kolmogorov turbulent spectrum to a point receiver for three different turbulent profile models, especially for an exponential model varying with altitude. These analytic solutions then are extended to a receiver with a finite aperture antenna for the three profile models. Smoothing effects of antenna aperture are expressed by gain factors. A group of scaling factor relations is derived to show the dependences of amplitude variances on signal wavelength, antenna size, and elevation angle. Finally, we use these analytic solutions to estimate the scintillation intensity for a DSN Goldstone 34-m receiving station. We find that the (rms) amplitude fluctuation is 0.13 dB at 20-deg elevation angle for an exponential model, while the fluctuation is 0.05 dB at 90 deg. These results will aid us in telecommunication system design and signal-fading prediction. They also provide a theoretical basis for further comparison with other measurements at Ka-band.

  4. A high performance frequency standard and distribution system for Cassini Ka-band experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Calhoun, M. D.; Kirk, A.; Diener, W. A.; Dick, G. J.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and update of a specialized frequency reference system for the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) to support Ka-band radio science experiments with the Cassini spacecraft, currently orbiting Saturn. Three major components, a Hydrogen Maser, Stabilized Fiber-optic Distribution Assembly (SFODA), and 10 Kelvin Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator (10K CSO) and frequency-lock-loop, are integrated to achieve the very high performance, ground based frequency reference at a remote antenna site located 16 km from the hydrogen maser. Typical measured Allan Deviation is 1.6 -14 1 0a't 1 second and 1.7 x 10 -15 at 1000 seconds averaging intervals. Recently two 10K CSOs have been compared in situ while operating at the remote DSN site DSS-25. The CSO references were used operationally to downconvert the Ka band downlink received from the Cassini spacecraft in a series of occultation measurements performed over a 78 day period from March to June 2005.

  5. Channel characterisation for future Ka-band Mobile Satellite Systems and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforza, Mario; Buonomo, Sergio; Arbesser-Rastburg, Bertram

    1994-01-01

    Mobile satellite systems (MSS) are presently designed or planned to operate, with the exception of OMNITRACKS, in the lower part of the frequency spectrum (UHF to S-bands). The decisions taken at the last World Administrative Radio Conference in 1992 to increase the allocated L- and S-bands for MSS services will only partly alleviate the problem of system capacity. In addition the use of L-and S-band frequencies generally requires large antenna apertures on board the satellite terminal side. The idea of exploiting the large spectrum resources available at higher frequencies (20-30 GHz) and the perspective of reducing user terminal size (and possibly price too) have spurred the interest of systems designers and planners. On the other hand, Ka-band frequencies suffer from increased slant path losses due to atmospheric attenuation phenomena. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently embarked on a number of activities aimed at studying the effect of the typical mobile propagation impairments at Ka-band. This paper briefly summarizes ESA efforts in this field of research and presents preliminary experimental results.

  6. Ka-Band Atmospheric Phase Stability Measurements in Goldstone, CA; White Sands, NM; and Guam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    As spacecraft communication links are driven to higher frequencies (e.g. Ka-band) both by spectrum congestion and the appeal of higher data rates, the propagation phenomena at these frequencies must be well characterized for effective system design. In particular, the phase stability of a site at a given frequency will govern whether or not the site is a practical location for an antenna array, particularly if uplink capabilities are desired. Propagation studies to characterize such phenomena must be done on a site-by-site basis due to the wide variety of climates and weather conditions at each ground terminal. Accordingly, in order to statistically characterize the atmospheric effects on Ka-Band links, site test interferometers (STIs) have been deployed at three of NASA's operational sites to directly measure each site's tropospheric phase stability. Using three years of results from these experiments, this paper will statistically characterize the simultaneous atmospheric phase noise measurements recorded by the STIs deployed at the following ground station sites: the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, CA; the White Sands Ground Terminal near Las Cruces, NM; and the Guam Remote Ground Terminal on the island of Guam.

  7. Generation of Data-Rate Profiles of Ka-Band Deep-Space Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2006-01-01

    A short report discusses a methodology for designing Ka-band Deep-Space-to- Earth radio-communication links. This methodology is oriented toward minimizing the effects of weather on the Ka-band telecommunication link by maximizing the expected data return subject to minimum link availability and a limited number of data rates. This methodology differs from the current standard practices in which a link is designed according to a margin policy for a given link availability at 10 elevation. In this methodology, one chooses a data-rate profile that will maximize the average data return over a pass while satisfying a minimum-availability requirement for the pass, subject to mission operational limitations expressed in terms of the number of data rates used during the pass. The methodology is implemented in an intelligent search algorithm that first finds the allowable data-rate profiles from the mission constraints, spacecraft-to-Earth distance, spacecraft EIRP (effective isotropic radiated power), and the applicable zenith atmospheric noise temperature distribution, and then selects the best data rate in terms of maximum average data return from the set of allowable data-rate profiles.

  8. A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator with a four-gap buncher

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lili; He, Juntao; Ling, Junpu

    2015-05-15

    A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator (TTO) with a four-gap buncher is proposed and investigated. Simulation results show that an output power of 1.27 GW and a frequency of 26.18 GHz can be achieved with a diode voltage of 447 kV and a beam current of 7.4 kA. The corresponding power efficiency is 38.5%, and the guiding magnetic field is 0.6 T. Studies and analysis indicate that a buncher with four gaps can modulate the electron beam better than the three-gap buncher in such a Ka-band TTO. Moreover, power efficiency increases with the coupling coefficient between the buncher and the extractor. Further simulation demonstrates that power efficiency can reach higher than 30% with a guiding magnetic field of above 0.5 T. Besides, the power efficiency exceeds 30% in a relatively large range of diode voltage from 375 kV to 495 kV.

  9. Spaceflight Ka-Band High-Rate Radiation-Hard Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaso, Jeffery M.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses the creation of a Ka-band modulator developed specifically for the NASA/GSFC Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This flight design consists of a high-bandwidth, Quadriphase Shift Keying (QPSK) vector modulator with radiation-hardened, high-rate driver circuitry that receives I and Q channel data. The radiationhard design enables SDO fs Ka-band communications downlink system to transmit 130 Mbps (300 Msps after data encoding) of science instrument data to the ground system continuously throughout the mission fs minimum life of five years. The low error vector magnitude (EVM) of the modulator lowers the implementation loss of the transmitter in which it is used, thereby increasing the overall communication system link margin. The modulator comprises a component within the SDO transmitter, and meets the following specifications over a 0 to 40 C operational temperature range: QPSK/OQPSK modulator, 300-Msps symbol rate, 26.5-GHz center frequency, error vector magnitude less than or equal to 10 percent rms, and compliance with the NTIA (National Telecommunications and Information Administration) spectral mask.

  10. Equatorial Precession in the Control Software of the Ka-Band Object Observation and Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakeman, Hali L.

    2013-01-01

    The Ka-Band Object Observation and Monitoring, or KaBOOM, project is designed mainly to track and characterize near Earth objects. However, a smaller goal of the project would be to monitor pulsars and study their radio frequency signals for use as a clock in interstellar travel. The use of pulsars and their timing accuracy has been studied for decades, but never in the Ka-band of the radio frequency spectrum. In order to begin the use of KaBOOM for this research, the control systems need to be analyzed to ensure its capability. Flaws in the control documentation leave it unclear as to whether the control software processes coordinates from the J200 epoch. This experiment will examine the control software of the Intertronic 12m antennas used for the KaBOOM project and detail its capabilities in its "equatorial mode." The antennas will be pointed at 4 chosen points in the sky on several days while probing the virtual azimuth and elevation (horizon coordinate) registers. The input right ascension and declination coordinates will then be converted separately from the control software to horizontal coordinates and compared, thus determining the ability of the control software to process equatorial coordinates.

  11. A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator with a four-gap buncher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lili; He, Juntao; Ling, Junpu

    2015-05-01

    A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator (TTO) with a four-gap buncher is proposed and investigated. Simulation results show that an output power of 1.27 GW and a frequency of 26.18 GHz can be achieved with a diode voltage of 447 kV and a beam current of 7.4 kA. The corresponding power efficiency is 38.5%, and the guiding magnetic field is 0.6 T. Studies and analysis indicate that a buncher with four gaps can modulate the electron beam better than the three-gap buncher in such a Ka-band TTO. Moreover, power efficiency increases with the coupling coefficient between the buncher and the extractor. Further simulation demonstrates that power efficiency can reach higher than 30% with a guiding magnetic field of above 0.5 T. Besides, the power efficiency exceeds 30% in a relatively large range of diode voltage from 375 kV to 495 kV.

  12. Channel characterisation for future Ka-band Mobile Satellite Systems and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforza, Mario; Buonomo, Sergio; Arbesser-Rastburg, Bertram

    1994-08-01

    Mobile satellite systems (MSS) are presently designed or planned to operate, with the exception of OMNITRACKS, in the lower part of the frequency spectrum (UHF to S-bands). The decisions taken at the last World Administrative Radio Conference in 1992 to increase the allocated L- and S-bands for MSS services will only partly alleviate the problem of system capacity. In addition the use of L-and S-band frequencies generally requires large antenna apertures on board the satellite terminal side. The idea of exploiting the large spectrum resources available at higher frequencies (20-30 GHz) and the perspective of reducing user terminal size (and possibly price too) have spurred the interest of systems designers and planners. On the other hand, Ka-band frequencies suffer from increased slant path losses due to atmospheric attenuation phenomena. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently embarked on a number of activities aimed at studying the effect of the typical mobile propagation impairments at Ka-band. This paper briefly summarizes ESA efforts in this field of research and presents preliminary experimental results.

  13. The All Sky Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, S.; Clark, J. E.; García-Miró, C.; Goodhart, C. E.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Maddè, R.; Mercolino, M.; Snedeker, L. G.; Sotuela, I.; White, L. A.

    2014-08-01

    We have constructed an X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) celestial reference frame using over seventy ~24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network. We detected 646 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and the full range of declinations. Comparison of 520 X/Ka sources in common with the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of 167 micro-arcsec μas in RA cos(dec) and 219 μas in Dec. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 μas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling. We recently began a collaboration with ESA using their Malargüe, Argentina antenna. This site greatly improves our geometry in the south. Compared to X-band, Ka-band allows access to more compact source morphology and reduced core shift. Existing X/Ka data and simulated Gaia data predict a frame tie precision of 7 μas (1-sigma, per 3-D rotation component) with anticipated improvements reducing that to ~5 μas per component.

  14. A metallic photonic crystal high power microwave mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Qin, Fen; Xu, Sha; Shi, Meiyou

    2013-06-01

    A compact metallic photonic crystal mode converter that converts TEM to TE11 mode for a high power transmission system is presented. Metallic photonic crystal is partially filled along azimuthal direction in the device to divide a single coaxial transmission line into two different partitions with different phase propagation constants for phase-shifting. A three row structure is designed and simulated by commercial software cst microwave studio. Simulation results show that it has high conversion efficiency and the bandwidth is 4.1%. Far-field measurement experiment is carried out and get a typical TE11 mode pattern. The result confirms the validity of the design.

  15. Software-defined microwave photonic filter with high reconfigurable resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Yi, Lilin; Jaouën, Yves; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-10-01

    Microwave photonic filters (MPFs) are of great interest in radio frequency systems since they provide prominent flexibility on microwave signal processing. Although filter reconfigurability and tunability have been demonstrated repeatedly, it is still difficult to control the filter shape with very high precision. Thus the MPF application is basically limited to signal selection. Here we present a polarization-insensitive single-passband arbitrary-shaped MPF with ~GHz bandwidth based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical fibre. For the first time the filter shape, bandwidth and central frequency can all be precisely defined by software with ~MHz resolution. The unprecedented multi-dimensional filter flexibility offers new possibilities to process microwave signals directly in optical domain with high precision thus enhancing the MPF functionality. Nanosecond pulse shaping by implementing precisely defined filters is demonstrated to prove the filter superiority and practicability.

  16. Software-defined microwave photonic filter with high reconfigurable resolution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Yi, Lilin; Jaouën, Yves; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-10-19

    Microwave photonic filters (MPFs) are of great interest in radio frequency systems since they provide prominent flexibility on microwave signal processing. Although filter reconfigurability and tunability have been demonstrated repeatedly, it is still difficult to control the filter shape with very high precision. Thus the MPF application is basically limited to signal selection. Here we present a polarization-insensitive single-passband arbitrary-shaped MPF with ~GHz bandwidth based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical fibre. For the first time the filter shape, bandwidth and central frequency can all be precisely defined by software with ~MHz resolution. The unprecedented multi-dimensional filter flexibility offers new possibilities to process microwave signals directly in optical domain with high precision thus enhancing the MPF functionality. Nanosecond pulse shaping by implementing precisely defined filters is demonstrated to prove the filter superiority and practicability.

  17. Software-defined microwave photonic filter with high reconfigurable resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Yi, Lilin; Jaouën, Yves; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    Microwave photonic filters (MPFs) are of great interest in radio frequency systems since they provide prominent flexibility on microwave signal processing. Although filter reconfigurability and tunability have been demonstrated repeatedly, it is still difficult to control the filter shape with very high precision. Thus the MPF application is basically limited to signal selection. Here we present a polarization-insensitive single-passband arbitrary-shaped MPF with ~GHz bandwidth based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical fibre. For the first time the filter shape, bandwidth and central frequency can all be precisely defined by software with ~MHz resolution. The unprecedented multi-dimensional filter flexibility offers new possibilities to process microwave signals directly in optical domain with high precision thus enhancing the MPF functionality. Nanosecond pulse shaping by implementing precisely defined filters is demonstrated to prove the filter superiority and practicability. PMID:27759062

  18. All-optical microwave photonic filter based on two-frequency optical source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Sadeev, Tagir S.

    2011-04-01

    All-optical microwave filter has been a topic of interest for over two decades because of the many advantageous features such as large time-bandwidth product, wide tunability, high Q-factor, low loss, light weight, and immunity to electromagnetic interference offered by photonic devices. All-optical microwave photonic filter is a system used to implement microwave filtering in the optical domain, which can provide a large tunability and a high Q factor which are usually difficult to realize through conventional electronic methods. In addition, since the microwave signal is processed directly in the optical domain without additional optical-electrical and electrical-optical conversions, the photonic microwave filters are particularly suitable for applications such as optically controlled phased-array antennas, radio-over-fiber (RoF) systems, and other microwave-photonic links (MPLs). For these reasons, photonic microwave filters have attracted considerable interest for a few years.

  19. All-optical microwave photonic filter based on two-frequency optical source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Sadeev, Tagir S.

    2010-12-01

    All-optical microwave filter has been a topic of interest for over two decades because of the many advantageous features such as large time-bandwidth product, wide tunability, high Q-factor, low loss, light weight, and immunity to electromagnetic interference offered by photonic devices. All-optical microwave photonic filter is a system used to implement microwave filtering in the optical domain, which can provide a large tunability and a high Q factor which are usually difficult to realize through conventional electronic methods. In addition, since the microwave signal is processed directly in the optical domain without additional optical-electrical and electrical-optical conversions, the photonic microwave filters are particularly suitable for applications such as optically controlled phased-array antennas, radio-over-fiber (RoF) systems, and other microwave-photonic links (MPLs). For these reasons, photonic microwave filters have attracted considerable interest for a few years.

  20. Photonic microwave signals with zeptosecond-level absolute timing noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaopeng; Bouchand, Romain; Nicolodi, Daniele; Giunta, Michele; Hänsel, Wolfgang; Lezius, Matthias; Joshi, Abhay; Datta, Shubhashish; Alexandre, Christophe; Lours, Michel; Tremblin, Pierre-Alain; Santarelli, Giorgio; Holzwarth, Ronald; Le Coq, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Photonic synthesis of radiofrequency (RF) waveforms revived the quest for unrivalled microwave purity because of its ability to convey the benefits of optics to the microwave world. In this work, we perform a high-fidelity transfer of frequency stability between an optical reference and a microwave signal via a low-noise fibre-based frequency comb and cutting-edge photodetection techniques. We demonstrate the generation of the purest microwave signal with a fractional frequency stability below 6.5 × 10-16 at 1 s and a timing noise floor below 41 zs Hz-1/2 (phase noise below -173 dBc Hz-1 for a 12 GHz carrier). This outperforms existing sources and promises a new era for state-of-the-art microwave generation. The characterization is achieved through a heterodyne cross-correlation scheme with the lowermost detection noise. This unprecedented level of purity can impact domains such as radar systems, telecommunications and time-frequency metrology. The measurement methods developed here can benefit the characterization of a broad range of signals.

  1. Frequency-stabilization of mode-locked laser-based photonic microwave oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Salik, Ertan; Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will describe our recent phase-noise measurements of photonic microwave oscillators. We will aslo discuss our investigation of the frequency stability link between the optical and microwave frequencies in the coupled oscillator.

  2. Entanglement concentration of microwave photons based on the Kerr effect in circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Haibo

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, superconducting qubits have shown great potential in quantum computation. Hence, microwave photons become very interesting qubits for quantum information processing assisted by superconducting quantum computation. Here, we present a protocol for the entanglement concentration on microwave photons, resorting to the cross-Kerr effect in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). Two superconducting transmission line resonators (TLRs) coupled to superconducting molecule with the N -type level structure induce the effective cross-Kerr effect for realizing the quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement on microwave photons. With this device, we present a two-qubit polarization parity QND detector on the photon states of the superconducting TLRs, which can be used to concentrate the nonlocal nonmaximally entangled states of microwave photons assisted by several linear microwave elements efficiently. This protocol has a high efficiency and it may be useful for solid-state quantum information processing assisted by microwave photons.

  3. Deep Space Ka-band Link Management and the MRO Demonstration: Long-term Weather Statistics Versus Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Shambayati, Shervin; Slobin, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    During the last 40 years, deep space radio communication systems have experienced a move toward shorter wavelengths. In the 1960s a transition from L- to S-band occurred which was followed by a transition from S- to X-band in the 1970s. Both these transitions provided deep space links with wider bandwidths and improved radio metrics capability. Now, in the 2000s, a new change is taking place, namely a move to the Ka-band region of the radio frequency spectrum. Ka-band will soon replace X-band as the frequency of choice for deep space communications providing ample spectrum for the high data rate requirements of future missions. The low-noise receivers of deep space networks have a great need for link management techniques that can mitigate weather effects. In this paper, three approaches for managing Ka-band Earth-space links are investigated. The first approach uses aggregate annual statistics, the second one uses monthly statistics, and the third is based on the short-term forecasting of the local weather. An example of weather forecasting for Ka-band link performance prediction is presented. Furthermore, spacecraft commanding schemes suitable for Ka-band link management are investigated. Theses schemes will be demonstrated using NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft in the 2007 to 2008 time period, and the demonstration findings will be reported in a future publication.

  4. Deep Space Ka-band Link Management and the MRO Demonstration: Long-term Weather Statistics Versus Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Shambayati, Shervin; Slobin, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    During the last 40 years, deep space radio communication systems have experienced a move toward shorter wavelengths. In the 1960s a transition from L- to S-band occurred which was followed by a transition from S- to X-band in the 1970s. Both these transitions provided deep space links with wider bandwidths and improved radio metrics capability. Now, in the 2000s, a new change is taking place, namely a move to the Ka-band region of the radio frequency spectrum. Ka-band will soon replace X-band as the frequency of choice for deep space communications providing ample spectrum for the high data rate requirements of future missions. The low-noise receivers of deep space networks have a great need for link management techniques that can mitigate weather effects. In this paper, three approaches for managing Ka-band Earth-space links are investigated. The first approach uses aggregate annual statistics, the second one uses monthly statistics, and the third is based on the short-term forecasting of the local weather. An example of weather forecasting for Ka-band link performance prediction is presented. Furthermore, spacecraft commanding schemes suitable for Ka-band link management are investigated. Theses schemes will be demonstrated using NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft in the 2007 to 2008 time period, and the demonstration findings will be reported in a future publication.

  5. Photonic compressive sensing with a micro-ring-resonator-based microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Ding, Yunhong; Zhu, Zhijing; Chi, Hao; Zheng, Shilie; Zhang, Xianmin; Jin, Xiaofeng; Galili, Michael; Yu, Xianbin

    2016-08-01

    A novel approach to realize photonic compressive sensing (CS) with a multi-tap microwave photonic filter is proposed and demonstrated. The system takes both advantages of CS and photonics to capture wideband sparse signals with sub-Nyquist sampling rate. The low-pass filtering function required in the CS is realized in a photonic way by using a frequency comb and a dispersive element. The frequency comb is realized by shaping an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source with an on-chip micro-ring resonator, which is beneficial to the integration of photonic CS. A proof-of-concept experiment for a two-tone signal acquisition with frequencies of 350 MHz and 1.25 GHz is experimentally demonstrated with a compression factor up to 16.

  6. Microwave Photonics Systems Based on Whispering-gallery-mode Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Coillet, Aurélien; Henriet, Rémi; Phan Huy, Kien; Jacquot, Maxime; Furfaro, Luca; Balakireva, Irina; Larger, Laurent; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave photonics systems rely fundamentally on the interaction between microwave and optical signals. These systems are extremely promising for various areas of technology and applied science, such as aerospace and communication engineering, sensing, metrology, nonlinear photonics, and quantum optics. In this article, we present the principal techniques used in our lab to build microwave photonics systems based on ultra-high Q whispering gallery mode resonators. First detailed in this article is the protocol for resonator polishing, which is based on a grind-and-polish technique close to the ones used to polish optical components such as lenses or telescope mirrors. Then, a white light interferometric profilometer measures surface roughness, which is a key parameter to characterize the quality of the polishing. In order to launch light in the resonator, a tapered silica fiber with diameter in the micrometer range is used. To reach such small diameters, we adopt the "flame-brushing" technique, using simultaneously computer-controlled motors to pull the fiber apart, and a blowtorch to heat the fiber area to be tapered. The resonator and the tapered fiber are later approached to one another to visualize the resonance signal of the whispering gallery modes using a wavelength-scanning laser. By increasing the optical power in the resonator, nonlinear phenomena are triggered until the formation of a Kerr optical frequency comb is observed with a spectrum made of equidistant spectral lines. These Kerr comb spectra have exceptional characteristics that are suitable for several applications in science and technology. We consider the application related to ultra-stable microwave frequency synthesis and demonstrate the generation of a Kerr comb with GHz intermodal frequency. PMID:23963358

  7. Microwave photonics systems based on whispering-gallery-mode resonators.

    PubMed

    Coillet, Aurélien; Henriet, Rémi; Phan Huy, Kien; Jacquot, Maxime; Furfaro, Luca; Balakireva, Irina; Larger, Laurent; Chembo, Yanne K

    2013-08-05

    Microwave photonics systems rely fundamentally on the interaction between microwave and optical signals. These systems are extremely promising for various areas of technology and applied science, such as aerospace and communication engineering, sensing, metrology, nonlinear photonics, and quantum optics. In this article, we present the principal techniques used in our lab to build microwave photonics systems based on ultra-high Q whispering gallery mode resonators. First detailed in this article is the protocol for resonator polishing, which is based on a grind-and-polish technique close to the ones used to polish optical components such as lenses or telescope mirrors. Then, a white light interferometric profilometer measures surface roughness, which is a key parameter to characterize the quality of the polishing. In order to launch light in the resonator, a tapered silica fiber with diameter in the micrometer range is used. To reach such small diameters, we adopt the "flame-brushing" technique, using simultaneously computer-controlled motors to pull the fiber apart, and a blowtorch to heat the fiber area to be tapered. The resonator and the tapered fiber are later approached to one another to visualize the resonance signal of the whispering gallery modes using a wavelength-scanning laser. By increasing the optical power in the resonator, nonlinear phenomena are triggered until the formation of a Kerr optical frequency comb is observed with a spectrum made of equidistant spectral lines. These Kerr comb spectra have exceptional characteristics that are suitable for several applications in science and technology. We consider the application related to ultra-stable microwave frequency synthesis and demonstrate the generation of a Kerr comb with GHz intermodal frequency.

  8. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  9. An active K/Ka-band antenna array for the NASA ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, A.; Crist, R.; Densmore, Art; Sukamto, L.

    1993-01-01

    An active K/Ka-band antenna array is currently under development for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT). The AMT task will demonstrate voice, data, and video communications to and from the AMT vehicle in Los Angeles, California, and a base station in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS satellite at 30 and 20 GHz. Satellite tracking for the land-mobile vehicular antenna system involves 'mechanical dithering' of the antenna, where the antenna radiates a fixed beam 46 deg. above the horizon. The antenna is to transmit horizontal polarization and receive vertical polarization at 29.634 plus or minus 0.15 GHz and 19.914 plus or minus 0.15 GHz, respectively. The active array will provide a minimum of 22 dBW EIRP transmit power density and a -8 dB/K deg. receive sensitivity.

  10. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  11. Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1997-01-01

    We present features for an ultra-stable sapphire cryogenic oscillator which has been designed to support the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment. The design of this standard is new in several respects. It is cooled by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid cryogens to increase operating time, and it uses a technology to adjust the temperature turn-over point to extend the upper operating temperature limit and to enable construction of multiple units with uniform operating characteristics. Objectives are 3 x 10(exp -15) stability for measuring times 1 second less than or equal to (tau) less than or equal to 100 seconds, phase noise of -85 dBc/Hz from offset frequencies of 1 Hz to 1000 Hz at 10 GHz carrier frequency, and a one year continuous operating period.

  12. Enhancing End-to-End Performance of Information Services Over Ka-Band Global Satellite Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Glover, Daniel R.; Ivancic, William D.; vonDeak, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The Internet has been growing at a rapid rate as the key medium to provide information services such as e-mail, WWW and multimedia etc., however its global reach is limited. Ka-band communication satellite networks are being developed to increase the accessibility of information services via the Internet at global scale. There is need to assess satellite networks in their ability to provide these services and interconnect seamlessly with existing and proposed terrestrial telecommunication networks. In this paper the significant issues and requirements in providing end-to-end high performance for the delivery of information services over satellite networks based on various layers in the OSI reference model are identified. Key experiments have been performed to evaluate the performance of digital video and Internet over satellite-like testbeds. The results of the early developments in ATM and TCP protocols over satellite networks are summarized.

  13. Design of a Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, G. J.; Wang, R. T.

    1998-04-01

    We present design aspects of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator that is being developed for ultra-high short-term stability and low phase noise in support of the Cassini Ka-band (32-GHz) radio science experiment. With cooling provided by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid helium, this standard is designed to operate continuously for periods of a year or more. Performance targets are a stability of 3 x 10^(-15) (1 second ≤ τ ≤ 100 seconds) and a phase noise of -73 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz measured at 34 GHz. Test results are reported for several subsystems, including the cryocooler, vibration isolation system, and ruby compensating element.

  14. Low phase noise GaAs HBT VCO in Ka-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yan; Yuming, Zhang; Hongliang, Lü; Yimen, Zhang; Yue, Wu; Yifeng, Liu

    2015-02-01

    Design and fabrication of a Ka-band voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) using commercially available 1-μm GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor technology is presented. A fully differential common-emitter configuration with a symmetric capacitance with a symmetric inductance tank structure is employed to reduce the phase noise of the VCO, and a novel π-feedback network is applied to compensate for the 180° phase shift. The on-wafer test shows that the VCO exhibits a phase noise of -96.47 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset and presents a tuning range from 28.312 to 28.695 GHz. The overall dc current consumption of the VCO is 18 mA with a supply voltage of -6 V The chip area of the VCO is 0.7 × 0.7 mm2.

  15. First Results from an Airborne Ka-band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed SweepSAR technique that breaks typical Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) trade space using time-dependent multi-beam DBF on receive. Developing SweepSAR implementation using array-fed reflector for proposed DESDynI Earth Radar Mission concept. Performed first-of-a-kind airborne demonstration of the SweepSAR concept at Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Validated calibration and antenna pattern data sufficient for beam forming in elevation. (1) Provides validation evidence that the proposed Deformation Ecosystem Structure Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) SAR architecture is sound. (2) Functions well even with large variations in receiver gain / phase. Future plans include using prototype DESDynI SAR digital flight hardware to do the beam forming in real-time onboard the aircraft.

  16. Study on Ka-Band Sheet Beam Traveling Wave Tube Focused by Closed PCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhan-Liang; Shi, Xianbao; Gong, Yu-Bin; Wei, Yan-Yu; Duan, Zhao-Yun; Su, Xiaogang; Gong, Huarong; Feng, Jinjun; Huang, Hua

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a Ka-band sheet beam traveling wave tube (TWT) focused by a 0.2 T closed periodic cusped magnet (PCM) system. The TWT with one section of staggered double-vane slow-wave structure (SWS) is driven by a 0.8-A sheet beam with rectangular cross-sectional area of 3.2 mm × 0.6 mm. This sheet beam TWT can produce 100 W output power, and the 3 dB band is 33-38.5 GHz. In order to improve the output power, an optimized sheet beam TWT with two sections of SWSs focused by a novel closed PCM system is proposed. The new closed PCM system is with annular magnetic blocks and can be fabricated and adjusted easily. The simulation shows that the optimized sheet beam TWT can produce 2000 W output power and the 3 dB band ranging from 33 to 40 GHz.

  17. First Results from an Airborne Ka-band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed SweepSAR technique that breaks typical Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) trade space using time-dependent multi-beam DBF on receive. Developing SweepSAR implementation using array-fed reflector for proposed DESDynI Earth Radar Mission concept. Performed first-of-a-kind airborne demonstration of the SweepSAR concept at Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Validated calibration and antenna pattern data sufficient for beam forming in elevation. (1) Provides validation evidence that the proposed Deformation Ecosystem Structure Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) SAR architecture is sound. (2) Functions well even with large variations in receiver gain / phase. Future plans include using prototype DESDynI SAR digital flight hardware to do the beam forming in real-time onboard the aircraft.

  18. An active K/Ka-band antenna array for the NASA ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulintseff, A.; Crist, R.; Densmore, Art; Sukamto, L.

    An active K/Ka-band antenna array is currently under development for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT). The AMT task will demonstrate voice, data, and video communications to and from the AMT vehicle in Los Angeles, California, and a base station in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS satellite at 30 and 20 GHz. Satellite tracking for the land-mobile vehicular antenna system involves 'mechanical dithering' of the antenna, where the antenna radiates a fixed beam 46 deg. above the horizon. The antenna is to transmit horizontal polarization and receive vertical polarization at 29.634 plus or minus 0.15 GHz and 19.914 plus or minus 0.15 GHz, respectively. The active array will provide a minimum of 22 dBW EIRP transmit power density and a -8 dB/K deg. receive sensitivity.

  19. A high power Ka band millimeter wave generator with low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jun; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Li Guolin; Zhang Zehai

    2010-08-15

    A slow wave type gigawatt millimeter wave generator is proposed in this paper. In order to increase power capacity, overmoded slow wave structures (SWSs) with larger diameter have been used. Taking advantage of the ''surface wave'' property of overmoded SWSs, the TM{sub 01} mode can be selected to be the operating mode. Calculations have also been carried out to choose a proper low operating magnetic field strength, and it agrees with particle in cell (PIC) simulations. Main structure parameters of the device are optimized by PIC simulations. A typical simulation result is that, at the beam parameters of 600 keV and 5.05 kA, and guiding magnetic field of 0.85 T, a Ka band millimeter wave with an output power of 1.05 GW is generated, yielding a conversion efficiency of about 35%.

  20. A Ka-band reflection-type analog electrically controlled phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenchao; Chen, Yanhui; Shen, Hui; Zhang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    In order to modulate the phase of RF signal continuously, a new miniaturized Ka-band analog electrically controlled phase shifter is presented. The phase shifter based on 90°directional coupler and parallel variable capacitance diodes(VCD) achieves matching circuit and shift phase, the circuit can gain wide range phase shift by changing the bias voltage of variable capacitance diodes (VCD), and the insertion loss fluctuations of the phase shifter has a significant improvement by parallel compensation resistance. Simulation and experimental results show that the phase shifter in 29˜31 GHz range obtains 180° phase shift, the insertion loss is better than 6.5 dB, and the insertion loss fluctuations are within 1 dB.

  1. Microwave photonic delay line signal processing.

    PubMed

    Diehl, John F; Singley, Joseph M; Sunderman, Christopher E; Urick, Vincent J

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides a path for the design of state-of-the-art fiber-optic delay lines for signal processing. The theoretical forms for various radio-frequency system performance metrics are derived for four modulation types: X- and Z-cut Mach-Zehnder modulators, a phase modulator with asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and a polarization modulator with control waveplate and polarizing beam splitter. Each modulation type is considered to cover the current and future needs for ideal system designs. System gain, compression point, and third-order output intercept point are derived from the transfer matrices for each modulation type. A discussion of optical amplifier placement and fiber-effect mitigation is offered. The paper concludes by detailing two high-performance delay lines, built for unique applications, that exhibit performance levels an order of magnitude better than commercial delay lines. This paper should serve as a guide to maximizing the performance of future systems and offer a look into current and future research being done to further improve photonics technologies.

  2. Simultaneous Ka-Band Site Characterization: Goldstone, CA, White Sands, NM, and Guam, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto; Morse, Jacquelynne; Zemba, Michael; Nessel, James; Morabito, David; Caroglanian, Armen

    2011-01-01

    To statistically characterize atmospheric effects on Ka-band links at NASA operational sites, NASA has constructed site test interferometers (STI s) which directly measure the tropospheric phase stability and rain attenuation. These instruments observe an unmodulated beacon signal broadcast from a geostationary satellite (e.g., Anik F2) and measure the phase difference between the signals received by the two antennas and its signal attenuation. Three STI s have been deployed so far: the first one at the NASA Deep Space Network Tracking Complex in Goldstone, California (May 2007); the second at the NASA White Sands Complex, in Las Cruses, New Mexico (February 2009); and the third at the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) Remote Ground Terminal (GRGT) complex in Guam (May 2010). Two station-years of simultaneous atmospheric phase fluctuation data have been collected at Goldstone and White Sands, while one year of data has been collected in Guam. With identical instruments operating simultaneously, we can directly compare the phase stability and rain attenuation at the three sites. Phase stability is analyzed statistically in terms of the root-mean-square (rms) of the tropospheric induced time delay fluctuations over 10 minute blocks. For two years, the time delay fluctuations at the DSN site in Goldstone, CA, have been better than 2.5 picoseconds (ps) for 90% of the time (with reference to zenith), meanwhile at the White Sands, New Mexico site, the time delay fluctuations have been better than 2.2 ps with reference to zenith) for 90% of time. For Guam, the time delay fluctuations have been better than 12 ps (reference to zenith) at 90% of the time, the higher fluctuations are as expected from a high humidity tropical rain zone. This type of data analysis, as well as many other site quality characteristics (e.g., rain attenuation, infrastructure, etc.) will be used to determine the suitability of all the sites for NASA s future communication services at Ka-band.

  3. High Stability CFRP Support Structure for Ka Band Multi-Spot Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarza, A.; Cano, J.; Ozores, E.

    2012-07-01

    In the recent days, Ka band mission are being implemented for telecommunication satellites as emergent technology. EADS CASA Espacio (ASTRIUM) has been doing developments able to face up the demanding requirements associated to this frequency band where aspects such as in orbit stability o manufacturing accuracy are essential. Once it has been demonstrated the capability to offer excellent antenna reflectors with low mass, very low ohmic losses, excellent RF performances and very stable in orbit thermoelastic behaviour, improvements at feeder-chain level have been developed with the aim to cover the global antenna mission with excellent performances. This paper presents the product developed to accommodate a KA band multi-spot cluster to cover a telecommunication mission. It includes a description of the tasks carried out until the current development status, with the definition of the mechanical specification used as applicable and the solutions applied to meet the requirements. A CFRP structure is proposed with the aim to achieve a light mass concept, structurally speaking optimized and capable to assemble multiple feeder chain and make independent the thermomechanical behaviour of each one. Moreover, the design with CFRP leads to very stable thermoelastic behaviour of the assembly and the feeder-chain with the scope to guaranty the stability of the RF-beam for the correct electrical performances. The compatibility between the carbon fibre structure and the Aluminium feeder chain is solved by means of isostatic devices that are capable to absorb the thermal stresses coming from the different thermal expansion coefficients of the materials used. The proposed design is to be confirmed over a Qualification Model, already manufactured, with the scope to be implemented as flight hardware in a commercial spacecraft. The product is to be tested in a full qualification environmental test campaign where the capability to withstand the dynamic loads and the thermal

  4. First Airswot Ka-Band Radar Backscatter Returns over a Complex California Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baney, O. N.; Smith, L. C.; Pitcher, L. H.; Gleason, C. J.; Chu, V. W.; Bennett, M. M.; Pavelsky, T.; Sadowy, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    In anticipation of the launch of the NASA Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, this project was conducted around the Piute Ponds of Edwards Air Force Base within the Mojave Desert, California to characterize ground conditions simultaneously with two AirSWOT flights collected May 14th, 2014. Both SWOT and AirSWOT employ a Ka-band interferometer to map water surface elevations and extent, but the ability of Ka-band radar to discriminate shorelines and flooded vegetation is not well known. Presumed bright returns from moist soils surrounding surface water bodies have also been speculated to confound interpretation of SWOT/AirSWOT data. The Piute Ponds are a dynamic area of constantly changing water conditions, providing a convenient test site for field studies to assess open water, dry shorelines, vegetation edges, islands, flooded vegetation and soil moisture in conjunction with AirSWOT backscatter and visible/near-infrared camera imagery. Islands were characterized into dry islands and flooded vegetation stands including species such as bulrush (Scripus acutus) and tamarisk (Tammarix ramosissima). Results demonstrate that full water extent can be determined by near-range backscatter returns which are strong for both open water and flooded vegetation. Far-range backscatter returns over open water were unreliable for flooded extent. Comparing near-range and far-range backscatter results to the soil moisture transect shows correlation, however as soil moisture increases, discriminating between wet sediment and water becomes difficult. In sum, first results suggest near-return backscatter results prove most useful in distinguishing open water from non-water, with a strong correlation between soil moisture and backscatter returns.

  5. Ka-Band GaAs FET Monolithic Power Amplifier Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunier, Paul; Tserng, Hua Quen

    1997-01-01

    Over the course of this program, very extensive progress was made in Ka-band GaAs technology. At the beginning of the program, odd-shaped VPE MESFET wafers were used. A breakthrough in power and efficiency was achieved with highly doped (8 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3) MBE grown MESFET material. We obtained power of 112 mW with 16 dB gain and 21.6% efficiency at 34 GHz with a monolithic 50-100-250 micron amplifier. The next breakthrough came with the use of heterostructures grown by MBE (AlGaAs/InGaAs where the InGaAs is highly doped). This allowed us to achieve high power density with high efficiency. A benchmark 40% efficiency was achieved with a single-stage 100 micron MMIC at 32.5 GHz. The corresponding three-stage 50-100-250 micron amplifier achieved 180 mW with 23 dB gain and 30.3% efficiency. The next breakthrough came with 3-inch MBE grown PHEMT wafers incorporating an etch-stop layer for the gate recess (using RIE). Again, state-of-the-art performances were achieved: 40% efficiency with 235 mW output power and 20.7 dB gain. The single-stage 2 x 600 micron chip demonstrated 794 mW output power with 5 dB gain and 38.2% power-added efficiency (PAE). The Ka-band technology developed under this program has promise for extensive use: JPL demonstrated 32 GHz phased arrays with a three-stage amplifier developed under this contract. A variation of the three-stage amplifier was used successfully in a 4 x 4 phased array transmitter developed under another NASA contract.

  6. Microwave photon Fock state generation by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    PubMed Central

    Premaratne, Shavindra P.; Wellstood, F. C.; Palmer, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    The deterministic generation of non-classical states of light, including squeezed states, Fock states and Bell states, plays an important role in quantum information processing and exploration of the physics of quantum entanglement. Preparation of these non-classical states in resonators is non-trivial due to their inherent harmonicity. Here we use stimulated Raman adiabatic passage to generate microwave photon Fock states in a superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics system comprised of a fixed-frequency transmon qubit in a three-dimensional microwave cavity at 20 mK. A two-photon process is employed to overcome a first order forbidden transition and the first, second and third Fock states are demonstrated. We also demonstrate how this all-microwave technique can be used to generate an arbitrary superposition of Fock states. Simulations of the system are in excellent agreement with the data and fidelities of 89%, 68% and 43% are inferred for the first three Fock states respectively. PMID:28128205

  7. Microwave plasma formation within a 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Stephen; Gregório, José; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Experiments demonstrate that an electromagnetic wave incident on a photonic crystal (PhC) containing a single point-defect causes gas breakdown. After breakdown we report the formation of a stable microwave plasma within this free-space vacancy. We show that gas breakdown is possible in low-pressure argon (10 Torr) using as little as 1.4 W of microwave power if the frequency of the incident wave is equal to the resonance of the vacancy (8.614 GHz). During formation, the plasma-filled defect decreases the transmission of energy through the photonic crystal by approximately two orders of magnitude. Plasma formation time is measured to be as fast as 100 ns at relatively high power (9 W). Using the transmission of energy through the PhC as a diagnostic tool, we report that the electron density of the microwave plasma is 1016-1017 m-3 for argon pressures between 10 and 50 Torr. Finally, we consider the application of the self-initiated plasma within the PhC as a simple power limiter.

  8. Integrated waveguide Bragg gratings for microwave photonics signal processing.

    PubMed

    Burla, Maurizio; Cortés, Luis Romero; Li, Ming; Wang, Xu; Chrostowski, Lukas; Azaña, José

    2013-10-21

    Integrated Microwave photonics (IMWP) signal processing using Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years as an enabling technology for a number of functionalities not attainable by purely microwave solutions. In this context, integrated waveguide Bragg grating (WBG) devices constitute a particularly attractive approach thanks to their compactness and flexibility in producing arbitrarily defined amplitude and phase responses, by directly acting on coupling coefficient and perturbations of the grating profile. In this article, we review recent advances in the field of integrated WBGs applied to MWP, analyzing the advantages leveraged by an integrated realization. We provide a perspective on the exciting possibilities offered by the silicon photonics platform in the field of MWP, potentially enabling integration of highly-complex active and passive functionalities with high yield on a single chip, with a particular focus on the use of WBGs as basic building blocks for linear filtering operations. We demonstrate the versatility of WBG-based devices by proposing and experimentally demonstrating a novel, continuously-tunable, integrated true-time-delay (TTD) line based on a very simple dual phase-shifted WBG (DPS-WBG).

  9. Multiplexing Superconducting Qubit Circuit for Single Microwave Photon Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, R. E.; Senior, J.; Saira, O.-P.; Pekola, J. P.; de Graaf, S. E.; Lindström, T.; Pashkin, Yu A.

    2017-07-01

    We report on a device that integrates eight superconducting transmon qubits in λ /4 superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators fed from a common feedline. Using this multiplexing architecture, each resonator and qubit can be addressed individually, thus reducing the required hardware resources and allowing their individual characterisation by spectroscopic methods. The measured device parameters agree with the designed values, and the resonators and qubits exhibit excellent coherence properties and strong coupling, with the qubit relaxation rate dominated by the Purcell effect when brought in resonance with the resonator. Our analysis shows that the circuit is suitable for generation of single microwave photons on demand with an efficiency exceeding 80%.

  10. Multiplexing Superconducting Qubit Circuit for Single Microwave Photon Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, R. E.; Senior, J.; Saira, O.-P.; Pekola, J. P.; de Graaf, S. E.; Lindström, T.; Pashkin, Yu A.

    2017-10-01

    We report on a device that integrates eight superconducting transmon qubits in λ /4 superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators fed from a common feedline. Using this multiplexing architecture, each resonator and qubit can be addressed individually, thus reducing the required hardware resources and allowing their individual characterisation by spectroscopic methods. The measured device parameters agree with the designed values, and the resonators and qubits exhibit excellent coherence properties and strong coupling, with the qubit relaxation rate dominated by the Purcell effect when brought in resonance with the resonator. Our analysis shows that the circuit is suitable for generation of single microwave photons on demand with an efficiency exceeding 80%.

  11. Photon transfer in a system of coupled superconducting microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, C. M. Gunupudi, B.; Colclough, M. S.

    2016-08-28

    A novel scheme is proposed for the study of energy transfer in a pair of coupled thin film superconducting microwave resonators. We show that the transfer could be achieved by modulating the kinetic inductance and that this has a number of advantages over earlier theoretical and experimental schemes, which use modulation of capacitance by vibrating nanobars or membranes. We show that the proposed scheme lends itself to the study of the classical analogues of Rabi and Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg oscillations and Landau-Zener transitions using experimentally achievable parameters. We consider a number of ways in which energy transfer (photon shuttle) between the two resonators could be achieved experimentally.

  12. Photon transfer in a system of coupled superconducting microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, C. M.; Gunupudi, B.; Colclough, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    A novel scheme is proposed for the study of energy transfer in a pair of coupled thin film superconducting microwave resonators. We show that the transfer could be achieved by modulating the kinetic inductance and that this has a number of advantages over earlier theoretical and experimental schemes, which use modulation of capacitance by vibrating nanobars or membranes. We show that the proposed scheme lends itself to the study of the classical analogues of Rabi and Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg oscillations and Landau-Zener transitions using experimentally achievable parameters. We consider a number of ways in which energy transfer (photon shuttle) between the two resonators could be achieved experimentally.

  13. VUV Photon Fluxes from Microwave Excited Microplasmas at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Denning, Mark; Urdhal, Randall; Kushner, Mark J.

    2013-09-01

    Microplasmas in rare gases and rare gases mixtures can provide efficient and discretely tunable sources of VUV light. Microwave excited microplasma sources excited by a split-ring resonator antenna in rare gas mixtures operated in ceramic cavities with sub-mm dimensions have been developed as discretely tunable VUV sources for chemical analysis. Controlling wavelengths and the ratio of ion to VUV fluxes are important to achieving chemical selectivity. In this paper, we will discuss results from an investigation of scaling laws for the efficiency of VUV photon production in rare gas mixtures. The investigation was performed using a hydrodynamics model where the electron energy distribution and radiation transport are addressed by Monte Carlo simulations. Plasma density, VUV photon production and fluxes from the cavities will be discussed for mixtures of Ar, He, Xe, Kr, and as a function of power format (pulsing, cw), pressure and cavity sizes.

  14. Nonclassical correlation between optical and microwave photons in a hybrid electro-optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong; Chen, Xiang; Lin, Gongwei; Lin, Xiumin

    2016-10-01

    A scheme to correlate optical and microwave photons is proposed in a hybrid electro-optomechanical system, where mechanical resonator is coupled to both optical and microwave fields. Analytical and numerical simulation results show that the cross-correlation function between Stokes and anti-Stokes photons strongly violates the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, which confirms the nonclassical correlation between the optical and microwave photons. It is worth noting that the nonclassical photon pairs with vast different wavelengths, which may be useful for quantum communication, are generated under the experimentally accessible weak coupling limit rather than single-photon strong coupling regime. In addition, the protocol provides a possible route to combine the respective advantages of optical photons, microwave photons, and phonons in a hybrid electro-optomechanical system.

  15. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Sadowy, G.; Wu, X.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Michel, T.; Lou, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Processing challenges were encountered in achieving the accuracy requirements on several fronts including, aircraft motion sensitivity, multipath and systematic drifts. However, through a combination of processor optimization, a modified phase-screen and motion-compensation implementations were able to minimize the impact of these systematic error sources. We will present results from the IPY data collections including system performance evaluations and imagery. This includes a large area digital elevation model (DEM) collected over Jakobshavn glacier as an illustrative science data product. Further, by intercomparison with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and calibration targets we quantify the interferometric penetration bias of the Ka-band returns into the snow cover. Following the success of the IPY campaign, we are funded under the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program to transition GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. In addition

  16. High Efficiency Power Combining of Ka-Band TWTs for High Data Rate Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Vaden, K. R.; Lesny, G. G.; Glass, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    Future NASA deep space exploration missions are expected in some cases to require telecommunication systems capable of operating at very high data rates (potentially 1 Gbps or more) for the transmission back to Earth of large volumes of scientific data, which means high frequency transmitters with large bandwidth. Among the Ka band frequencies of interest are the present 500 MHz Deep Space Network (DSN) band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz and a broader band at 37-38 GHz allocated for space science [1]. The large distances and use of practical antenna sizes dictate the need for high transmitter power of up to 1 kW or more. High electrical efficiency is also a requirement. The approach investigated by NASA GRC is a novel wave guide power combiner architecture based on a hybrid magic-T junction for combining the power output from multiple TWTs [1,2]. This architecture was successfully demonstrated and is capable of both high efficiency (90-95%, depending on frequency) and high data rate transmission (up to 622 Mbps) in a two-way power combiner circuit for two different pairs of Ka band TWTs at two different frequency bands. One pair of TWTs, tested over a frequency range of 29.1 to 29.6 GHz, consisted of two 110-115W TWTs previously used in uplink data transmission evaluation terminals in the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program [1,2]. The second pair was two 100W TWTs (Boeing 999H) designed for high efficiency operation (greater than 55%) over the DSN frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz [3]. The presentation will provide a qualitative description of the wave guide circuit, results for power combining and data transmission measurements, and results of computer modeling of the magic-T and alternative hybrid junctions for improvements in efficiency and power handling capability. The power combiner results presented here are relevant not only to NASA deep space exploration missions, but also to other U.S. Government agency programs.

  17. Large Ka-Band Slot Array for Digital Beam-Forming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Hodges, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the development of a large Ka Band Slot Array for the Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN), a proposed spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar for topographic mapping of ice sheets and glaciers. GLISTIN will collect ice topography measurement data over a wide swath with sub-seasonal repeat intervals using a Ka-band digitally beamformed antenna. For technology demonstration purpose a receive array of size 1x1 m, consisting of 160x160 radiating elements, was developed. The array is divided into 16 sticks, each stick consisting of 160x10 radiating elements, whose outputs are combined to produce 16 digital beams. A transmit array stick was also developed. The antenna arrays were designed using Elliott's design equations with the use of an infinite-array mutual-coupling model. A Floquet wave model was used to account for external coupling between radiating slots. Because of the use of uniform amplitude and phase distribution, the infinite array model yielded identical values for all radiating elements but for alternating offsets, and identical coupling elements but for alternating positive and negative tilts. Waveguide-fed slot arrays are finding many applications in radar, remote sensing, and communications applications because of their desirable properties such as low mass, low volume, and ease of design, manufacture, and deployability. Although waveguide-fed slot arrays have been designed, built, and tested in the past, this work represents several advances to the state of the art. The use of the infinite array model for the radiating slots yielded a simple design process for radiating and coupling slots. Method of moments solution to the integral equations for alternating offset radiating slots in an infinite array environment was developed and validated using the commercial finite element code HFSS. For the analysis purpose, a method of moments code was developed for an infinite array of subarrays. Overall

  18. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band: Status & Prospects for Improving the South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Alonso, J.; Clark, J. E.; Gamborino, L.; García-Miró, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Lobo, J.; Maddè, R.; Mercolino, M.; Naudet, C. J.; Snedeker, L. G.; Sotuela, I.; White, L. A.

    2012-10-01

    Deep space tracking and navigation are done in a quasi-inertial reference frame based upon the angular positions of distant active galactic nuclei (AGN).We discuss the construction of such a frame based on radio observations of AGN at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz). Compared to S/Xband frames such as the international standard ICRF2, X/Ka-band allows access to more compact source morphology and reduced core shift. Both these effects allow for a more well-defined and stable reference frame at X/Ka. Using sixty-seven 24-hour sessions with NASA's Deep Space Network, we detected over 482 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45deg. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 µas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mis-modelling, and limited southern geometry. We discuss our plans to address these errors with an emphasis on plans to use ESA's new 35-meter antenna in Malargüe, Argentina to greatly improve our southern hemisphere geometric coverage. We report successful fringe tests between ESA's 35-m antenna in Cebreros, Spain and the NASA 34-m in Robledo, Spain thereby validating the NASA-ESA interfaces and the portable VLBI recorder intended for use at Malargüe when that station is ready in the Fall of 2012. Allan variance tests on time scales of 1-1000 sec on the Cebreros-Robledo baseline were limited by tropospheric stability thus confirming that instrumental stability is not expected to be a limiting factor on these time scales once we go to Malargüe. In the next decade, we expect that ESA's optically based Gaia mission will produce a competitive frame. In anticipation of this development, we simulated a frame tie between our X/Ka frame and the Gaia frame. The simulation predicts a frame tie precision of 10-15 µas (1-sigma, per 3-D rotation component) with anticipated improvements in the radio reducing that to 5-10 µas per component by the time of Gaia's end of mission ca

  19. Radar Cross-Section (RCS) Measurements of a Dismount With Rocket-Propelled Grenade (RPG) Launcher at Ka-Band

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    corner reflector of known cross section was placed on the... Radar Cross - Section (RCS) Measurements of a Dismount with Rocket-Propelled Grenade (RPG) Launcher at Ka-Band by Suzanne R. Stratton and...Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 ARL-TR-3855 July 2006 Radar Cross - Section (RCS) Measurements of a Dismount with

  20. A New Blind Pointing Model Improves Large Reflector Antennas Precision Pointing at Ka-Band (32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)-Deep Space Network (DSN) subnet of 34-m Beam Waveguide (BWG) Antennas was recently upgraded with Ka-Band (32-GHz) frequency feeds for space research and communication. For normal telemetry tracking a Ka-Band monopulse system is used, which typically yields 1.6-mdeg mean radial error (MRE) pointing accuracy on the 34-m diameter antennas. However, for the monopulse to be able to acquire and lock, for special radio science applications where monopulse cannot be used, or as a back-up for the monopulse, high-precision open-loop blind pointing is required. This paper describes a new 4th order pointing model and calibration technique, which was developed and applied to the DSN 34-m BWG antennas yielding 1.8 to 3.0-mdeg MRE pointing accuracy and amplitude stability of 0.2 dB, at Ka-Band, and successfully used for the CASSINI spacecraft occultation experiment at Saturn and Titan. In addition, the new 4th order pointing model was used during a telemetry experiment at Ka-Band (32 GHz) utilizing the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft while at a distance of 0.225 astronomical units (AU) from Earth and communicating with a DSN 34-m BWG antenna at a record high rate of 6-megabits per second (Mb/s).

  1. Phase and frequency structure of superradiance pulses generated by relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-08-15

    Phase and frequency stability of electromagnetic oscillations in sub-gigawatt superradiance (SR) pulses generated by an extensive slow-wave structure of a relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator were experimentally investigated. Data on the frequency tuning and radiation phase stability of SR pulses with a variation of the energy and current of electron beam were obtained.

  2. Research on 1:5000 Scale DEM Generation Technology Using Airborne Ka-Band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qianfu; Li, Tao; Gao, Xiaoming; Chen, Weinan; Wu, Danqin

    2016-08-01

    Airborne Ka-band InSAR system is able to provide images with high resolution, high signal-noise-ratio, high-precision attitude, and high- precision positioning data, thus DEM with high-precision can be obtained using InSAR. In this paper, we use the orthogonal decomposition of look vector to analyze the three-dimensional positioning model based on the airborne Ka-band imaging geometry, then establish the interferometric calibration model to correct the main error sources. Besides, we implement multi-baseline fusion given that the airborne instrument consists of three antennas, which make it possible to construct three interferograms through one flight. We conduct experiments using airborne Ka-band InSAR data covering Xi'an, China. Finally, we use ground control points (GCPs) for the interferometric calibration model and generate the fused DEM. Experiments show that we can determine the airborne Ka-band InSAR system parameters accurately using interferometric calibration model. The vertical accuracy of multi-baseline fused DEM is 0.33 m, and the plane positioning error is 1.40 m. It meets the requirements of DEM quality at 1:5000 measurement scale.

  3. Demonstration and Evaluation of the Ka-Band Array Feed Compensation System on the 70-m Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Fort, D.

    1999-01-01

    The current plan for DSN evolution calls for the use of Ka-band (32GHz) frequencies on large DSN antennas to increase antenna gain and useful communications bandwidth over that of current X- and S-band systems, with reduced sensitivity to plasma effects.

  4. Generating entangled quantum microwaves in a Josephson-photonics device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambach, Simon; Kubala, Björn; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    When connecting a voltage-biased Josephson junction in series to several microwave cavities, a Cooper-pair current across the junction gives rise to a continuous emission of strongly correlated photons into the cavity modes. Tuning the bias voltage to the resonance where a single Cooper pair provides the energy to create an additional photon in each of the cavities, we demonstrate the entangling nature of these creation processes by simple witnesses in terms of experimentally accessible observables. To characterize the entanglement properties of the such created quantum states of light to the fullest possible extent, we then proceed to more elaborate entanglement criteria based on the knowledge of the full density matrix and provide a detailed study of bi- and multipartite entanglement. In particular, we illustrate how due to the relatively simple design of these circuits changes of experimental parameters allow one to access a wide variety of entangled states differing, e.g., in the number of entangled parties or the dimension of state space. Such devices, besides their promising potential to act as a highly versatile source of entangled quantum microwaves, may thus represent an excellent natural testbed for classification and quantification schemes developed in quantum information theory.

  5. Ka-band propagation studies using the ACTS propagation terminal and the CSU-CHILL multiparameter, Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, J.; Turk, J.; Bringi, V. N.

    1995-08-01

    An increase in the demand for satellite communications has led to an overcrowding of the current spectrums being used - mainly at C and Ku bands. To alleviate this overcrowding, new technology is being developed to open up the Ka-band for communications use. One of the first experimental communications satellites using this technology is NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). In Sept. 1993, ACTS was deployed into a geostationary orbit near 100 deg W longitude. The ACTS system employs two Ka-band beacons for propagation experiments, one at 20.185 GHz and another at 27.505 GHz. Attenuation due to rain and tropospheric scintillations will adversely affect new technologies proposed for this spectrum. Therefore, before being used commercially, propagation effects at Ka-band must be studied. Colorado State University is one of eight sites across the United States and Canada conducting propagations studies; each site is equipped with the ACTS propagation terminal (APT). With each site located in a different climatic zone, the main objective of the propagation experiment is to obtain monthly and yearly attenuation statistics. Each site also has secondary objectives that are site dependent. At CSU, the CSU-CHILL radar facility is being used to obtain polarimetric radar data along the ACTS propagation path. During the expected two to four year period of the project, it is hoped to study several significant weather events. The S-band radar will be used to obtain Ka-band attenuation estimates and to initialize propagation models that have been developed, to help classify propagation events measured by the APT. Preliminary attenuation estimates for two attenuation events will be shown here - a bright band case that occurred on 13 May 1994 and a convective case that occurred on 20 Jun. 1994. The computations used to obtain Ka-band attenuation estimates from S-band radar data are detailed. Results from the two events are shown.

  6. Ka-band propagation studies using the ACTS propagation terminal and the CSU-CHILL multiparameter, Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, J.; Turk, J.; Bringi, V. N.

    1995-01-01

    An increase in the demand for satellite communications has led to an overcrowding of the current spectrums being used - mainly at C and Ku bands. To alleviate this overcrowding, new technology is being developed to open up the Ka-band for communications use. One of the first experimental communications satellites using this technology is NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). In Sept. 1993, ACTS was deployed into a geostationary orbit near 100 deg W longitude. The ACTS system employs two Ka-band beacons for propagation experiments, one at 20.185 GHz and another at 27.505 GHz. Attenuation due to rain and tropospheric scintillations will adversely affect new technologies proposed for this spectrum. Therefore, before being used commercially, propagation effects at Ka-band must be studied. Colorado State University is one of eight sites across the United States and Canada conducting propagations studies; each site is equipped with the ACTS propagation terminal (APT). With each site located in a different climatic zone, the main objective of the propagation experiment is to obtain monthly and yearly attenuation statistics. Each site also has secondary objectives that are site dependent. At CSU, the CSU-CHILL radar facility is being used to obtain polarimetric radar data along the ACTS propagation path. During the expected two to four year period of the project, it is hoped to study several significant weather events. The S-band radar will be used to obtain Ka-band attenuation estimates and to initialize propagation models that have been developed, to help classify propagation events measured by the APT. Preliminary attenuation estimates for two attenuation events will be shown here - a bright band case that occurred on 13 May 1994 and a convective case that occurred on 20 Jun. 1994. The computations used to obtain Ka-band attenuation estimates from S-band radar data are detailed. Results from the two events are shown.

  7. Ka-Band, MEMS Switched Line Phase Shifters Implemented in Finite Ground Coplanar Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Ponchak, George E.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2005-01-01

    Ka-band MEMS switched line phase shifters implemented in finite ground coplanar waveguide are described in this paper. The phase shifters are constructed of single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches with additional reference and phase offset transmission line lengths. The one- and two-bit phase shifters are fabricated on high resistivity (HR) silicon with a dielectric constant, Epsilon(sub T) = 11.7 and a substrate thickness, t = 500microns. The switching architectures integrated within the phase shifters consist of MEMS switches that are doubly anchored cantilever beam capacitive switches with additional high inductive sections (MEMS LC device). The SPDT switch is composed of a T-junction with a MEMS LC device at each output port. The one-bit phase shifter described in this paper has an insertion loss (IL) and return loss (RL) of 0.9 dB and 30 dB while the two-bit described has an IL and RL of 1.8 dB and 30 dB respectively. The one-bit phase shifter's designed offset phase is 22.5deg and actual measured phase shift is 21.8deg. The two-bit phase shifter's designed offset phase is 22.5deg, 45deg, and 67.5deg and the actual measured phase shifts are 21.4deg, 44.2deg, and 65.8deg, respectively.

  8. 3D modeling of large targets and clutter utilizing Ka band monopulse SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Jerry A.; Barr, Doug; Shurtz, Ric; Channell, Rob

    2006-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama have developed a dual mode, Ka Band Radar and IIR system for the purpose of data collection and tracker algorithm development. The system is comprised of modified MMW and IIR sensors and is mounted in a stabilized ball on a UH-1 helicopter operated by Redstone Technical Test Center. Several missile programs under development require MMW signatures of multiple target and clutter scenes. Traditionally these target signatures have been successfully collected using static radars and targets mounted on a turntable to produce models from ISAR images; clutter scenes have been homogeneously characterized using information on various classes of clutter. However, current and future radar systems require models of many targets too large for turntables, as well as high resolution 3D scattering characteristics of urban and other non-homogenous clutter scenes. In partnership with industry independent research and development (IRAD) activities the U.S. Army RDEC has developed a technique for generating 3D target and clutter models using SAR imaging in the MMW spectrum. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of funded projects and resulting data products with an emphasis on MMW data reduction and analysis, especially the unique 3D modeling capabilities of the monopulse radar flying SAR profiles. Also, a discussion of lessons learned and planned improvements will be presented.

  9. Variability study of Ka-band HRR polarimetric signatures on 11 T-72 tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, William E.; Neilson, H. J.; Szatkowski, G. N.; Giles, Robert H.; Kersey, William T.; Perkins, L. C.; Waldman, Jerry

    1998-09-01

    In an effort to effectively understand signature verification requirements through the variability of a structure's RCS characteristics, the U.S. Army National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC), with technical support from STL, originated a signature project plan to obtain MMW signatures from multiple similar tanks. In implementing this plan NGIC/STL directed and sponsored turntable measurements performed by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Sensors and Electromagnetic Resource Directorate on eleven T-72 tanks using an HRR full-polarimetric Ka-band radar. The physical condition and configuration of these vehicles were documented by careful inspection and then photographed during the acquisition sequence at 45 degree(s) azimuth intervals. The turntable signature of one vehicle was acquired eight times over the three day signatures acquisition period for establishing measurement variability on any single target. At several intervals between target measurements, the turntable signature of a 30 m2 trihedral was also acquired as a calibration reference for the signature library. Through an RCS goodness-of-fit correlation and ISAR comparison study, the signature-to-signature variability was evaluated for the eighteen HRR turntable measurements of the T-72 tanks. This signature data is available from NGIC on request for Government Agencies and Government Contractors with an established need-to-know.

  10. Inflatable Microstrip Reflectarray Antennas At X and Ka-Band Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Feria, Alfonso

    1998-01-01

    Introduction: Inflatable antenna technology is being developed by JPL/NASA to enable the capabilities of low mass, high packaging efficiency, and low-cost deployment for future spacecraft high-gain and large aperture antennas. One of the technologies being considered [11 is the inflatable microstrip reflectarray. A conventional inflatable parabolic reflector antenna will offer similar advantages with the added capability of wide electrical bandwidth. However, it suffers from the difficulty of maintaining its required large, thin, and curved-parabolic surface in the space environment. Since the microstrip reflectarray has the "natural" flat reflecting surface, it is much easier to maintain the required surface tolerance using an inflatable structure. This is the primary reason, despite its narrow bandwidth characteristic, that the inflatable microstrip reflectarray is being studied. This article discusses an already-developed one-meter X-band inflatable microstrip reflectarray and a three-meter Ka-band inflatable microstrip reflectarray which is currently under development. Both antennas' RF structures are designed at JPL and their mechanical inflatable structures are designed and manufactured at ILC Dover, Inc.

  11. An advanced Ka band phased array communication system at commercial frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Lawrence; Kacpura, Thomas; Kershner, Dennis

    2000-01-01

    The Glenn Research Center (GRC) Direct Data Distribution (D3) project will demonstrate an advanced, high-performance communication system that transmits information from a technology payload carried by the Space Shuttle in low-Earth orbit (LEO) to a small receiving terminal on the Earth. The Shuttle-based communications package will utilize a solid-state, Ka-band phased array antenna that electronically steers the 19.05 Ghz RF signal toward a low-cost, tracking ground terminal, thereby providing agile, vibration-free, electronic steering at reduced size and weight with increased reliability. The project will also demonstrate new digital modulation and processing technology that will allow transmission of user/platform data at rates up to 1200 Mbits per second. This capability will enable the management of the substantially increased amounts of data to be collected from the International Space Station (ISS) or other LEO platforms directly to NASA field centers, principal investigators, or into the commercial terrestrial communications network. .

  12. Ultra-Compact Ka-Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna for RADAR and Interplanetary CubeSats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauder, Jonathan; Chahat, Nacer; Thomson, Mark; Hodges, Richard; Peral, Eva; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, technology and launch opportunities for CubeSats have exploded, enabling a wide variety of missions. However, as instruments become more complex and CubeSats travel deeper into space, data communication rates become an issue. To solve this challenge, JPL has initiated a research and technology development effort to design a 0.5 meter Ka-band parabolic deployable antenna (KaPDA) which would stow in 1.5U (10 x 10 x 15 cu cm) and provide 42dB of gain (50% efficiency). A folding rib architecture and dual reflector Cassegrainian design was selected as it best balances RF gain and stowed size. The design implements an innovative telescoping waveguide and gas powered deployment. RF simulations show that after losses, the antenna would have over 42 dB gain, supported by preliminary test results. KaPDA would create opportunities for a host of new CubeSat missions by allowing high data rate communication which would enable using high fidelity instruments or venturing further into deep space, including potential interplanetary missions. Additionally KaPDA would provide a solution for other small antenna needs and the opportunity to obtain Earth science data. This paper discusses the design challenges encountered, the architecture of the solution, and the antennas expected performance capabilities.

  13. Onboard Interferometric SAR Processor for the Ka-Band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Peral, Eva; Clark, Duane I.; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2011-01-01

    An interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) onboard processor concept and algorithm has been developed for the Ka-band radar interferometer (KaRIn) instrument on the Surface and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. This is a mission- critical subsystem that will perform interferometric SAR processing and multi-look averaging over the oceans to decrease the data rate by three orders of magnitude, and therefore enable the downlink of the radar data to the ground. The onboard processor performs demodulation, range compression, coregistration, and re-sampling, and forms nine azimuth squinted beams. For each of them, an interferogram is generated, including common-band spectral filtering to improve correlation, followed by averaging to the final 1 1-km ground resolution pixel. The onboard processor has been prototyped on a custom FPGA-based cPCI board, which will be part of the radar s digital subsystem. The level of complexity of this technology, dictated by the implementation of interferometric SAR processing at high resolution, the extremely tight level of accuracy required, and its implementation on FPGAs are unprecedented at the time of this reporting for an onboard processor for flight applications.

  14. Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, A.; Zhang, C.; Kollias, P.; Matrosov, S.; Szyrmer, W.

    2015-09-01

    The use of millimeter wavelength radars for probing precipitation has recently gained interest. However, estimation of precipitation variables is not straightforward due to strong signal attenuation, radar receiver saturation, antenna wet radome effects and natural microphysical variability. Here, an automated algorithm is developed for routinely retrieving rain rates from the profiling Ka-band (35-GHz) ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) zenith radars (KAZR). A 1-dimensional, simple, steady state microphysical model is used to estimate impacts of microphysical processes and attenuation on the profiles of radar observables at 35-GHz and thus provide criteria for identifying situations when attenuation or microphysical processes dominate KAZR observations. KAZR observations are also screened for signal saturation and wet radome effects. The algorithm is implemented in two steps: high rain rates are retrieved by using the amount of attenuation in rain layers, while low rain rates are retrieved from the reflectivity-rain rate (Ze-R) relation. Observations collected by the KAZR, rain gauge, disdrometer and scanning precipitating radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign at the Gan Island of the tropical Indian Ocean are used to validate the proposed approach. The differences in the rain accumulation from the proposed algorithm are quantified. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm has a potential for deriving continuous rain rate statistics in the tropics.

  15. Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, A.; Zhang, C.; Kollias, P.; Matrosov, S.; Szyrmer, W.

    2014-02-01

    The use of millimeter wavelength radars for probing precipitation has recently gained interest. However, estimation of precipitation variables is not straightforward due to strong attenuation, radar receiver saturation, antenna wet radome effects and natural microphysical variability. Here, an automated algorithm is developed for routinely retrieving rain rates from profiling Ka-band (35-GHz) ARM zenith radars (KAZR). A 1-D simple, steady state microphysical model is used to estimate the impact of microphysical processes and attenuation on the profiles of the radar observables at 35-GHz and thus provide criteria for identifying when attenuation or microphysical processes dominate KAZR observations. KAZR observations are also screened for saturation and wet radome effects. The proposed algorithm is implemented in two steps: high rain rates are retrieved by using the amount of attenuation in rain layers, while lower rain rates by the Ze-R (reflectivity-rain rate) relation is implemented. Observations collected by the KAZR, disdrometer and scanning weather radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign at Gan Island of the tropical Indian Ocean are used to validate the proposed approach. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm can be used to derive robust statistics of rain rates in the tropics from KAZR observations.

  16. An experimental investigation of high temperature superconducting microstrip antennas at K- and Ka-band frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Mark A.

    1993-03-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS results in narrow bandwidths and high patch edge impedances of such antennas. To investigate the performance of superconducting microstrip antennas, three antenna architectures at K and Ka-band frequencies are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled, gap coupled, and electromagnetically coupled to a microstrip transmission line were designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using YBa2Cu3O7 superconducting thin films. For each architecture, a single patch antenna and a four element array were fabricated. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, patterns, efficiency, and gain are presented. The measured results show usable antennas can be constructed using any of the architectures. All architectures show excellent gain characteristics, with less than 2 dB of total loss in the four element arrays. Although the direct and gap coupled antennas are the simplest antennas to design and fabricate, they suffer from narrow bandwidths. The electromagnetically coupled antenna, on the other hand, allows the flexibility of using a low permittivity substrate for the patch radiator, while using HTS for the feed network, thus increasing the bandwidth while effectively utilizing the low loss properties of HTS. Each antenna investigated in this research is the first of its kind reported.

  17. AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on sapphire substrates for Ka band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xubo, Song; Yuanjie, Lü; Guodong, Gu; Yuangang, Wang; Xin, Tan; Xingye, Zhou; Shaobo, Dun; Peng, Xu; Jiayun, Yin; Bihua, Wei; Zhihong, Feng; Shujun, Cai

    2016-04-01

    We report the DC and RF characteristics of AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with the gate length of 100 nm on sapphire substrates. The device exhibits a maximum drain current density of 1.29 A/mm and a peak transconductance of 440 mS/mm. A current gain cutoff frequency and a maximum oscillation frequency of 119 GHz and 155 GHz have been obtained, respectively. Furthermore, the large signal load pull characteristics of the AlN/GaN HEMTs were measured at 29 GHz. An output power density of 429 mW/mm has been demonstrated at a drain bias of 10 V. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the earliest demonstration of power density at the Ka band for AlN/GaN HEMTs in the domestic, and also a high frequency of load-pull measurements for AlN/GaN HEMTs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306113).

  18. User RF requirements for a Ka-band data relay satellite link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, David J.; Aleman, Roberto M.

    1989-01-01

    The user G/T and EIRP requirements were determined for a data relay satellite link consisting of a forward link to 360 Mbps at 23 GHz and a return link to 2 Gbps at 26.5 GHz. Hardware for this data link would be a modular expansion to the NASA Data Link Module. Calculations were based on a data relay satellite model of predetermined characteristics patterned after the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS). The desired data rates could be achieved with a G/T of 21.7 dB/deg K (forward link) and an EIRP of 68.2 dBW (return link) for the user satellite. Hardware configurations meeting these requirements are discussed in terms of RF performance, efficiency, reliability, and modular flexibility. A planar array configuration emerges as the logical candidate for most NASA missions. Pertinent Ka-band technology and certain ongoing research efforts are reviewed. Areas of particular interest include new power device families, 0.25-micron low-noise HEMT technology, and fiber optic distribution and control of RF arrays.

  19. Narrow Angle Diversity using ACTS Ka-band Signal with Two USAT Ground Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, A.; Emrich, C.; Ventre, J.; Wilson, W.; Acosta, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two ultra small aperture terminal (USAT) ground stations, separated by 1.2 km in a narrow angle diversity configuration, received a continuous Ka-band tone sent from Cleveland Link Evaluation Terminal (LET). The signal was transmitted to the USAT ground stations via NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) steerable beam. Received signal power at the two sites was measured and analyzed. A dedicated datalogger at each site recorded time-of-tip data from tipping bucket rain gauges, providing rain amount and instantaneous rain rate. WSR-88D data was also obtained for the collection period. Eleven events with ground-to-satellite slant-path precipitation and resultant signal attenuation were observed during the data collection period. Fade magnitude and duration were compared at the two sites and diversity gain was calculated. These results exceeded standard diversity gain model predictions by several decibels. Rain statistics from tipping bucket data and from radar data were also compared to signal attenuation. The nature of Florida's subtropical rainfall, specifically its impact on signal attenuation at the sites, was addressed.

  20. Preface to the special issue on "Integrated Microwave Photonic Signal Processing"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaña, José; Yao, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    As Guest Editors, we are pleased to introduce this special issue on ;Integrated Microwave Photonic Signal Processing; published by the Elsevier journal Optics Communications. Microwave photonics is a field of growing importance from both scientific and practical application perspectives. The field of microwave photonics is devoted to the study, development and application of optics-based techniques and technologies aimed to the generation, processing, control, characterization and/or distribution of microwave signals, including signals well into the millimeter-wave frequency range. The use of photonic technologies for these microwave applications translates into a number of key advantages, such as the possibility of dealing with high-frequency, wide bandwidth signals with minimal losses and reduced electromagnetic interferences, and the potential for enhanced reconfigurability. The central purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the state of the art of generation, processing and characterization technologies for high-frequency microwave signals. It is now widely accepted that the practical success of microwave photonics at a large scale will essentially depend on the realization of high-performance microwave-photonic signal-processing engines in compact and integrated formats, preferably on a chip. Thus, the focus of the issue is on techniques implemented using integrated photonic technologies, with the goal of providing an update of the most recent advances toward realization of this vision.

  1. Photonic-assisted microwave signal multiplication and modulation using a silicon Mach–Zehnder modulator

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yun; Zhou, Linjie; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Photonic generation of microwave signal is obviously attractive for many prominent advantages, such as large bandwidth, low loss, and immunity to electromagnetic interference. Based on a single integrated silicon Mach–Zehnder modulator (MZM), we propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and compact photonic scheme to enable frequency-multiplicated microwave signal. Using the fabricated integrated MZM, we also demonstrate the feasibility of microwave amplitude-shift keying (ASK) modulation based on integrated photonic approach. In proof-of-concept experiments, 2-GHz frequency-doubled microwave signal is generated using a 1-GHz driving signal. 750-MHz/1-GHz frequency-tripled/quadrupled microwave signals are obtained with a driving signal of 250 MHz. In addition, a 50-Mb/s binary amplitude coded 1-GHz microwave signal is also successfully generated. PMID:26832305

  2. Brillouin Amplification--A Powerful New Scheme for Microwave Photonic Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, S.; Maleki, L.

    1997-01-01

    We introduce the Brillouin selective sideband amplification technique and demonstrate many important applications of this technique in photonic microwave systems, including efficient phase modulation to amplitude modulation conversion, photonic frequency multiplication, photonic signal mixing with gain, and frequency multiplied signal up conversion.

  3. Bandwidth-Efficient Communication through 225 MHz Ka-band Relay Satellite Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, Joseph A.; Downey, James M.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Evans, Michael A.; Mortensen, Dale J.

    2016-01-01

    The communications and navigation space infrastructure of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) consists of a constellation of relay satellites (called Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS)) and a global set of ground stations to receive and deliver data to researchers around the world from mission spacecraft throughout the solar system. Planning is underway to enhance and transform the infrastructure over the coming decade. Key to the upgrade will be the simultaneous and efficient use of relay transponders to minimize cost and operations while supporting science and exploration spacecraft. Efficient use of transponders necessitates bandwidth efficient communications to best use and maximize data throughput within the allocated spectrum. Experiments conducted with NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed on the International Space Station provides a unique opportunity to evaluate advanced communication techniques, such as bandwidth-efficient modulations, in an operational flight system. Demonstrations of these new techniques in realistic flight conditions provides critical experience and reduces the risk of using these techniques in future missions. Efficient use of spectrum is enabled by using high-order modulations coupled with efficient forward error correction codes. This paper presents a high-rate, bandwidth-efficient waveform operating over the 225 MHz Ka-band service of the TDRS System (TDRSS). The testing explores the application of Gaussian Minimum Shift Keying (GMSK), 2/4/8-phase shift keying (PSK) and 16/32- amplitude PSK (APSK) providing over three bits-per-second-per-Hertz (3 b/s/Hz) modulation combined with various LDPC encoding rates to maximize through- put. With a symbol rate of 200 M-band, coded data rates of 1000 Mbps were tested in the laboratory and up to 800 Mbps over the TDRS 225 MHz channel. This paper will present on the high-rate waveform design, channel characteristics, performance results

  4. Bandwidth-Efficient Communication through 225 MHz Ka-band Relay Satellite Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, Joseph; Downey, James; Reinhart, Richard C.; Evans, Michael Alan; Mortensen, Dale John

    2016-01-01

    The communications and navigation space infrastructure of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) consists of a constellation of relay satellites (called Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS)) and a global set of ground stations to receive and deliver data to researchers around the world from mission spacecraft throughout the solar system. Planning is underway to enhance and transform the infrastructure over the coming decade. Key to the upgrade will be the simultaneous and efficient use of relay transponders to minimize cost and operations while supporting science and exploration spacecraft. Efficient use of transponders necessitates bandwidth efficient communications to best use and maximize data throughput within the allocated spectrum. Experiments conducted with NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed on the International Space Station provides a unique opportunity to evaluate advanced communication techniques, such as bandwidth-efficient modulations, in an operational flight system. Demonstrations of these new techniques in realistic flight conditions provides critical experience and reduces the risk of using these techniques in future missions. Efficient use of spectrum is enabled by using high-order modulations coupled with efficient forward error correction codes. This paper presents a high-rate, bandwidth-efficient waveform operating over the 225 MHz Ka-band service of the TDRS System (TDRSS). The testing explores the application of Gaussian Minimum Shift Keying (GMSK), 248-phase shift keying (PSK) and 1632- amplitude PSK (APSK) providing over three bits-per-second-per-Hertz (3 bsHz) modulation combined with various LDPC encoding rates to maximize throughput. With a symbol rate of 200 Mbaud, coded data rates of 1000 Mbps were tested in the laboratory and up to 800 Mbps over the TDRS 225 MHz channel. This paper will present on the high-rate waveform design, channel characteristics, performance results, compensation

  5. Generating Ka-Band Signals Using an X-Band Vector Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott; Mysoor, Narayan; Lux, James; Cook, Brian; Shah, Biren

    2009-01-01

    A breadboard version of a transmitter for radio communication at a carrier frequency of 32 GHz (which is in the Ka band) utilizes a vector modulator operating at a carrier frequency of 8 GHz (the low end of the X band) to generate any of a number of advanced modulations that could include amplitude and/or phase modulation components. The 8-GHz modulated signal is mixed with a 24-GHz signal generated by an upconverter to obtain the desired 32-GHz modulated output. The transmitter is being developed as a prototype of downlink transmitters for transmission of data from spacecraft to Earth at high rates (>100 Mb/s). The transmitter design could also be adapted to terrestrial and Earth/satellite communication links. The advanced modulations (which can include M-ary phase-shift keying (M-PSK), offset phase-shift keying (OPSK), and M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM). These modulations are needed because for a given amount of signal bandwidth, they enable transmission of data at rates greater than those of older, simpler modulation schemes. The transmitter architecture (see figure) was chosen not only to enable generation of the required modulations at 32 GHz but also to reduce the number of components needed to implement the transmitter. Instead of incorporating an 8-GHz signal source, the transmitter utilizes an 8-GHz signal generated by a voltage-controlled oscillator that is part of an X-band transponder with which the fully developed version of this transmitter would be used in the original intended spacecraft application. The oscillator power is divided onto two paths, one of which goes through the vector modulator, the other through amplifiers and a 3 frequency multiplier. Band-pass filters are included downstream of the frequency multiplier to suppress unwanted harmonics.

  6. Modeling atmospheric precipitation impact on synthetic aperture radar imagery at X and Ka bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Saverio; Polverari, Federica; Pulvirenti, Luca; Montopoli, Mario; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Marzano, Frank S.

    2014-10-01

    Spaceborne synthetic aperture radars (SARs) operating at X-band and above allow observations of Earth surface at very high spatial resolution. Moreover, recent polarimetric SARs enable the complete characterization of target scattering and extinction properties. Nowadays several spaceborne X-band SAR systems are operative, and plans exist for systems operating at higher frequency bands (i.e. Ku, Ka and W). Although higher frequencies may have interesting and distinctive applications, atmospheric effects, especially in precipitating conditions, may affect the surface SAR response in both the signal amplitude and its phase, as assessed by numerous works in the last years. A valid tool to analyze and characterize the SAR response in these conditions is represented by forward modeling, where a known synthetic scenario, which is described by user-selected surface and atmospheric conditions, is considered. Thus, the SAR echoes corresponding to the synthetic scenarios are simulated using electromagnetic models. In this work a 3-D realistic polarimetric SAR response numerical simulator is presented. The proposed model framework accounts for the SAR slant observing geometry and it is able to characterize the polarimetric response both in amplitude and phase. In this work we have considered both X and Ka bands, thus exploring the atmospheric effects for the present and future polarimetric systems. The atmospheric conditions are simulated using the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) which is an high-resolution mesoscale model. SAM is used to define the three-dimensional distribution of hydrometeors which are among the inputs used in the Hydrometeor Ensemble Scattering Simulator (HESS) T-Matrix which allow simulating the SAR signal due to the atmospheric component. The SAR surface component is, instead, simulated by a Semi Empirical Model (SEM) for bare-soils conditions and SEAWIND2 two-scale model for ocean surfaces. The proposed methodology has been applied in this work

  7. Modem Characterization Through a Wideband, Hard-Limited Ka-Band Satellite Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Ivancic, William; Tanger, Tom; Cronon, Chris; Lee, Donald; Kifer, David R.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is using a commercial customized TDMA/FDMA bandwidth on demand modem for use with the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to highlight the numerous services and experiments that can be performed using small Ka-Band terminals. Characterizing the modems proved challenging due to the characteristics of the satellite transponder. The ACTS channel is hard-limited and up to 900 MHz wide. The channel has some unusual dynamic properties due to the satellite and antenna system, which make modem testing through the satellite challenging and the test requirements stringent. The satellite Multi-Beam Antenna (MBA) has a 1 hertz oscillation induced by the momentum wheel, which causes the transmit antenna pattern to move slightly. This results in a 1 hertz oscillation in the ground station receive power, with amplitude changes up to 1 dB depending on terminal location within a spot beam and associated gain slope. In addition, ACTS experiences a solar induced "thermal event" each day. This "thermal event" occurs when the sun heats the antenna support structure causing the transmit and receive reflectors to mispoint. This results in a slowly decreasing or increasing power density at the ground station receiver as the antenna pattern moves off bore-site. This paper describes the method used to fully characterize the TDMA/FDMA modem through the ACTS wideband, hard-limited transponder. In particular, techniques are discussed for conducting RF measurements on such a channel, the affect that the thermal characteristics and 1 hertz variations have on the accuracy of the results, and suggested means to minimize the error and provide useful and valuable data.

  8. Nonreciprocal quantum-state conversion between microwave and optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin; Li, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    Optoelectromechanical quantum interfaces can be utilized to connect systems with distinctively different frequencies in hybrid quantum networks. Here we present a scheme of nonreciprocal quantum-state conversion between microwave and optical photons via an optoelectromechanical interface. By introducing an auxiliary cavity and manipulating the phase differences between the linearized light-matter couplings, unidirectional state transmission that is immune to mechanical noise can be achieved. This interface can function as an isolator, a circulator, and a two-way switch that routes the input state to a designated output channel. We show that under a generalized impedance matching condition the state conversion can prevent thermal fluctuations of the mechanical mode from propagating to the cavity outputs and reach high fidelity. The realization of this scheme is also discussed.

  9. Applications of Microwave Photonics in Radio Astronomy and Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Addario, Larry R.; Shillue, William P.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of narrow band vs wide band signals is given. Topics discussed included signal transmission, reference distribution and photonic antenna metrology. Examples of VLA, ALMA, ATA and DSN arrays are given. . Arrays of small antennas have become more cost-effective than large antennas for achieving large total aperture or gain, both for astronomy and for communication. It is concluded that emerging applications involving arrays of many antennas require low-cost optical communication of both wide bandwidth and narrow bandwidth; development of round-trip correction schemes enables timing precision; and free-space laser beams with microwave modulation allow structural metrology with approx 100 micrometer precision over distances of 200 meters.

  10. Applications of Microwave Photonics in Radio Astronomy and Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Addario, Larry R.; Shillue, William P.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of narrow band vs wide band signals is given. Topics discussed included signal transmission, reference distribution and photonic antenna metrology. Examples of VLA, ALMA, ATA and DSN arrays are given. . Arrays of small antennas have become more cost-effective than large antennas for achieving large total aperture or gain, both for astronomy and for communication. It is concluded that emerging applications involving arrays of many antennas require low-cost optical communication of both wide bandwidth and narrow bandwidth; development of round-trip correction schemes enables timing precision; and free-space laser beams with microwave modulation allow structural metrology with approx 100 micrometer precision over distances of 200 meters.

  11. Phase noise measurement of wideband microwave sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dengjian; Zhang, Fangzheng; Zhou, Pei; Pan, Shilong

    2015-04-01

    An approach for phase noise measurement of microwave signal sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter is proposed. Using the same optical carrier, the microwave signal under test is applied to generate two +1st-order optical sidebands by two stages of electro-optical modulations. A time delay is introduced between the two sidebands through a span of fiber. By beating the two +1st-order sidebands at a photodetector, frequency down-conversion is implemented, and phase noise of the signal under test can be calculated thereafter. The system has a very large operation bandwidth thanks to the frequency conversion in the optical domain, and good phase noise measurement sensitivity can be achieved since the signal degradation caused by electrical amplifiers is avoided. An experiment is carried out. The phase noise measured by the proposed system agrees well with that measured by a commercial spectrum analyzer or provided by the datasheet. A large operation bandwidth of 5-40 GHz is demonstrated using the proposed system. Moreover, good phase noise floor is achieved (-123  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -137  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz at 10 GHz), which is nearly constant over the full measurement range.

  12. AltiKa: a Ka-band Altimetry Payload and System for Operational Altimetry during the GMES Period

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Patrick; Steunou, Nathalie; Caubet, Eric; Phalippou, Laurent; Rey, Laurent; Thouvenot, Eric; Verron, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the Ka-band altimetry payload and system that has been studied for several years by CNES, ALCATEL SPACE and some science laboratories. Altimetry is one of the major elements of the ocean observing system to be made sustainable through the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) and GMES (Global Monitoring of the Environment and Security) programs. A short review of some mission objectives to be fulfilled in terms of mesoscale oceanography in the frame of the GEOSS and GMES programs is performed. To answer the corresponding requirements, the approach consisting in a constellation of nadir altimeter is discussed. A coupled Ka-band altimeter-radiometer payload is then described; technical items are detailed to explain how this payload shall meet the science and operational requirements, and expected performances are displayed. The current status of the payload development and flight perspectives are given.

  13. Frequency Tracking Performance Using a Hyperbolic Digital-Phase Locked Loop for Ka-Band Communication in Rain Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithamparanathan, Kandeepan; Piesiewicz, Radoslaw

    In this paper we study and present some results on the performances of frequency tracking for Ka-band satellite communications in rain fading channels. The carrier frequency is tracked using a 2nd order hyperbolic phase detector based digital-phase locked loop (D-PLL). The hyperbolic D-PLL has the capability of extending the tracking range compared to the other D-PLL and hence can be designed such that to achieve low phase jitter performance for improved carrier tracking. We present the design and analysis of the D-PLL and show some simulation results on the frequency tracking performance for Ka-band rain fading channel. The results are compared with the non-fading noise only case and comparative analyses are made.

  14. Ka-Band Propagation Studies using the ACTS Propagation Terminal and the CSU-CHILL Multiparameter Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Beaver, John

    1996-01-01

    One of the first experimental communications satellites using Ka-band technology is the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). In September 1993, ACTS was deployed into a geostationary orbit near 100 degrees W longitude by the space shuttle Discovery. The ACTS system supports both communication and propagation experiments at the 20/30 GHz frequency bands. The propagation experiment involves multi-year attenuation measurements along the satellite-Earth slant path.

  15. Ka-Band Propagation Studies using the ACTS Propagation Terminal and the CSU-CHILL Multiparameter Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Beaver, John

    1996-01-01

    One of the first experimental communications satellites using Ka-band technology is the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). In September 1993, ACTS was deployed into a geostationary orbit near 100 degrees W longitude by the space shuttle Discovery. The ACTS system supports both communication and propagation experiments at the 20/30 GHz frequency bands. The propagation experiment involves multi-year attenuation measurements along the satellite-Earth slant path.

  16. Estimation of the penetration effects of the Ka-band radar signal into the Arctic sea ice snowpack.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Kévin; Fleury, Sara; Kouraev, Alexei; Rémy, Frédérique; Zakharova, Elena; Blumstein, Denis

    2015-04-01

    In the context of quantifying Arctic sea ice volume at global scale, altimetry provides a unique tool to estimate sea ice thickness through the freeboard method that mainly consists in evaluating the thickness of emerged sea ice. Most of the altimeters employed to retrieve sea ice thickness operate at Ku-band frequency (13.6 Ghz). Over Arctic sea ice and at this frequency, the radar signal is only slightly affected by scattering and absorbtion due to the presence of snow over the ice. Therefore, it is commonly admitted that most of the return echo comes from the ice surface. Launched in February 2013, the Saral-AltiKa mission carries a Ka-band (36.5 Ghz) altimeter that is a great opportunity to expand the study of sea ice thickness. However, unlike the Ku-band operating systems, most of the Ka-band signal does not reach the sea ice surface and is scattered by overlying snow layers. For this reason and in order to obtain the best estimate of sea ice thickness with Ka-band radar, it is crucial to evaluate the bias due to penetration of the radar signal into the snowpack at this frequency. We combine both Ku and Ka band radar observations to study the influence of radar penetration into the snow and estimate the extinction coefficient over Arctic sea ice. Our results are of the same order of magnitude of what is found in Antarctica. This research has been done in the framework of CNES TOSCA SICKays and IDEX Transversalité InHERA projects.

  17. Single photon frequency conversion and channelization based on microwave piezo-optomechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linran; Zou, Changlin; Poot, Menno; Cheng, Risheng; Tang, Hong

    Cavity optomechanics holds very promising potentials for quantum information processing, as it provides both a convenient method to manipulate photons and a platform to bridge different quantum system. Especially, the integration of microwave devices with cavity optomechanics draws great interest as such a hybrid platform can provide strong electrical actuation, ultra-sensitive optical readout, and parametric mechanical signal amplification simultaneously in a single device. This hybrid platform enables great functionalities in manipulating photons, and builds direct link between microwave photon and optical photon, which is important for future quantum network. Aluminum nitride (AlN) is ideal for such hybrid platform. Besides low optical and mechanical loss, AlN possesses strong piezoelectric effect, which gives rise to strong coupling between microwave cavities and mechanical resonators. We will present our recent progress in developing integrated AlN hybrid platform for photon manipulation, such as optical amplification and absorption, cascaded optical delay, single photon frequency shifting, etc.

  18. Assessment of virtual towers performed with scanning wind lidars and Ka-band radars during the XPIA experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Debnath, Mithu; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Brewer, W. Alan; ...

    2017-03-29

    During the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign, which was carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in spring 2015, multiple-Doppler scanning strategies were carried out with scanning wind lidars and Ka-band radars. Specifically, step–stare measurements were collected simultaneously with three scanning Doppler lidars, while two scanning Ka-band radars carried out simultaneous range height indicator (RHI) scans. The XPIA experiment provided the unique opportunity to compare directly virtual-tower measurements performed simultaneously with Ka-band radars and Doppler wind lidars. Furthermore, multiple-Doppler measurements were assessed against sonic anemometer data acquired from the meteorological tower (met-tower) present at the BAOmore » site and a lidar wind profiler. As a result, this survey shows that – despite the different technologies, measurement volumes and sampling periods used for the lidar and radar measurements – a very good accuracy is achieved for both remote-sensing techniques for probing horizontal wind speed and wind direction with the virtual-tower scanning technique.« less

  19. Assessment of virtual towers performed with scanning wind lidars and Ka-band radars during the XPIA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Mithu; Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Brewer, W. Alan; Choukulkar, Aditya; Delgado, Ruben; Gunter, Scott; Lundquist, Julie K.; Schroeder, John L.; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    During the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign, which was carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in spring 2015, multiple-Doppler scanning strategies were carried out with scanning wind lidars and Ka-band radars. Specifically, step-stare measurements were collected simultaneously with three scanning Doppler lidars, while two scanning Ka-band radars carried out simultaneous range height indicator (RHI) scans. The XPIA experiment provided the unique opportunity to compare directly virtual-tower measurements performed simultaneously with Ka-band radars and Doppler wind lidars. Furthermore, multiple-Doppler measurements were assessed against sonic anemometer data acquired from the meteorological tower (met-tower) present at the BAO site and a lidar wind profiler. This survey shows that - despite the different technologies, measurement volumes and sampling periods used for the lidar and radar measurements - a very good accuracy is achieved for both remote-sensing techniques for probing horizontal wind speed and wind direction with the virtual-tower scanning technique.

  20. Photonic band gap structure for a ferroelectric photonic crystal at microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    King, Tzu-Chyang; Chen, De-Xin; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Chien-Jang

    2015-10-10

    In this work, the photonic band gap (PBG) structure in a one-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystal (PC) is theoretically investigated. We consider a PC, air/(AB)N/air, in which layer A is a dielectric of MgO and layer B is taken to be a ferroelectric of Ba0.55Sr0.45TiO3 (BSTO). With an extremely high value in the dielectric constant in BSTO, the calculated photonic band structure at microwave frequencies exhibits some interesting features that are significantly different from those in a usual dielectric-dielectric PC. First, the photonic transmission band consists of multiple and nearly discrete transmission peaks. Second, the calculated bandwidth of the PBG is nearly unchanged as the angle of incidence varies in the TE wave. The bandwidth will slightly reduce for the TM mode. Thus, a wide omnidirectional PBG can be obtained. Additionally, the effect of the thickness of the ferroelectric layer on the PBG is much more pronounced compared to the dielectric layer thickness. That is, the increase of ferroelectric thickness can significantly decrease the PBG bandwidth.

  1. Calibration of the KA Band Tracking of the Bepi-Colombo Spacecraft (more Experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriot, J.; Serafini, J.; Sichoix, L.

    2013-12-01

    The radiosciences Bepi-Colombo MORE experiment will use X/X, X/Ka and Ka/Ka band radio links to make accurate measurements of the spacecraft range and range rate. Tropospheric zenith wet delays range from 1.5 cm to 10 cm, with high variability (less than 1000 s) and will impair these accurate measurements. Conditions vary from summer (worse) to winter (better), from day (worse) to night (better). These wet delays cannot be estimated from ground weather measurements and alternative calibration methods should be used in order to cope with the MORE requirements (no more than 3 mm at 1000 s). Due to the Mercury orbit, MORE measurements will be performed by daylight and more frequently in summer than in winter (from Northern hemisphere). Two systems have been considered to calibrate this wet delay: Water Vapor Radiometers (WVRs) and GPS receivers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a new class of WVRs reaching a 5 percent accuracy for the wet delay calibration (0.75 mm to 5 mm), but these WVRs are expensive to build and operate. GPS receivers are also routinely used for the calibration of data from NASA Deep Space probes, but several studies have shown that GPS receivers can give good calibration (through wet delay mapping functions) for long time variations, but are not accurate enough for short time variations (100 to 1000 s), and that WVRs must be used to efficiently calibrate the wet troposphere delays over such time spans. We think that such a calibration could be done by assimilating data from all the GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou and IRNSS) that will be available at the time of the Bepi-Colombo arrival at Mercury (2021), provided that the underlying physics of the turbulent atmosphere and evapotranspiration processes are properly taken into account at such time scales. This implies to do a tomographic image of the troposphere overlying each Deep Space tracking station at time scales of less than 1000 s. For this purpose, we have

  2. Ka-Band TWT High-Efficiency Power Combiner for High-Rate Data Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee; Vaden, Karl R.; Lesny, Gary G.; Glass, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    A four-port magic-T hybrid waveguide junction serves as the central component of a high-efficiency two-way power combiner circuit for transmitting a high-rate phase-modulated digital signal at a carrier frequency in the Ka-band (between 27 and 40 GHz). This power combiner was developed to satisfy a specific requirement to efficiently combine the coherent outputs of two traveling-wavetube (TWT) amplifiers that are typically characterized by power levels on the order of 100 W or more. In this application, the use of a waveguide-based power combiner (instead of a coaxial-cable- or microstrip-based power combiner, for example) is dictated by requirements for low loss, high power-handling capability, and broadband response. Combiner efficiencies were typically 90 percent or more over both the linear and saturated output power regions of operation of the TWTs . Figure 1 depicts the basic configuration of the magic-T hybrid junction. The coherent outputs of the two TWTs enter through ports 1 and 4. As a result of the orientations of the electromagnetic fields, which also provides a needed high port-to-port isolation, of these two input signals and the interior design of the magic-T junction, the input powers are divided so as to add in phase at one output port (port 2), and to be opposite in phase and hence cancel each other at the opposite coplanar output port (port 3). The net result is that the output power at port 2 is essentially double that of the output of one TWT, minus the power lost in the magic-T hybrid junction. Optimum performance as a high-efficiency power combiner thus requires a balance of both power and phase at the input ports of the magic-T. Replicas of this two-way combiner can be arranged in a binary configuration to obtain a 2n-way (where n is an integer) combiner. For example, Figure 2 illustrates the use of three two-way combiners to combine the outputs of four TWTs.

  3. Power Spectrum of Atmospheric Scintillation for the Deep Space Network Goldstone Ka-Band Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C.; Wheelon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic signal fluctuations due to atmospheric scintillations may impair the Ka-band (around 32-GHz) link sensitivities for a low-margin Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving system. The ranges of frequency and power of the fast fluctuating signals (time scale less than 1 min) are theoretically investigated using the spatial covariance and turbulence theory. Scintillation power spectrum solutions are derived for both a point receiver and a finite-aperture receiver. The aperture-smoothing frequency ((omega(sub s)), corner frequency ((omega(sub c)), and damping rate are introduced to define the shape of the spectrum for a finite-aperture antenna. The emphasis is put on quantitatively describing the aperture-smoothing effects and graphically estimating the corner frequency for a large aperture receiver. Power spectral shapes are analyzed parametrically in detail through both low- and high-frequency approximations. It is found that aperture-averaging effects become significant when the transverse correlation length of the scintillation is smaller than the antenna radius. The upper frequency or corner frequency for a finite-aperture receiver is controlled by both the Fresnel frequency and aperture-smoothing frequency. Above the aperture-smoothing frequency, the spectrum rolls off at a much faster rate of exp (-omega(sup 2)/omega(sup 2, sub s), rather than omega(sup -8/3), which is customary for a point receiver. However, a relatively higher receiver noise level can mask the fast falling-off shape and make it hard to be identified. We also predict that when the effective antenna radius a(sub r) less than or = 6 m, the corner frequency of its power spectrum becomes the same as that for a point receiver. The aperture-smoothing effects are not obvious. We have applied these solutions to the scenario of a DSN Goldstone 34-m-diameter antenna and predicted the power spectrum shape for the receiving station. The maximum corner frequency for the receiver (with omega(sub s) = 0

  4. Study of rain attenuation in Ka band for satellite communication in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Choi, Dong-You

    2016-10-01

    The important factor to be considered in the link budget estimation for satellite communication systems, operating at frequencies above 10 GHz is the rain attenuation. Scattering and absorption are the main concern for system designers at these frequency bands. This has resulted in the need for suitable prediction models that can best provide estimates of attenuation due to rain with available information of rain attenuation data. Researchers have developed models that can be used to estimate 1-min rainfall attenuation distribution for earth space link but there is still some confusion with regard to choosing the right model to predict attenuation for the location of interest. In this context, the existing prediction models need to be tested against the measured results. This paper presents studies on rain attenuation at 19.8 GHz, which specifies the performance parameters for Ka-Band under earth space communication system. It presents the experimental result of rain rates and rain-induced attenuation in 19.8 and 20.73 GHz for vertical and circular polarization respectively. The received signal data for rain attenuation and rain rate were collected at 10 s intervals over a three year periods from 2013 to 2015. The data highlights the impact of clear air variation and rain fade loss. Rain rate data was measured through OTT Parsivel. During the observation period, rain rates of about 50 mm/h and attenuation values of 11.6 dB for 0.01% of the time were noted. The experimental link was set up at Korea Radio Promotion Association, Mokdong, Seoul. Out of several models, this paper present discussion and comparison of ITU-R P.618-12, Unified Method, Dissanayake Allnutt and Haidara (DAH), Simple Attenuation (SAM), Crane Global and Ramachandran and Kumar models. The relative error margin of 27.51, 89.84,72.46% and 67.24, 130.84, 166.48% are obtained for 0.1%, 0.01% and 0.001% of the time for 19.8 and 20.73 GHz under vertical and circular polarization respectively from ITU

  5. Power Spectrum of Atmospheric Scintillation for the Deep Space Network Goldstone Ka-Band Downlink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C.; Wheelon, A.

    2004-08-01

    Dynamic signal fluctuations due to atmospheric scintillations may impair the Ka-band (around 32-GHz) link sensitivities for a low-margin Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving system. The ranges of frequency and power of the fast fluctuating signals (time scale <1 min) are theoretically investigated using the spatial covariance and turbulence theory. Scintillation power spectrum solutions are derived for both a point receiver and a finite-aperture receiver. The aperture-smoothing frequency (omega_{s}), corner frequency (omega_{c}), and damping rate are introduced to define the shape of the spectrum for a finite-aperture antenna. The emphasis is put on quantitatively describing the aperture-smoothing effects and graphically estimating the corner frequency for a large aperture receiver. Power spectral shapes are analyzed parametrically in detail through both low- and high-frequency approximations. It is found that aperture-averaging effects become significant when the transverse correlation length of the scintillation is smaller than the antenna radius. The upper frequency or corner frequency for a finite-aperture receiver is controlled by both the Fresnel frequency and aperture-smoothing frequency. Above the aperture-smoothing frequency, the spectrum rolls off at a much faster rate of exp≤ft(- omega(2}/omega_{s}({2)) right), rather than omega(-(8/3)) , which is customary for a point receiver. However, a relatively higher receiver noise level can mask the fast falling-off shape and make it hard to be identified. We also predict that when the effective antenna radius a_{r}≤ 6 m, the corner frequency of its power spectrum becomes the same as that for a point receiver. The aperture-smoothing effects are not obvious. We have applied these solutions to the scenario of a DSN Goldstone 34-m-diameter antenna and predicted the power spectrum shape for the receiving station. The maximum corner frequency for the receiver (with omega_{s} = 0.79 omega_{0}) is found to be 0.44 Hz

  6. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Michel, T.; Muellerschoen, R.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Miller, T.; Milligan, L.; Sadowy, G.; Sanchez-Barbetty, M.; Lou, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicated swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Following the success of the IPY campaign, the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program funded the upgrade of GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. The AITT made three fundamental upgrades to improve system performance: 1. State-of-the-art solid-state power amplifiers (80W peak) were integrated directly on the antenna panel reducing front-end losses; 2. A ping-pong capability was incorporated to effectively double the baseline thereby improving height measurement precision by a factor of two; and 3. A high-fidelity calibration loop was implemented which is critical for routine processing. Upon completion of our engineering flights in February 2013, GLISTIN-A flew a brief campaign to Alaska (4/24-4/27/13). The purpose was to fully demonstrate GLISTIN-A's ability to generate high-precision, high resolution maps of ice surface topography with swaths in excess of 10km. Furthermore, the question of the utility of GLISTIN-A for sea-ice mapping, tracking and inventory has received a great deal of interest. To address this GLISTIN-A collected data over sea-ice in the Beaufort sea including an underflight of CryoSAT II. Note that there are

  7. Chromatic dispersion effect in a microwave photonic filter using superstructured fiber Bragg grating and dispersive fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Bennion, Ian; Williams, John

    2005-08-22

    In this paper a microwave photonic filter using superstructured fiber Bragg grating and dispersive fiber is investigated. A theoretical model to describe the transfer function of the filter taking into consideration the spectral width of light source is established. Experiments are carried out to verify the theoretical analysis. Both theoretical and experimental results indicate that due to chromatic dispersion the source spectral width introduces an additional power penalty to the microwave photonic response of the filter.

  8. Reconfigurable microwave photonic filter with negative coefficient based on an optoelectronic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen Hui; Li, Wei; Wang, Wen Ting; Liu, Jian Guo; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-06-01

    We report a reconfigurable multi-tap microwave photonic filter with negative coefficient based on an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO). The key novelty of this work is that a single polarization modulator (PolM) is used to build the OEO as well as to generate a multi-wavelength optical source. Thus, an external microwave source which is usually involved in the generation of multi-wavelength optical source by externally modulating a single tone optical beam is saved. In addition, the spectrum of the multi-wavelength optical source is reconfigurable in terms of the number of the optical components and the frequency interval between the adjacent components. The negative coefficient of the microwave photonic filter is achieved using a phase modulator (PM) and a dispersive element. The proposed approach is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified. The generated fundamental microwave signal has a frequency of 9.95 GHz and a phase noise of -118 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset. By adjusting the optical power inside the OEO loop and the polarization controller (PC) outside the OEO loop, the tap number of the microwave photonic filter can be adjusted from 2 to 5, leading to a reconfigurable microwave photonic filter. The measured frequency responses of the microwave photonic filters agree well with the simulated ones.

  9. Lunar Noise-Temperature Increase Measurements at S-Band, X-Band, and Ka-Band Using a 34-Meter-Diameter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2006-08-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will cause an increase in receiver noise temperature that needs to be accounted for in telemetry, radio science, or ranging link budgets. The Deep Space Network may be required to use its antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature increase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular offset of the antenna beam from the center of the lunar disk. This article quantifies such a set of measurements acquired at DSS 13, a 34-m-diameter research and development beam-waveguide antenna located at Goldstone, California, at three different telecommunication frequencies, S-band (2.3 GHz), X-band (8.4 GHz), and Ka-band (32 GHz), over a wide range of lunar phase, for both disk-centered and limb-centered positions of the antenna beam.

  10. Fully tunable 360° microwave photonic phase shifter based on a single semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Juan; Lloret, Juan; Gasulla, Ivana; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José

    2011-08-01

    A fully tunable microwave photonic phase shifter involving a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is proposed and demonstrated. 360° microwave phase shift has been achieved by tuning the carrier wavelength and the optical input power injected in an SOA while properly profiting from the dispersion feature of a conveniently designed notch filter. It is shown that the optical filter can be advantageously employed to switch between positive and negative microwave phase shifts. Numerical calculations corroborate the experimental results showing an excellent agreement.

  11. Photonic RF-IF wideband down conversion using optical injection locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adleman, James R.; Lin, Chunyan L.; Jester, Shai B.; Pascoguin, B. M.; Evans, Douglass C.; Jacobs, Everett W.

    2015-05-01

    We describe the implementation of a self-heterodyne, tunable down converting RF-IF photonic link as a key component of a wideband microwave signal search and intercept system covering S to Ka bands. The presented architecture uses photomixing of two distributed feedback lasers injection locked to a master external cavity laser, allowing low phase to amplitude noise conversion and improved sensitivity. Coherent detection of the intermediate frequency allows unambiguous recovery of full time-domain information. The practical implementation of a packaged prototype system will be discussed, with emphasis on the system stabilization strategy and performance requirements.

  12. Photonic instantaneous frequency measurement of wideband microwave signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueqin; Pei, Li; Li, Jing; Wang, Yiqun; Yuan, Jin; Ning, Tigang

    2017-01-01

    We propose a photonic system for instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM) of wideband microwave signals with a tunable measurement range and resolution based on a polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG). Firstly, in order to be insensitive to laser power fluctuation, we aim at generating two different frequency to amplitude characteristics so that we can normalize them to obtain an amplitude comparison function (ACF). Then we encode these two different wavelengths in two perpendicular polarizations by using the PM-FBG which shows different transmission profiles at two polarizations. The ACF is capable of being adjusted by tuning polarization angle, therefore the measurement range and resolution are tunable. By theoretical analyses and simulated verification, a frequency measurement range of 0~17.2 GHz with average resolution of ±0.12 GHz can be achieved, which signifies a wide measurement range with relatively high resolution. Our system does not require large optical bandwidth for the components because the wavelength spacing can be small, making the system affordable, stable, and reliable with more consistent characteristics due to the narrowband nature of the optical parts. PM-FBG with high integration can be potentially used for more polarization manipulating systems and the use of a single-polarization dual-wavelength laser can simplify the architecture and enhance the stability.

  13. Microwave Photonic Filters for Interference Cancellation and Adaptive Beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, John

    Wireless communication has experienced an explosion of growth, especially in the past half- decade, due to the ubiquity of wireless devices, such as tablets, WiFi-enabled devices, and especially smartphones. Proliferation of smartphones with powerful processors and graphic chips have given an increasing amount of people the ability to access anything from anywhere. Unfortunately, this ease of access has greatly increased mobile wireless bandwidth and have begun to stress carrier networks and spectra. Wireless interference cancellation will play a big role alongside the popularity of wire- less communication. In this thesis, we will investigate optical signal processing methods for wireless interference cancellation methods. Optics provide the perfect backdrop for interference cancellation. Mobile wireless data is already aggregated and transported through fiber backhaul networks in practice. By sandwiching the signal processing stage between the receiver and the fiber backhaul, processing can easily be done locally in one location. Further, optics offers the advantages of being instantaneously broadband and size, weight, and power (SWAP). We are primarily concerned with two methods for interference cancellation, based on microwave photonic filters, in this thesis. The first application is for a co-channel situation, in which a transmitter and receiver are co-located and transmitting at the same frequency. A novel analog optical technique extended for multipath interference cancellation of broadband signals is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this thesis. The proposed architecture was able to achieve a maximum of 40 dB of cancellation over 200 MHz and 50 dB of cancellation over 10 MHz. The broadband nature of the cancellation, along with its depth, demonstrates both the precision of the optical components and the validity of the architecture. Next, we are interested in a scenario with dynamically changing interference, which requires an adaptive photonic

  14. Coherent integrated receiver for highly linear microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klamkin, Jonathan

    Phase modulation can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and spurfree dynamic range (SFDR) of microwave photonic links because phase modulation is not limited in input modulation swing and is inherently linear using certain electro-optic devices. Traditional interferometer-based phase demodulators have a sinusoidal response therefore a novel approach is required for achieving linear coherent detection at the receive end of a photonic link employing phase modulation. In this work, a balanced receiver with feedback to a reference tracking phase modulator was developed. With sufficient feedback loop gain, the received signal phase is closely tracked and the phase detection falls within the linear regime of the interferometer response. For stable operation at high frequency the delay of the feedback loop must be kept short, therefore a monolithic approach is required to realize a compact receiver architecture. The monolithic photonic integrated circuit (PIC) developed here consists of a high power balanced uni-traveling-carrier photodiode (UTC-PD), a compact 2x2 multimode interference (MMI) coupler, and multi-quantum well reference phase modulators. This PIC is hybrid integrated with an electronic IC that provides transconductance amplification of the feedback signal for increased loop gain. Novel concepts such as charge compensation, partially depleted absorption, and absorption profile modification were incorporated into the design of the waveguide UTCPDs resulting in record output saturation current and linearity. Both general interference surface ridge (SR) MMI couplers and restricted interference deep ridge (DR) MMI couplers were explored, the latter for reducing the loop delay. Current injection tuning was incorporated into the MMI couplers for fine tuning the output power splitting ratio. The quantum well design of the reference phase modulators was optimized for realizing low Vpi, low insertion loss, low absorption modulation, and improved linearity

  15. Preliminary Results from NASA/GSFC Ka-Band High Rate Demonstration for Near-Earth Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Yen; Gioannini, Bryan; Bundick, Steven N.; Miller, David T.

    2004-01-01

    In early 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) commenced the Ka-Band Transition Project (KaTP) as another step towards satisfying wideband communication requirements of the space research and earth exploration-satellite services. The KaTP team upgraded the ground segment portion of NASA's Space Network (SN) in order to enable high data rate space science and earth science services communications. The SN ground segment is located at the White Sands Complex (WSC) in New Mexico. NASA conducted the SN ground segment upgrades in conjunction with space segment upgrades implemented via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS)-HIJ project. The three new geostationary data relay satellites developed under the TDRS-HIJ project support the use of the inter-satellite service (ISS) allocation in the 25.25-27.5 GHz band (the 26 GHz band) to receive high speed data from low earth-orbiting customer spacecraft. The TDRS H spacecraft (designated TDRS-8) is currently operational at a 171 degrees west longitude. TDRS I and J spacecraft on-orbit testing has been completed. These spacecraft support 650 MHz-wide Ka-band telemetry links that are referred to as return links. The 650 MHz-wide Ka-band telemetry links have the capability to support data rates up to at least 1.2 Gbps. Therefore, the TDRS-HIJ spacecraft will significantly enhance the existing data rate elements of the NASA Space Network that operate at S-band and Ku-band.

  16. Toward Improving Ice Water Content and Snow Rate Retrievals from Spaceborne Radars, Emphasizing Ku and Ka-Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.; Tanelli, S.; Poellot, M.

    2015-12-01

    This study uses a data set from either overflying aircraft or ground-based radars operating at Ku and Ka bands, combined with in-situ microphysical measurements to develop radar reflectivity (Ze)-ice water content (IWC) and Ze-snowfall rate (S) relationships that are suited for retrieval of snowfall rate from the GPM radars. During GCPEX, the NASA DC-8 aircraft, carrying the JPL APR-2 KU and KA band radars overflew the UND Citation aircraft, making microphysical measurements in the ice clouds below. On two days, 19 and 28 January 2011, there are a total of almost 7000 1-sec colocations of the aircraft, where a collocation was defined as having a combination of a spatial separation of less than 3 km and a time separation of less than 10 minutes. During the NASA GPM Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E), the Citation aircraft made in-situ observations over Oklahoma in 2011. We evaluated the data from two types of collocations. First, there were two Citation spirals on 27 April 2011, over the NPOL radar. At the same time, the UHF-band KUZR radar was collecting data in a vertically-pointing mode. Also, the Ka band KAZR Doppler radar was operating in a zenith orientation. Reflectivities and Doppler velocities, without and with appreciable Mie-scattering effects of the hydrometers (for KUZR and KAZR, respectively), are thus available during the spirals. Also during MC3E, six deep convective clouds with a total of more than 5000 5-sec samples and a range of temperatures from -40 to 0C were sampled by the Citation at the same time that NEXRAD reflectivities were measured at about the same position. These data allows us to evaluate various backscatter models and to develop multi-wavelength Z-IWC and Z-S relationships. We will present the results of this study.

  17. Engineering entangled microwave photon states through multiphoton interactions between two cavity fields and a superconducting qubit

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan-Jun; Wang, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaobo; Liu, Yu-xi

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that there are not only transverse but also longitudinal couplings between microwave fields and a superconducting qubit with broken inversion symmetry of the potential energy. Using multiphoton processes induced by longitudinal coupling fields and frequency matching conditions, we design a universal algorithm to produce arbitrary superpositions of two-mode photon states of microwave fields in two separated transmission line resonators, which are coupled to a superconducting qubit. Based on our algorithm, we analyze the generation of evenly-populated states and NOON states. Compared to other proposals with only single-photon process, we provide an efficient way to produce entangled microwave photon states when the interactions between superconducting qubits and microwave fields are in the strong and ultrastrong regime. PMID:27033558

  18. On-Orbit Performance Verification and End-To-End Characterization of the TDRS-H Ka-band Communications Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toral, Marco; Wesdock, John; Kassa, Abby; Pogorelc, Patsy; Jenkens, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In June 2000, NASA launched the first of three next generation Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS-H) equipped with a Ka-band forward and return service capability. This Ka-band service supports forward data rates of up to 25 Mb/sec using the 22.55-23.55 GHz space-to-space allocation. Return services are supported via channel bandwidths of 225 and 650 MHz for data rates up to at least 800 Mb/sec using the 25.25 - 27.5 GHz space-to-space allocation. As part of NASA's acceptance of the TDRS-H spacecraft, an extensive on-orbit calibration, verification and characterization effort was performed to ensure that on-orbit spacecraft performance is within specified limits. This process verified the compliance of the Ka-band communications payload with all performance specifications, and demonstrated an end-to-end Ka-band service capability. This paper summarizes the results of the TDRS-H Ka-band communications payload on-orbit performance verification and end-to-end service characterization. Performance parameters addressed include antenna gain pattern, antenna Gain-to-System Noise Temperature (G/T), Effective Isotropically Radiated Power (EIRP), antenna pointing accuracy, frequency tunability, channel magnitude response, and Ka-band service Bit-Error-Rate (BER) performance.

  19. On-Orbit Performance Verification and End-to-End Characterization of the TDRS-H Ka-Band Communications Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toral, Marco; Wesdock, John; Kassa, Abby; Pogorelc, Patsy; Jenkens, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In June 2000, NASA launched the first of three next generation Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS-H) equipped with a Ka-band forward and return service capability. This Ka-band service supports forward data rates up to 25 Mb/sec using the 22.55 - 23.55 GHz space-to-space allocation. Return services are supported via channel bandwidths of 225 and 650 MHz for data rates up to 800 Mb/sec (QPSK) using the 25.25 - 27.5 GHz space-to-space allocation. As part of NASA's acceptance of the TDRS-H spacecraft, an extensive on-orbit calibration, verification and characterization effort was performed to ensure that on-orbit spacecraft performance is within specified limits. This process verified the compliance of the Ka-band communications payload with all performance specifications and demonstrated an end-to-end Ka-band service capability. This paper summarizes the results of the TDRS-H Ka-band communications payload on-orbit performance verification and end-to-end service characterization. Performance parameters addressed include Effective Isotropically Radiated Power (EIRP), antenna Gain-to-System Noise Temperature (G/T), antenna gain pattern, frequency tunability and accuracy, channel magnitude response, and Ka-band service Bit-Error-Rate (BER) performance.

  20. Generation of phase-coded microwave signals using a polarization-modulator-based photonic microwave phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Pan, Shilong

    2013-03-01

    A scheme for the generation of phase-coded microwave signals using an electrically tunable photonic microwave phase shifter is proposed and demonstrated. The photonic phase shifter is based on a single-sideband polarization modulator (PolM), and the tuning of the phase shifter is implemented by a second PolM. By introducing an RF signal to the first PolM and an electrical coding signal to the second PolM, a phase-coded microwave signal with binary phase codes or polyphase codes is achieved. An experiment is performed. The simple and flexible operation, high coding rate, large frequency range, excellent transmission performance, and high stability of the system is confirmed.

  1. Phase Noise Enhancement of the GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistors Using Micromachined Cavity Resonators at Ka-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Insang; Kim, Chungwoo; Kwon, Youngwoo; Cheon, Changyul; Song, Cimoo

    1999-06-01

    We introduce a new structure of the micromachined cavity resonator coupled GaAs-based oscillator to enhance the phase noise and the frequency stability. The oscillator and the cavity are designed for Ka-band applications. Compared to the free running oscillator, the cavity resonator coupled oscillator showed the phase noise enhancement of about 20 dB. The phase noises of about -110 and -85 dBc/Hz are obtained at 1 MHz and 100 kHz offset frequency, respectively. The frequency pushing for the gate bias of the cavity coupled oscillator is about two order of magnitude less than that of the free running oscillator.

  2. A microwave beam waveguide undulator for a brilliant above 100 keV photon source.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    1999-04-19

    For generation of photons above 100-keV with a magnetic field strength in the range 0.2-0.5 Tesla, an undulator wavelength {lambda}{sub u} shorter than 5 mm may be needed with beam in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. A microwave beam waveguide undulator system has been investigated for generation of such light. The waveguide structure consists of two parallel reflector surfaces that can be derived from an elliptically cylindrical waveguide. The structure can support deflecting TE{sub m0} modes with very low microwave loss. A microwave ring resonator circuit employing the beam waveguide is considered to construct an undulator with the above requirement. Microwave properties of the beam waveguide structure have been investigated, and the design criteria for a microwave undulator are discussed.

  3. Microwave frequency measurement based on photonic sampling analog-to-digital conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yangxue; Zhang, Zhiyao; Peng, Di; Zou, Jinfang; Liu, Yong

    2016-11-01

    A new microwave photonic approach to microwave frequency measurement with a high resolution and a large bandwidth is proposed. In this method, three photonic sampling analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) with co-prime sampling rates are employed. Three Fourier frequencies acquiring through down-converted analog-to-digital conversion of the unknown microwave signal are utilized to recovery the frequency of the unknown signal. The simulation results show that a microwave frequency measurement system which is feasible for multi-frequency microwave signal achieves a large measurement range of 0-50GHz and an accuracy of+/-1MHz. In addition, the spur-free dynamic range of 101.1dB-Hz2/3@50GHz is also numerically demonstrated.

  4. Influence of an externally modulated photonic link on a microwave communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the influence of an externally modulated photonic link on the performance of a microwave communications system. From the analysis, we deduce limitations on the photocurrent, magnitude of the relaxation oscillation noise of the laser, third-order intercept point of the preamplifier, and other parameters in order for the photonic link to function according to the system specifications. Based on this, we outline a procedure for designing a photonic link that can be integrated in a system with minimal performance degradation.

  5. Using microwave and macroscopic samples of dielectric solids to study the photonic properties of disordered photonic bandgap materials.

    PubMed

    Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Tsitrin, Sam; Yadak, Polin; He, Yingquan; Cuneo, Daniel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Liner, Devin; Man, Weining

    2014-09-26

    Recently, disordered photonic materials have been suggested as an alternative to periodic crystals for the formation of a complete photonic bandgap (PBG). In this article we will describe the methods for constructing and characterizing macroscopic disordered photonic structures using microwaves. The microwave regime offers the most convenient experimental sample size to build and test PBG media. Easily manipulated dielectric lattice components extend flexibility in building various 2D structures on top of pre-printed plastic templates. Once built, the structures could be quickly modified with point and line defects to make freeform waveguides and filters. Testing is done using a widely available Vector Network Analyzer and pairs of microwave horn antennas. Due to the scale invariance property of electromagnetic fields, the results we obtained in the microwave region can be directly applied to infrared and optical regions. Our approach is simple but delivers exciting new insight into the nature of light and disordered matter interaction. Our representative results include the first experimental demonstration of the existence of a complete and isotropic PBG in a two-dimensional (2D) hyperuniform disordered dielectric structure. Additionally we demonstrate experimentally the ability of this novel photonic structure to guide electromagnetic waves (EM) through freeform waveguides of arbitrary shape.

  6. Using Microwave and Macroscopic Samples of Dielectric Solids to Study the Photonic Properties of Disordered Photonic Bandgap Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Tsitrin, Sam; Yadak, Polin; He, Yingquan; Cuneo, Daniel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Liner, Devin; Man, Weining

    2014-01-01

    Recently, disordered photonic materials have been suggested as an alternative to periodic crystals for the formation of a complete photonic bandgap (PBG). In this article we will describe the methods for constructing and characterizing macroscopic disordered photonic structures using microwaves. The microwave regime offers the most convenient experimental sample size to build and test PBG media. Easily manipulated dielectric lattice components extend flexibility in building various 2D structures on top of pre-printed plastic templates. Once built, the structures could be quickly modified with point and line defects to make freeform waveguides and filters. Testing is done using a widely available Vector Network Analyzer and pairs of microwave horn antennas. Due to the scale invariance property of electromagnetic fields, the results we obtained in the microwave region can be directly applied to infrared and optical regions. Our approach is simple but delivers exciting new insight into the nature of light and disordered matter interaction. Our representative results include the first experimental demonstration of the existence of a complete and isotropic PBG in a two-dimensional (2D) hyperuniform disordered dielectric structure. Additionally we demonstrate experimentally the ability of this novel photonic structure to guide electromagnetic waves (EM) through freeform waveguides of arbitrary shape. PMID:25285416

  7. Installing the earth station of Ka-band satellite frequency in Malaysia: conceptual framework for site decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, M. R.; Reba, M. N. M.; Jaw, S. W.; Arsyad, A.; Ibrahim, M. A. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper developed a conceptual framework in determining the suitable location in installing the earth station for Ka-band satellite communication in Malaysia. This current evolution of high throughput satellites experienced major challenge due to Malaysian climate. Because Ka-band frequency is highly attenuated by the rainfall; it is an enormous challenge to define the most appropriate site for the static communication. Site diversity, a measure to anticipate this conflict by choosing less attenuated region and geographically change the transmission strategy on season basis require accurate spatio-temporal information on the geographical, environmental and hydro-climatology at local scale. Prior to that request, this study developed a conceptual framework to cater the needs. By using the digital spatial data, acquired from site measurement and remote sensing, the proposed framework applied a multiple criteria analysis to perform the tasks of site selection. With the advancement of high resolution remotely sensed data, site determination can be conducted as in Malaysia; accommodating a new, fast, and effective satellite communication. The output of this study is one of the pioneer contributions to create a high tech-society.

  8. Ka-Band Link Study and Analysis for a Mars Hybrid RF/Optical Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznikar, Daniel J.; Nappier, Jennifer M.; Downey, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    The integrated radio and optical communications (iROC) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating the feasibility of a hybrid RF and optical communication subsystem for future deep space missions. The hybrid communications subsystem enables the advancement of optical communications while simultaneously mitigating the risk of infusion by combining an experimental optical transmitter and telescope with a reliable Ka-band RF transmitter and antenna. The iROC communications subsystem seeks to maximize the total data return over the course of a potential 2-year mission in Mars orbit beginning in 2021. Although optical communication by itself offers potential for greater data return over RF, the reliable Ka-band link is also being designed for high data return capability in this hybrid system. A daily analysis of the RF link budget over the 2-year span is performed to optimize and provide detailed estimates of the RF data return. In particular, the bandwidth dependence of these data return estimates is analyzed for candidate waveforms. In this effort, a data return modeling tool was created to analyze candidate RF modulation and coding schemes with respect to their spectral efficiency, amplifier output power back-off, required digital to analog conversion (DAC) sampling rates, and support by ground receivers. A set of RF waveforms is recommended for use on the iROC platform.

  9. Ka-Band Atmospheric Noise-Temperature Measurements at Goldstone California, Using a 34-Meter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D.; Clauss, R.; Speranza, M.

    1997-10-01

    System operating noise temperature, T_op, data acquired during the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Satellite (SURFSAT-1) link experiment at the 34-meter research and development antenna, DSS 13, at Goldstone, California, were used to estimate the noise contribution due to the atmosphere at both Ka-band (32 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz). Data from 192 tracking passes conducted between November 1995 and October 1996 were acquired over a wide range of elevation angles (or air masses). The T_op data were recorded as the antenna tracked the spacecraft in elevation angle (antenna "tipping" curves). These data were least-squares fitted to estimate the equivalent atmospheric noise contribution and attenuation of one mass of atmosphere (at antenna zenith or a 90-deg elevation angle) at Ka-band. The statistics and cumulative distributions of these measurements will be presented along with intercomparisons of independent estimates derived from concurrent water vapor radiometer data and a model using input surface meteorological data.

  10. Single microwave-photon detector using an artificial Λ-type three-level system

    PubMed Central

    Inomata, Kunihiro; Lin, Zhirong; Koshino, Kazuki; Oliver, William D.; Tsai, Jaw-Shen; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon detection is a requisite technique in quantum-optics experiments in both the optical and the microwave domains. However, the energy of microwave quanta are four to five orders of magnitude less than their optical counterpart, making the efficient detection of single microwave photons extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate the detection of a single microwave photon propagating through a waveguide. The detector is implemented with an impedance-matched artificial Λ system comprising the dressed states of a driven superconducting qubit coupled to a microwave resonator. Each signal photon deterministically induces a Raman transition in the Λ system and excites the qubit. The subsequent dispersive readout of the qubit produces a discrete ‘click'. We attain a high single-photon-detection efficiency of 0.66±0.06 with a low dark-count probability of 0.014±0.001 and a reset time of ∼400 ns. This detector can be exploited for various applications in quantum sensing, quantum communication and quantum information processing. PMID:27453153

  11. Photonic compressive sensing for analog-to-information conversion with a delay-line based microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhijing; Chi, Hao; Jin, Tao; Zheng, Shilie; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2016-07-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) in the photonic domain is highly promising for analog-to-information conversion of sparse signals due to its potential capability of high input bandwidth and digitization with sub-Nyquist sampling. In this paper, we suggest that the concept of delay-line based microwave photonic filter be used in photonic CS to realize the low-pass filtering (LPF) function which is required in CS. A microwave photonic filter (MPF) with a dispersive element and fiber delay lines is applied in photonic CS to achieve better performance and flexibility. In the approach, the input radio-frequency signal and the pseudorandom bit sequence (PRBS) are modulated on a multi-wavelength optical carrier and propagate through a dispersive element. The modulated optical signal is split into multiple channels with tunable delay lines. The multiple wavelengths, dispersive element and multiple channels constitute a reconfigurable low-pass microwave filter. Experiment and simulations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and potentials of this approach.

  12. Investigation of a metallic photonic crystal high power microwave mode converter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong Qin, Fen; Xu, Sha; Yu, Aimin; Wu, Yong

    2015-02-15

    It is demonstrated that an L band metallic photonic crystal TEM-TE{sub 11} mode converter is suitable for narrow band high power microwave application. The proposed mode converter is realized by partially filling metallic photonic crystals along azimuthal direction in a coaxial transmission line for phase-shifting. A three rows structure is designed and simulated by commercial software CST Microwave Studio. Simulation results show that its conversion efficiency is 99% at the center frequency 1.58 GHz. Over the frequency range of 1.56-1.625 GHz, the conversion efficiency exceeds 90 %, with a corresponding bandwidth of 4.1 %. This mode converter has a gigawatt level power handling capability which is suitable for narrow band high power microwave application. Using magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator(MILO) as a high power microwave source, particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to test the performance of the mode converter. The expected TE{sub 11} mode microwave output is obtained and the MILO works well. Mode conversion performance of the converter is tested by far-field measurement method. And the experimental result confirms the validity of our design. Then, high power microwave experiment is carried out on a Marx-driven Blumlein water line pulsed power accelerator. Microwave frequency, radiated pattern and power are measured in the far-field region and the results agree well with simulation results. The experiment also reveals that no microwave breakdown or pulse shortening took place in the experimental setup.

  13. Investigation of a metallic photonic crystal high power microwave mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Qin, Fen; Xu, Sha; Yu, Aimin; Wu, Yong

    2015-02-01

    It is demonstrated that an L band metallic photonic crystal TEM-TE11 mode converter is suitable for narrow band high power microwave application. The proposed mode converter is realized by partially filling metallic photonic crystals along azimuthal direction in a coaxial transmission line for phase-shifting. A three rows structure is designed and simulated by commercial software CST Microwave Studio. Simulation results show that its conversion efficiency is 99% at the center frequency 1.58 GHz. Over the frequency range of 1.56-1.625 GHz, the conversion efficiency exceeds 90 %, with a corresponding bandwidth of 4.1 %. This mode converter has a gigawatt level power handling capability which is suitable for narrow band high power microwave application. Using magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator(MILO) as a high power microwave source, particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to test the performance of the mode converter. The expected TE11 mode microwave output is obtained and the MILO works well. Mode conversion performance of the converter is tested by far-field measurement method. And the experimental result confirms the validity of our design. Then, high power microwave experiment is carried out on a Marx-driven Blumlein water line pulsed power accelerator. Microwave frequency, radiated pattern and power are measured in the far-field region and the results agree well with simulation results. The experiment also reveals that no microwave breakdown or pulse shortening took place in the experimental setup.

  14. Design and Performance of Ka-Band Fiber-Optic Delay Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-28

    erbium - doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs). Laser RIN is a major concern in analog photonics. Laser noise at the RF carrier frequency as well as...same is true and more explicitly shown for the data in Fig. 11. Shown there are the measured baseband RIN of an erbium - doped fiber laser as well...Idc = 10 mA. Shown are data for a laser only and the same laser amplified with one and two erbium - doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs). In

  15. Stabilizing an optoelectronic microwave oscillator with photonic filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, D.; Aveline, D.; Yu, N.; Thompson, R.; Matsko, A. B.; Maleki, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares methods of active stabilization of an optoelectronic microwave oscillator (OEO) based on insertion of a source of optical group delay into an OEO loop. The performance of an OEO stabilized with either a high- optical cavity or an atomic cell is analyzed. We show that the elements play a role of narrow-band microwave filters improving an OEO stability.

  16. Photonic approach to microwave frequency measurement with digital circular-code results.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xihua; Pan, Wei; Luo, Bin; Yan, Lianshan; Jiang, Yushi

    2011-10-10

    A photonic approach to measuring microwave frequency with digital results is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed approach, N photonic phase-shifted filters with a phase shift increment of π/N in the transmission responses are designed. The filters are then employed to process the single optical sideband generated by applying a microwave signal to a single sideband suppressed-carrier (SSB-SC) modulation module, to perform frequency-to-amplitude conversion and analog-to-digital conversion simultaneously. After the implementation of power detection and decision operation to the filtered optical sideband, an N-bit result in the form of the circular code is obtained, which indicates the frequency of the microwave signal. A proof-of-concept experiment is performed to verify the proposed approach and a 5-bit circular code is generated to indicate microwave frequency up to 40 GHz.

  17. Ultrahigh energy photons, electrons, and neutrinos, the microwave background, and the universal cosmic-ray hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    The production of ultrahigh energy photons, electrons and neutrinos as the decay products of pions produced in photomeson interactions between cosmic ray nucleons and the blackbody microwave background is discussed in terms of the resultant energy spectra of these particles. Simple asymptotic formulas are given for calculating the ultrahigh energy photon spectrum predicted for the universal cosmic ray hypothesis and the resulting spectra are compared with those obtained previously by numerical means using a different propagation equation for the photons. Approximate analytic solutions for the photon spectra are given in terms of simple power-law energy functions and slowly varying logarithmic functions.

  18. Design and Validation of Rugged Microwave Photonic Network for Phased-Array Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Manisha; Rai, J. K.; Sridhar, N.

    2015-11-01

    Military radar has the requirement of 24 × 7 operation in harsh environments with a high level of safety and integrity built in for equipment and personnel working with it. This article presents an application of a microwave photonic network for phased-array military radar. The design challenge is to realize faithful reproduction of the input microwave signals over extreme temperature and frequency ranges. Environmental testing has been carried out to validate the performance of the proposed microwave photonic network over 2-4 GHz and a temperature range of -20°C to +55°C. The result shows that the photonic network can be successfully utilized for phased-array radar.

  19. Creating photon-number squeezed strong microwave fields by a Cooper-pair injection laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenhöfer, Martin; Leppäkangas, Juha; Marthaler, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The use of artificial atoms as an active lasing medium opens a way to construct novel sources of nonclassical radiation. An example is the creation of photon-number squeezed light. Here, we present a design of a laser consisting of multiple Cooper-pair transistors coupled to a microwave resonator. Over a broad range of experimentally realizable parameters, this laser creates photon-number squeezed microwave radiation, characterized by a Fano factor F ≪1 , at a very high resonator photon number. We investigate the impact of gate-charge disorder in a Cooper-pair transistor and show that the system can create squeezed strong microwave fields even in the presence of maximum disorder.

  20. Celestial Reference Frame at X/KA-Band (8.4/32 GHz) for Deep Space Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. E.; García-Miró, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Snedeker, L. G.; Sotuela, I.

    2012-10-01

    Deep space tracking and navigation are done in a quasi-inertial reference frame based upon the angular positions of distant active galactic nuclei (AGN). These objects, which are found at extreme distances characterized by median redshifts of z = 1, are ideal for reference frame definition because they exhibit no measurable parallax or proper motion. They are thought to be powered by super massive black holes whose gravitational energy drives galactic sized relativistic jets. These jets produce synchrotron emissions which are detectable by modern radio techniques such as Very Long baseline Interferometry (VLBI). We have constructed a reference frame based on sixty seven X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) VLBI observing sessions (2005 to present), each of ∼24 hours duration, using the intercontinental baselines of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN): Goldstone, California to Madrid, Spain and Canberra, Australia. We detected 482 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of 460 X/Ka sources in common with the international standard ICRF2 at S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) shows wRMS agreement of 180 μas in RA cos(dec) and 270 μas in Dec. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 μas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. Compared to S/X-band frames (e.g. ICRF2 (Ma et al, 2009)), X/Ka-band allows access to more compact source morphology and reduced core shift. Both these improvements allow for a more well-defined and stable reference frame at X/Ka-band. In the next decade, the optically-based Gaia mission (Lindegren, 2008) may produce a frame with competitive precision. By accurately registering radio frames with Gaia, we could study wavelength dependent systematic errors. A simulated frame tie between our X/Ka radio frame and the Gaia optical frame predicts a frame tie precision of 10-15 μas (1-σ, per 3-D rotation component) with

  1. Superradiant Ka-band Cherenkov oscillator with 2-GW peak power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Pedos, M. S.; Rukin, S. N.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The generation of a 2-GW microwave superradiance (SR) pulses has been demonstrated at 29-GHz using a single-mode relativistic backward-wave oscillator possessing the beam-to-wave power conversion factor no worse than 100%. A record-breaking radiation power density in the slow-wave structure (SWS) of ˜1.5 GW/cm2 required the use of high guiding magnetic field (7 T) decreasing the beam losses to the SWS in strong rf fields. Despite the field strength at the SWS wall of 2 MV/cm, a single-pass transmission mode of a short SR pulse in the SWS allows one to obtain extremely high power density in subnanosecond time scale due to time delay in the development of the breakdown phenomena.

  2. Superradiant Ka-band Cherenkov oscillator with 2-GW peak power

    SciTech Connect

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Pedos, M. S.; Rukin, S. N.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-09-15

    The generation of a 2-GW microwave superradiance (SR) pulses has been demonstrated at 29-GHz using a single-mode relativistic backward-wave oscillator possessing the beam-to-wave power conversion factor no worse than 100%. A record-breaking radiation power density in the slow-wave structure (SWS) of ∼1.5 GW/cm{sup 2} required the use of high guiding magnetic field (7 T) decreasing the beam losses to the SWS in strong rf fields. Despite the field strength at the SWS wall of 2 MV/cm, a single-pass transmission mode of a short SR pulse in the SWS allows one to obtain extremely high power density in subnanosecond time scale due to time delay in the development of the breakdown phenomena.

  3. Optical single photons on-demand teleported from microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a scheme for entangling the optical and microwave output modes of the respective cavities by using a micro mechanical resonator. The micro mechanical resonator, on one side, is capacitively coupled to the microwave cavity and, on the other side, it is coupled to a high-finesses optical cavity. We then show how this continuous variable entanglement can be profitably used to teleport the non-Gaussian number state |1> and the superposition (|0\\rangle +|1\\rangle )/\\sqrt 2 from the microwave cavity output mode onto an output of the optical cavity mode with fidelity much larger than the no-cloning limit.

  4. A 3 to 6 GHz microwave/photonic transceiver for phased-array interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Edward; Wanuga, Stephen; Candela, Karen; Scotti, Ronald E.; MacDonald, V. W.; Gates, John V.

    1992-04-01

    The general design and operation of a microwave/photonic transceiver operating in the range 3-6 GHz are presented. The transceiver consists of drop-in submodules with optical fiber pigtails mounted on a brass carrier measuring less than 1 x 1 x 0.1 inch along with MMIC amplifiers and an alumina motherboard. Minimum 3 to 6 GHz return losses of 6 dB have been measured for both the microwave input and the microwave output of the module; the insertion loss is between 19 and 20 dB at most frequencies in the 3-6 GHz band.

  5. Dynamic modes of microwave signal autogeneration in a radio photonic ring generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, A. V.; Ustinov, A. B.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic modes of microwave signal autogeneration in a radio photonic generator have been investigated. The generator is a ring circuit with a low-pass filter and microwave amplifier in its microwave path. The optical path contains an optical fiber delay line. The generator demonstrates the periodical, chaotic, and noise dynamics. It has been shown that the correlation dimensionality of the random signal attractor in the chaotic generation mode saturates with increasing phase space dimensionality. Saturation is not observed in the noise-generation mode.

  6. Fiber Sensor Systems Based on Fiber Laser and Microwave Photonic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongyan; Chen, Daru; Cai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors, especially fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are very attractive due to their numerous advantages over traditional sensors, such as light weight, high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, ease of multiplexing and so on. Therefore, fiber-optic sensors have been intensively studied during the last several decades. Nowadays, with the development of novel fiber technology, more and more newly invented fiber technologies bring better and superior performance to fiber-optic sensing networks. In this paper, the applications of some advanced photonic technologies including fiber lasers and microwave photonic technologies for fiber sensing applications are reviewed. FBG interrogations based on several kinds of fiber lasers, especially the novel Fourier domain mode locking fiber laser, have been introduced; for the application of microwave photonic technology, examples of microwave photonic filtering utilized as a FBG sensing interrogator and microwave signal generation acting as a transversal loading sensor have been given. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations have been carried out. The comparison of these advanced photonic technologies for the applications of fiber sensing is carried out and important issues related to the applications have been addressed and the suitable and potential application examples have also been discussed in this paper. PMID:22778591

  7. Fiber sensor systems based on fiber laser and microwave photonic technologies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongyan; Chen, Daru; Cai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors, especially fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are very attractive due to their numerous advantages over traditional sensors, such as light weight, high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, ease of multiplexing and so on. Therefore, fiber-optic sensors have been intensively studied during the last several decades. Nowadays, with the development of novel fiber technology, more and more newly invented fiber technologies bring better and superior performance to fiber-optic sensing networks. In this paper, the applications of some advanced photonic technologies including fiber lasers and microwave photonic technologies for fiber sensing applications are reviewed. FBG interrogations based on several kinds of fiber lasers, especially the novel Fourier domain mode locking fiber laser, have been introduced; for the application of microwave photonic technology, examples of microwave photonic filtering utilized as a FBG sensing interrogator and microwave signal generation acting as a transversal loading sensor have been given. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations have been carried out. The comparison of these advanced photonic technologies for the applications of fiber sensing is carried out and important issues related to the applications have been addressed and the suitable and potential application examples have also been discussed in this paper.

  8. Bandwidth Efficient Modulation and Coding Techniques for NASA's Existing Ku/Ka-Band 225 MHz Wide Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioannini, Bryan; Wong, Yen; Wesdock, John

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently established the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) K-band Upgrade Project (TKUP), a project intended to enhance the TDRSS Ku-band and Ka-band Single Access Return 225 MHz (Ku/KaSAR-225) data service by adding the capability to process bandwidth efficient signal design and to replace the White Sand Complex (WSC) KSAR high data rate ground equipment and high rate switches which are nearing obsolescence. As a precursor to this project, a modulation and coding study was performed to identify signal structures which maximized the data rate through the Ku/KaSAR-225 channel, minimized the required customer EIRP and ensured acceptable hardware complexity on the customer platform. This paper presents the results and conclusions of the TKUP modulation and coding study.

  9. K- and Ka-band mobile-vehicular satellite-tracking reflector antenna system for the NASA ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, Art; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Wu, T. K.; Woo, Ken

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the K- and Ka-band mobile-vehicular satellite-tracking reflector antenna system for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. ACTS is NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellites. The AMT project will make the first experimental use of ACTS soon after the satellite is operational, to demonstrate mobile communications via the satellite from a van on the road. The AMT antenna system consists of a mechanically steered small reflector antenna, using a shared aperture for both frequency bands and fitting under a radome of 23 cm diameter and 10 cm height, and a microprocessor controlled antenna controller that tracks the satellite as the vehicle moves about. The RF and mechanical characteristics of the antenna and the antenna tracking control system are discussed. Measurements of the antenna performance are presented.

  10. Ku- and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna for the Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  11. Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project Ku-Band and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  12. Fine resolution topographic mapping of the Jovian moons: a Ka-band high resolution topographic mapping interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Carsey, Frank D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through us of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100 km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  13. Fine Resolution Topographic Mapping of the Jovian Moons: A Ka-Band High Resolution Topographic Mapping Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, S. N.; Carsey, F. D.; Turtle, E. P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through use of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  14. A real-time signal combining system for Ka-band feed arrays using maximum-likelihood weight estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Rodemich, E. R.

    1990-01-01

    A real-time digital signal combining system for use with Ka-band feed arrays is proposed. The combining system attempts to compensate for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss resulting from antenna deformations induced by gravitational and atmospheric effects. The combining weights are obtained directly from the observed samples by using a sliding-window implementation of a vector maximum-likelihood parameter estimator. It is shown that with averaging times of about 0.1 second, combining loss for a seven-element array can be limited to about 0.1 dB in a realistic operational environment. This result suggests that the real-time combining system proposed here is capable of recovering virtually all of the signal power captured by the feed array, even in the presence of severe wind gusts and similar disturbances.

  15. A Ka-band monolithic low phase noise coplanar waveguide oscillator using InAlAs/InGaAs HBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Delong; Hsu, Shawn; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Chin, Patrick; Block, Tom

    2002-02-01

    A Ka-band oscillator has been designed, fabricated and tested using InAlAs/InGaAs HBTs. Coplanar waveguide technology has been employed to improve the Q-factor of the circuit. An output power of 2.6 dBm with DC to RF conversion efficiency of 7.8% was measured at 31.7 GHz. Low phase noise of -87 and -112 dBc/Hz were achieved at an offset frequency of 100 kHz and 1 MHz respectively. These low phase noise values can be attributed to the low 1/ f noise of the InAlAs/InGaAs HBT devices and the coplanar design used for the circuit.

  16. Bandwidth Efficient Modulation and Coding Techniques for NASA's Existing Ku/Ka-Band 225 MHz Wide Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioannini, Bryan; Wong, Yen; Wesdock, John

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently established the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) K-band Upgrade Project (TKUP), a project intended to enhance the TDRSS Ku-band and Ka-band Single Access Return 225 MHz (Ku/KaSAR-225) data service by adding the capability to process bandwidth efficient signal design and to replace the White Sand Complex (WSC) KSAR high data rate ground equipment and high rate switches which are nearing obsolescence. As a precursor to this project, a modulation and coding study was performed to identify signal structures which maximized the data rate through the Ku/KaSAR-225 channel, minimized the required customer EIRP and ensured acceptable hardware complexity on the customer platform. This paper presents the results and conclusions of the TKUP modulation and coding study.

  17. Ka-band and X-band observations of the solar corona acquired during the Cassini 2001 superior conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous dual-frequency Ka-band (32 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) carrier signal data have been acquired during the superior conjunction of the Cassini spacecraft June 2001, using the NASA Deep Space Network's facilities located in Goldstone, California. The solar elongation angle of the observations varied from -4.1 degrees (-16 solar radii) to -0.6 degrees (-2.3 solar radii). The observed coronal and solar effects on the signals include spectral broadening, amplitude scintillation, phase scintillation, and increased noise. The measurements were generally consistent with existing solar models, except during solar transient events when the signatures of the measurements were observed to increase significantly above the quiet background levels. This is the second solar conjunction of Cassini for which simultaneous X/Ka data were acquired. Both solar conjunctions, conducted in May 2000 and June 2001, occurred near the peak of the current 11 year solar cycle.

  18. The Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN): A Novel Ka-band Digitally Beamformed Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn K.; Heavey, Brandon; Hodges, Richard; Rengarajan, Sembiam; Rignot, Eric; Rogez, Francois; Sadowy, Gregory; Simard, Marc; Zawadzki, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The estimation of the mass balance of ice sheets and glaciers on Earth is a problem of considerable scientific and societal importance. A key measurement to understanding, monitoring and forecasting these changes is ice-surface topography, both for ice-sheet and glacial regions. As such NASA identified 'ice topographic mapping instruments capable of providing precise elevation and detailed imagery data for measurements on glacial scales for detailed monitoring of ice sheet, and glacier changes' as a science priority for the most recent Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) opportunities. Funded under this opportunity is the technological development for a Ka-Band (35GHz) single-pass digitally beamformed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Unique to this concept is the ability to map a significant swath impervious of cloud cover with measurement accuracies comparable to laser altimeters but with variable resolution as appropriate to the differing scales-of-interest over ice-sheets and glaciers.

  19. Sensitivity of S- and Ka-band matched dual-wavelength radar system for detecting nonprecipitating cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Politovich, Marcia; Rilling, Robert; Ellis, Scott; Pratte, Frank

    2004-12-01

    Remote detection of cloud phase in either liquid, ice or mixed form a key microphysical observation. Evolution of a cloud system and associated radiative properties depend on microphysical characteristics. Polarization radars rely on the shape of the particle to delineate the regions of liquid and ice. For specified transmitter and receiver characteristics, it is easier to detect a high concentrations of larger atmospheric particles than a low concentration of small particles. However, the radar cross-section of a given hydrometeor increases as the transmit frequency of the radar increases. Thus, in spite of a low transmit power, the sensitivity of a millimeter-wave radar might be better than high powered centimeter-wave radars. Also, ground clutter echoes and receiver system noise powers are sensitive functions of radar transmit frequency. For example, ground clutter in centimeter-wave radar sample volumes might mask non-precipitating or lightly precipitating clouds. An optimal clutter filter or signal processing technique can be used to suppress clutter masking its effects and/or enhanced weak cloud echoes that have significantly different Doppler characteristics than stationary ground targets. In practice, it is imperative to investigate the actual performance of S and Ka-band radar systems to detect small-scale, weak cloud reflectivity. This paper describes radar characteristics and the sensitivity of the new system in non-precipitating conditions. Recently, a dual-wavelength S and Ka-band radar system with matched resolution volume and sensitivity was built to remotely detect supercooled liquid droplets. The detection of liquid water content was based on the fact that the shorter of the two wavelengths is more strongly attenuated by liquid water. The radar system was deployed during the Winter Icing Storms Project 2004 (WISP04) near Boulder, Colorado to detect and estimate liquid water content. Observations by dual-wavelength radar were collected in both non

  20. Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Hardware Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L.; Khan, P.; Silva, A.

    2005-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in wide-bandgap (WBG) gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductor technology, there is considerable interest in developing efficient solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) as an alternative to the traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for space applications. This article documents proof-of-concept hardware used to validate power-combining technologies that may enable a 120-W, 40 percent power-added efficiency (PAE) SSPA. Results in previous articles [1-3] indicate that architectures based on at least three power combiner designs are likely to enable the target SSPA. Previous architecture performance analyses and estimates indicate that the proposed architectures can power combine 16 to 32 individual monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) with >80 percent combining efficiency. This combining efficiency would correspond to MMIC requirements of 5- to 10-W output power and >48 percent PAE. In order to validate the performance estimates of the three proposed architectures, measurements of proof-of-concept hardware are reported here.

  1. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1990-01-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  2. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  3. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.

    1990-06-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  4. Multiple-output microwave single-photon source using superconducting circuits with longitudinal and transverse couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Miranowicz, Adam; Li, Hong-Rong; Nori, Franco

    2016-11-01

    Single-photon devices at microwave frequencies are important for applications in quantum information processing and communication in the microwave regime. In this work we describe a proposal of a multioutput single-photon device. We consider two superconducting resonators coupled to a gap-tunable qubit via both its longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom. Thus, this qubit-resonator coupling differs from the coupling in standard circuit quantum-electrodynamic systems described by the Jaynes-Cummings model. We demonstrate that an effective quadratic coupling between one of the normal modes and the qubit can be induced and this induced second-order nonlinearity is much larger than that for conventional Kerr-type systems exhibiting photon blockade. Assuming that a coupled normal mode is resonantly driven, we observe that the output fields from the resonators exhibit strong sub-Poissonian photon-number statistics and photon antibunching. Contrary to previous studies on resonant photon blockade, the first-excited state of our device is a pure single-photon Fock state rather than a polariton state, i.e., a highly hybridized qubit-photon state. In addition, it is found that the optical state truncation caused by the strong qubit-induced nonlinearity can lead to an entanglement between the two resonators, even in their steady state under the Markov approximation.

  5. Mapping snow depth from Ka-band interferometry over a mountainous basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreadis, Konstantinos; Moller, Delwyn; Bormann, Kat; Hensley, Scott; Painter, Thomas H.

    2017-04-01

    Mapping snow depth and water equivalent from remote sensing becomes very challenging over mountains where complex topography drives extremes in orographic precipitation, snow redistribution, and snowmelt gradients. Traditionally, attempts to remotely map snow properties have focused on passive/active microwave sensors that either use regression relationships or radiative transfer modeling as the retrieval algorithm. However, these approaches are hindered by issues such as penetration into the snow volume, presence of liquid water, vertical heterogeneity in grain size and density among others. Recently, an alternate approach has been demonstrated whereby SWE is estimated by merging modeled density with a direct measurement of snow depth. The NASA Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) provided the first distributed mapping of mountain SWE across entire basins using an airborne scanning lidar for the accurate measurement of topography and retrieval of depth. Lidar may hold a path to space but it suffers from scattering by cloud cover at very small optical depths. Single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radars may hold the key to overcoming this issue while making accurate topographic maps. We present the first demonstration of mm- wave single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) for snow-depth mapping. Maps are presented over the Tuolumne River Basin region of the Sierra Nevada, CA, USA and compared with those collected by ASO for the same region on the same snow day. Despite the rugged terrain, heavy tree- cover, very low snow-volume, and wet conditions depth maps had a relative mean error of 0.5% (or 0.0073 m) with the largest differences occurring on slopes exceeding 40o. While additional evaluation is needed with demonstration of the InSAR capability over a greater range of conditions and terrain, these results are promising. InSAR for snow-depth mapping holds significant advantages for a spaceborne mission if proven viable as it can operate

  6. Honeycomb lattice meshes for reconfigurable universal microwave photonics processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, D.; Gasulla, I.; Capmany, J.; Soref, Richard A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores the use of honeycomb lattice waveguide meshes for universal linear operations and photonic integrated circuit synthesis by programming a common hardware. We discuss the main photonic processor architecture, the non-ideal effects to be considered and its application to different signal processing functionalities.

  7. Microwave photonic filter using multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with double-Brillouin-frequency shift

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, K. K.; Yeo, K. S.; Shee, Y. G.

    2015-04-24

    A microwave photonic filter based on double-Brillouin-frequency spaced multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (BEFL) is experimentally demonstrated. The filter selectivity can be easily adjusted by tuning and apodizing the optical taps generated from the multiwavelength BEFL. Reconfiguration of different frequency responses are demonstrated.

  8. High-Power, High-Efficiency Ka-Band Space Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczyk, Richard; Wilson, Jeffrey; Simons, Rainee; Williams, Wallace; Bhasin, Kul; Robbins, Neal; Dibb, Daniel; Menninger, William; Zhai, Xiaoling; Benton, Robert; Burdette, James

    2007-01-01

    The L-3 Communications Model 999H traveling-wave tube (TWT) has been demonstrated to generate an output power of 144 W at 60-percent overall efficiency in continuous-wave operation over the frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The best TWT heretofore commercially available for operation in the affected frequency band is characterized by an output power of only 35 W and an efficiency of 50 percent. Moreover, whereas prior TWTs are limited to single output power levels, it has been shown that the output power of the Model 999H can be varied from 54 to 144 W. A TWT is a vacuum electronic device used to amplify microwave signals. TWTs are typically used in free-space communication systems because they are capable of operating at power and efficiency levels significantly higher than those of solid-state devices. In a TWT, an electron beam is generated by an electron gun consisting of a cathode, focusing electrodes, and an anode. The electrons pass through a hole in the anode and are focused into a cylindrical beam by a stack of periodic permanent magnets and travel along the axis of an electrically conductive helix, along which propagates an electromagnetic wave that has been launched by an input signal that is to be amplified. The beam travels within the helix at a velocity close to the phase velocity of the electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field decelerates some of the electrons and accelerates others, causing the beam to become formed into electron bunches, which further interact with the electromagnetic wave in such a manner as to surrender kinetic energy to the wave, thereby amplifying the wave. The net result is to amplify the input signal by a factor of about 100,000. After the electrons have passed along the helix, they impinge on electrodes in a collector. The collector decelerates the electrons in such a manner as to recover most of the remaining kinetic energy and thereby significantly increase the power efficiency of the TWT.

  9. A Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Architecture Performance Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L.; Khan, P.; Silva, A.

    2005-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in wide-bandgap (WBG) gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductor technology, there is considerable interest in developing efficient solidstate power amplifiers (SSPAs) as an alternative to the traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for space applications. This article documents the results of a study to investigate power-combining technology and SSPA architectures that can enable a 120-W, 40 percent power-added efficiency (PAE) SSPA. Results of the study indicate that architectures based on at least three power combiner designs are likely to enable the target SSPA. The proposed architectures can power combine 16 to 32 individual monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) with >80 percent combining efficiency. This corresponds to MMIC requirements of 5- to 10-W output power and >48 percent PAE. For the three proposed architectures [1], detailed analysis and design of the power combiner are presented. The first architecture studied is based on a 16-way septum combiner that offers low loss and high isolation over the design band of 31 to 36 GHz. Analysis of a 2-way prototype septum combiner had an input match >25 dB, output match >30 dB, insertion loss <0.02 dB, and isolation >30 dB over the design band. A 16-way design, based on cascading this combiner in a binary fashion, is documented. The second architecture is based on a 24-way waveguide radial combiner. A prototype 24-way radial base was analyzed to have an input match >30 dB (under equal excitation of all input ports). The match of the mode transducer that forms the output of a radial combiner was found to be >27 dB. The functional bandwidth of the radial base and mode transducer, which together will form a radial combiner/divider, exceeded the design band. The third architecture employs a 32-way, parallel-plate radial combiner. Simulation results indicated an input match >24 dB, output match >22 dB, insertion loss <0.23 dB, and adjacent port isolation >20 dB over the design band. All

  10. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Diener, P.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 ± 0.2.

  11. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-15

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 {+-} 0.2.

  12. Theory of microwave single-photon detection using an impedance-matched Λ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshino, Kazuki; Inomata, Kunihiro; Lin, Zhirong; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    By properly driving a qubit-resonator system in the strong dispersive regime, we implement an "impedance-matched" Λ system in the dressed states, where a resonant single photon deterministically induces a Raman transition and excites the qubit. Combining this effect and a fast dispersive readout of the qubit, we realize a detector of itinerant microwave photons. We theoretically analyze the single-photon response of the Λ system and evaluate its performance as a detector. We achieve a high detection efficiency without relying on precise temporal control of the input pulse shape and under a conservative estimate of the system parameters. The detector can also be reset quickly by applying microwave pulses, which allows a short dead time and a high repetition rate.

  13. Demonstration and experimental evaluation of a bi-directional 10-GHz microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaldívar-Huerta, I. E.; Correa-Mena, A. G.; Hernández-Nava, P.; García-Juárez, A.; Rodríguez-Asomoza, J.; Lee, Min Won

    2016-09-01

    A bi-directional 10-GHz microwave photonic filter is proposed and experimentally evaluated. Its frequency response consists of a series of microwave band-pass windows obtained by the interaction of externally modulated multimode laser diodes emitting around of 1550 nm associated to the chromatic dispersion parameter of an optical fiber, as well as the length of the optical link. Microwave band-pass windows exhibit on average a-3 dB bandwidth of 378 MHz. This electro-optical system shows an efficient configuration and good performance. Potentially, filtered microwave signals can be used as electrical carriers in optical communication systems to transmit and distribute services such as video, voice and data.

  14. Rigorous numerical study of strong microwave photon-magnon coupling in all-dielectric magnetic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Hutomo, Jessica; Nam, Donghee; Kostylev, Mikhail

    2015-05-21

    We demonstrate theoretically a ∼350-fold local enhancement of the intensity of the in-plane microwave magnetic field in multilayered structures made from a magneto-insulating yttrium iron garnet (YIG) layer sandwiched between two non-magnetic layers with a high dielectric constant matching that of YIG. The enhancement is predicted for the excitation regime when the microwave magnetic field is induced inside the multilayer by the transducer of a stripline Broadband Ferromagnetic Resonance (BFMR) setup. By means of a rigorous numerical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation consistently with the Maxwell's equations, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics in the multilayer. We reveal a strong photon-magnon coupling, which manifests itself as anti-crossing of the ferromagnetic resonance magnon mode supported by the YIG layer and the electromagnetic resonance mode supported by the whole multilayered structure. The frequency of the magnon mode depends on the external static magnetic field, which in our case is applied tangentially to the multilayer in the direction perpendicular to the microwave magnetic field induced by the stripline of the BFMR setup. The frequency of the electromagnetic mode is independent of the static magnetic field. Consequently, the predicted photon-magnon coupling is sensitive to the applied magnetic field and thus can be used in magnetically tuneable metamaterials based on simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability achievable thanks to the YIG layer. We also suggest that the predicted photon-magnon coupling may find applications in microwave quantum information systems.

  15. Multiple scattering effects on the Linear Depolarization Ratio (LDR) measured during CaPE by a Ka-band air-borne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Toshio; Meneghini, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Air-borne radar measurements of thunderstorms were made as part of the CaPE (Convection and Precipitation/Electrification) experiment in Florida in July 1991. The radar has two channels, X-band (10 GHz) and Ka-band (34.5 GHz), and is capable of measuring cross-polarized returns as well as co-polarized returns. In stratiform rain, the cross-polarized components can be observed only at the bright band region and from the surface reflection. The linear depolarization ratios (LDR's) measured at X-band and Ka-band at the bright band are nearly equal. In convective rain, however, the LDR in Ka-band often exceeds the X-band LDR by several dB, and sometimes by more than 10 dB, reaching LDR values of up to -5 dB over heavy convective rain. For randomly oriented hydrometeors, such high LDR values cannot be explained by single scattering from non-spherical scattering particles alone. Because the LDR by single backscatter depends weakly on the wavelength, the difference between the Ka-band and X-band LDR's suggests that multiple scattering effects prevail in the Ka-band LDR. In order to test this inference, the magnitude of the cross-polarized component created by double scattering was calculated using the parameters of the airborne radar, which for both frequencies has beamwidths of 5.1 degrees and pulse widths of 0.5 microsecond. Uniform rain beyond the range of 3 km is assumed.

  16. Preliminary Analysis of X-Band and Ka-Band Radar for Use in the Detection of Icing Conditions Aloft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Koenig, George G.

    2004-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) have an on-going activity to develop remote sensing technologies for the detection and measurement of icing conditions aloft. Radar has been identified as a strong tool for this work. However, since the remote detection of icing conditions with the intent to identify areas of icing hazard is a new and evolving capability, there are no set requirements for radar sensitivity. This work is an initial attempt to quantify, through analysis, the sensitivity requirements for an icing remote sensing radar. The primary radar of interest for cloud measurements is Ka-band, however, since NASA is currently using an X-band unit, this frequency is also examined. Several aspects of radar signal analysis were examined. Cloud reflectivity was calculated for several forms of cloud using two different techniques. The Air Force Geophysical Laboratory (AFGL) cloud models, with different drop spectra represented by a modified gamma distribution, were utilized to examine several categories of cloud formation. Also a fundamental methods approach was used to allow manipulation of the cloud droplet size spectra. And an analytical icing radar simulator was developed to examine the complete radar system response to a configurable multi-layer cloud environment. Also discussed is the NASA vertical pointing X-band radar. The radar and its data system are described, and several summer weather events are reviewed.

  17. Satellite Communications for Unmanned Aircraft C2 Links: C-Band, Ku-Band and Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Bishop, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Unmanned aircraft (UA) that require access to controlled (or non-segregated) airspace require a highly reliable and robust command and control (C2) link, operating over protected aviation spectrum. While operating within radio line-of-sight (LOS) UA can make use of air-to-ground C2 links to terrestrial stations. When operating beyond LOS (BLOS) where a group of networked terrestrial stations does not exist to provide effective BLOS coverage, a satellite communications link is required. Protected aviation spectrum for satellite C2 links has only recently been allocated in bands where operational satellites exist. A previously existing C-Band allocation covers a bands where there are currently no operational satellites. The new allocations, within the Fixed Satellite Service bands at Ku and Ka-Bands will not be finalized until 2023 due to the need for the development of standards and technical decisions on the operation of UA satellite C2 links within these bands. This paper provides an overview of BLOS satellite C2 links, some of the conditions which will need to be met for the operation of such links, and a look at some aspects of spectrum sharing which may constrain these operations.

  18. A Ka-Band (26 GHz) Circularly Polarized 2x2 Microstrip Patch Sub-Array with Compact Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrysler, Andrew; Furse, Cynthia; Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2017-01-01

    A Ka-Band (26 gigahertz) 2 by 2 sub-array with square-shaped microstrip patch antenna elements having two truncated corners for circular polarization (CP) is presented. In addition, the layout for a new compact microstrip feed network for the sub-array is also presented. The compact feed network offers a footprint size reduction of near 60 percent over traditional sub-array at 26 gigahertz. Experimental data indicates that a truncation amount a equals 0.741 millimeters for an isolated patch element results in a return loss (S (sub II)) of minus 35 decibels at 26.3 gigahertz. Furthermore, the measured S (sub II) for the proof-of-concept sub-array with the above elements is better than minus 10.0 decibels at 27.7 gigahertz. However, the impedance match and the operating frequency can be fine-tuned to 26 gigahertz by adjusting the feed network dimensions. Lastly, good agreement is observed between the measured and simulated S (sub II) for the subarray for both right hand and left hand CP. The goal of this effort is utilize the above sub-array as a building block for a larger N by N element array, which would serve as a feed for a reflector antenna for satellite communications.

  19. Ka-Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) Enabling High Speed Data Communication for CubeSats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauder, Jonathan F.; Chahat, Nacer; Hodges, Richard; Thomson, Mark W.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    CubeSats are at a very exciting point as their mission capabilities and launch opportunities are increasing. But as instruments become more advanced and operational distances between CubeSats and earth increase communication data rate becomes a mission-limiting factor. Improving data rate has become critical enough for NASA to sponsor the Cube Quest Centennial Challenge when: one of the key metrics is transmitting as much data as possible from the moon and beyond Currently, many CubeSats communicate on UHF bands and those that have high data rate abilities use S-band or X-band patch antennas. The CubeSat Aneas, which was launched in September 2012, pushed the envelope with a half-meter S-band dish which could achieve 100x the data rate of patch antennas. A half-meter parabolic antenna operating at Ka-band would increase data rates by over 100x that of the AMOS antenM and 10,000 that of X-band patch antennas.

  20. Ka Band Channelized Receiver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Communications allocations reside in this band of the spectrum. This report defines a first-order system analysis of constructing an analog radio ......art in digital signal processing hardware and software algorithms. RF commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts are selected in order to develop a system

  1. Some observations on hyperuniform disordered photonic bandgap materials, from microwave scale study to infrared scale study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitrin, Sam; Nahal, Geev; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining; San Francisco State University Team; University of Surrey Team

    2015-03-01

    A novel class of disordered photonic materials, hyperuniform disordered solids (HUDS), attracted more attention. Recently they have been experimentally proven to provide complete photonic band gap (PBG) when made with Alumina or Si; as well as single-polarization PBG when made with plastic with refract index of 1.6. These PBGs were shown to be real energy gaps with zero density of photonic states, instead of mobility gaps of low transmission due to scattering, etc. Using cm-scale samples and microwave experiments, we reveal the nature of photonic modes existing in these disordered materials by analyzing phase delay and mapping field distribution profile inside them. We also show how to extend the proof-of-concept microwave studies of these materials to proof-of-scale studies for real applications, by designing and fabricating these disordered photonic materials at submicron-scale with functional devices for 1.55 micron wavelength. The intrinsic isotropy of the disordered structure is an inherent advantage associated with the absence of limitations of orientational order, which is shown to provide valuable freedom in defect architecture design impossible in periodical structures. NSF Award DMR-1308084, the University of Surrey's FRSF and Santander awards.

  2. Tuneable on-demand single-photon source in the microwave range

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Z. H.; de Graaf, S. E.; Tsai, J. S.; Astafiev, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    An on-demand single-photon source is a key element in a series of prospective quantum technologies and applications. Here we demonstrate the operation of a tuneable on-demand microwave photon source based on a fully controllable superconducting artificial atom strongly coupled to an open-ended transmission line. The atom emits a photon upon excitation by a short microwave π-pulse applied through a control line. The intrinsically limited device efficiency is estimated to be in the range 65–80% in a wide frequency range from 7.75 to 10.5 GHz continuously tuned by an external magnetic field. The actual demonstrated efficiency is also affected by the excited state preparation, which is about 90% in our experiments. The single-photon generation from the single-photon source is additionally confirmed by anti-bunching in the second-order correlation function. The source may have important applications in quantum communication, quantum information processing and sensing. PMID:27545689

  3. Nonlinear microwave photon occupancy of a driven resonator strongly coupled to a transmon qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, B.; Keane, Z. K.; Bishop, Lev S.; Novikov, S.; Wellstood, F. C.; Palmer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    We measure photon occupancy in a thin-film superconducting lumped element resonator coupled to a transmon qubit at 20 mK and find a nonlinear dependence on the applied microwave power. The transmon-resonator system was operated in the strong dispersive regime, where the ac Stark shift (2 χ ) due to a single microwave photon present in the resonator was larger than the linewidth (Γ ) of the qubit transition. When the resonator was coherently driven at 5.474 325 GHz, the transition spectrum of the transmon at 4.982 GHz revealed well-resolved peaks, each corresponding to an individual photon number-state of the resonator. From the relative peak heights we obtain the occupancy of the photon states and the average photon occupancy n ¯ of the resonator. We observe a nonlinear variation of n ¯ with the applied drive power Prf for n ¯<5 and compare our results to numerical simulations of the system-bath master equation in the steady state, as well as to a semiclassical model for the resonator that includes the Jaynes-Cummings interaction between the transmon and the resonator. We find good quantitative agreement using both models and analysis reveals that the nonlinear behavior is principally due to shifts in the resonant frequency caused by a qubit-induced Jaynes-Cummings nonlinearity.

  4. Strong coupling of a single electron in silicon to a microwave photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, X.; Cady, J. V.; Zajac, D. M.; Deelman, P. W.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon is vital to the computing industry because of the high quality of its native oxide and well-established doping technologies. Isotopic purification has enabled quantum coherence times on the order of seconds, thereby placing silicon at the forefront of efforts to create a solid-state quantum processor. We demonstrate strong coupling of a single electron in a silicon double quantum dot to the photonic field of a microwave cavity, as shown by the observation of vacuum Rabi splitting. Strong coupling of a quantum dot electron to a cavity photon would allow for long-range qubit coupling and the long-range entanglement of electrons in semiconductor quantum dots.

  5. Tunable narrowband microwave photonic filter created by stimulated Brillouin scattering from a silicon nanowire.

    PubMed

    Casas-Bedoya, Alvaro; Morrison, Blair; Pagani, Mattia; Marpaung, David; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate the first, to the best of our knowledge, functional signal processing device based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in a silicon nanowire. We use only 1 dB of on-chip stimulated Brillouin scattering gain to create an RF photonic notch filter with 48 dB of suppression, 98 MHz linewidth, and 6 GHz frequency tuning. This device has potential applications in on-chip microwave signal processing and establishes the foundation for the first CMOS-compatible high-performance RF photonic filter.

  6. Microwave photonic notch filter with complex coefficient based on four wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Cao, Ye; Tong, Zheng-rong; Yang, Jing-peng

    2016-11-01

    A microwave photonic notch filter with a complex coefficient is proposed and demonstrated based on four wave mixing (FWM). FWM effect of two single-frequency laser beams occurs in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF), and multi-wavelength optical signals are generated and used to generate the multi-tap of microwave photonic filter (MPF). The complex coefficient is generated by using a Fourier-domain optical processor (FD-OP) to control the amplitude and phase of the optical carrier and phase modulation sidebands. The results show that this filter can be changed from bandpass filter to notch filter by controlling the FD-OP. The center frequency of the notch filter can be continuously tuned from 5.853 GHz to 29.311 GHz with free spectral range ( FSR) of 11.729 GHz. The shape of the frequency response keeps unchanged when the phase is tuned.

  7. Single-sideband photonic microwave generation with an optically injected quantum-dot semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ying; Cheng, Chih-Hao; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2016-12-26

    We studied single-sideband (SSB) photonic microwave generation with a high sideband rejection ratio (SRR) based on the period-one dynamical states of an optically injected quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor laser and demonstrated that the SSB signals have SRRs of approximately 15 dB higher than those generated with a conventional quantum-well semiconductor laser under conditions of optimal microwave power. The enhancement of SRR in the QD laser, which is important in mitigating the power penalty effect in applications such as radio-over-fiber optical communications, could be primarily attributed to a lower carrier decay rate in the dots, smaller linewidth enhancement factor, and reduced photon decay rate.

  8. Demodulation of an optical fiber MEMS pressure sensor based on single bandpass microwave photonic filter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiping; Ni, Xiaoqi; Wang, Ming; Cui, Yifeng; Shi, Qingyun

    2017-01-23

    In this paper, a demodulation method for optic fiber micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) pressure sensor exploiting microwave photonics filter technique is firstly proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A single bandpass microwave photonic filter (MPF) which mainly consists of a spectrum-sliced light source, a pressurized optical fiber MEMS EFPI, a phase modulator (PM) and a length of dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) is demonstrated. The frequency response of the filter with respect to the pressure is studied. By detecting the resonance frequency shifts of the MPF, the pressure can be determined. The theoretical and experimental results show that the proposed EFPI pressure demodulation method has a higher resolution and higher speed than traditional methods based on optical spectrum analysis. The sensitivity of the sensor is measured to be as high as 86 MHz/MPa in the range of 0-4Mpa. Moreover, the sensitivity can be easily adjusted.

  9. An optical fiber MEMS pressure sensor using microwave photonics filtering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiping; Wang, Ming; Ni, Xiaoqi; Xia, Wei; Guo, Dongmei; Hao, Hui; Ma, Qingyu; Zhuang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    A fiber-optic micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) pressure sensor exploiting microwave photonics filtering technique is firstly proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A single-bandpass microwave photonic filter (MPF) which mainly consists of a spectrum-sliced light source, a pressurized EFPI, a phase modulator (PM) and a length of dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) is demonstrated. The frequency response of the filter with respect to the pressure is studied. By detecting the resonance frequency shifts of the MPF, the pressure can be determined. The theoretical and experimental results show that the proposed EFPI pressure sensor has a higher resolution and higher speed than traditional methods based on optical spectrum analysis. The sensitivity of the sensor is measured to be as high as 86 MHz/MPa in the range of 0-4MPa.

  10. Quantum efficiency of a single microwave photon detector based on a semiconductor double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement H.; Vavilov, Maxim G.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we consider a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting resonator that is driven by the microwave field of a superconducting transmission line. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and show that the resonator-coupled DQD is a sensitive microwave single photon detector. Using currently available experimental parameters of DQD-resonator coupling and dissipation, including the effects of 1 /f charge noise and phonon noise, we determine the parameter regime for which incident photons are completely absorbed and near-unit ≳98 % efficiency can be achieved. We show that this regime can be reached by using very high quality resonators with quality factor Q ≃105 .

  11. Practical application of a bidirectional microwave photonic filter: simultaneous transmission of analog TV signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa-Mena, Ana Gabriela; Zaldívar-Huerta, Ignacio E.; Abril García, Jose Humberto; García-Juárez, Alejandro; Vera-Marquina, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    A practical application of a bidirectional microwave photonic filter (MPF) to transmit simultaneous analog TV signals coded on microwave carriers is experimentally demonstrated. The frequency response of the bidirectional MPF is obtained by the interaction of an externally modulated multimode laser diode emitting at 1.55 μm associated to the free-spectral range of the optical source, the chromatic dispersion parameter of the optical fiber, as well as the length of the optical link. The filtered microwave bandpass window generated around 2 GHz is used as electrical carrier in order to simultaneously transmit TV signals of 67.25 and 61.25 MHz in both directions. The obtained signal-to-noise ratios for the transmitted signals of 67.25 and 61.25 MHz are 37.62 and 44.77 dB, respectively.

  12. Optically injected InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser for tunable photonic microwave generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Raghunathan, Ravi; Schires, Kevin; Chan, Sze-Chun; Lester, Luke F; Grillot, Frédéric

    2016-03-15

    We present an experimental investigation on the period-one dynamics of an optically injected InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser as a photonic microwave source. It is shown that the microwave frequency of the quantum dot laser's period-one oscillation is continuously tunable through the adjustment of the frequency detuning. The microwave power is enhanced by increasing the injection strength providing that the operation is away from the Hopf bifurcation, whereas the second-harmonic distortion of the electrical signal is well reduced by increasing the detuning frequency. Both strong optical injection and high detuning frequency are favorable for obtaining a single sideband optical signal. In addition, particular period-one oscillation points of low sensitivity to the frequency detuning are found close to the Hopf bifurcation line.

  13. Photonic generation of versatile frequency-doubled microwave waveforms via a dual-polarization modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Xuan; Qu, Kun; Lin, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We report a photonic approach to generate frequency-doubled microwave waveforms using an integrated electro-optic dual-polarization modulator driven by a sinusoidal radio frequency (RF) signal. With active bias control, two MZMs of the dual-polarization modulator operate at minimum transmission points, a triangular waveform can be generated by a parameter setting of modulation index. After introducing a broadband 90° microwave phase shifter, a square waveform can be obtained by readjusting the power relationship of harmonics. The proposal is first theoretically analyzed and then validated by simulation. Simulation results show that a 10 GHz triangular and square waveform sequences are successfully generated from a 5 GHz sinusoidal RF drive signal, and the performance of the microwave waveforms are not influenced by the finite extinction ratio of modulator.

  14. Integrated wideband optical frequency combs with high stability and their application in microwave photonic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenhui; Wang, Sunlong; Zhong, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Wenting; Tong, Youwan; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Haiqing; Yu, Lijuan; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-08-01

    An integrated wideband optical frequency comb (OFC) based on a semiconductor quantum dot laser is realized with high stability. The OFC module is packaged in our lab. A circuit which is designed to provide a low-ripple current and control the temperature regards as a servo system to enhance the stability of the OFC. The frequency stability of the OFC is 2.7×10-9 (Allan Variance). The free spectral range (FSR) of the OFC is 40 GHz and the number of comb lines is up to 55. The flatness of the OFC over span of 4 nm can be limited to 0.5 dB. Negative coefficients microwave photonic filters with multiple taps are generated based on the proposed OFC. For the 10 taps microwave photonic filter, the pass-band at 8.74 GHz has a 3 dB bandwidth of 630 MHz with 16.58 dB side-lobe suppression. Compared with the published microwave photonic filters, the proposed system is more stable, of more compact structures, and of less power consumption.

  15. High-speed tunable microwave photonic notch filter based on phase modulator incorporated Lyot filter.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jia; Feng, Hanlin; Scott, Guy; Fok, Mable P

    2015-01-01

    A high-speed tunable microwave photonic notch filter with ultrahigh rejection ratio is presented, which is achieved by semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based single-sideband modulation and optical spectral filtering with a phase modulator-incorporated Lyot (PM-Lyot) filter. By varying the birefringence of the phase modulator through electro-optic effect, electrically tuning of the microwave photonic notch filter is experimentally achieved at tens of gigahertz speed. The use of SOA-polarizer based single-sideband modulation scheme provides good sideband suppression over a wide frequency range, resulting in an ultrahigh rejection ratio of the microwave photonic notch filter. Stable filter spectrum with bandstop rejection ratio over 60 dB is observed over a frequency tuning range from 1.8 to 10 GHz. Compare with standard interferometric notch filter, narrower bandwidth and sharper notch profile are achieved with the unique PM-Lyot filter, resulting in better filter selectivity. Moreover, bandwidth tuning is also achieved through polarization adjustment inside the PM-Lyot filter, that the 10-dB filter bandwidth is tuned from 0.81 to 1.85 GHz.

  16. Photonic bandgap crystals on magnetic-dielectric for microwave frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Manoj K.; Gupta, K. K.; Gupta, H. C.; Dube, D. C.

    2006-04-01

    The variation of magnetic permeability of substrate on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) has been studied for microstrip type periodic metallic structure and the experimental findings will be presented and discussed. Periodic structure was carved out in the metallic foil of 18 micron thickness and was put on the composite of magnetic and dielectric substrate. As the dielectric constant of the substrate affects the band gap for the photons in the microwave region, the combined effect of magneto-dielectric substrate have been studied here for different combination of ferrite materials with different composition and different sintering temperature. The substrate of Ni-Zn ferrite was prepared on the Perspex sheet of desired dimensions. The behavior of variation of band gap was also been studied for the air as dielectric material of the substrate. We found a well defined PBG and the band gap increases and transmission loss decreases in the microwave region with appropriate combination of magnetic and dielectric substrate. Thus it could be concluded that the dielectric constant viz. a viz. magnetic permeability plays an important role in the formation of broad band photonic materials for the microwave applications such as filters, antennas, frequency selective surfaces etc. Further work is going on to fabricate the patch antenna on the PBG embedded ground plane.

  17. Retrieval of Air Vertical Velocity in Convective Clouds over the Tibetan Plateau by Ka-band Cloud Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Liu, L.

    2016-12-01

    Convective clouds over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) have great influences on the weather and climate of China and East Asia. Deriving air vertical motion can help us understand the cloud dynamic and microphysical processes, and provide dynamic parameters for numerical model. Since Chinese scientists launched the 3rd Tibetan Plateau Meteorological Science Experiment in 2013, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences had deployed several ground-based active remote sensing instruments at eastern TP (31°28' N, 92°03' E). As critical equipment, a vertical incident Ka-band cloud radar designed with solid-state transmitter and multiple observation modes is used to detect the overhead cloud systems. In an attempt to accurately map the time-height structure of the air vertical motion, this manuscript develops an improved method for the retrieval of air vertical velocity from cloud radar Doppler spectra based on previous scientists' work. The highlights of this paper mainly involve data quality control of Doppler spectra and retrieval algorithm design using multiple-mode measurements. Cases analysis of weak Cu, moderate Cb and light convective precipitation demonstrate that the retrievals are reliable, updrafts are beneficial to the cloud development and correlative with the increase of reflectivity factor and spectrum width. As general phenomenon on TP, updrafts in cloud are relatively weak before noon, but apparently increased in the afternoon as a result of ground thermodynamic effect. The maximum air vertical velocity could be up to 15 m/s in convective systems with a strong updraft core in the middle and two strong downdrafts on both sides. The inversion results of air vertical velocity are proved to be quite accurate with an acceptable uncertainty by using a theoretical method. Key Word Cloud radar, air vertical velocity, retrieval method

  18. A Ka-band solid-state transmitter cloud radar and data merging algorithm for its measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liping; Zheng, Jiafeng; Wu, Jingya

    2017-04-01

    This study concerns a Ka-band solid-state transmitter cloud radar, made in China, which can operate in three different work modes, with different pulse widths, and coherent and incoherent integration numbers, to meet the requirements for cloud remote sensing over the Tibetan Plateau. Specifically, the design of the three operational modes of the radar (i.e., boundary mode M1, cirrus mode M2, and precipitation mode M3) is introduced. Also, a cloud radar data merging algorithm for the three modes is proposed. Using one month's continuous measurements during summertime at Naqu on the Tibetan Plateau, we analyzed the consistency between the cloud radar measurements of the three modes. The number of occurrences of radar detections of hydrometeors and the percentage contributions of the different modes' data to the merged data were estimated. The performance of the merging algorithm was evaluated. The results indicated that the minimum detectable reflectivity for each mode was consistent with theoretical results. Merged data provided measurements with a minimum reflectivity of -35 dBZ at the height of 5 km, and obtained information above the height of 0.2 km. Measurements of radial velocity by the three operational modes agreed very well, and systematic errors in measurements of reflectivity were less than 2 dB. However, large discrepancies existed in the measurements of the linear depolarization ratio taken from the different operational modes. The percentage of radar detections of hydrometeors in mid- and high-level clouds increased by 60% through application of pulse compression techniques. In conclusion, the merged data are appropriate for cloud and precipitation studies over the Tibetan Plateau.

  19. Feasibility Study on Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing Using Earth Thermal Images for Deep-Space Ka-Band and Optical Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Ortiz, G. G.; Roberts, W. T.; Alexander, J. W.

    2003-11-01

    The feasibility of using long-wavelength Earth thermal (infrared) images for antenna/ telescope tracking/pointing applications for both deep-space Ka-band (18 to 35 GHz) and free-space optical communications has been investigated and is reported on here. The advantage of this technology rests on using full Earth images in this band that yield more accurate estimates of geometric centroids than those of Earth images in the visible band. Furthermore, these images are nearly independent of Earth phase angle. The results of the study show that, at a Mars range with currently available sensors, a noise equivalent angle of 10 to 150 nrad and a bias error of better than 80 nrad can be obtained. This would enable precise pointing of both the optical and Ka-band communications beams.

  20. Properties of microplasmas excited by microwaves for VUV photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, James E.; Urdahl, Randall; Xue, Jun; Denning, Mark; Tian, Peng; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-12-01

    Microplasma sources typically take advantage of pd (pressure  ×  size) scaling by increasing pressure to operate at dimensions as small as tens of microns. In many applications, low pressure operation is desirable, which makes miniaturization difficult. In this paper, the characteristics of low pressure microplasma sources excited by microwave power are discussed based on results from experimental and computational studies. The intended application is production of VUV radiation for chemical analysis, and so emphasis in this study is on the production of resonant excited states of rare gases and radiation transport. The systems of interest operate at a few to 10 Torr in Ar and He/Ar mixtures with cavity dimensions of hundreds of microns to 1 mm. Power deposition is a few watts which produces fractional ionization of about 0.1%. We found that production of VUV radiation from argon microplasmas at 104.8 nm and 106.7 nm saturates as a function of power deposition due to a quasi-equilibrium that is established between the electron temperature (that is not terribly sensitive to power deposition) and the population of the Ar(4s) manifold.

  1. Linear, Low Noise Microwave Photonic Systems using Phase and Frequency Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrwas, John Michael

    Photonic systems that transmit and process microwave-frequency analog signals have traditionally been encumbered by relatively large signal distortion and noise. Optical phase modulation (PM) and frequency modulation (FM) are promising techniques that can improve system performance. In this dissertation, I discuss an optical filtering approach to demodulation of PM and FM signals, which does not rely on high frequency electronics, and which scales in linearity with increasing photonic integration. I present an analytical model, filter designs and simulations, and experimental results using planar lightwave circuit (PLC) filters and FM distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers. The linearity of the PM and FM photonic links exceed that of the current state-of-the-art.

  2. Demonstration of a single-photon router in the microwave regime.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Io-Chun; Wilson, C M; Johansson, Göran; Palomaki, Tauno; Peropadre, Borja; Delsing, Per

    2011-08-12

    We have embedded an artificial atom, a superconducting transmon qubit, in an open transmission line and investigated the strong scattering of incident microwave photons (∼6  GHz). When an input coherent state, with an average photon number N≪1 is on resonance with the artificial atom, we observe extinction of up to 99.6% in the forward propagating field. We use two-tone spectroscopy to study scattering from excited states and we observe electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We then use EIT to make a single-photon router, where we can control to what output port an incoming signal is delivered. The maximum on-off ratio is around 99% with a rise and fall time on the order of nanoseconds, consistent with theoretical expectations. The router can easily be extended to have multiple output ports and it can be viewed as a rudimentary quantum node, an important step towards building quantum information networks.

  3. Measured Phase Performance of the Photonics System for Microwave Power Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeper, Herbert R.; Arndt, Dickey G.

    2002-01-01

    A microwave wireless power transmission has a large phased array antenna which focuses its beam onto a ground rectenna. The microwave beam is steered using retrodirective phase control which has the necessary safety feature of always focusing the beam onto the rectenna. It is not possible for the beam to "wander" around the countryside. In order for the retrodirective phase control technique to work, it is necessary to distribute a very stable phase reference throughout the antenna to each subarray. A photonics system which modulates an RF signal onto a laser which is then transmitted via fiber optic cables over the 500 meter transmit antenna. Since there will be regions of various temperature ranges over the antenna due to the heat generated in the microwave tubes, the DC/DC converters at each subarray, and the DC power line I2R losses. The photonics system must be able to maintain a stable phase reference despite varying temperature increases in the fiber optic cables. In a study to determine the induced phase changes over various temperatures for a number of commercially available fiber optic cables, a test program has been initiated at the NASA Johnson Space Center. In addition to the regular fiber cables being tested, special cables with a low coefficient of thermal expansion have been investigated. In each test the phase of a microwave signal transmitted over the fiber cables is measured while the operating temperature is varied inside a thermal test chamber. This paper describes a possible configuration for the photonics system within the transmit array, the test system, and the test results. Recommendations for future studies are also included.

  4. Analysis of Fade Detection and Compensation Experimental Results in a Ka-Band Satellite System. Degree awarded by Akron Univ., May 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    The frequency bands being used for new satellite communication systems are constantly increasing to accommodate the requirements for additional capacity. At these higher frequencies, propagation impairments that did not significantly affect the signal at lower frequencies begin to have considerable impact. In Ka-band, the next logical commercial frequency band to be used for satellite communication, attenuation of the signal due to rain is a primary concern. An experimental satellite built by NASA, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS), launched in September 1993, is the first US communication satellite operating in the Ka-band. In addition to higher carrier frequencies, a number of other new technologies, including onboard baseband processing, multiple beam antennas, and rain fade detection and compensation techniques, were designed into the ACTS. Verification experiments have been conducted since the launch to characterize the new technologies. The focus of this thesis is to describe and validate the method used by the ACTS Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) ground stations in detecting the presence of fade in the communication signal and to adaptively compensate for it by the addition of burst rate reduction and forward error correction. Measured data obtained from the ACTS program is used to validate the compensation technique. In this thesis, models in MATLAB are developed to statistically characterize the increased availability achieved by the compensation techniques in terms of the bit error rate time enhancement factor. Several improvements to the ACTS technique are discussed and possible implementations for future Ka-band systems are also presented.

  5. High Efficiency Traveling-Wave Tube Power Amplifier for Ka-Band Software Defined Radio on International Space Station-A Platform for Communications Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Force, Dale A.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication and RF performance of the output traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for a space based Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) is presented. The TWTA, the SDR and the supporting avionics are integrated to forms a testbed, which is currently located on an exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SDR in the testbed communicates at Ka-band frequencies through a high-gain antenna directed to NASA s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which communicates to the ground station located at White Sands Complex. The application of the testbed is for demonstrating new waveforms and software designed to enhance data delivery from scientific spacecraft and, the waveforms and software can be upgraded and reconfigured from the ground. The construction and the salient features of the Ka-band SDR are discussed. The testbed is currently undergoing on-orbit checkout and commissioning and is expected to operate for 3 to 5 years in space.

  6. Narrow-linewidth photonic microwave generation based on an optically injected 1550 nm VCSEL subject to optoelectronic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qing; Fan, Li; Yang, Ji-Yun; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Wu, Zheng-Mao; Xia, Guang-Qiong

    2016-11-01

    High-quality photonic microwave generation is experimentally demonstrated based on the period-one (P1) dynamical state output from an optically injected 1550 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (1550 nm-VCSEL) subject to optoelectronic negative feedback. The experimental results show that, under suitable injection condition, the 1550 nm-VCSEL can generate a photonic microwave signal with single sideband optical spectrum structure, but the linewidth of the microwave signal is relatively wide (on the order of MHz). After further introducing optoelectronic negative feedback, the linewidth of the microwave signal can be narrowed two orders of magnitude to 105.7 kHz. Furthermore, for the case that the feedback strength is set at an optimized value, the frequency of the microwave signal can be tuned continuously within a certain range through simply adjusting the injection strength.

  7. Microwave/millimeter wave arbitrary waveform generation via ultrafast photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Andrew M.; McKinney, Jason D.; Lin, Ingrid S.

    2005-05-01

    Femtosecond pulse shaping for generating nearly arbitrarily shaped ultrafast optical pulses is now a well-established technology and has been widely adopted for applications ranging from high-speed communications to coherent laser control of chemical reactions. Arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities for millimeter-wave, microwave and THz electromagnetic signals, however, are quite limited. Commercial radio frequency AWG instrumentation is currently limited to ~2 GHz bandwidth. In this talk we review work at Purdue in which shaped optical pulses are used to drive an optical-to-electrical (O/E) converter. This leverages our femtosecond optical AWG technology to achieve cycle-by-cycle synthesis of arbitrary voltage waveforms in the range between a few GHz and ~1 THz. Such capabilities could open new possibilities for applications in areas such as wireless communications, electronic countermeasures, sensing, and pulsed radar. Recently our work has focused on the range from GHz to tens of GHz. A particular focus has been on the generation of signals appropriate for ultrawideband (UWB) wireless communications using "monocycle" pulses with very large fractional bandwidths. UWB technology provides high immunity to multipath interference, low probability of intercept, and high spatial resolution (for position location). Potential defense applications include tactical sensor networks and RFIF tags for inventory control. Our experiments demonstrate the ability to generate programmable monocycles with spectra that can be tailored to match emission limits and with durations and bandwidths that improve on the mainstream electronic technology. Additional potential applications include predistortion of transmit waveforms in order to precompensate distortions associated with broadband antennas and waveform optimization for enhanced target discrimination in pulsed radar.

  8. Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Prototype Combiner Spurious Mode Suppression and Power Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, P.; Epp, L.

    2006-02-01

    Results of prototype hardware activities related to a 120-W, 32-GHz (Ka-band) solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) architecture study are presented. Spurious mode suppression and the power-handling capability of a prototype 24-way radial combiner and a prototype 2-way septum binary combiner were investigated. Experimental data indicate that a commercial absorptive filter, designed to pass the circular TE_01 mode, effectively suppressed the higher-order modes generated by a narrowband, flower-petal-type mode transducer. However, the same filter was not effective in suppressing higher-order modes generated by the broadband Marie mode transducer that is used in the prototype waveguide radial combiner. Should greater filtering be required by a particular SSPA application, a broadband mode filter that can suppress specifically those higher-order modes that are generated by the Marie transducer will need to be developed. A back-to-back configuration of the prototype radial combiner was tested with drive power up to approximately 50 W. No anomalous behavior was observed. Power measurements of the septum combiner indicate that up to 10-W radio frequency (RF) can be dissipated in the integrated resistive element before a permanent performance shift is observed. Thus, a given adder (a single-stage, 2-way combiner) can safely combine two 20-W sources, and the adder will not be damaged in the event of a source failure. This result is used to calculate the maximum source power that can be safely combined as a function of the number of sources combined and the number of source failures allowed in a multi-stage combiner. The analysis shows that SSPA power greater than 140 W can be generated by power combining 16 sources producing 10 W each. In this configuration, up to three sources could fail with the guarantee that the combiner would not be damaged. Finally, a modified prototype septum combiner design was verified. The improved design reduced the assembly time from over 2 hours

  9. Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Prototype Combiner Spurious Mode Suppression and Power Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, P.; Epp, L.

    2006-01-01

    Results of prototype hardware activities related to a 120-W, 32-GHz (Ka-band) solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) architecture study are presented. Spurious mode suppression and the power-handling capability of a prototype 24-way radial combiner and a prototype 2-way septum binary combiner were investigated. Experimental data indicate that a commercial absorptive filter, designed to pass the circular TE01 mode, effectively suppressed the higher-order modes generated by a narrowband, flower-petal-type mode transducer. However, the same filter was not effective in suppressing higher-order modes generated by the broadband Marie mode transducer that is used in the prototype waveguide radial combiner. Should greater filtering be required by a particular SSPA application, a broadband mode filter that can suppress specifically those higher-order modes that are generated by the Marie transducer will need to be developed. A back-to-back configuration of the prototype radial combiner was tested with drive power up to approximately 50 W. No anomalous behavior was observed. Power measurements of the septum combiner indicate that up to 10-W radio frequency (RF) can be dissipated in the integrated resistive element before a permanent performance shift is observed. Thus, a given adder (a single-stage, 2-way combiner) can safely combine two 20-W sources, and the adder will not be damaged in the event of a source failure. This result is used to calculate the maximum source power that can be safely combined as a function of the number of sources combined and the number of source failures allowed in a multi-stage combiner. The analysis shows that SSPA power >140 W can be generated by power combining 16 sources producing 10 W each. In this configuration, up to three sources could fail with the guarantee that the combiner would not be damaged. Finally, a modified prototype septum combiner design was verified. The improved design reduced the assembly time from over 2 hours to about 15

  10. Mapping Snow Depth From Ka-Band Interferometry: Proof Of Concept And Comparison With Scanning Lidar Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Andreadis, K.; Bormann, K. J.; Painter, T. H.; Hensley, S.

    2016-12-01

    Snow cover and its melt dominate sources in many of the world's mountainous regions, and in adjacent areas dependent on river flows originating from mountain basins. However, snow water equivalent (SWE) across Earth is very poorly known. Our inability to measure and track distribution of SWE severely hampers our skill in modeling snow cover for climate and hydrology. In 2013, NASA/JPL began an ambitious program to solve the need for distributed SWE and coincident snow albedo, developing the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO). The SWE component of the ASO comes from the scanning lidar, which is used to map distributed topography for snow-free and snow-on conditions and in turn snow depth with an unbiased uncertainty of 8 cm. SWE is generated then with modeling of snow density, constrained by available in situ measurements. ASO has provided full basin and distributed mapping of SWE leading to unique discoveries for water cycle science. While these measurements provide critical measurements, an identical path to space with lidar is not presently available and suffers from cloud cover. We investigate the capacity of a Ka-band single pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) GLISTIN (Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer) to map snow topography/snow depth in a complex mountain basin independent of cloud cover. As a proof-of-concept, GLISTIN overflew a portion of the ASO site in the Sierra Nevada in August 2012 (snow-off) and again in April 2013 (snow-on). Despite it being a "low-snow year"whereby the snow-depth is largely decimetric in a region of high topographic complexity, the quantitative and qualitative comparisons of GLISTIN and ASO are encouraging. Our methodology includes: 1) classification of tree-contaminated regions using the InSAR correlation data at high spatial resolution; 2) data calibration of the InSAR height-data; and 3) generation of bare-Earth digital elevation models at coarsened resolution. Our initial GLISTIN

  11. Tunable microwave signal generation based on an Opto-DMD processor and a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Sang, Xin-Zhu; Yan, Bin-Bin; Ai, Qi; Li, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Gen-Xiang; Song, Fei-Jun; Zhang, Xia; Wang, Kui-Ru; Yuan, Jin-Hui; Yu, Chong-Xiu; Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-06-01

    Frequency-tunable microwave signal generation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated with a dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped fiber ring laser based on a digital Opto-DMD processor and four-wave mixing (FWM) in a high-nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The high-nonlinear PCF is employed for the generation of the FWM to obtain stable and uniform dual-wavelength oscillation. Two different short passive sub-ring cavities in the main ring cavity serve as mode filters to make SLM lasing. The two lasing wavelengths are electronically selected by loading different gratings on the Opto-DMD processor controlled with a computer. The wavelength spacing can be smartly adjusted from 0.165 nm to 1.08 nm within a tuning accuracy of 0.055 nm. Two microwave signals at 17.23 GHz and 27.47 GHz are achieved. The stability of the microwave signal is discussed. The system has the ability to generate a 137.36-GHz photonic millimeter signal at room temperature.

  12. Statistical and Prediction modeling of the Ka Band Using Experimental Results from ACTS Propagation Terminals at 20.185 and 27.505 GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogunwuyi, Oluwatosin O.

    2004-01-01

    With the increase in demand for wireless communication services, most of the operating frequency bands have become very congested. The increase of wireless costumers is only fractional contribution to this phenomenon. The demand for more services such as video streams and internet explorer which require a lot of band width has been a more significant contributor to the congestion in a communication system. One way to increase the amount of information or data per unit of time transmitted with in a wireless communication system is to use a higher radio frequency. However in spite the advantage available in the using higher frequency bands such as, the Ka-band, higher frequencies also implies short wavelengths. And shorter wavelengths are more susceptible to rain attenuation. Until the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) was launched, the Ka- band frequency was virtually unused - the majority of communication satellites operated in lower frequency bands called the C- and Ku- bands. Ka-band is desirable because its higher frequency allows wide bandwidth applications, smaller spacecraft and ground terminal components, and stronger signal strength. Since the Ka-band is a high frequency band, the millimeter wavelengths of the signals are easily degraded by rain. This problem known as rain fade or rain attenuation The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation experiment has collected 5 years of Radio Frequency (RF) attenuation data from December 1993 to November 1997. The objective of my summer work is to help develop the statistics and prediction techniques that will help to better characterize the Ka Frequency band. The statistical analysis consists of seasonal and cumulative five-year attenuation statistics for the 20.2 and 27.5 GHz. The cumulative five-year results give the link outage that occurs for a given link margin. The experiment has seven ground station terminals that can be attributed to a unique rain zone climate. The

  13. Statistical and Prediction modeling of the Ka Band Using Experimental Results from ACTS Propagation Terminals at 20.185 and 27.505 GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogunwuyi, Oluwatosin O.

    2004-01-01

    With the increase in demand for wireless communication services, most of the operating frequency bands have become very congested. The increase of wireless costumers is only fractional contribution to this phenomenon. The demand for more services such as video streams and internet explorer which require a lot of band width has been a more significant contributor to the congestion in a communication system. One way to increase the amount of information or data per unit of time transmitted with in a wireless communication system is to use a higher radio frequency. However in spite the advantage available in the using higher frequency bands such as, the Ka-band, higher frequencies also implies short wavelengths. And shorter wavelengths are more susceptible to rain attenuation. Until the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) was launched, the Ka- band frequency was virtually unused - the majority of communication satellites operated in lower frequency bands called the C- and Ku- bands. Ka-band is desirable because its higher frequency allows wide bandwidth applications, smaller spacecraft and ground terminal components, and stronger signal strength. Since the Ka-band is a high frequency band, the millimeter wavelengths of the signals are easily degraded by rain. This problem known as rain fade or rain attenuation The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation experiment has collected 5 years of Radio Frequency (RF) attenuation data from December 1993 to November 1997. The objective of my summer work is to help develop the statistics and prediction techniques that will help to better characterize the Ka Frequency band. The statistical analysis consists of seasonal and cumulative five-year attenuation statistics for the 20.2 and 27.5 GHz. The cumulative five-year results give the link outage that occurs for a given link margin. The experiment has seven ground station terminals that can be attributed to a unique rain zone climate. The

  14. Analytical model and figures of merit for filtered Microwave Photonic Links.

    PubMed

    Gasulla, Ivana; Capmany, José

    2011-09-26

    The concept of filtered Microwave Photonic Links is proposed in order to provide the most general and versatile description of complex analog photonic systems. We develop a field propagation model where a global optical filter, characterized by its optical transfer function, embraces all the intermediate optical components in a linear link. We assume a non-monochromatic light source characterized by an arbitrary spectral distribution which has a finite linewidth spectrum and consider both intensity modulation and phase modulation with balanced and single detection. Expressions leading to the computation of the main figures of merit concerning the link gain, noise and intermodulation distortion are provided which, to our knowledge, are not available in the literature. The usefulness of this derivation resides in the capability to directly provide performance criteria results for complex links just by substituting in the overall closed-form formulas the numerical or measured optical transfer function characterizing the link. This theory is presented thus as a potential tool for a wide range of relevant microwave photonic application cases which is extendable to multiport radio over fiber systems.

  15. Design, Fabrication, and Evaluation of a MEMS-Based, Ka-Band, 16-Element Sub-Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    MEMS) and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit ( MMIC )-based phase shifters with an overall goal of reducing missile seeker costs by 50 percent based...Frequency (RF) Micro Electro-Mechanical Switch (MEMS) Phase Shifters for Phased Arrays Manufacturing Technology Objective (APSPA MEMS) Program. The objective...cost and loss of these systems, particularly in the passive systems, is the packaged Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit ( MMIC ) phase shifter

  16. Microwave Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, J. E.

    2017-02-01

    High-power microwave radiation is used in the Deep Space Network (DSN) and Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) for uplink communications with spacecraft and for monitoring asteroids and space debris, respectively. Intense X-band (7.1 to 8.6 GHz) microwave signals are produced for these applications via klystron and traveling-wave microwave vacuum tubes. In order to achieve higher data rate communications with spacecraft, the DSN is planning to gradually furnish several of its deep space stations with uplink systems that employ Ka-band (34-GHz) radiation. Also, the next generation of planetary radar, such as Ka-Band Objects Observation and Monitoring (KaBOOM), is considering frequencies in the Ka-band range (34 to 36 GHz) in order to achieve higher target resolution. Current commercial Ka-band sources are limited to power levels that range from hundreds of watts up to a kilowatt and, at the high-power end, tend to suffer from poor reliability. In either case, there is a clear need for stable Ka-band sources that can produce kilowatts of power with high reliability. In this article, we present a new concept for high-power, high-frequency generation (including Ka-band) that we refer to as the microwave frequency multiplier (MFM). The MFM is a two-cavity vacuum tube concept where low-frequency (2 to 8 GHz) power is fed into the input cavity to modulate and accelerate an electron beam. In the second cavity, the modulated electron beam excites and amplifies high-power microwaves at a frequency that is a multiple integer of the input cavity's frequency. Frequency multiplication factors in the 4 to 10 range are being considered for the current application, although higher multiplication factors are feasible. This novel beam-wave interaction allows the MFM to produce high-power, high-frequency radiation with high efficiency. A key feature of the MFM is that it uses significantly larger cavities than its klystron counterparts, thus greatly reducing power density and arcing

  17. A tunable and wideband microwave photonic phase shifter based on dual-polarization modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhengxue; Wen, Aijun; Gao, Yongsheng; Tu, Zhaoyang

    2017-01-01

    A microwave photonic phase shifter based on dual-polarization Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPol-MZM) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. A polarization multiplexed double sideband (DSB) signal is produced by a DPol-MZM. An optical bandpass filter (OBPF) follows after the DPol-MZM to filter out the optical carrier and one sideband. The polarization multiplexed signal is converted into a linear polarization light by a polarizer (Pol), and then beat at a photodiode (PD) to obtain the phase shifted signal. Experiments are carried out, and a continuous phase shift from -180° to 180° over a wide microwave frequency range of 10-33 GHz can be achieved by changing the polarization state using a polarization controller (PC). We also studied the spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) in the experiments. The features of this proposed phase shifter are large operation bandwidth, full-range 360° phase shift, and simple structure.

  18. Frequency agile microwave photonic notch filter with anomalously high stopband rejection.

    PubMed

    Marpaung, David; Morrison, Blair; Pant, Ravi; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2013-11-01

    We report a novel class microwave photonic (MWP) notch filter with a very narrow isolation bandwidth (10 MHz), an ultrahigh stopband rejection (>60 dB), a wide frequency tuning (1-30 GHz), and flexible bandwidth reconfigurability (10-65 MHz). This performance is enabled by a new concept of sideband amplitude and phase controls using an electro-optic modulator and an optical filter. This concept enables energy efficient operation in active MWP notch filters, and opens up a pathway toward enabling low-power nanophotonic devices as high-performance RF filters.

  19. Figures of merit for microwave photonic phase shifters based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan; Lloret, Juan; Gasulla, Ivana; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José

    2012-05-07

    We theoretically and experimentally compare the performance of two fully tunable phase shifter structures based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) by means of several figures of merit common to microwave photonic systems. A single SOA stage followed by a tailored notch filter is compared with a cascaded implementation comprising three SOA-based phase shifter stages. Attention is focused on the assessment of the RF net gain, noise figure and nonlinear distortion. Recommendations on the performance optimization of this sort of approaches are detailed.

  20. Microwave photonic filter with multiple taps based on single semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Enming; Zhou, Lina; Yu, Yuan; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Xinliang

    2010-08-01

    A novel technique to implement a microwave photonic filter structure with multiple taps and arbitrary frequency response is presented. The proposed filter is based on Four-Wave Mixing (FWM) and Cross-Gain Modulation (XGM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Two-tap notch filter and three-tap bandpass filter with arbitrary bipolar tap generation, high rejection ratio, and widely tunability are successfully demonstrated in the experiment. Extensions to this concept by adding new probe light to provide more taps and improve the bandwidth to high frequency regime are also discussed.

  1. High-efficiency microwave photonic harmonic down-conversion with tunable and reconfigurable filtering.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jinxin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Li, Shangyuan; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Bingkun

    2014-12-01

    A new optical-frequency comb-based microwave photonic harmonic down-convertor with tunable and reconfigurable filtering is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The coherent evenly spaced optical carriers offer harmonic down-conversion for ultrahigh radio frequency signals with low-frequency local oscillator, and construct a tunable and reconfigurable bandpass filter for the intermediate-frequency (IF) signal combined with dispersion. This implementation features high conversion efficiency. Experimental results show the filtered output IF signal has a clean spectrum with high quality. Measured conversion loss is 8.3 dB without extra electrical amplification.

  2. Integrated frequency comb source based Hilbert transformer for wideband microwave photonic phase analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thach G; Shoeiby, Mehrdad; Chu, Sai T; Little, Brent E; Morandotti, Roberto; Mitchell, Arnan; Moss, David J

    2015-08-24

    We demonstrate a photonic RF Hilbert transformer for broadband microwave in-phase and quadrature-phase generation based on an integrated frequency optical comb, generated using a nonlinear microring resonator based on a CMOS compatible, high-index contrast, doped-silica glass platform. The high quality and large frequency spacing of the comb enables filters with up to 20 taps, allowing us to demonstrate a quadrature filter with more than a 5-octave (3 dB) bandwidth and an almost uniform phase response.

  3. Research of dual-band microwave photonic filter for WLAN based on optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Jiaqi; Jiang, Lingke; Pan, Linbing; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xindong; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-07-20

    This paper presents a dual-band microwave photonic filter for a wireless local area networks with independently tunable passband center frequencies and bandwidths. The two bands of the filter were 2.4 GHz and 5.725 GHz, respectively. The filter was based on a stimulated Brillouin scattering and an optical frequency comb (OFC) scheme. We created this filter using OFC pumps instead of a single pump. The OFC scheme consists of a cascaded Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) and a dual-parallel MZM (DPMZM) hybrid modulation that generated seven and 11 lines. The experimental results show that the two passbands of the filter were 80 and 130 MHz.

  4. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    SciTech Connect

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-16

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  5. A novel phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Gao, Yingjie; Yang, Chun

    2016-07-01

    Microwave photonic links can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth and immunity to external interference. In this paper, a novel phase noise measurement system is built, since the input signal and the power supply noise can be effectively cancelled by a two-arm configuration without the phase locking. Using this approach, the phase noise performance of the 10-GHz phase modulation photonic link has been measured for the first time, evaluated the values of -124 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -132 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset is obtained. Theoretical analysis on the phase noise measurement system calibration is also discussed.

  6. Nanowires and sidewall Bragg gratings in silicon as enabling technologies for microwave photonic filters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lawrence R; Li, Jia; Spasojevic, Mina; Adams, Rhys

    2013-08-26

    We describe the use of various silicon photonic device technologies to implement microwave photonic filters (MPFs). We demonstrate four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire waveguide (SNW) to increase the number of taps for MPFs based on finite impulse response filter designs. Using a 12 mm long SNW reduces the footprint by five orders of magnitude compared to silica highly nonlinear fiber while only requiring approximately two times more input power. We also demonstrate optical delays based on serial sidewall Bragg grating arrays and step-chirped sidewall Bragg gratings in silicon waveguides. We obtain up to 63 ps delay in discrete steps from 15 ps to 32 ps over a wide bandwidth range from 33 nm to at least 62 nm. These components can be integrated with other silicon-based components such as integrated spectral shapers and modulators to realize a fully integrated MPF.

  7. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-01

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  8. Microwave-induced three-photon coherence of Rydberg atomic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Hyo Min; Jeong, Taek; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the three-photon coherence (TPC) effects of the Rydberg state in a Doppler-broadened four-level ladder-type atomic system for the 5S1/2(F=3)-5P3/2(F‧=4)-50D5/2-51P3/2 transition of 85Rb atoms. Upon interaction of the Rydberg Rb atom of the ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) scheme with a resonant microwave (MW) field, we numerically analyze the spectral features of the Rydberg TPC from two viewpoints, Autler-Townes splitting (AT-splitting) of the Rydberg EIT and three-photon electromagnetically induced absorption (TPEIA). We determine the criterion to differentiate between AT-splitting of the Rydberg EIT and TPEIA in the Doppler-broadened ladder-type atomic system.

  9. Broadband microwave photonic phase shifter based on a feedback-coupled microring resonator with small radio frequency power variations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Li, Ming; Sun, Shuqian; Li, Zhiyong; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-10-15

    An on-chip microwave photonic phase shifter based on an electrically tunable feedback-coupled microring resonator (FCMR) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By properly adjusting the voltage applied on the FCMR, the transmission spectrum with different optical extinction ratios is realized while the phase shift range remains almost unchanged. This proposal solves the conflict between the large range of phase shift and small radio frequency (RF) power variation in the ring-resonator-based microwave photonics phase shifter. Finally, a microwave photonic phase shifter with phase tuning of over 172 deg from 20 to 30 GHz is obtained, and the RF power variation can be compressed less than 5 dB under a certain status tuned by the bias voltage.

  10. Tailoring of the Brillouin gain for on-chip widely tunable and reconfigurable broadband microwave photonic filters.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Amol; Aryanfar, Iman; Shahnia, Shayan; Morrison, Blair; Vu, Khu; Madden, Stephen; Luther-Davies, Barry; Marpaung, David; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2016-02-01

    An unprecedented Brillouin gain of 44 dB in a photonic chip enables the realization of broadly tunable and reconfigurable integrated microwave photonic filters. More than a decade bandwidth reconfigurability from 30 up to 440 MHz, with a passband ripple <1.9  dB is achieved by tailoring the Brillouin pump. The filter central frequency is continuously tuned up to 30 GHz with no degradation of the passband response, which is a major improvement over electronic filters. Furthermore, we demonstrate pump tailoring to realize multiple bandpass filters with different bandwidths and central frequencies, paving the way for multiple on-chip microwave filters and channelizers.

  11. Fast universal quantum gates on microwave photons with all-resonance operations in circuit QED

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Stark shift on a superconducting qubit in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) has been used to construct universal quantum entangling gates on superconducting resonators in previous works. It is a second-order coupling effect between the resonator and the qubit in the dispersive regime, which leads to a slow state-selective rotation on the qubit. Here, we present two proposals to construct the fast universal quantum gates on superconducting resonators in a microwave-photon quantum processor composed of multiple superconducting resonators coupled to a superconducting transmon qutrit, that is, the controlled-phase (c-phase) gate on two microwave-photon resonators and the controlled-controlled phase (cc-phase) gates on three resonators, resorting to quantum resonance operations, without any drive field. Compared with previous works, our universal quantum gates have the higher fidelities and shorter operation times in theory. The numerical simulation shows that the fidelity of our c-phase gate is 99.57% within about 38.1 ns and that of our cc-phase gate is 99.25% within about 73.3 ns. PMID:25787147

  12. Fast universal quantum gates on microwave photons with all-resonance operations in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-03-19

    Stark shift on a superconducting qubit in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) has been used to construct universal quantum entangling gates on superconducting resonators in previous works. It is a second-order coupling effect between the resonator and the qubit in the dispersive regime, which leads to a slow state-selective rotation on the qubit. Here, we present two proposals to construct the fast universal quantum gates on superconducting resonators in a microwave-photon quantum processor composed of multiple superconducting resonators coupled to a superconducting transmon qutrit, that is, the controlled-phase (c-phase) gate on two microwave-photon resonators and the controlled-controlled phase (cc-phase) gates on three resonators, resorting to quantum resonance operations, without any drive field. Compared with previous works, our universal quantum gates have the higher fidelities and shorter operation times in theory. The numerical simulation shows that the fidelity of our c-phase gate is 99.57% within about 38.1 ns and that of our cc-phase gate is 99.25% within about 73.3 ns.

  13. Generation of triangular waveforms based on a microwave photonic filter with negative coefficient.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Wen Ting; Sun, Wen Hui; Wang, Wei Yu; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-06-16

    We report a novel approach to generating full-duty-cycle triangular waveforms based on a microwave photonic filter (MPF) with negative coefficient. It is known that the Fourier series expansion of a triangular waveform has only odd-order harmonics. In this work, the undesired even-order harmonics are suppressed by the MPF that has a periodic transmission response. A triangular waveform at fundamental frequency can be generated by setting the bias of a Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) at quadrature point. However, it is found that a broadband 90° microwave phase shifter has to be used after photodetection to adjust the phases of odd-order harmonics. Alternatively, a frequency doubling triangular waveform can be generated by setting the bias of the MZM at maximum or minimum transmission point. This approach is more promising because the broadband microwave phase shifter is no longer required in this case but it is more power consuming. The proposed approach is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified.

  14. Microwave Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    sensors , High temperature sapphire pressure sensors , Platinum thin film thermal sensors , Diamond film deposition by...reproducible electrical and mechanical thin - film properties. By combining a bulk-micromachining SOI process module with a polysilicon surface...cleanroom layout Dry Etch Bay Wet Etch Bay Gowning Diffusion / Thin Film Bay Photo Bay CMP Bay Wet Strip Bay Future expansion

  15. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-11-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing.

  16. Wideband dynamic microwave frequency identification system using a low-power ultracompact silicon photonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Maurizio; Wang, Xu; Li, Ming; Chrostowski, Lukas; Azaña, José

    2016-09-01

    Photonic-based instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM) of unknown microwave signals offers improved flexibility and frequency range as compared with electronic solutions. However, no photonic platform has ever demonstrated the key capability to perform dynamic IFM, as required in real-world applications. In addition, all demonstrations to date employ bulky components or need high optical power for operation. Here we demonstrate an integrated photonic IFM system that can identify frequency-varying signals in a dynamic manner, without any need for fast measurement instrumentation. The system is based on a fully linear, ultracompact system based on a waveguide Bragg grating on silicon, only 65-μm long and operating up to ~30 GHz with carrier power below 10 mW, significantly outperforming present technologies. These results open a solid path towards identification of dynamically changing signals over tens of GHz bandwidths using a practical, low-cost on-chip implementation for applications from broadband communications to biomedical, astronomy and more.

  17. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing. PMID:26531777

  18. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-11-04

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing.

  19. Wideband dynamic microwave frequency identification system using a low-power ultracompact silicon photonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Maurizio; Wang, Xu; Li, Ming; Chrostowski, Lukas; Azaña, José

    2016-01-01

    Photonic-based instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM) of unknown microwave signals offers improved flexibility and frequency range as compared with electronic solutions. However, no photonic platform has ever demonstrated the key capability to perform dynamic IFM, as required in real-world applications. In addition, all demonstrations to date employ bulky components or need high optical power for operation. Here we demonstrate an integrated photonic IFM system that can identify frequency-varying signals in a dynamic manner, without any need for fast measurement instrumentation. The system is based on a fully linear, ultracompact system based on a waveguide Bragg grating on silicon, only 65-μm long and operating up to ∼30 GHz with carrier power below 10 mW, significantly outperforming present technologies. These results open a solid path towards identification of dynamically changing signals over tens of GHz bandwidths using a practical, low-cost on-chip implementation for applications from broadband communications to biomedical, astronomy and more. PMID:27687576

  20. Novel microwave photonic fractional Hilbert transformer using a ring resonator-based optical all-pass filter.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Khan, Muhammad Rezaul; Beeker, Willem; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René; Roeloffzen, Chris

    2012-11-19

    We propose and demonstrate a novel wideband microwave photonic fractional Hilbert transformer implemented using a ring resonator-based optical all-pass filter. The full programmability of the ring resonator allows variable and arbitrary fractional order of the Hilbert transformer. The performance analysis in both frequency and time domain validates that the proposed implementation provides a good approximation to an ideal fractional Hilbert transformer. This is also experimentally verified by an electrical S21 response characterization performed on a waveguide realization of a ring resonator. The waveguide-based structure allows the proposed Hilbert transformer to be integrated together with other building blocks on a photonic integrated circuit to create various system-level functionalities for on-chip microwave photonic signal processors. As an example, a circuit consisting of a splitter and a ring resonator has been realized which can perform on-chip phase control of microwave signals generated by means of optical heterodyning, and simultaneous generation of in-phase and quadrature microwave signals for a wide frequency range. For these functionalities, this simple and on-chip solution is considered to be practical, particularly when operating together with a dual-frequency laser. To our best knowledge, this is the first-time on-chip demonstration where ring resonators are employed to perform phase control functionalities for optical generation of microwave signals by means of optical heterodyning.

  1. Third-order linearization for self-beating filtered microwave photonic systems using a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Daniel; Gasulla, Ivana; Capmany, José; Fandiño, Javier S; Muñoz, Pascual; Alavi, Hossein

    2016-09-05

    We develop, analyze and apply a linearization technique based on dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator to self-beating microwave photonics systems. The approach enables broadband low-distortion transmission and reception at expense of a moderate electrical power penalty yielding a small optical power penalty (<1 dB).

  2. Tunable and wideband microwave photonic phase shifter based on a single-sideband polarization modulator and a polarizer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shilong; Zhang, Yamei

    2012-11-01

    A novel microwave photonic phase shifter based on a single-sideband (SSB) polarization modulator (PolM) and a polarizer is proposed and demonstrated. In the SSB-PolM, two SSB intensity-modulated signals with a phase difference of π along two orthogonal polarization directions are generated. With the polarizer to combine the two signals, the phase of the optical microwave signal can be tuned from -180 to 180 deg by simply adjusting the polarization direction of the polarizer, whereas the amplitude keeps unchanged. An experiment is carried out. A full-range tunable phase shift in the frequency range of 11-43 GHz is achieved. The flat power response, power independent operation, and high stability of the proposed microwave photonic phase shifter is also confirmed.

  3. Hyperuniform disordered photonic bandgap materials, from microwave to infrared wavelength regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Weining

    Recently, we have introduced a new class of hyperuniform disordered (HUD) photonic bandgap (PBG) materials enabled by a novel constrained optimization method for engineering the material's Fourier transform to be continuous, isotropic and stealthy. Their structure factor S (k) is equal to zero for small kand exhibits a broad ring of maximum values around a characteristic wave-length range. Experimentally, an isotropic complete PBG (at all angles and for all polarizations) in an alumina-based HUD structure and single-polarized PBGs for plastic-based HUD structure have been demonstrated. Using measured and simulated transmission and phase delay information through these HUD structures, we also unfolded their band structures and reconstructed the effective dispersion relations of propagating electromagnetic modes in them. The intrinsic isotropy in these disordered structures is an inherent advantage associated with the lack of crystalline order, offering unprecedented freedom for functional defect design impossible to achieve in photonic crystals. In the microwave regime, we have shown the creation of freeform waveguides, which can channel photons robustly along arbitrarily curved paths and around sharp bends, and be decorated with defects to produce sharply resonant structures useful for filtering and frequency splitting. Recent simulation and experimental results for waveguides and modulators based on submicron-scale planar hyperuniform disordered PBG structures further highlight their ability to serve as highly compact, flexible and energy-efficient platforms for photonic integrated circuits. NSF DMR-1308084, EPSRC (UK) DTG Grant KD5050, EPSRC (UK) Strategic Equipment Grant EP/M008576/1, NSF SBIR-1345168, NSF MRI-1040444.

  4. Reconfigurable microwave photonic in-phase and quadrature detector for frequency agile radar.

    PubMed

    Emami, Hossein; Sarkhosh, Niusha

    2014-06-01

    A microwave photonic in-phase and quadrature detector is conceived and practically demonstrated. The detector has the ability to become electronically reconfigured to operate at any frequency over a wide range. This makes it an excellent candidate for frequency agile radars and other electronic warfare systems based on frequency hopping. The detector exhibits a very low amplitude and phase imbalance, which removes the need for any imbalance compensation technique. The system is designed based on the transversal filtering concept and reconfigurability is achieved via wavelength control in a dispersive fiber. The system operation was demonstrated over a frequency range of 3.5-35 GHz, with a maximum of -32 dB amplitude imbalance.

  5. Microwave photonic link with improved phase noise using a balanced detection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jingjing; Gu, Yiying; Tan, Wengang; Zhu, Wenwu; Wang, Linghua; Zhao, Mingshan

    2016-07-01

    A microwave photonic link (MPL) with improved phase noise performance using a dual output Mach-Zehnder modulator (DP-MZM) and balanced detection is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The fundamental concept of the approach is based on the two complementary outputs of DP-MZM and the destructive combination of the photocurrent in balanced photodetector (BPD). Theoretical analysis is performed to numerical evaluate the additive phase noise performance and shows a good agreement with the experiment. Experimental results are presented for 4 GHz, 8 GHz and 12 GHz transmission link and an 11 dB improvement of phase noise performance at 10 MHz offset is achieved compared to the conventional intensity-modulation and direct-detection (IMDD) MPL.

  6. Investigation of microwave photonic filter based on multiple longitudinal modes fiber laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Feng; Feng, Xinhuan; Lu, Chao; Guan, Bai-ou; Wai, P. K. A.

    2015-06-01

    We theoretically study the transfer function of a finite impulse response microwave photonic filter (FIR-MPF) system using a multi-wavelength fiber laser source by considering multiple longitudinal modes in each wavelength. The full response function with the response from longitudinal mode taps is obtained. We also discussed the influence of the longitudinal mode envelope and mode spacing on the performance of FIR-MPF. The response function of the longitudinal mode taps is fully discussed and the contribution is compared with the response of the carrier suppression factor for double sideband (DSB) modulation. The multiple longitudinal modes structure in the wavelength taps can be utilized to engineer the response of the FIR-MPF such that desirable features such as high side lode suppression ratio can be realized. The analysis provides a guideline for designing incoherent FIR-MPF systems.

  7. Frequency-multiplying microwave photonic phase shifter for independent multichannel phase shifting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Pan, Shilong

    2016-03-15

    A frequency-multiplying microwave photonic phase shifter with independent multichannel phase shifting capability is proposed and demonstrated using an integrated polarization division multiplexing dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (PDM-DPMZM) and a polarizer. By building a proper power distribution network to drive the PDM-DPMZM, two sidebands along two orthogonal polarization directions are generated with a spacing of two or four times the frequency of the driving signal. Leading the signal to a polarizer and a photodetector, a frequency-doubled or frequency-quadrupled signal with its phase adjusted by the polarization direction of the polarizer is achieved. The magnitude of the signal remains almost unchanged when the phase is adjusted. The proposed approach features compact configuration, scalable independent phase-shift channels and wide bandwidth, which can find applications in beam forming and analog signal processing for millimeter-wave or terahertz applications.

  8. Photonic-assisted microwave frequency measurement system based on a silicon ORR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianfei; Shao, Haifeng; Li, Xia; Li, Yan; Dai, Tingge; Wang, Gencheng; Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    A photonic-assisted instantaneous microwave frequency measurement (IFM) system is demonstrated with add-drop optical ring resonators (ORRs) on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. By launching a double-sideband suppressed carrier modulated optical signal into the ring, a monotonous amplitude comparison function (ACF) irrespective of the amplitudes of both optical and RF signals is established to translate the RF frequency to the power ratio between the through and drop ports of the ring. Two experiments have been set up with two rings which have different Q values. Two 25 μm radius ORRs with Q values of 3974 and 25833 are used to offer different measurement ranges and accuracies. In the experiments the ORR with low Q value has a large measurement range of 0.5-35 GHz, and the other one with high Q value exhibits a high accuracy of 0.1 GHz in the frequency range of 0.1-5 GHz.

  9. A microwave photonic link with high spurious-free dynamic range based on a parallel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-kui; Gao, Yong-sheng; Wen, Ai-jun; Liu, Ling

    2015-03-01

    A microwave photonic link (MPL) with high spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) is proposed and analyzed. The optical carrier is divided equally into two paths. The path 1 is modulated by radio frequency (RF) signals in a Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM), and the phase of path 2 is controlled before the combination with path 1. By properly adjusting the phase difference of the two paths with the optical phase shifter, the third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) can be significantly suppressed. A proof-of-concept simulation is carried out. The results show that a reduction of 40 dB in the IMD3 and an improvement of 21.1 dB in the SFDR are achieved as compared with the conventional MZM-based MPL. The proposed MPL shows the advantages of simple structure, low cost and high efficiency.

  10. Phase noise of whispering gallery photonic hyper-parametric microwave oscillators.

    PubMed

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Rubiola, Enrico; Matsko, Andrey B; Ilchenko, Vladimir S; Maleki, Lute

    2008-03-17

    We report on the experimental study of phase noise properties of a high frequency photonic microwave oscillator based on four wave mixing in calcium fluoride whispering gallery mode resonators. Specifically, the oscillator generates approximately 8.5 GHz signals with -120 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz from the carrier. The floor of the phase noise is limited by the shot noise of the signal received at the photodetector. We argue that the performance of the oscillator can be significantly improved if one uses extremely high finesse resonators, increases the input optical power, supersaturates the oscillator, and suppresses the residual stimulated Raman scattering in the resonator. We also disclose a method of extremely sensitive measurement of the integral dispersion of millimeter scale dielectric resonators.

  11. A continuously tunable microwave photonic notch filter with complex coefficient based on phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Cao, Ye; Tong, Zheng-rong; Yang, Jing-peng

    2017-01-01

    A continuously tunable microwave photonic notch filter with complex coefficient based on phase modulation is proposed and demonstrated. The complex coefficient is generated using a Fourier-domain optical processor (FD-OP) to control the amplitude and phase of the optical carrier and radio-frequency (RF) phase modulation sidebands. By controlling the FD-OP, the frequency response of the filter can be tuned in the full free spectral range ( FSR) without changing the shape and the FSR of the frequency response. The results show that the center frequency of the notch filter can be continuously tuned from 17.582 GHz to 29.311 GHz with FSR of 11.729 GHz. The shape of the frequency response keeps unchanged when the phase is tuned.

  12. Single crystal silicon capacitors with low microwave loss in the single photon regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, S. J.; Murch, K. W.; Slichter, D. H.; Vijay, R.; Siddiqi, I.

    2011-04-01

    We have fabricated superconducting microwave resonators in a lumped element geometry using single crystal silicon dielectric parallel plate capacitors with C >2 pF. Aluminum devices with resonant frequencies between 4.0 and 6.5 GHz exhibited an average internal quality factor Qi of 2×105 in the single photon excitation regime at T =20 mK. Attributing the observed loss solely to the capacitive element, our measurements place an upper bound on the loss tangent of the silicon dielectric layer of tan δi=5×10-6. This level of loss is an order of magnitude lower than is currently observed in structures incorporating amorphous dielectric materials, thus making single crystal silicon capacitors an attractive, robust route for realizing long-lived quantum circuits.

  13. RF characterization of monolithic microwave and mm-wave ICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Ponchak, G. E.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    A number of fixturing techniques compatible with automatic network analysis are presented. The fixtures are capable of characterizing GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) at K and Ka band. Several different transitions are used to couple the RF test port to microstrip. Fixtures which provide chip level de-embedding are included. In addition, two advanced characterization techniques are assessed.

  14. Two-photon microwave transitions and strong-field effects in a room-temperature Rydberg-atom gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Miller, S. A.; Thaicharoen, N.; Raithel, G.; Gordon, J. A.; Holloway, C. L.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate two-photon Autler-Townes splitting and strong-field effects of 85Rb Rydberg atoms in a room-temperature vapor cell. To observe the level structure we employ electromagnetically induced transparency. We first study the two-photon 62 S1 /2-63 S1 /2 microwave transition using an electric-field reference measurement obtained with the one-photon 62 S1 /2-62 P3 /2 transition. We then study the 61 D5 /2-62 D5 /2 transition where the microwave electric-field range is extended up to ˜40 V /m . A Floquet analysis is used to model field-induced level shifts and state-mixing effects present in the strongly driven quantum systems under consideration. Calculations are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  15. Frequency switched narrow linewidth microwave signal photonic generation based on a double-Brillouin-frequency spaced fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Tianshu; Jia, Qingsong; Sun, Hongwei; Dong, Keyan; Liu, Xin; Kong, Mei; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-04-10

    A simple photonic approach to generate microwave frequency switched microwave signal is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In this scheme, a Brillouin fiber laser with double-Brillouin-frequency spacing is used. The Brillouin ring configuration suppresses incoming Brillouin pump and even-order Stokes signals in the cavity. In addition, it also allows propagation of the odd-order Brillouin Stokes signals from configuration to output coupler. A dual-wavelength optical signal is heterodyned at the high-speed photodetector to produce a microwave signal. Frequency switched microwave signals, at 10.75 and 21.39 GHz, respectively, can be obtained through adjusting the polarization controller (PC) and loss of the variable optical attenuator (VOA).

  16. High speed and high resolution interrogation of a fiber Bragg grating sensor based on microwave photonic filtering and chirped microwave pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ou; Zhang, Jiejun; Yao, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    High speed and high resolution interrogation of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor based on microwave photonic filtering and chirped microwave pulse compression is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed sensor, a broadband linearly chirped microwave waveform (LCMW) is applied to a single-passband microwave photonic filter (MPF) which is implemented based on phase modulation and phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion using a phase modulator (PM) and a phase-shifted FBG (PS-FBG). Since the center frequency of the MPF is a function of the central wavelength of the PS-FBG, when the PS-FBG experiences a strain or temperature change, the wavelength is shifted, which leads to the change in the center frequency of the MPF. At the output of the MPF, a filtered chirped waveform with the center frequency corresponding to the applied strain or temperature is obtained. By compressing the filtered LCMW in a digital signal processor, the resolution is improved. The proposed interrogation technique is experimentally demonstrated. The experimental results show that interrogation sensitivity and resolution as high as 1.25 ns/με and 0.8 με are achieved.

  17. Design and optimization of polymer ring resonator modulators for analog microwave photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Arash; Middlebrook, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Efficient modulation of electrical signals onto an optical carrier remains the main challenge in full implementation of microwave photonic links (MPLs) for applications such as antenna remoting and wireless access networks. Current MPLs utilize Mach-Zehnder Interferometers (MZI) with sinusoidal transfer function as electro-optic modulators causing nonlinear distortions in the link. Recently ring resonator modulators (RRM) consisting of a ring resonator coupled to a base waveguide attracted interest to enhance linearity, reduce the size and power consumption in MPLs. Fabrication of a RRM is more challenging than the MZI not only in fabrication process but also in designing and optimization steps. Although RRM can be analyzed theoretically for MPLs, physical structures need to be designed and optimized utilizing simulation techniques in both optical and microwave regimes with consideration of specific material properties. Designing and optimization steps are conducted utilizing full-wave simulation software package and RRM function analyzed in both passive and active forms and confirmed through theoretical analysis. It is shown that RRM can be completely designed and analyzed utilizing full-wave simulation techniques and as a result linearity effect of the modulator on MPLs can be studied and optimized. The material nonlinearity response can be determined computationally and included in modulator design and readily adaptable for analyzing other materials such as silicon or structures where theoretical analysis is not easily achieved.

  18. Microwave response and photon emission of a voltage baised Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebari, Salha; Grimm, Alexander; Hazra, Dibyendu; Hofheinz, Max

    The readout of superconducting qubits requires amplifiers combining noise close to the quantum limit, high gain, large bandwidth, and sufficient dynamic range. Josephson parametric amplifiers using Josephson junctions in the 0-voltage state, driven by a large microwave signals, begin to perform sufficiently well in all 4 of these aspects to be of practical use, but remain difficult to optimize and use. Recent experiments with superconducting circuits consisting of a DC voltage-biased Josephson junction in series with a resonator, showed that a tunneling Cooper pair can emit one or several photons with a total energy of 2e times the applied voltage. We present microwave reflection measurements on this device indicating that amplification is possible with a simple DC voltage-biased Josephson junction. We compare these measurements with the noise power emitted by the junction and show that, for low Josephson energy, transmission and noise emission can be explained within the framework of P(E) theory of inelastic Cooper pair tunneling. Combined with a theoretical model, our results indicate that voltage-biased Josephson junctions might be useful for amplification near the quantum limit, offering simpler design and a different trade-off between gain, bandwidth and dynamic range.

  19. Hollow carbon spheres in microwaves: Bio inspired absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Gorokhov, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Pasc, A.; Ballweg, T.; Mandel, K.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a heterostructure based on a monolayer of hollow glassy carbon spheres packed in 2D was experimentally surveyed with respect to its response to microwaves, namely, the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. Such an ordered monolayer of spheres mimics the well-known "moth-eye"-like coating structures, which are widely used for designing anti-reflective surfaces, and was modelled with the long-wave approximation. Based on the experimental and modelling results, we demonstrate that carbon hollow spheres may be used for building an extremely lightweight, almost perfectly absorbing, coating for Ka-band applications.

  20. Lossless microwave photonic delay line using a ring resonator with an integrated semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiwei; Zhuang, Leimeng; Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Lowery, Arthur James

    2017-06-01

    Optical delay lines implemented in photonic integrated circuits (PICs) are essential for creating robust and low-cost optical signal processors on miniaturized chips. In particular, tunable delay lines enable a key feature of programmability for the on-chip processing functions. However, the previously investigated tunable delay lines are plagued by a severe drawback of delay-dependent loss due to the propagation loss in the constituent waveguides. In principle, a serial-connected amplifier can be used to compensate such losses or perform additional amplitude manipulation. However, this solution is generally unpractical as it introduces additional burden on chip area and power consumption, particularly for large-scale integrated PICs. Here, we report an integrated tunable delay line that overcomes the delay-dependent loss, and simultaneously allows for independent manipulation of group delay and amplitude responses. It uses a ring resonator with a tunable coupler and a semiconductor optical amplifier in the feedback path. A proof-of-concept device with a free spectral range of 11.5 GHz and a delay bandwidth in the order of 200 MHz is discussed in the context of microwave photonics and is experimentally demonstrated to be able to provide a lossless delay up to 1.1 to a 5 ns Gaussian pulse. The proposed device can be designed for different frequency scales with potential for applications across many other areas such as telecommunications, LIDAR, and spectroscopy, serving as a novel building block for creating chip-scale programmable optical signal processors.

  1. Spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Wan, Ren-Gang; Yao, Zhi-Hai

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom embedded in an anisotropic photonic crystal is studied. Due to the modified density of state (DOS) in the anisotropic photonic band gap (PBG) and the coherent control induced by the coupling fields, spontaneous emission can be significantly enhanced when the position of the spontaneous emission peak gets close to the band gap edge. As a result of the closed-loop interaction between the fields and the atom, the spontaneous emission depends on the dynamically induced Autler-Townes splitting and its position relative to the PBG. Interesting phenomena, such as spectral-line suppression, enhancement and narrowing, and fluorescence quenching, appear in the spontaneous emission spectra, which are modulated by amplitudes and phases of the coherently driven fields and the effect of PBG. This theoretical study can provide us with more efficient methods to manipulate the atomic spontaneous emission. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11447232, 11204367, 11447157, and 11305020).

  2. Dynamics of a three-level V-type atom driven by a cavity photon and microwave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Li, Xue; Shi-Deng, Zhu; Ju, Liu; Ting-Hui, Xiao; Bao-Hua, Feng; Zhi-Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the dynamics of a three-level V-type atom driven simultaneously by a cavity photon and microwave field by examining the atomic population evolution. Owing to the coupling effect of the cavity photon, periodical oscillation of the population between the two upper states and the ground state takes place, which is the well-known vacuum Rabi oscillation. Meanwhile, the population exchange between the upmost level and the middle level can occur due to the driving action of the external microwave field. The general dynamic behavior is the superposition of a fast and a slow periodical oscillation under the cooperative and competitive effect of the cavity photon and the microwave field. Numerical results demonstrate that the time evolution of the population is strongly dependent on the atom-cavity coupling coefficient g and Rabi frequency Ω e that reflects the intensity of the external microwave field. By modulating the two parameters g and Ω e, a large number of population transfer behaviors can be achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11434017 and 11374357) and the National Basics Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632704).

  3. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 1: Design and ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A unique experimental method was used to test the beam waveguide (BWG) antenna at Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 in the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, California. The methodology involved the use of portable test packages to make measurements of operating noise temperatures and antenna efficiencies (as functions of antenna pointing angles) at the Cassegrain focal point and the final focal point located in a subterranean pedestal room. Degradations caused by the BWG mirror systems were determined by making comparisons of the measured parameters at the two focal points of the antenna. Previous articles were concerned with the design, performance characteristics, and test results obtained with an X-band test package operating at 32 GHz. Noise temperature measurement results are presented for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration.

  4. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 1: Design and ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A unique experimental method was used to test the beam waveguide (BWG) antenna at Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 in the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, California. The methodology involved the use of portable test packages to make measurements of operating noise temperatures and antenna efficiencies (as functions of antenna pointing angles) at the Cassegrain focal point and the final focal point located in a subterranean pedestal room. Degradations caused by the BWG mirror systems were determined by making comparisons of the measured parameters at the two focal points of the antenna. Previous articles were concerned with the design, performance characteristics, and test results obtained with an X-band test package operating at 32 GHz. Noise temperature measurement results are presented for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration.

  5. High-Capacity Communications from Martian Distances Part 4: Assessment of Spacecraft Pointing Accuracy Capabilities Required For Large Ka-Band Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Richard E.; Sands, O. Scott; Huang, John; Bassily, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Improved surface accuracy for deployable reflectors has brought with it the possibility of Ka-band reflector antennas with extents on the order of 1000 wavelengths. Such antennas are being considered for high-rate data delivery from planetary distances. To maintain losses at reasonable levels requires a sufficiently capable Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) onboard the spacecraft. This paper provides an assessment of currently available ADCS strategies and performance levels. In addition to other issues, specific factors considered include: (1) use of "beaconless" or open loop tracking versus use of a beacon on the Earth side of the link, and (2) selection of fine pointing strategy (body-fixed/spacecraft pointing, reflector pointing or various forms of electronic beam steering). Capabilities of recent spacecraft are discussed.

  6. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Analysis of a Novel Ka-band Folded Waveguide Amplifier for Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ming-Liang; Wei, Yan-Yu; He, Jun; Gong, Yu-Bin; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Gun-sik, Park

    2009-11-01

    A novel Ka-band folded waveguide (FW) amplifier for traveling wave tubes (TWT) is investigated. The dispersion curve and interaction impedance are obtained and compared to the normal FW circuit by numerical simulation. The interaction impedance is higher than a normal circuit through the whole band. We also study the beam-wave interaction in this novel circuit, and the nonlinear large-signal performance is analyzed by a 3-D particle-in-cell code MAGIC3D. A much higher continuous-wave (CW) output power with a considerably shorter circuit compared to a normal circuit is predicted by our simulation. Moreover, the novel FW even has a broader 3-dB bandwidth. It therefore will be useful in designing a miniature but high-power and broadband millimeter-wave TWT.

  7. Millimeter-wave photonic downconvertors: theory and demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.; Gertel, Eitan

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, theoretical and experimental results for wideband photonic downconversion systems operating from microwave frequencies through millimeter-wave frequencies are presented. The system consists of a low phase-noise optical heterodyne local oscillator (LO) generator derived froma two-frequency diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, a millimeter-wave Mach-Zehnder modulator, and a high-speed photodiode. The sum and difference frequency products between the optical LO and the input RF signal are generated upon photodetection. An analysis of photonic heterodyne downconversion is presented, and preliminary experimental downconversion results at Ka-band are presented that are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction of 6 dB conversion loss. Due to the high degree of correlation between the phase fluctuations of the laser modes, the phase noise is much lower than that of previous heterodyne sources, which were typically too noisy for many applications. The free- running optical LO has measured phase noise better than L(1 kHz) equals -90 dBc/Hz at X-band, limited by the measuring system. Finally, novel microwave and millimeter-wave system architectures with enhanced performance and flexibility are discussed, and compared to conventional downlink systems employing electronic mixers.

  8. Spin-wave band-pass filters based on yttrium iron garnet films for tunable microwave photonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. B.; Drozdovskii, A. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on development of tunable band-pass microwave filters for microwave photonic generators. The filters were fabricated with the use of epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films. Principle of operation of the filters was based on excitation, propagation, and reception of spin waves. In order to obtain narrow pass band, the filtering properties of excitation and reception antennas were exploited. The filters demonstrated insertion losses of 2-3 dB, bandwidth of 25-35 MHz, and tuning range of up to 1.5 GHz in the range 3-7 GHz.

  9. Photonic microwave amplification for radio-over-fiber links using period-one nonlinear dynamics of semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Han; Hwang, Sheng-Kwang

    2013-09-01

    For radio-over-fiber links, microwave-modulated optical carriers with high optical modulation depth are preferred because high optical modulation depth allows generation of high microwave power after photodetection, leading to high detection sensitivity, long transmission distance, and large link gain. This study investigates the period-one nonlinear dynamics of semiconductor lasers for optical modulation depth improvement to achieve photonic microwave amplification through modulation sideband enhancement. In our scheme, only typical semiconductor lasers are required as the amplification unit. The amplification is achieved for a broad microwave range, from less than 25 GHz to more than 60 GHz, and for a wide gain range, from less than 10 dB to more than 30 dB. The microwave phase quality is mainly preserved while the microwave power is largely amplified, improving the signal-to-noise ratio up to at least 25 dB. The bit-error ratio at 1.25 Gbits/s is better than 10(-9), and a sensitivity improvement of up to at least 15 dB is feasible.

  10. Combined Brillouin light scattering and microwave absorption study of magnon-photon coupling in a split-ring resonator/YIG film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, S.; Maier-Flaig, H.; Gross, R.; Hu, C.-M.; Huebl, H.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Weiler, M.

    2016-08-01

    Microfocused Brillouin light scattering (BLS) and microwave absorption (MA) are used to study magnon-photon coupling in a system consisting of a split-ring microwave resonator and an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film. The split-ring resonator is defined by optical lithography and loaded with a 1 μm-thick YIG film grown by liquid phase epitaxy. BLS and MA spectra of the hybrid system are simultaneously recorded as a function of the applied magnetic field magnitude and microwave excitation frequency. Strong coupling of the magnon and microwave resonator modes is found with a coupling strength of geff /2π = 63 MHz. The combined BLS and MA data allow us to study the continuous transition of the hybridized modes from a purely magnonic to a purely photonic mode by varying the applied magnetic field and microwave frequency. Furthermore, the BLS data represent an up-conversion of the microwave frequency coupling to optical frequencies.

  11. Photonic generation of a phase-coded microwave signal based on a single dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2013-12-15

    A compact scheme for photonic generation of a phase-coded microwave signal using a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DMZM) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed scheme, the radio frequency (RF) carrier and the coding signal are sent to the two RF ports of the DMZM, respectively. By properly setting the amplitude of the coding signal and the bias voltage of the DMZM, an exact π-phase-shift phase-coded microwave signal is generated. The proposed scheme has a simple structure since only a single DMZM is required. In addition, good frequency tunability is achieved because no frequency-dependent electrical devices or wavelength-dependent optical devices are applied. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is verified by experiment. 2 or 2.5 Gb/s phase-coded 10 and 20 GHz microwave signals are successfully generated.

  12. Photonic generation of phase-stable and wideband chirped microwave signals based on phase-locked dual optical frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yitian; Zhou, Qian; Han, Daming; Li, Baiyu; Xie, Weilin; Liu, Zhangweiyi; Qin, Jie; Wang, Xiaocheng; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-08-15

    A photonics-based scheme is presented for generating wideband and phase-stable chirped microwave signals based on two phase-locked combs with fixed and agile repetition rates. By tuning the difference of the two combs' repetition rates and extracting different order comb tones, a wideband linearly frequency-chirped microwave signal with flexible carrier frequency and chirped range is obtained. Owing to the scheme of dual-heterodyne phase transfer and phase-locked loop, extrinsic phase drift and noise induced by the separated optical paths is detected and suppressed efficiently. Linearly frequency-chirped microwave signals from 5 to 15 GHz and 237 to 247 GHz with 30 ms duration are achieved, respectively, contributing to the time-bandwidth product of 3×108. And less than 1.3×10-5 linearity errors (RMS) are also obtained.

  13. Microwave absorption properties of pyrolytic carbon nanofilm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the electromagnetic (EM) shielding effectiveness in the Ka band (26 to 37 GHz) of highly amorphous nanometrically thin pyrolytic carbon (PyC) films with lateral dimensions of 7.2 × 3.4 mm2, which consists of randomly oriented and intertwined graphene flakes with a typical size of a few nanometers. We discovered that the manufactured PyC films, whose thickness is thousand times less than the skin depth of conventional metals, provide a reasonably high EM attenuation. The latter is caused by absorption losses that can be as high as 38% to 20% in the microwave frequency range. Being semi-transparent in visible and infrared spectral ranges and highly conductive at room temperature, PyC films emerge as a promising material for manufacturing ultrathin microwave (e.g., Ka band) filters and shields. PMID:23388194

  14. Fully carbon metasurface: Absorbing coating in microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Gorokhov, G.; Piasotski, K.; Meisak, D.; Kuzhir, P.; Burgess, E. A.; Gallagher, C. P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Hibbins, A. P.; Pasc, A.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2017-04-01

    The microwave-absorbing properties of a heterostructure consisting of an ordered monolayer of porous glassy carbon spheres were experimentally and theoretically investigated in the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. The electromagnetic response of such a "moth-eye"-like all-carbon metasurface at a normal incidence angle was modelled on the basis of long-wave approximation. Modelling parameters in the Ka-band were used to estimate and predict the absorption properties of monolayers in free space in the range 1-40 GHz. Experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that a metasurface based on porous glassy carbon spheres is an inert, lightweight, compact, and perfectly absorbing material for designing new effective microwave absorbers in various practically used frequency ranges.

  15. Ring resonator-based on-chip modulation transformer for high-performance phase-modulated microwave photonic links.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Taddei, Caterina; Hoekman, Marcel; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René; van Dijk, Paulus; Roeloffzen, Chris

    2013-11-04

    In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel wideband on-chip photonic modulation transformer for phase-modulated microwave photonic links. The proposed device is able to transform phase-modulated optical signals into intensity-modulated versions (or vice versa) with nearly zero conversion of laser phase noise to intensity noise. It is constructed using waveguide-based ring resonators, which features simple architecture, stable operation, and easy reconfigurability. Beyond the stand-alone functionality, the proposed device can also be integrated with other functional building blocks of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) to create on-chip complex microwave photonic signal processors. As an application example, a PIC consisting of two such modulation transformers and a notch filter has been designed and realized in TriPleX(TM) waveguide technology. The realized device uses a 2 × 2 splitting circuit and 3 ring resonators with a free spectral range of 25 GHz, which are all equipped with continuous tuning elements. The device can perform phase-to-intensity modulation transform and carrier suppression simultaneously, which enables high-performance phase-modulated microwave photonics links (PM-MPLs). Associated with the bias-free and low-complexity advantages of the phase modulators, a single-fiber-span PM-MPL with a RF bandwidth of 12 GHz (3 dB-suppression band 6 to 18 GHz) has been demonstrated comprising the proposed PIC, where the achieved spurious-free dynamic range performance is comparable to that of Class-AB MPLs using low-biased Mach-Zehnder modulators.

  16. An optically tunable wideband optoelectronic oscillator based on a bandpass microwave photonic filter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Wong, Jia Haur; Lam, Huy Quoc; Zhou, Junqiang; Aditya, Sheel; Lim, Peng Huei; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Shum, Perry Ping; Zhang, Xinliang

    2013-07-15

    An optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) with wideband frequency tunability and stable output based on a bandpass microwave photonic filter (MPF) has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Realized by cascading a finite impulse response (FIR) filter and an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter together, the tunable bandpass MPF successfully replaces the narrowband electrical bandpass filter in a conventional single-loop OEO and serves as the oscillating frequency selector. The FIR filter is based on a tunable multi-wavelength laser and dispersion compensation fiber (DCF) while the IIR filter is simply based on an optical loop. Utilizing a long length of DCF as the dispersion medium for the FIR filter also provides a long delay line for the OEO feedback cavity and as a result, optical tuning over a wide frequency range can be achieved without sacrificing the quality of the generated signal. By tuning the wavelength spacing of the multi-wavelength laser, the oscillation frequency can be tuned from 6.88 GHz to 12.79 GHz with an average step-size of 0.128 GHz. The maximum frequency drift of the generated 10 GHz signal is observed to be 1.923 kHz over 1 hour and its phase noise reaches the -112 dBc/Hz limit of our measuring equipment at 10 kHz offset frequency.

  17. Reconfigurable broadband microwave photonic intensity differentiator based on an integrated optical frequency comb source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xingyuan; Wu, Jiayang; Shoeiby, Mehrdad; Nguyen, Thach G.; Chu, Sai T.; Little, Brent E.; Morandotti, Roberto; Mitchell, Arnan; Moss, David J.

    2017-09-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a microwave photonic intensity differentiator based on a Kerr optical comb generated by a compact integrated micro-ring resonator (MRR). The on-chip Kerr optical comb, containing a large number of comb lines, serves as a high-performance multi-wavelength source for implementing a transversal filter, which will greatly reduce the cost, size, and complexity of the system. Moreover, owing to the compactness of the integrated MRR, frequency spacings of up to 200-GHz can be achieved, enabling a potential operation bandwidth of over 100 GHz. By programming and shaping individual comb lines according to calculated tap weights, a reconfigurable intensity differentiator with variable differentiation orders can be realized. The operation principle is theoretically analyzed, and experimental demonstrations of the first-, second-, and third-order differentiation functions based on this principle are presented. The radio frequency amplitude and phase responses of multi-order intensity differentiations are characterized, and system demonstrations of real-time differentiations for a Gaussian input signal are also performed. The experimental results show good agreement with theory, confirming the effectiveness of our approach.

  18. Quantum superposition of a single microwave photon in two different 'colour' states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakka-Bajjani, Eva; Nguyen, François; Lee, Minhyea; Vale, Leila R.; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Aumentado, José

    2011-08-01

    Fully controlled coherent coupling of arbitrary harmonic oscillators is an important tool for processing quantum information. Coupling between quantum harmonic oscillators has previously been demonstrated in several physical systems using a two-level system as a mediating element. Direct interaction at the quantum level has only recently been realized by means of resonant coupling between trapped ions. Here we implement a tunable direct coupling between the microwave harmonics of a superconducting resonator by means of parametric frequency conversion. We accomplish this by coupling the mode currents of two harmonics through a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and modulating its flux at the difference (~7GHz) of the harmonic frequencies. We deterministically prepare a single-photon Fock state and coherently manipulate it between multiple modes, effectively controlling it in a superposition of two different 'colours'. This parametric interaction can be described as a beamsplitter-like operation that couples different frequency modes. As such, it could be used to implement linear optical quantum computing protocols on-chip.

  19. Theoretical investigation of the capture effect in intensity-modulation direct-detection microwave photonic links.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyyed Esmail; Banai, Ali

    2013-10-01

    We introduce the capture effect concept in microwave photonic links (MWPLs) for the first time to our knowledge. The capture effect or the small-signal suppression is the change in the amplitude ratio of the two signals between input and output of the intensity-modulation direct-detection (IMDD) MWPLs. An analytical explanation of the performance of external IMDD MWPLs due to the effects of nonlinearity combined with sum of several input sinusoidal signals is given. We have investigated the suppression of a weaker signal in these links. General analytic expression for the small-signal suppression is derived using a nonlinear analytical approach. We show that the small-signal suppression is quite dependent on the input back-off, the power ratio of input signals, and on the number of input sinusoidal signals. The theoretical maximum possible signal suppression was found to be 6 dB. This analytical asymptotic value is verified by numerical results. We show the influence of the capture effect of the nonlinear MWPL on the optoelectronic oscillator operation that is verified by experimental data in the literature that has already been published.

  20. An intensity modulation and coherent balanced detection intersatellite microwave photonic link using polarization direction control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Yongjun; Han, Lei; Zhao, Jing

    2014-03-01

    A simple approach for high loss intersatellite microwave photonic link with intensity modulation and coherent balanced detection is proposed. In the transmitter, the double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) modulated optical signal and optical carrier (OC) are combined by employing a polarization combiner to chose and control the signals polarization directions, while in the receiver, they are selected respectively by using a polarization splitter for they have orthogonal polarization directions. The separated DSB-SC signal and OC put into balanced detectors and the coherent detection is realized without a local oscillator (LO). At the output, the fundamental signal is augmented and the third-order distortion is suppressed for the DSB-SC modulation, the second-order distortion is removed for the balanced detection and the noise is reduced for the polarization direction control. The signal to noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) can be optimized by adjusting the power of OC and modulation index. The simulation results show that, a SNDR higher than 30 dB can be obtained for the proposed method, which is in agreement with the theoretical analysis.