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Sample records for ka-band photonic microwave

  1. Photonically enabled Ka-band radar and infrared sensor subscale testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, Michele B.; Sova, Raymond M.; Funk, Kevin B.; Airola, Marc B.; Dennis, Michael L.; Pavek, Richard E.; Hollenbeck, Jennifer S.; Garrison, Sean K.; Conard, Steven J.; Terry, David H.

    2014-10-01

    A subscale radio frequency (RF) and infrared (IR) testbed using novel RF-photonics techniques for generating radar waveforms is currently under development at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to study target scenarios in a laboratory setting. The linearity of Maxwell's equations allows the use of millimeter wavelengths and scaled-down target models to emulate full-scale RF scene effects. Coupled with passive IR and visible sensors, target motions and heating, and a processing and algorithm development environment, this testbed provides a means to flexibly and cost-effectively generate and analyze multi-modal data for a variety of applications, including verification of digital model hypotheses, investigation of correlated phenomenology, and aiding system capabilities assessment. In this work, concept feasibility is demonstrated for simultaneous RF, IR, and visible sensor measurements of heated, precessing, conical targets and of a calibration cylinder. Initial proof-of-principle results are shown of the Ka-band subscale radar, which models S-band for 1/10th scale targets, using stretch processing and Xpatch models.

  2. A new airborne Ka-band double-antenna microwave radiometer for cloud liquid water content measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Tao; Gu, Lingjia

    2013-09-01

    A new type upward-looking airborne double-antenna microwave radiometer (ADAMR) system intended for detecting atmospheric cloud liquid water content (LWC) is developed in this paper. The frequency of this radiometer is 31.65 GHz. For the antenna elevation angle, one is 30°and the other is 90°. In order to detect the signals with low effective noise temperature (<10K) from the LWC, the noise coupling technique is used. Through injecting constant equal noise signal into the two antenna ports respectively, the technique can elevate the small input noise signal power to the detectable range of the square-law detector and thus realize the weak signal detection. Moreover, in order to eliminate the impacts of the system gain fluctuations and obtain a higher sensitivity, an auto-gain compensation method based on the analog-to-digital converter, microcontroller and host computer software techniques is also proposed. Compared with the traditional radiometers, the radiometer topology is greatly simplified and the gain fluctuations can be readily realtime compensated using the compensation method. The laboratory test results show that radiometric sensitivity is better than 0.2 K for 300ms integration time and the instrument is conforming to specifications. Finally, the flight observation experiment results are presented to prove that the designed instrument is able to detect small changes of noise signal in a wide effective range of noise temperature (10-350K) and is a powerful tool for LWC measurement.

  3. Ka-band study: 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Horttor, R. L.; Clauss, R. C.; Wilcher, J. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Mudgway, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Ka-band study team was chartered in late 1987 to bring together all the planning elements for establishing 32 GHz (Ka-band) as the primary downlink frequency for deep-space operation, and to provide a stable baseline from which to pursue that development. This article summarizes the results of that study at its conclusion in mid-1988, and corresponds to material presented to NASA's Office of Space Operations on July 14, 1988. For a variety of reasons, Ka-band is the right next major step in deep-space communications. It offers improved radio metric accuracy through reduced plasma sensitivity and increased bandwidth. Because of these improvements, it offers the opportunity to reduce costs in the flight radio system or in the DSN by allocating part of the overall benefits of Ka-band to this cost reduction. A mission scenario is being planned that can drive at least two and possibly all three of the DSN subnets to provide a Ka-band downlink capability by the turn of the century. The implementation scenario devised by the study team is believed to be feasible within reasonable resource expectations, and capable of providing the needed upgrade as a natural follow-on to the technology development which is already underway.

  4. Satellite-borne QPSK Direct Modulator for Ka Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Li, Changsheng

    2016-02-01

    Ka band is referred to a microwave band whose frequency range is from 24.6 GHz to 40 GHz, it shares a wide available bandwidth, high frequency reuse rate and strong ability of anti-jamming. This paper presents a novel method to design a modulator for Ka-band satellite communication. Using QPSK to improve the ability of anti-jamming, using direct modulation to reduce the weight, volume and cost of electronic equipment, using sub-harmonic mixer to cut the LO power leakage, excellent modulation results are obtained.

  5. Ka-band MMIC microstrip array for high rate communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Raquet, C. A.; Tolleson, J. B.; Sanzgiri, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    In a recent technology assessment of alternative communication systems for the space exploration initiative (SEI), Ka-band (18 to 40 GHz) communication technology was identified to meet the mission requirements of telecommunication, navigation, and information management. Compared to the lower frequency bands, Ka-band antennas offer higher gain and broader bandwidths; thus, they are more suitable for high data rate communications. Over the years, NASA has played an important role in monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array technology development, and currently, has an ongoing contract with Texas Instrument (TI) to develop a modular Ka-band MMIC microstrip subarray (NAS3-25718). The TI contract emphasizes MMIC integration technology development and stipulates using existing MMIC devices to minimize the array development cost. The objective of this paper is to present array component technologies and integration techniques used to construct the subarray modules.

  6. Fade Mitigation Techniques at Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissanayake, Asoka (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Rain fading is the dominant propagation impairment affecting Ka-band satellite links and rain fade mitigation is a key element in the design of Ka-band satellite networks. Some of the common fade mitigation techniques include: power control, diversity, adaptive coding, and resource sharing. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides an excellent opportunity to develop and test Ka-band rain impairment amelioration techniques. Up-link power control and diversity are discussed in this paper.

  7. Design of Input Coupler and Output Window for Ka-Band Gyro-TWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, M. K.; Singh, Khushbu; Choyal, Y.; Sinha, A. K.

    2013-10-01

    The design of input coupler with loaded interaction structure for Ka-band gyro traveling wave tube (gyro-TWT) has been carried out using Ansoft HFSS to operate in the TE11 mode. The return loss (S11) and transmission loss (S21) of the Ka-band gyro-TWT input coupler have been found -27.3 and -0.05 dB respectively. The design of output window for Ka-band gyro-TWT has been carried out using CST microwave studio. In this paper thermal analysis of the input coupler for Ka-band gyro-TWT has also been carried out using ANSYS software. In the simulation results, the temperature on the ceramic disc of window does not exceed 80 °C and found in safe limit. The optimized design of input and output window for gyro-TWT allows low heat loads in the ceramic and consequently low temperature increase.

  8. Integrated Microphotonic Receiver for Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levi, A. F. J.

    2005-01-01

    This report consists of four main sections. Part I: LiNbO3 microdisk resonant optical modulator. Brief review of microdisk optical resonator and RF ring resonator. Microwave and photonic design challenges for achieving simultaneous RF-optical resonance are addressed followed by our solutions. Part II: Experimental demonstration of LiNbO3 microdisk modulator performance in wired and wireless RF-optical links. Part III: Microphotonic RF receiver architecture that exploits the nonlinear modulation in the LiNbO3 microdisk modulator to achieve direct photonic down-conversion from RF carrier without using any high-speed electronic elements. Part IV: Ultimate sensitivity of the microdisk photonic receiver and the future road map toward a practical device.

  9. Ultra Small Aperture Terminal for Ka-Band SATCOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto; Reinhart, Richard; Lee, Richard; Simons, Rainee

    1997-01-01

    An ultra small aperture terminal (USAT) at Ka-band frequency has been developed by Lewis Research Center (LeRC) for data rates up to 1.5 Mbps in the transmit mode and 40 Mbps in receive mode. The terminal consists of a 35 cm diameter offset-fed parabolic antenna which is attached to a solid state power amplifier and low noise amplifier. A single down converter is used to convert the Ka-band frequency to 70 MHz intermediate frequency (IF). A variable rate (9.6 Kbps to 10 Mbps) commercial modem with a standard RS-449/RS-232 interface is used to provide point-to-point digital services. The terminal has been demonstrated numerous times using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) and the 4.5 in Link Evaluation Terminal (LET) in Cleveland. A conceptual design for an advanced terminal has also been developed. This advanced USAT utilizes Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit (MMIC) and flat plate array technologies. This terminal will be self contained in a single package which will include a 1 watt solid state amplifier (SSPA), low noise amplifier (LNA) and a modem card located behind the aperture of the array. The advanced USAT will be light weight, transportable, low cost and easy to point to the satellite. This paper will introduce designs for the reflector based and array based USAT's.

  10. High-power Ka-band amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Development of a high-power tube suitable to power a Ka-band (34.5-GHz) antenna transmitter located at the Goldstone, California, tracking station is continuing. The University of Maryland Laboratory for Plasma Research and JPL are conducting a joint effort to test the feasibility of phase locking a second-harmonic gyrotron both by direct injection at the output cavity and by using a priming cavity to bunch the electrons in the beam. This article describes several design options and the results of computer simulation testing.

  11. Ka-band MMIC subarray technology program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottenger, Warren

    1995-01-01

    The broad objective of this program was to demonstrate a proof of concept insertion of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) device technology into an innovative (tile architecture) active phased array antenna application supporting advanced EHF communication systems. Ka-band MMIC arrays have long been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in close proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments.

  12. Ka-Band Multibeam Aperture Phased Array Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems offer many advantages to low-Earth-orbiting satellite systems. Their large scan angles and multibeam capabilities allow for vibration-free, rapid beam scanning and graceful degradation operation for high rate downlink of data to users on the ground. Technology advancements continue to reduce the power, weight, and cost of these systems to make phased arrays a competitive alternative in comparison to the gimbled reflector system commonly used in science missions. One effort to reduce the cost of phased arrays is the development of a Ka-band multibeam aperture (MBA) phased array by Boeing Corporation under a contract jointly by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Office of Naval Research. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a space-qualifiable dual-beam Ka-band (26.5-GHz) phased-array antenna. The goals are to advance the state of the art in Ka-band active phased-array antennas and to develop and demonstrate multibeam transmission technology compatible with spacecraft in low Earth orbit to reduce the cost of future missions by retiring certain development risks. The frequency chosen is suitable for space-to-space and space-to-ground communication links. The phased-array antenna has a radiation pattern designed by combining a set of individual radiating elements, optimized with the type of radiating elements used, their positions in space, and the amplitude and phase of the currents feeding the elements. This arrangement produces a directional radiation pattern that is proportional to the number of individual radiating elements. The arrays of interest here can scan the main beam electronically with a computerized algorithm. The antenna is constructed using electronic components with no mechanical parts, and the steering is performed electronically, without any resulting vibration. The speed of the scanning is limited primarily by the control electronics. The radiation performance degrades gracefully if a portion of the elements

  13. Electromagnetic properties of polyurethane template-based carbon foams in Ka-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Plyushch, A.; Piasotski, K.; Paddubskaya, A.; Voronovich, S.; Kuzhir, P.; Baturkin, S.; Klochkov, A.; Korovin, E.; Letellier, M.; Schaefer, S.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2015-09-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) properties of polyurethane template-based reticulated carbon foams were investigated in the 26-37 GHz microwave frequency range (Ka-band). It was experimentally proved that carbon foams of a thickness of 2 mm and a density of 22-55 mg cm-3 are almost not transparent to microwave radiation, and this is especially true for the densest ones. Depending on bulk density, the EM response of carbon foams in the microwave region can be mainly accounted for by either reflection or absorption. EM shielding efficiency of more dilute samples is due to absorption mechanisms, whereas denser foams provide up to 80% reflection of EM signals. EM properties of carbon foams in the Ka-band can be accurately predicted by a very simple model based on Fresnel formulae developed in this communication.

  14. Ka-Band Autonomous Formation Flying Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, Jeffrey; Purcell, George, Jr.; Srinivasan, Jeffrey; Ciminera, Michael; Srinivasan, Meera; Meehan, Thomas; Young, Lawrence; Aung, MiMi; Amaro, Luis; Chong, Yong; Quirk, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Ka-band integrated range and bearing-angle formation sensor called the Autonomous Formation Flying (AFF) Sensor has been developed to enable deep-space formation flying of multiple spacecraft. The AFF Sensor concept is similar to that of the Global Positioning System (GPS), but the AFF Sensor would not use the GPS. The AFF Sensor would reside in radio transceivers and signal-processing subsystems aboard the formation-flying spacecraft. A version of the AFF Sensor has been developed for initial application to the two-spacecraft StarLight optical-interferometry mission, and several design investigations have been performed. From the prototype development, it has been concluded that the AFF Sensor can be expected to measure distances and directions with standard deviations of 2 cm and 1 arc minute, respectively, for spacecraft separations ranging up to about 1 km. It has also been concluded that it is necessary to optimize performance of the overall mission through design trade-offs among the performance of the AFF Sensor, the field of view of the AFF Sensor, the designs of the spacecraft and the scientific instruments that they will carry, the spacecraft maneuvers required for formation flying, and the design of a formation-control system.

  15. High power Ka band TWT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Golkowski, C.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Wang, P.; Schachter, L.

    1999-07-01

    Two high power 35 GHz TWT amplifiers driven by a relativistic pencil, 850 kV, 200A electron beam have been assembled and tested. The first had a dielectric slow wave structure and was primarily used to develop diagnostics, and to gain experience in working with high power systems in Ka band. The source of the input power for the amplifier was a magnetron producing a 30 kW, 200ns long pulse of which 10 kW as delivered to the experiment. The 30 cm long dielectric (Teflon) amplifier produced output power levels of about 1 MW with a gain of about 23 dB. These results are consistent with expectations from PIC code simulations for this arrangement. The second amplifier, which is a single stage disk loaded slow wave structure, has been designed. It consists of one hundred uniform cells with two sets of ten tapered calls at the ends to lower the reflection coefficient. The phase advance per cell is {pi}/2. The amplifier passband extends from 28 to 40 GHz. It is designed to increase the output power to about 20 MW. The amplifier is in construction and will be tested in the near future. Details of the design of both systems will be provided and initial results from the new amplifier presented.

  16. Design of a Ka-band gyro-TWT amplifier for broadband operation

    SciTech Connect

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K.; Choyal, Y.

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, the design of a Ka-band periodically ceramic loaded gyro-TWT amplifier has been carried out. The design predict that the interaction structure can produce more than 80 kW output power, 50 dB saturated gain, and 3 dB bandwidth for 65 kV and 5 A electron beam with velocity ratio (α) of 1.2. This paper describes the design and simulation of a high performance 35 GHz TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWT that applies the same technique of employing a periodic dielectric loaded interaction structure to achieve stability and wide bandwidth. The design of input coupler with loaded interaction structure for Ka-band Gyro-TWT has been carried out using Ansoft hfss. The return loss (S{sub 11}) and transmission loss (S{sub 21}) of the Ka-band gyro-TWT input coupler have been found to be −27.3 dB and −0.05 dB, respectively. The design of output window for Ka-band Gyro-TWT has been carried out using cst microwave studio.

  17. Design of a Ka-band gyro-TWT amplifier for broadband operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Choyal, Y.; Sinha, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the design of a Ka-band periodically ceramic loaded gyro-TWT amplifier has been carried out. The design predict that the interaction structure can produce more than 80 kW output power, 50 dB saturated gain, and 3 dB bandwidth for 65 kV and 5 A electron beam with velocity ratio (α) of 1.2. This paper describes the design and simulation of a high performance 35 GHz TE01 mode gyro-TWT that applies the same technique of employing a periodic dielectric loaded interaction structure to achieve stability and wide bandwidth. The design of input coupler with loaded interaction structure for Ka-band Gyro-TWT has been carried out using Ansoft hfss. The return loss (S11) and transmission loss (S21) of the Ka-band gyro-TWT input coupler have been found to be -27.3 dB and -0.05 dB, respectively. The design of output window for Ka-band Gyro-TWT has been carried out using cst microwave studio.

  18. Performance of a Ka-band transponder breadboard for deep-space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Lane, J. P.; Kayalar, S.; Kermode, A. W.

    1995-01-01

    This article summarizes the design concepts applied in the development of and advanced Ka-band (34.4 GHz/32 GHz) transponder breadboard for the next generation of space communications systems applications. The selected architecture upgrades the X-band (7.2 GHz/8.4 GHz) deep-space transponder (DST) to provide Da-band up/Ka- and X-band down capability. The Ka-band transponder breadboard incorporates several state-of-the-art components, including sampling mixers, a Ka-band dielectric resonator oscillator, and microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs). The MMICs that were tested in the breadboard include upconverters, downconverters, automatic gain control circuits, mixers, phase modulators, and amplifiers. The measured receiver dynamic range, tracking range, acquisition rate, static phase error, and phase jitter characteristics of the Ka-band breadboard interfaced to the advanced engineering model X-band DST are in good agreement with the expected performance. The results show a receiver tracking threshold of -149 dBm with a dynamic range of 80 dB and a downlink phase jitter of 7 deg rms. The analytical results of phase noise and Allan standard deviation are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Highly Efficient Amplifier for Ka-Band Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    An amplifier developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract will have applications for both satellite and terrestrial communications. This power amplifier uses an innovative series bias arrangement of active devices to achieve over 40-percent efficiency at Ka-band frequencies with an output power of 0.66 W. The amplifier is fabricated on a 2.0- by 3.8-square millimeter chip through the use of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology, and it uses state-of-the-art, Pseudomorphic High-Electron-Mobility Transistor (PHEMT) devices. Although the performance of the MMIC chip depends on these high-performance devices, the real innovations here are a unique series bias scheme, which results in a high-voltage chip supply, and careful design of the on-chip planar output stage combiner. This design concept has ramifications beyond the chip itself because it opens up the possibility of operation directly from a satellite power bus (usually 28 V) without a dc-dc converter. This will dramatically increase the overall system efficiency. Conventional microwave power amplifier designs utilize many devices all connected in parallel from the bias supply. This results in a low-bias voltage, typically 5 V, and a high bias current. With this configuration, substantial I(sup 2) R losses (current squared times resistance) may arise in the system bias-distribution network. By placing the devices in a series bias configuration, the total current is reduced, leading to reduced distribution losses. Careful design of the on-chip planar output stage power combiner is also important in minimizing losses. Using these concepts, a two-stage amplifier was designed for operation at 33 GHz and fabricated in a standard MMIC foundry process with 0.20-m PHEMT devices. Using a 20-V bias supply, the amplifier achieved efficiencies of over 40 percent with an output power of 0.66 W and a 16-dB gain over a 2-GHz bandwidth centered at 33 GHz. With a 28-V bias, a power

  20. A Ka-band radial relativistic backward wave oscillator with GW-class output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xiaoping; Dang, Fangchao

    2016-07-01

    A novel radial relativistic backward wave oscillator with a reflector is proposed and designed to generate GW-level high power microwaves at Ka-band. The segmented radial slow wave structure and the reflector are matched to enhance interaction efficiency. We choose the volume wave TM01 mode as the working mode due to the volume wave characteristic. The main structural parameters of the novel device are optimized by particle-in-cell simulation. High power microwaves with power of 2 GW and a frequency of 29.4 GHz are generated with 30% efficiency when the electron beam voltage is 383 kV, the beam current is 17 kA, and the guiding magnetic field is only 0.6 T. Simultaneously, the highest electric field in the novel Ka-band device is just about 960 kV/cm in second slow wave structure.

  1. A hemispherically scanning X/Ka band mirror antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenbeck, Kurt; Kesler, Oren

    1987-02-01

    Texas Instruments, under contract to Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC), have delivered the first proof of concept, prototype X and Ka band Mirror Scanning Antenna to the Navy. This antenna is a candidate for the Navy's new generation of ship self defense weapon systems and culminates over two years of work by Texas Instruments' Antenna Department. Several unique operational features are offered by the Mirror Scanning Antenna. These features include full hemispherical scan coverage, simultaneous X and Ka band dual plane monopulse tracking, rapid scan rates, variable scan modes, high Ka band power handling ability, and an integral weather-tight protective radome.

  2. A dual frequency microstrip antenna for Ka band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Baddour, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    For fixed satellite communication systems at Ka band with downlink at 17.7 to 20.2 GHz and uplink at 27.5 to 30.0 GHz, the focused optics and the unfocused optics configurations with monolithic phased array feeds have often been used to provide multiple fixed and multiple scanning spot beam coverages. It appears that a dual frequency microstrip antenna capable of transmitting and receiving simultaneously is highly desirable as an array feed element. This paper describes some early efforts on the development and experimental testing of a dual frequency annular microstrip antenna. The antenna has potential application for use in conjunction with a monolithic microwave integrated circuit device as an active radiating element in a phased array of phased array feeds. The antenna is designed to resonate at TM sub 12 and TM sub 13 modes and tuned with a circumferential microstrip ring to vary the frequency ratio. Radiation characteristics at both the high and low frequencies are examined. Experimental results including radiating patterns and swept frequency measurements are presented.

  3. Mars Telecommunications Orbiter Ka-band system design and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noreen, Gary; Komarek, Tomas; Diehl, Roger; Shambayati, Shervin; Breidenthal, Julian; Lopez, Saturnino; Jordan, Frank

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Mars Telecommunications Orbiter (MTO) will relay broadband communications from landers, rovers and spacecraft in the vicinity of Mars to Earth. This paper describes the MTO communications system and how the MTO Ka-band system will be operated.

  4. A comparative study of RADAR Ka-band backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, D.; Pierdicca, N.; Guerriero, L.; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Calleja, Eduardo; Rommen, B.; Giudici, D.; Monti Guarnieri, A.

    2014-10-01

    Ka-band RADAR frequency range has not yet been used for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from space so far, although this technology may lead to important applications for the next generation of SAR space sensors. Therefore, feasibility studies regarding a Ka-band SAR instrument have been started [1][2], for the next generation of SAR space sensors. In spite of this, the lack of trusted references on backscatter at Ka-band revealed to be the main limitation for the investigation of the potentialities of this technology. In the framework of the ESA project "Ka-band SAR backscatter analysis in support of future applications", this paper is aimed at the study of wave interaction at Ka-band for a wide range of targets in order to define a set of well calibrated and reliable Ka-band backscatter coefficients for different kinds of targets. We propose several examples of backscatter data resulting from a critical survey of available datasets at Ka-band, focusing on the most interesting cases and addressing both correspondences and differences. The reliability of the results will be assessed via a preliminary comparison with ElectroMagnetic (EM) theoretical models. Furthermore, in support of future technological applications, we have designed a prototypal software acting as a "library" of earth surface radar response. In our intention, the output of the study shall contribute to answer to the need of a trustworthy Ka-Band backscatter reference. It will be of great value for future technological applications, such as support to instrument analysis, design and requirements' definition (e.g.: Signal to Noise Ratio, Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero).

  5. The Mars Observer Ka-band link experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebold, T. A.; Kwok, A.; Wood, G. E.; Butman, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Ka-Band Link Experiment was the first demonstration of a deep-space communications link in the 32- to 35-GHz band (Ka-band). It was carried out using the Mars Observer spacecraft while the spacecraft was in the cruise phase of its mission and using a 34-meter beam-waveguide research and development antenna at the Goldstone complex of the DSN. The DSN has been investigating the performance benefits of a shift from X-band (8.4 GHz) to Ka-band (32 GHz) for deep-space communications. The fourfold increase in frequency is expected to offer a factor of 3 to 10 improvement (5 to 10 dB) in signal strength for a given spacecraft transmitter power and antenna size. Until recently, the expected benefits were based on performance studies, with an eye to implementing such a link, but theory was transformed to reality when a 33.7-GHz Ka-band signal was received from the spacecraft by DSS 13. This article describes the design and implementation of the Ka-Band Link Experiment from the spacecraft to the DSS-13 system, as well as results from the Ka-band telemetry demonstration, ranging demonstration, and long-term tracking experiment. Finally, a preliminary analysis of comparative X- and Ka-band tracking results is included. These results show a 4- to 7-dB advantage for Ka-band using the system at DSS 13, assuming such obstacles as antenna pointing loss and power conversion loss are overcome.

  6. Detecting itinerant single microwave photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, Sankar Raman; Stace, Thomas M.; Johansson, Göran

    2016-08-01

    Single-photon detectors are fundamental tools of investigation in quantum optics and play a central role in measurement theory and quantum informatics. Photodetectors based on different technologies exist at optical frequencies and much effort is currently being spent on pushing their efficiencies to meet the demands coming from the quantum computing and quantum communication proposals. In the microwave regime, however, a single-photon detector has remained elusive, although several theoretical proposals have been put forth. In this article, we review these recent proposals, especially focusing on non-destructive detectors of propagating microwave photons. These detection schemes using superconducting artificial atoms can reach detection efficiencies of 90% with the existing technologies and are ripe for experimental investigations.

  7. Ka Band Objects: Observation and Monitoring (KaBOOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldzahler, B.

    2012-09-01

    NASA has embarked on a path that will enable the implementation of a high power, high resolution X/Ka band radar system using widely spaced 12m antennas to better track and characterize near Earth objects and orbital debris. This radar system also has applications for cost effective space situational awareness. We shall demonstrate Ka band coherent uplink arraying with real-time atmospheric compensation using three 12m antennas at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Our proposed radar system can complement and supplement the activities of the Space Fence. The proposed radar array has the advantages of filling the gap between dusk and dawn and offers the possibility of high range resolution (4 cm) and high spatial resolution (?10 cm at GEO) when used in a VLBI mode. KSC was chosen because [a] of reduced implementation costs, [b] there is a lot of water vapor in the air (not Ka band friendly), and [c] the test satellites have a low elevation adding more attenuation and turbulence to the demonstration. If Ka band coherent uplink arraying can be made to work at KSC, it will work anywhere. We expect to rebaseline X-band in 2013, and demonstrate Ka band uplink arraying in 2014.

  8. Ka-Band MMIC Subarray Technology Program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottinger, W.

    1995-01-01

    Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) arrays have been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in closed proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the 'tile' array packaging architecture at EHF via the insertion of 1990 MMIC technology into a functional tile array or subarray module. The means test of this objective was to demonstrate and deliver to NASA a minimum of two 4 x 4 (16 radiating element) subarray modules operating in a transmit mode at 29.6 GHz. Available (1990) MMIC technology was chosen to focus the program effort on the novel interconnect schemes and packaging requirements rather than focusing on MMIC development. Major technical achievements of this program include the successful integration of two 4 x 4 subarray modules into a single antenna array. This 32 element array demonstrates a transmit EIRP of over 300 watts yielding an effective directive power gain in excess of 55 dB at 29.63 GHz. The array has been actively used as the transmit link in airborne/terrestrial mobile communication experiments accomplished via the ACTS satellite launched in August 1993.

  9. ACTS Ka-Band Earth Stations: Technology, Performance, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Struharik, Steven J.; Diamond, John J.; Stewart, David

    2000-01-01

    stations successfully demonstrated many services and applications at Ka-band in three different modes of operation: circuit switched TDMA using the satellite on-board processor, satellite switched SS-TDMA applications using the on-board Microwave Switch Matrix (MSM), and conventional transponder (bent-pipe) operation. Data rates ranged from 4.8 kbps up to 622 Mbps. Experiments included: 1) low rate (4.8- 1 00's kbps) remote data acquisition and control using small earth stations, 2) moderate rate (1-45 Mbps) experiments included full duplex voice and video conferencing and both full duplex and asymmetric data rate protocol and network evaluation using mid-size ground stations, and 3) link characterization experiments and high data rate (155-622 Mbps) terrestrial and satellite interoperability application experiments conducted by a consortium of experimenters using the large transportable ground stations.

  10. X-/Ka-band dichroic plate noise temperature reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veruttipong, W.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    The X-/Ka-band (8.4 GHz/32.0 GHz) dichroic plate installed as DSS 13 contributes an estimated 3 K to the system noise temperature at 32.0 GHz. Approximately 1 percent of the Ka-band incident field is reflected by the plate into the 300-K environment of the DSS-13 pedestal room. A low-cost, easily implemented method of reducing the noise temperature is presented. Using a curved reflector, the reflected field can be re-focused into an 80-K cold load, reducing the noise temperature contribution of the dichroic plate by about 2 K.

  11. The Ka-Band Propagation Measurements campaign at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, D.; Davarian, Faramaz; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the JPL-managed Propagation Program are discussed, and the types of activities performed to meet these objectives are described. Particular consideration is given to activities of the NASA-sponsored Ka-Band Propagation Measurement campaign, which was established to investigate the applicability of using the Ka-band (20/30 GHz) for satellite telecommunications via ESA's OLYMPUS satellite, which is a precursor to NASA's ACTS. The basic physics involved in this problem are discussed, and the OLYMPUS-program data collected to date are reviewed.

  12. Packaging Considerations for Integrated RF Microphotonic Receiver at Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Pouch, John; Lee, Richard; Miranda, Felix; Hossein-Zadeh, Mani; Harriague, Ferando; Levi, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program is supporting the development of an RF microphotonic Ka-band receiver. The receiver consists of a lithium niobate micro-disk that enables the incoming RF signal (up to Ka-band) to be coupled to the optical signal (approx. 200 THz). The modulated optical signal is detected by the high-speed photonic signal processing electronics. When compared with an all-electronic approach, the microphotonic receiver technology offers 1 Ox smaller volume, smaller weight, and smaller power consumption, greater sensitivity, and optical isolation for applications in extreme environments. It could potentially be implemented to support planetary surface-to-surface and surface-to-relay communications, as well as high-data-rate inter-satellite links. We are currently studying a number of fabrication and integration issues that could result as this technology is advanced for potential insertion into a NASA mission. The results of our preliminary effort to integrate the RF microphotonic receiver components (e.g., the lithium niobate micro-disk, the optical elements, and the Ka-band patch antenna) on an etched silicon wafer will be presented, In addition, the concomitant integration and packaging issues, and the potential NASA applications will be discussed.

  13. Measurement techniques for cryogenic Ka-band microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, K. B.; Gilbert, C.; Metzler, S.; Claspy, P. C.

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of cryogenic antennas poses unique logistical problems since the antenna under test must be embedded in a cooling chamber. A method of measuring the performance of cryogenic microstrip antennas using a closed cycle gas cooled refrigerator in a far field range is described. Antenna patterns showing the performance of gold and superconducting Ka-band microstrip antennas at various temperatures are presented.

  14. Modified Wilkinson Power Dividers For K And Ka Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antsos, Dimitrios

    1995-01-01

    Modified configuration for Wilkinson power dividers devised for operating frequencies in K and Ka bands (18 to 27 and 27 to 40 GHz, respectively). Overcomes some difficulties associated with increasing frequency, making possible to design and accurately predict performances of unequal-split power dividers for frequencies above X-band.

  15. Ka-Band Waveguide Hybrid Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers with Unequal and Arbitrary Power Output Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2009-01-01

    The design, simulation and characterization of a novel Ka-band (32.05 +/- 0.25 GHz) rectangular waveguide branchline hybrid unequal power combiner is presented. The manufactured combiner was designed to combine input signals, which are nearly in phase and with an amplitude ratio of two. The measured return loss and isolation of the branch-line hybrid are better than 22 and 27 dB, respectively. The application of the branch-line hybrid for combining two monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers with output power ratio of two is demonstrated. The measured combining efficiency is 92.9% at the center frequency of 32.05 GHz.

  16. Evaluation of Deep Space Ka-Band Data Transfer using Radiometeorological Forecasts and Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Biscarini, Marianna; Milani, Luca; Cimini, Domenico; De Sanctis, Klaide; Di Fabio, Saverio

    2016-04-01

    Deep space exploration is aimed at acquiring information about the solar system. In this scenario, telecommunications links between Earth ground receiving stations and extra-terrestrial satellite platforms have to be designed in order to ensure the optimal transfer of the acquired scientific data back to the Earth. A significant communication capacity has to be planned when very large distances, as those characterising deep space links, are involved thus fostering more ambitious scientific mission requirements. At the current state of the art, two microwave channel frequencies are used to perform the deep space data transfer: X band (~ 8.4 GHz) and Ka band (~ 32 GHz) channel. Ka-band transmission can offer an advantage over X-band in terms of antenna performance with the same antenna effective area and an available data transfer bandwidth (50 times higher at Ka band than X band). However, Earth troposphere-related impairments can affects the space-to-Earth carrier signals at frequencies higher than 10 GHz by degrading its integrity and thus reducing the deep space channel temporal availability. Such atmospheric impairments, especially in terms of path attenuation, their statistic and the possibility to forecast them in the next 24H at the Earth's receiving station would allow a more accurate design of the deep space link, promoting the mitigation of the detrimental effects on the link availability. To pursue this aim, meteorological forecast models and in situ measurements need to be considered in order to characterise the troposphere in terms of signal path attenuation at current and future time. In this work, we want to show how the synergistic use of meteorological forecasts, radiative transfer simulations and in situ measurements such as microwave radiometry observations, rain gauges and radiosoundings, can aid the optimisation of a deep space link at Ka band and improve its performance with respect to usual practices. The outcomes of the study are in the

  17. Ka-band MMIC arrays for ACTS Aero Terminal Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, C.; Zakrajsek, R.; Lee, R.; Turtle, J.

    1992-01-01

    An antenna system consisting of three experimental Ka-band active arrays using GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification is presented. The MMIC arrays are to be demonstrated in the ACTS Aeronautical Terminal Experiment, planned for early 1994. The experiment is outlined, with emphasis on a description of the antenna system. Attention is given to the way in which proof-of-concept MMIC arrays featuring three different state-of-the-art approaches to Ka-band MMIC insertion are being incorporated into an experimental aircraft terminal for the demonstration of an aircraft-to-satellite link, providing a basis for follow-on MMIC array development.

  18. Measurement techniques for cryogenic Ka-band microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Gilbert, C.; Metzler, S.; Claspy, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of cryogenic antennas poses unique logistical problems since the antenna under test must be embedded in the cooling chamber. A method for measuring the performance of cryogenic microstrip antennas using a closed cycle gas-cooled refrigerator in a far field range is described. Antenna patterns showing the performance of gold and superconducting Ka-band microstrip antennas at various temperatures are presented.

  19. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Frequency Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4 GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-in diameter parabolic high gain antenna (HGA) on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) R&D 34-meter antenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. The projected 5-dB link advantage of Ka-band relative to X-band was confirmed in previous reports using measurements of MGS signal strength data acquired during the first two years of the link experiment from December 1996 to December 1998. Analysis of X-band and Ka-band frequency data and difference frequency (fx-fka)/3.8 data will be presented here. On board the spacecraft, a low-power sample of the X-band downlink from the transponder is upconverted to 32 GHz, the Ka-band frequency, amplified to I-W using a Solid State Power Amplifier, and radiated from the dual X/Ka HGA. The X-band signal is amplified by one of two 25 W TWTAs. An upconverter first downconverts the 8.42 GHz X-band signal to 8 GHz and then multiplies using a X4 multiplier producing the 32 GHz Ka-band frequency. The frequency source selection is performed by an RF switch which can be commanded to select a VCO (Voltage Controlled Oscillator) or USO (Ultra-Stable Oscillator) reference. The Ka-band frequency can be either coherent with the X-band downlink reference or a hybrid combination of the USO and VCO derived frequencies. The data in this study were chosen such that the Ka-band signal is purely coherent with the X-band signal, that is the downconverter is driven by the same frequency source as the X-band downlink). The ground station used to acquire the data is DSS-13, a 34-meter BWG antenna which incorporates a series of mirrors inside beam waveguide tubes which guide the energy to a subterranean pedestal room, providing a stable environment

  20. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Frequency Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4 GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-in diameter parabolic high gain antenna (HGA) on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) R&D 34-meter antenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. The projected 5-dB link advantage of Ka-band relative to X-band was confirmed in previous reports using measurements of MGS signal strength data acquired during the first two years of the link experiment from December 1996 to December 1998. Analysis of X-band and Ka-band frequency data and difference frequency (f(sub x)-f(sub ka)/3.8) data will be presented here. On board the spacecraft, a low-power sample of the X-band downlink from the transponder is upconverted to 32 GHz, the Ka-band frequency, amplified to I-W using a Solid State Power Amplifier, and radiated from the dual X/Ka HGA. The X-band signal is amplified by one of two 25 W TWTAs. An upconverter first downconverts the 8.42 GHz X-band signal to 8 GHz and then multiplies using a X4 multiplier producing the 32 GHz Ka-band frequency. The frequency source selection is performed by an RF switch which can be commanded to select a VCO (Voltage Controlled Oscillator) or USO (Ultra-Stable Oscillator) reference. The Ka-band frequency can be either coherent with the X-band downlink reference or a hybrid combination of the USO and VCO derived frequencies. The data in this study were chosen such that the Ka-band signal is purely coherent with the X-band signal, that is the downconverter is driven by the same frequency source as the X-band downlink). The ground station used to acquire the data is DSS-13, a 34-meter BWG antenna which incorporates a series of mirrors inside beam waveguide tubes which guide the energy to a subterranean pedestal room, providing a stable

  1. Rain Fade Compensation Alternatives for Ka Band Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    1997-01-01

    Future satellite communications systems operating in Ka-band frequency band are subject to degradation produced by the troposphere which is much more severe than those found at lower frequency bands. These impairments include signal absorption by rain, clouds and gases, and amplitude scintillation's arising from refractive index irregularities. For example, rain attenuation at 20 GHz is almost three times that at 11 GHz. Although some of these impairments can be overcome by oversizing the ground station antennas and high power amplifiers, the current trend is using small (less than 20 inches apertures), low-cost ground stations (less than $1000) that can be easily deployed at user premises. As a consequence, most Ka-band systems are expected to employ different forms of fade mitigation that can be implemented relatively easily and at modest cost. The rain fade mitigation approaches are defined by three types of Ka-band communications systems - a low service rate (less than 1.5 Mb/s), a moderate service rate (1.5 to 6 Mb/s) system and a high service rate (greater than 43 Mb/s) system. The ACTS VSAT network, which includes an adaptive rain fade technique, is an example of a moderate service rate.

  2. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  3. Low cost, Ka-band microstrip patch monopulse antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Charles M.; Newman, Jeffrey

    1987-07-01

    A monopulse antenna is a novel concept which combines the theory of an interferometer with the practical application of pulsed radar to obtain the angle and altitude of an object in a single radar pulse; four antennas receive signals that are combined to obtain information about the elevation, azimuth, and distance of an object. This paper describes the design and test of a low-cost Ka-band microstrip antenna. Performance results are examined for 35 GHz (twice the rated frequency), and the antenna patterns are considered.

  4. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-03-06

    The Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) is a zenith-pointing Doppler cloud radar operating at approximately 35 GHz. The KAZR is an evolutionary follow-on radar to ARM's widely successful millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). The main purpose of the KAZR is to provide vertical profiles of clouds by measuring the first three Doppler moments: reflectivity, radial Doppler velocity, and spectra width. At the sites where the dual-polarization measurements are made, the Doppler moments for the cross-polarization channel are also available. In addition to the moments, velocity spectra are also continuously recorded for each range gate.

  5. NASA SCaN Overview and Ka-Band Actvities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, James D.; Midon, Marco Mario; Davarian, Faramaz; Geldzahler, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The Ka- and Broadband Communications Conference is an international forum attended by worldwide experts in the area of Ka-Band Propagation and satellite communications. Since its inception, NASA has taken the initiative of organizing and leading technical sections on RF Propagation and satellite communications, solidifying its worldwide leadership in the aforementioned areas. Consequently, participation in this conference through the contributions described below will maintain NASA leadership in Ka- and above RF Propagation as it relates to enhancing current and future satellite communication systems supporting space exploration.

  6. Design and construction of a Ka-band scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoll, Michael

    1994-10-01

    This report provides documentation of a Ka-band scatterometer designed and constructed for the Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station. The system is designed to work in conjunction with a Hewlett-Packard 8510 network analyzer to provide fully polarimetric measurements of back-scatter from terrain. It operates over a 2-GHz bandwidth and can be operated in a monostatic, quasimonostatic, or bistatic configuration. The design, theory of operation, and characteristics are provided as a means to assist the operator or to provide information to others wishing to construct their own.

  7. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} for hidden photon masses between 10{sup -14} eV and 10{sup -7} eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained.

  8. Ka-Band, Multi-Gigabit-Per-Second Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Smith, Francis J.; Harris, Johnny M.; Landon, David G.; Haddadin, Osama S.; McIntire, William K.; Sun, June Y.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a multi-Gigabit-per-second, Ka-band transceiver with a software-defined modem (SDM) capable of digitally encoding/decoding data and compensating for linear and nonlinear distortions in the end-to-end system, including the traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA). This innovation can increase data rates of space-to-ground communication links, and has potential application to NASA s future spacebased Earth observation system. The SDM incorporates an extended version of the industry-standard DVB-S2, and LDPC rate 9/10 FEC codec. The SDM supports a suite of waveforms, including QPSK, 8-PSK, 16-APSK, 32- APSK, 64-APSK, and 128-QAM. The Ka-band and TWTA deliver an output power on the order of 200 W with efficiency greater than 60%, and a passband of at least 3 GHz. The modem and the TWTA together enable a data rate of 20 Gbps with a low bit error rate (BER). The payload data rates for spacecraft in NASA s integrated space communications network can be increased by an order of magnitude (>10 ) over current state-of-practice. This innovation enhances the data rate by using bandwidth-efficient modulation techniques, which transmit a higher number of bits per Hertz of bandwidth than the currently used quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) waveforms.

  9. K/Ka-band channel characterization for mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinck, Deborah S.; Rice, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    Mobile satellite systems allow truly ubiquitous wireless communications to users anywhere and anytime. NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides an ideal space-based platform for the measurement of K/Ka band propagation characteristics in a land mobile satellite application. Field tests conducted in Southern California during the first seven months of 1994 using JPL's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) provided channel characterization data for the K/Ka-band link. A pilot tone was transmitted from a fixed station in Cleveland, Ohio through the satellite and downlinked at 20 GHz in the Southern California spot beam. The AMT was equipped with a narrow beam, high gain antenna which tracked the satellite in azimuth for a fixed elevation angle (46 degrees for this case). The field tests were conducted in three basic environments: clear line-of-sight (LOS) highways, lightly shadowed suburban, and heavily shadowed suburban. Preliminary results of these field tests indicate very little multipath for rural environments and for clear LOS links (as expected with a narrow beam antenna). Deep fades were experienced in shadowed areas, especially those where tree canopies covered the road.

  10. ACTS propagation experiment discussion: Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the CSU-CHILL and Space Communications Technology Center Florida propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.; Mueller, Eugene A.; Turk, Joseph; Beaver, John; Helmken, Henry F.; Henning, Rudy

    1993-01-01

    Papers on Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the Colorado State University CHILL multiparameter radar and on Space Communications Technology Center Florida Propagation Program are discussed. Topics covered include: microwave radiative transfer and propagation models; NASA propagation terminal status; ACTS channel characteristics; FAU receive only terminal; FAU terminal status; and propagation testbed.

  11. Experimental investigation of a Ka band high power millimeter wave generator operated at low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jun; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Li Guolin; Zhang Zehai; Fan Yuwei

    2011-05-15

    An overmoded slow wave type Ka band generator is investigated experimentally to produce high power millimeter waves in this paper. The experiments were carried out at the TORCH-01 accelerator. The produced microwave frequency was measured by dispersive line method, and the power was estimated by integrating over the radiation pattern at far field. With relatively low guiding magnetic field of 0.8 T and diode voltage and beam current of 590 kV and 5.2 kA, respectively, a 33.56 GHz millimeter wave with an output power of 320 MW was generated, and the microwave mode was quasi-TM{sub 01} mode.

  12. High Efficiency Ka-Band Solid State Power Amplifier Waveguide Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    A novel Ka-band high efficiency asymmetric waveguide four-port combiner for coherent combining of two Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Solid State Power Amplifiers (SSPAs) having unequal outputs has been successfully designed, fabricated and characterized over the NASA deep space frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The measured combiner efficiency is greater than 90 percent, the return loss greater than 18 dB and input port isolation greater than 22 dB. The manufactured combiner was designed for an input power ratio of 2:1 but can be custom designed for any arbitrary power ratio. Applications considered are NASA s space communications systems needing 6 to 10 W of radio frequency (RF) power. This Technical Memorandum (TM) is an expanded version of the article recently published in Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Electronics Letters.

  13. Ka-Band SiGe Receiver Front-End MMIC for Transponder Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, Jaikrishna; Mysoor, Narayan R.; Hashemi, Hassein; Aflatouni, Firooz

    2010-01-01

    A fully integrated, front-end Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) was developed that houses an LNA (low noise amplifier) stage, a down-conversion stage, and output buffer amplifiers. The MMIC design employs a two-step quadrature down-conversion architecture, illustrated in the figure, which results in improved quality of the down-converted IF quadrature signals. This is due to the improved sensitivity of this architecture to amplitude and phase mismatches in the quadrature down-conversion process. Current sharing results in reduced power consumption, while 3D-coupled inductors reduce the chip area. Improved noise figure is expected over previous SiGe-based, frontend designs

  14. Dielectric Resonator for Ka-Band Pulsed EPR Measurements at Cryogenic Temperatures: Probehead Construction and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Astashkin, A.; Enemark, J. H.; Blank, A.; Twig, Y.; Song, Y.; Meade, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    The construction and performance of a Ka-band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) cryogenic probehead that incorporates dielectric resonator (DR) is presented. We demonstrate that the use of DR allows one to optimize pulsed double electron–electron resonance (DEER) measurements utilizing large resonator bandwidth and large amplitude of the microwave field B1. In DEER measurements of Gd-based spin labels, use of this probe finally allows one to implement the potentials of Gd-based labels in distance measurements. Evidently, this DR is well suited to any applications requiring large B1-fields and resonator bandwidths, such as electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy of nuclei having low magnetic moments and strong hyperfine interactions and double quantum coherence dipolar spectroscopy as was recently demonstrated in the application of a similar probe based on an loop-gap resonator and reported by Forrer et al. (J Magn Reson 190:280, 2008). PMID:23626406

  15. Advanced Ka-Band Transceiver With Monopulse Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Abdur; Hoppe, Dan; Epp, Larry; Perez, Raul

    2006-01-01

    A proposed Ka-band transmitting/ receiving system would embody a unique combination of established and semi-proven design features. The proposed system (see figure) would include a monopulse receiving feedback loop and a mirror that could be moved by piezoelectric actuators in the feedback loop to adjust the aim of the transmitted and received radio beams. Unlike in a phased-array tracking system, phase shifters (which can be complex and expensive) would not be needed in this monopulse tracking system. Moreover, the monopulse-tracking loop could be combined with other subsystems used in established subreflector and antenna designs. The final transmitter power amplifier in the proposed system would be a quasi-optical power amplifier (QOPA) -- a combination of a planar array of 25 amplifiers and corresponding planar arrays of antenna elements, such that free-space power combining would take place at the output.

  16. A personal communications network using a Ka-band satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Larry C.; Laborde, Enrique; Stern, Alan; Sohn, Philip Y.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of a personal communications network using portable terminals that can provide 4.8-kb/s voice communications to a hub station via a Ka-band geosynchronous satellite has been investigated. Tradeoffs are examined so that the combined system of hub and gateway earth stations, the satellite, and the personal terminals can provide a competitive service in terms of cost, availability, and quality. A baseline system that uses a spacecraft with approximately 140 spot beams to cover the contiguous US (CONUS) and 5-W power amplifiers in each beam is described. Satellite access in both the forward and return directions uses frequency-division multiple-access/code-division multiple-access (FDMA/CDMA) with a chip rate of 2.5 Mchip/s.

  17. Miniaturized Ka-Band Dual-Channel Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James P.; Moussessian, Alina; Jenabi, Masud; Custodero, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Smaller (volume, mass, power) electronics for a Ka-band (36 GHz) radar interferometer were required. To reduce size and achieve better control over RFphase versus temperature, fully hybrid electronics were developed for the RF portion of the radar s two-channel receiver and single-channel transmitter. In this context, fully hybrid means that every active RF device was an open die, and all passives were directly attached to the subcarrier. Attachments were made using wire and ribbon bonding. In this way, every component, even small passives, was selected for the fabrication of the two radar receivers, and the devices were mounted relative to each other in order to make complementary components isothermal and to isolate other components from potential temperature gradients. This is critical for developing receivers that can track each other s phase over temperature, which is a key mission driver for obtaining ocean surface height. Fully hybrid, Ka-band (36 GHz) radar transmitter and dual-channel receiver were developed for spaceborne radar interferometry. The fully hybrid fabrication enables control over every aspect of the component selection, placement, and connection. Since the two receiver channels must track each other to better than 100 millidegrees of RF phase over several minutes, the hardware in the two receivers must be "identical," routed the same (same line lengths), and as isothermal as possible. This level of design freedom is not possible with packaged components, which include many internal passive, unknown internal connection lengths/types, and often a single orientation of inputs and outputs.

  18. Passive silicon photonic devices for microwave photonic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiayang; Peng, Jizong; Liu, Boyu; Pan, Ting; Zhou, Huanying; Mao, Junming; Yang, Yuxing; Qiu, Ciyuan; Su, Yikai

    2016-08-01

    We present our recent progress on microwave signal processing (MSP) using on-chip passive silicon photonic devices, including tunable microwave notch filtering/millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation based on self-coupled micro-resonators (SCMRs), and tunable radio-frequency (RF) phase shifting implemented by a micro-disk resonator (MDR). These schemes can provide improved flexibility and performances of MSP. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  19. A Tutorial on Microwave Photonic Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capmany, José; Ortega, Beatriz; Pastor, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Microwave photonic filters are photonic subsystems designed with the aim of carrying equivalent tasks to those of an ordinary microwave filter within a radio frequency (RF) system or link, bringing supplementary advantages inherent to photonics such as low loss, high bandwidth, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), tunability, and reconfigurability. There is an increasing interest in this subject since, on one hand, emerging broadband wireless access networks and standards spanning from universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) to fixed access picocellular networks and including wireless local area network (WLAN), World Interoperability for Microwave Access, Inc. (WIMAX), local multipoint distribution service (LMDS), etc., require an increase in capacity by reducing the coverage area. An enabling technology to obtain this objective is based on radio-over-fiber (RoF) systems where signal processing is carried at a central office to where signals are carried from inexpensive remote antenna units (RAUs). On the other hand, microwave photonic filters can find applications in specialized fields such as radar and photonic beamsteering of phased-arrayed antennas, where dynamical reconfiguration is an added value. This paper provides a tutorial introduction of this subject to the reader not working directly in the field but interested in getting an overall introduction of the subject and also to the researcher wishing to get a comprehensive background before working on the subject.

  20. Ka-Band Waveguide Three-Way Serial Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2012-01-01

    In this innovation, the three-way combiner consists internally of two branch-line hybrids that are connected in series by a short length of waveguide. Each branch-line hybrid is designed to combine input signals that are in phase with an amplitude ratio of two. The combiner is constructed in an E-plane split-block arrangement and is precision machined from blocks of aluminum with standard WR-28 waveguide ports. The port impedances of the combiner are matched to that of a standard WR-28 waveguide. The component parts include the power combiner and the MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) power amplifiers (PAs). The three-way series power combiner is a six-port device. For basic operation, power that enters ports 3, 5, and 6 is combined in phase and appears at port 1. Ports 2 and 4 are isolated ports. The application of the three-way combiner for combining three PAs with unequal output powers was demonstrated. NASA requires narrow-band solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) at Ka-band frequencies with output power in the range of 3 to 5 W for radio or gravity science experiments. In addition, NASA also requires wideband, high-efficiency SSPAs at Ka-band frequencies with output power in the range of 5 to 15 W for high-data-rate communications from deep space to Earth. The three-way power combiner is designed to operate over the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz, which is NASA s deep-space frequency band.

  1. Nanomechanical coupling between microwave and optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochmann, Joerg; Vainsencher, Amit; Awschalom, David D.; Cleland, Andrew N.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of nanomechanical systems can now operate at the quantum limit, making quantum phenomena more accessible for applications and providing new opportunities for exploring the fundamentals of quantum physics. Such mechanical quantum devices offer compelling opportunities for quantum-enhanced sensing and quantum information. Furthermore, mechanical modes provide a versatile quantum bus for coupling hybrid quantum systems, supporting a quantum-coherent connection between different physical degrees of freedom. Here, we demonstrate a nanomechanical interface between optical photons and microwave electrical signals, using a piezoelectric optomechanical crystal. We achieve coherent signal transfer between itinerant microwave and optical fields by parametric electro-optical coupling using a localized phonon mode. We perform optical tomography of electrically injected mechanical states and observe coherent interactions between microwave, mechanical and optical modes, manifested as electromechanically induced optical transparency. Our on-chip approach merges integrated photonics with microwave nanomechanics and is fully compatible with superconducting quantum circuits, potentially enabling microwave-to-optical quantum state transfer, and photonic networks of superconducting quantum bits.

  2. Rain Fade Compensation for Ka-Band Communications Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, W. Carl; Nguyen, Lan; Dissanayake, Asoka; Markey, Brian; Le, Anh

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a review and evaluation of rain fade measurement and compensation techniques for Ka-band satellite systems. This report includes a description of and cost estimates for performing three rain fade measurement and compensation experiments. The first experiment deals with rain fade measurement techniques while the second one covers the rain fade compensation techniques. The third experiment addresses a feedback flow control technique for the ABR service (for ATM-based traffic). The following conclusions were observed in this report; a sufficient system signal margin should be allocated for all carriers in a network, that is a fixed clear-sky margin should be typically in the range of 4-5 dB and should be more like 15 dB in the up link for moderate and heavy rain zones; to obtain a higher system margin it is desirable to combine the uplink power control technique with the technique that implements the source information rate and FEC code rate changes resulting in a 4-5 dB increase in the dynamic part of the system margin. The experiments would assess the feasibility of the fade measurements and compensation techniques, and ABR feedback control technique.

  3. Ka-Band Transponder for Deep-Space Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Matthew S.; Mysoor, Narayan R.; Folkner, William M.; Mendoza, Ricardo; Venkatesan, Jaikrishna

    2008-01-01

    A one-page document describes a Ka-band transponder being developed for use in deep-space radio science. The transponder receives in the Deep Space Network (DSN) uplink frequency band of 34.2 to 34.7 GHz, transmits in the 31.8- to 32.3 GHz DSN downlink band, and performs regenerative ranging on a DSN standard 4-MHz ranging tone subcarrier phase-modulated onto the uplink carrier signal. A primary consideration in this development is reduction in size, relative to other such transponders. The transponder design is all-analog, chosen to minimize not only the size but also the number of parts and the design time and, thus, the cost. The receiver features two stages of frequency down-conversion. The receiver locks onto the uplink carrier signal. The exciter signal for the transmitter is derived from the same source as that used to generate the first-stage local-oscillator signal. The ranging-tone subcarrier is down-converted along with the carrier to the second intermediate frequency, where the 4-MHz tone is demodulated from the composite signal and fed into a ranging-tone-tracking loop, which regenerates the tone. The regenerated tone is linearly phase-modulated onto the downlink carrier.

  4. High-Efficiency Ka-Band Waveguide Two-Way Asymmetric Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Freeman, J. C.; Chevalier, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is planning a number of Space Exploration, Earth Observation and Space Science missions where Ka-band solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) could have a role. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) based SSPAs with output powers on the order of 10 W at Ka-band frequencies would be adequate to satisfy the data transmission rate requirements at the distances involved. MMICs are a type of integrated circuit fabricated on a GaAs wafer, which operates at micro wave frequencies and performs the function of signal amplification. The highest power Ka-band (31.8 to 32.3 GHz) SSPA to have flown in space had an output power of 2.6 W with an overall efficiency of 14.3 percent. This SSPA was built around discrete GaAs pHEMT (high electron mobility transistor) devices and flew aboard the Deep Space One spacecraft. State-of-the-art GaAs pHEMT-based MMIC power amplifiers (PAs) can deliver RF power at Ka-band frequencies anywhere from 3 W with a power added efficiency (PAE) of 32 percent to 6 W with a PAE of 26 percent. However, to achieve power levels higher than 6 W, the output of several MMIC PAs would need to be combined using a high-efficiency power combiner. Conventional binary waveguide power combiners, based on short-slot and magic-T circuits, require MMIC PAs with identical amplitude and phase characteristics for high combining efficiency. However, due to manufacturing process variations, the output powers of the MMIC PAs tend to be unequal, and hence the need to develop unequal power combiners. A two-way asymmetric magic-T based power combiner for MMIC power amplifiers, which can take in unequal inputs, has been successfully designed, fabricated, and characterized over NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) frequency range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The figure is a transparent view of the a sym - metric combiner that shows the 4-port configuration and the internal structure. The rod, post, and iris are positioned by design to achieve the desired asymmetric power ratio

  5. X/X/Ka-band prime focus feed antenna for the Mars Observer beacon spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P.; Reilly, H.; Esquivel, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an X/X/Ka-band feed design concept demonstration are presented. The purpose is to show the feasibility of adding a Ka-band beacon to the Mars Observer spacecraft. Scale model radiation patterns were made and analyzed.

  6. X-/Ka-band dichroic plate design and grating lobe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    An X-/Ka-band dichroic plate is needed for simultaneously receiving X-band and Ka-band in the DSS-13 Beam Waveguide Antenna. The plate is transparent to the allocated Ka-band downlink (31.8-32.3 GHz) and the frequency band for the Mars Observer Ka-band Beacon Link Experiment (KABLE) (33.6-33.8 GHz), while at the same time reflecting the X-band downlink (8.4-8.5 GHz). The design is made using a computer program for dichroic plates with rectangular holes. The theoretical performance of the X-/Ka-band dichroic plate is presented. A study of the grating lobe problem is also included in this article.

  7. Software-defined reconfigurable microwave photonics processor.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Daniel; Gasulla, Ivana; Capmany, José

    2015-06-01

    We propose, for the first time to our knowledge, a software-defined reconfigurable microwave photonics signal processor architecture that can be integrated on a chip and is capable of performing all the main functionalities by suitable programming of its control signals. The basic configuration is presented and a thorough end-to-end design model derived that accounts for the performance of the overall processor taking into consideration the impact and interdependencies of both its photonic and RF parts. We demonstrate the model versatility by applying it to several relevant application examples.

  8. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  9. Microwave Photonics: current challenges towards widespread application.

    PubMed

    Capmany, José; Li, Guifang; Lim, Christina; Yao, Jianping

    2013-09-23

    Microwave Photonics, a symbiotic field of research that brings together the worlds of optics and radio frequency is currently facing several challenges in its transition from a niche to a truly widespread technology essential to support the ever-increasing values for speed, bandwidth, processing capability and dynamic range that will be required in next generation hybrid access networks. We outline these challenges, which are the subject of the contributions to this focus issue.

  10. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David; Reinhart, Richard; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Mike

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASAs Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  11. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASA's Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  12. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  13. A Ka-band (32 GHz) beacon link experiment (KABLE) with Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, A. L.; Hansen, D. M.; Mileant, A.; Hartop, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    A proposal for a Ka-Band (32 GHz) Link Experiment (KABLE) with the Mars Observer mission was submitted to NASA. The experiment will rely on the fourth harmonic of the spacecraft X-band transmitter to generate a 33.6 GHz signal. The experiment will rely also on the Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving station equipped to simultaneously receive X- and Ka-band signals. The experiment will accurately measure the spacecraft-to-Earth telecommunication link performance at Ka-band and X-band (8.4 GHz).

  14. A Ka-band TM02 mode relativistic backward wave oscillator with cascaded resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yan; Cao, Yinbin; Song, Zhimin; Ye, Hu; Shi, Yanchao; Chen, Changhua; Sun, Jun

    2014-12-01

    By combining the Cerenkov-type generator with the cascaded resonators, this paper proposes a Ka-band relativistic backward wave oscillator operating under the guide magnetic field 1.0 T with high power handling capability and high conversion efficiency. It is found that TM02 can be selected as the operation mode in order to increase the power handling capability and provide sufficient coupling with the electron beam. In slow wave structure (SWS), ripples composed of semicircle on top of the rectangle enhance the wave-beam interaction and decrease the intensity of the electric field on the metallic surface. Taking advantage of the resonator cascades, the output power and the conversion efficiency are promoted greatly. The front cascaded resonators efficiently prevent the power generated in SWS from leaking into the diode region, and quicken the startup of the oscillation due to the premodulation of the beam. However, the post cascade slightly postpones the startup because of the further energy extraction from the electron beam. The numerical simulation shows that generation with power 514 MW and efficiency 41% is obtained under the diode voltage 520 kV and current 2.4 kA. And the microwave with the pure frequency spectrum of 29.35 GHz radiates in the pure TM01 mode.

  15. Ka-band Ga-As FET noise receiver/device development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schellenberg, J. M.; Feng, M.; Hackett, L. H.; Watkins, E. T.; Yamasaki, H.

    1982-01-01

    The development of technology for a 30 GHz low noise receiver utilizing GaAs FET devices exclusively is discussed. This program required single and dual-gate FET devices, low noise FET amplifiers, dual-gate FET mixers, and FET oscillators operating at Ka-band frequencies. A 0.25 micrometer gate FET device, developed with a minimum noise figure of 3.3 dB at 29 GHz and an associated gain of 7.4 dB, was used to fabricate a 3-stage amplifier with a minimum noise figure and associated gain of 4.4 dB and 17 dB, respectively. The 1-dB gain bandwidth of this amplifier extended from below 26.5 GHz to 30.5 GHz. A dual-gate mixer with a 2 dB conversion loss and a minimum noise figure of 10 dB at 29 GHz as well as a dielectric resonator stabilized FET oscillator at 25 GHz for the receiver L0. From these components, a hybrid microwave integrated circuit receiver was constructed which demonstrates a minimum single-side band noise figure of 4.6 dB at 29 GHz with a conversion gain of 17 dB. The output power at the 1-dB gain compression point was -5 dBm.

  16. A Ka-band TM{sub 02} mode relativistic backward wave oscillator with cascaded resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yan; Cao, Yinbin; Song, Zhimin; Ye, Hu; Shi, Yanchao; Chen, Changhua; Sun, Jun

    2014-12-15

    By combining the Cerenkov-type generator with the cascaded resonators, this paper proposes a Ka-band relativistic backward wave oscillator operating under the guide magnetic field 1.0 T with high power handling capability and high conversion efficiency. It is found that TM{sub 02} can be selected as the operation mode in order to increase the power handling capability and provide sufficient coupling with the electron beam. In slow wave structure (SWS), ripples composed of semicircle on top of the rectangle enhance the wave-beam interaction and decrease the intensity of the electric field on the metallic surface. Taking advantage of the resonator cascades, the output power and the conversion efficiency are promoted greatly. The front cascaded resonators efficiently prevent the power generated in SWS from leaking into the diode region, and quicken the startup of the oscillation due to the premodulation of the beam. However, the post cascade slightly postpones the startup because of the further energy extraction from the electron beam. The numerical simulation shows that generation with power 514 MW and efficiency 41% is obtained under the diode voltage 520 kV and current 2.4 kA. And the microwave with the pure frequency spectrum of 29.35 GHz radiates in the pure TM{sub 01} mode.

  17. Microwave Photon Detector in Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose; Romero, Guillermo; Solano, Enrique

    2009-03-01

    In this work we propose a design for a microwave photodetector based on elements from circuit QED such as the ones used in qubit designs. Our proposal consists on a microwave guide in which we embed circuital elements that can absorb photons and irreversibly change state. These incoherent absorption processes constitute the measurement itself. We first model this design using a general master equation for the propagating photons and the absorbing elements. We find that the detection efficiency for a single absorber is limited to 50%, and that this efficiency can be quickly increased by adding more elements with a moderate separation, obtaining 80% and 90% for two and three absorbers. Our abstract design has at least one possible implementation in which the absorbers are current biased Josephson junction. We demonstrate that the coupling between the guide and the junctions is strong enough, irrespectively of the microwave guide size, and derivate realistic parameters for high fidelity operation with current experiments. Patent pending No. 200802933, Oficina Espanola de Patentes y Marcas, 17/10/2008.

  18. Advances in Ka-Band Communication System for CubeSats and SmallSats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegege, Obadiah; Wong, Yen F.; Altunc, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed that evaluated the feasibility of Ka-band communication system to provide CubeSat/SmallSat high rate science data downlink with ground antennas ranging from the small portable 1.2m/2.4m to apertures 5.4M, 7.3M, 11M, and 18M, for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Lunar CubeSat missions. This study included link analysis to determine the data rate requirement, based on the current TRL of Ka-band flight hardware and ground support infrastructure. Recent advances in Ka-band transceivers and antennas, options of portable ground stations, and various coverage distances were included in the analysis. The link/coverage analysis results show that Cubesat/Smallsat missions communication requirements including frequencies and data rates can be met by utilizing Near Earth Network (NEN) Ka-band support with 2 W and high gain (>6 dBi) antennas.

  19. Design and Validation of High Date Rate Ka-Band Software Defined Radio for Small Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The Design and Validation of High Date Rate Ka- Band Software Defined Radio for Small Satellite project will develop a novel Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) that is capable of establishing high data rate inter-satellite links with a throughput of 500 megabits per second (Mb/s) and providing millimeter ranging precision. The system will be designed to operate with high performance and reliability that is robust against various interference effects and network anomalies. The Ka-band radio resulting from this work will improve upon state of the art Ka-band radios in terms of dimensional size, mass and power dissipation, which limit their use in small satellites.

  20. Ka-Band Atmospheric Noise Temperature Measurements Using a 34-Meter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D.; Clauss, B.; Speranza, M.

    1997-01-01

    (viewgraphs) NASA's Deep space missions have used 960 MHz, 2.3 GHz, and 8.4 GHz for spacecraft communication downlinks. Ka-band (32 GHz) is being considered as a downlink frequency for future flight projects.

  1. Experiments for Ka-band mobile applications: The ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Dessouky, Khaled; Jedrey, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    To explore the potential of Ka-band to support mobile satellite services, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has initiated the design and development of a Ka-band land-mobile terminal to be used with the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The planned experimental setup with ACTS is described. Brief functional descriptions of the mobile and fixed terminals are provided. The inputs required from the propagation community to support the design activities and the planned experiments are also discussed.

  2. NASA's Evolution to Ka-Band Space Communications for Near-Earth Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, Kevin; Stocklin, Frank; Geldzahler, Barry; Friedman, Daniel; Celeste, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the exploration of NASA using a Ka-band system for spacecraft communications in Near-Earth orbits. The reasons for changing to Ka-band are the higher data rates, and the current (X-band spectrum) is becoming crowded. This will require some modification to the current ground station antennas systems. The results of a Request for Information (RFI) are discussed, and the recommended solution is reviewed.

  3. Pre-Flight Testing and Performance of a Ka-Band Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, Joseph A.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed a space-qualified, reprogrammable, Ka-band Software Defined Radio (SDR) to be utilized as part of an on-orbit, reconfigurable testbed. The testbed will operate on the truss of the International Space Station beginning in late 2012. Three unique SDRs comprise the testbed, and each radio is compliant to the Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard. The testbed provides NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop communications, navigation, and networking applications in the laboratory and space environment, while at the same time advancing SDR technology, reducing risk, and enabling future mission capability. Designed and built by Harris Corporation, the Ka-band SDR is NASA's first space-qualified Ka-band SDR transceiver. The Harris SDR will also mark the first NASA user of the Ka-band capabilities of the Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) for on-orbit operations. This paper describes the testbed's Ka-band System, including the SDR, travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA), and antenna system. The reconfigurable aspects of the system enabled by SDR technology are discussed and the Ka-band system performance is presented as measured during extensive pre-flight testing.

  4. A Ka-Band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. Eric; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Sotuela, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of approximately 200 micro-arcsec in alpha cos(delta) and approximately 300 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  5. Gigawatt-class radiation generated by a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dapeng; Shu, Ting; Ju, Jinchuan; Peng, Shengren

    2015-08-01

    Particle simulation and experimental results are presented about a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator in this paper. The relativistic electron beam with peak current of 8.4 kA was generated by a pulsed power accelerator working at the voltage of 625 kV, which was guided by an axial magnetic field of 1.05 T and transported through the beam-wave interaction structures. After careful calibration, the microwave power radiated in the far field was as high as about 500 MW, with a frequency of 32.1 GHz and a pulse width of 20 ns. The radiation mode was well controlled to be TM(0n) mode. PMID:26329220

  6. Rainfall estimation with a commercial tool for satellite internet in Ka band: concept and preliminary data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnai, Clio; Cuccoli, Fabrizio; Sermi, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    This work presents a real time method for rainfall estimation based on attenuation data acquired via Ka-band satellite link and discusses some results of its application. Data to be processed are recorded with a commercial kit for satellite web supplied by a European provider and operating above the urban area of Florence (Italy). Since the system automatically performs a continuous adjustment of the transmitted power in function of the intensity of the received signal, this information is being exploited to estimate the entity of the precipitation within the area. The adopted model for the attenuation of a microwave link due to hydrometeors is the one suggested by Olsen and Hodge and recommended by the ITU. The results are interpreted together with registered rain-rate measurements provided by three rain gauges dislocated within the area.

  7. Gigawatt-class radiation generated by a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dapeng Shu, Ting; Ju, Jinchuan; Peng, Shengren

    2015-08-15

    Particle simulation and experimental results are presented about a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator in this paper. The relativistic electron beam with peak current of 8.4 kA was generated by a pulsed power accelerator working at the voltage of 625 kV, which was guided by an axial magnetic field of 1.05 T and transported through the beam-wave interaction structures. After careful calibration, the microwave power radiated in the far field was as high as about 500 MW, with a frequency of 32.1 GHz and a pulse width of 20 ns. The radiation mode was well controlled to be TM{sub 0n} mode.

  8. Gigawatt-class radiation generated by a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dapeng; Shu, Ting; Ju, Jinchuan; Peng, Shengren

    2015-08-01

    Particle simulation and experimental results are presented about a Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov-type high power millimeter wave generator in this paper. The relativistic electron beam with peak current of 8.4 kA was generated by a pulsed power accelerator working at the voltage of 625 kV, which was guided by an axial magnetic field of 1.05 T and transported through the beam-wave interaction structures. After careful calibration, the microwave power radiated in the far field was as high as about 500 MW, with a frequency of 32.1 GHz and a pulse width of 20 ns. The radiation mode was well controlled to be TM(0n) mode.

  9. Ka-Band Waveguide Two-Way Hybrid Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    The design, simulation, and characterization of a novel Ka-band (32.05 0.25 GHz) rectangular waveguide two-way branch-line hybrid unequal power combiner (with port impedances matched to that of a standard WR-28 waveguide) has been created to combine input signals, which are in phase and with an amplitude ratio of two. The measured return loss and isolation of the branch-line hybrid are better than 22 and 27 dB, respectively. The measured combining efficiency is 92.9 percent at the center frequency of 32.05 GHz. This circuit is efficacious in combining the unequal output power from two Ka-band GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (pHEMT) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) with high efficiency. The component parts include the branch-line hybrid-based power combiner and the MMIC-based PAs. A two-way branch-line hybrid is a four-port device with all ports matched; power entering port 1 is divided in phase, and into the ratio 2:1 between ports 3 and 4. No power is coupled to port 2. MMICs are a type of integrated circuit fabricated on GaAs that operates at microwave frequencies, and performs the function of signal amplification. The power combiner is designed to operate over the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz, which is NASA's deep space frequency band. The power combiner would have an output return loss better than 20 dB. Isolation between the output port and the isolated port is greater than 25 dB. Isolation between the two input ports is greater than 25 dB. The combining efficiency would be greater than 90 percent when the ratio of the two input power levels is two. The power combiner is machined from aluminum with E-plane split-block arrangement, and has excellent reliability. The flexibility of this design allows the combiner to be customized for combining the power from MMIC PAs with an arbitrary power output ratio. In addition, it allows combining a low-power GaAs MMIC with a high-power GaN MMIC. The arbitrary

  10. Overview of Ka-band communications technology requirements for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    In the Space Exploration Initiative, Ka-band frequencies are likely to carry the bulk of the communications traffic both in the vicinity of and on the return links from the moon and Mars. The four exploration architectures identified by the Synthesis Group are examined and Ka-band technology requirements to meet the data traffic needs and schedule are identified. Specific Ka-band technology requirements identified are: transmitters - 0.5 to 200 W with high efficiency; antennas - 5m and 9m diameter, with multiple beams and/or scanning beams; and spacecraft receivers - noise figure of 2 dB. For each component, the current state of technology is assessed and needed technology development programs are identified. It is concluded that to meet the schedules of lunar and Mars precursor missions beginning in approximately the year 2000, aggressive technology development and advanced development programs are required immediately for Ka-band communications systems components. Additionally, the greater data transmission rates for the cargo and piloted phases of the exploration program require further Ka-band communications technology developments targeted for operations beginning in about 2010.

  11. Ka-band monopulse antenna-pointing systems analysis and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, V. Y.

    1996-01-01

    NASA 's Deep Space Network (DSN) has been using both 70-m and 34-m reflector antennas to communicate with spacecraft at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.45 GHz). To improve the quality of telecommunication and to meet future mission requirements, JPL has been developing 34-m Ka-band (32-GHz) beam waveguide antennas. Presently, antenna pointing operates in either the open-loop mode with blind pointing using navigation predicts or the closed-loop mode with conical scan (conscan). Pointing accuracy under normal conscan operating conditions is in the neighborhood of 5 mdeg. This is acceptable at S- and X-bands, but not enough at Ka-band. Due to the narrow beamwidth at Ka-band, it is important to improve pointing accuracy significantly (approximately 2 mdeg). Monopulse antenna tracking is one scheme being developed to meet the stringent pointing-accuracy requirement at Ka-band. Other advantages of monopulse tracking include low sensitivity to signal amplitude fluctuations as well as single-pulse processing for acquisition and tracking. This article presents system modeling, signal processing, simulation, and implementation of Ka-band monopulse tracking feed for antennas in NASA/DSN ground stations.

  12. Ka-Band Monopulse Antenna-Pointing Systems Analysis and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, V. Y.

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) has been using both 70-m and 34-m reflector antennas to communicate with spacecraft at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.45 GHz). To improve the quality of telecommunication and to meet future mission requirements, JPL has been developing 34-m Ka-band (32-GHz) beamwave guide antennas. Presently, antenna pointing operates in either the open-loop mode with blind pointing using navigation predicts or the closed-loop mode with conical scan (conscan). Pointing accuracy under normal conscan operating conditions is in the neighborhood of 5 mdeg. This is acceptable at S- and X-bands, but not enough at Ka-band. Due to the narrow beamwidth at Ka-band, it is important to improve pointing accuracy significantly (approx. 2 mdeg). Monopulse antenna tracking is one scheme being developed to meet the stringent pointing-accuracy requirement at Ka-band. Other advantages of monopulse tracking include low sensitivity to signal amplitude fluctuations as well as single-pulse processing for acquisition and tracking. This article presents system modeling, signal processing, simulation, and implementation of Ka-band monopulse tracking feed for antennas in NASA/DSN ground stations.

  13. Ka-Band Monopulse Antenna-Pointing Systems Analysis and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, V. Y.

    1995-10-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) has been using both 70-m and 34-m reflector antennas to communicate with spacecraft at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.45 GHz). To improve the quality of telecommunication and to meet future mission requirements, JPL has been developing 34-m Ka-band (32-GHz) beam-waveguide antennas. Presently, antenna pointing operates in either the open-loop mode with blind pointing using navigation predicts or the closed-loop mode with conical scan (conscan). Pointing accuracy under normal conscan operating conditions is in the neighborhood of 5 mdeg. This is acceptable at S- and X-bands, but not enough at Ka-band. Due to the narrow beamwidth at Ka-band, it is important to improve pointing accuracy significantly (~2 mdeg). Monopulse antenna tracking is one scheme being developed to meet the stringent pointing-accuracy requirement at Ka-band. Other advantages of monopulse tracking include low sensitivity to signal amplitude fluctuations as well as single-pulse processing for acquisition and tracking. This article presents system modeling, signal processing, simulation, and implementation of Ka-band monopulse tracking feed for antennas in NASA/DSN ground stations.

  14. NASA's K/Ka-Band Broadband Aeronautical Terminal for Duplex Satellite Video Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, A.; Agan, M.

    1994-01-01

    JPL has recently begun the development of a Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT) for duplex video satellite communications on commercial or business class aircraft. The BAT is designed for use with NASA's K/Ka-band Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The BAT system will provide the systems and technology groundwork for an eventual commercial K/Ka-band aeronautical satellite communication system. With industry/government partnerships, three main goals will be addressed by the BAT task: 1) develop, characterize and demonstrate the performance of an ACTS based high data rate aeronautical communications system; 2) assess the performance of current video compression algorithms in an aeronautical satellite communication link; and 3) characterize the propagation effects of the K/Ka-band channel for aeronautical communications.

  15. Ka-band MMIC beam steered transmitter array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rascoe, D. L.; Riley, A. L.; Huang, J.; Lubecke, V.; Duffy, L.

    1989-01-01

    A 32-GHz six-element linear transmitter array utilizing monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shifters and power amplifiers was designed and tested as part of the development of a spacecraft array feed for NASA deep-space communications applications. Measurements of the performance of individual phase shifters, power amplifiers, and microstrip radiators were carried out, and electronic beam steering of the linear array was demonstrated. The switched-line phase shifters were accurate to within 7 percent on average and the power amplifier 1-dB compressed output power varied over 0.3 dB. The array had a beamwidth of 7.5 deg and demonstrated acceptable beam steering over + or - 8 deg. From the results, it can be concluded that this MMIC phased array has adequate beam-scanning capability for use in the two-dimensional array. The areas that need to be improved are the efficiency of the MMIC power amplifier and the insertion loss of the MMIC phase shifter.

  16. Design of a Ka-Band Propagation Terminal for Atmospheric Measurements in Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a Ka-Band beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed alongside an existing Ka-Band Radiometer [2] located at the east end of the Svalbard Near Earth Network (NEN) complex. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation [3] receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation by directly measuring the propagated signal from the satellite Thor 7.

  17. Design of a Ka-band Propagation Terminal for Atmospheric Measurements in Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a Ka-Band beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed alongside an existing Ka-Band Radiometer located at the east end of the Svalbard Near Earth Network (NEN) complex. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation by directly measuring the propagated signal from the satellite Thor 7.

  18. Design characterization of an electronic steerable Ka-band antenna using liquid crystal phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, A.; Hager, P. B.; Harder, J. T.

    Modern high data rate satellite communication systems increasingly utilize the Ka-band due to its ability to support higher bandwidth. Prior research work presented a copper-galvanically produced Ka-band horn array antenna and associated waveguide distribution network, mounted on a two axes mechanical steerable mechanism (LISAMS) for use aboard fast, low earth orbiting satellites. The current project, LISAES, investigates the feasibility of a similar horn array antenna, but fitted with liquid crystal phase shifters in the transmission path of each horn, which now allow steering of the antenna boresight through beam forming without the use of mechanically moving parts.

  19. A portfolio of fine resolution Ka-band SAR images : part l.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Martin; Gutierrez, Vivian Dee; Dubbert, Dale Francis; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories designs and builds Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems capable of forming high-quality exceptionally fine resolution images. During the spring of 2004 a series of test flights were completed with a Ka-band testbed SAR on Sandia's DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft. A large data set was collected including real-time fine-resolution images of a variety of target scenes. This paper offers a sampling of high quality images representative of the output of Sandia's Ka-band testbed radar with resolutions as fine as 4 inches. Images will be annotated with descriptions of collection geometries and other relevant image parameters.

  20. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  1. Photonics for microwave systems and ultra-wideband signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, W.

    2016-08-01

    The advantages of using the broadband and low-loss distribution attributes of photonics to enhance the signal processing and sensing capabilities of microwave systems are well known. In this paper, we review the progress made in the topical areas of true-time-delay beamsteering, photonic-assisted analog-to-digital conversion, RF-photonic filtering and link performances. We also provide an outlook on the emerging field of integrated microwave photonics (MWP) that promise to reduce the cost of MWP subsystems and components, while providing significantly improved form-factors for system insertion.

  2. Phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Chen, Zhengyu; Xu, Zhiguo; Gao, Yingjie

    2015-10-01

    Microwave photonic links (MPLs) can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial and waveguide solutions due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth, superior stability and immunity to external interference. It has been considered in various applications such as: the transmission of radio frequency (RF) signal over optical carriers, video television transmission, radar and communication systems. Stability of phase of the microwave photonic links is a critical issue in several realistic applications. The delay line technique for phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links is measured for the first time. Using this approach, the input signal noise and power supply noise can be effectively cancelled, and it does not require phase locking. The phase noise of a microwave photonic links with a 10 GHz sinusoidal signal is experimentally demonstrated.

  3. A dual-cavity ruby maser for the Ka-band link experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J.; Quinn, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    A 33.68-GHz dual-cavity ruby maser was built to support the Ka-Band Link Experiment (KABLE) conducted with the Mars Observer spacecraft. It has 25 dB of net gain and a 3-dB bandwidth of 85 MHz. Its noise temperature in reference to the cooled feedhorn aperture is 5 K.

  4. Performance of a Ka-band satellite system under variable transmitted signal power conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory hardware-based satellite communication system simulator has been used to measure the effects of transmitted signal power changes on the performance of a Ka-band system. Such power changes can be used to compensate for signal fade due to rain attenuation. This paper presents and discusses the results of these measurements.

  5. Results from Two Years of Ka-Band Propagation Characterization at Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Zemba, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Over the several years, NASA plans to launch several earth science missions which are expected to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day transmitted from low earth orbiting spacecraft to ground stations. The current S-band and X-band frequency allocations in use by NASA, however, are incapable of supporting the data rates required to meet this demand. As such, NASA is in the planning stages to upgrade its existing Near Earth Network (NEN) Polar ground stations to support Ka-band (25.5-27 GHz) operations. Consequently, it becomes imperative that characterization of propagation effects at these NEN sites is conducted to determine expected system performance, particularly at low elevation angles ((is) less than 10 deg) where spacecraft signal acquisition typically occurs. Since May 2011, NASA Glenn Research Center has installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the NEN site located in Svalbard, Norway. The Ka-band radiometer monitors the water vapor line, as well as 6 frequencies around 26.5 GHz at multiple elevation angles: 45 deg, 20 deg, and 10 deg. Two year data collection results indicate comparable performance to previously characterized northern latitude sites in the United States, i.e., Fairbanks, Alaska. It is observed that cloud cover at the Svalbard site remains the dominant loss mechanism for Ka-band links, resulting in a margin requirement of 4.1 dB to maintain link availability of 99% at 10 deg elevation.

  6. Computer Aided Design of Ka-Band Waveguide Power Combining Architectures for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaden, Karl R.

    2006-01-01

    Communication systems for future NASA interplanetary spacecraft require transmitter power ranging from several hundred watts to kilowatts. Several hybrid junctions are considered as elements within a corporate combining architecture for high power Ka-band space traveling-wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs). This report presents the simulated transmission characteristics of several hybrid junctions designed for a low loss, high power waveguide based power combiner.

  7. Ka-Band, RF MEMS Switches on CMOS Grade Silicon with a Polyimide Interface Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.; Papapolymerou, John

    2003-01-01

    For the first time, RF MEMS switcbes on CMOS grade Si witb a polyimide interface layer are fabricated and characterized. At Ka-Band (36.6 GHz), an insertion loss of 0.52 dB and an isolation of 20 dB is obtained.

  8. High Power High Efficiency Ka-Band Power Combiners for Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    Wide-band power combining units for Ka-band are simulated for use as MMIC amplifier applications. Short-slot couplers as well as magic-tees are the basic elements for the combiners. Wide bandwidth (5 GHz) and low insertion (approx.0.2 dB) and high combining efficiencies (approx.90 percent) are obtained.

  9. A circularly polarized Ka-band stacked patch antenna with increased gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawadzki, M.

    2002-01-01

    Stacking layers of microstrip patches is a technique often used to improve the bandwidth of a patch antenna, but rarely used to increase its gain. The work presented here scales the three-layer S-band work done in to Ka-band.

  10. Ka-Band High-Rate Telemetry System Upgrade for the NASA Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBelle, Remi; Bernardo, Abner; Bowen, James; Britcliffe, Michael; Bucknam, Neil; Link, Christopher; Long, Ezra; Manalo, Leslie; O'Dea, James A.; Rochblatt, David; Sosnowski, John; Veruttipong, Watt

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) has a new requirement to support high-data-rate Category A (Cat A) missions (within 2 million kilometers of Earth) with simultaneous S-band uplink, S-band downlink and Ka-band downlink. The S-band links are required for traditional TT&C (Telemetry, Tracking, and Command) support to the spacecraft, while the Ka-band link is intended for high-data-rate science returns. The new Ka-band system combines the use of proven DSN cryogenic designs, for low system temperature, and high data rate capability using commercial telemetry receivers. The initial Cat A support is required for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in 2013 and possibly other missions. The upgrade has been implemented into 3 different 34-meter Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas in the DSN, one at each of the complexes in Canberra (Australia), Goldstone (California) and Madrid (Spain). System test data is presented to show that the requirements were met and the DSN is ready for Cat A Ka-band operational support.

  11. Results from Three Years of Ka-Band Propagation Characterization at Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Zemba, Michael; Morse, Jacquelynne

    2015-01-01

    Over the next several years, NASA plans to launch several earth science missions which are expected to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day transmitted from low earth orbiting spacecraft to ground stations. The current S-band and X-band frequency allocations in use by NASA, however, are incapable of supporting the data rates required to meet this demand. As such, NASA is in the planning stages to upgrade its existing Near Earth Network (NEN) polar ground stations to support Ka-band (25.5-27 GHz) operations. Consequently, it installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the Svalbard site. Svalbard was chosen as the appropriate site for two primary reasons: (1) Svalbard will be the first site to be upgraded to Ka-band operations within the NEN Polar Network enhancement plan, and (2) there exists a complete lack of Ka-band propagation data at this site (as opposed to the Fairbanks, AK NEN site, which has 5 years of characterization collected during the Advanced Communications Technology becomes imperative that characterization of propagation effects at these NEN sites is conducted to determine expected system Satellite (ACTS) campaign). processing and provide the Herein, we discuss the data three-year measurement results performance, particularly at low elevation angles ((is) less than 10 deg) from the ongoing Ka-band propagation characterization where spacecraft signal acquisition typically occurs. Since May 2011, NASA Glenn Research Center has installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the NEN site located in Svalbard, Norway. The Ka-band radiometer monitors the water vapor line, as well as 4 frequencies around 26.5 GHz at a fixed 10 deg elevation angle. Three-year data collection results indicate good campaign at Svalbard, Norway. Comparison of these results with the ITU models and existing ERA profile data indicates very good agreement when the 2010 rain maps and cloud statistics are used. Finally, the Svalbard data is used to derive the expected

  12. Results from Three Years of Ka-band Propagation Characterization at Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael; Morse, Jacquelynne

    2015-01-01

    Over the next several years, NASA plans to launch several earth science missions which are expected to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day transmitted from low earth orbiting spacecraft to ground stations. The current S-band and X-band frequency allocations in use by NASA, however, are incapable of supporting the data rates required to meet this demand. As such, NASA is in the planning stages to upgrade its existing Near Earth Network (NEN) polar ground stations to support Ka-band (25.5-27 GHz) operations. Consequently, it installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the Svalbard site. Svalbard was chosen as the appropriate site for two primary reasons: (1) Svalbard will be the first site to be upgraded to Ka-band operations within the NEN Polar Network enhancement plan, and (2) there exists a complete lack of Ka-band propagation data at this site (as opposed to the Fairbanks, AK NEN site, which has 5 years of characterization collected during the Advanced Communications Technology becomes imperative that characterization of propagation effects at these NEN sites is conducted to determine expected system Satellite (ACTS) campaign). processing and provide the Herein, we discuss the data three-year measurement results performance, particularly at low elevation angles ((is) less than 10 deg) from the ongoing Ka-band propagation characterization where spacecraft signal acquisition typically occurs. Since May 2011, NASA Glenn Research Center has installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the NEN site located in Svalbard, Norway. The Ka-band radiometer monitors the water vapor line, as well as 4 frequencies around 26.5 GHz at a fixed 10 deg elevation angle. Three-year data collection results indicate good campaign at Svalbard, Norway. Comparison of these results with the ITU models and existing ERA profile data indicates very good agreement when the 2010 rain maps and cloud statistics are used. Finally, the Svalbard data is used to derive the expected

  13. Holonomic quantum computation on microwave photons with all resonant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ping; Yu, Long-Bao; Zhou, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The intrinsic difficulties of holonomic quantum computation on superconducting circuits are originated from the use of three levels in superconducting transmon qubits and the complicated dispersive interaction between them. Due to the limited anharmonicity of transmon qubits, the experimental realization seems to be very challenging. However, with recent experimental progress, coherent control over microwave photons in superconducting circuit cavities is well achieved, and thus provides a promising platform for quantum information processing with photonic qubits. Here, with all resonant inter-cavity photon-photon interactions, we propose a scheme for implementing scalable holonomic quantum computation on a circuit QED lattice. In our proposal, three cavities, connected by a SQUID, are used to encode a logical qubit. By tuning the inter-cavity photon-photon interaction, we can construct all the holonomies needed for universal quantum computation in a non-adiabatic way. Therefore, our scheme presents a promising alternative for robust quantum computation with microwave photons.

  14. Dichroic Filter for Separating W-Band and Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry W.; Durden, Stephen L.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Long, Ezra M.; Sosnowski, John B.; Higuera, Raymond J.; Chen, Jacqueline C.

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems (ACEs) mission development would advance cloud profiling radar from that used in CloudSat by adding a 35-GHz (Ka-band) channel to the 94-GHz (W-band) channel used in CloudSat. In order to illuminate a single antenna, and use CloudSat-like quasi-optical transmission lines, a spatial diplexer is needed to add the Ka-band channel. A dichroic filter separates Ka-band from W-band by employing advances in electrical discharge machining (EDM) and mode-matching analysis techniques developed and validated for designing dichroics for the Deep Space Network (DSN), to develop a preliminary design that both met the requirements of frequency separation and mechanical strength. First, a mechanical prototype was built using an approximately 102-micron-diameter EDM process, and tolerances of the hole dimensions, wall thickness, radius, and dichroic filter thickness measured. The prototype validated the manufacturing needed to design a dichroic filter for a higher-frequency usage than previously used in the DSN. The initial design was based on a Ka-band design, but thicker walls are required for mechanical rigidity than one obtains by simply scaling the Ka-band dichroic filter. The resulting trade of hole dimensions for mechanical rigidity (wall thickness) required electrical redesign of the hole dimensions. Updates to existing codes in the linear solver decreased the analysis time using mode-matching, enabling the electrical design to be realized quickly. This work is applicable to missions and instruments that seek to extend W-band cloud profiling measurements to other frequencies. By demonstrating a dichroic filter that passes W-band, but reflects a lower frequency, this opens up the development of instruments that both compare to and enhance CloudSat.

  15. Passband switchable microwave photonic multiband filter

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jia; Fok, Mable P.

    2015-01-01

    A reconfigurable microwave photonic (MWP) multiband filter with selectable and switchable passbands is proposed and experimentally demonstrated, with a maximum of 12 simultaneous passbands evenly distributed from 0 to 10 GHz. The scheme is based on the generation of tunable optical comb lines using a two-stage Lyot loop filter, such that various filter tap spacings and spectral combinations are obtained for the configuration of the MWP filter. Through polarization state adjustment inside the Lyot loop filter, an optical frequency comb with 12 different comb spacings is achieved, which corresponds to a MWP filter with 12 selectable passbands. Center frequencies of the filter passbands are switchable, while the number of simultaneous passbands is tunable from 1 to 12. Furthermore, the MWP multiband filter can either work as an all-block, single-band or multiband filter with various passband combinations, which provide exceptional operation flexibility. All the passbands have over 30 dB sidelobe suppression and 3-dB bandwidth of 200 MHz, providing good filter selectivity. PMID:26521693

  16. Delay-Throughput Performance the Deep-Space Ka-Band Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, performance of a first-in, first-out (FIFO), selective retransmission scheme for the deep-space Ka-band link is presented and compared to the performance of a comparable X-band link. In this analysis, 16 months of water vapor radiometer (WVR) and advanced water vapor radiometer (AWVR) data from the three Deep Space Network (DSN) Communication Complexes (DSCC) were used to emulate weather effects on X-band and Ka-band links from Mars. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) X-band and Ka-band telecommunications parameters were used for spacecraft telecommunications capabilities. One pass per week per complex was selected from MRO's Deep Space Network (DSN) schedule from April 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007 for a total of 207 passes (69 passes per complex) for this analysis. For each pass both X-band and Ka-band links were designed using at most two data rates so that the expected pass capacity would be maximized subject to a minimum availability requirement (MAR). In conjunction with the WVR/AWVR data, elevation profiles of the selected passes and models for the performance of the antennas in the DSN were used to emulate the performance of both links. It was assumed that the retransmission of the data takes place not on the same pass as the original transmission but during subsequent passes. The data collected before a pass was assumed to be a fraction of the expected capacity of the pass as calculated through the link design process. Infinite spacecraft storage was assumed to obtain an upper bound on the spacecraft storage requirement. The independent parameters of this analysis were MAR and the ratio of data collected before a pass to the expected pass capacity. Since the selected passes did not occur at regular intervals, the delay in this analysis was measured in terms of number of passes. The throughput was measured in terms of number of bits received successfully on the ground. The results indicate that reasonable delay performance could be achieved with

  17. Delay-Throughput Performance of the Deep-Space Ka-band Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, performance of a first-in, first-out (FIFO), selective retransmission scheme for the deep-space Ka-band link is presented and compared to the performance of a comparable X-band link. In this analysis, 16 months of water vapor radiometer (WVR) and advanced water vapor radiometer (AWVR) data from the three Deep Space Network (DSN) Communication Complexes (DSCC) were used to emulate weather effects on X-band and Ka-band links from Mars. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) X-band and Ka-band telecommunications parameters were used for spacecraft telecommunications capabilities. One pass per week per complex was selected from MRO's Deep Space Network (DSN) schedule from April 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007 for a total of 207 passes (69 passes per complex) for this analysis. For each pass both X-band and Ka-band links were designed using at most two data rates so that the expected pass capacity would be maximized subject to a minimum availability requirement (MAR). In conjunction with the WVR/AWVR data, elevation profiles of the selected passes and models for the performance of the antennas in the DSN were used to emulate the performance of both links. It was assumed that the retransmission of the data takes place not on the same pass as the original transmission but during subsequent passes. The data collected before a pass was assumed to be a fraction of the expected capacity of the pass as calculated through the link design process. Infinite spacecraft storage was assumed to obtain an upper bound on the spacecraft storage requirement. The independent parameters of this analysis were MAR and the ratio of data collected before a pass to the expected pass capacity. Since the selected passes did not occur at regular intervals, the delay in this analysis was measured in terms of number of passes. The throughput was measured in terms of number of bits received successfully on the ground. The results indicate that reasonable delay performance could be achieved with

  18. A Gigabit-per-Second Ka-Band Demonstration Using a Reconfigurable FPGA Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dennis; Gray, Andrew A.; Kang, Edward C.; Tsou, Haiping; Lay, Norman E.; Fong, Wai; Fisher, Dave; Hoy, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Gigabit-per-second communications have been a desired target for future NASA Earth science missions, and for potential manned lunar missions. Frequency bandwidth at S-band and X-band is typically insufficient to support missions at these high data rates. In this paper, we present the results of a 1 Gbps 32-QAM end-to-end experiment at Ka-band using a reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) baseband modulator board. Bit error rate measurements of the received signal using a software receiver demonstrate the feasibility of using ultra-high data rates at Ka-band, although results indicate that error correcting coding and/or modulator predistortion must be implemented in addition. Also, results of the demonstration validate the low-cost, MOS-based reconfigurable modulator approach taken to development of a high rate modulator, as opposed to more expensive ASIC or pure analog approaches.

  19. Experiments on Tree Reflectivity at C, X, K and Ka-bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskelinen, Pekka; Ylinen, Juhana

    2014-07-01

    Dedicated field portable radars have been used to measure the reflectivity of identified deciduous and coniferous trees at C to Ka frequency bands with perpendicular illumination. Actual test radars, their electrical parameters including antennas and calibration devices are described. First results show summer time reflectivities from -30 to -10 dB (m2/m2) for deciduous trees and from -30 to 0 dB (2/m2) for coniferous samples, depending on frequency band. Late autumn and spring measurements show particularly well in Ka-band the absence of leaves. Variations in histogram detail, from one frequency to another, exceed 10 dB despite the cumulative probabilities for all bands are quite similar. The measured power spectral density of deciduous trees in the spring was typically 20 dB/Hz at X-band and 30 dB/Hz in Ka-band. Midsummer tests gave values close to 15 and 25 dB/Hz.

  20. Silicon-Germanium Films Grown on Sapphire for Ka-Band Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Mueller, Carl H.; Croke, Edward T.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's vision in the space communications area is to develop a broadband data network in which there is a high degree of interconnectivity among the various satellite systems, ground stations, and wired systems. To accomplish this goal, we will need complex electronic circuits integrating analog and digital data handling at the Ka-band (26 to 40 GHz). The purpose of this project is to show the feasibility of a new technology for Ka-band communications applications, namely silicon germanium (SiGe) on sapphire. This new technology will have several advantages in comparison to the existing silicon-substrate- based circuits. The main advantages are extremely low parasitic reactances that enable much higher quality active and passive components, better device isolation, higher radiation tolerance, and the integration of digital and analog circuitry on a single chip.

  1. Multiple access capacity trade-offs for a Ka-band personal access satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessouky, Khaled; Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    System capability is critical to the economic viability of a personal satellite communication system. Ka band has significant potential to support a high capacity multiple access system because of the availability of bandwidth. System design tradeoffs are performed and multiple access schemes are compared with the design goal of achieving the highest capacity and efficiency. Conclusions regarding the efficiency of the different schemes and the achievable capacities are given.

  2. A satellite system for multimedia personal communications at Ka-band and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatalaro, F.; Losquadro, G.

    1995-01-01

    The main characteristics of the satellite extremely high frequency (EHF) communication of multimedia mobile services (SECOMS) system are given and the results of the preliminary analysis are included. The SECOMS provides a first generation Ka band system with coverage over Western Europe, in order to satisfy business user needs of very large bandwidths and terminal mobility. The satellite system also provides a second generation EHF enhanced system with increased capacity and enlarged coverage, to serve all of Europe and the nearby countries.

  3. Holonomic quantum computation on microwave photons with all resonant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ping; Yu, Long-Bao; Zhou, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The intrinsic difficulties of holonomic quantum computation on superconducting circuits are originated from the use of three levels in superconducting transmon qubits and the complicated dispersive interaction between them. Due to the limited anharmonicity of transmon qubits, the experimental realization seems to be very challenging. However, with recent experimental progress, coherent control over microwave photons in superconducting circuit cavities is well achieved, and thus provides a promising platform for quantum information processing with photonic qubits. Here, with all resonant inter-cavity photon–photon interactions, we propose a scheme for implementing scalable holonomic quantum computation on a circuit QED lattice. In our proposal, three cavities, connected by a SQUID, are used to encode a logical qubit. By tuning the inter-cavity photon–photon interaction, we can construct all the holonomies needed for universal quantum computation in a non-adiabatic way. Therefore, our scheme presents a promising alternative for robust quantum computation with microwave photons.

  4. ACTS Ka-Band Earth Stations: Technology, Performance, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Struharik, Steven J.; Diamond, John J.; Stewart, David

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project invested heavily in prototype Ka-band satellite ground terminals to conduct an experiments program with ACTS. The ACTS experiments program proposed to validate Ka-band satellite and ground-station technology, demonstrate future telecommunication services, demonstrate commercial viability and market acceptability of these new services, evaluate system networking and processing technology, and characterize Ka-band propagation effects, including development of techniques to mitigate signal fading. This paper will present a summary of the fixed ground terminals developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center and its industry partners, emphasizing the technology and performance of the terminals and the lessons learned throughout their 6-year operation, including the inclined orbit phase-of-operations. The fixed ground stations used for experiments by government, academic, and commercial entities used reflector-based offset-fed antenna systems with antennas ranging in size from 0.35 to 3.4 in. in diameter. Gateway earth stations included two systems referred to as the NASA Ground Station (NGS) and the Link Evaluation Terminal (LET).

  5. Quantum efficiency of a double quantum dot microwave photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement; Vavilov, Maxim

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we study charge transfer through a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting cavity subject to a microwave field. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and determine the optimal parameter regime for complete absorption of radiation and efficient conversion of microwave photons to electric current. For experimentally available DQD systems, we show that the cavity-coupled DQD operates as a photon-to-charge converter with quantum efficiencies up to 80% C.W. acknowledges support by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program.

  6. Microwave photonic comb filter with ultra-fast tunability.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H Y; Yan, L S; Pan, Y; Pan, W; Luo, B; Zou, X H; Eggleton, B J

    2015-11-01

    A microwave comb filter with ultra-fast tunability is proposed based on the fundamental delay-line microwave photonic filter. The central frequency of the passband or stopband in such a filter can be rapidly adjusted, along with the independent tunability of the free spectral range (FSR). Experimental results show that the central frequency of the transfer function is electronically tuned with a frequency difference of half of the FSR at a speed of <100  ps. Such high-speed tunability is vital for high-speed microwave switching, frequency hopping, cognitive radio, and next-generation radar systems. PMID:26512477

  7. Photonic microwave receivers based on high-Q optical resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Zadeh, Mani

    2012-02-01

    The quest for low power and high frequency electro-optical modulator has been one of the important endeavors in microwave photonics. The advent of microdisk electro-optic modulator created a new domain in optical modulator and photonic microwave receiver design by exploiting the unique properties of high quality (high-Q) Whispering-Gallery Mode (WGM) optical cavities. High-Q crystalline WG cavities were the first devices used as compact and low power resonant electro-optical modulators and gradually semiconductor and polymer based microdisk and microring modulators emerged from this core technology. Due to its small size, high sensitivity and limited bandwidth, originally microdisk modulator was developed with the objective of replacing the conventional microwave wireless receiver frontend with a sensitive photonic front-end. Later it was shown that the electro-optic microdisk modulator could also function as a microwave frequency mixer in optical domain. Starting from fundamentals of resonant electro-optic modulation in high-Q WGM cavities, in this paper we review the development of high sensitivity microdisk modulators and the recent progress toward more efficient modulation at higher frequencies. Next related topics such as singlesideband modulation, all-dielectric photonic receiver, and semiconductor microring modulators are briefly discussed. Finally, photonic microwave receiver configurations that employ high-Q optical resonance for modulation, filtering and mixing are presented. We will show that high-Q optical resonance is one of the promising routes toward the general idea of an all-optical microwave receiver free of high frequency electronic transistors, mixers and filters.

  8. Ka-Band Atmospheric Noise Temperature Measurements at Goldstone, California Using a 34-meter Beam Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D.; Clauss, R.; Speranza, M.

    1997-01-01

    (View graphs) NASA's Deep space missions have used 960 MHz, 2.3 GHz, and 8.4 GHz for spacecraft communications dowlinks. Ka-band (32 GHz) is being considered as a downlink frequency for future flight projects.

  9. Recent Results From The Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Link Experiment (MGS/KaBLE-II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-Band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4 GHz) downlink.

  10. MEMS, Ka-Band Single-Pole Double-Throw (SPDT) Switch for Switched Line Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Ponchak, George E.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2002-01-01

    Ka-band MEMS doubly anchored cantilever beam capacitive shunt devices are used to demonstrate a MEMS SPDT switch fabricated on high resistivity silicon (HRS) utilizing finite ground coplanar waveguide (FGC) transmission lines. The SPDT switch has an insertion loss (IL), return loss (RL), and isolation of 0.3dB, 40dB, and 30 dB, respectively at Ka-band.

  11. Ka-Band Site Characterization of the NASA Near Earth Network in Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Morse, J.; Nessel, J.; Zemba, M.; Tuttle, K.; Caroglanian, A.; Younes, B.; Pedersen, Sten-Chirstian

    2011-01-01

    Critical to NASA s rapid migration toward Ka-Band is the comprehensive characterization of the communication channels at NASA's ground sites to determine the effects of the atmosphere on signal propagation and the network's ability to support various classes of users in different orbits. Accordingly, NASA has initiated a number of studies involving the ground sites of its Near Earth and Deep Space Networks. Recently, NASA concluded a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the Norwegian Space Centre of the Kingdom of Norway and began a joint site characterization study to determine the atmospheric effects on Ka-Band links at the Svalbard Satellite Station in Norway, which remains a critical component of NASA s Near Earth Communication Network (NEN). System planning and design for Ka-band links at the Svalbard site cannot be optimally achieved unless measured attenuation statistics (e.g. cumulative distribution functions (CDF)) are obtained. In general, the CDF will determine the necessary system margin and overall system availability due to the atmospheric effects. To statistically characterize the attenuation statistics at the Svalbard site, NASA has constructed a ground-based monitoring station consisting of a multi-channel total power radiometer (25.5 - 26.5 GHz) and a weather monitoring station to continuously measure (at 1 second intervals) attenuation and excess noise (brightness temperature). These instruments have been tested in a laboratory environment as well as in an analogous outdoor climate (i.e. winter in Northeast Ohio), and the station was deployed in Svalbard, Norway in May 2011. The measurement campaign is planned to last a minimum of 3 years but not exceeding a maximum of 5 years.

  12. Ka-Band Waveguide Hybrid Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers With Unequal and Arbitrary Power Output Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2009-01-01

    The design, simulation and characterization of a novel Ka-band (32.05 +/- 0.25 GHz) rectangular waveguide branch-line hybrid unequal power combiner is presented. The manufactured combiner was designed to combine input signals, which are in phase and with an amplitude ratio of two. The measured return loss and isolation of the branch-line hybrid are better than 22 and 27 dB, respectively. The application of the branch-line hybrid for combining two MMIC power amplifiers with output power ratio of two is demonstrated. The measured combining efficiency is approximately 93 percent over the above frequency band.

  13. Weather related continuity and completeness on Deep Space Ka-band links: statistics and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the concept of link 'stability' as means of measuring the continuity of the link is introduced and through it, along with the distributions of 'good' periods and 'bad' periods, the performance of the proposed Ka-band link design method using both forecasting and long-term statistics has been analyzed. The results indicate that the proposed link design method has relatively good continuity and completeness characteristics even when only long-term statistics are used and that the continuity performance further improves when forecasting is employed. .

  14. Use of elliptical orbits for a Ka-band personal access satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motamedi, Masoud; Estabrook, Polly

    1990-01-01

    The use of satellites in elliptical orbits for a Ka-band personal communications system application designed to provide voice and data service within the continental U.S. is examined. The impact of these orbits on system parameters such as signal carrier-to-noise ratio, roundtrip delay, Doppler shift, and satellite antenna size is quantized for satellites in two elliptical orbits, the Molniya and the ACE orbits. The number of satellites necessary for continuous CONUS coverage has been determined for the satellites in these orbits. The increased system complexity brought about by the use of satellites at such altitudes is discussed.

  15. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles <30° due to specular reflection from regular surface. At larger incidence angles, the relative non-polarized contribution decreases, but grows again at HH-polarization approaching 0.7-0.8 at 65° for 10 m/s wind speed, suggesting that backscattering from breaking waves dominates HH NRCS at low grazing angles. At high incidence angles (>60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on

  16. Advanced mobile satellite communications using COMETS satellite in MM-wave and Ka-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Isobe, Shunkichi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Naito, Hideyuki

    1993-01-01

    Early in the 21st century, the demand for personal communications using mobile, hand-held, and VSAT terminals will rapidly increase. In a future system, many different types of services should be provided with one-hop connection. The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) has studied a future advanced mobile satellite communications system using millimeter wave and Ka band. In 1990, CRL started the Communications and Broadcasting Engineering Test Satellite (COMETS) project. The satellite has been developed in conjunction with NASDA and will be launched in 1997. This paper describes the COMETS payload configuration and the experimental system for the advanced mobile communications mission.

  17. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 2: Tests on the antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    In part one of this article, a description was given of a Ka-band test package developed to enable testing of the Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 34-m beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna at 32 GHz. Test results were given for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration. This article is a companion article concerned with Ka-band test results for the test package in an on-the-antenna test configuration. Included are Ka-band zenith noise-temperature values, tipping-curve data, and subreflector test results obtained at the Cassegrain focal point, as well as at the final BWG focal point (located in a subterranean pedestal room). Test results show that, through the use of the Ka-band test package, the BWG antenna performance was successfully evaluated at Ka-band. The Ka-band test package operated well in all of the different antenna test configurations.

  18. Equatorial Precession in the Control Software of the Ka-Band Object Observation and Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakeman, Hali L.

    2013-01-01

    The Ka-Band Object Observation and Monitoring, or KaBOOM, project is designed mainly to track and characterize near Earth objects. However, a smaller goal of the project would be to monitor pulsars and study their radio frequency signals for use as a clock in interstellar travel. The use of pulsars and their timing accuracy has been studied for decades, but never in the Ka-band of the radio frequency spectrum. In order to begin the use of KaBOOM for this research, the control systems need to be analyzed to ensure its capability. Flaws in the control documentation leave it unclear as to whether the control software processes coordinates from the J200 epoch. This experiment will examine the control software of the Intertronic 12m antennas used for the KaBOOM project and detail its capabilities in its "equatorial mode." The antennas will be pointed at 4 chosen points in the sky on several days while probing the virtual azimuth and elevation (horizon coordinate) registers. The input right ascension and declination coordinates will then be converted separately from the control software to horizontal coordinates and compared, thus determining the ability of the control software to process equatorial coordinates.

  19. A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator with a four-gap buncher

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lili; He, Juntao; Ling, Junpu

    2015-05-15

    A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator (TTO) with a four-gap buncher is proposed and investigated. Simulation results show that an output power of 1.27 GW and a frequency of 26.18 GHz can be achieved with a diode voltage of 447 kV and a beam current of 7.4 kA. The corresponding power efficiency is 38.5%, and the guiding magnetic field is 0.6 T. Studies and analysis indicate that a buncher with four gaps can modulate the electron beam better than the three-gap buncher in such a Ka-band TTO. Moreover, power efficiency increases with the coupling coefficient between the buncher and the extractor. Further simulation demonstrates that power efficiency can reach higher than 30% with a guiding magnetic field of above 0.5 T. Besides, the power efficiency exceeds 30% in a relatively large range of diode voltage from 375 kV to 495 kV.

  20. Channel characterisation for future Ka-band Mobile Satellite Systems and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforza, Mario; Buonomo, Sergio; Arbesser-Rastburg, Bertram

    1994-01-01

    Mobile satellite systems (MSS) are presently designed or planned to operate, with the exception of OMNITRACKS, in the lower part of the frequency spectrum (UHF to S-bands). The decisions taken at the last World Administrative Radio Conference in 1992 to increase the allocated L- and S-bands for MSS services will only partly alleviate the problem of system capacity. In addition the use of L-and S-band frequencies generally requires large antenna apertures on board the satellite terminal side. The idea of exploiting the large spectrum resources available at higher frequencies (20-30 GHz) and the perspective of reducing user terminal size (and possibly price too) have spurred the interest of systems designers and planners. On the other hand, Ka-band frequencies suffer from increased slant path losses due to atmospheric attenuation phenomena. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently embarked on a number of activities aimed at studying the effect of the typical mobile propagation impairments at Ka-band. This paper briefly summarizes ESA efforts in this field of research and presents preliminary experimental results.

  1. Generation of Data-Rate Profiles of Ka-Band Deep-Space Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2006-01-01

    A short report discusses a methodology for designing Ka-band Deep-Space-to- Earth radio-communication links. This methodology is oriented toward minimizing the effects of weather on the Ka-band telecommunication link by maximizing the expected data return subject to minimum link availability and a limited number of data rates. This methodology differs from the current standard practices in which a link is designed according to a margin policy for a given link availability at 10 elevation. In this methodology, one chooses a data-rate profile that will maximize the average data return over a pass while satisfying a minimum-availability requirement for the pass, subject to mission operational limitations expressed in terms of the number of data rates used during the pass. The methodology is implemented in an intelligent search algorithm that first finds the allowable data-rate profiles from the mission constraints, spacecraft-to-Earth distance, spacecraft EIRP (effective isotropic radiated power), and the applicable zenith atmospheric noise temperature distribution, and then selects the best data rate in terms of maximum average data return from the set of allowable data-rate profiles.

  2. Ka-Band Atmospheric Phase Stability Measurements in Goldstone, CA; White Sands, NM; and Guam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    As spacecraft communication links are driven to higher frequencies (e.g. Ka-band) both by spectrum congestion and the appeal of higher data rates, the propagation phenomena at these frequencies must be well characterized for effective system design. In particular, the phase stability of a site at a given frequency will govern whether or not the site is a practical location for an antenna array, particularly if uplink capabilities are desired. Propagation studies to characterize such phenomena must be done on a site-by-site basis due to the wide variety of climates and weather conditions at each ground terminal. Accordingly, in order to statistically characterize the atmospheric effects on Ka-Band links, site test interferometers (STIs) have been deployed at three of NASA's operational sites to directly measure each site's tropospheric phase stability. Using three years of results from these experiments, this paper will statistically characterize the simultaneous atmospheric phase noise measurements recorded by the STIs deployed at the following ground station sites: the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, CA; the White Sands Ground Terminal near Las Cruces, NM; and the Guam Remote Ground Terminal on the island of Guam.

  3. Amplitude Scintillation due to Atmospheric Turbulence for the Deep Space Network Ka-Band Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C.; Wheelon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Fast amplitude variations due to atmospheric scintillation are the main concerns for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Ka-band downlink under clear weather conditions. A theoretical study of the amplitude scintillation variances for a finite aperture antenna is presented. Amplitude variances for weak scattering scenarios are examined using turbulence theory to describe atmospheric irregularities. We first apply the Kolmogorov turbulent spectrum to a point receiver for three different turbulent profile models, especially for an exponential model varying with altitude. These analytic solutions then are extended to a receiver with a finite aperture antenna for the three profile models. Smoothing effects of antenna aperture are expressed by gain factors. A group of scaling factor relations is derived to show the dependences of amplitude variances on signal wavelength, antenna size, and elevation angle. Finally, we use these analytic solutions to estimate the scintillation intensity for a DSN Goldstone 34-m receiving station. We find that the (rms) amplitude fluctuation is 0.13 dB at 20-deg elevation angle for an exponential model, while the fluctuation is 0.05 dB at 90 deg. These results will aid us in telecommunication system design and signal-fading prediction. They also provide a theoretical basis for further comparison with other measurements at Ka-band.

  4. Stabilizing Microwave Frequency of a Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong

    2006-01-01

    A scheme for stabilizing the frequency of a microwave signal is proposed that exploits the operational characteristics of a coupled optoelectronic oscillator (COEO) and related optoelectronic equipment. An essential element in the scheme is a fiber mode-locked laser (MLL), the optical frequency of which is locked to an atomic transition. In this scheme, the optical frequency stability of the mode-locked laser is transferred to that of the microwave in the same device. Relative to prior schemes for using wideband optical frequency comb to stabilize microwave signals, this scheme is simpler and lends itself more readily to implementation in relatively compact, rugged equipment. The anticipated development of small, low-power, lightweight, highly stable microwave oscillators based on this scheme would afford great benefits in communication, navigation, metrology, and fundamental sciences. COEOs of various designs, at various stages of development, in some cases called by different names, have been described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. A COEO is an optoelectronic apparatus that generates both short (picosecond) optical pulses and a steady microwave signal having an ultrahigh degree of spectral purity. The term "coupled optoelectronic" in the full name of such an apparatus signifies that its optical and electronic oscillations are coupled to each other in a single device. The present frequency-stabilization scheme is best described indirectly by describing the laboratory apparatus used to demonstrate it. The apparatus (see figure) includes a COEO that generates a comb-like optical spectrum, the various frequency components of which interfere, producing short optical pulses. This spectrum is centered at a nominal wavelength of 1,560 nm. The spectrum separation of this comb is about 10 GHz, as determined primarily by the length of an optical loop and the bandpass filter in the microwave feedback loop. The optical loop serves as microwave resonator

  5. Wide-Band Microwave Receivers Using Photonic Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Yu, Nan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2008-01-01

    In wide-band microwave receivers of a type now undergoing development, the incoming microwave signals are electronically preamplified, then frequency-up-converted to optical signals that are processed photonically before being detected. This approach differs from the traditional approach, in which incoming microwave signals are processed by purely electronic means. As used here, wide-band microwave receivers refers especially to receivers capable of reception at any frequency throughout the range from about 90 to about 300 GHz. The advantage expected to be gained by following the up-conversion-and-photonic-processing approach is the ability to overcome the limitations of currently available detectors and tunable local oscillators in the frequency range of interest. In a receiver following this approach (see figure), a preamplified incoming microwave signal is up-converted by the method described in the preceeding article. The frequency up-converter exploits the nonlinearity of the electromagnetic response of a whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator made of LiNbO3. Up-conversion takes place by three-wave mixing in the resonator. The WGM resonator is designed and fabricated to function simultaneously as an electro-optical modulator and to exhibit resonance at the microwave and optical operating frequencies plus phase matching among the microwave and optical signals circulating in the resonator. The up-conversion is an efficient process, and the efficiency is enhanced by the combination of microwave and optical resonances. The up-converted signal is processed photonically by use of a tunable optical filter or local oscillator, and is then detected. Tunable optical filters can be made to be frequency agile and to exhibit high resonance quality factors (high Q values), thereby making it possible to utilize a variety of signal-processing modalities. Therefore, it is anticipated that when fully developed, receivers of this type will be compact and will be capable of both

  6. Tunable superconducting qudit mediated by microwave photons

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sung Un; Bae, Myung-Ho; Kim, Nam; Kang, Kicheon

    2015-08-15

    We have investigated the time-domain characteristics of the Autler-Townes doublet in a superconducting circuit. The transition probabilities between the ground state and the Autler-Townes doublet states are shown to be controlled in a phase-coherent manner using a well-known microwave pulse pattern technique. The experimental results are well explained by a numerical simulation based on the Markovian master equation. Our result indicates that the Autler-Townes doublet states might be useful as a tunable qudit for implementation of quantum information processing, in particular as a multivalued quantum logic element.

  7. Deep Space Ka-band Link Management and the MRO Demonstration: Long-term Weather Statistics Versus Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Shambayati, Shervin; Slobin, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    During the last 40 years, deep space radio communication systems have experienced a move toward shorter wavelengths. In the 1960s a transition from L- to S-band occurred which was followed by a transition from S- to X-band in the 1970s. Both these transitions provided deep space links with wider bandwidths and improved radio metrics capability. Now, in the 2000s, a new change is taking place, namely a move to the Ka-band region of the radio frequency spectrum. Ka-band will soon replace X-band as the frequency of choice for deep space communications providing ample spectrum for the high data rate requirements of future missions. The low-noise receivers of deep space networks have a great need for link management techniques that can mitigate weather effects. In this paper, three approaches for managing Ka-band Earth-space links are investigated. The first approach uses aggregate annual statistics, the second one uses monthly statistics, and the third is based on the short-term forecasting of the local weather. An example of weather forecasting for Ka-band link performance prediction is presented. Furthermore, spacecraft commanding schemes suitable for Ka-band link management are investigated. Theses schemes will be demonstrated using NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft in the 2007 to 2008 time period, and the demonstration findings will be reported in a future publication.

  8. Software-defined microwave photonic filter with high reconfigurable resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Yi, Lilin; Jaouën, Yves; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    Microwave photonic filters (MPFs) are of great interest in radio frequency systems since they provide prominent flexibility on microwave signal processing. Although filter reconfigurability and tunability have been demonstrated repeatedly, it is still difficult to control the filter shape with very high precision. Thus the MPF application is basically limited to signal selection. Here we present a polarization-insensitive single-passband arbitrary-shaped MPF with ~GHz bandwidth based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical fibre. For the first time the filter shape, bandwidth and central frequency can all be precisely defined by software with ~MHz resolution. The unprecedented multi-dimensional filter flexibility offers new possibilities to process microwave signals directly in optical domain with high precision thus enhancing the MPF functionality. Nanosecond pulse shaping by implementing precisely defined filters is demonstrated to prove the filter superiority and practicability. PMID:27759062

  9. Highly tunable microwave and millimeter wave filtering using photonic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregelyi, Joe; Lu, Ping; Paquet, Stéphane; Celo, Dritan; Mihailov, Stephen J.

    2015-05-01

    The design for a photonic microwave filter tunable in both bandwidth and operating frequency is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The circuit is based on a single sideband modulator used in conjunction with two or more transmission fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) cascaded in series. It is demonstrated that the optical filtering characteristics of the FBGs are instrumental in defining the shape of the microwave filter, and the numerical modeling was used to optimize these characteristics. A multiphase-shift transmission FBG design is used to increase the dynamic range of the filter, control the filter ripple, and maximize the slope of the filter skirts. Initial measurements confirmed the design theory and demonstrated a working microwave filter with a bandwidth tunable from approximately 2 to 3.5 GHz and an 18 GHz operating frequency tuning range. Further work is required to refine the FBG manufacturing process and reduce the impact of fabrication errors.

  10. Enhancing End-to-End Performance of Information Services Over Ka-Band Global Satellite Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Glover, Daniel R.; Ivancic, William D.; vonDeak, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The Internet has been growing at a rapid rate as the key medium to provide information services such as e-mail, WWW and multimedia etc., however its global reach is limited. Ka-band communication satellite networks are being developed to increase the accessibility of information services via the Internet at global scale. There is need to assess satellite networks in their ability to provide these services and interconnect seamlessly with existing and proposed terrestrial telecommunication networks. In this paper the significant issues and requirements in providing end-to-end high performance for the delivery of information services over satellite networks based on various layers in the OSI reference model are identified. Key experiments have been performed to evaluate the performance of digital video and Internet over satellite-like testbeds. The results of the early developments in ATM and TCP protocols over satellite networks are summarized.

  11. Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1997-01-01

    We present features for an ultra-stable sapphire cryogenic oscillator which has been designed to support the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment. The design of this standard is new in several respects. It is cooled by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid cryogens to increase operating time, and it uses a technology to adjust the temperature turn-over point to extend the upper operating temperature limit and to enable construction of multiple units with uniform operating characteristics. Objectives are 3 x 10(exp -15) stability for measuring times 1 second less than or equal to (tau) less than or equal to 100 seconds, phase noise of -85 dBc/Hz from offset frequencies of 1 Hz to 1000 Hz at 10 GHz carrier frequency, and a one year continuous operating period.

  12. A high power Ka band millimeter wave generator with low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jun; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Li Guolin; Zhang Zehai

    2010-08-15

    A slow wave type gigawatt millimeter wave generator is proposed in this paper. In order to increase power capacity, overmoded slow wave structures (SWSs) with larger diameter have been used. Taking advantage of the ''surface wave'' property of overmoded SWSs, the TM{sub 01} mode can be selected to be the operating mode. Calculations have also been carried out to choose a proper low operating magnetic field strength, and it agrees with particle in cell (PIC) simulations. Main structure parameters of the device are optimized by PIC simulations. A typical simulation result is that, at the beam parameters of 600 keV and 5.05 kA, and guiding magnetic field of 0.85 T, a Ka band millimeter wave with an output power of 1.05 GW is generated, yielding a conversion efficiency of about 35%.

  13. Study on Ka-Band Sheet Beam Traveling Wave Tube Focused by Closed PCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhan-Liang; Shi, Xianbao; Gong, Yu-Bin; Wei, Yan-Yu; Duan, Zhao-Yun; Su, Xiaogang; Gong, Huarong; Feng, Jinjun; Huang, Hua

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a Ka-band sheet beam traveling wave tube (TWT) focused by a 0.2 T closed periodic cusped magnet (PCM) system. The TWT with one section of staggered double-vane slow-wave structure (SWS) is driven by a 0.8-A sheet beam with rectangular cross-sectional area of 3.2 mm × 0.6 mm. This sheet beam TWT can produce 100 W output power, and the 3 dB band is 33-38.5 GHz. In order to improve the output power, an optimized sheet beam TWT with two sections of SWSs focused by a novel closed PCM system is proposed. The new closed PCM system is with annular magnetic blocks and can be fabricated and adjusted easily. The simulation shows that the optimized sheet beam TWT can produce 2000 W output power and the 3 dB band ranging from 33 to 40 GHz.

  14. A short-pulse Ka-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Mikko; Eskelinen, Pekka

    2008-10-01

    A portable Ka-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements has been designed. It uses direct dielectric resonator oscillator multiplier pulse modulation giving a half power pulse width of 17 ns. The dual conversion scalar receiver utilizes either a digital storage oscilloscope in envelope detection format or a special gated comparator arrangement providing 1 m resolution and associated led seven segment display for data analysis. The calibrated dynamic range is better than 37 dB with an equivalent noise floor of 0.005 dBsm at 25 m test range distance. First experiments indicate an effective beamwidth close to 1°. The total weight is below 5 kg and the unit can be mounted on a conventional photographic tripod. Power is supplied from a 12 V/6 A h sealed lead acid battery giving an operating time in excess of 10 h.

  15. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  16. First Results from an Airborne Ka-band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed SweepSAR technique that breaks typical Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) trade space using time-dependent multi-beam DBF on receive. Developing SweepSAR implementation using array-fed reflector for proposed DESDynI Earth Radar Mission concept. Performed first-of-a-kind airborne demonstration of the SweepSAR concept at Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Validated calibration and antenna pattern data sufficient for beam forming in elevation. (1) Provides validation evidence that the proposed Deformation Ecosystem Structure Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) SAR architecture is sound. (2) Functions well even with large variations in receiver gain / phase. Future plans include using prototype DESDynI SAR digital flight hardware to do the beam forming in real-time onboard the aircraft.

  17. Target variability and exact signature reproduction requirements for Ka-band radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Robert H.; Kersey, William T.; McFarlin, M. Shane; Finley, Robbin; Neilson, H. J.; Nixon, William E.

    2001-08-01

    A variety of ATR algorithms have promise improved performance, not yet realized operationally. Typically, good results have been reported on data sets of limited size that have been tested in a laboratory environment, only to see the performance degrade when stressed with real-world target and environmental variability. To investigate exact signature reproduction requirements along with target and environment variability issues for stressing new ATR metrics, the U.S. Army's National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) and Targets Management Office (TMO) originated, sponsored, and directed a signature project plan to acquire multiple target full-polarimetric Ka-band radar signature data at Eglin AFB, as well as its submillimeter-wave compact radar range equivalent using high-fidelity exact 1/16th scale replicas fabricated by the ERADS program. To effectively understand signature reproduction requirements through the variability of multiple target RCS characteristics, TMO and NGIC sponsored researchers at U Mass Lowell's Submillimeter-Wave Technology Laboratory (STL) and Simulation Technologies (SimTech) to analyze the intra- class and inter-class variability of the full scale Ka-band turntable signature data. NGIC, TMO, STL and SimTech researchers then traveled to the location of the vehicles measured at Eglin AFB and conducted extensive documentation and mensuration on these vehicles. Using this information, ERADS built high fidelity, articulatable exact replicas for measurement in the NGIC's compact radar ranges. Signal processing software established by STL researchers in an NGIC directed signature study was used to execute an HRR and ISAR cross-correlation study of the field and scale-model signature data. The signature to signature variability quantified is presented, along with a description and examples of the signature analysis techniques exploited. This signature data is available from NGIC on request for Government Agencies and Government Contractors with an

  18. First Airswot Ka-Band Radar Backscatter Returns over a Complex California Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baney, O. N.; Smith, L. C.; Pitcher, L. H.; Gleason, C. J.; Chu, V. W.; Bennett, M. M.; Pavelsky, T.; Sadowy, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    In anticipation of the launch of the NASA Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, this project was conducted around the Piute Ponds of Edwards Air Force Base within the Mojave Desert, California to characterize ground conditions simultaneously with two AirSWOT flights collected May 14th, 2014. Both SWOT and AirSWOT employ a Ka-band interferometer to map water surface elevations and extent, but the ability of Ka-band radar to discriminate shorelines and flooded vegetation is not well known. Presumed bright returns from moist soils surrounding surface water bodies have also been speculated to confound interpretation of SWOT/AirSWOT data. The Piute Ponds are a dynamic area of constantly changing water conditions, providing a convenient test site for field studies to assess open water, dry shorelines, vegetation edges, islands, flooded vegetation and soil moisture in conjunction with AirSWOT backscatter and visible/near-infrared camera imagery. Islands were characterized into dry islands and flooded vegetation stands including species such as bulrush (Scripus acutus) and tamarisk (Tammarix ramosissima). Results demonstrate that full water extent can be determined by near-range backscatter returns which are strong for both open water and flooded vegetation. Far-range backscatter returns over open water were unreliable for flooded extent. Comparing near-range and far-range backscatter results to the soil moisture transect shows correlation, however as soil moisture increases, discriminating between wet sediment and water becomes difficult. In sum, first results suggest near-return backscatter results prove most useful in distinguishing open water from non-water, with a strong correlation between soil moisture and backscatter returns.

  19. Ka-Band GaAs FET Monolithic Power Amplifier Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunier, Paul; Tserng, Hua Quen

    1997-01-01

    Over the course of this program, very extensive progress was made in Ka-band GaAs technology. At the beginning of the program, odd-shaped VPE MESFET wafers were used. A breakthrough in power and efficiency was achieved with highly doped (8 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3) MBE grown MESFET material. We obtained power of 112 mW with 16 dB gain and 21.6% efficiency at 34 GHz with a monolithic 50-100-250 micron amplifier. The next breakthrough came with the use of heterostructures grown by MBE (AlGaAs/InGaAs where the InGaAs is highly doped). This allowed us to achieve high power density with high efficiency. A benchmark 40% efficiency was achieved with a single-stage 100 micron MMIC at 32.5 GHz. The corresponding three-stage 50-100-250 micron amplifier achieved 180 mW with 23 dB gain and 30.3% efficiency. The next breakthrough came with 3-inch MBE grown PHEMT wafers incorporating an etch-stop layer for the gate recess (using RIE). Again, state-of-the-art performances were achieved: 40% efficiency with 235 mW output power and 20.7 dB gain. The single-stage 2 x 600 micron chip demonstrated 794 mW output power with 5 dB gain and 38.2% power-added efficiency (PAE). The Ka-band technology developed under this program has promise for extensive use: JPL demonstrated 32 GHz phased arrays with a three-stage amplifier developed under this contract. A variation of the three-stage amplifier was used successfully in a 4 x 4 phased array transmitter developed under another NASA contract.

  20. High Stability CFRP Support Structure for Ka Band Multi-Spot Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarza, A.; Cano, J.; Ozores, E.

    2012-07-01

    In the recent days, Ka band mission are being implemented for telecommunication satellites as emergent technology. EADS CASA Espacio (ASTRIUM) has been doing developments able to face up the demanding requirements associated to this frequency band where aspects such as in orbit stability o manufacturing accuracy are essential. Once it has been demonstrated the capability to offer excellent antenna reflectors with low mass, very low ohmic losses, excellent RF performances and very stable in orbit thermoelastic behaviour, improvements at feeder-chain level have been developed with the aim to cover the global antenna mission with excellent performances. This paper presents the product developed to accommodate a KA band multi-spot cluster to cover a telecommunication mission. It includes a description of the tasks carried out until the current development status, with the definition of the mechanical specification used as applicable and the solutions applied to meet the requirements. A CFRP structure is proposed with the aim to achieve a light mass concept, structurally speaking optimized and capable to assemble multiple feeder chain and make independent the thermomechanical behaviour of each one. Moreover, the design with CFRP leads to very stable thermoelastic behaviour of the assembly and the feeder-chain with the scope to guaranty the stability of the RF-beam for the correct electrical performances. The compatibility between the carbon fibre structure and the Aluminium feeder chain is solved by means of isostatic devices that are capable to absorb the thermal stresses coming from the different thermal expansion coefficients of the materials used. The proposed design is to be confirmed over a Qualification Model, already manufactured, with the scope to be implemented as flight hardware in a commercial spacecraft. The product is to be tested in a full qualification environmental test campaign where the capability to withstand the dynamic loads and the thermal

  1. Simultaneous Ka-Band Site Characterization: Goldstone, CA, White Sands, NM, and Guam, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto; Morse, Jacquelynne; Zemba, Michael; Nessel, James; Morabito, David; Caroglanian, Armen

    2011-01-01

    To statistically characterize atmospheric effects on Ka-band links at NASA operational sites, NASA has constructed site test interferometers (STI s) which directly measure the tropospheric phase stability and rain attenuation. These instruments observe an unmodulated beacon signal broadcast from a geostationary satellite (e.g., Anik F2) and measure the phase difference between the signals received by the two antennas and its signal attenuation. Three STI s have been deployed so far: the first one at the NASA Deep Space Network Tracking Complex in Goldstone, California (May 2007); the second at the NASA White Sands Complex, in Las Cruses, New Mexico (February 2009); and the third at the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) Remote Ground Terminal (GRGT) complex in Guam (May 2010). Two station-years of simultaneous atmospheric phase fluctuation data have been collected at Goldstone and White Sands, while one year of data has been collected in Guam. With identical instruments operating simultaneously, we can directly compare the phase stability and rain attenuation at the three sites. Phase stability is analyzed statistically in terms of the root-mean-square (rms) of the tropospheric induced time delay fluctuations over 10 minute blocks. For two years, the time delay fluctuations at the DSN site in Goldstone, CA, have been better than 2.5 picoseconds (ps) for 90% of the time (with reference to zenith), meanwhile at the White Sands, New Mexico site, the time delay fluctuations have been better than 2.2 ps with reference to zenith) for 90% of time. For Guam, the time delay fluctuations have been better than 12 ps (reference to zenith) at 90% of the time, the higher fluctuations are as expected from a high humidity tropical rain zone. This type of data analysis, as well as many other site quality characteristics (e.g., rain attenuation, infrastructure, etc.) will be used to determine the suitability of all the sites for NASA s future communication services at Ka-band.

  2. Frequency-stabilization of mode-locked laser-based photonic microwave oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Salik, Ertan; Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will describe our recent phase-noise measurements of photonic microwave oscillators. We will aslo discuss our investigation of the frequency stability link between the optical and microwave frequencies in the coupled oscillator.

  3. Microwave photonic bandgap devices with active plasma elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benjamin; Colon Quinones, Roberto; Biggs, David; Underwood, Thomas; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark; Stanford Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2015-09-01

    A 3-D alumina rod based microwave photonic crystal device with integrated gaseous plasma elements is designed and characterized. Modulation of the plasma density of the active plasma elements is shown to allow for high fidelity modulation of the output signal of the photonic crystal device. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations of the device are presented, and the functional effects of the plasma electron density, plasma collision frequency, and plasma dimensions are studied. Experimental characterization of the transmission of the device shows active tunability through adjustments of plasma parameters, including discharge current and plasma size. Additional photonic crystal structures with integrated plasma elements are explored. Sponsored by the AFSOR MURI and DOD NDSEG.

  4. Photonic compressive sensing with a micro-ring-resonator-based microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Ding, Yunhong; Zhu, Zhijing; Chi, Hao; Zheng, Shilie; Zhang, Xianmin; Jin, Xiaofeng; Galili, Michael; Yu, Xianbin

    2016-08-01

    A novel approach to realize photonic compressive sensing (CS) with a multi-tap microwave photonic filter is proposed and demonstrated. The system takes both advantages of CS and photonics to capture wideband sparse signals with sub-Nyquist sampling rate. The low-pass filtering function required in the CS is realized in a photonic way by using a frequency comb and a dispersive element. The frequency comb is realized by shaping an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source with an on-chip micro-ring resonator, which is beneficial to the integration of photonic CS. A proof-of-concept experiment for a two-tone signal acquisition with frequencies of 350 MHz and 1.25 GHz is experimentally demonstrated with a compression factor up to 16.

  5. Microwave photonics systems based on whispering-gallery-mode resonators.

    PubMed

    Coillet, Aurélien; Henriet, Rémi; Phan Huy, Kien; Jacquot, Maxime; Furfaro, Luca; Balakireva, Irina; Larger, Laurent; Chembo, Yanne K

    2013-08-05

    Microwave photonics systems rely fundamentally on the interaction between microwave and optical signals. These systems are extremely promising for various areas of technology and applied science, such as aerospace and communication engineering, sensing, metrology, nonlinear photonics, and quantum optics. In this article, we present the principal techniques used in our lab to build microwave photonics systems based on ultra-high Q whispering gallery mode resonators. First detailed in this article is the protocol for resonator polishing, which is based on a grind-and-polish technique close to the ones used to polish optical components such as lenses or telescope mirrors. Then, a white light interferometric profilometer measures surface roughness, which is a key parameter to characterize the quality of the polishing. In order to launch light in the resonator, a tapered silica fiber with diameter in the micrometer range is used. To reach such small diameters, we adopt the "flame-brushing" technique, using simultaneously computer-controlled motors to pull the fiber apart, and a blowtorch to heat the fiber area to be tapered. The resonator and the tapered fiber are later approached to one another to visualize the resonance signal of the whispering gallery modes using a wavelength-scanning laser. By increasing the optical power in the resonator, nonlinear phenomena are triggered until the formation of a Kerr optical frequency comb is observed with a spectrum made of equidistant spectral lines. These Kerr comb spectra have exceptional characteristics that are suitable for several applications in science and technology. We consider the application related to ultra-stable microwave frequency synthesis and demonstrate the generation of a Kerr comb with GHz intermodal frequency.

  6. Microwave photonic delay line signal processing.

    PubMed

    Diehl, John F; Singley, Joseph M; Sunderman, Christopher E; Urick, Vincent J

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides a path for the design of state-of-the-art fiber-optic delay lines for signal processing. The theoretical forms for various radio-frequency system performance metrics are derived for four modulation types: X- and Z-cut Mach-Zehnder modulators, a phase modulator with asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and a polarization modulator with control waveplate and polarizing beam splitter. Each modulation type is considered to cover the current and future needs for ideal system designs. System gain, compression point, and third-order output intercept point are derived from the transfer matrices for each modulation type. A discussion of optical amplifier placement and fiber-effect mitigation is offered. The paper concludes by detailing two high-performance delay lines, built for unique applications, that exhibit performance levels an order of magnitude better than commercial delay lines. This paper should serve as a guide to maximizing the performance of future systems and offer a look into current and future research being done to further improve photonics technologies.

  7. A Comparison of the Ka-Band Deep-Space Link with the X-Band Link through Emulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shambayati, S.

    2009-08-01

    In this article, the performance of the 32-GHz (Ka-band) deep-space link is compared to that of the 8.41-GHz (X-band) link through emulation. Sky brightness time series from water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and advanced WVRs (AWVRs) were used to emulate the effects of increased system noise temperature (SNT) and line-of-sight atmospheric attenuation due for both X-band and Ka-band. Models for Deep Space Network (DSN) ground antennas were used to obtain ground antenna gain and system noise temperature performance. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) X-band and Ka-band capabilities with slightly different coding and data rates were chosen for the spacecraft link design and emulation. A total of 207 passes (69 per DSN complex) from MRO's DSN tracking schedule were selected for these emulations. For each pass, the actual link geometry was used to design and emulate the link. The Ka-band link was designed so that the expected pass capacity is maximized with at most two data rates, subject to a minimum availability requirement (MAR). Two X-band link designs were used. The first design approach, similar to Ka-band, maximized the expected link capacity with at most two data rates subject to a MAR. The second design approach was similar to the current MRO link design practice. In this approach, the X-band link was designed for operations above 20 deg elevation with a single data rate that has at least 1 dB of margin over 90 percent supportable data rate at 20 deg elevation. The analysis provides continuity and completeness statistics as well as delay-throughput performance characteristics for both Ka-band and X-band. The analysis indicates that the optimized X-band link has only a 2-dB advantage over current practice in terms of capacity and the Ka-band link offers an approximately 5.5-dB advantage over current practice (normalized for onboard DC power used). The analysis also indicates that even with a 99 percent MAR, the Ka-band link suffers an order of magnitude more losses

  8. Phase and frequency structure of superradiance pulses generated by relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    Phase and frequency stability of electromagnetic oscillations in sub-gigawatt superradiance (SR) pulses generated by an extensive slow-wave structure of a relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator were experimentally investigated. Data on the frequency tuning and radiation phase stability of SR pulses with a variation of the energy and current of electron beam were obtained.

  9. A New Blind Pointing Model Improves Large Reflector Antennas Precision Pointing at Ka-Band (32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)-Deep Space Network (DSN) subnet of 34-m Beam Waveguide (BWG) Antennas was recently upgraded with Ka-Band (32-GHz) frequency feeds for space research and communication. For normal telemetry tracking a Ka-Band monopulse system is used, which typically yields 1.6-mdeg mean radial error (MRE) pointing accuracy on the 34-m diameter antennas. However, for the monopulse to be able to acquire and lock, for special radio science applications where monopulse cannot be used, or as a back-up for the monopulse, high-precision open-loop blind pointing is required. This paper describes a new 4th order pointing model and calibration technique, which was developed and applied to the DSN 34-m BWG antennas yielding 1.8 to 3.0-mdeg MRE pointing accuracy and amplitude stability of 0.2 dB, at Ka-Band, and successfully used for the CASSINI spacecraft occultation experiment at Saturn and Titan. In addition, the new 4th order pointing model was used during a telemetry experiment at Ka-Band (32 GHz) utilizing the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft while at a distance of 0.225 astronomical units (AU) from Earth and communicating with a DSN 34-m BWG antenna at a record high rate of 6-megabits per second (Mb/s).

  10. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Sadowy, G.; Wu, X.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Michel, T.; Lou, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Processing challenges were encountered in achieving the accuracy requirements on several fronts including, aircraft motion sensitivity, multipath and systematic drifts. However, through a combination of processor optimization, a modified phase-screen and motion-compensation implementations were able to minimize the impact of these systematic error sources. We will present results from the IPY data collections including system performance evaluations and imagery. This includes a large area digital elevation model (DEM) collected over Jakobshavn glacier as an illustrative science data product. Further, by intercomparison with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and calibration targets we quantify the interferometric penetration bias of the Ka-band returns into the snow cover. Following the success of the IPY campaign, we are funded under the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program to transition GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. In addition

  11. High Efficiency Power Combining of Ka-Band TWTs for High Data Rate Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Vaden, K. R.; Lesny, G. G.; Glass, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    Future NASA deep space exploration missions are expected in some cases to require telecommunication systems capable of operating at very high data rates (potentially 1 Gbps or more) for the transmission back to Earth of large volumes of scientific data, which means high frequency transmitters with large bandwidth. Among the Ka band frequencies of interest are the present 500 MHz Deep Space Network (DSN) band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz and a broader band at 37-38 GHz allocated for space science [1]. The large distances and use of practical antenna sizes dictate the need for high transmitter power of up to 1 kW or more. High electrical efficiency is also a requirement. The approach investigated by NASA GRC is a novel wave guide power combiner architecture based on a hybrid magic-T junction for combining the power output from multiple TWTs [1,2]. This architecture was successfully demonstrated and is capable of both high efficiency (90-95%, depending on frequency) and high data rate transmission (up to 622 Mbps) in a two-way power combiner circuit for two different pairs of Ka band TWTs at two different frequency bands. One pair of TWTs, tested over a frequency range of 29.1 to 29.6 GHz, consisted of two 110-115W TWTs previously used in uplink data transmission evaluation terminals in the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program [1,2]. The second pair was two 100W TWTs (Boeing 999H) designed for high efficiency operation (greater than 55%) over the DSN frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz [3]. The presentation will provide a qualitative description of the wave guide circuit, results for power combining and data transmission measurements, and results of computer modeling of the magic-T and alternative hybrid junctions for improvements in efficiency and power handling capability. The power combiner results presented here are relevant not only to NASA deep space exploration missions, but also to other U.S. Government agency programs.

  12. Large Ka-Band Slot Array for Digital Beam-Forming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Hodges, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the development of a large Ka Band Slot Array for the Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN), a proposed spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar for topographic mapping of ice sheets and glaciers. GLISTIN will collect ice topography measurement data over a wide swath with sub-seasonal repeat intervals using a Ka-band digitally beamformed antenna. For technology demonstration purpose a receive array of size 1x1 m, consisting of 160x160 radiating elements, was developed. The array is divided into 16 sticks, each stick consisting of 160x10 radiating elements, whose outputs are combined to produce 16 digital beams. A transmit array stick was also developed. The antenna arrays were designed using Elliott's design equations with the use of an infinite-array mutual-coupling model. A Floquet wave model was used to account for external coupling between radiating slots. Because of the use of uniform amplitude and phase distribution, the infinite array model yielded identical values for all radiating elements but for alternating offsets, and identical coupling elements but for alternating positive and negative tilts. Waveguide-fed slot arrays are finding many applications in radar, remote sensing, and communications applications because of their desirable properties such as low mass, low volume, and ease of design, manufacture, and deployability. Although waveguide-fed slot arrays have been designed, built, and tested in the past, this work represents several advances to the state of the art. The use of the infinite array model for the radiating slots yielded a simple design process for radiating and coupling slots. Method of moments solution to the integral equations for alternating offset radiating slots in an infinite array environment was developed and validated using the commercial finite element code HFSS. For the analysis purpose, a method of moments code was developed for an infinite array of subarrays. Overall

  13. Ka-band propagation studies using the ACTS propagation terminal and the CSU-CHILL multiparameter, Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, J.; Turk, J.; Bringi, V. N.

    1995-01-01

    An increase in the demand for satellite communications has led to an overcrowding of the current spectrums being used - mainly at C and Ku bands. To alleviate this overcrowding, new technology is being developed to open up the Ka-band for communications use. One of the first experimental communications satellites using this technology is NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). In Sept. 1993, ACTS was deployed into a geostationary orbit near 100 deg W longitude. The ACTS system employs two Ka-band beacons for propagation experiments, one at 20.185 GHz and another at 27.505 GHz. Attenuation due to rain and tropospheric scintillations will adversely affect new technologies proposed for this spectrum. Therefore, before being used commercially, propagation effects at Ka-band must be studied. Colorado State University is one of eight sites across the United States and Canada conducting propagations studies; each site is equipped with the ACTS propagation terminal (APT). With each site located in a different climatic zone, the main objective of the propagation experiment is to obtain monthly and yearly attenuation statistics. Each site also has secondary objectives that are site dependent. At CSU, the CSU-CHILL radar facility is being used to obtain polarimetric radar data along the ACTS propagation path. During the expected two to four year period of the project, it is hoped to study several significant weather events. The S-band radar will be used to obtain Ka-band attenuation estimates and to initialize propagation models that have been developed, to help classify propagation events measured by the APT. Preliminary attenuation estimates for two attenuation events will be shown here - a bright band case that occurred on 13 May 1994 and a convective case that occurred on 20 Jun. 1994. The computations used to obtain Ka-band attenuation estimates from S-band radar data are detailed. Results from the two events are shown.

  14. Variability study of Ka-band HRR polarimetric signatures on 11 T-72 tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, William E.; Neilson, H. J.; Szatkowski, G. N.; Giles, Robert H.; Kersey, William T.; Perkins, L. C.; Waldman, Jerry

    1998-09-01

    In an effort to effectively understand signature verification requirements through the variability of a structure's RCS characteristics, the U.S. Army National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC), with technical support from STL, originated a signature project plan to obtain MMW signatures from multiple similar tanks. In implementing this plan NGIC/STL directed and sponsored turntable measurements performed by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Sensors and Electromagnetic Resource Directorate on eleven T-72 tanks using an HRR full-polarimetric Ka-band radar. The physical condition and configuration of these vehicles were documented by careful inspection and then photographed during the acquisition sequence at 45 degree(s) azimuth intervals. The turntable signature of one vehicle was acquired eight times over the three day signatures acquisition period for establishing measurement variability on any single target. At several intervals between target measurements, the turntable signature of a 30 m2 trihedral was also acquired as a calibration reference for the signature library. Through an RCS goodness-of-fit correlation and ISAR comparison study, the signature-to-signature variability was evaluated for the eighteen HRR turntable measurements of the T-72 tanks. This signature data is available from NGIC on request for Government Agencies and Government Contractors with an established need-to-know.

  15. Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, A.; Zhang, C.; Kollias, P.; Matrosov, S.; Szyrmer, W.

    2014-02-01

    The use of millimeter wavelength radars for probing precipitation has recently gained interest. However, estimation of precipitation variables is not straightforward due to strong attenuation, radar receiver saturation, antenna wet radome effects and natural microphysical variability. Here, an automated algorithm is developed for routinely retrieving rain rates from profiling Ka-band (35-GHz) ARM zenith radars (KAZR). A 1-D simple, steady state microphysical model is used to estimate the impact of microphysical processes and attenuation on the profiles of the radar observables at 35-GHz and thus provide criteria for identifying when attenuation or microphysical processes dominate KAZR observations. KAZR observations are also screened for saturation and wet radome effects. The proposed algorithm is implemented in two steps: high rain rates are retrieved by using the amount of attenuation in rain layers, while lower rain rates by the Ze-R (reflectivity-rain rate) relation is implemented. Observations collected by the KAZR, disdrometer and scanning weather radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign at Gan Island of the tropical Indian Ocean are used to validate the proposed approach. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm can be used to derive robust statistics of rain rates in the tropics from KAZR observations.

  16. Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, A.; Zhang, C.; Kollias, P.; Matrosov, S.; Szyrmer, W.

    2015-09-01

    The use of millimeter wavelength radars for probing precipitation has recently gained interest. However, estimation of precipitation variables is not straightforward due to strong signal attenuation, radar receiver saturation, antenna wet radome effects and natural microphysical variability. Here, an automated algorithm is developed for routinely retrieving rain rates from the profiling Ka-band (35-GHz) ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) zenith radars (KAZR). A 1-dimensional, simple, steady state microphysical model is used to estimate impacts of microphysical processes and attenuation on the profiles of radar observables at 35-GHz and thus provide criteria for identifying situations when attenuation or microphysical processes dominate KAZR observations. KAZR observations are also screened for signal saturation and wet radome effects. The algorithm is implemented in two steps: high rain rates are retrieved by using the amount of attenuation in rain layers, while low rain rates are retrieved from the reflectivity-rain rate (Ze-R) relation. Observations collected by the KAZR, rain gauge, disdrometer and scanning precipitating radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign at the Gan Island of the tropical Indian Ocean are used to validate the proposed approach. The differences in the rain accumulation from the proposed algorithm are quantified. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm has a potential for deriving continuous rain rate statistics in the tropics.

  17. Onboard Interferometric SAR Processor for the Ka-Band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Peral, Eva; Clark, Duane I.; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2011-01-01

    An interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) onboard processor concept and algorithm has been developed for the Ka-band radar interferometer (KaRIn) instrument on the Surface and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. This is a mission- critical subsystem that will perform interferometric SAR processing and multi-look averaging over the oceans to decrease the data rate by three orders of magnitude, and therefore enable the downlink of the radar data to the ground. The onboard processor performs demodulation, range compression, coregistration, and re-sampling, and forms nine azimuth squinted beams. For each of them, an interferogram is generated, including common-band spectral filtering to improve correlation, followed by averaging to the final 1 1-km ground resolution pixel. The onboard processor has been prototyped on a custom FPGA-based cPCI board, which will be part of the radar s digital subsystem. The level of complexity of this technology, dictated by the implementation of interferometric SAR processing at high resolution, the extremely tight level of accuracy required, and its implementation on FPGAs are unprecedented at the time of this reporting for an onboard processor for flight applications.

  18. Inflatable Microstrip Reflectarray Antennas at X and Ka-band Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Feria, Alfonso

    1999-01-01

    Inflatable antenna technology is being developed by JPL/NASA to enable the capabilities of low mass, high packaging efficiency, and low-cost deployment for future spacecraft high-gain and large aperture antennas. One of the technologies being considered is the inflatable microstrip reflectarray. A conventional inflatable parabolic reflector antenna will offer similar advantages with the added capability of wide electrical bandwidth. However, it suffers from the difficulty of maintaining its required large, thin, and curved-parabolic surface in the space environment. Since the microstrip reflectarray has the "natural" flat reflecting surface, it is much easier to maintain the required surface tolerance using an inflatable structure. This is the primary reason, despite its narrow bandwidth characteristic, that the inflatable microstrip reflectarray is being studied. This article discusses an already-developed one-meter X-band inflatable microstrip reflectarray and a three-meter Ka-band inflatable microstrip reflectarray which is currently under development. Both antennas' RF structures are designed at JPL and their mechanical inflatable structures are designed and manufactured at ILC Dover, Inc.

  19. Inflatable Microstrip Reflectarray Antennas At X and Ka-Band Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Feria, Alfonso

    1998-01-01

    Introduction: Inflatable antenna technology is being developed by JPL/NASA to enable the capabilities of low mass, high packaging efficiency, and low-cost deployment for future spacecraft high-gain and large aperture antennas. One of the technologies being considered [11 is the inflatable microstrip reflectarray. A conventional inflatable parabolic reflector antenna will offer similar advantages with the added capability of wide electrical bandwidth. However, it suffers from the difficulty of maintaining its required large, thin, and curved-parabolic surface in the space environment. Since the microstrip reflectarray has the "natural" flat reflecting surface, it is much easier to maintain the required surface tolerance using an inflatable structure. This is the primary reason, despite its narrow bandwidth characteristic, that the inflatable microstrip reflectarray is being studied. This article discusses an already-developed one-meter X-band inflatable microstrip reflectarray and a three-meter Ka-band inflatable microstrip reflectarray which is currently under development. Both antennas' RF structures are designed at JPL and their mechanical inflatable structures are designed and manufactured at ILC Dover, Inc.

  20. Ka-Band, MEMS Switched Line Phase Shifters Implemented in Finite Ground Coplanar Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Ponchak, George E.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2005-01-01

    Ka-band MEMS switched line phase shifters implemented in finite ground coplanar waveguide are described in this paper. The phase shifters are constructed of single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches with additional reference and phase offset transmission line lengths. The one- and two-bit phase shifters are fabricated on high resistivity (HR) silicon with a dielectric constant, Epsilon(sub T) = 11.7 and a substrate thickness, t = 500microns. The switching architectures integrated within the phase shifters consist of MEMS switches that are doubly anchored cantilever beam capacitive switches with additional high inductive sections (MEMS LC device). The SPDT switch is composed of a T-junction with a MEMS LC device at each output port. The one-bit phase shifter described in this paper has an insertion loss (IL) and return loss (RL) of 0.9 dB and 30 dB while the two-bit described has an IL and RL of 1.8 dB and 30 dB respectively. The one-bit phase shifter's designed offset phase is 22.5deg and actual measured phase shift is 21.8deg. The two-bit phase shifter's designed offset phase is 22.5deg, 45deg, and 67.5deg and the actual measured phase shifts are 21.4deg, 44.2deg, and 65.8deg, respectively.

  1. 3D modeling of large targets and clutter utilizing Ka band monopulse SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Jerry A.; Barr, Doug; Shurtz, Ric; Channell, Rob

    2006-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama have developed a dual mode, Ka Band Radar and IIR system for the purpose of data collection and tracker algorithm development. The system is comprised of modified MMW and IIR sensors and is mounted in a stabilized ball on a UH-1 helicopter operated by Redstone Technical Test Center. Several missile programs under development require MMW signatures of multiple target and clutter scenes. Traditionally these target signatures have been successfully collected using static radars and targets mounted on a turntable to produce models from ISAR images; clutter scenes have been homogeneously characterized using information on various classes of clutter. However, current and future radar systems require models of many targets too large for turntables, as well as high resolution 3D scattering characteristics of urban and other non-homogenous clutter scenes. In partnership with industry independent research and development (IRAD) activities the U.S. Army RDEC has developed a technique for generating 3D target and clutter models using SAR imaging in the MMW spectrum. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of funded projects and resulting data products with an emphasis on MMW data reduction and analysis, especially the unique 3D modeling capabilities of the monopulse radar flying SAR profiles. Also, a discussion of lessons learned and planned improvements will be presented.

  2. AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on sapphire substrates for Ka band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xubo, Song; Yuanjie, Lü; Guodong, Gu; Yuangang, Wang; Xin, Tan; Xingye, Zhou; Shaobo, Dun; Peng, Xu; Jiayun, Yin; Bihua, Wei; Zhihong, Feng; Shujun, Cai

    2016-04-01

    We report the DC and RF characteristics of AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with the gate length of 100 nm on sapphire substrates. The device exhibits a maximum drain current density of 1.29 A/mm and a peak transconductance of 440 mS/mm. A current gain cutoff frequency and a maximum oscillation frequency of 119 GHz and 155 GHz have been obtained, respectively. Furthermore, the large signal load pull characteristics of the AlN/GaN HEMTs were measured at 29 GHz. An output power density of 429 mW/mm has been demonstrated at a drain bias of 10 V. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the earliest demonstration of power density at the Ka band for AlN/GaN HEMTs in the domestic, and also a high frequency of load-pull measurements for AlN/GaN HEMTs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306113).

  3. High Rate User Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caroglanian, Armen; Perko, Kenneth; Seufert, Steve; Dod, Tom; Warshowsky, Jay; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High Rate User Phased Array Antenna (HRUPAA) is a Ka-Band planar phased array designed by the Harris Corporation for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The HRUPAA permits a satellite to downlink data either to a ground station or through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The HRUPAA is scanned electronically by ground station / user satellite command over a 120 degree cone angle. The phased array has the advantage of not imparting attitude disturbances to the user spacecraft. The 288-element transmit-only array has distributed RF amplifiers integrated behind each of the printed patch antenna elements. The array has 33 dBW EIRP and is left-hand circularly polarized. An engineering model of a partially populated array has been developed and delivered to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This report deals with the testing of the engineering model at the Goddard Antenna Range near-field and compact range facilities. The antenna specifications are described first, followed by the test plan and test results.

  4. An advanced Ka band phased array communication system at commercial frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Lawrence; Kacpura, Thomas; Kershner, Dennis

    2000-01-01

    The Glenn Research Center (GRC) Direct Data Distribution (D3) project will demonstrate an advanced, high-performance communication system that transmits information from a technology payload carried by the Space Shuttle in low-Earth orbit (LEO) to a small receiving terminal on the Earth. The Shuttle-based communications package will utilize a solid-state, Ka-band phased array antenna that electronically steers the 19.05 Ghz RF signal toward a low-cost, tracking ground terminal, thereby providing agile, vibration-free, electronic steering at reduced size and weight with increased reliability. The project will also demonstrate new digital modulation and processing technology that will allow transmission of user/platform data at rates up to 1200 Mbits per second. This capability will enable the management of the substantially increased amounts of data to be collected from the International Space Station (ISS) or other LEO platforms directly to NASA field centers, principal investigators, or into the commercial terrestrial communications network. .

  5. Nonclassical correlation between optical and microwave photons in a hybrid electro-optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong; Chen, Xiang; Lin, Gongwei; Lin, Xiumin

    2016-10-01

    A scheme to correlate optical and microwave photons is proposed in a hybrid electro-optomechanical system, where mechanical resonator is coupled to both optical and microwave fields. Analytical and numerical simulation results show that the cross-correlation function between Stokes and anti-Stokes photons strongly violates the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, which confirms the nonclassical correlation between the optical and microwave photons. It is worth noting that the nonclassical photon pairs with vast different wavelengths, which may be useful for quantum communication, are generated under the experimentally accessible weak coupling limit rather than single-photon strong coupling regime. In addition, the protocol provides a possible route to combine the respective advantages of optical photons, microwave photons, and phonons in a hybrid electro-optomechanical system.

  6. Monolithically Integrated Reconfigurable Filters for Microwave Photonic Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Erik J.

    For the purposes of commercial communication and military electronic warfare and radar alike, there is an increasing interest in RF systems that can handle very wide instantaneous bandwidths at high center frequencies. Optical signal processing has the capability to reduce latency, improve size, weight and power (SwAP) performance, and overcome the inherent bandwidth limitations of electronic counterparts. By rapidly pre-filtering wide bandwidth microwave signals in the optical domain, the analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) and subsequent digital signal processing (DSP) can be significantly relieved. Compared to channelizing and add/drop filters for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) applications, the microwave filter application is much more challenging as it requires a more versatile filter, ideally with tunability in both frequency and bandwidth. In this work such a filter was developed using integrated photonics. By integrating the filter on a single InP chip, the stability required for coherent filtering is met, while the active integration platform offers a flexible filter design and higher tolerance in the coupler and fabrication specifications. Using an entirely deep etched fabrication with a single blanket regrowth, a simple fabrication with high yield is achieved. The reconfigurable filter is designed as an array of uncoupled filter stages with each filter stage reconfigurable as a filter pole or zero with arbitrary magnitude and phase. This gives rise to a flexible ffilter synthesis, much like an optical version of DSP filters. Flat-topped bandpass filters are demonstrated with frequency tunability over 30 GHz, bandwidth adjustable between 1.9 and 5.4 GHz, and stopband rejection >32 dB. In order to meet the stringent spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) requirements of the microwave application, a novel epitaxial layer integration platform is developed. Optimized for high optical saturation power and low propagation loss, it produces semiconductor

  7. Microwave photonic integrator based on a multichannel fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiejun; Yao, Jianping

    2016-01-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a microwave photonic integrator based on a multichannel fiber Bragg grating (FBG) working in conjunction with a dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) to provide a step group delay response with no in-channel dispersion-related distortion. The multichannel FBG is designed based on the spectral Talbot effect, which provides a large group delay dispersion (GDD) within each channel. A step group delay response can then be achieved by cascading the multichannel FBG with a DCF having a GDD opposite the in-channel GDD. An optical comb, with each comb line located at the center of each channel of the FBG, is modulated by a microwave signal to be integrated. At the output of the DCF, multiple time-delayed replicas of the optical signal, with equal time delay spacing are obtained and are detected and summed at a photodetector (PD). The entire operation is equivalent to the integration of the input microwave signal. For a multichannel FBG with an in-channel GDD of 730 ps/nm and a DCF with an opposite GDD, an integrator with a bandwidth of 2.9 GHz and an integration time of 7 ns is demonstrated. PMID:26766692

  8. Ultracompact ring resonator microwave photonic filters based on photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guansheng; Tian, Huiping; Ji, Yuefeng

    2013-02-20

    We design two microwave photonic filters (notch filter and bandpass filter) based on silicon on insulator (SOI) photonic crystal waveguides for a 60 GHz single-sideband signal radio-over-fiber (ROF) system. By perturbing the radii of the first two rows of holes adjacent to the photonic crystal waveguide, we obtained a broad negligible dispersion bandwidth and a corresponding constant low group velocity. With the slow light effect, the delay line of filters can be significantly reduced while providing the same delay time as fiber based delay lines. The simulation results show that the delay-line length of the notch filter is only about 25.9 μm, and it has a free spectral range of 130 GHz, a baseband width (BW) of 4.12 GHz, and a notch depth of 22 dB. The length of the bandpass filter is 62.4 μm, with a 19.6 dB extinction ratio and a 4.02 GHz BW, and the signal-to-noise ratio requirement of received data can be reduced by 9 dB for the 10(-7) bit-error ratio. Demonstrated microwave photonic crystal filters could be used in a future high-frequency millimeter ROF system. PMID:23434992

  9. Modem Characterization Through a Wideband, Hard-Limited Ka-Band Satellite Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Ivancic, William; Tanger, Tom; Cronon, Chris; Lee, Donald; Kifer, David R.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is using a commercial customized TDMA/FDMA bandwidth on demand modem for use with the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to highlight the numerous services and experiments that can be performed using small Ka-Band terminals. Characterizing the modems proved challenging due to the characteristics of the satellite transponder. The ACTS channel is hard-limited and up to 900 MHz wide. The channel has some unusual dynamic properties due to the satellite and antenna system, which make modem testing through the satellite challenging and the test requirements stringent. The satellite Multi-Beam Antenna (MBA) has a 1 hertz oscillation induced by the momentum wheel, which causes the transmit antenna pattern to move slightly. This results in a 1 hertz oscillation in the ground station receive power, with amplitude changes up to 1 dB depending on terminal location within a spot beam and associated gain slope. In addition, ACTS experiences a solar induced "thermal event" each day. This "thermal event" occurs when the sun heats the antenna support structure causing the transmit and receive reflectors to mispoint. This results in a slowly decreasing or increasing power density at the ground station receiver as the antenna pattern moves off bore-site. This paper describes the method used to fully characterize the TDMA/FDMA modem through the ACTS wideband, hard-limited transponder. In particular, techniques are discussed for conducting RF measurements on such a channel, the affect that the thermal characteristics and 1 hertz variations have on the accuracy of the results, and suggested means to minimize the error and provide useful and valuable data.

  10. Multiple-resolution study of Ka-band HRR polarimetric signature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Robert H.; Kersey, William T.; McFarlin, M. Shane; Woodruff, Bobby G.; Finley, Robbin; Nixon, William E.

    2000-08-01

    SAR resolution and polarization performance studies for ATR algorithms have been the source of recent attention. Thorough investigations are often hindered by the lack of rigorously consistent high-resolution full-polarimetric signature data for a sufficient number of targets across requisite viewing angles, articulations and environmental conditions. While some evaluative performance studies of high-value structures and conceptual radar systems may be effectively studied with limited field radar data, to minimize signature acquisition costs, pose-independent studies of ATR algorithm are best served by signature libraries fashioned to encompass the complexity of the collection scenario. In response to the above requirements, the U.S. Army's National Ground Intelligence Center and Targets Management Office originated, sponsored, and directed a signature project plan to acquire multiple target signature data at Eglin, AFB using a high resolution full-polarimetric Ka-band radar. TMO and NGIC have sponsored researchers at both the Submillimeter-Wave Technology Laboratory and Simulation Technologies to analyze the trade-off between signature resolution and polarimetric features (ongoing research) of this turntable data. The signature data was acquired at five elevations spanning 5 degree to 60 degree for a T-72M1, T-72B, M1, M60-A3 and one classified vehicle. Using signal processing software established in an NGIC/STL-based signature study, researchers executed an HRR and ISAR cross-correlation study involving multiple resolutions to evaluate peak performance levels and to effectively understand signature requirements through the variability of multiple target RCS characteristics. The signature-to-signature variability quantified on the four unclassified MBTs is presented in this report, along with a description and examples of the signature analysis techniques exploited. This signature data is available from NGIC/TMO on request for Government Agencies and Government

  11. Demonstration of a Ka-Band communication path for On-Orbit Servicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purschke, R.; Harder, J.; Fleischner, A.

    2011-09-01

    The objectives of on-orbit servicing (OOS) missions include manipulation, proximity operations and inspection of target satellites. Therefore the servicer satellite often has to be teleoperated at low latency for several minutes to fulfill these tasks. That means communication plays a crucial role for OOS missions because real time teleoperation including high data rates has to be realized. So the communication path from front end sensors on the servicer spacecraft to the operator on ground has to be optimized and the latency time has to be minimized. Furthermore a long access time from the ground station is required because continuous communication with the satellite is mandatory for most of the OOS tasks. This can be realized by an inter-satellite link via a geostationary relay satellite, which has the advantage that a satellite in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) can be accessed from one ground station for about half an orbit. To evaluate both, the requirement of a long access time from the ground station as well as the need of a short latency time, an end to end communication scenario was implemented at the Institute of Astronautics (LRT) at the Technische Universität München (TUM). This scenario includes different spacecraft sensors (e.g. stereo cameras, LIDAR systems), a Ka-Band ground station and man machine interfaces. This paper describes the setup of a realistic simulation of a communication path from a data source to an operator via space-link. Furthermore the method of latency measuring depending on the data source is described. The communication architecture is embedded in a spacecraft simulator to simulate On-Orbit Servicing scenarios like Space Debris removal and target inspection.

  12. Preface to the special issue on "Integrated Microwave Photonic Signal Processing"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaña, José; Yao, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    As Guest Editors, we are pleased to introduce this special issue on "Integrated Microwave Photonic Signal Processing" published by the Elsevier journal Optics Communications. Microwave photonics is a field of growing importance from both scientific and practical application perspectives. The field of microwave photonics is devoted to the study, development and application of optics-based techniques and technologies aimed to the generation, processing, control, characterization and/or distribution of microwave signals, including signals well into the millimeter-wave frequency range. The use of photonic technologies for these microwave applications translates into a number of key advantages, such as the possibility of dealing with high-frequency, wide bandwidth signals with minimal losses and reduced electromagnetic interferences, and the potential for enhanced reconfigurability. The central purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the state of the art of generation, processing and characterization technologies for high-frequency microwave signals. It is now widely accepted that the practical success of microwave photonics at a large scale will essentially depend on the realization of high-performance microwave-photonic signal-processing engines in compact and integrated formats, preferably on a chip. Thus, the focus of the issue is on techniques implemented using integrated photonic technologies, with the goal of providing an update of the most recent advances toward realization of this vision.

  13. Interaction of Microwave Photons with Nanostructured Magnetic Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, Ivan; Tyberkevych, Vasyl; Levin-Pompetzki, Luke; Bankowski, Elena; Meitzler, Thomas; Nikitov, Sergey; Slavin, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    We develop a theoretical formalism for the description of the interaction of microwave photons with a thin (compared to the photon wavelength) magnetic metasurface comprised of dipolarly interacting nanoscale magnetic elements. We derive a scattering matrix describing the processes of photon transmission and reflection at the metasurface boundary. As an example of the use of the developed formalism, we demonstrate that the introduction of a magnetic metasurface inside a microstrip electromagnetic waveguide quantitatively changes the dispersion relation of the fundamental waveguide mode, opening a nonpropagation frequency band gap in the waveguide spectrum. The frequency position and the width of the band gap are dependent on the waveguide thickness and can be controlled dynamically by switching the magnetic ground state of the metasurface. For sufficiently thin waveguides, the position of the band gap is shifted from the resonance absorption frequency of the metasurface. In such a case, the magnetic metasurface inside a waveguide works as an efficient reflector, as the energy absorption in the metasurface is small, and most of the electromagnetic energy inside the nonpropagation band gap is reflected.

  14. AltiKa: a Ka-band Altimetry Payload and System for Operational Altimetry during the GMES Period

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Patrick; Steunou, Nathalie; Caubet, Eric; Phalippou, Laurent; Rey, Laurent; Thouvenot, Eric; Verron, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the Ka-band altimetry payload and system that has been studied for several years by CNES, ALCATEL SPACE and some science laboratories. Altimetry is one of the major elements of the ocean observing system to be made sustainable through the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) and GMES (Global Monitoring of the Environment and Security) programs. A short review of some mission objectives to be fulfilled in terms of mesoscale oceanography in the frame of the GEOSS and GMES programs is performed. To answer the corresponding requirements, the approach consisting in a constellation of nadir altimeter is discussed. A coupled Ka-band altimeter-radiometer payload is then described; technical items are detailed to explain how this payload shall meet the science and operational requirements, and expected performances are displayed. The current status of the payload development and flight perspectives are given.

  15. Ka-Band Propagation Studies using the ACTS Propagation Terminal and the CSU-CHILL Multiparameter Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Beaver, John

    1996-01-01

    One of the first experimental communications satellites using Ka-band technology is the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). In September 1993, ACTS was deployed into a geostationary orbit near 100 degrees W longitude by the space shuttle Discovery. The ACTS system supports both communication and propagation experiments at the 20/30 GHz frequency bands. The propagation experiment involves multi-year attenuation measurements along the satellite-Earth slant path.

  16. Experimental and theoretical study of parasitic leakage/resonance in a K/Ka-band MMIC package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yook, Jong-Gwan; Simons, Rainee N.; Katehi, Linda P. B.; Shaulkhauser, Kurt

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, electromagnetic leakage and spurious resonances in a K/Ka-band (18-40 GHz) MMIC hermetic package designed for a phase shifter chip are studied using the finite element method (FEM) and the numerical simulation results are compared with measured data. Both in measured and calculated data several spurious resonances are observed in the 18 to 24 GHz region and the origin of this phenomenon is identified by virtue of the modeling capability of the FEM.

  17. Photonic-assisted microwave signal multiplication and modulation using a silicon Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    PubMed

    Long, Yun; Zhou, Linjie; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Photonic generation of microwave signal is obviously attractive for many prominent advantages, such as large bandwidth, low loss, and immunity to electromagnetic interference. Based on a single integrated silicon Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM), we propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and compact photonic scheme to enable frequency-multiplicated microwave signal. Using the fabricated integrated MZM, we also demonstrate the feasibility of microwave amplitude-shift keying (ASK) modulation based on integrated photonic approach. In proof-of-concept experiments, 2-GHz frequency-doubled microwave signal is generated using a 1-GHz driving signal. 750-MHz/1-GHz frequency-tripled/quadrupled microwave signals are obtained with a driving signal of 250 MHz. In addition, a 50-Mb/s binary amplitude coded 1-GHz microwave signal is also successfully generated.

  18. Photonic-assisted microwave signal multiplication and modulation using a silicon Mach–Zehnder modulator

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yun; Zhou, Linjie; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Photonic generation of microwave signal is obviously attractive for many prominent advantages, such as large bandwidth, low loss, and immunity to electromagnetic interference. Based on a single integrated silicon Mach–Zehnder modulator (MZM), we propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and compact photonic scheme to enable frequency-multiplicated microwave signal. Using the fabricated integrated MZM, we also demonstrate the feasibility of microwave amplitude-shift keying (ASK) modulation based on integrated photonic approach. In proof-of-concept experiments, 2-GHz frequency-doubled microwave signal is generated using a 1-GHz driving signal. 750-MHz/1-GHz frequency-tripled/quadrupled microwave signals are obtained with a driving signal of 250 MHz. In addition, a 50-Mb/s binary amplitude coded 1-GHz microwave signal is also successfully generated. PMID:26832305

  19. Applications of Microwave Photonics in Radio Astronomy and Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Addario, Larry R.; Shillue, William P.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of narrow band vs wide band signals is given. Topics discussed included signal transmission, reference distribution and photonic antenna metrology. Examples of VLA, ALMA, ATA and DSN arrays are given. . Arrays of small antennas have become more cost-effective than large antennas for achieving large total aperture or gain, both for astronomy and for communication. It is concluded that emerging applications involving arrays of many antennas require low-cost optical communication of both wide bandwidth and narrow bandwidth; development of round-trip correction schemes enables timing precision; and free-space laser beams with microwave modulation allow structural metrology with approx 100 micrometer precision over distances of 200 meters.

  20. Reconfigurable microwave photonic filter based on polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Enming; Pan, Shilong; Li, Peili

    2016-03-01

    A reconfigurable microwave photonic filter based on a polarization modulator (PolM) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The PolM together with a polarization controller (PC) and a polarization beam splitter (PBS) implements two complementary intensity modulations in two separated branches. Then, optical components are inserted in the two branches to realize a bandpass filter and an allpass filter, respectively. When the two branches are combined by a second PBS, a filter with a frequency response that equals the subtraction of the frequency responses of the allpass filter and bandpass filter is achieved. By adjusting the PCs placed before the second PBS, a notch filter with a tunable notch depth or a bandpass filter can be achieved.

  1. Brillouin Amplification--A Powerful New Scheme for Microwave Photonic Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, S.; Maleki, L.

    1997-01-01

    We introduce the Brillouin selective sideband amplification technique and demonstrate many important applications of this technique in photonic microwave systems, including efficient phase modulation to amplitude modulation conversion, photonic frequency multiplication, photonic signal mixing with gain, and frequency multiplied signal up conversion.

  2. Power Spectrum of Atmospheric Scintillation for the Deep Space Network Goldstone Ka-Band Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C.; Wheelon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic signal fluctuations due to atmospheric scintillations may impair the Ka-band (around 32-GHz) link sensitivities for a low-margin Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving system. The ranges of frequency and power of the fast fluctuating signals (time scale less than 1 min) are theoretically investigated using the spatial covariance and turbulence theory. Scintillation power spectrum solutions are derived for both a point receiver and a finite-aperture receiver. The aperture-smoothing frequency ((omega(sub s)), corner frequency ((omega(sub c)), and damping rate are introduced to define the shape of the spectrum for a finite-aperture antenna. The emphasis is put on quantitatively describing the aperture-smoothing effects and graphically estimating the corner frequency for a large aperture receiver. Power spectral shapes are analyzed parametrically in detail through both low- and high-frequency approximations. It is found that aperture-averaging effects become significant when the transverse correlation length of the scintillation is smaller than the antenna radius. The upper frequency or corner frequency for a finite-aperture receiver is controlled by both the Fresnel frequency and aperture-smoothing frequency. Above the aperture-smoothing frequency, the spectrum rolls off at a much faster rate of exp (-omega(sup 2)/omega(sup 2, sub s), rather than omega(sup -8/3), which is customary for a point receiver. However, a relatively higher receiver noise level can mask the fast falling-off shape and make it hard to be identified. We also predict that when the effective antenna radius a(sub r) less than or = 6 m, the corner frequency of its power spectrum becomes the same as that for a point receiver. The aperture-smoothing effects are not obvious. We have applied these solutions to the scenario of a DSN Goldstone 34-m-diameter antenna and predicted the power spectrum shape for the receiving station. The maximum corner frequency for the receiver (with omega(sub s) = 0

  3. Ka-Band TWT High-Efficiency Power Combiner for High-Rate Data Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee; Vaden, Karl R.; Lesny, Gary G.; Glass, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    A four-port magic-T hybrid waveguide junction serves as the central component of a high-efficiency two-way power combiner circuit for transmitting a high-rate phase-modulated digital signal at a carrier frequency in the Ka-band (between 27 and 40 GHz). This power combiner was developed to satisfy a specific requirement to efficiently combine the coherent outputs of two traveling-wavetube (TWT) amplifiers that are typically characterized by power levels on the order of 100 W or more. In this application, the use of a waveguide-based power combiner (instead of a coaxial-cable- or microstrip-based power combiner, for example) is dictated by requirements for low loss, high power-handling capability, and broadband response. Combiner efficiencies were typically 90 percent or more over both the linear and saturated output power regions of operation of the TWTs . Figure 1 depicts the basic configuration of the magic-T hybrid junction. The coherent outputs of the two TWTs enter through ports 1 and 4. As a result of the orientations of the electromagnetic fields, which also provides a needed high port-to-port isolation, of these two input signals and the interior design of the magic-T junction, the input powers are divided so as to add in phase at one output port (port 2), and to be opposite in phase and hence cancel each other at the opposite coplanar output port (port 3). The net result is that the output power at port 2 is essentially double that of the output of one TWT, minus the power lost in the magic-T hybrid junction. Optimum performance as a high-efficiency power combiner thus requires a balance of both power and phase at the input ports of the magic-T. Replicas of this two-way combiner can be arranged in a binary configuration to obtain a 2n-way (where n is an integer) combiner. For example, Figure 2 illustrates the use of three two-way combiners to combine the outputs of four TWTs.

  4. Study of rain attenuation in Ka band for satellite communication in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Choi, Dong-You

    2016-10-01

    The important factor to be considered in the link budget estimation for satellite communication systems, operating at frequencies above 10 GHz is the rain attenuation. Scattering and absorption are the main concern for system designers at these frequency bands. This has resulted in the need for suitable prediction models that can best provide estimates of attenuation due to rain with available information of rain attenuation data. Researchers have developed models that can be used to estimate 1-min rainfall attenuation distribution for earth space link but there is still some confusion with regard to choosing the right model to predict attenuation for the location of interest. In this context, the existing prediction models need to be tested against the measured results. This paper presents studies on rain attenuation at 19.8 GHz, which specifies the performance parameters for Ka-Band under earth space communication system. It presents the experimental result of rain rates and rain-induced attenuation in 19.8 and 20.73 GHz for vertical and circular polarization respectively. The received signal data for rain attenuation and rain rate were collected at 10 s intervals over a three year periods from 2013 to 2015. The data highlights the impact of clear air variation and rain fade loss. Rain rate data was measured through OTT Parsivel. During the observation period, rain rates of about 50 mm/h and attenuation values of 11.6 dB for 0.01% of the time were noted. The experimental link was set up at Korea Radio Promotion Association, Mokdong, Seoul. Out of several models, this paper present discussion and comparison of ITU-R P.618-12, Unified Method, Dissanayake Allnutt and Haidara (DAH), Simple Attenuation (SAM), Crane Global and Ramachandran and Kumar models. The relative error margin of 27.51, 89.84,72.46% and 67.24, 130.84, 166.48% are obtained for 0.1%, 0.01% and 0.001% of the time for 19.8 and 20.73 GHz under vertical and circular polarization respectively from ITU

  5. Calibration of the KA Band Tracking of the Bepi-Colombo Spacecraft (more Experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriot, J.; Serafini, J.; Sichoix, L.

    2013-12-01

    The radiosciences Bepi-Colombo MORE experiment will use X/X, X/Ka and Ka/Ka band radio links to make accurate measurements of the spacecraft range and range rate. Tropospheric zenith wet delays range from 1.5 cm to 10 cm, with high variability (less than 1000 s) and will impair these accurate measurements. Conditions vary from summer (worse) to winter (better), from day (worse) to night (better). These wet delays cannot be estimated from ground weather measurements and alternative calibration methods should be used in order to cope with the MORE requirements (no more than 3 mm at 1000 s). Due to the Mercury orbit, MORE measurements will be performed by daylight and more frequently in summer than in winter (from Northern hemisphere). Two systems have been considered to calibrate this wet delay: Water Vapor Radiometers (WVRs) and GPS receivers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a new class of WVRs reaching a 5 percent accuracy for the wet delay calibration (0.75 mm to 5 mm), but these WVRs are expensive to build and operate. GPS receivers are also routinely used for the calibration of data from NASA Deep Space probes, but several studies have shown that GPS receivers can give good calibration (through wet delay mapping functions) for long time variations, but are not accurate enough for short time variations (100 to 1000 s), and that WVRs must be used to efficiently calibrate the wet troposphere delays over such time spans. We think that such a calibration could be done by assimilating data from all the GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou and IRNSS) that will be available at the time of the Bepi-Colombo arrival at Mercury (2021), provided that the underlying physics of the turbulent atmosphere and evapotranspiration processes are properly taken into account at such time scales. This implies to do a tomographic image of the troposphere overlying each Deep Space tracking station at time scales of less than 1000 s. For this purpose, we have

  6. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Michel, T.; Muellerschoen, R.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Miller, T.; Milligan, L.; Sadowy, G.; Sanchez-Barbetty, M.; Lou, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicated swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Following the success of the IPY campaign, the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program funded the upgrade of GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. The AITT made three fundamental upgrades to improve system performance: 1. State-of-the-art solid-state power amplifiers (80W peak) were integrated directly on the antenna panel reducing front-end losses; 2. A ping-pong capability was incorporated to effectively double the baseline thereby improving height measurement precision by a factor of two; and 3. A high-fidelity calibration loop was implemented which is critical for routine processing. Upon completion of our engineering flights in February 2013, GLISTIN-A flew a brief campaign to Alaska (4/24-4/27/13). The purpose was to fully demonstrate GLISTIN-A's ability to generate high-precision, high resolution maps of ice surface topography with swaths in excess of 10km. Furthermore, the question of the utility of GLISTIN-A for sea-ice mapping, tracking and inventory has received a great deal of interest. To address this GLISTIN-A collected data over sea-ice in the Beaufort sea including an underflight of CryoSAT II. Note that there are

  7. Phase noise measurement of wideband microwave sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dengjian; Zhang, Fangzheng; Zhou, Pei; Pan, Shilong

    2015-04-01

    An approach for phase noise measurement of microwave signal sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter is proposed. Using the same optical carrier, the microwave signal under test is applied to generate two +1st-order optical sidebands by two stages of electro-optical modulations. A time delay is introduced between the two sidebands through a span of fiber. By beating the two +1st-order sidebands at a photodetector, frequency down-conversion is implemented, and phase noise of the signal under test can be calculated thereafter. The system has a very large operation bandwidth thanks to the frequency conversion in the optical domain, and good phase noise measurement sensitivity can be achieved since the signal degradation caused by electrical amplifiers is avoided. An experiment is carried out. The phase noise measured by the proposed system agrees well with that measured by a commercial spectrum analyzer or provided by the datasheet. A large operation bandwidth of 5-40 GHz is demonstrated using the proposed system. Moreover, good phase noise floor is achieved (-123  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -137  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz at 10 GHz), which is nearly constant over the full measurement range.

  8. Phase noise measurement of wideband microwave sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dengjian; Zhang, Fangzheng; Zhou, Pei; Pan, Shilong

    2015-04-01

    An approach for phase noise measurement of microwave signal sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter is proposed. Using the same optical carrier, the microwave signal under test is applied to generate two +1st-order optical sidebands by two stages of electro-optical modulations. A time delay is introduced between the two sidebands through a span of fiber. By beating the two +1st-order sidebands at a photodetector, frequency down-conversion is implemented, and phase noise of the signal under test can be calculated thereafter. The system has a very large operation bandwidth thanks to the frequency conversion in the optical domain, and good phase noise measurement sensitivity can be achieved since the signal degradation caused by electrical amplifiers is avoided. An experiment is carried out. The phase noise measured by the proposed system agrees well with that measured by a commercial spectrum analyzer or provided by the datasheet. A large operation bandwidth of 5-40 GHz is demonstrated using the proposed system. Moreover, good phase noise floor is achieved (-123  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -137  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz at 10 GHz), which is nearly constant over the full measurement range. PMID:25831324

  9. Experimental investigation of photonic microwave switching based on XGM in a SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Wu, Huan; Pan, Shilong

    2016-08-01

    The photonic microwave switching performances based on the cross gain modulation (XGM) effect in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) are experimentally investigated. The influences of the key parameters of the system, such as the optical power of the pump and probe signals, the SOA bias current and the modulation depth are experimentally studied and analyzed to optimize the system performance. Important performances of the linearity, the dynamic range and the polarization sensitivity of the photonic microwave switching system are analyzed and discussed. The channel uniformities are also investigated according to the requirements of the photonic microwave switching applications.

  10. Comptonization of cosmic microwave background photons in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Evans, N. Wyn; Colafrancesco, S.

    2006-05-01

    We present theoretical modelling of the electron distribution produced by annihilating neutralino dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). In particular, we follow up the idea of Colafrancesco and find that such electrons distort the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For an assumed neutralino mass of 10 GeV and beam size of 1 arcsec, the SZ temperature decrement is of the order of nano-Kelvin for dSph models with a soft core. By contrast, it is of the order of micro-Kelvin for the strongly cusped dSph models favoured by some cosmological simulations. Although this is out of reach of current instruments, it may well be detectable by future mm telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimetre Array. We also show that the upscattered CMB photons have energies within reach of upcoming X-ray observatories, but that the flux of such photons is too small to be detectable now. None the less, we conclude that searching for the dark matter induced SZ effect is a promising way of constraining the dark distribution in dSphs, especially if the particles are light.

  11. Toward Improving Ice Water Content and Snow Rate Retrievals from Spaceborne Radars, Emphasizing Ku and Ka-Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.; Tanelli, S.; Poellot, M.

    2015-12-01

    This study uses a data set from either overflying aircraft or ground-based radars operating at Ku and Ka bands, combined with in-situ microphysical measurements to develop radar reflectivity (Ze)-ice water content (IWC) and Ze-snowfall rate (S) relationships that are suited for retrieval of snowfall rate from the GPM radars. During GCPEX, the NASA DC-8 aircraft, carrying the JPL APR-2 KU and KA band radars overflew the UND Citation aircraft, making microphysical measurements in the ice clouds below. On two days, 19 and 28 January 2011, there are a total of almost 7000 1-sec colocations of the aircraft, where a collocation was defined as having a combination of a spatial separation of less than 3 km and a time separation of less than 10 minutes. During the NASA GPM Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E), the Citation aircraft made in-situ observations over Oklahoma in 2011. We evaluated the data from two types of collocations. First, there were two Citation spirals on 27 April 2011, over the NPOL radar. At the same time, the UHF-band KUZR radar was collecting data in a vertically-pointing mode. Also, the Ka band KAZR Doppler radar was operating in a zenith orientation. Reflectivities and Doppler velocities, without and with appreciable Mie-scattering effects of the hydrometers (for KUZR and KAZR, respectively), are thus available during the spirals. Also during MC3E, six deep convective clouds with a total of more than 5000 5-sec samples and a range of temperatures from -40 to 0C were sampled by the Citation at the same time that NEXRAD reflectivities were measured at about the same position. These data allows us to evaluate various backscatter models and to develop multi-wavelength Z-IWC and Z-S relationships. We will present the results of this study.

  12. Qubit-Photon Entanglement and Hong-Ou-Mandel Interference with Propagating Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Christopher; Lang, Christian; Fink, Johannes; Govenius, Joonas; Steffen, Lars; Filipp, Stefan; Wallraff, Andreas; Woolley, Matthew; Blais, Alexandre

    2013-03-01

    Itinerant microwave photons offer an attractive carrier of quantum information in superconducting circuits. However, until recently it remained challenging to measure photon statistics and coherence properties of microwave fields beyond the Gaussian level - mainly due to the absence of efficient detectors in this frequency range. Here, we present the on-demand generation and efficient characterization of microwave radiation and its entanglement with stationary qubits. Based on novel tomography techniques and low noise parametric amplification we are able to resolve all relevant quantum correlations between the propagating field and the superconducting qubit to demonstrate entanglement with high fidelity. We have also created entangled microwave fields traveling in two spatially separated modes. Making use of the two-photon interference at a microwave beamsplitter we are able to prepare propagating NOON-type states, which we fully characterize by measuring the joint photon statistics of the two modes. The possibility to synthesize, guide and detect entanglement correlations between itinerant microwave photons and stationary qubits put microwave based quantum network experiments within reach.

  13. Microwave Photonic Filters for Interference Cancellation and Adaptive Beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, John

    Wireless communication has experienced an explosion of growth, especially in the past half- decade, due to the ubiquity of wireless devices, such as tablets, WiFi-enabled devices, and especially smartphones. Proliferation of smartphones with powerful processors and graphic chips have given an increasing amount of people the ability to access anything from anywhere. Unfortunately, this ease of access has greatly increased mobile wireless bandwidth and have begun to stress carrier networks and spectra. Wireless interference cancellation will play a big role alongside the popularity of wire- less communication. In this thesis, we will investigate optical signal processing methods for wireless interference cancellation methods. Optics provide the perfect backdrop for interference cancellation. Mobile wireless data is already aggregated and transported through fiber backhaul networks in practice. By sandwiching the signal processing stage between the receiver and the fiber backhaul, processing can easily be done locally in one location. Further, optics offers the advantages of being instantaneously broadband and size, weight, and power (SWAP). We are primarily concerned with two methods for interference cancellation, based on microwave photonic filters, in this thesis. The first application is for a co-channel situation, in which a transmitter and receiver are co-located and transmitting at the same frequency. A novel analog optical technique extended for multipath interference cancellation of broadband signals is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this thesis. The proposed architecture was able to achieve a maximum of 40 dB of cancellation over 200 MHz and 50 dB of cancellation over 10 MHz. The broadband nature of the cancellation, along with its depth, demonstrates both the precision of the optical components and the validity of the architecture. Next, we are interested in a scenario with dynamically changing interference, which requires an adaptive photonic

  14. Ka-Band Link Study and Analysis for a Mars Hybrid RF/Optical Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznikar, Daniel J.; Nappier, Jennifer M.; Downey, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    The integrated radio and optical communications (iROC) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating the feasibility of a hybrid RF and optical communication subsystem for future deep space missions. The hybrid communications subsystem enables the advancement of optical communications while simultaneously mitigating the risk of infusion by combining an experimental optical transmitter and telescope with a reliable Ka-band RF transmitter and antenna. The iROC communications subsystem seeks to maximize the total data return over the course of a potential 2-year mission in Mars orbit beginning in 2021. Although optical communication by itself offers potential for greater data return over RF, the reliable Ka-band link is also being designed for high data return capability in this hybrid system. A daily analysis of the RF link budget over the 2-year span is performed to optimize and provide detailed estimates of the RF data return. In particular, the bandwidth dependence of these data return estimates is analyzed for candidate waveforms. In this effort, a data return modeling tool was created to analyze candidate RF modulation and coding schemes with respect to their spectral efficiency, amplifier output power back-off, required digital to analog conversion (DAC) sampling rates, and support by ground receivers. A set of RF waveforms is recommended for use on the iROC platform.

  15. Engineering entangled microwave photon states through multiphoton interactions between two cavity fields and a superconducting qubit

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan-Jun; Wang, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaobo; Liu, Yu-xi

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that there are not only transverse but also longitudinal couplings between microwave fields and a superconducting qubit with broken inversion symmetry of the potential energy. Using multiphoton processes induced by longitudinal coupling fields and frequency matching conditions, we design a universal algorithm to produce arbitrary superpositions of two-mode photon states of microwave fields in two separated transmission line resonators, which are coupled to a superconducting qubit. Based on our algorithm, we analyze the generation of evenly-populated states and NOON states. Compared to other proposals with only single-photon process, we provide an efficient way to produce entangled microwave photon states when the interactions between superconducting qubits and microwave fields are in the strong and ultrastrong regime. PMID:27033558

  16. Engineering entangled microwave photon states through multiphoton interactions between two cavity fields and a superconducting qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan-Jun; Wang, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaobo; Liu, Yu-Xi

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown that there are not only transverse but also longitudinal couplings between microwave fields and a superconducting qubit with broken inversion symmetry of the potential energy. Using multiphoton processes induced by longitudinal coupling fields and frequency matching conditions, we design a universal algorithm to produce arbitrary superpositions of two-mode photon states of microwave fields in two separated transmission line resonators, which are coupled to a superconducting qubit. Based on our algorithm, we analyze the generation of evenly-populated states and NOON states. Compared to other proposals with only single-photon process, we provide an efficient way to produce entangled microwave photon states when the interactions between superconducting qubits and microwave fields are in the strong and ultrastrong regime.

  17. Influence of an externally modulated photonic link on a microwave communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the influence of an externally modulated photonic link on the performance of a microwave communications system. From the analysis, we deduce limitations on the photocurrent, magnitude of the relaxation oscillation noise of the laser, third-order intercept point of the preamplifier, and other parameters in order for the photonic link to function according to the system specifications. Based on this, we outline a procedure for designing a photonic link that can be integrated in a system with minimal performance degradation.

  18. Co-axial Ka-band Free Electron Maser Using Two-dimensional Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, A. D. R.; Konoplev, I. V.; McGrane, P.; Cross, A. W.; He, W.; Whyte, C. G.; Ronald, K.; Thumm, M. K.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2006-01-03

    The first successful experimental studies of microwave radiation from a co-axial Free-Electron Maser (FEM) based on two-dimensional (2D) distributed feedback have been recently conducted. This paper contains a description of the experimental set-up and the results obtained. The high-power pulsed power supply and high-current accelerator (HCA) developed and used to drive the FEM are discussed. The results of the experimental study of the FEM operating in the Ka frequency band are presented and compared with theoretical predictions.

  19. Using Microwave and Macroscopic Samples of Dielectric Solids to Study the Photonic Properties of Disordered Photonic Bandgap Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Tsitrin, Sam; Yadak, Polin; He, Yingquan; Cuneo, Daniel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Liner, Devin; Man, Weining

    2014-01-01

    Recently, disordered photonic materials have been suggested as an alternative to periodic crystals for the formation of a complete photonic bandgap (PBG). In this article we will describe the methods for constructing and characterizing macroscopic disordered photonic structures using microwaves. The microwave regime offers the most convenient experimental sample size to build and test PBG media. Easily manipulated dielectric lattice components extend flexibility in building various 2D structures on top of pre-printed plastic templates. Once built, the structures could be quickly modified with point and line defects to make freeform waveguides and filters. Testing is done using a widely available Vector Network Analyzer and pairs of microwave horn antennas. Due to the scale invariance property of electromagnetic fields, the results we obtained in the microwave region can be directly applied to infrared and optical regions. Our approach is simple but delivers exciting new insight into the nature of light and disordered matter interaction. Our representative results include the first experimental demonstration of the existence of a complete and isotropic PBG in a two-dimensional (2D) hyperuniform disordered dielectric structure. Additionally we demonstrate experimentally the ability of this novel photonic structure to guide electromagnetic waves (EM) through freeform waveguides of arbitrary shape. PMID:25285416

  20. Using microwave and macroscopic samples of dielectric solids to study the photonic properties of disordered photonic bandgap materials.

    PubMed

    Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Tsitrin, Sam; Yadak, Polin; He, Yingquan; Cuneo, Daniel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Liner, Devin; Man, Weining

    2014-09-26

    Recently, disordered photonic materials have been suggested as an alternative to periodic crystals for the formation of a complete photonic bandgap (PBG). In this article we will describe the methods for constructing and characterizing macroscopic disordered photonic structures using microwaves. The microwave regime offers the most convenient experimental sample size to build and test PBG media. Easily manipulated dielectric lattice components extend flexibility in building various 2D structures on top of pre-printed plastic templates. Once built, the structures could be quickly modified with point and line defects to make freeform waveguides and filters. Testing is done using a widely available Vector Network Analyzer and pairs of microwave horn antennas. Due to the scale invariance property of electromagnetic fields, the results we obtained in the microwave region can be directly applied to infrared and optical regions. Our approach is simple but delivers exciting new insight into the nature of light and disordered matter interaction. Our representative results include the first experimental demonstration of the existence of a complete and isotropic PBG in a two-dimensional (2D) hyperuniform disordered dielectric structure. Additionally we demonstrate experimentally the ability of this novel photonic structure to guide electromagnetic waves (EM) through freeform waveguides of arbitrary shape.

  1. Single microwave-photon detector using an artificial Λ-type three-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Kunihiro; Lin, Zhirong; Koshino, Kazuki; Oliver, William D.; Tsai, Jaw-Shen; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2016-07-01

    Single-photon detection is a requisite technique in quantum-optics experiments in both the optical and the microwave domains. However, the energy of microwave quanta are four to five orders of magnitude less than their optical counterpart, making the efficient detection of single microwave photons extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate the detection of a single microwave photon propagating through a waveguide. The detector is implemented with an impedance-matched artificial Λ system comprising the dressed states of a driven superconducting qubit coupled to a microwave resonator. Each signal photon deterministically induces a Raman transition in the Λ system and excites the qubit. The subsequent dispersive readout of the qubit produces a discrete `click'. We attain a high single-photon-detection efficiency of 0.66+/-0.06 with a low dark-count probability of 0.014+/-0.001 and a reset time of ~400 ns. This detector can be exploited for various applications in quantum sensing, quantum communication and quantum information processing.

  2. Single microwave-photon detector using an artificial Λ-type three-level system.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Kunihiro; Lin, Zhirong; Koshino, Kazuki; Oliver, William D; Tsai, Jaw-Shen; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon detection is a requisite technique in quantum-optics experiments in both the optical and the microwave domains. However, the energy of microwave quanta are four to five orders of magnitude less than their optical counterpart, making the efficient detection of single microwave photons extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate the detection of a single microwave photon propagating through a waveguide. The detector is implemented with an impedance-matched artificial Λ system comprising the dressed states of a driven superconducting qubit coupled to a microwave resonator. Each signal photon deterministically induces a Raman transition in the Λ system and excites the qubit. The subsequent dispersive readout of the qubit produces a discrete 'click'. We attain a high single-photon-detection efficiency of 0.66±0.06 with a low dark-count probability of 0.014±0.001 and a reset time of ∼400 ns. This detector can be exploited for various applications in quantum sensing, quantum communication and quantum information processing.

  3. Single microwave-photon detector using an artificial Λ-type three-level system.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Kunihiro; Lin, Zhirong; Koshino, Kazuki; Oliver, William D; Tsai, Jaw-Shen; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon detection is a requisite technique in quantum-optics experiments in both the optical and the microwave domains. However, the energy of microwave quanta are four to five orders of magnitude less than their optical counterpart, making the efficient detection of single microwave photons extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate the detection of a single microwave photon propagating through a waveguide. The detector is implemented with an impedance-matched artificial Λ system comprising the dressed states of a driven superconducting qubit coupled to a microwave resonator. Each signal photon deterministically induces a Raman transition in the Λ system and excites the qubit. The subsequent dispersive readout of the qubit produces a discrete 'click'. We attain a high single-photon-detection efficiency of 0.66±0.06 with a low dark-count probability of 0.014±0.001 and a reset time of ∼400 ns. This detector can be exploited for various applications in quantum sensing, quantum communication and quantum information processing. PMID:27453153

  4. Single microwave-photon detector using an artificial Λ-type three-level system

    PubMed Central

    Inomata, Kunihiro; Lin, Zhirong; Koshino, Kazuki; Oliver, William D.; Tsai, Jaw-Shen; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon detection is a requisite technique in quantum-optics experiments in both the optical and the microwave domains. However, the energy of microwave quanta are four to five orders of magnitude less than their optical counterpart, making the efficient detection of single microwave photons extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate the detection of a single microwave photon propagating through a waveguide. The detector is implemented with an impedance-matched artificial Λ system comprising the dressed states of a driven superconducting qubit coupled to a microwave resonator. Each signal photon deterministically induces a Raman transition in the Λ system and excites the qubit. The subsequent dispersive readout of the qubit produces a discrete ‘click'. We attain a high single-photon-detection efficiency of 0.66±0.06 with a low dark-count probability of 0.014±0.001 and a reset time of ∼400 ns. This detector can be exploited for various applications in quantum sensing, quantum communication and quantum information processing. PMID:27453153

  5. Photonic compressive sensing for analog-to-information conversion with a delay-line based microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhijing; Chi, Hao; Jin, Tao; Zheng, Shilie; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2016-07-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) in the photonic domain is highly promising for analog-to-information conversion of sparse signals due to its potential capability of high input bandwidth and digitization with sub-Nyquist sampling. In this paper, we suggest that the concept of delay-line based microwave photonic filter be used in photonic CS to realize the low-pass filtering (LPF) function which is required in CS. A microwave photonic filter (MPF) with a dispersive element and fiber delay lines is applied in photonic CS to achieve better performance and flexibility. In the approach, the input radio-frequency signal and the pseudorandom bit sequence (PRBS) are modulated on a multi-wavelength optical carrier and propagate through a dispersive element. The modulated optical signal is split into multiple channels with tunable delay lines. The multiple wavelengths, dispersive element and multiple channels constitute a reconfigurable low-pass microwave filter. Experiment and simulations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and potentials of this approach.

  6. Superradiant Ka-band Cherenkov oscillator with 2-GW peak power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Pedos, M. S.; Rukin, S. N.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The generation of a 2-GW microwave superradiance (SR) pulses has been demonstrated at 29-GHz using a single-mode relativistic backward-wave oscillator possessing the beam-to-wave power conversion factor no worse than 100%. A record-breaking radiation power density in the slow-wave structure (SWS) of ˜1.5 GW/cm2 required the use of high guiding magnetic field (7 T) decreasing the beam losses to the SWS in strong rf fields. Despite the field strength at the SWS wall of 2 MV/cm, a single-pass transmission mode of a short SR pulse in the SWS allows one to obtain extremely high power density in subnanosecond time scale due to time delay in the development of the breakdown phenomena.

  7. Investigation of a metallic photonic crystal high power microwave mode converter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong Qin, Fen; Xu, Sha; Yu, Aimin; Wu, Yong

    2015-02-15

    It is demonstrated that an L band metallic photonic crystal TEM-TE{sub 11} mode converter is suitable for narrow band high power microwave application. The proposed mode converter is realized by partially filling metallic photonic crystals along azimuthal direction in a coaxial transmission line for phase-shifting. A three rows structure is designed and simulated by commercial software CST Microwave Studio. Simulation results show that its conversion efficiency is 99% at the center frequency 1.58 GHz. Over the frequency range of 1.56-1.625 GHz, the conversion efficiency exceeds 90 %, with a corresponding bandwidth of 4.1 %. This mode converter has a gigawatt level power handling capability which is suitable for narrow band high power microwave application. Using magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator(MILO) as a high power microwave source, particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to test the performance of the mode converter. The expected TE{sub 11} mode microwave output is obtained and the MILO works well. Mode conversion performance of the converter is tested by far-field measurement method. And the experimental result confirms the validity of our design. Then, high power microwave experiment is carried out on a Marx-driven Blumlein water line pulsed power accelerator. Microwave frequency, radiated pattern and power are measured in the far-field region and the results agree well with simulation results. The experiment also reveals that no microwave breakdown or pulse shortening took place in the experimental setup.

  8. Ka-band and X-band observations of the solar corona acquired during the Cassini 2001 superior conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous dual-frequency Ka-band (32 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) carrier signal data have been acquired during the superior conjunction of the Cassini spacecraft June 2001, using the NASA Deep Space Network's facilities located in Goldstone, California. The solar elongation angle of the observations varied from -4.1 degrees (-16 solar radii) to -0.6 degrees (-2.3 solar radii). The observed coronal and solar effects on the signals include spectral broadening, amplitude scintillation, phase scintillation, and increased noise. The measurements were generally consistent with existing solar models, except during solar transient events when the signatures of the measurements were observed to increase significantly above the quiet background levels. This is the second solar conjunction of Cassini for which simultaneous X/Ka data were acquired. Both solar conjunctions, conducted in May 2000 and June 2001, occurred near the peak of the current 11 year solar cycle.

  9. K- and Ka-band mobile-vehicular satellite-tracking reflector antenna system for the NASA ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, Art; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Wu, T. K.; Woo, Ken

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the K- and Ka-band mobile-vehicular satellite-tracking reflector antenna system for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. ACTS is NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellites. The AMT project will make the first experimental use of ACTS soon after the satellite is operational, to demonstrate mobile communications via the satellite from a van on the road. The AMT antenna system consists of a mechanically steered small reflector antenna, using a shared aperture for both frequency bands and fitting under a radome of 23 cm diameter and 10 cm height, and a microprocessor controlled antenna controller that tracks the satellite as the vehicle moves about. The RF and mechanical characteristics of the antenna and the antenna tracking control system are discussed. Measurements of the antenna performance are presented.

  10. Fine Resolution Topographic Mapping of the Jovian Moons: A Ka-Band High Resolution Topographic Mapping Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, S. N.; Carsey, F. D.; Turtle, E. P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through use of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  11. Fine resolution topographic mapping of the Jovian moons: a Ka-band high resolution topographic mapping interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Carsey, Frank D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through us of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100 km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  12. A novel slotted helix slow-wave structure for high power Ka-band traveling-wave tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu-Wei; Wei, Yan-Yu; Wang, Shao-Meng; Hou, Yan; Yin, Hai-Rong; Zhao, Guo-Qing; Duan, Zhao-Yun; Xu, Jin; Gong, Yu-Bin; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2013-10-01

    A novel slotted helix slow-wave structure (SWS) is proposed to develop a high power, wide-bandwidth, and high reliability millimeter-wave traveling-wave tube (TWT). This novel structure, which has higher heat capacity than a conventional helix SWS, evolves from conventional helix SWS with three parallel rows of rectangular slots made in the outside of the helix tape. In this paper, the electromagnetic characteristics and the beam-wave interaction of this novel structure operating in the Ka-band are investigated. From our calculations, when the designed beam voltage and beam current are set to be 18.45 kV and 0.2 A, respectively, this novel circuit can produce over 700-W average output power in a frequency range from 27.5 GHz to 32.5 GHz, and the corresponding conversion efficiency values vary from 19% to 21.3%, and the maximum output power is 787 W at 30 GHz.

  13. A real-time signal combining system for Ka-band feed arrays using maximum-likelihood weight estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Rodemich, E. R.

    1990-01-01

    A real-time digital signal combining system for use with Ka-band feed arrays is proposed. The combining system attempts to compensate for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss resulting from antenna deformations induced by gravitational and atmospheric effects. The combining weights are obtained directly from the observed samples by using a sliding-window implementation of a vector maximum-likelihood parameter estimator. It is shown that with averaging times of about 0.1 second, combining loss for a seven-element array can be limited to about 0.1 dB in a realistic operational environment. This result suggests that the real-time combining system proposed here is capable of recovering virtually all of the signal power captured by the feed array, even in the presence of severe wind gusts and similar disturbances.

  14. Ku- and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna for the Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  15. Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project Ku-Band and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  16. The Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN): A Novel Ka-band Digitally Beamformed Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn K.; Heavey, Brandon; Hodges, Richard; Rengarajan, Sembiam; Rignot, Eric; Rogez, Francois; Sadowy, Gregory; Simard, Marc; Zawadzki, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The estimation of the mass balance of ice sheets and glaciers on Earth is a problem of considerable scientific and societal importance. A key measurement to understanding, monitoring and forecasting these changes is ice-surface topography, both for ice-sheet and glacial regions. As such NASA identified 'ice topographic mapping instruments capable of providing precise elevation and detailed imagery data for measurements on glacial scales for detailed monitoring of ice sheet, and glacier changes' as a science priority for the most recent Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) opportunities. Funded under this opportunity is the technological development for a Ka-Band (35GHz) single-pass digitally beamformed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Unique to this concept is the ability to map a significant swath impervious of cloud cover with measurement accuracies comparable to laser altimeters but with variable resolution as appropriate to the differing scales-of-interest over ice-sheets and glaciers.

  17. Bandwidth Efficient Modulation and Coding Techniques for NASA's Existing Ku/Ka-Band 225 MHz Wide Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioannini, Bryan; Wong, Yen; Wesdock, John

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently established the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) K-band Upgrade Project (TKUP), a project intended to enhance the TDRSS Ku-band and Ka-band Single Access Return 225 MHz (Ku/KaSAR-225) data service by adding the capability to process bandwidth efficient signal design and to replace the White Sand Complex (WSC) KSAR high data rate ground equipment and high rate switches which are nearing obsolescence. As a precursor to this project, a modulation and coding study was performed to identify signal structures which maximized the data rate through the Ku/KaSAR-225 channel, minimized the required customer EIRP and ensured acceptable hardware complexity on the customer platform. This paper presents the results and conclusions of the TKUP modulation and coding study.

  18. Stabilizing an optoelectronic microwave oscillator with photonic filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, D.; Aveline, D.; Yu, N.; Thompson, R.; Matsko, A. B.; Maleki, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares methods of active stabilization of an optoelectronic microwave oscillator (OEO) based on insertion of a source of optical group delay into an OEO loop. The performance of an OEO stabilized with either a high- optical cavity or an atomic cell is analyzed. We show that the elements play a role of narrow-band microwave filters improving an OEO stability.

  19. Ultrahigh energy photons, electrons, and neutrinos, the microwave background, and the universal cosmic-ray hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    The production of ultrahigh energy photons, electrons and neutrinos as the decay products of pions produced in photomeson interactions between cosmic ray nucleons and the blackbody microwave background is discussed in terms of the resultant energy spectra of these particles. Simple asymptotic formulas are given for calculating the ultrahigh energy photon spectrum predicted for the universal cosmic ray hypothesis and the resulting spectra are compared with those obtained previously by numerical means using a different propagation equation for the photons. Approximate analytic solutions for the photon spectra are given in terms of simple power-law energy functions and slowly varying logarithmic functions.

  20. Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Hardware Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L.; Khan, P.; Silva, A.

    2005-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in wide-bandgap (WBG) gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductor technology, there is considerable interest in developing efficient solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) as an alternative to the traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for space applications. This article documents proof-of-concept hardware used to validate power-combining technologies that may enable a 120-W, 40 percent power-added efficiency (PAE) SSPA. Results in previous articles [1-3] indicate that architectures based on at least three power combiner designs are likely to enable the target SSPA. Previous architecture performance analyses and estimates indicate that the proposed architectures can power combine 16 to 32 individual monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) with >80 percent combining efficiency. This combining efficiency would correspond to MMIC requirements of 5- to 10-W output power and >48 percent PAE. In order to validate the performance estimates of the three proposed architectures, measurements of proof-of-concept hardware are reported here.

  1. An ultrawide tunable range single passband microwave photonic filter based on stimulated Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongchuan; Guo, Jing; Wu, Kui; Qu, Pengfei; Qi, Huajuan; Liu, Caixia; Ruan, Shengping; Chen, Weiyou; Dong, Wei

    2013-02-11

    A single passband microwave photonic filter with ultrawide tunable range based on stimulated Brillouin scattering is theoretically analyzed. Combining the gain and loss spectrums, tuning range with 44GHz is obtained without crosstalk by introducing two pumps. Adding more pumps, Tuning range multiplying with the multiplication factor equaling to the total quantity of pump can be achieved, which has potential application in microwave and millimeter wave wireless communication systems.

  2. Photonic generation of tunable microwave signal using Brillouin fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rugang; Zhang, Xuping; Hu, Junhui; Wang, Guanghui

    2012-03-10

    A simple approach to generate two bands of tunable microwave signal is proposed and demonstrated. In this scheme, two single-mode fibers with optimized Brillouin frequency shift spacing have been chosen as the scattering medium in two cascaded ring cavities. Two bands of tunable microwave signal from 390 to 453 MHz and 10.863 to 11.076 GHz can be obtained through adjusting the temperature of the fiber and the pump wavelength. The tunable frequency range can be further expanded by using a temperature controller with a wider adjustment range. The generated microwave signal exhibits high stability on frequency.

  3. Optical single photons on-demand teleported from microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a scheme for entangling the optical and microwave output modes of the respective cavities by using a micro mechanical resonator. The micro mechanical resonator, on one side, is capacitively coupled to the microwave cavity and, on the other side, it is coupled to a high-finesses optical cavity. We then show how this continuous variable entanglement can be profitably used to teleport the non-Gaussian number state |1> and the superposition (|0\\rangle +|1\\rangle )/\\sqrt 2 from the microwave cavity output mode onto an output of the optical cavity mode with fidelity much larger than the no-cloning limit.

  4. Natural Radio Source and Spacecraft Signal Measurements at Ka-Band (32.0 GHz) and X-Band (8.4 GHz) Using a 34-Meter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D. D.

    1996-01-01

    From Intro.: NASA'a Deep Space Network (DSN) Technology Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is evaluating the use of the Ka-Band frequency allocation band (31.8 GHz to 32.3 GHz) for deep space to Earth telecommunications...This paper addresses the three current Ka-Band and X-Band activities, 1)KaAp, 2)SURSAT-1, and 3)KaBLE-II's upcoming Ka-Band experiments aboard Mars Global Surveyor.

  5. A 3 to 6 GHz microwave/photonic transceiver for phased-array interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Edward; Wanuga, Stephen; Candela, Karen; Scotti, Ronald E.; MacDonald, V. W.; Gates, John V.

    1992-04-01

    The general design and operation of a microwave/photonic transceiver operating in the range 3-6 GHz are presented. The transceiver consists of drop-in submodules with optical fiber pigtails mounted on a brass carrier measuring less than 1 x 1 x 0.1 inch along with MMIC amplifiers and an alumina motherboard. Minimum 3 to 6 GHz return losses of 6 dB have been measured for both the microwave input and the microwave output of the module; the insertion loss is between 19 and 20 dB at most frequencies in the 3-6 GHz band.

  6. Fiber Sensor Systems Based on Fiber Laser and Microwave Photonic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongyan; Chen, Daru; Cai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors, especially fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are very attractive due to their numerous advantages over traditional sensors, such as light weight, high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, ease of multiplexing and so on. Therefore, fiber-optic sensors have been intensively studied during the last several decades. Nowadays, with the development of novel fiber technology, more and more newly invented fiber technologies bring better and superior performance to fiber-optic sensing networks. In this paper, the applications of some advanced photonic technologies including fiber lasers and microwave photonic technologies for fiber sensing applications are reviewed. FBG interrogations based on several kinds of fiber lasers, especially the novel Fourier domain mode locking fiber laser, have been introduced; for the application of microwave photonic technology, examples of microwave photonic filtering utilized as a FBG sensing interrogator and microwave signal generation acting as a transversal loading sensor have been given. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations have been carried out. The comparison of these advanced photonic technologies for the applications of fiber sensing is carried out and important issues related to the applications have been addressed and the suitable and potential application examples have also been discussed in this paper. PMID:22778591

  7. High-Power, High-Efficiency Ka-Band Space Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczyk, Richard; Wilson, Jeffrey; Simons, Rainee; Williams, Wallace; Bhasin, Kul; Robbins, Neal; Dibb, Daniel; Menninger, William; Zhai, Xiaoling; Benton, Robert; Burdette, James

    2007-01-01

    The L-3 Communications Model 999H traveling-wave tube (TWT) has been demonstrated to generate an output power of 144 W at 60-percent overall efficiency in continuous-wave operation over the frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The best TWT heretofore commercially available for operation in the affected frequency band is characterized by an output power of only 35 W and an efficiency of 50 percent. Moreover, whereas prior TWTs are limited to single output power levels, it has been shown that the output power of the Model 999H can be varied from 54 to 144 W. A TWT is a vacuum electronic device used to amplify microwave signals. TWTs are typically used in free-space communication systems because they are capable of operating at power and efficiency levels significantly higher than those of solid-state devices. In a TWT, an electron beam is generated by an electron gun consisting of a cathode, focusing electrodes, and an anode. The electrons pass through a hole in the anode and are focused into a cylindrical beam by a stack of periodic permanent magnets and travel along the axis of an electrically conductive helix, along which propagates an electromagnetic wave that has been launched by an input signal that is to be amplified. The beam travels within the helix at a velocity close to the phase velocity of the electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field decelerates some of the electrons and accelerates others, causing the beam to become formed into electron bunches, which further interact with the electromagnetic wave in such a manner as to surrender kinetic energy to the wave, thereby amplifying the wave. The net result is to amplify the input signal by a factor of about 100,000. After the electrons have passed along the helix, they impinge on electrodes in a collector. The collector decelerates the electrons in such a manner as to recover most of the remaining kinetic energy and thereby significantly increase the power efficiency of the TWT.

  8. A Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Architecture Performance Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L.; Khan, P.; Silva, A.

    2005-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in wide-bandgap (WBG) gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductor technology, there is considerable interest in developing efficient solidstate power amplifiers (SSPAs) as an alternative to the traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for space applications. This article documents the results of a study to investigate power-combining technology and SSPA architectures that can enable a 120-W, 40 percent power-added efficiency (PAE) SSPA. Results of the study indicate that architectures based on at least three power combiner designs are likely to enable the target SSPA. The proposed architectures can power combine 16 to 32 individual monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) with >80 percent combining efficiency. This corresponds to MMIC requirements of 5- to 10-W output power and >48 percent PAE. For the three proposed architectures [1], detailed analysis and design of the power combiner are presented. The first architecture studied is based on a 16-way septum combiner that offers low loss and high isolation over the design band of 31 to 36 GHz. Analysis of a 2-way prototype septum combiner had an input match >25 dB, output match >30 dB, insertion loss <0.02 dB, and isolation >30 dB over the design band. A 16-way design, based on cascading this combiner in a binary fashion, is documented. The second architecture is based on a 24-way waveguide radial combiner. A prototype 24-way radial base was analyzed to have an input match >30 dB (under equal excitation of all input ports). The match of the mode transducer that forms the output of a radial combiner was found to be >27 dB. The functional bandwidth of the radial base and mode transducer, which together will form a radial combiner/divider, exceeded the design band. The third architecture employs a 32-way, parallel-plate radial combiner. Simulation results indicated an input match >24 dB, output match >22 dB, insertion loss <0.23 dB, and adjacent port isolation >20 dB over the design band. All

  9. Microwave photonic filter using multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with double-Brillouin-frequency shift

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, K. K.; Yeo, K. S.; Shee, Y. G.

    2015-04-24

    A microwave photonic filter based on double-Brillouin-frequency spaced multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (BEFL) is experimentally demonstrated. The filter selectivity can be easily adjusted by tuning and apodizing the optical taps generated from the multiwavelength BEFL. Reconfiguration of different frequency responses are demonstrated.

  10. Direct observation of photonic jets and corresponding backscattering enhancement at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Ong, C. K.

    2009-06-01

    We report the direct observation of photonic nanojets that emerged from the shadow side of a dielectric cylinder illuminated by plane waves in the microwave frequencies (8-13 GHz). Using our recently developed two-dimensional spatial field mapping system, we carried out a point-by-point measurement of both the phase and intensity of spatial electric field distribution inside and around scattering dielectric cylinders. The direct electric field maps confirm the subwavelength waist of the photonic jet. In addition, we also confirmed the superbackscattering enhancement induced by the presence of a particle much smaller than the initial focusing cylinder within the photonic jet.

  11. Demonstration and Evaluation of the Ka-Band Array Feed Compensation System on the 70-Meter Antenna at DSS 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Fort, D.

    1999-07-01

    This article documents the results of experiments designed to verify the gravity-compensation and tracking performance of a novel seven-channel 32-GHz (Ka-band) array feed compensation system (AFCS) for the DSN's 70-m antennas. The AFCS (along with other proposed compensation systems) was installed on the spare holography cone that was placed temporarily on the 70-m antenna in place of the X-band K-band radar (XKR) cone, which has been removed for repairs. These experiments took place from November 1998 through February 1999 and consisted of both quasar and spacecraft observations. Compensation performance was characterized in terms of both antenna-efficiency improvement and total signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain, while simultaneous-tracking capability was demonstrated by means of a least-squares tracking algorithm. A combined system consisting of the AFCS together with a deformable flat plate (DFP), designed to refocus divergent rays back in the array, also was examined briefly at low elevations. The results indicate that a properly designed real-time compensation system regains most of the SNR lost to deformations at low elevations and has the potential for similar improvements at high elevations, although this remains to be demonstrated.

  12. Preliminary Analysis of X-Band and Ka-Band Radar for Use in the Detection of Icing Conditions Aloft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Koenig, George G.

    2004-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) have an on-going activity to develop remote sensing technologies for the detection and measurement of icing conditions aloft. Radar has been identified as a strong tool for this work. However, since the remote detection of icing conditions with the intent to identify areas of icing hazard is a new and evolving capability, there are no set requirements for radar sensitivity. This work is an initial attempt to quantify, through analysis, the sensitivity requirements for an icing remote sensing radar. The primary radar of interest for cloud measurements is Ka-band, however, since NASA is currently using an X-band unit, this frequency is also examined. Several aspects of radar signal analysis were examined. Cloud reflectivity was calculated for several forms of cloud using two different techniques. The Air Force Geophysical Laboratory (AFGL) cloud models, with different drop spectra represented by a modified gamma distribution, were utilized to examine several categories of cloud formation. Also a fundamental methods approach was used to allow manipulation of the cloud droplet size spectra. And an analytical icing radar simulator was developed to examine the complete radar system response to a configurable multi-layer cloud environment. Also discussed is the NASA vertical pointing X-band radar. The radar and its data system are described, and several summer weather events are reviewed.

  13. Verification and correction of cloud base and top height retrievals from Ka-band cloud radar in Boseong, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Su-Bin; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Ki-Hoon; Cho, Chun-Ho; Lim, Eunha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, cloud base height (CBH) and cloud top height (CTH) observed by the Ka-band (33.44 GHz) cloud radar at the Boseong National Center for Intensive Observation of Severe Weather during fall 2013 (September-November) were verified and corrected. For comparative verification, CBH and CTH were obtained using a ceilometer (CL51) and the Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite (COMS). During rainfall, the CBH and CTH observed by the cloud radar were lower than observed by the ceilometer and COMS because of signal attenuation due to raindrops, and this difference increased with rainfall intensity. During dry periods, however, the CBH and CTH observed by the cloud radar, ceilometer, and COMS were similar. Thin and low-density clouds were observed more effectively by the cloud radar compared with the ceilometer and COMS. In cases of rainfall or missing cloud radar data, the ceilometer and COMS data were proven effective in correcting or compensating the cloud radar data. These corrected cloud data were used to classify cloud types, which revealed that low clouds occurred most frequently.

  14. Demonstration and experimental evaluation of a bi-directional 10-GHz microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaldívar-Huerta, I. E.; Correa-Mena, A. G.; Hernández-Nava, P.; García-Juárez, A.; Rodríguez-Asomoza, J.; Lee, Min Won

    2016-09-01

    A bi-directional 10-GHz microwave photonic filter is proposed and experimentally evaluated. Its frequency response consists of a series of microwave band-pass windows obtained by the interaction of externally modulated multimode laser diodes emitting around of 1550 nm associated to the chromatic dispersion parameter of an optical fiber, as well as the length of the optical link. Microwave band-pass windows exhibit on average a-3 dB bandwidth of 378 MHz. This electro-optical system shows an efficient configuration and good performance. Potentially, filtered microwave signals can be used as electrical carriers in optical communication systems to transmit and distribute services such as video, voice and data.

  15. Rigorous numerical study of strong microwave photon-magnon coupling in all-dielectric magnetic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Hutomo, Jessica; Nam, Donghee; Kostylev, Mikhail

    2015-05-21

    We demonstrate theoretically a ∼350-fold local enhancement of the intensity of the in-plane microwave magnetic field in multilayered structures made from a magneto-insulating yttrium iron garnet (YIG) layer sandwiched between two non-magnetic layers with a high dielectric constant matching that of YIG. The enhancement is predicted for the excitation regime when the microwave magnetic field is induced inside the multilayer by the transducer of a stripline Broadband Ferromagnetic Resonance (BFMR) setup. By means of a rigorous numerical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation consistently with the Maxwell's equations, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics in the multilayer. We reveal a strong photon-magnon coupling, which manifests itself as anti-crossing of the ferromagnetic resonance magnon mode supported by the YIG layer and the electromagnetic resonance mode supported by the whole multilayered structure. The frequency of the magnon mode depends on the external static magnetic field, which in our case is applied tangentially to the multilayer in the direction perpendicular to the microwave magnetic field induced by the stripline of the BFMR setup. The frequency of the electromagnetic mode is independent of the static magnetic field. Consequently, the predicted photon-magnon coupling is sensitive to the applied magnetic field and thus can be used in magnetically tuneable metamaterials based on simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability achievable thanks to the YIG layer. We also suggest that the predicted photon-magnon coupling may find applications in microwave quantum information systems.

  16. Distortion-free spectrum sliced microwave photonic signal processor: analysis, design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Li, Liwei; Yi, Xiaoke; Huang, Thomas X H; Minasian, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    A new switchable microwave photonic filter based on a novel spectrum slicing technique is presented. The processor enables programmable multi-tap generation with general transfer function characteristics and offers tunability, reconfigurabiliy, and switchability. It is based on connecting a dispersion controlled spectrum slicing filter after the modulated bipolar broadband light source, which consequently generates multiple spectrum slices with bipolarity, and compensates dispersion induced RF degradation simultaneously within a single device. A detailed theoretical model for this microwave photonic filter design is presented. Experimental results are presented which verify the model, and demonstrate a 33 bipolar-tap microwave filter with significant reduction of passband attenuations at high frequencies. The RF response improvement of the new microwave photonic filter is investigated, for both an ideal linear group delay line and for the experimental fiber delay line that has second order group delay and the results show that this new structure is effective for RF filters with various free spectral range values and spectrum slice bandwidths. Finally, a switchable bipolar filter that has a square-top bandpass filter response with more than 30 dB stopband attenuation that can be switched on/off via software control is demonstrated.

  17. Factors influencing the temporal growth rate of the high order TM0n modes in the Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dapeng; Shu, Ting; Ju, Jinchuan

    2015-06-01

    When the wavelength of overmoded Cherenkov oscillator goes into Ka-band, power handling capacity becomes an essential issue. Using the TM02 mode or higher order TM0n modes as the operating mode is a potential solution. This paper is aimed to find some proper parameters to make the temporal growth rate of the TM02 mode higher in our previously studied Gigawatt (GW)-class Ka band oscillator. An accurate and fast calculation method of the "hot" dispersion equation is derived for rectangular corrugated SWSs, which are widely used in the high frequency Cherenkov devices. Then, factors that affect the temporal growth rate of the high order TM0n modes are analyzed, including the depth of corrugation, the radius of drift tube, and the diode voltage. Results show that, when parameters are chosen properly, the temporal growth rate of the TM02 mode can be as high as 0.3 ns-1.

  18. Nonlinear microwave photon occupancy of a driven resonator strongly coupled to a transmon qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, B.; Keane, Z. K.; Bishop, Lev S.; Novikov, S.; Wellstood, F. C.; Palmer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    We measure photon occupancy in a thin-film superconducting lumped element resonator coupled to a transmon qubit at 20 mK and find a nonlinear dependence on the applied microwave power. The transmon-resonator system was operated in the strong dispersive regime, where the ac Stark shift (2 χ ) due to a single microwave photon present in the resonator was larger than the linewidth (Γ ) of the qubit transition. When the resonator was coherently driven at 5.474 325 GHz, the transition spectrum of the transmon at 4.982 GHz revealed well-resolved peaks, each corresponding to an individual photon number-state of the resonator. From the relative peak heights we obtain the occupancy of the photon states and the average photon occupancy n ¯ of the resonator. We observe a nonlinear variation of n ¯ with the applied drive power Prf for n ¯<5 and compare our results to numerical simulations of the system-bath master equation in the steady state, as well as to a semiclassical model for the resonator that includes the Jaynes-Cummings interaction between the transmon and the resonator. We find good quantitative agreement using both models and analysis reveals that the nonlinear behavior is principally due to shifts in the resonant frequency caused by a qubit-induced Jaynes-Cummings nonlinearity.

  19. Some observations on hyperuniform disordered photonic bandgap materials, from microwave scale study to infrared scale study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitrin, Sam; Nahal, Geev; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining; San Francisco State University Team; University of Surrey Team

    2015-03-01

    A novel class of disordered photonic materials, hyperuniform disordered solids (HUDS), attracted more attention. Recently they have been experimentally proven to provide complete photonic band gap (PBG) when made with Alumina or Si; as well as single-polarization PBG when made with plastic with refract index of 1.6. These PBGs were shown to be real energy gaps with zero density of photonic states, instead of mobility gaps of low transmission due to scattering, etc. Using cm-scale samples and microwave experiments, we reveal the nature of photonic modes existing in these disordered materials by analyzing phase delay and mapping field distribution profile inside them. We also show how to extend the proof-of-concept microwave studies of these materials to proof-of-scale studies for real applications, by designing and fabricating these disordered photonic materials at submicron-scale with functional devices for 1.55 micron wavelength. The intrinsic isotropy of the disordered structure is an inherent advantage associated with the absence of limitations of orientational order, which is shown to provide valuable freedom in defect architecture design impossible in periodical structures. NSF Award DMR-1308084, the University of Surrey's FRSF and Santander awards.

  20. Tuneable on-demand single-photon source in the microwave range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z. H.; de Graaf, S. E.; Tsai, J. S.; Astafiev, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    An on-demand single-photon source is a key element in a series of prospective quantum technologies and applications. Here we demonstrate the operation of a tuneable on-demand microwave photon source based on a fully controllable superconducting artificial atom strongly coupled to an open-ended transmission line. The atom emits a photon upon excitation by a short microwave π-pulse applied through a control line. The intrinsically limited device efficiency is estimated to be in the range 65-80% in a wide frequency range from 7.75 to 10.5 GHz continuously tuned by an external magnetic field. The actual demonstrated efficiency is also affected by the excited state preparation, which is about 90% in our experiments. The single-photon generation from the single-photon source is additionally confirmed by anti-bunching in the second-order correlation function. The source may have important applications in quantum communication, quantum information processing and sensing.

  1. Tuneable on-demand single-photon source in the microwave range.

    PubMed

    Peng, Z H; de Graaf, S E; Tsai, J S; Astafiev, O V

    2016-01-01

    An on-demand single-photon source is a key element in a series of prospective quantum technologies and applications. Here we demonstrate the operation of a tuneable on-demand microwave photon source based on a fully controllable superconducting artificial atom strongly coupled to an open-ended transmission line. The atom emits a photon upon excitation by a short microwave π-pulse applied through a control line. The intrinsically limited device efficiency is estimated to be in the range 65-80% in a wide frequency range from 7.75 to 10.5 GHz continuously tuned by an external magnetic field. The actual demonstrated efficiency is also affected by the excited state preparation, which is about 90% in our experiments. The single-photon generation from the single-photon source is additionally confirmed by anti-bunching in the second-order correlation function. The source may have important applications in quantum communication, quantum information processing and sensing. PMID:27545689

  2. Tuneable on-demand single-photon source in the microwave range

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Z. H.; de Graaf, S. E.; Tsai, J. S.; Astafiev, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    An on-demand single-photon source is a key element in a series of prospective quantum technologies and applications. Here we demonstrate the operation of a tuneable on-demand microwave photon source based on a fully controllable superconducting artificial atom strongly coupled to an open-ended transmission line. The atom emits a photon upon excitation by a short microwave π-pulse applied through a control line. The intrinsically limited device efficiency is estimated to be in the range 65–80% in a wide frequency range from 7.75 to 10.5 GHz continuously tuned by an external magnetic field. The actual demonstrated efficiency is also affected by the excited state preparation, which is about 90% in our experiments. The single-photon generation from the single-photon source is additionally confirmed by anti-bunching in the second-order correlation function. The source may have important applications in quantum communication, quantum information processing and sensing. PMID:27545689

  3. High-resolution fiber Bragg grating based transverse load sensor using microwave photonics filtering technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiping; Wang, Ming; Xia, Wei; Ni, Xiaoqi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a new fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor exploiting microwave photonics filter technique for transverse load sensing is firstly proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A two-tap incoherent notch microwave photonics filter (MPF) based on a transverse loaded FBG, a polarization beam splitter (PBS), a tunable delay line (TDL) and a length of dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) is demonstrated. The frequency response of the filter with respect to the transverse load is studied. By detecting the resonance frequency shifts of the notch MPF, the transverse load can be determined. The theoretical and experimental results show that the proposed FBG sensor has a higher resolution than traditional methods based on optical spectrum analysis. The sensitivity of the sensor is measured to be as high as 2.5 MHz/N for a sensing fiber with a length of 18mm. Moreover, the sensitivity can be easily adjusted. PMID:27505763

  4. Intensity-intensity and intensity-amplitude correlation of microwave photons from a superconducting artificial atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Feng, Xunli; Oh, C. H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the microwave-frequency nonclassical correlations in a three-level Δ -configuration artificial atom, which is realized by superconducting quantum circuits. The intensity-intensity correlation and intensity field are strongly dependent on the relative phase Φ of the driven fields. It is found that two interference loops are formed in the dressed state picture at Φ =0 or π, which are responsible for the generation of nonclassical microwave photons. When the phase is changed into Φ =π /2 or 3π /2 , the temporal correlation functions exhibit different oscillating behaviors. The phase-sensitive nonclassical correlations of fluorescence photons may find practical application in the design of all-optical switches and quantum information processing.

  5. Optically injected InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser for tunable photonic microwave generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Raghunathan, Ravi; Schires, Kevin; Chan, Sze-Chun; Lester, Luke F; Grillot, Frédéric

    2016-03-15

    We present an experimental investigation on the period-one dynamics of an optically injected InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser as a photonic microwave source. It is shown that the microwave frequency of the quantum dot laser's period-one oscillation is continuously tunable through the adjustment of the frequency detuning. The microwave power is enhanced by increasing the injection strength providing that the operation is away from the Hopf bifurcation, whereas the second-harmonic distortion of the electrical signal is well reduced by increasing the detuning frequency. Both strong optical injection and high detuning frequency are favorable for obtaining a single sideband optical signal. In addition, particular period-one oscillation points of low sensitivity to the frequency detuning are found close to the Hopf bifurcation line. PMID:26977657

  6. Optically injected InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser for tunable photonic microwave generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Raghunathan, Ravi; Schires, Kevin; Chan, Sze-Chun; Lester, Luke F; Grillot, Frédéric

    2016-03-15

    We present an experimental investigation on the period-one dynamics of an optically injected InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser as a photonic microwave source. It is shown that the microwave frequency of the quantum dot laser's period-one oscillation is continuously tunable through the adjustment of the frequency detuning. The microwave power is enhanced by increasing the injection strength providing that the operation is away from the Hopf bifurcation, whereas the second-harmonic distortion of the electrical signal is well reduced by increasing the detuning frequency. Both strong optical injection and high detuning frequency are favorable for obtaining a single sideband optical signal. In addition, particular period-one oscillation points of low sensitivity to the frequency detuning are found close to the Hopf bifurcation line.

  7. High-speed microwave photonic switch for millimeter-wave ultra-wideband signal generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Xian; Li, Wei; Zheng, Jian Yu; Wang, Hui; Liu, Jian Guo; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2013-02-15

    We propose a scheme for generating millimeter-wave (MMW) ultra-wideband (UWB) signal that is free from low-frequency components and a residual local oscillator. The system consists of two cascaded polarization modulators and is equivalent to a high-speed microwave photonic switch, which truncates a sinusoidal MMW into short pulses. The polarity switchability of the generated MMW-UWB pulse is also demonstrated.

  8. Photonic vector signal generation at microwave/millimeter-wave bands employing an optical frequency quadrupling scheme.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Ting; Shih, Po-Tsung; Jiang, Wen-Jr; Wong, Er-Zih; Chen, Jason Jyehong; Chi, Sien

    2009-07-15

    To the best of our knowledge, a novel photonic architecture to generate vector signals at microwave/millimeter-wave bands employing an optical frequency quadrupling technique based on an external dual-parallel modulator is proposed for the first time. A 312.5 MSym/s quadruple phase-shift keying signal at 25 GHz is experimentally demonstrated using properly precoding driving signal at 6.25 GHz, and optical power penalty is negligible following 50 km single-mode fiber transmission.

  9. Analysis of Fade Detection and Compensation Experimental Results in a Ka-Band Satellite System. Degree awarded by Akron Univ., May 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    The frequency bands being used for new satellite communication systems are constantly increasing to accommodate the requirements for additional capacity. At these higher frequencies, propagation impairments that did not significantly affect the signal at lower frequencies begin to have considerable impact. In Ka-band, the next logical commercial frequency band to be used for satellite communication, attenuation of the signal due to rain is a primary concern. An experimental satellite built by NASA, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS), launched in September 1993, is the first US communication satellite operating in the Ka-band. In addition to higher carrier frequencies, a number of other new technologies, including onboard baseband processing, multiple beam antennas, and rain fade detection and compensation techniques, were designed into the ACTS. Verification experiments have been conducted since the launch to characterize the new technologies. The focus of this thesis is to describe and validate the method used by the ACTS Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) ground stations in detecting the presence of fade in the communication signal and to adaptively compensate for it by the addition of burst rate reduction and forward error correction. Measured data obtained from the ACTS program is used to validate the compensation technique. In this thesis, models in MATLAB are developed to statistically characterize the increased availability achieved by the compensation techniques in terms of the bit error rate time enhancement factor. Several improvements to the ACTS technique are discussed and possible implementations for future Ka-band systems are also presented.

  10. High Efficiency Traveling-Wave Tube Power Amplifier for Ka-Band Software Defined Radio on International Space Station-A Platform for Communications Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Force, Dale A.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication and RF performance of the output traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for a space based Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) is presented. The TWTA, the SDR and the supporting avionics are integrated to forms a testbed, which is currently located on an exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SDR in the testbed communicates at Ka-band frequencies through a high-gain antenna directed to NASA s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which communicates to the ground station located at White Sands Complex. The application of the testbed is for demonstrating new waveforms and software designed to enhance data delivery from scientific spacecraft and, the waveforms and software can be upgraded and reconfigured from the ground. The construction and the salient features of the Ka-band SDR are discussed. The testbed is currently undergoing on-orbit checkout and commissioning and is expected to operate for 3 to 5 years in space.

  11. Broadband linearized analog intersatellite microwave photonic link using a polarization modulator in a Sagnac loop.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zihang; Li, Yongjun; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Xuan; Qu, Kun; Ma, Jiajun

    2016-02-10

    A novel orthogonal polarization optical carrier suppression with carrier (OCS+C) modulation and a coherent balanced detection intersatellite microwave photonic link with improved signal-to-noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) is proposed. By bidirectional use of a polarization modulator in a Sagnac loop in conjunction with a polarization beam splitter and two polarization controllers, only the light wave along the clockwise direction is effectively modulated while the counterclockwise light wave is not modulated due to the velocity mismatch, which generates the orthogonal polarization OCS+C modulation signal to mitigate the third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) and the signal-amplifier spontaneous emission beating noise. By demultiplexing and adjusting the polarization of the orthogonal polarization OCS+C modulation signal, coherent balanced detection can be realized without a local oscillator signal in the receiver, which suppresses the second-order distortions. Thus, a broadband linearized intersatellite microwave photonic link with high SNDR is achieved. Simulation results show that the maximum SNDR of 36.2 dB can be obtained when the optimum modulation index is 0.26, which is 8 dB higher than our previously proposed intersatellite microwave photonic link with an optical preamplifier. PMID:26906370

  12. Integrated wideband optical frequency combs with high stability and their application in microwave photonic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenhui; Wang, Sunlong; Zhong, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Wenting; Tong, Youwan; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Haiqing; Yu, Lijuan; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-08-01

    An integrated wideband optical frequency comb (OFC) based on a semiconductor quantum dot laser is realized with high stability. The OFC module is packaged in our lab. A circuit which is designed to provide a low-ripple current and control the temperature regards as a servo system to enhance the stability of the OFC. The frequency stability of the OFC is 2.7×10-9 (Allan Variance). The free spectral range (FSR) of the OFC is 40 GHz and the number of comb lines is up to 55. The flatness of the OFC over span of 4 nm can be limited to 0.5 dB. Negative coefficients microwave photonic filters with multiple taps are generated based on the proposed OFC. For the 10 taps microwave photonic filter, the pass-band at 8.74 GHz has a 3 dB bandwidth of 630 MHz with 16.58 dB side-lobe suppression. Compared with the published microwave photonic filters, the proposed system is more stable, of more compact structures, and of less power consumption.

  13. Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Prototype Combiner Spurious Mode Suppression and Power Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, P.; Epp, L.

    2006-01-01

    Results of prototype hardware activities related to a 120-W, 32-GHz (Ka-band) solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) architecture study are presented. Spurious mode suppression and the power-handling capability of a prototype 24-way radial combiner and a prototype 2-way septum binary combiner were investigated. Experimental data indicate that a commercial absorptive filter, designed to pass the circular TE01 mode, effectively suppressed the higher-order modes generated by a narrowband, flower-petal-type mode transducer. However, the same filter was not effective in suppressing higher-order modes generated by the broadband Marie mode transducer that is used in the prototype waveguide radial combiner. Should greater filtering be required by a particular SSPA application, a broadband mode filter that can suppress specifically those higher-order modes that are generated by the Marie transducer will need to be developed. A back-to-back configuration of the prototype radial combiner was tested with drive power up to approximately 50 W. No anomalous behavior was observed. Power measurements of the septum combiner indicate that up to 10-W radio frequency (RF) can be dissipated in the integrated resistive element before a permanent performance shift is observed. Thus, a given adder (a single-stage, 2-way combiner) can safely combine two 20-W sources, and the adder will not be damaged in the event of a source failure. This result is used to calculate the maximum source power that can be safely combined as a function of the number of sources combined and the number of source failures allowed in a multi-stage combiner. The analysis shows that SSPA power >140 W can be generated by power combining 16 sources producing 10 W each. In this configuration, up to three sources could fail with the guarantee that the combiner would not be damaged. Finally, a modified prototype septum combiner design was verified. The improved design reduced the assembly time from over 2 hours to about 15

  14. Statistical and Prediction modeling of the Ka Band Using Experimental Results from ACTS Propagation Terminals at 20.185 and 27.505 GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogunwuyi, Oluwatosin O.

    2004-01-01

    With the increase in demand for wireless communication services, most of the operating frequency bands have become very congested. The increase of wireless costumers is only fractional contribution to this phenomenon. The demand for more services such as video streams and internet explorer which require a lot of band width has been a more significant contributor to the congestion in a communication system. One way to increase the amount of information or data per unit of time transmitted with in a wireless communication system is to use a higher radio frequency. However in spite the advantage available in the using higher frequency bands such as, the Ka-band, higher frequencies also implies short wavelengths. And shorter wavelengths are more susceptible to rain attenuation. Until the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) was launched, the Ka- band frequency was virtually unused - the majority of communication satellites operated in lower frequency bands called the C- and Ku- bands. Ka-band is desirable because its higher frequency allows wide bandwidth applications, smaller spacecraft and ground terminal components, and stronger signal strength. Since the Ka-band is a high frequency band, the millimeter wavelengths of the signals are easily degraded by rain. This problem known as rain fade or rain attenuation The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation experiment has collected 5 years of Radio Frequency (RF) attenuation data from December 1993 to November 1997. The objective of my summer work is to help develop the statistics and prediction techniques that will help to better characterize the Ka Frequency band. The statistical analysis consists of seasonal and cumulative five-year attenuation statistics for the 20.2 and 27.5 GHz. The cumulative five-year results give the link outage that occurs for a given link margin. The experiment has seven ground station terminals that can be attributed to a unique rain zone climate. The

  15. Catching Microwave Photons in a Superconducing Resonator with Tunable Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenner, James; Yin, Yi; Chen, Yu; Barends, R.; Chiaro, B.; Kelly, J.; Mariantoni, M.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; Ohya, S.; Sank, D.; White, T.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2013-03-01

    When transferring a quantum state from a freely propagating mode to a resonator, reflections must be minimized to avoid energy loss. Performing this transfer with high fidelity requires tunable coupling. We experimentally studied a 50 Ohm transmission line with tunable coupling to a 6GHz superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator, which in turn is capacitively coupled to a phase qubit for calibration. We classically drove the resonator while measuring the reflected and captured signals using a HEMT amplifier. Following theory by Korotkov (PRB 84, 014510, 2011), we find that the photon capture efficiency is maximized with an exponentially increasing drive; further improvements come from varying pulse duration and dynamic coupling. With these techniques, we reduce reflections so that presently over 80% of the pulse energy is captured by the resonator.

  16. Microwave transmission measurements through wire array photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Graeme; Souther, Nathan; Johnson, Michael

    2008-03-01

    We have measured the microwave transmission between 12.4 and 18.0 GHz through wire arrays formed into two dimensional square lattices. One array made of copper wire 0.16 mm in radius consisted of five rows by 21 columns having a lattice constant of 5.15 mm. This array exhibited a pass band above 15 GHz, in good agreement with the calculated plasma frequency found from an expression for the permittivity^1 derived in the long wavelength limit. A second array was made with wire of radius 18 microns and lattice constant 0.8 mm. This array was filled with dielectric loaded with powdered magnetite. A sample of this metamaterial 5.8 mm thick and with no externally applied magnetic field exhibited a pass band above 16 GHz. Implications for creating metamaterials with a negative index of refraction from wire arrays embedded in a magnetic host will be discussed. ^1G. Dewar, in Complex Mediums III: Beyond Linear Isotropic Dielectrics, Akhlesh Lakhtakai, Graeme Dewar, Martin W. McCall, Editors, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 4806, 156-166 (2002).

  17. Photonic DPASK/QAM signal generation at microwave/millimeter-wave band based on an electro-optic phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Xu, Kun; Zhu, Ran; Li, Jianqiang; Wu, Jian; Hong, Xiaobin; Lin, Jintong

    2008-10-15

    We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated two novel photonic architectures to generate differential-phase amplitude-shift keying and circular quadrature amplitude modulation signals at microwave/millimeter-wave band based on an electro-optic phase modulator. In our proposed schemes, the electronic driven circuits were greatly simplified by employing the photonic vector modulation technique.

  18. Tunable microwave signal generation based on an Opto-DMD processor and a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Sang, Xin-Zhu; Yan, Bin-Bin; Ai, Qi; Li, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Gen-Xiang; Song, Fei-Jun; Zhang, Xia; Wang, Kui-Ru; Yuan, Jin-Hui; Yu, Chong-Xiu; Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-06-01

    Frequency-tunable microwave signal generation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated with a dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped fiber ring laser based on a digital Opto-DMD processor and four-wave mixing (FWM) in a high-nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The high-nonlinear PCF is employed for the generation of the FWM to obtain stable and uniform dual-wavelength oscillation. Two different short passive sub-ring cavities in the main ring cavity serve as mode filters to make SLM lasing. The two lasing wavelengths are electronically selected by loading different gratings on the Opto-DMD processor controlled with a computer. The wavelength spacing can be smartly adjusted from 0.165 nm to 1.08 nm within a tuning accuracy of 0.055 nm. Two microwave signals at 17.23 GHz and 27.47 GHz are achieved. The stability of the microwave signal is discussed. The system has the ability to generate a 137.36-GHz photonic millimeter signal at room temperature.

  19. Photonic-assisted chirped microwave pulses generation with a flexible and fine parameter manipulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinkai; Pan, Wei; Zou, Xihua; Yan, Lianshan; Luo, Bin; Zheng, Di; Ye, Jia; Lu, Bing

    2016-08-22

    A photonic approach for generating chirped microwave pulses with a flexible and fine parameter manipulation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed system, an intensity modulator (IM) biased at the minimum transmission point is used to generate two ± 1st-order optical sidebands which are then sent to a phase modulator (PM) for implementing large-signal phase modulations. A de-interleaver combined with an optical variable delay line (OVDL) is utilized to introduce a time delay between two phase-modulated optical signals. A second IM that acts as a time domain intensity switch (TDIS) is used to select different phase modulation ranges of the two phase-modulated optical signals. After the optical-electrical conversion in a photodetector (PD), chirped microwave pulses are generated. The key feature of this approach is that the parameters of the generated chirped microwave pulses including central frequency, pulse repetition frequency, and chirp rate can be flexibly and precisely manipulated by the radio frequency (RF) signals applied to modulators. A proof-of-principle experiment is carried out to verify the proposed approach. Consequently, positive or negative chirped microwave pulses with different central frequencies at 20, 22, 24 or 26 GHz and different pulse repetition frequencies at 1.5 or 2 GHz are generated, respectively. PMID:27557237

  20. Boltzmann hierarchy for the cosmic microwave background at second order including photon polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Beneke, M.; Fidler, C.

    2010-09-15

    Non-Gaussianity and B-mode polarization are particularly interesting features of the cosmic microwave background, as--at least in the standard model of cosmology--their only sources to first order in cosmological perturbation theory are primordial, possibly generated during inflation. If the primordial sources are small, the question arises how large is the non-Gaussianity and B-mode background induced in second order from the initially Gaussian and scalar perturbations. In this paper we derive the Boltzmann hierarchy for the microwave background photon phase-space distributions at second order in cosmological perturbation theory including the complete polarization information, providing the basis for further numerical studies. As an aside we note that the second-order collision term contains new sources of B-mode polarization and that no polarization persists in the tight-coupling limit.

  1. Tunable bandpass microwave photonic filter with ultrahigh stopband attenuation and skirt selectivity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Yu, Yuan; Tang, Haitao; Xu, Lu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    we propose and demonstrate a bandpass microwave photonic filter (MPF) with ultrahigh stopband attenuation and skirt selectivity based on a simple signal cancellation technique. By injecting two phase modulated signals located on opposite sides of two resonant gain peaks of a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifier (FP-SOA), two microwave frequency responses can be generated by the two input signals, respectively. The two frequency responses will add together within the passband but cancel each other out within the stopband, thus generating a MPF with simultaneous ultrahigh stopband attenuation and skirt selectivity. In the experiment the obtained MPF exhibits single passband in the range from 0 to 18 GHz and is tunable from 4 to 16 GHz by adjusting the laser wavelengths. During the tuning process the maximum stopband attenuation is 76.3 dB and the minimum 30-dB to 3-dB bandwidth shape factor is 3.5. PMID:27505828

  2. Photonic generation of chirped microwave and millimeter wave pulses based on optical spectral shaping and wavelength-to-time mapping in silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lawrence R.

    2016-08-01

    We provide an overview of photonic generation of chirped microwave and millimeter wave pulses based on optical spectral shaping followed by wavelength-to-time mapping. We summarize results obtained using bulk optic/benchtop and all-fiber spectral shapers, and discuss recent developments on integrated versions in silicon photonics. In particular, we describe devices based on microring resonators and present new results obtained using integrated spectral shapers incorporating chirped Bragg gratings.

  3. The defect mode in a low-dimensional waveguide microwave photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Skripal', A. V.; Posadskii, V. N.; Tyazhlov, V. S.; Baykin, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the violation of periodicity in a low-dimensional waveguide microwave photonic crystal, in which the periodic structure is formed by dielectric layers and adjacent metal plates partly overlapping the waveguide cross section and forming capacitive gaps between the plate edge and wide wall of the waveguide, leads to the appearance of a defect (impurity) mode. It is established that the defect mode position on the frequency scale significantly depends on both the thickness of "disturbed" dielectric layer and the capacitive gap width of diaphragms.

  4. Frequency agile microwave photonic notch filter with anomalously high stopband rejection.

    PubMed

    Marpaung, David; Morrison, Blair; Pant, Ravi; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2013-11-01

    We report a novel class microwave photonic (MWP) notch filter with a very narrow isolation bandwidth (10 MHz), an ultrahigh stopband rejection (>60 dB), a wide frequency tuning (1-30 GHz), and flexible bandwidth reconfigurability (10-65 MHz). This performance is enabled by a new concept of sideband amplitude and phase controls using an electro-optic modulator and an optical filter. This concept enables energy efficient operation in active MWP notch filters, and opens up a pathway toward enabling low-power nanophotonic devices as high-performance RF filters.

  5. A novel phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Gao, Yingjie; Yang, Chun

    2016-07-01

    Microwave photonic links can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth and immunity to external interference. In this paper, a novel phase noise measurement system is built, since the input signal and the power supply noise can be effectively cancelled by a two-arm configuration without the phase locking. Using this approach, the phase noise performance of the 10-GHz phase modulation photonic link has been measured for the first time, evaluated the values of -124 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -132 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset is obtained. Theoretical analysis on the phase noise measurement system calibration is also discussed.

  6. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    SciTech Connect

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-16

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  7. Fast universal quantum gates on microwave photons with all-resonance operations in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Stark shift on a superconducting qubit in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) has been used to construct universal quantum entangling gates on superconducting resonators in previous works. It is a second-order coupling effect between the resonator and the qubit in the dispersive regime, which leads to a slow state-selective rotation on the qubit. Here, we present two proposals to construct the fast universal quantum gates on superconducting resonators in a microwave-photon quantum processor composed of multiple superconducting resonators coupled to a superconducting transmon qutrit, that is, the controlled-phase (c-phase) gate on two microwave-photon resonators and the controlled-controlled phase (cc-phase) gates on three resonators, resorting to quantum resonance operations, without any drive field. Compared with previous works, our universal quantum gates have the higher fidelities and shorter operation times in theory. The numerical simulation shows that the fidelity of our c-phase gate is 99.57% within about 38.1 ns and that of our cc-phase gate is 99.25% within about 73.3 ns. PMID:25787147

  8. Fast universal quantum gates on microwave photons with all-resonance operations in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-03-19

    Stark shift on a superconducting qubit in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) has been used to construct universal quantum entangling gates on superconducting resonators in previous works. It is a second-order coupling effect between the resonator and the qubit in the dispersive regime, which leads to a slow state-selective rotation on the qubit. Here, we present two proposals to construct the fast universal quantum gates on superconducting resonators in a microwave-photon quantum processor composed of multiple superconducting resonators coupled to a superconducting transmon qutrit, that is, the controlled-phase (c-phase) gate on two microwave-photon resonators and the controlled-controlled phase (cc-phase) gates on three resonators, resorting to quantum resonance operations, without any drive field. Compared with previous works, our universal quantum gates have the higher fidelities and shorter operation times in theory. The numerical simulation shows that the fidelity of our c-phase gate is 99.57% within about 38.1 ns and that of our cc-phase gate is 99.25% within about 73.3 ns.

  9. Microwave generation with photonic frequency octupling using a DPMZM in a Sagnac loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yongsheng; Wen, Aijun; Li, Ningning; Wu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Huixing

    2015-09-01

    A photonic microwave signal generation scheme with frequency octupling is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The scheme is based on bi-directional use of a dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM) in a Sagnac loop. The two sub-modulators in the DPMZM are driven by two low-frequency signals with a π/2 phase difference, and the dc biases of the modulator are all set at the maximum transmission points. Due to the velocity mismatch of the modulator, only the light wave along the clockwise direction is effectively modulated by the drive signals to generate an optical signal with a carrier and ±4th order sidebands, while the modulation of the light wave along the counterclockwise direction is far less effective and can be ignored. By properly adjusting the polarization of the light wave output from the Sagnac loop, the optical carrier can be significantly suppressed at a polarizer, and then an optical signal with only ±4th order sidebands is generated. In the experiment, a pure 24-GHz microwave signal without additional phase noise from the optical system is generated using a 3-GHz local oscillator signal. As no electrical or optical filter is used, the photonic frequency octupler is of good frequency tunability.

  10. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing. PMID:26531777

  11. Wideband dynamic microwave frequency identification system using a low-power ultracompact silicon photonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Maurizio; Wang, Xu; Li, Ming; Chrostowski, Lukas; Azaña, José

    2016-09-01

    Photonic-based instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM) of unknown microwave signals offers improved flexibility and frequency range as compared with electronic solutions. However, no photonic platform has ever demonstrated the key capability to perform dynamic IFM, as required in real-world applications. In addition, all demonstrations to date employ bulky components or need high optical power for operation. Here we demonstrate an integrated photonic IFM system that can identify frequency-varying signals in a dynamic manner, without any need for fast measurement instrumentation. The system is based on a fully linear, ultracompact system based on a waveguide Bragg grating on silicon, only 65-μm long and operating up to ~30 GHz with carrier power below 10 mW, significantly outperforming present technologies. These results open a solid path towards identification of dynamically changing signals over tens of GHz bandwidths using a practical, low-cost on-chip implementation for applications from broadband communications to biomedical, astronomy and more.

  12. Novel microwave photonic fractional Hilbert transformer using a ring resonator-based optical all-pass filter.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Khan, Muhammad Rezaul; Beeker, Willem; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René; Roeloffzen, Chris

    2012-11-19

    We propose and demonstrate a novel wideband microwave photonic fractional Hilbert transformer implemented using a ring resonator-based optical all-pass filter. The full programmability of the ring resonator allows variable and arbitrary fractional order of the Hilbert transformer. The performance analysis in both frequency and time domain validates that the proposed implementation provides a good approximation to an ideal fractional Hilbert transformer. This is also experimentally verified by an electrical S21 response characterization performed on a waveguide realization of a ring resonator. The waveguide-based structure allows the proposed Hilbert transformer to be integrated together with other building blocks on a photonic integrated circuit to create various system-level functionalities for on-chip microwave photonic signal processors. As an example, a circuit consisting of a splitter and a ring resonator has been realized which can perform on-chip phase control of microwave signals generated by means of optical heterodyning, and simultaneous generation of in-phase and quadrature microwave signals for a wide frequency range. For these functionalities, this simple and on-chip solution is considered to be practical, particularly when operating together with a dual-frequency laser. To our best knowledge, this is the first-time on-chip demonstration where ring resonators are employed to perform phase control functionalities for optical generation of microwave signals by means of optical heterodyning.

  13. Hollow carbon spheres in microwaves: Bio inspired absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Gorokhov, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Pasc, A.; Ballweg, T.; Mandel, K.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a heterostructure based on a monolayer of hollow glassy carbon spheres packed in 2D was experimentally surveyed with respect to its response to microwaves, namely, the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. Such an ordered monolayer of spheres mimics the well-known "moth-eye"-like coating structures, which are widely used for designing anti-reflective surfaces, and was modelled with the long-wave approximation. Based on the experimental and modelling results, we demonstrate that carbon hollow spheres may be used for building an extremely lightweight, almost perfectly absorbing, coating for Ka-band applications.

  14. Third-order linearization for self-beating filtered microwave photonic systems using a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Daniel; Gasulla, Ivana; Capmany, José; Fandiño, Javier S; Muñoz, Pascual; Alavi, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    We develop, analyze and apply a linearization technique based on dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator to self-beating microwave photonics systems. The approach enables broadband low-distortion transmission and reception at expense of a moderate electrical power penalty yielding a small optical power penalty (<1 dB). PMID:27607667

  15. Hyperuniform disordered photonic bandgap materials, from microwave to infrared wavelength regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Weining

    Recently, we have introduced a new class of hyperuniform disordered (HUD) photonic bandgap (PBG) materials enabled by a novel constrained optimization method for engineering the material's Fourier transform to be continuous, isotropic and stealthy. Their structure factor S (k) is equal to zero for small kand exhibits a broad ring of maximum values around a characteristic wave-length range. Experimentally, an isotropic complete PBG (at all angles and for all polarizations) in an alumina-based HUD structure and single-polarized PBGs for plastic-based HUD structure have been demonstrated. Using measured and simulated transmission and phase delay information through these HUD structures, we also unfolded their band structures and reconstructed the effective dispersion relations of propagating electromagnetic modes in them. The intrinsic isotropy in these disordered structures is an inherent advantage associated with the lack of crystalline order, offering unprecedented freedom for functional defect design impossible to achieve in photonic crystals. In the microwave regime, we have shown the creation of freeform waveguides, which can channel photons robustly along arbitrarily curved paths and around sharp bends, and be decorated with defects to produce sharply resonant structures useful for filtering and frequency splitting. Recent simulation and experimental results for waveguides and modulators based on submicron-scale planar hyperuniform disordered PBG structures further highlight their ability to serve as highly compact, flexible and energy-efficient platforms for photonic integrated circuits. NSF DMR-1308084, EPSRC (UK) DTG Grant KD5050, EPSRC (UK) Strategic Equipment Grant EP/M008576/1, NSF SBIR-1345168, NSF MRI-1040444.

  16. High-Capacity Communications from Martian Distances Part 4: Assessment of Spacecraft Pointing Accuracy Capabilities Required For Large Ka-Band Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Richard E.; Sands, O. Scott; Huang, John; Bassily, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Improved surface accuracy for deployable reflectors has brought with it the possibility of Ka-band reflector antennas with extents on the order of 1000 wavelengths. Such antennas are being considered for high-rate data delivery from planetary distances. To maintain losses at reasonable levels requires a sufficiently capable Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) onboard the spacecraft. This paper provides an assessment of currently available ADCS strategies and performance levels. In addition to other issues, specific factors considered include: (1) use of "beaconless" or open loop tracking versus use of a beacon on the Earth side of the link, and (2) selection of fine pointing strategy (body-fixed/spacecraft pointing, reflector pointing or various forms of electronic beam steering). Capabilities of recent spacecraft are discussed.

  17. Computational Methods and Theoretical Results for the Ka-Band Array Feed Compensation System-Deformable Flat Plate Experiment at DSS 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Hoppe, D. J.

    1999-10-01

    This article documents the computational methods and theoretical results for the deformable flat plate (DFP), array feed compensation system (AFCS), monopulse tracking system, and combined AFCS--DFP used for compensating the gravity-induced distortions on the DSN's 70-m antenna. These systems were utilized in an experiment designed to verify gravity compensation and tracking performance of the 70-m antenna at 31.8--32.2 GHz (Ka-band). This experiment took place from November 1998 through February 1999 and consisted of both quasar and spacecraft observations. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data. The analytical tools are also used to document and understand the characteristics of each system.

  18. Research of dual-band microwave photonic filter for WLAN based on optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Jiaqi; Jiang, Lingke; Pan, Linbing; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xindong; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-07-20

    This paper presents a dual-band microwave photonic filter for a wireless local area networks with independently tunable passband center frequencies and bandwidths. The two bands of the filter were 2.4 GHz and 5.725 GHz, respectively. The filter was based on a stimulated Brillouin scattering and an optical frequency comb (OFC) scheme. We created this filter using OFC pumps instead of a single pump. The OFC scheme consists of a cascaded Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) and a dual-parallel MZM (DPMZM) hybrid modulation that generated seven and 11 lines. The experimental results show that the two passbands of the filter were 80 and 130 MHz. PMID:27463899

  19. Microwave photonic link with improved phase noise using a balanced detection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jingjing; Gu, Yiying; Tan, Wengang; Zhu, Wenwu; Wang, Linghua; Zhao, Mingshan

    2016-07-01

    A microwave photonic link (MPL) with improved phase noise performance using a dual output Mach-Zehnder modulator (DP-MZM) and balanced detection is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The fundamental concept of the approach is based on the two complementary outputs of DP-MZM and the destructive combination of the photocurrent in balanced photodetector (BPD). Theoretical analysis is performed to numerical evaluate the additive phase noise performance and shows a good agreement with the experiment. Experimental results are presented for 4 GHz, 8 GHz and 12 GHz transmission link and an 11 dB improvement of phase noise performance at 10 MHz offset is achieved compared to the conventional intensity-modulation and direct-detection (IMDD) MPL.

  20. Reconfigurable microwave photonic in-phase and quadrature detector for frequency agile radar.

    PubMed

    Emami, Hossein; Sarkhosh, Niusha

    2014-06-01

    A microwave photonic in-phase and quadrature detector is conceived and practically demonstrated. The detector has the ability to become electronically reconfigured to operate at any frequency over a wide range. This makes it an excellent candidate for frequency agile radars and other electronic warfare systems based on frequency hopping. The detector exhibits a very low amplitude and phase imbalance, which removes the need for any imbalance compensation technique. The system is designed based on the transversal filtering concept and reconfigurability is achieved via wavelength control in a dispersive fiber. The system operation was demonstrated over a frequency range of 3.5-35 GHz, with a maximum of -32 dB amplitude imbalance.

  1. Stimulated Brillouin scattering gain bandwidth reduction and applications in microwave photonics and optical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preussler, Stefan; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is one of the most dominant nonlinear effects in standard single-mode fibers and its unique spectral characteristics, especially the narrow bandwidth, enable many different applications. Most of the applications would benefit from a narrower bandwidth. Different methods for the bandwidth reduction of SBS in optical fibers are presented and discussed. A bandwidth reduction down to 17% of the natural gain can be achieved by the superposition of the gain with two losses or the utilization of a multistage system. Furthermore, applications in the field of microwave photonics and optical signal processing like high-resolution spectroscopy of communication signals, the storage of optical data packets as well as the processing of frequency combs including generation of millimeter waves and ideal sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses are presented.

  2. Single crystal silicon capacitors with low microwave loss in the single photon regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, S. J.; Murch, K. W.; Slichter, D. H.; Vijay, R.; Siddiqi, I.

    2011-04-01

    We have fabricated superconducting microwave resonators in a lumped element geometry using single crystal silicon dielectric parallel plate capacitors with C >2 pF. Aluminum devices with resonant frequencies between 4.0 and 6.5 GHz exhibited an average internal quality factor Qi of 2×105 in the single photon excitation regime at T =20 mK. Attributing the observed loss solely to the capacitive element, our measurements place an upper bound on the loss tangent of the silicon dielectric layer of tan δi=5×10-6. This level of loss is an order of magnitude lower than is currently observed in structures incorporating amorphous dielectric materials, thus making single crystal silicon capacitors an attractive, robust route for realizing long-lived quantum circuits.

  3. Frequency switched narrow linewidth microwave signal photonic generation based on a double-Brillouin-frequency spaced fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Tianshu; Jia, Qingsong; Sun, Hongwei; Dong, Keyan; Liu, Xin; Kong, Mei; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-04-10

    A simple photonic approach to generate microwave frequency switched microwave signal is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In this scheme, a Brillouin fiber laser with double-Brillouin-frequency spacing is used. The Brillouin ring configuration suppresses incoming Brillouin pump and even-order Stokes signals in the cavity. In addition, it also allows propagation of the odd-order Brillouin Stokes signals from configuration to output coupler. A dual-wavelength optical signal is heterodyned at the high-speed photodetector to produce a microwave signal. Frequency switched microwave signals, at 10.75 and 21.39 GHz, respectively, can be obtained through adjusting the polarization controller (PC) and loss of the variable optical attenuator (VOA).

  4. Two-photon microwave transitions and strong-field effects in a room-temperature Rydberg-atom gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Miller, S. A.; Thaicharoen, N.; Raithel, G.; Gordon, J. A.; Holloway, C. L.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate two-photon Autler-Townes splitting and strong-field effects of 85Rb Rydberg atoms in a room-temperature vapor cell. To observe the level structure we employ electromagnetically induced transparency. We first study the two-photon 62 S1 /2-63 S1 /2 microwave transition using an electric-field reference measurement obtained with the one-photon 62 S1 /2-62 P3 /2 transition. We then study the 61 D5 /2-62 D5 /2 transition where the microwave electric-field range is extended up to ˜40 V /m . A Floquet analysis is used to model field-induced level shifts and state-mixing effects present in the strongly driven quantum systems under consideration. Calculations are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  5. Design and optimization of polymer ring resonator modulators for analog microwave photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Arash; Middlebrook, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Efficient modulation of electrical signals onto an optical carrier remains the main challenge in full implementation of microwave photonic links (MPLs) for applications such as antenna remoting and wireless access networks. Current MPLs utilize Mach-Zehnder Interferometers (MZI) with sinusoidal transfer function as electro-optic modulators causing nonlinear distortions in the link. Recently ring resonator modulators (RRM) consisting of a ring resonator coupled to a base waveguide attracted interest to enhance linearity, reduce the size and power consumption in MPLs. Fabrication of a RRM is more challenging than the MZI not only in fabrication process but also in designing and optimization steps. Although RRM can be analyzed theoretically for MPLs, physical structures need to be designed and optimized utilizing simulation techniques in both optical and microwave regimes with consideration of specific material properties. Designing and optimization steps are conducted utilizing full-wave simulation software package and RRM function analyzed in both passive and active forms and confirmed through theoretical analysis. It is shown that RRM can be completely designed and analyzed utilizing full-wave simulation techniques and as a result linearity effect of the modulator on MPLs can be studied and optimized. The material nonlinearity response can be determined computationally and included in modulator design and readily adaptable for analyzing other materials such as silicon or structures where theoretical analysis is not easily achieved.

  6. Spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Wan, Ren-Gang; Yao, Zhi-Hai

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom embedded in an anisotropic photonic crystal is studied. Due to the modified density of state (DOS) in the anisotropic photonic band gap (PBG) and the coherent control induced by the coupling fields, spontaneous emission can be significantly enhanced when the position of the spontaneous emission peak gets close to the band gap edge. As a result of the closed-loop interaction between the fields and the atom, the spontaneous emission depends on the dynamically induced Autler-Townes splitting and its position relative to the PBG. Interesting phenomena, such as spectral-line suppression, enhancement and narrowing, and fluorescence quenching, appear in the spontaneous emission spectra, which are modulated by amplitudes and phases of the coherently driven fields and the effect of PBG. This theoretical study can provide us with more efficient methods to manipulate the atomic spontaneous emission. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11447232, 11204367, 11447157, and 11305020).

  7. Dynamics of a three-level V-type atom driven by a cavity photon and microwave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Li, Xue; Shi-Deng, Zhu; Ju, Liu; Ting-Hui, Xiao; Bao-Hua, Feng; Zhi-Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the dynamics of a three-level V-type atom driven simultaneously by a cavity photon and microwave field by examining the atomic population evolution. Owing to the coupling effect of the cavity photon, periodical oscillation of the population between the two upper states and the ground state takes place, which is the well-known vacuum Rabi oscillation. Meanwhile, the population exchange between the upmost level and the middle level can occur due to the driving action of the external microwave field. The general dynamic behavior is the superposition of a fast and a slow periodical oscillation under the cooperative and competitive effect of the cavity photon and the microwave field. Numerical results demonstrate that the time evolution of the population is strongly dependent on the atom-cavity coupling coefficient g and Rabi frequency Ω e that reflects the intensity of the external microwave field. By modulating the two parameters g and Ω e, a large number of population transfer behaviors can be achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11434017 and 11374357) and the National Basics Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632704).

  8. Combined Brillouin light scattering and microwave absorption study of magnon-photon coupling in a split-ring resonator/YIG film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, S.; Maier-Flaig, H.; Gross, R.; Hu, C.-M.; Huebl, H.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Weiler, M.

    2016-08-01

    Microfocused Brillouin light scattering (BLS) and microwave absorption (MA) are used to study magnon-photon coupling in a system consisting of a split-ring microwave resonator and an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film. The split-ring resonator is defined by optical lithography and loaded with a 1 μm-thick YIG film grown by liquid phase epitaxy. BLS and MA spectra of the hybrid system are simultaneously recorded as a function of the applied magnetic field magnitude and microwave excitation frequency. Strong coupling of the magnon and microwave resonator modes is found with a coupling strength of geff /2π = 63 MHz. The combined BLS and MA data allow us to study the continuous transition of the hybridized modes from a purely magnonic to a purely photonic mode by varying the applied magnetic field and microwave frequency. Furthermore, the BLS data represent an up-conversion of the microwave frequency coupling to optical frequencies.

  9. Investigation of the vertical structure of clouds over the Western Ghats, India using X-band and Ka-band Doppler radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subrata Kumar

    Investigation of the vertical structure of clouds over the Western Ghats, India using X-band and Ka-band Doppler radar observations Subrata Kumar Das*, S. M. Deshpande, K. Chakravarty and M. C. R. Kalapureddy Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, India ABSTRACT The Western Ghats (WGs) located parallel to the west coast of India receives a huge amount of rainfall during the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) in which topography plays a huge role in it. To understand the dynamics and microphysics of monsoon precipitating clouds over the WGs, a High Altitude Cloud Physics Laboratory (HACPL) has been setup at Mahabaleshwar (17.92 oN, 73.6 oE, ~1.4 km AMSL) in 2012. As part of this laboratory, a mobile X-band (9.5 GHz) and Ka-band (35.29 GHz) dual-polarization Doppler weather radar system is installed at Mandhardev (18.04 oN, 73.87 oE, ~1.3 km AMSL, at 26 km radial distance from the HACPL). The X-band radar shows the dominant cloud movement is from the western side of the WGs to the eastern side, crossing the HACPL and the radar site. The cloud occurrence statistics show a sudden reduction within a distance of ~30 km on the eastern side of WGs indicates the possibility of a rain shadow area. Further, we investigate the vertical structure of cloud over the HACPL, and identified four cloud modes viz., shallow cumulus mode, congestus mode, deep convective mode, and overshooting convection mode. The frequency distribution of cloud-cell base height (CBH) and cloud-cell top height (CTH) shows most of the clouds with base below 2.5 km and tops usually not exceeding 9 km. This indicates the dominance of warm-rain process in the WGs region. The positive relationships between surface rainfall rates and CTH and 0oC isotherm level have observed. Details will be presented in the upcoming symposium.

  10. Influence of the modulation index of Mach-Zehnder modulator on intersatellite microwave photonics links with multiple RF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Yongjun; Chu, Xingchun; Hou, Rui

    2013-04-01

    A generalized intersatellite microwave photonics links model to study the influence of the modulation index of Mach-Zehnder modulator on the receiver sensitivity with multiple radio frequency (RF) signals is presented. An exact analytical solution of signal-to-noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) for optical double-sideband (ODSB) and optical single-sideband (OSSB) modulation is deduced with Bessel expansion and Graf's addition theorem. Numerical results show that the receiver sensitivity increases and then decreases as the increase in modulation index, there is an optimum modulation index that maximizes the receiver sensitivity and the larger channel numbers lead to lower receiver sensitivity for maintaining the SNDR at the desired level. In addition, ODSB modulation can be more attractive than OSSB modulation in intersatellite microwave photonics links, since the maximum receiver sensitivity for ODSB modulation is better than that for OSSB modulation.

  11. Organic-based electro-optic modulators for microwave photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, David

    As cutting-edge microwave photonic systems with higher complexity and stringent device requirement are being developed, the demand higher performance modulators with lower drive voltages and higher bandwidth is beginning to overtake the physical limitations of existing modulators based in LiNbO3. To address this growing demand, groundbreaking work in the field of organic electro-optic materials has been achieved over the past 10--15 years that has resulted in materials with electro-optic coefficients up to 10 times that of LiNbO3 and with demonstrated response times into the THz regime. This dissertation details work towards developing low drive-voltage, high bandwidth organic-based electro-optic modulators to support next generation microwave photonic systems. Initial efforts were focused on designing an organic electro-optic material based low frequency phase modulator and developing a fabrication procedure that successfully integrates the material without compromising its electro optic activity. Additionally a procedure for inducing the high electro-optic activity in the waveguide core through a process known as 'poling' was developed. The phase modulators were then characterized to confirm the expected high electro-optic activity and correspondingly low drive voltages. To transition from low frequency modulation to broadband operation it was necessary to gather some dielectric information of the waveguide materials for RF design. Because traditional RF dielectric constant measurements assume thick substrates on the order of 100s of microns, a modified microstrip ring resonator technique was developed to measure the dielectric constant of thin, polymer waveguide films on the order of 10 mum out to 110 GHz. A high frequency traveling wave microstrip modulator was then designed and optimized for operation up to 50 GHz, and efforts were turned towards RF packaging of the microstrip modulators for practical utilization and integration. To feed the RF signals a

  12. Photonic generation of phase-stable and wideband chirped microwave signals based on phase-locked dual optical frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yitian; Zhou, Qian; Han, Daming; Li, Baiyu; Xie, Weilin; Liu, Zhangweiyi; Qin, Jie; Wang, Xiaocheng; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-08-15

    A photonics-based scheme is presented for generating wideband and phase-stable chirped microwave signals based on two phase-locked combs with fixed and agile repetition rates. By tuning the difference of the two combs' repetition rates and extracting different order comb tones, a wideband linearly frequency-chirped microwave signal with flexible carrier frequency and chirped range is obtained. Owing to the scheme of dual-heterodyne phase transfer and phase-locked loop, extrinsic phase drift and noise induced by the separated optical paths is detected and suppressed efficiently. Linearly frequency-chirped microwave signals from 5 to 15 GHz and 237 to 247 GHz with 30 ms duration are achieved, respectively, contributing to the time-bandwidth product of 3×108. And less than 1.3×10-5 linearity errors (RMS) are also obtained. PMID:27519089

  13. Photonic generation of microwave frequency shift keying signal using a single-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    PubMed

    Cao, Pan; Hu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Jiayang; Jiang, Xinhong; Su, Yikai

    2014-06-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new scheme for photonic generation of microwave frequency shift keying (FSK) signal by employing one single-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM). In the proposed method, an electrical signal with different radio frequency (RF) amplitudes and direct current (DC) components for bit '0' and bit '1' is generated. After amplification, the signal is fed into a single-drive MZM which is biased at the quadrature and null points of its transmission curve for bit '0' and bit '1', respectively. Due to the different RF amplitudes, a microwave FSK signal can be obtained after photodetection, where the space frequency is the same as the RF frequency and the mark frequency is twice as large as the RF frequency. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is verified by a proof-of-concept experiment. 5/10-GHz and 10/20-GHz microwave FSK signals with different bit rates are successfully demonstrated.

  14. Photonic generation of a phase-coded microwave signal based on a single dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2013-12-15

    A compact scheme for photonic generation of a phase-coded microwave signal using a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DMZM) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed scheme, the radio frequency (RF) carrier and the coding signal are sent to the two RF ports of the DMZM, respectively. By properly setting the amplitude of the coding signal and the bias voltage of the DMZM, an exact π-phase-shift phase-coded microwave signal is generated. The proposed scheme has a simple structure since only a single DMZM is required. In addition, good frequency tunability is achieved because no frequency-dependent electrical devices or wavelength-dependent optical devices are applied. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is verified by experiment. 2 or 2.5 Gb/s phase-coded 10 and 20 GHz microwave signals are successfully generated.

  15. An experimental investigation of high temperature superconducting microstrip antennas at K- and Ka-band frequencies. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS results in narrow bandwidths and high patch edge impedances of such antennas. To investigate the performance of superconducting microstrip antennas, three antenna architectures at K and Ka-band frequencies are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled, gap coupled, and electromagnetically coupled to a microstrip transmission line were designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using YBa2Cu3O7 superconducting thin films. For each architecture, a single patch antenna and a four element array were fabricated. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, patterns, efficiency, and gain are presented. The measured results show usable antennas can be constructed using any of the architectures. All architectures show excellent gain characteristics, with less than 2 dB of total loss in the four element arrays. Although the direct and gap coupled antennas are the simplest antennas to design and fabricate, they suffer from narrow bandwidths. The electromagnetically coupled antenna, on the other hand, allows the flexibility of using a low permittivity substrate for the patch radiator, while using HTS for the feed network, thus increasing the bandwidth while effectively utilizing the low loss properties of HTS. Each antenna investigated in this research is the first of its kind reported.

  16. A Frequency Transfer and Cleanup System for Ultra-High Stability at Both Long and Short Times for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, M. D.; Dick, G. J.; Wang, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    New radio science experiments, including a gravitational wave search and several atmospheric occultation studies, are planned for the Cassini Ka-band experiment. These experiments are made possible by reduced solar-induced phase fluctuations at the high-frequency (32 GHZ) of the radio link between the earth and the spacecraft. In order to match the improved link performance, a significant upgrade is under way to improve the frequency stability capabilities of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). Significant improvements are being undertaken in many areas, including antenna vibration and (wet) tropospheric calibration, in addition to frequency generation and distribution. We describe here the design and development of a system to provide a reference signal with the highest possible frequency stability for both long-term, short-term, and phase noise, at an antenna (DSS 25) that is remote from the frequency standards room at SPC-10 at the Goldstone site. The new technologies were developed in order to meet the very tight requirements. They are: 1) a Stabilized Fiber-Optic Distribution Assembly (SFODA) that includes active compensation of thermal variations to transfer long-term stability over 16 km of ordinary fiber-optic cable, and 2) a Compensated Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) that provides short-term performance in a cryocooled sapphire oscillator with ultra-high short-term stability and low phase noise.

  17. A microwave photonic filter based on multi-wavelength fiber laser and infinite impulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Cao, Ye; Zhao, Ai-hong; Tong, Zheng-rong

    2016-09-01

    A microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on multi-wavelength fiber laser and infinite impulse response (IIR) is proposed. The filter uses a multi-wavelength fiber laser as the light source, two sections of polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) and three polarization controllers (PCs) as the laser frequency selection device. By adjusting the PC to change the effective length of the PMF, the laser can obtain three wavelength spacings, which are 0.44 nm, 0.78 nm and 1.08 nm, respectively. And the corresponding free spectral ranges ( FSRs) are 8.46 GHz, 4.66 GHz and 3.44 GHz, respectively. Thus changing the wavelength spacing of the laser can make the FSR variable. An IIR filter is introduced based on a finite impulse response (FIR) filter. Then the 3-dB bandwidth of the MPF is reduced, and the main side-lobe suppression ratio ( MSSR) is increased. By adjusting the gain of the radio frequency (RF) signal amplifier, the frequency response of the filter can be enhanced.

  18. Resolution-improved in situ DNA hybridization detection based on microwave photonic interrogation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Guo, Tuan; Wang, Xudong; Sun, Dandan; Ran, Yang; Feng, Xinhuan; Guan, Bai-ou

    2015-10-19

    In situ bio-sensing system based on microwave photonics filter (MPF) interrogation method with improved resolution is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A microfiber Bragg grating (mFBG) is used as sensing probe for DNA hybridization detection. Different from the traditional wavelength monitoring technique, we use the frequency interrogation scheme for resolution-improved bio-sensing detection. Experimental results show that the frequency shift of MPF notch presents a linear response to the surrounding refractive index (SRI) change over the range of 1.33 to 1.38, with a SRI resolution up to 2.6 × 10(-5) RIU, which has been increased for almost two orders of magnitude compared with the traditional fundamental mode monitoring technique (~3.6 × 10(-3) RIU). Due to the high Q value (about 27), the whole process of DNA hybridization can be in situ monitored. The proposed MPF-based bio-sensing system provides a new interrogation method over the frequency domain with improved sensing resolution and rapid interrogation rate for biochemical and environmental measurement.

  19. Simplified photonic-assisted digitalized microwave frequency measurement with improved coding efficiency and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing; Pan, Wei; Zou, Xihua; Yan, Lianshan; Luo, Bin; Liu, Xinkai; Li, Peixuan; Yan, Xianglei

    2016-08-01

    A simplified photonic approach to implement digitalized microwave frequency measurement with improved coding efficiency and receiving sensitivity is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed approach, an optical phase-shifted filter array and multiple optical filters with multiplied FSRs are designed to obtain digitalized results in the form of binary encoding. Thanks to the complementary outputs, an adaptive threshold decision implemented using balanced receivers is employed to perform binary encoding, instead of a fixed power ratio threshold of 0.5, leading to an improvement in the receiving sensitivity. Besides, a high coding efficiency and a fine measurement resolution are achieved with relaxed accuracy requirement on phase shifts of the optical filters. In particular, compared with the previous approaches, larger tolerances on the phase shifts of the optical phase-shifted filters are provided in the proposed approach having the same coding efficiency and resolution. Therefore, the proposed system is easy to be implemented and robust to noise. A proof-of-concept experiment is then performed. 6-bit binary digital results with a 5-bit effective number are obtained in the range from 10 GHz to 40 GHz. In addition, an integrated version of such a filter array is designed and analyzed in simulation.

  20. Microwave-driven plasmas in Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. L.; Leroy, O.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Debord, B.; Gerome, F.; Jamier, R.; Benabid, F.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports on a novel solution to ignite and maintain micro-plasmas in gas-filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibres (HC-PCFs), using CW microwave excitation (2.45 GHz). The original concept is based on a surfatron, generating argon micro-plasmas of few centimetres in length within a 100 μm core-diameter Kagome HC-PCF, at ~1 mbar on-gap gas-pressure using low powers (< 50 W). Diagnostics of the coupled power evidence high ionization degrees (~10-2) , for moderate gas temperatures (~1300 K at the centre of the fibre, estimated by OES), with no damage to the host structure. This counter intuitive result is studied using a 1D-radial fluid model that describes the charged particle and the electron energy transport, the electromagnetic excitation and the gas heating. We analyze the modification of the plasma and the gas heating mechanisms with changes in the work conditions (core diameter, pressure and electron density). Work supported by ANR and DGA (ASTRID-2011-UVfactor) and by FCT (Pest-OE/SADG/LA0010/2011).

  1. Nonlinearity modelling of an on-board microwave photonics system based on Mach-Zehnder modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zi-hang; Zhao, Shang-hong; Yao, Zhou-shi; Tan, Qing-gui; Li, Yong-jun; Chu, Xing-chun; Wang, Xiang; Zhao, Gu-hao

    2012-11-01

    For the nonlinearity distortion problem of Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) applied in the on-board microwave photonics system, the situation for two input radio frequency (RF) signals with different frequencies and phases is discussed, and an exact analytical solution is derived with the method of expanding Bessel series and Graf addition theory. According to the analytical expression, the nonlinearity characteristics of the modulator can be precisely predicted, and the system performance can be optimized. The correctness of the analytical solution is approved by simulation results. Analytical results indicate that the nonlinearity distortion is suppressed as the decrease of modulation index, the increase of direct current bias phase shift and phase difference between two input RF signals. When the phase difference equals zero or π and the direct current bias phase shift is π/2, there are only odd-order distortion terms. When the phase difference equals zero or π and the direct current bias phase shift is π, there are only even-order distortion terms.

  2. Optically tunable full 360° microwave photonic phase shifter using three cascaded silicon-on-insulator microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehteshami, Nasrin; Zhang, Weifeng; Yao, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    A broadband optically tunable microwave phase shifter with a tunable phase shift covering the entire 360° range using three cascaded silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microring resonators (MRRs) that are optically pumped is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The phase tuning is implemented based on the thermal nonlinear effect in the MRRs. By optically pumping the MRRs, the stored light in the MRRs is absorbed due to two photon absorption (TPA) to generate free carriers, which result in free carrier absorption (FCA). The FCA effect would lead to the heating of the MRRs and cause a redshift in the phase response, which is used to implement a microwave phase shifter with a tunable phase shift. The device is designated and fabricated on an SOI platform, which is experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that by optically pumping the MRRs, a broadband microwave photonic phase shifter with a bandwidth of 7 GHz from 16 to 23 GHz with a tunable phase shift covering the entire 360° phase shift range is achieved.

  3. Emerging, Photonic Based Technologies for NASA Space Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Lee, Richard; Levi, Anthony; Bos, Philip; Titus, Charles; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An objective of NASA's Computing, Information, and Communications Technology program is to support the development of technologies that could potentially lower the cost of the Earth science and space exploration missions, and result in greater scientific returns. NASA-supported photonic activities which will impact space communications will be described. The objective of the RF microphotonic research is to develop a Ka-band receiver that will enable the microwaves detected by an antenna to modulate a 1.55- micron optical carrier. A key element is the high-Q, microphotonic modulator that employs a lithium niobate microdisk. The technical approach could lead to new receivers that utilize ultra-fast, photonic signal processing techniques, and are low cost, compact, low weight and power efficient. The progress in the liquid crystal (LC) beam steering research will also be reported. The predicted benefits of an LC-based device on board a spacecraft include non-mechanical, submicroradian laser-beam pointing, milliradian scanning ranges, and wave-front correction. The potential applications of these emerging technologies to the various NASA missions will be presented.

  4. Microwave photonic filter with reconfigurable and tunable bandpass response using integrated optical signal processor based on microring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zan; Huang, Beiju; Zhang, Zanyun; Cheng, Chuantong; Chen, Hongda

    2013-12-01

    A bandpass microwave photonic filter based on an integrated optical signal processor is proposed and demonstrated by numerical simulation. The optical signal processor consisting of double-bus-coupled and series-cascaded silicon microrings (MRs) is used to produce two bandpass responses to process optical carrier signal and sideband signal separately. Because of the tunability of MRs, variable -3 dB bandwidth and tunable operating frequency are achieved. The -3 dB bandwidth and operating frequency can be tuned from 1.5 to 12 GHz and from 15 to 34 GHz, respectively. The loss impact, tuning method, and fabrication error tolerance are also discussed.

  5. Generation of surface-wave microwave microplasmas in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based on a split-ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Vial, Florian; Gadonna, Katell; Debord, Benoît; Delahaye, Frédéric; Amrani, Foued; Leroy, Olivier; Gérôme, Frédéric; Benabid, Fetah

    2016-05-15

    We report on a new and highly compact scheme for the generation and sustainment of microwave-driven plasmas inside the core of an inhibited coupling Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The microwave plasma generator consists of a split-ring resonator that efficiently couples the microwave field into the gas-filled fiber. This coupling induces the concomitant generation of a microwave surface wave at the fiber core surround and a stable plasma column confined in the fiber core. The scheme allowed the generation of several centimeters long argon microplasma columns with a very low excitation power threshold. This result represents an important step toward highly compact plasma lasers or plasma-based photonic components. PMID:27176984

  6. Generation of surface-wave microwave microplasmas in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based on a split-ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Vial, Florian; Gadonna, Katell; Debord, Benoît; Delahaye, Frédéric; Amrani, Foued; Leroy, Olivier; Gérôme, Frédéric; Benabid, Fetah

    2016-05-15

    We report on a new and highly compact scheme for the generation and sustainment of microwave-driven plasmas inside the core of an inhibited coupling Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The microwave plasma generator consists of a split-ring resonator that efficiently couples the microwave field into the gas-filled fiber. This coupling induces the concomitant generation of a microwave surface wave at the fiber core surround and a stable plasma column confined in the fiber core. The scheme allowed the generation of several centimeters long argon microplasma columns with a very low excitation power threshold. This result represents an important step toward highly compact plasma lasers or plasma-based photonic components.

  7. Microwave remote sensing of ionized air.

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Heifetz, A.; Elmer, T.; Fiflis, P.; Koehl, E. R.; Chien, H. T.; Raptis, A. C.

    2011-07-01

    We present observations of microwave scattering from ambient room air ionized with a negative ion generator. The frequency dependence of the radar cross section of ionized air was measured from 26.5 to 40 GHz (Ka-band) in a bistatic mode with an Agilent PNA-X series (model N5245A) vector network analyzer. A detailed calibration scheme is provided to minimize the effect of the stray background field and system frequency response on the target reflection. The feasibility of detecting the microwave reflection from ionized air portends many potential applications such as remote sensing of atmospheric ionization and remote detection of radioactive ionization of air.

  8. Fan tomography of the tropospheric water vapor for the calibration of the Ka band tracking of the Bepi-Colombo spacecraft (MORE experiment).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Serafini, Jonathan; Sichoix, Lydie

    2012-07-01

    The radiosciences Bepi-Colombo MORE experiment will use X/X, X/Ka and Ka/Ka band radio links to make accurate measurements of the spacecraft range and range rate. Tropospheric zenith wet delays range from 1.5 cm to 10 cm, with high variability (less than 1000 s) and will impair these accurate measurements. Conditions vary from summer (worse) to winter (better), from day (worse) to night (better). These wet delays cannot be estimated from ground weather measurements and alternative calibration methods should be used in order to cope with the MORE requirements (no more than 3 mm at 1000 s). Due to the Mercury orbit, MORE measurements will be performed by daylight and more frequently in summer than in winter (from Northern hemisphere). Two systems have been considered to calibrate this wet delay: Water Vapour Radiometers (WVRs) and GPS receivers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a new class of WVRs reaching a 5 percent accuracy for the wet delay calibration (0.75 mm to 5 mm), but these WVRs are expensive to build and operate. GPS receivers are also routinely used for the calibration of data from NASA Deep Space probes, but several studies have shown that GPS receivers can give good calibration (through wet delay mapping functions) for long time variations, but are not accurate enough for short time variations (100 to 1000 s), and that WVRs must be used to efficiently calibrate the wet troposphere delays over such time spans. We think that such a calibration could be done by assimilating data from all the GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou and IRNSS) that will be available at the time of the Bepi-Colombo arrival at Mercury (2021), provided that the underlying physics of the turbulent atmosphere and evapotranspiration processes are properly taken into account at such time scales. This implies to do a tomographic image of the troposphere overlying each Deep Space tracking station at time scales of less than 1000 s. For this purpose, we have

  9. Wideband 360 degrees microwave photonic phase shifter based on slow light in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-03-15

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a continuously tunable 360 degrees microwave phase shifter spanning a microwave bandwidth of several tens of GHz (up to 40 GHz). The proposed device exploits the phenomenon of coherent population oscillations, enhanced by optical filtering, in combination with a regeneration stage realized by four-wave mixing effects. This combination provides scalability: three hybrid stages are demonstrated but the technology allows an all-integrated device. The microwave operation frequency limitations of the suggested technique, dictated by the underlying physics, are also analyzed.

  10. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit technology for advanced space communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1988-01-01

    Future Space Communications subsystems will utilize GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMIC's) to reduce volume, weight, and cost and to enhance system reliability. Recent advances in GaAs MMIC technology have led to high-performance devices which show promise for insertion into these next generation systems. The status and development of a number of these devices operating from Ku through Ka band will be discussed along with anticipated potential applications.

  11. Microwave-assisted self-doping of TiO2 photonic crystals for efficient photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonghai; Yang, Xiulin; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Ahmed, Elaf; Shi, Le; Wang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report that the combination of microwave heating and ethylene glycol, a mild reducing agent, can induce Ti(3+) self-doping in TiO2. A hierarchical TiO2 nanotube array with the top layer serving as TiO2 photonic crystals (TiO2 NTPCs) was selected as the base photoelectrode. The self-doped TiO2 NTPCs demonstrated a 10-fold increase in visible-light photocurrent density compared to the nondoped one, and the optimized saturation photocurrent density under simulated AM 1.5G illumination was identified to be 2.5 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode, which is comparable to the highest values ever reported for TiO2-based photoelectrodes. The significant enhancement of photoelectrochemical performance can be ascribed to the rational coupling of morphological and electronic features of the self-doped TiO2 NTPCs: (1) the periodically morphological structure of the photonic crystal layer traps broadband visible light, (2) the electronic interband state induced from self-doping of Ti(3+) can be excited in the visible-light region, and (3) the captured light by the photonic crystal layer is absorbed by the self-doped interbands.

  12. Photonic generation of a microwave signal by incorporating a delay interferometer and a saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guojie; Huang, Dexiu; Zhang, Xinliang; Cao, Hui

    2008-03-15

    A novel approach to generate microwave signals is presented by employing a dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser. By using a delay interferometer as a comb filter cascaded with a tunable bandpass filter and a saturable absorber formed by an unpumped polarization-maintaining erbium-doped fiber, a stable wavelength-tunable dual-wavelength single longitudinal-mode laser is achieved. A microwave signal at 20.07 GHz with a linewidth of <25 kHz is demonstrated by beating the two wavelengths at a photodetector.

  13. A single source microwave photonic filter using a novel single-mode fiber to multimode fiber coupling technique.

    PubMed

    Chang, John; Fok, Mable P; Meister, James; Prucnal, Paul R

    2013-03-11

    In this paper we present a fully tunable and reconfigurable single-laser multi-tap microwave photonic FIR filter that utilizes a special SM-to-MM combiner to sum the taps. The filter requires only a single laser source for all the taps and a passive component, a SM-to-MM combiner, for incoherent summing of signal. The SM-to-MM combiner does not produce optical interference during signal merging and is phase-insensitive. We experimentally demonstrate an eight-tap filter with both positive and negative programmable coefficients with excellent correspondence between predicted and measured values. The magnitude response shows a clean and accurate function across the entire bandwidth, and proves successful operation of the FIR filter using a SM-to-MM combiner.

  14. A monolithically integrated dual-mode laser for photonic microwave generation and all-optical clock recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liqiang; Zhou, Daibing; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a monolithically integrated dual-mode laser (DML) with narrow-beat-linewidth and wide-beat-tunability. Using a monolithic DFB laser subjected to amplified feedback, photonic microwave generation of up to 45 GHz is obtained with higher than 15 GHz beat frequency tunability. Thanks to the high phase correlation of the two modes and the narrow mode linewidth, a RF linewidth of lower than 50 kHz is measured. Simulations are also carried out to illustrate the dual-mode beat characteristic. Furthermore, using the DML, an all-optical clock recovery for 40  Gbaud NRZ-QPSK signals is demonstrated. Timing jitter of lower than 363 fs (integrated within a frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 GHz) is obtained.

  15. Multilayered Graphene in Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzhir, P.; Volynets, N.; Maksimenko, S.; Kaplas, T.; Svirko, Yu.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the experimental study of electromagnetic (EM) properties of multilayered graphene in Ka-band synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in between nanometrically thin Cu catalyst film and dielectric (SiO2) substrate. The quality of the produced multilayered graphene samples were monitored by Raman spectroscopy. The thickness of graphene films was controlled by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and was found to be a few nanometers (up to 5 nm). We discovered, that the fabricated graphene provided remarkably high EM shielding efficiency caused by absorption losses at the level of 35-43% of incident power. Being highly conductive at room temperature, multi-layer graphene emerges as a promising material for manufacturing ultrathin microwave coatings to be used in aerospace applications.

  16. Photon-assisted tunnelling with nonclassical microwaves in hybrid circuit QED systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souquet, Jean-René; Woolley, Matthew; Gabelli, Julien; Simon, Pascal; Clerk, Aashish

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by recent experiments where superconducting microwave circuits have been coupled to electrons in semiconductor nanostructures, we study theoretically the interplay of non-classical light produced in a cavity with electron transport through a tunnel junction. We demonstrate that this basic light-matter interaction is naturally characterized by non-positive definite quasi-probability distributions which are intimately connected to the Glauber-Sudarshan P-function. We further demonstrate that this negative quasiprobability has unequivocal signatures on the differential conductance that should be easily detectable in state of art experiments. This thus turns the tunnel junction into a non-trivial probe of the microwave state. We also discuss the non-trivial backaction of the junction current on the cavity.

  17. Whispering-gallery-mode electro-optic modulator and photonic microwave receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchenko, Vladimir S.; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A.; Matsko, Andrey B.; Maleki, Lute

    2003-02-01

    We report on the experimental observation of efficient all-resonant three-wave mixing using high-Q whispering-gallery modes. The modes were excited in a millimeter size toroidal cavity fabricated from LiNbO3. We implemented a low-noise resonant electro-optic modulator based on this wave mixing process. We observe an efficient modulation of light with coherent microwave pumping at 9 GHz with applied power of approximately 10 mW. Used as a receiver, the modulator allows us to detect nanowatt microwave radiation. Preliminary results with a 33-GHz modulator prototype are also reported. We present a theoretical interpretation of the experimental results and discuss possible applications of the device.

  18. Microwave photonics for space-time compression of ultrabroadband signals through multipath wireless channels.

    PubMed

    Dezfooliyan, Amir; Weiner, Andrew M

    2013-12-01

    We employed photonic radio frequency (RF) arbitrary waveform generation to demonstrate space-time compression of ultrabroadband wireless signals through highly scattering multipath channels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental report that explores an RF-photonic transmitter to both characterize channel dispersions in real wireless environments and generate predistorted waveforms to achieve focusing through the multipath channels. Our experiments span a three octave frequency range of 2-18 GHz, nearly an order of magnitude beyond the ~2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth reported in previous spatiotemporal focusing experiments relying on electronic waveform generators.

  19. Photonic generation of microwave signal using a dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser with CMFBG filter and saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Suchun; Lu, Shaohua; Peng, Wanjing; Li, Qi; Qi, Chunhui; Feng, Ting; Jian, Shuisheng

    2013-02-01

    A simple approach for photonic generation of microwave signal using a dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped fiber (EDF) ring laser is proposed and demonstrated. For the first time as we know, a chirped moiré fiber Bragg grating (CMFBG) filter with ultra-narrow transmission band and a chirped fiber Bragg grating (FBG) are used to select the laser longitudinal mode. The stable SLM operation of the fiber laser is guaranteed by the combination of the CMFBG filter and 3 m unpumped EDF acting as a saturable absorber. Stable dual-wavelength SLM fiber laser with a wavelength spacing of approximately 0.140 nm is experimentally realized. By beating the dual-wavelength fiber laser at a photodetector, photonic generation of microwave signal at 17.682 GHz is successfully obtained.

  20. DSS-24 microwave holography measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.; Withington, P. M.; Jackson, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The JPL DSN Microwave Antenna Holography System (MAHST) was applied to the newly constructed DSS-24 34-m beam-waveguide antenna at Goldstone, California. The application of MAHST measurements and corrections at DSS 24 provided the critical RF performance necessary to not only meet the project requirements and goals, but to surpass them. A performance increase of 0.35 dB at X-band (8.45 GHz) and 4.9 dB at Ka-band (32 GHz) was provided by MAHST, resulting in peak efficiencies of 75.25 percent at X-band and 60.6 percent at Ka-band (measured from the Cassegrain focus at f1). The MAHST enabled setting the main reflector panels of DSS 24 to 0.25-mm rms, making DSS 24 the highest precision antenna in the NASA/JPL DSN. The precision of the DSS-24 antenna (diameter/rms) is 1.36 x 10(exp 5), and its gain limit is at 95 GHz.

  1. High-directivity planar antenna using controllable photonic bandgap material at microwave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    de Lustrac, A.; Gadot, F.; Akmansoy, E.; Brillat, T.

    2001-06-25

    In this letter, we experimentally demonstrate the capability of a controllable photonic bandgap (CPBG) material to conform the emitted radiation of a planar antenna at 12 GHz. The CPBG material is a variable conductance lattice fabricated with high-frequency PIN diodes soldered along metallic stripes on dielectric printed boards. Depending on the diode bias, the emitted radiation of the antenna can be either transmitted or totally reflected by the material. In the transmission state, the antenna radiation is spatially filtered by the CPBG material in a sharp beam perpendicular to the surface of the material. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  2. High-performance GaAs/AlGaAs optical phase modulators for microwave/photonic integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Armendariz, M.G.; Vawter, G.A.; Carson, R.F.; Leibenguth, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    High-speed high-performance optical phase modulators are being developed for use in a coherent Photonic Integrated Circuit (PIC) technology. These phase modulators are the critical component of a PIC program at Sandia National Laboratories targeted for microwave/millimeter-wave signal processing and control including phased-array antenna control. The primary design goals for these modulators are amenability for integration into PICs, high ``figure of merit`` (FOM -- phase shift per unit length-voltage), and large bandwidths allowing for operation at millimeter wave frequencies. Depletion-edge-translation optical phase modulators (GaAs/AlGaAs based) have been selected as the device technology of choice due to their high FOM (>60{degree}/V{center_dot}mm @ 1.3 {mu}m). These modulators unfortunately suffer from a large terminal capacitance which greatly limits speed. To overcome this problem, a distributed electrode design based on the use of slow-wave coplanar strips has been developed. Device design and measurements are presented in this paper.

  3. Low-Pressure Microwave Excited Microplasmas as Sources of VUV Photons and Metastable Excited Atoms: Experimental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, James; Xue, Jun; Urdahl, Randall

    2011-10-01

    Microplasma discharges are typically operated at high pressure due to pd scaling. However, there are a number of potential applications for which lower pressure operation offers advantages. These applications, including spatially precise surface processing, treatment of soft materials, and chemical analysis, require energetic plasma products such as excited state species, VUV photons, or high-energy ions while taking advantage of the small size and high specific power a microdischarge offers. To this end, microwave-excited microplasma sources in rare gases operating at pressures of < 10 Torr are being developed. The microplasmas are sustained in ceramic cavities having cross sectional dimensions of <= 1 mm, excited by a split-ring resonator antenna operated at 2.45 GHz at power levels of a few W. Experimental measurements, focused on the production of energetic plasma products, will be discussed. These will include emission spectroscopy, photodiode measurements of total VUV emission, diode laser absorption measurements of excited-state densities, and measurements of electron density through RF reflectometry. The effects of varying gas flow rate, composition, and RF power will be explored.

  4. Low-Pressure Microwave Excited Microplasmas as Sources of VUV Photons and Metastable Excited Atoms: Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark; Cooley, James; Xue, Jun; Urdhal, Randall

    2011-10-01

    Low pressure plasmas sustained in rare gases and rare gas mixtures can be efficient sources of VUV light from resonant optical transitions. Many applications would benefit from having small, inexpensive sources of plasma produced VUV light. To address this need, microwave wave excited microplasma sources in rare gases operating at pressures of <10 Torr are being developed. The microplasmas are sustained in ceramic cavities having cross sectional dimensions of <=1 mm, excited by a split-ring resonator antenna operated at 2.45 GHz. Power deposition is a few W. Hybrid computer modeling of microplasmas sustained in Ar has been performed to develop scaling laws for increasing the efficiency of VUV light production. The model includes a Monte Carlo simulation for the electron energy distribution and for radiation transport. Results from those studies will be discussed for plasma densities, electron energy distributions, VUV light production and excited state densities as a function of power, pressure and aspect ratio of the microplasma cavities. Modeling results will be compared to laser absorption spectroscopy of Ar excited state densities. Work supported by Agilent Technologies.

  5. Ka-Band Radar Terminal Descent Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, Brian; Berkun, Andrew; Tope, Michael; Andricos, Constantine; Okonek, Joseph; Lou, Yunling

    2007-01-01

    The terminal descent sensor (TDS) is a radar altimeter/velocimeter that improves the accuracy of velocity sensing by more than an order of magnitude when compared to existing sensors. The TDS is designed for the safe planetary landing of payloads, and may be used in helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft requiring high-accuracy velocity sensing

  6. Ka-Band Phased Array System Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Johnson, S.; Sands, O.; Lambert, K.

    2001-01-01

    Phased Array Antennas (PAAs) using patch-radiating elements are projected to transmit data at rates several orders of magnitude higher than currently offered with reflector-based systems. However, there are a number of potential sources of degradation in the Bit Error Rate (BER) performance of the communications link that are unique to PAA-based links. Short spacing of radiating elements can induce mutual coupling between radiating elements, long spacing can induce grating lobes, modulo 2 pi phase errors can add to Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), phase shifters and power divider network introduce losses into the system. This paper describes efforts underway to test and evaluate the effects of the performance degrading features of phased-array antennas when used in a high data rate modulation link. The tests and evaluations described here uncover the interaction between the electrical characteristics of a PAA and the BER performance of a communication link.

  7. Photonic generation of tunable microwave signals from a dual-wavelength distributed-Bragg-reflector highly Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Shupei; Feng, Zhouming; Xu, Shanhui; Zhang, Weinan; Chen, Dongdan; Yang, Tong; Yang, Changsheng; Li, Can; Yang, Zhongmin

    2013-12-01

    The photonic generation of tunable microwave signal from a dual-wavelength distributed-Bragg-reflector (DW-DBR) highly Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate fiber laser is presented. Microwave signals centered at ˜15, ˜22 and ˜25 GHz with <10 kHz linewidth were obtained. The laser cavity of the fiber laser consists of a dual-channel narrowband fiber-Bragg-grating (DC-NB-FBG), a 0.4-cm-long Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate fiber and a wideband FBG (WB-FBG). The wavelength selecting gratings are spatially separated to create partially separated resonant cavities. Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate fiber ensures that mode competition is relative weak under low pump power. The short cavity length and the DC-NB-FBG ensure that only one longitudinal mode is supported by each reflection peak. Dual-wavelength single-frequency lasing with laser linewidths of <4 kHz is achieved.

  8. Design and development of a surface micro-machined push-pull-type true-time-delay phase shifter on an alumina substrate for Ka-band T/R module application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2012-12-01

    A radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF-MEMS) phase shifter based on the distributed MEMS transmission line (DMTL) concept towards maximum achievable phase shift with low actuation voltage with good figure of merit (FOM) is presented in this paper. This surface micro-machined analog DMTL phase shifter demonstrates low power consumption for implementation in a Ka-band transmit/receive (T/R) module. The push-pull-type switch has been designed and optimized with an analytical method and validated with simulation, which is the fundamental building block of the design of a true-time-delay phase shifter. Change in phase has been designed and optimized in push and pull states with reference to the up-state performance of the phase shifter. The working principle of this push-pull-type DMTL phase shifter has been comprehensively worked out. A thorough detail of the design and performance analysis of the phase shifter has been carried out with various structural parameters using commercially available simulation tools with reference to a change in phase shift and has been verified using a system level simulation. The phase shifter is fabricated on the alumina substrate, using a suspended gold bridge membrane with a surface micromachining process. Asymmetric behaviour of push-pull bridge configuration has been noted and a corresponding effect on mechanical, electrical and RF performances has been extensively investigated. It is demonstrated 114° dB-1 FOM over 0-40 GHz band, which is the highest achievable FOM from a unit cell on an alumina substrate reported so far. A complete phase shifter contributes to a continuous differential phase shift of 0°-360° over 0-40 GHz band with a minimum actuation voltage of 8.1 V which is the highest achievable phase shift with the lowest actuation voltage as per till date on the alumina substrate with good repeatability and return loss better than 11.5 dB over 0-40 GHz band.

  9. Microwave Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  10. Microwave and accelerator research. Final report on Grant DE-FG02-92ER40731

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, John A.

    2002-09-01

    This report summarizes the main technical objectives and accomplishments during the life of the grant, and concludes with data on publications describing the research. The main activity was the development of very high power microwave sources, initially in X-band, and recent initial work on a Ka band TWT amplifier. There was additional activity on ferroelectric emitters. Highlights include the following: (1) The development of a relatively broad band microwave source yielding approx. 75 MW power at a power efficiency of 54% and an energy conversion efficiency of 43%. (2) The development of a ferroelectric cathode electron gun which yielded a beam current of up to 350 A at 500 kV. The device was shown to operate satisfactorily at a low repetition rate, limited by the available power supplies. The final beam power obtained exceeds that achieved elsewhere by several orders of magnitude. The gun development achieved was shown to give an electron beam suitable for high power X-band microwave sources with the demonstration of a 5-MW tunable X-band TWT single-stage amplifier. (3) Work was initiated on a Ka-Band TWT amplifier. Gains of over 30 dB were achieved at peak output powers of about 4 MW. Appendices include two submitted papers: Symmetric and asymmetric mode interaction in high-power traveling wave amplifiers: experiments and theory and High power microwave generation using a ferroelectric cathode electron gun.

  11. High Q-factor sapphire whispering gallery mode microwave resonator at single photon energies and millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Farr, Warrick; Martinis, John M.; Duty, Timothy L.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2011-05-01

    The microwave properties of a crystalline sapphire dielectric whispering gallery mode resonator have been measured at very low excitation strength (E /ℏω≈1) and low temperatures (T ≈30 mK). The measurements were sensitive enough to observe saturation due to a highly detuned electron spin resonance, which limited the loss tangent of the material to about 2×10-8 measured at 13.868 and 13.259 GHz. Small power dependent frequency shifts were also measured which correspond to an added magnetic susceptibility of order 10-9. This work shows that quantum limited microwave resonators with Q-factors >108 are possible with the implementation of a sapphire whispering gallery mode system.

  12. Multi-band local microwave signal generation based on an optical frequency comb generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen Ting; Liu, Jian Guo; Sun, Wen Hui; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2015-03-01

    We propose and experimental demonstrate a new method to generate multi-band local microwave signals based on an optical frequency comb generator (OFCG) by applying an optical sideband injection locking technique and an optical heterodyning technique. The generated microwave signal can cover multi bands from S band to Ka band. A tunable multiband microwave signal spanning from 5 GHz to 40 GHz can be generated by the beating between the optical carrier and injection locked modulation sidebands in a photodetector without an optical filter. The wavelength of the slave laser can be continuously and near-linearly adjusted by proper changing its bias current. By tuning the bias current of the slave laser, the wavelength of that is matched to one of the modulation sidebands of the OFCG. The performance of the arrangement in terms of the tunability and stability of the generated microwave signal is also studied.

  13. Invited Article: Electrically tunable silicon-based on-chip microdisk resonator for integrated microwave photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weifeng; Yao, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    Silicon photonics with advantages of small footprint, compatibility with the mature CMOS fabrication technology, and its potential for seamless integration with electronics is making a significant difference in realizing on-chip integration of photonic systems. A microdisk resonator (MDR) with a strong capacity in trapping and storing photons is a versatile element in photonic integrated circuits. Thanks to the large index contrast, a silicon-based MDR with an ultra-compact footprint has a great potential for large-scale and high-density integrations. However, the existence of multiple whispering gallery modes (WGMs) and resonance splitting in an MDR imposes inherent limitations on its widespread applications. In addition, the waveguide structure of an MDR is incompatible with that of a lateral PN junction, which leads to the deprivation of its electrical tunability. To circumvent these limitations, in this paper we propose a novel design of a silicon-based MDR by introducing a specifically designed slab waveguide to surround the disk and the lateral sides of the bus waveguide to suppress higher-order WGMs and to support the incorporation of a lateral PN junction for electrical tunability. An MDR based on the proposed design is fabricated and its optical performance is evaluated. The fabricated MDR exhibits single-mode operation with a free spectral range of 28.85 nm. Its electrical tunability is also demonstrated and an electro-optic frequency response with a 3-dB modulation bandwidth of ˜30.5 GHz is measured. The use of the fabricated MDR for the implementation of an electrically tunable optical delay-line and a tunable fractional-order temporal photonic differentiator is demonstrated.

  14. High-performance GaAs/AlGaAs optical phase modulators for microwave photonic integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Armendariz, M.G.; Vawter, G.A.; Carson, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    A high-performance high-speed optical phase modulator for photonic integrated circuit (PIC) use is described. Integration of these optical phase modulators into a real system (compass) is also discussed. The optical phase modulators are based on depletion-edge translation and have experimentally provided optical phase shifts in excess of 60{degrees}/V{center_dot}mm with approximately 4 dB/cm loss while simultaneously demonstrating bandwidths in excess of 10 GHz.

  15. Flat-top bandpass microwave photonic filter with tunable bandwidth and center frequency based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Yu, Yuan; Cao, Tong; Tang, Haitao; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-07-15

    We propose a flat-top bandpass microwave photonic filter (MPF) with flexible tunability of the bandwidth and center frequency based on optical nonlinearities in a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifier (FP-SOA). Phase-inverted modulation induced by cross-gain modulation (XGM) and optical spectral broadening induced by self-phase modulation (SPM) are exploited to achieve flat-top and bandwidth tuning, respectively. Wideband and continuous tuning of the center frequency is achieved by altering the bias current of the FP-SOA. Experimental results demonstrate a flat-top single-passband MPF with its center frequency tunable from 6.0 to 18.3 GHz by adjusting the bias current from 54.05 to 107.85 mA. The 3-dB bandwidth of the passband when centered at 10.0 GHz is shown to be variable from 680 to 1.43 GHz, by increasing the injected optical power from -1 to +5  dBm. During the bandwidth tuning, the amplitude ripple within the passband is maintained at less than ±0.5  dB. Excellent main to secondary sidelobe ratio exceeding 45 dB is achieved when the MPF is centered at 18.3 GHz.

  16. Flat-top bandpass microwave photonic filter with tunable bandwidth and center frequency based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Yu, Yuan; Cao, Tong; Tang, Haitao; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-07-15

    We propose a flat-top bandpass microwave photonic filter (MPF) with flexible tunability of the bandwidth and center frequency based on optical nonlinearities in a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifier (FP-SOA). Phase-inverted modulation induced by cross-gain modulation (XGM) and optical spectral broadening induced by self-phase modulation (SPM) are exploited to achieve flat-top and bandwidth tuning, respectively. Wideband and continuous tuning of the center frequency is achieved by altering the bias current of the FP-SOA. Experimental results demonstrate a flat-top single-passband MPF with its center frequency tunable from 6.0 to 18.3 GHz by adjusting the bias current from 54.05 to 107.85 mA. The 3-dB bandwidth of the passband when centered at 10.0 GHz is shown to be variable from 680 to 1.43 GHz, by increasing the injected optical power from -1 to +5  dBm. During the bandwidth tuning, the amplitude ripple within the passband is maintained at less than ±0.5  dB. Excellent main to secondary sidelobe ratio exceeding 45 dB is achieved when the MPF is centered at 18.3 GHz. PMID:27420520

  17. Simultaneous even- and third-order distortion suppression in a microwave photonic link based on orthogonal polarization modulation, balanced detection, and optical sideband filtering.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiuyou; Chen, Xiang; Yao, Jianping

    2016-06-27

    A microwave photonic link (MPL) with simultaneous suppression of the even-order and third-order distortions using a polarization modulator (PolM), an optical bandpass filter (OBPF), and a balanced photodetector (BPD) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The even-order distortions are suppressed by utilizing orthogonal polarization modulation based on the PolM and balanced differential detection based on the BPD. The third-order distortions (IMD3) are suppressed by optimizing the spectral response of the OBPF with an optimal power ratio between the optical carrier and the sidebands of the phase-modulated signals from the PolM. Since the suppression of the IMD3 is achieved when the MPL is optimized for even-order distortion suppression, the proposed MPL can operate with simultaneous suppression of the even-order and third-order distortions. The proposed MPL is analyzed theoretically and is verified by an experiment. For a two-tone RF signal of f1 = 10 GHz and f2 = 19.95 GHz, the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR2) is enhanced by 23.4 dB for the second harmonic (2f1), and 29.1 and 27.6 dB for the second intermodulation (f2-f1 and f1 + f2), as compared with a conventional MPL. For a two-tone RF signal of f1 = 9.95 GHz and f2 = 10 GHz, the SFDR3 is increased by 13.1 dB as compared with a conventional MPL. PMID:27410633

  18. Nonlinear stimulated Brillouin scattering based photonic signal processors

    SciTech Connect

    Minasian, Robert A.

    2014-10-06

    Recent new methods in photonic signal processing based on stimulated Brillouin scattering, that enable the realization of photonic mixers with high conversion efficiency, ultra-wide continuously tunable high-resolution microwave photonic filters and programmable switchable microwave photonic tunable filters, are presented. These processors provide new capabilities for the realisation of high-performance and high-resolution signal processing.

  19. Photonic approach for microwave frequency measurement with adjustable measurement range and resolution using birefringence effect in highly non-linear fiber.

    PubMed

    Feng, Danqi; Xie, Heng; Qian, Lifen; Bai, Qinhong; Sun, Junqiang

    2015-06-29

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel approach for microwave frequency measurement utilizing birefringence effect in the highly non-linear fiber (HNLF). A detailed theoretical analysis is presented to implement the adjustable measurement range and resolution. By stimulating a complementary polarization-domain interferometer pair in the HNLF, a mathematical expression that relates the microwave frequency and amplitude comparison function is developed. We carry out a proof-to-concept experiment. A frequency measurement range of 2.5-30 GHz with a measurement error within 0.5 GHz is achieved except 16-17.5 GHz. This method is all-optical and requires no high-speed electronic components. PMID:26191769

  20. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  1. WFL: Microwave Applications of Thin Ferroelectric Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a family of tunable microwave circuits, operating from X- through Ka-band, based on laser ablated BaxSr1-xTiO films on lanthanum aluminate and magnesium oxide substrates. Circuits include voltage controlled oscillators, filters, phase shifters and antennas. A review of the basic theory of operation of these devices will be presented along with measured performance. Emphasis has been on low-loss phase shifters to enable a new phased array architecture. The critical role of phase shifter loss and transient response in reflectarray antennas will be discussed. The Ferroelectric Reflectarray Critical Components Space Experiment was launched on the penultimate Space Shuttle, STS-134, in May of 2011. It included a bank of ferroelectric phase shifters with two different stoichiometries as well as ancillary electronics. The experiment package and status will be reported. In addition, unusual results of a Van der Pauw measurement involving a ferroelectric film grown on buffered high resisitivity silicon will be discussed.

  2. James Webb Space Telescope Ka-Band Trade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan; Luers, Ed

    2004-01-01

    In August 2003 James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) had its Initial Review Confirmation Assessment Briefing with NASA HQ management. This is a major milestone as the project was approved to proceed from Phase A to B, and NASA will commit funds for the project towards meeting its science goals from the Earth-Sun s Lagrange 2 (L2) environment. At this briefing, the Project was asked, "to take another look" into using, the JPL s Deep Space Network (DSN) as the provider of ground stations and evaluate other ground station options. The current operations concept assumes S-band and X-band communications with a daily &hour contact using the DSN with the goal of transmitting over 250 Gigabit (Gb) of data to the ground. The Project has initiated a trade study to look at this activity, and we would like to share the result of the trade in the conference. Early concept trades tends to focus on the "normal" operation mode of supporting telemetry (science and engineering), command and radio metrics. Entering the design phase, we find that we have the unique ranging requirement for our L2 orbit using alternating ground stations located in different hemispheres. The trade must also address emergency operations (which are covered when using the DSN). This paper describes the issues confronting this Project and how the DSN and the JWST Project are working together to find an optimized approach for meeting these issues. We believe this trade is of major interest for future Code S and other L2 missions in that JWST will set the standard.

  3. Feasiblity study for a 34 GHz (Ka band) gyroamplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, D. S.; Bier, R. E.; Caplan, M.; Huey, H. E.; Pirkle, D. R.; Robinson, J. D.; Thompson, L.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using a gyroklystron power tube as the final amplifier in a 400 kW CW 34 GHz transmitter on the Goldstone Antenna is investigated. A conceptual design of the gyroklystron and the transmission line connecting it with the antenna feed horn is presented. The performance characteristics of the tube and transmission line are compared to the transmitter requirements for a deep space radar system. Areas of technical risk for a follow-on hardware development program for the gyroklystron amplifier and overmoded transmission line components are discussed.

  4. Selection of Ka-Band Transponder Turnaround Frequency Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koukos, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems has issued recommendations specifying Transponder Turn-around Frequency Ratios for S-band and X-band coherent earth-to-space and space-to earth links.

  5. Triple Play over Satellite, Ka-Band Making the Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Guillaume; Fenech, Hector; Pezzana, Stefano

    Over the last years a number of operators have been deploying satellite-based consumer internet access services to reduce the digital divide and capture the market of households not covered by ADSL, cable or wireless broadband. These operators are proposing a step change improvement in the economics of consumer service, with lower terminal costs, broadband access with monthly fees comparable to ADSL and an integrated technology simplifying the process of terminal installation, provisioning and management.

  6. High-Power Ka-Band Window and Resonant Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2006-11-29

    A stand-alone 200 MW rf test station is needed for carrying out development of accelerator structures and components for a future high-gradient multi-TeV collider, such as CLIC. A high-power rf window is needed to isolate the test station from a structure element under test. This project aimed to develop such a window for use at a frequency in the range 30-35 GHz, and to also develop a high-power resonant ring for testing the window. During Phase I, successful conceptual designs were completed for the window and the resonant ring, and cold tests of each were carried out that confirmed the designs.

  7. Low-loss Ka-band frequency selective subreflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, K.; Kumazawa, H.; Ohtomo, I.

    1991-06-01

    A frequency selective subreflector with two separate focal fed positions for a 30/20 GHz offset Gregorian reflector antenna is developed. For a bandwidth exceeding 3 GHz in the 20 and 30 GHz band, the measured losses are 0.7 and 1.5 dB, respectively.

  8. Weather Forecasting for Ka-band Operations: Initial Study Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D.; Wu, L.; Slobin, S.

    2016-08-01

    As lower frequency bands (e.g., 2.3 GHz and 8.4 GHz) have become oversubscribed during the past several decades, NASA has become interested in using higher frequency bands (e.g., 26 GHz and 32 GHz) for telemetry, thus making use of the available wider bandwidth. However, these bands are more susceptible to atmospheric degradation. Currently, flight projects tend to be conservative in preparing their communications links by using worst-case or conservative assumptions. Such assumptions result in nonoptimum data return. We explore the use of weather forecasting for Goldstone and Madrid for different weather condition scenarios to determine more optimal values of atmospheric attenuation and atmospheric noise temperature for use in telecommunication link design. We find that the use of weather forecasting can provide up to 2 dB or more of increased data return when more favorable conditions are forecast. Future plans involve further developing the technique for operational scenarios with interested flight projects.

  9. Ka-band (32 GHz) allocations for deep space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, N. F.

    1987-01-01

    At the 1979 World Administrative Conference, two new bands were allocated for deep space telecommunications: 31.8 to 32.3 GHz, space-to-Earth, and 34.2 to 34.7 GHz, Earth-to-space. These bands provide opportunity for further development of the Deep Space Network and its support of deep space research. The history of the process by which JPL/NASA developed the rationale, technical background, and statement of requirement for the bands are discussed. Based on this work, United States proposals to the conference included the bands, and subsequent U.S. and NASA participation in the conference led to successful allocations for deep space telecommunications in the 30 GHz region of the spectrum. A detailed description of the allocations is included.

  10. Modeling Ka-band low elevation angle propagation statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Thomas A.; Weinfield, John; Pearson, Chris; Ippolito, Louis J.

    1995-01-01

    The statistical variability of the secondary atmospheric propagation effects on satellite communications cannot be ignored at frequencies of 20 GHz or higher, particularly if the propagation margin allocation is such that link availability falls below 99 percent. The secondary effects considered in this paper are gaseous absorption, cloud absorption, and tropospheric scintillation; rain attenuation is the primary effect. Techniques and example results are presented for estimation of the overall combined impact of the atmosphere on satellite communications reliability. Statistical methods are employed throughout and the most widely accepted models for the individual effects are used wherever possible. The degree of correlation between the effects is addressed and some bounds on the expected variability in the combined effects statistics are derived from the expected variability in correlation. Example estimates are presented of combined effects statistics in the Washington D.C. area of 20 GHz and 5 deg elevation angle. The statistics of water vapor are shown to be sufficient for estimation of the statistics of gaseous absorption at 20 GHz. A computer model based on monthly surface weather is described and tested. Significant improvement in prediction of absorption extremes is demonstrated with the use of path weather data instead of surface data.

  11. Ka-band geostationary satellite spacing requirements and access schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, Mario; Hindson, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Geostationary satellite systems for wideband personal communications applications have been proposed. This paper looks at the geostationary satellite spacing requirement to meet the ITU-R sharing criterion for FDMA and CDMA access schemes. CDMA capacity equation is first developed. Then the basis for the interference analysis between two systems with an overlapping coverage area is developed for the cases of identical and different access schemes and for bandwidth and power limited systems. An example of an interference analysis between two systems is fully carried out. The paper also points out the inherent problems when comparing systems with different access schemes. It is found that under certain scenarios, CDMA can allow a closer spacing between satellites.

  12. Estimation of snow depth and snow water equivalent distribution using airborne microwave radiometry in the Binggou Watershed, the upper reaches of the Heihe River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Tao; Dai, Liyun; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Kai; Liu, Qiang

    2012-07-01

    We estimated the spatial distribution of snow depth/snow water equivalent (SD/SWE) in a mountainous watershed (Binggou, which is in the upper reaches of the Heihe River basin) by an airborne microwave radiometry observational experiment. Two microwave radiometers measuring at K band (18.7 GHz) and Ka band (36 GHz) were used to estimate the volume scatter from snowpacks and infer SD and SWE. Simultaneously, the snow physical properties (such as snow depth, density, grain size and temperature) over four sites were measured, and a simple multi-layer sample scheme was adopted to obtain the stratigraphic information. The microwave emission model of layered snowpacks (MEMLS) was used to simulate the brightness temperatures of snow cover for each measurement point. By comparing TB data that were simulated by MEMLS and observed by radiometers on the aircraft over the four sites, we obtained the retrieval algorithms of SD and SWE based on brightness temperature differences (TBD) at the K- and Ka-bands that are suitable to the local snow properties. The validation shows that the mean absolute and relative errors of SD estimates are approximately 3.5 cm and 14.8%, respectively. SWE from airborne microwave radiometers show that blowing snow and sun radiation are two main factors that determine the spatial distribution of SWE in Binggou Watershed. The local angle of incidence of the microwave radiometer observation can be influenced by mountainous topography, and a sensitivity analysis suggests that changes in the local angle of incidence (e.g., the nominal angle of incidence) will not significantly influence the estimation of SD/SWE. The snow's stratigraphic condition is not an important factor for estimating SD/SWE in this study because the snow was not very deep in the Binggou Watershed. However, the field sampling scheme should be given more attention to obtain the spatial variations of snow properties and to support pixel-by-pixel validation in next field campaign.

  13. The Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Power Spectrum from the BEAST Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Bersanelli, Marco; Childers, Jeffrey; Figueiredo, Newton; Halevi, Doron; Huey, Greg; Lubin, Philip M.; Maino, Davide; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Joshua; Meinhold, Peter R.; Mejía, Jorge; Natoli, Paolo; O'Neill, Hugh; Pina, Agenor; Seiffert, Michael D.; Stebor, Nathan C.; Tello, Camilo; Villela, Thyrso; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Williams, Brian; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2005-05-01

    The Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) is a 2.2 m off-axis telescope with an eight-element mixed Q-band (38-45 GHz) and Ka-band (26-36 GHz) focal plane, designed for balloon-borne and ground-based studies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Here we present the CMB angular power spectrum calculated from 682 hr of data observed with the BEAST instrument. We use a binned pseudo-Cl estimator (the MASTER method). We find results that are consistent with other determinations of the CMB anisotropy for angular wavenumbers l between 100 and 600. We also perform cosmological parameter estimation. The BEAST data alone produce a good constraint on Ωk≡1-Ωtot=-0.074+/-0.070, consistent with a flat universe. A joint parameter estimation analysis with a number of previous CMB experiments produces results consistent with previous determinations.

  14. Observing the Moon at Microwave Frequencies Using a Large-Diameter Deep Space Network Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.; Imbriale, William; Keihm, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will result in an increase in system operating noise temperature, which needs to be accounted for in RF telecommunications, radio science or radiometric link calculations. The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) may use its large-diameter antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature incre ase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular position of the antenna beam on the lunar disk. This paper reports on a comprehensive lunar noise temperature measurement campaign and associated theoretical treatment for a 34-m diameter Deep Space Network antenna observing an extended source such as the Moon. A set of measurements over a wide range of lunar phase angles was acquired at DSS-13, a 34-m diameter beam waveguide antenna (BWG) located at Goldstone, California at 2.3 GHz (S-band), 8.4 GHz (X-band) and 32 GHz (Ka-band). For validation purposes, independent predictions of noise temperature increase were derived using a physical optics characterization of the 34-m diameter antenna gain patterns and Apollo model-based brightness temperature maps of the Moon as input. The model-based predictions of noise temperature increase were compared with the measurements at all three frequencies. In addition, a methodology is presented that relates noise temperature increase due to the Moon to disk-centered or disk-averaged brightness temperature of the Moon at the microwave frequencies of interest. Comparisons were made between the measurements and models in the domain of lunar disk-centered and disk-averaged brightness temperatures. It is anticipated that the measurements and associated theoretical development will be useful in developing telecommunications strategies for future high-rate Ka-band communications where large

  15. Microwave Ovens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Required Reports for the Microwave Oven Manufacturers or Industry Exemption from Certain Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements for ... Microwave Ovens (PDF) (PDF - 2.5MB) FDA eSubmitter Industry Guidance - Documents of Interest Notifications to Industry (PDF ...

  16. Improving the instantaneous vertical profiling of precipitation for passive-microwave retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacimi, S.; Haddad, Z. S.; Turk, J.

    2013-12-01

    Current passive-microwave retrieval approaches that are based on the a-priori knowledge provided by a representative database of columns of atmospheric variables and their corresponding microwave signatures, depend crucially on the realism of the representation of the cloud and precipitation in the column. Most approaches rely on columns produced by cloud-permitting model simulations, which suffer from oversimplifications of the very variables to which the microwave brightness temperatures are most sensitive, namely the type, concentration and relative sizes of the hydrometeors. Others rely on retrieved descriptions obtained from imperfect remotely-sensed measurements. The TRMM radar being a single-channel instrument cannot, by itself identify the phase of the condensation. The GPM radar that offers an additional Ka-band frequency should be slightly better. This presentation will summarize our approach of using higher-sensitivity ground-based measurements to address these shortcomings. During the CINDY-DYNAMO experiment (2011-2012), the dual-wavelength polarimetric radar SPolKa was deployed, providing a unique set of observations. This allows insight into rainfall characteristics for different species. Using a Bayesian approach with Mie-scattering calculations, the rainfall rate, cloud liquid water, mean diameter and other parameters can be retrieved from SPolKa data. Different assumptions (on hydrometeor habit and size distributions) for those simulations were used, and their impact on the retrievals evaluated. This preliminary study will eventually enable the elaboration of a passive-microwave retrievals' database, accounting for the quantitative vertical distribution of precipitation.

  17. Proposal for an Optomechanical Microwave Sensor at the Subphoton Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keye; Bariani, Francesco; Dong, Ying; Zhang, Weiping; Meystre, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Because of their low energy content, microwave signals at the single-photon level are extremely challenging to measure. Guided by recent progress in single-photon optomechanics and hybrid optomechanical systems, we propose a multimode optomechanical transducer that can detect intensities significantly below the single-photon level via adiabatic transfer of the microwave signal to the optical frequency domain where the measurement is then performed. The influence of intrinsic quantum and thermal fluctuations is also discussed.

  18. Charge Qubit Coupled to an Intense Microwave Electromagnetic Field in a Superconducting Nb Device: Evidence for Photon-Assisted Quasiparticle Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, S. E.; Leppäkangas, J.; Adamyan, A.; Danilov, A. V.; Lindström, T.; Fogelström, M.; Bauch, T.; Johansson, G.; Kubatkin, S. E.

    2013-09-01

    We study a superconducting charge qubit coupled to an intensive electromagnetic field and probe changes in the resonance frequency of the formed dressed states. At large driving strengths, exceeding the qubit energy-level splitting, this reveals the well known Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference structure of a longitudinally driven two-level system. For even stronger drives, we observe a significant change in the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg pattern and contrast. We attribute this to photon-assisted quasiparticle tunneling in the qubit. This results in the recovery of the qubit parity, eliminating effects of quasiparticle poisoning, and leads to an enhanced interferometric response. The interference pattern becomes robust to quasiparticle poisoning and has a good potential for accurate charge sensing.

  19. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  20. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  1. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  2. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  3. Storage and control of optical photons using Rydberg polaritons.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, D; Szwer, D J; Paredes-Barato, D; Busche, H; Pritchard, J D; Gauguet, A; Weatherill, K J; Jones, M P A; Adams, C S

    2013-03-01

    We use a microwave field to control the quantum state of optical photons stored in a cold atomic cloud. The photons are stored in highly excited collective states (Rydberg polaritons) enabling both fast qubit rotations and control of photon-photon interactions. Through the collective read-out of these pseudospin rotations it is shown that the microwave field modifies the long-range interactions between polaritons. This technique provides a powerful interface between the microwave and optical domains, with applications in quantum simulations of spin liquids, quantum metrology and quantum networks.

  4. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et al., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention [1]. A 1990 article by V.I. Telnov describes the situation at that time [2]. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held [3]. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons—the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  5. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Comparison of active and passive microwave signatures of Arctic sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Crawford, J. P.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Holt, B.; Carsey, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    In March 1988, overlapping active and passive microwave instrument data were acquired over Arctic sea ice using the NASA DC-8 aircraft equipped with multifrequency, variable polarization SAR and radiometer. Flights were conducted as a series of coordinated underflights of the DMSP SSM/I satellite radiometer in order to validate ice products derived from the SSM/I radiances. Subsequent flights by an NRL P-3 aircraft enabled overlapping high-resolution, single frequency image data to be acquired over the same regions using a Ka-band scanning microwave radiometer. In this paper, techniques are discussed for the accurate coregistration of the three aircraft datasets. Precise coregistration to an accuracy of 100 m plus or minus 25 m has, for the first time, enabled the detailed comparison of temporally and spatially coincident active and passive airborne microwave datasets. Preliminary results from the intercomparisons indicate that the SAR has highly frequency- and polarization-dependent signatures, which at 5.3 GHz (C-band) show an extremely high correlation with the 37 GHz radiometric temperatures.

  7. Stabilized Photonic Links for Deep Space Tracking, Navigation, and Radio Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable fiber optic links have been operational in NASA's DSN for over 20 years providing distribution limited fractional frequency stability below 10-14 at one second and reaching 10-18 at approx 10,000 seconds. We summarize recent stabilized photonic link developments for DSN operation capable of high performance and reliability, and at much lower cost than previous systems. Recent research has focused on two applications, 1) actively stabilized links to transport 100 MHz metrology frequency references to sites up to 30 km from the central atomic frequency standard, and 2) stabilized links transporting broadband S, X, and Ka band signals used in deep space tracking and navigation and antenna arraying applications.

  8. Quantum simulation with interacting photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Enhancing optical nonlinearities so that they become appreciable on the single photon level and lead to nonclassical light fields has been a central objective in quantum optics for many years. After this has been achieved in individual micro-cavities representing an effectively zero-dimensional volume, this line of research has shifted its focus towards engineering devices where such strong optical nonlinearities simultaneously occur in extended volumes of multiple nodes of a network. Recent technological progress in several experimental platforms now opens the possibility to employ the systems of strongly interacting photons, these give rise to as quantum simulators. Here we review the recent development and current status of this research direction for theory and experiment. Addressing both, optical photons interacting with atoms and microwave photons in networks of superconducting circuits, we focus on analogue quantum simulations in scenarios where effective photon-photon interactions exceed dissipative processes in the considered platforms.

  9. Microwave signal processing in two-frequency domain for ROF systems implementation: training course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Morozov, Gennady A.

    2014-04-01

    This article is presented materials from two tutorials: "Optical two-frequency domain reflectometry1, 2" and "Microwave technologies in industry, living systems and telecommunications3". These materials were prepared for master training courses and listed in the "SPIE Optical Education Directory" for 2013/2014. The main its theme is microwave photonics. Microwave photonics has been defined as the study of photonic devices operating at microwave frequencies and their application to microwave and optical systems. Its initial rationale was to use the advantages of photonic technologies to provide functions in microwave systems that are very complex or even impossible to carry out directly in the radiofrequency domain. But microwave photonics is also succeeding in incorporating a variety of techniques used in microwave engineering to improve the performance of photonic communication networks and systems. Three parts of this chapter are devoted to applications and construction principles of systems forming microwave photonic filters, measuring instantaneous frequency of microwave heterodyne signals and characterizing stimulated Mandelstam- Brillouin scattering spectrum in ROF systems. The main emphasis is on the use of the two-frequency symmetric radiation, generated by the Il'in-Morozov's method4, in given systems. It is forming radiation for the synthesis of optical filters coefficients, it's application and processing determine the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio during heterodyne frequencies monitoring and characterization of nonlinear effects spectrum.

  10. Bidirectional conversion between microwave and light via ferromagnetic magnons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisatomi, R.; Osada, A.; Tabuchi, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Noguchi, A.; Yamazaki, R.; Usami, K.; Nakamura, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Coherent conversion of microwave and optical photons in the single quantum level can significantly expand our ability to process signals in various fields. Efficient up-conversion of a feeble signal in the microwave domain to the optical domain will lead to quantum-noise-limited microwave amplifiers. Coherent exchange between optical photons and microwave photons will also be a stepping stone to realize long-distance quantum communication. Here we demonstrate bidirectional and coherent conversion between microwave and light using collective spin excitations in a ferromagnet. The converter consists of two harmonic oscillator modes, a microwave cavity mode and a magnetostatic mode called the Kittel mode, where microwave photons and magnons in the respective modes are strongly coupled and hybridized. An itinerant microwave field and a traveling optical field can be coupled through the hybrid system, where the microwave field is coupled to the hybrid system through the cavity mode, while the optical field addresses the hybrid system through the Kittel mode via Faraday and inverse Faraday effects. The conversion efficiency is theoretically analyzed and experimentally evaluated. The possible schemes for improving the efficiency are also discussed.

  11. Microwave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1986-12-02

    A detector is described for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations, the detector comprising: a B-dot loop linking the magnetic field of the microwave pulse; a biased ferrite, that produces a magnetization field flux that links the B-dot loop. The ferrite is positioned within the B-dot loop so that the magnetic field of the microwave pulse interacts with the ferrite and thereby participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux; and high-frequency insensitive means for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop.

  12. Microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  13. Microwave annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yao-Jen; Cho, T.-C.; Chuang, S.-S.; Hsueh, F.-K.; Lu, Y.-L.; Sung, P.-J.; Chen, S.-J.; Lo, C.-H.; Lai, C.-H.; Current, Michael I.; Tseng, T.-Y.; Chao, T.-S.; Yang, F.-L.

    2012-11-01

    Microwave annealing of dopants in Si has been reported to produce highly activated junctions at temperatures far below those needed for comparable results using conventional thermal processes. However the details of the kinetics and mechanisms for microwave annealing are far from well understood. Comparisons between MWA and RTA of dopants in implanted Si has been investigated to produce highly activated junctions. First, As, 31P, and BF 2 implants in Si substrate were annealed by MWA at temperatures below 550 °C.

  14. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  15. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  16. Status of VESAS: a fully-electronic microwave imaging radiometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Eric; Peichl, Markus; Suess, Helmut

    2010-04-01

    Present applications of microwave remote sensing systems cover a large variety. One utilisation of the frequency range from 1 - 300 GHz is the domain of security and reconnaissance. Examples are the observation of critical infrastructures or the performance of security checks on people in order to detect concealed weapons or explosives, both being frequent threats in our world of growing international terrorism. The imaging capability of concealed objects is one of the main advantages of microwave remote sensing, because of the penetration performance of electromagnetic waves through dielectric materials in this frequency domain. The main physical effects used in passive microwave sensing rely on the naturally generated thermal radiation and the physical properties of matter, the latter being surface characteristics, chemical and physical composition, and the temperature of the material. As a consequence it is possible to discriminate objects having different material characteristics like ceramic weapons or plastic explosives with respect to the human body. Considering the use of microwave imaging with respect to people scanning systems in airports, railway stations, or stadiums, it is advantageous that passively operating devices generate no exposure on the scanned objects like actively operating devices do. For frequently used security gateways it is additionally important to have a high through-put rate in order to minimize the queue time. Consequently fast imaging systems are necessary. In this regard the conceptual idea of a fully-electronic microwave imaging radiometer system is introduced. The two-dimensional scanning mechanism is divided into a frequency scan in one direction and the method of aperture synthesis in the other. The overall goal here is to design a low-cost, fully-electronic imaging system with a frame rate of around one second at Ka band. This frequency domain around a center frequency of 37 GHz offers a well-balanced compromise between the

  17. Microwave Cooling of Josephson Plasma Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.; Aprili, M.; Petković, I.

    2011-07-01

    An extended Josephson junction can be described as a microwave cavity coupled to a Josephson oscillator. This is formally equivalent to a Fabry-Perot cavity with a freely vibrating mirror, where it has been shown that radiation pressure from photons in the cavity can reduce (increase) the vibrations of the mirror, effectively cooling (heating) it. We demonstrate that, similarly, the superconducting phase difference across a Josephson junction—the Josephson phase—can be “cooled” or “heated” by microwave excitation of the junction and that both these effects increase with microwave power.

  18. Microwave-assisted transport through a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEuen, P. L.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.; Jauhar, S.; Orenstein, J.; McCormick, K.; Dixon, D.; Nazarov, Yu V.; van der Vaart, N. C.; Foxon, C. T.

    1996-12-01

    We present results on microwave-assisted transport through quantum dots. First, the important energy/frequency scales are discussed. Then, measurements of the current versus gate voltage characteristics in the presence of microwaves are presented. At finite source-drain bias, microwave-induced features are observed, and at zero source-drain bias, an oscillating photocurrent is observed. A model of photon-assisted transport is discussed that can account for the experimental observations.

  19. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Janney, Mark A.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy.

  20. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Janney, M.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1992-03-24

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy. 2 figs.

  1. Quantization of the superconducting energy gap in an intense microwave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, A. A.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally photon-assisted tunneling in Nb /AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions. We perform a quantitative calibration of the microwave field inside the junction. This allows direct verification of the quantum efficiency of microwave photon detection, which corresponds to tunneling of one electron per one absorbed microwave photon. We observe that voltages of photon-assisted tunneling steps vary both with the microwave power and the tunneling current. However, this variation is not monotonous but staircaselike. The phenomenon is caused by mutual locking of positive and negative step series. A similar locking is observed with Shapiro steps. As a result, the superconducting gap assumes quantized values equal to multiples of the quarter of the photon energy. The quantization is a manifestation of nonequilibrium tuning (suppression or enhancement) of superconductivity by the microwave field.

  2. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  3. The Capability of Microwave Radiometers In Retrieving Soil Moisture Profiles Using A Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macelloni, G.; Paloscia, S.; Santi, E.; Tedesco, M.

    Hydrological models require the knowledge of land surface parameters like soil mois- ture and snow properties with a large spatial distribution and high temporal frequency. Whilst conventional methods are unable to satisfy the constraints of space and time estimation of these parameters, the use of remote sensing data represents a real im- provement. In particular the potential of data collected by microwave radiometers at low frequencies to extract soil moisture has been clearly demonstrated in several pa- pers. However, the penetration power into the soil depends on frequency and, whereas L-band is able to estimate the moisture of a relatively thick soil layer, higher frequen- cies are only sensitive to the moisture of soil layer closer to the surface. This remark leads to the hypothesis that multifrequency observations could be able to retrieve a soil moisture profile. In several experiments carried out both on agricultural fields and on samples of soil in a tank, by using the IROE multifrequency microwave radiometers, the effect of moisture and surface roughness on different frequencies was studied. From this experiments the capability of L-band in measuring the moisture of a soil layer of several centimeters, in the order of the wavelength, was confirmed, as well the sensitivity to the moisture of the first centimeters layer at C- and X-bands, and the one of the very first layer of smooth soil at Ka-band. Using an electromagnetic model (Integral Equation Model, IEM) the brightness temperatures as a function of the in- cidence angle were computed at 1.4, 6, 10, and 37 GHz for different soil moisture profiles and different surface roughness. A particular consideration was dedicated to the latter parameter, since, especially at Ka band, surface roughness strongly affects the emission and masks the effect of moisture. Different soil moisture profiles have been tested: increasing and decreasing with depth and also constant for sandy and sandy-loam soils. After this

  4. Sensing feeble microwave signals via an optomechanical transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keye; Bariani, Francesco; Dong, Ying; Zhang, Weiping; Meystre, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Due to their low energy content microwave signals at the single-photon level are extremely challenging to measure. Guided by recent progress in single-photon optomechanics and hybrid optomechanical systems, we propose a multimode optomechanical transducer that can detect intensities significantly below the single-photon level via off-resonant adiabatic transfer of the microwave signal to the optical frequency domain where the measurement is then performed. The influence of intrinsic quantum and thermal fluctuations on the performance of this detector are considered in detail. We acknowledge financial support from National Basic Research Program of China, NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuaSAR and ORCHID programs.

  5. Photonic Floquet topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Zeuner, Julia M; Plotnik, Yonatan; Lumer, Yaakov; Podolsky, Daniel; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai; Szameit, Alexander

    2013-04-11

    Topological insulators are a new phase of matter, with the striking property that conduction of electrons occurs only on their surfaces. In two dimensions, electrons on the surface of a topological insulator are not scattered despite defects and disorder, providing robustness akin to that of superconductors. Topological insulators are predicted to have wide-ranging applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing and spintronics. Substantial effort has been directed towards realizing topological insulators for electromagnetic waves. One-dimensional systems with topological edge states have been demonstrated, but these states are zero-dimensional and therefore exhibit no transport properties. Topological protection of microwaves has been observed using a mechanism similar to the quantum Hall effect, by placing a gyromagnetic photonic crystal in an external magnetic field. But because magnetic effects are very weak at optical frequencies, realizing photonic topological insulators with scatter-free edge states requires a fundamentally different mechanism-one that is free of magnetic fields. A number of proposals for photonic topological transport have been put forward recently. One suggested temporal modulation of a photonic crystal, thus breaking time-reversal symmetry and inducing one-way edge states. This is in the spirit of the proposed Floquet topological insulators, in which temporal variations in solid-state systems induce topological edge states. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a photonic topological insulator free of external fields and with scatter-free edge transport-a photonic lattice exhibiting topologically protected transport of visible light on the lattice edges. Our system is composed of an array of evanescently coupled helical waveguides arranged in a graphene-like honeycomb lattice. Paraxial diffraction of light is described by a Schrödinger equation where the propagation coordinate (z) acts as 'time'. Thus the helicity of the

  6. Photonic Floquet topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Zeuner, Julia M; Plotnik, Yonatan; Lumer, Yaakov; Podolsky, Daniel; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai; Szameit, Alexander

    2013-04-11

    Topological insulators are a new phase of matter, with the striking property that conduction of electrons occurs only on their surfaces. In two dimensions, electrons on the surface of a topological insulator are not scattered despite defects and disorder, providing robustness akin to that of superconductors. Topological insulators are predicted to have wide-ranging applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing and spintronics. Substantial effort has been directed towards realizing topological insulators for electromagnetic waves. One-dimensional systems with topological edge states have been demonstrated, but these states are zero-dimensional and therefore exhibit no transport properties. Topological protection of microwaves has been observed using a mechanism similar to the quantum Hall effect, by placing a gyromagnetic photonic crystal in an external magnetic field. But because magnetic effects are very weak at optical frequencies, realizing photonic topological insulators with scatter-free edge states requires a fundamentally different mechanism-one that is free of magnetic fields. A number of proposals for photonic topological transport have been put forward recently. One suggested temporal modulation of a photonic crystal, thus breaking time-reversal symmetry and inducing one-way edge states. This is in the spirit of the proposed Floquet topological insulators, in which temporal variations in solid-state systems induce topological edge states. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a photonic topological insulator free of external fields and with scatter-free edge transport-a photonic lattice exhibiting topologically protected transport of visible light on the lattice edges. Our system is composed of an array of evanescently coupled helical waveguides arranged in a graphene-like honeycomb lattice. Paraxial diffraction of light is described by a Schrödinger equation where the propagation coordinate (z) acts as 'time'. Thus the helicity of the

  7. WGM-Based Photonic Local Oscillators and Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2007-01-01

    Photonic local oscillators and modulators that include whispering-gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators have been proposed as power-efficient devices for generating and detecting radiation at frequencies of the order of a terahertz. These devices are intended especially to satisfy anticipated needs for receivers capable of detecting lowpower, narrow-band terahertz signals to be used for sensing substances of interest in scientific and military applications. At present, available terahertz-signal detectors are power-inefficient and do not afford the spectral and amplitude resolution needed for detecting such signals. The proposed devices would not be designed according to the conventional approach of direct detection of terahertz radiation. Instead, terahertz radiation would first be up-converted into the optical domain, wherein signals could be processed efficiently by photonic means and detected by optical photodetectors, which are more efficient than are photodetectors used in conventional direct detection of terahertz radiation. The photonic devices used to effect the up-conversion would include a tunable optical local oscillator and a novel electro-optical modulator. A local oscillator according to the proposal would be a WGM-based modelocked laser operating at a desired pulserepetition rate of the order of a terahertz. The oscillator would include a terahertz optical filter based on a WGM microresonator, a fiber-optic delay line, an optical amplifier (which could be either a semiconductor optical amplifier or an erbium-doped optical fiberamplifier), and a WGM Ka-band modulator. The terahertz repetition rate would be obtained through harmonic mode locking: for example, by modulating the light at a frequency of 33 GHz and locking each 33d optical mode, one would create a 1.089-THz pulse train. The high resonance quality factors (Q values) of WGM optical resonators should make it possible to decrease signal-generation threshold power levels significantly below

  8. Quantum and wave dynamical chaos in superconducting microwave billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, B. Richter, A.

    2015-09-15

    Experiments with superconducting microwave cavities have been performed in our laboratory for more than two decades. The purpose of the present article is to recapitulate some of the highlights achieved. We briefly review (i) results obtained with flat, cylindrical microwave resonators, so-called microwave billiards, concerning the universal fluctuation properties of the eigenvalues of classically chaotic systems with no, a threefold and a broken symmetry; (ii) summarize our findings concerning the wave-dynamical chaos in three-dimensional microwave cavities; (iii) present a new approach for the understanding of the phenomenon of dynamical tunneling which was developed on the basis of experiments that were performed recently with unprecedented precision, and finally, (iv) give an insight into an ongoing project, where we investigate universal properties of (artificial) graphene with superconducting microwave photonic crystals that are enclosed in a microwave resonator, i.e., so-called Dirac billiards.

  9. Behavior of multitemporal and multisensor passive microwave indices in Southern Hemisphere ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza, Veronica; Grings, Francisco; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Huete, Alfredo; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Beringer, Jason; Van Gorsel, Eva; Karszenbaum, Haydee

    2014-12-01

    This study focused on the time series analysis of passive microwave and optical satellite data collected from six Southern Hemisphere ecosystems in Australia and Argentina. The selected ecosystems represent a wide range of land cover types, including deciduous open forest, temperate forest, tropical and semiarid savannas, and grasslands. We used two microwave indices, the frequency index (FI) and polarization index (PI), to assess the relative contributions of soil and vegetation properties (moisture and structure) to the observations. Optical-based satellite vegetation products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer were also included to aid in the analysis. We studied the X and Ka bands of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS and Wind Satellite, resulting in up to four observations per day (1:30, 6:00, 13:30, and 18:00 h). Both the seasonal and hourly variations of each of the indices were examined. Environmental drivers (precipitation and temperature) and eddy covariance measurements (gross ecosystem productivity and latent energy) were also analyzed. It was found that in moderately dense forests, FI was dependent on canopy properties (leaf area index and vegetation moisture). In tropical woody savannas, a significant regression (R2) was found between FI and PI with precipitation (R2 > 0.5) and soil moisture (R2 > 0.6). In the areas of semiarid savanna and grassland ecosystems, FI variations found to be significantly related to soil moisture (R2 > 0.7) and evapotranspiration (R2 > 0.5), while PI varied with vegetation phenology. Significant differences (p < 0.01) were found among FI values calculated at the four local times.

  10. Theory of the Rydberg-atom two-photon micromaser

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, M.; Raimond, J.M.; Haroche, S.

    1987-01-01

    A continuous-wave maser operating on a two-photon transition between Rydberg levels is expected to oscillate with about one atom and a few tens of microwave photons at any time in its superconducting cavity. We analyze in detail the characteristics of this new microscopic quantum electronics device presently under construction in our laboratory.

  11. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  12. Developments of frequency comb microwave reflectometer for the interchange mode observations in LHD plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soga, R.; Tokuzawa, T.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamada, I.; Inagaki, S.; Kasuya, N.

    2016-02-01

    We have upgraded the multi-channel microwave reflectometer system which uses a frequency comb as a source and measure the distribution of the density fluctuation caused by magneto-hydro dynamics instability. The previous multi-channel system was composed of the Ka-band, and the U-band system has been developed. Currently, the U-band system has eight frequency channels, which are 43.0, 45.0, 47.0, 49.0, 51.0, 53.0, 55.0, and 57.0 GHz, in U-band. Before the installation to the Large Helical Device (LHD), several tests for understanding the system characteristics, which are the phase responsibility, the linearity of output signal, and others, have been carried out. The in situ calibration in LHD has been done for the cross reference. In the neutral beam injected plasma experiments, we can observe the density fluctuation of the interchange mode and obtain the radial distribution of fluctuation amplitude.

  13. Electron Density Measurements on LTX Using Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Peebles, W. A.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Schmitt, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic evolution of the electron density profile is tracked using microwave and millimeter-wave diagnostics on LTX. The 296 GHz (λ =1 mm) interferometer provides a radial line density measurement at the midplane, while an FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer (13.5 -33 GHz, or O-mode 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3) provides density profile measurements for the low-field side. Data taken during FY2015 will be compared with measurements from Thomson scattering and estimates of the plasma position from LRDFIT. Measurements of density fluctuations due to low-frequency (<100 kHz) MHD instabilities will also be shown. Future plans include the installation of a correlation reflectomter (Ka-band, 27-40 GHz) with dual tuneable sources and a frequency bandwidth of up to 5 MHz. This system will utilize the same antennas as the profile reflectometer to provide radial and/or toroidal/poloidal correlations. Further diagnostic details will be presented at the meeting. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Dual-band and high-efficiency polarization converter based on metasurfaces at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yajun; Xia, Song; Shi, Hongyu; Zhang, Anxue; Xu, Zhuo

    2016-06-01

    We present a dual-band and high-efficiency polarization converter in microwave regime. The proposed converter can convert a linearly polarized wave to its cross-polarized wave for two distinct bands: Ku (11.5-20.0 GHz) and Ka (28.8-34.0 GHz). It can also convert the linearly polarized wave to a circularly polarized wave at four other frequencies. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulation results for both frequency bands. The polarization conversion ratio is above 0.94 for the Ku-band and 0.90 for the Ka-band. Furthermore, the converter can achieve dual-band and high-efficiency polarization conversion over angles of incidence up to 45°. The converter is also polarization-selective in that only the x- and y-polarized waves can be converted. The physical mechanism of the dual-band polarization conversion effect is interpreted via decomposed electric field components that couple with different plasmon resonance modes of the structure.

  15. Microwave alcohol fuel sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, K.; Endo, A.; Morozumi, H.; Shibata, T.

    1984-06-05

    A microwave alcohol fuel sensor comprises a microwave oscillator, a microwave receiver, and a microwave transmission circuit connected to the oscillator and the receiver. The microwave transmission circuit comprises a dielectric substrate and, a strip line mounted on the substrate so that microwaves leak from the substrate to an alcohol gasoline fuel, and the microwaves attenuate by alcohol dielectric loss, whereby output voltage from the receiver corresponds to alcohol content rate. The dielectric substrate is formed tubular so that a constant amount of the fuel is fed the sensor.

  16. Hidden-sector photon and axion searches using photonic band gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seviour, Rebecca; Bailey, Ian; Woollett, Nathan; Williams, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Many proposed extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) such as hidden-sector photons and axions, which are also of interest as dark matter candidates. In this paper we propose a novel experimental approach in which microwave photonic lattice structures form part of a ‘light shining through the wall’-type experiment to search for WISPs. We demonstrate the potential to match and exceed the sensitivities of conventional experiments operating in the microwave regime.

  17. Radiating dipoles in photonic crystals

    PubMed

    Busch; Vats; John; Sanders

    2000-09-01

    The radiation dynamics of a dipole antenna embedded in a photonic crystal are modeled by an initially excited harmonic oscillator coupled to a non-Markovian bath of harmonic oscillators representing the colored electromagnetic vacuum within the crystal. Realistic coupling constants based on the natural modes of the photonic crystal, i.e., Bloch waves and their associated dispersion relation, are derived. For simple model systems, well-known results such as decay times and emission spectra are reproduced. This approach enables direct incorporation of realistic band structure computations into studies of radiative emission from atoms and molecules within photonic crystals. We therefore provide a predictive and interpretative tool for experiments in both the microwave and optical regimes.

  18. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  19. A cavity experiment to search for hidden sector photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Ringwald, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We propose a cavity experiment to search for low mass extra U(1) gauge bosons with gauge-kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon, so-called paraphotons. The setup consists of two microwave cavities shielded from each other. In one cavity, paraphotons are produced via photon-paraphoton oscillations. The second, resonant, cavity is then driven by the paraphotons that permeate the shielding and reconvert into photons. This setup resembles the classic "light shining through a wall" setup. However, the high quality factors achievable for microwave cavities and the good sensitivity of microwave detectors allow for a projected sensitivity for photon-paraphoton mixing of the order of χ ∼10-12-10-8, for paraphotons with masses in the μeV to meV range-exceeding the current laboratory and astrophysics-based limits by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, this experiment bears significant discovery potential for hidden sector physics.

  20. Signatures of a hidden cosmic microwave background.

    PubMed

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2008-09-26

    If there is a light Abelian gauge boson gamma' in the hidden sector its kinetic mixing with the photon can produce a hidden cosmic microwave background (HCMB). For meV masses, resonant oscillations gamma<-->gamma' happen after big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) but before CMB decoupling, increasing the effective number of neutrinos Nnu(eff) and the baryon to photon ratio, and distorting the CMB blackbody spectrum. The agreement between BBN and CMB data provides new constraints. However, including Lyman-alpha data, Nnu(eff) > 3 is preferred. It is tempting to attribute this effect to the HCMB. The interesting parameter range will be tested in upcoming laboratory experiments. PMID:18851438

  1. Antenna-coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, P. K.; Leduc, H. G.; Goldin, A.; Vayonakis, T.; Mazin, B. A.; Kumar, S.; Gao, J.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2006-04-01

    We report on the development of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) coupled to planar antennas for millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths. The MKID is a relatively new type of superconducting photon detector which is applicable from millimeter-wave frequencies to X-rays. Photons are absorbed in a superconductor, producing quasiparticle excitations, which change the surface reactance (kinetic inductance) of the superconductor. The changes in kinetic inductance are monitored using microwave high-Q thin-film superconducting resonators. Because the MKID is particularly amenable to frequency-domain multiplexing, with likely detector multiplexing factors of ˜103 or more per cryogenic amplifier, these detectors are well suited for use in large arrays. We have fabricated MKIDs coupled to submillimeter slot-array antennas using microstrip lines and have detected power from a thermal radiation source. We discuss the potential of antenna-coupled MKID arrays for ground and space-based millimeter/submillimeter imaging.

  2. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Phased Array Demonstrated With ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) arrays developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rome Laboratory were demonstrated in aeronautical terminals and in mobile or fixed Earth terminals linked with NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Four K/Ka-band experimental arrays were demonstrated between May 1994 and May 1995. Each array had GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The 30-GHz transmit array used in uplinks to ACTS was developed by Lewis and Texas Instruments. The three 20-GHz receive arrays used in downlinks from ACTS were developed in cooperation with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force integrated-circuit, active-phased-array development contracts with the Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin Corporation. Four demonstrations, each related to an application of high interest to both commercial and Department of Defense organizations, were conducted. The location, type of link, and the data rate achieved for each of the applications is shown. In one demonstration-- an aeronautical terminal experiment called AERO-X--a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the Lewis Learjet and ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice links (and in one case, interactive video links as well) between ACTS and an Army high-mobility, multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV, or "humvee"). In the fourth demonstration, the array was on a fixed mount and was electronically steered toward ACTS. Lewis served as project manager for all demonstrations and as overall system integrator. Lewis engineers developed the array system including a controller for open-loop tracking of ACTS during flight and HMMWV motion, as well as a laptop data display and recording system used in all demonstrations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory supported the AERO-X program, providing elements of the ACTS Mobile Terminal. The successful

  3. Slow microwaves in left-handed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Gennaro, E.; Parimi, P. V.; Lu, W. T.; Sridhar, S.; Derov, J. S.; Turchinetz, B.

    2005-07-01

    Remarkably slow propagation of microwaves in two different classes of left-handed materials (LHM’s) is reported from microwave-pulse and continuous-wave transmission measurements. Microwave dispersion in a composite LHM made of split-ring resonators and wire strips reveals group velocity vg˜c/50 , where c is the free-space light velocity. Photonic crystals (PhC’s) made of dielectric Al2O3 rods reveal vg˜c/10 . Group delay dispersion of both the composite LHM and PhC’s determined from the experiment is in complete agreement with that obtained from theory. The slow group velocities are quantitatively described by the strong dispersion observed in these materials.

  4. Coherent Excited States in Superconductors due to a Microwave Field.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A V; Devyatov, I A; de Visser, P J; Klapwijk, T M

    2016-07-22

    We describe theoretically the depairing effect of a microwave field on diffusive s-wave superconductors. The ground state of the superconductor is altered qualitatively in analogy to the depairing due to a dc current. In contrast to dc depairing, the density of states acquires, for microwaves with frequency ω_{0}, steps at multiples of the photon energy Δ±nℏω_{0} and shows an exponential-like tail in the subgap regime. We show that this ac depairing explains the measured frequency shift of a superconducting resonator with microwave power at low temperatures. PMID:27494495

  5. Coherent Excited States in Superconductors due to a Microwave Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. V.; Devyatov, I. A.; de Visser, P. J.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2016-07-01

    We describe theoretically the depairing effect of a microwave field on diffusive s -wave superconductors. The ground state of the superconductor is altered qualitatively in analogy to the depairing due to a dc current. In contrast to dc depairing, the density of states acquires, for microwaves with frequency ω0, steps at multiples of the photon energy Δ ±n ℏω0 and shows an exponential-like tail in the subgap regime. We show that this ac depairing explains the measured frequency shift of a superconducting resonator with microwave power at low temperatures.

  6. Cavity Microwave Searches for Cosmological Axions

    SciTech Connect

    Carosi, G; van Bibber, K

    2007-01-22

    This chapter will cover the search for dark matter axions based on microwave cavity experiments proposed by Pierre Sikivie. We will start with a brief overview of halo dark matter and the axion as a candidate. The principle of resonant conversion of axions in an external magnetic field will be described as well as practical considerations in optimizing the experiment as a signal-to-noise problem. A major focus of this chapter will be the two complementary strategies for ultra-low noise detection of the microwave photons--the 'photon-as-wave' approach (i.e. conventional heterojunction amplifiers and soon to be quantum-limited SQUID devices), and 'photon-as-particle' (i.e. Rydberg-atom single-quantum detection). Experimental results will be presented; these experiments have already reached well into the range of sensitivity to exclude plausible axion models, for limited ranges of mass. The section will conclude with a discussion of future plans and challenges for the microwave cavity experiment.

  7. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  8. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  9. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background using BEAST for the determination of cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, Jeffery Dale

    The Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) is a millimeter wavelength experiment designed to generate maps of fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The telescope is composed of an off-axis Gregorian optical system with a 2.2 meter primary that focuses the collected microwave radiation onto an array of cryogenically cooled high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) receivers. This array is composed of six corrugated scalar feed horns in the Q band (38 to 45 GHz) and two more in the Ka band (26 to 36 GHz) with one of the six Q-band horns connected to an ortho-mode transducer for extraction of both polarizations incident on the single feed. The system has a minimum beam size of 20' with an average sensitivity of 900 m K [Special characters omitted.] per receiver. A map of the CMB centered on the north celestial pole has been generated from the BEAST telescope in a 9 ° wide annulus at declination 37° with a typical pixel error of 57 ± 5 m K when smoothed to 30' resolution. Cosmological parameter estimation of the power spectrum resulting from the map provides a measure of O k == 1- O total = -0.0= 74 ± .070, which is consistent with a flat universe. This paper describes the design and performance of the BEAST instrument and provides the details of subsystems developed and used toward the goal of generating a map of CMB fluctuations on 20' scales with sensitivity in l space between l ~100 and l ~500. A summary of the map and results generated by an observing campaign at the University of California White Mountain Research Station are also included.

  10. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  11. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third is a more…

  12. Photonic Band Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabonovitch, Eli

    2001-09-01

    Scientists at UCLA, Caltech, and Polytechnic University have developed a new concept in Electromagnetics called "Photonic Bandgaps' that permits unprecedented control of Electromagnetic Waves, at both radio frequencies, and optical frequencies. This new paradigm of Electromagnetics is based on Nature's design for semiconductor crystals, but it is a crystal structure that is artificially engineered for electromagnetic waves rather than for electron waves. Beginning in 1996, new frontiers in the engineered control of electromagnetic waves have emerged from this design paradigm. For example, the very tiniest, most miniaturized electromagnetic cavity ever created was engineered, and demonstrated, under this MURI; trapping optical energy in the smallest volume ever achieved. This world's most tiny light trap was also made into the most miniaturized laser ever made, occupying a volume smaller than a cubic wavelength. At the same time this MURI advanced the electromagnetic bandgap concept into microwaves and radio waves that are so important for military systems. This required new concepts that permitted the bandgap structure to be much smaller than the electromagnetic wavelength. As in the optical version of photonic crystals, these electromagnetic bandgaps permit unprecedented control over radio frequency electromagnetic waves. For example new antenna structures have been invented that permit near field control over radio emissions from antennas, so that the hand-held radio transmitters can be more efficient.

  13. Non-Gaussian Photon Probability Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Benjamin T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the axiom that the photon's probability distribution is a Gaussian distribution. The Airy disc empirical evidence shows that the best fit, if not exact, distribution is a modified Gamma mΓ distribution (whose parameters are α = r, βr/√u ) in the plane orthogonal to the motion of the photon. This modified Gamma distribution is then used to reconstruct the probability distributions along the hypotenuse from the pinhole, arc from the pinhole, and a line parallel to photon motion. This reconstruction shows that the photon's probability distribution is not a Gaussian function. However, under certain conditions, the distribution can appear to be Normal, thereby accounting for the success of quantum mechanics. This modified Gamma distribution changes with the shape of objects around it and thus explains how the observer alters the observation. This property therefore places additional constraints to quantum entanglement experiments. This paper shows that photon interaction is a multi-phenomena effect consisting of the probability to interact Pi, the probabilistic function and the ability to interact Ai, the electromagnetic function. Splitting the probability function Pi from the electromagnetic function Ai enables the investigation of the photon behavior from a purely probabilistic Pi perspective. The Probabilistic Interaction Hypothesis is proposed as a consistent method for handling the two different phenomena, the probability function Pi and the ability to interact Ai, thus redefining radiation shielding, stealth or cloaking, and invisibility as different effects of a single phenomenon Pi of the photon probability distribution. Sub wavelength photon behavior is successfully modeled as a multi-phenomena behavior. The Probabilistic Interaction Hypothesis provides a good fit to Otoshi's (1972) microwave shielding, Schurig et al. (2006) microwave cloaking, and Oulton et al. (2008) sub wavelength confinement; thereby providing a strong case that

  14. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Robust reconfigurable electromagnetic pathways within a photonic topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Jouvaud, Camille; Ni, Xiang; Mousavi, S Hossein; Genack, Azriel Z; Khanikaev, Alexander B

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of topological photonic states has revolutionized our understanding of electromagnetic propagation and scattering. Endowed with topological robustness, photonic edge modes are not reflected from structural imperfections and disordered regions. Here we demonstrate robust propagation along reconfigurable pathways defined by synthetic gauge fields within a topological photonic metacrystal. The flow of microwave radiation in helical edge modes following arbitrary contours of the synthetic gauge field between bianisotropic metacrystal domains is unimpeded. This is demonstrated in measurements of the spectrum of transmission and time delay along the topological domain walls. These results provide a framework for freely steering electromagnetic radiation within photonic structures.

  16. Robust reconfigurable electromagnetic pathways within a photonic topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Jouvaud, Camille; Ni, Xiang; Mousavi, S Hossein; Genack, Azriel Z; Khanikaev, Alexander B

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of topological photonic states has revolutionized our understanding of electromagnetic propagation and scattering. Endowed with topological robustness, photonic edge modes are not reflected from structural imperfections and disordered regions. Here we demonstrate robust propagation along reconfigurable pathways defined by synthetic gauge fields within a topological photonic metacrystal. The flow of microwave radiation in helical edge modes following arbitrary contours of the synthetic gauge field between bianisotropic metacrystal domains is unimpeded. This is demonstrated in measurements of the spectrum of transmission and time delay along the topological domain walls. These results provide a framework for freely steering electromagnetic radiation within photonic structures. PMID:26901513

  17. Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Rana; Christensen, C.; Muehlmeier, J.; Tuttle, G.; Ho, K.-M.

    2008-04-07

    Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complete photonic band gaps are simulated with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, and compared with measurements on microwave scale photonic crystals. The transmission through waveguide bends critically depends on the photonic crystal architecture in the bend region. We have found experimentally and theoretically, a new waveguide bend configuration consisting of overlapping rods in the bend region, that performs better than the simple waveguide bend of terminated rods, especially in the higher frequency portion of the band. Efficient beam splitters with this junction geometry are also simulated.

  18. Application of artificial neural networks for the soil moisture retrieval from active and passive microwave spaceborne sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santi, Emanuele; Paloscia, Simonetta; Pettinato, Simone; Fontanelli, Giacomo

    2016-06-01

    Among the algorithms used for the retrieval of SMC from microwave sensors (both active, such as Synthetic Aperture Radar-SAR, and passive, radiometers), the artificial neural networks (ANN) represent the best compromise between accuracy and computation speed. ANN based algorithms have been developed at IFAC, and adapted to several radar and radiometric satellite sensors, in order to generate SMC products at a resolution varying from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers according to the spatial scale of each sensor. These algorithms, which are based on the ANN techniques for inverting theoretical and semi-empirical models, have been adapted to the C- to Ka- band acquisitions from spaceborne radiometers (AMSR-E/AMSR2), SAR (Envisat/ASAR, Cosmo-SkyMed) and real aperture radar (MetOP ASCAT). Large datasets of co-located satellite acquisitions and direct SMC measurements on several test sites worldwide have been used along with simulations derived from forward electromagnetic models for setting up, training and validating these algorithms. An overall quality assessment of the obtained results in terms of accuracy and computational cost was carried out, and the main advantages and limitations for an operational use of these algorithms were evaluated. This technique allowed the retrieval of SMC from both active and passive satellite systems, with accuracy values of about 0.05 m3/m3 of SMC or better, thus making these applications compliant with the usual accuracy requirements for SMC products from space.

  19. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  20. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  1. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  2. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  3. Photons Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, Matej; Begalli, Marcia; Han, Min Cheol; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Han Sung; Grazia Pia, Maria; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review of methods and data for the Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions is in progress: it concerns a wide set of theoretical modeling approaches and data libraries available for this purpose. Models and data libraries are assessed quantitatively with respect to an extensive collection of experimental measurements documented in the literature to determine their accuracy; this evaluation exploits rigorous statistical analysis methods. The computational performance of the associated modeling algorithms is evaluated as well. An overview of the assessment of photon interaction models and results of the experimental validation are presented.

  4. Green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  5. A readout for large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Sean; Mazin, Benjamin A; Serfass, Bruno; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; Duan, Ran; Raffanti, Rick; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting detectors capable of counting single photons and measuring their energy in the UV, optical, and near-IR. MKIDs feature intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) at microwave frequencies, allowing the construction and readout of large arrays. Due to the microwave FDM, MKIDs do not require the complex cryogenic multiplexing electronics used for similar detectors, such as transition edge sensors, but instead transfer this complexity to room temperature electronics where they present a formidable signal processing challenge. In this paper, we describe the first successful effort to build a readout for a photon counting optical/near-IR astronomical instrument, the ARray Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry. This readout is based on open source hardware developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. Designed principally for radio telescope backends, it is flexible enough to be used for a variety of signal processing applications.

  6. A readout for large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Sean; Mazin, Benjamin A; Serfass, Bruno; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; Duan, Ran; Raffanti, Rick; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting detectors capable of counting single photons and measuring their energy in the UV, optical, and near-IR. MKIDs feature intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) at microwave frequencies, allowing the construction and readout of large arrays. Due to the microwave FDM, MKIDs do not require the complex cryogenic multiplexing electronics used for similar detectors, such as transition edge sensors, but instead transfer this complexity to room temperature electronics where they present a formidable signal processing challenge. In this paper, we describe the first successful effort to build a readout for a photon counting optical/near-IR astronomical instrument, the ARray Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry. This readout is based on open source hardware developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. Designed principally for radio telescope backends, it is flexible enough to be used for a variety of signal processing applications. PMID:22559560

  7. Photon-assisted tunneling through a quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Jauhar, S.; McCormick, K.; Dixon, D.; McEuen, P.L. Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, Mail Stop 2-200, Berkeley, California 94720 ); Nazarov, Y.V.; van der Vaart, N.C. ); Foxon, C.T. )

    1994-07-15

    We study single-electron tunneling in a two-junction device in the presence of microwave radiation. We introduce a model for numerical simulations that extends the Tien-Gordon theory for photon-assisted tunneling to encompass correlated single-electron tunneling. We predict sharp current jumps which reflect the discrete photon energy [ital hf], and a zero-bias current whose sign changes when an electron is added to the central island of the device. Measurements on split-gate quantum dots show microwave-induced features that are in good agreement with the model.

  8. Photon-photon collisions via relativisitic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James K.

    2012-07-11

    Photon-photon scattering at low energies has been predicted theoretically for many years. However, due to the extremely small cross section there has been no experimental confirmation of this. Due to the rapid increase in laser irradiances and projected peak irradiances in planned facilities regimes could be reached where photon-photon scattering could be experimentally observed. We will first review basic aspects of photon-photon collisions concentrating on the calculation of the photon-photon scattering cross section. Then we will discuss the possibilities for observing these phenomena in ultra-high irradiance laser-plasma interactions involving relativistic mirrors.

  9. RF Photonic Technology in Optical Fiber Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, William S. C.

    2007-06-01

    List of contributors; Introduction and preface; 1. Figures of merit and performance analysis of photonic microwave links Charles Cox and William S. C. Chang; 2. RF subcarrier links in local access networks Xiaolin Lu; 3. Analog modulation of semiconductor lasers Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 4. LiNbO3 external modulators and their use in high performance analog links Gary E. Betts; 5. Broadband traveling wave modulators in LiNbO3 Marta M. Howerton and William K. Burns; 6. Multiple quantum well electroabsorption modulators for RF photonic links William S. C. Chang; 7. Polymer modulators for RF photonics Timothy Van Eck; 8. Photodiodes for high performance analog links P. K. L. Yu and Ming C. Wu; 9. Opto-electronic oscillators X. Steve Yao; 10. Photonic link techniques for microwave frequency conversion Stephen A. Pappert, Roger Helkey and Ronald T. Logan Jr; 11. Antenna-coupled millimeter-wave electro-optical modulators William B. Bridges; 12. System design and performance of wideband photonic phased array antennas Greg L. Tangonan, Willie Ng, Daniel Yap and Ron Stephens; Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  10. Microwave spectroscopy on a double quantum dot with an on-chip Josephson oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleitner, A. W.; Qin, H.; Simmel, F.; Irmer, B.; Blick, R. H.; Kotthaus, J. P.; Ustinov, A. V.; Eberl, K.

    2000-02-01

    We present measurements on microwave spectroscopy on a double quantum dot with an on-chip microwave source. The quantum dots are realized in the two-dimensional electron gas of an AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure and are weakly coupled in series by a tunnelling barrier forming an `ionic' molecular state. We employ a Josephson oscillator formed by a long Nb/Al-AlOx /Nb junction as a microwave source. We find photon-assisted tunnelling sidebands induced by the Josephson oscillator, and compare the results with those obtained using an externally operated microwave source.

  11. Optical technology for microwave applications IV; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 28, 29, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Shi-Kay (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Among the topics discussed at the meeting are high-speed laser and electrooptical technologies, detectors and detector arrays, microwave delay lines, and photon-microwave interactions. In addition, optical link applications are discussed, along with electronic warfare receivers and acoustooptical signal processing. Emphasis is placed on laser diode technology, direct modulation of laser diodes, external electrooptical laser modulation techniques, and microwave fiber-optic delay lines. Attention is given to such optical link applications as multigigahertz links as well as to signal processing for phased-array antennas and channelized microwave receiver technologies.

  12. Spin pumping in strongly coupled magnon-photon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier-Flaig, H.; Harder, M.; Gross, R.; Huebl, H.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally investigate magnon polaritons arising in ferrimagnetic resonance experiments in a microwave cavity with a tunable quality factor. To this end, we simultaneously measure the electrically detected spin pumping signal and the microwave reflection (the ferrimagnetic resonance signal) of a yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/platinum (Pt) bilayer in the microwave cavity. The coupling strength of the fundamental magnetic resonance mode and the cavity is determined from the microwave reflection data. All features of the magnetic resonance spectra predicted by first principle calculations and an input-output formalism agree with our experimental observations. By changing the decay rate of the cavity at constant magnon-photon coupling rate, we experimentally tune in and out of the strong coupling regime and successfully model the corresponding change of the spin pumping signal and microwave reflection. Furthermore, we observe the coupling and spin pumping of several spin wave modes and provide a quantitative analysis of their coupling rates to the cavity.

  13. Piezoelectric tunable microwave superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, N. C.; Fan, Y.; Tobar, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of engineered quantum systems, there is a demand for superconducting tunable devices, able to operate with high-quality factors at power levels equivalent to only a few photons. In this work, we developed a 3D microwave re-entrant cavity with such characteristics ready to provide a very fine-tuning of a high-Q resonant mode over a large dynamic range. This system has an electronic tuning mechanism based on a mechanically amplified piezoelectric actuator, which controls the resonator dominant mode frequency by changing the cavity narrow gap by very small displacements. Experiments were conducted at room and dilution refrigerator temperatures showing a large dynamic range up to 4 GHz and 1 GHz, respectively, and were compared to a finite element method model simulated data. At elevated microwave power input, nonlinear thermal effects were observed to destroy the superconductivity of the cavity due to the large electric fields generated in the small gap of the re-entrant cavity.

  14. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  15. Imaging Photon Lattice States by Scanning Defect Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, D. L.; Shanks, W. E.; Li, Andy C. Y.; Ateshian, Lamia; Koch, Jens; Houck, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave photons inside lattices of coupled resonators and superconducting qubits can exhibit surprising matterlike behavior. Realizing such open-system quantum simulators presents an experimental challenge and requires new tools and measurement techniques. Here, we introduce scanning defect microscopy as one such tool and illustrate its use in mapping the normal-mode structure of microwave photons inside a 49-site kagome lattice of coplanar waveguide resonators. Scanning is accomplished by moving a probe equipped with a sapphire tip across the lattice. This locally perturbs resonator frequencies and induces shifts of the lattice resonance frequencies, which we determine by measuring the transmission spectrum. From the magnitude of mode shifts, we can reconstruct photon field amplitudes at each lattice site and thus create spatial images of the photon-lattice normal modes.

  16. Novel High Cooperativity Photon-Magnon Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobar, Michael; Bourhill, Jeremy; Kostylev, Nikita; G, Maxim; Creedon, Daniel

    Novel microwave cavities are presented, which couple photons and magnons in YIG spheres in a super- and ultra-strong way at around 20 mK in temperature. Few/Single photon couplings (or normal mode splitting, 2g) of more than 6 GHz at microwave frequencies are obtained. Types of cavities include multiple post reentrant cavities, which co-couple photons at different frequencies with a coupling greater that the free spectral range, as well as spherical loaded dielectric cavity resonators. In such cavities we show that the bare dielectric properties can be obtained by polarizing all magnon modes to high energy using a 7 Tesla magnet. We also show that at zero-field, collective effects of the spins significantly perturb the photon modes. Other effects like time-reversal symmetry breaking are observed.

  17. Magnetometer Based on Optoelectronic Microwave Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey

    2005-01-01

    proposed instrument, intended mainly for use as a magnetometer, would include an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) stabilized by an atomic cell that could play the role of a magnetically tunable microwave filter. The microwave frequency would vary with the magnetic field in the cell, thereby providing an indication of the magnetic field. The proposed magnetometer would offer a combination of high accuracy and high sensitivity, characterized by flux densities of less than a picotesla. In comparison with prior magnetometers, the proposed magnetometer could, in principle, be constructed as a compact, lightweight instrument: It could fit into a package of about 10 by 10 by 10 cm and would have a mass <0.5 kg. As described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, an OEO is a hybrid of photonic and electronic components that generates highly spectrally pure microwave radiation, and optical radiation modulated by the microwave radiation, through direct conversion between laser light and microwave radiation in an optoelectronic feedback loop. As used here, "atomic cell" signifies a cell containing a vapor, the constituent atoms of which can be made to undergo transitions between quantum states, denoted hyperfine levels, when excited by light in a suitable wavelength range. The laser light must be in this range. The energy difference between the hyperfine levels defines the microwave frequency. In the proposed instrument (see figure), light from a laser would be introduced into an electro-optical modulator (EOM). Amplitude-modulated light from the exit port of the EOM would pass through a fiber-optic splitter having two output branches. The light in one branch would be sent through an atomic cell to a photodiode. The light in the other branch would constitute the microwave-modulated optical output. Part of the light leaving the atomic cell could also be used to stabilize the laser at a frequency in the vicinity of the desired hyperfine or other quantum transition. The

  18. Microwave Lightcraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Looking like an alien space ship or a flying saucer the Microwave Lightcraft is an unconventional launch vehicle approach for delivering payload to orbit using power transmitted via microwaves. Microwaves re beamed from either a ground station or an orbiting solar power satellite to the lightcraft. The energy received breaks air molecules into a plasma and a magnetohydrodynamic fanjet provides the lifting force. Only a small amount of propellant is required for circulation, attitude control and deorbit.

  19. Microalgae photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Coquil, Thomas; Sylvestre, Julien

    2011-05-01

    Due to their metabolic flexibility and fast growth rate, microscopic aquatic phototrophs like algae have a potential to become industrial photochemical converters. Algae photosynthesis could enable the large scale production of clean and renewable liquid fuels and chemicals with major environmental, economic and societal benefits. Capital and operational costs are the main issues to address through optical, process and biochemical engineering improvements. In this perspective, a variety of photonic approaches have been proposed - we introduce them here and describe their potential, limitations and compatibility with separate biotechnology and engineering progresses. We show that only sunlight-based approaches are economically realistic. One of photonics' main goals in the algae field is to dilute light to overcome photosaturation effects that impact upon cultures exposed to full sunlight. Among other approaches, we introduce a widely-compatible broadband spectral adaptation technique called AlgoSun® that uses luminescence to optimize sunlight spectrum in view of the bioconverter's requirements.

  20. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  1. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymeric materials. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIM Materials Program, allows the authors, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of various thermoset resins will be studied because it holds the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components or in-situ curing of adhesives, including metal-to-metal. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  2. Plasma enhanced microwave joining

    SciTech Connect

    Yiin, T.; Barmatz, M.; Sayir, A.

    1995-12-31

    A new method for plasma enhanced microwave joining of high purity (99.8%) alumina has been developed. The controlled application of a plasma between the adjoining surfaces of two rods initially heats the microwave-low-absorbing alumina rods to temperatures high enough for them to absorb microwave energy efficiently. With this technology, the adjacent surfaces of alumina rods can be melted and welded together in less than three minutes using approximately 400 watts of microwave energy. Four point bending tests measured fracture strengths of up to 130 MPa at the joined interface. Optical and SEM micrographs indicated that exaggerated grain growth prevailed for all joints studied.

  3. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIC Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of thermoset resins will be studied because it hold the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  4. A laboratory system for the investigation of rain fade compensation techniques for Ka-band satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svoboda, James S.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    1993-01-01

    The design and performance of a rain fade simulation/counteraction system on a laboratory simulated 30/20 GHz, time division multiple access (TDMA) satellite communications testbed is evaluated. Severe rain attenuation of electromagnetic radiation at 30/20 GHz occurs due to the carrier wavelength approaching the water droplet size. Rain in the downlink path lowers the signal power present at the receiver, resulting in a higher number of bit errors induced in the digital ground terminal. The laboratory simulation performed at NASA Lewis Research Center uses a programmable PIN diode attenuator to simulate 20 GHz satellite downlink geographic rain fade profiles. A computer based network control system monitors the downlink power and informs the network of any power threshold violations, which then prompts the network to issue commands that temporarily increase the gain of the satellite based traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier. After the rain subsides, the network returns the TWT to the normal energy conserving power mode. Bit error rate (BER) data taken at the receiving ground terminal serves as a measure of the severity of rain degradation, and also evaluates the extent to which the network can improve the faded channel.

  5. Operational Demonstration of Ka-Band Telecommunications for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townes, S. A.; Breidenthal, J. C.; Moyd, K. I.; Patterson, J. E.; Shambayati, S.; Amoozegar, F.; Morabito, D.; Border, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of the operational demonstration are to verify that the anticipated benefits of the higher carrier frequency can actually be realized under realistic operating conditions, and if possible to provide a significant enhancement to scientific data return.

  6. Ka-Band Monopulse Antenna Pointing Calibration Using Wideband Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buu, C.; Calvo, J.; Cheng, T.-H.; Vazquez, M.

    2010-08-01

    A new method of performing a system end-to-end monopulse antenna calibration using widely available wideband astronomical radio sources is presented as an alternative to the current method of using a spacecraft signal. Current monopulse calibration requires a spacecraft carrier signal to measure amplitude and phase differences in the monopulse feed and low-noise amplifiers (LNAs). The alternative method presented here will allow the ground station to perform monopulse calibrations during maintenance periods instead of spacecraft track time, and provide an end-to-end system check-out capability without requiring a spacecraft signal. In this article, we give an overview of the current calibration approach, describe a new method for calibrating with radio sources, and present results from field testing of this new method.

  7. Ka-band MMIC array system for ACTS aeronautical terminal experiment (Aero-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A.; Zakrajsek, Robert J.; Lee, Richard Q.; Andro, Monty; Turtle, John P.

    1995-01-01

    During the summer of 1994, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Aeronautical Terminal Experiment (Aero-X) was successfully completed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). 4.8 and 9.6 Kbps duplex voice links were established between the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS Link Evaluation Terminal (LET) in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS. The antenna system used in this demonstration was developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and US Air Force experimental arrays using GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The antenna system consisted of three arrays mounted inside the LeRC Learjet, pointing out through the windows. An open loop tracking controller developed by LeRC used information from the aircraft position and attitude sensors to automatically steer the arrays toward ACTS during flight JPL ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) system hardware was used as transceivers both on the aircraft and at the LET. The single 32 element MMIC transmit array developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments has an EIRP of 23.4 dBW at boresight. The two 20 GHz MMIC receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the USAF Rome Laboratory/Electronic System Center, taking advantage of existing USAF array development contracts with Boeing and Martin Marietta. The Boeing array has 23 elements and a G/T of 16/6 db/degK at boresight. The Martin Marietta array has 16 elements and a G/T of 16.1 db/degK at boresight. The three proof-of-concept arrays, the array control system and their integration and operation in the Learjet for Aero-X are described.

  8. First deep space operational experience with simultaneous X- and Ka-bands coherent tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, S.; Herrera, R.; Armstrong, J.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Gatti, M.; Goltz, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the new DSN science capability and highlights of the engineering work that lead to its development. It will also discuss experience with operations along with statistics and data quality.

  9. Ka-Band Digital Beamforming and SweepSAR Demonstration for Ice and Solid Earth Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Heavy, Brandon; Perkovic, Dragana; Quddus, Momin; Zawadzki, Mark; Moller, Delwyn

    2010-01-01

    GLISTIN is an instrument concept for a single-pass interferometric SAR operating at 35.6 GHz. To achieve large swath widths using practical levels of transmitter power, a digitally-beamformed planar waveguide array is used. This paper describes results from a ground-based demonstration of a 16-receiver prototype. Furthermore, SweepSAR is emerging as promising technique for achieving very wide swaths for surface change detection. NASA and DLR are studying this approach for the DESDynI and Tandem-L missions. SweepSAR employs a reflector with a digitally-beamformed array feed. We will describe development of an airborne demonstration of SweepSAR using the GLISTIN receiver array and a reflector.

  10. Performance of a four-element Ka-band high-temperature superconducting microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, K. B.; Gilbert, C.; Metzler, S.; Koepf, G.; Claspy, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    Superconducting four-element microstrip array antennas operating at 30 GHz have been designed and fabricated on a lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) substrates. The experimental performance of these thin film Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting antennas is compared with that of identical antenna patterned with evaporated gold. Efficiency measurements of these antennas show an improvement of 2 dB at 70 K and as much as 3.5 dB at 40 K in the superconducting antenna over the gold antenna.

  11. Atmospheric refraction correction for Ka-band blind pointing on the DSS-13 beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Borroto, I. M.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the atmospheric refraction corrections at the DSS-13 34-m diameter beam waveguide (BWG) antenna for the period Jul. - Dec. 1990 is presented. The current Deep Space Network (DSN) atmospheric refraction model and its sensitivity with respect to sensor accuracy are reviewed. Refraction corrections based on actual atmospheric parameters are compared with the DSS-13 station default corrections for the six-month period. Average blind-pointing improvement during the worst month would have amounted to 5 mdeg at 10 deg elevation using actual surface weather values. This would have resulted in an average gain improvement of 1.1 dB.

  12. Time Reversal Symmetry Breaking Microwave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, John C.; Lachapelle, Aman; Yoon, Taekwan; Ma, Ruichao; Schuster, David; Simon, Jonathan

    In this talk we present our work towards realizing high Q, superconducting circulators to be employed in topological circuit QED lattices. These circulators generate gauge fields that produce protected edge states. We couple magnon excitations in spheres of the ferrite Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) to microwave cavity fields in order to break the degeneracy between modes that precess with different handedness. The YIG sphere only couples strongly (1GHz) to cavity modes that precess with the same handedness. We tune the YIG sphere into resonance with degenerate cavity modes to shift only the frequency of the modes with the same handedness, leaving the uncoupled mode at its original frequency. Since this mode is dark to the YIG excitation, its quality factor is dependent only on the characteristics of the cavity. We make the cavities out of the Type II superconductor Niobium Titanium so that we achieve high quality factors while also tolerating the large magnetic fields acting on the YIG spheres within the cavities. These cavities can be evanescently coupled to create topologically nontrivial lattices. Photon-photon interactions can then be added via couplings to qubits to create fractional quantum hall states for microwave photons.

  13. Fast tuning of superconducting microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, M.; Wilson, C. M.; Persson, F.; Johansson, G.; Shumeiko, V.; Bauch, T.; Duty, T.; Delsing, P.

    2008-11-07

    Photons are fundamental excitations of electromagnetic fields and can be captured in cavities. For a given cavity with a certain size, the fundamental mode has a fixed frequency f which gives the photons a specific 'color'. The cavity also has a typical lifetime {tau}, which results in a finite linewidth {delta}f. If the size of the cavity is changed fast compared to {tau}, and so that the frequency change {delta}f>>{delta}f, then it is possible to change the 'color' of the captured photons. Here we demonstrate superconducting microwave cavities, with tunable effective lengths. The tuning is obtained by varying a Josephson inductance at one end of the cavity. We show data on four different samples and demonstrate tuning by several hundred linewidths in a time {delta}t<<{tau}. Working in the few photon limit, we show that photons stored in the cavity at one frequency will leak out from the cavity with the new frequency after the detuning. The characteristics of the measured devices make them suitable for different applications such as dynamic coupling of qubits and parametric amplification.

  14. IDENTIFYING THE RADIO BUBBLE NATURE OF THE MICROWAVE HAZE

    SciTech Connect

    Dobler, Gregory

    2012-11-20

    Using seven-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, I identify a sharp 'edge' in the microwave haze at high southern Galactic latitude (-55 Degree-Sign < b < -35 Degree-Sign ) that is spatially coincident with the southern edge of the 'Fermi haze/bubbles'. This finding proves conclusively that the edge in the gamma rays is real (and not a processing artifact), demonstrates explicitly that the microwave haze and the gamma-ray bubbles are indeed the same structure observed at multiple wavelengths, and strongly supports the interpretation of the microwave haze as a separate component of Galactic synchrotron (likely generated by a transient event) as opposed to a simple variation of the spectral index of disk synchrotron. In addition, combining these data sets allows for the first determination of the magnetic field within a radio bubble using microwaves and gamma rays by taking advantage of the fact that the inverse Compton gamma rays are primarily generated by scattering of cosmic microwave background photons at these latitudes, thus minimizing uncertainty in the target radiation field. Assuming uniform volume emissivity, I find that the magnetic field within the southern Galactic microwave/gamma-ray bubble is {approx}5 {mu}G above 6 kpc off of the Galactic plane.

  15. Three-photon coherence of Rydberg atomic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Hyo Min; Jeong, Taek; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-05-01

    We investigated three-photon coherence effects of the Rydberg state in a four-level ladder-type atomic system for the 5 S1/2 (F = 3) - 5 P3/2 (F' = 4) - 50 D5/2 - 51 P3/2 transition of 85 Rb atoms. By adding a resonant electric field of microwave (MW) at electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in Rydberg state scheme, we observed experimentally that splitting of EIT signal appears under the condition of three-photon resonance in the Doppler-broadened atomic system. Discriminating the two- and three-photon coherence terms from the calculated spectrum in a simple four-level ladder-type Doppler-broadened atomic system, we found that the physical origin of splitting of EIT was three-photon coherence effect, but not three-photon quantum interference phenomena such as three-photon electromagnetically induced absorption (TPEIA).

  16. MICROWAVES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of microwaves, a non-ionizing radiation, on organic reactions is described both in polar solvents and under solvent-free conditions. The special applications are highlighted in the context of solventless organic synthesis which involve microwave (MW) exposure of neat r...

  17. Microwave device investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, K. K. D.; Haddad, G. I.; Kwok, S. P.; Masnari, N. A.; Trew, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Materials, devices and novel schemes for generation, amplification and detection of microwave and millimeter wave energy are studied. Considered are: (1) Schottky-barrier microwave devices; (2) intermodulation products in IMPATT diode amplifiers; and (3) harmonic generation using Read diode varactors.

  18. Television Microwave--1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Roger E.

    Since it became a reality just before World War II, terrestrial microwave has improved in systems and equipments, but with the improvements have come higher costs. Television microwave costs are so high because users are demanding more capability, land prices have increased, operating costs are higher, and there is frequency congestion along many…

  19. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  20. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  1. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Thigpen, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  2. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.; Johnson, A.C.; Thigpen, L.T.

    1999-10-05

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  3. A Map of the Cosmic Microwave Background from the BEAST Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, Peter R.; Bersanelli, Marco; Childers, Jeffrey; Figueiredo, Newton; Gaier, Todd C.; Halevi, Doron; Huey, Gregory G.; Kangas, Miikka; Lawrence, Charles R.; Levy, Alan; Lubin, Philip M.; Malaspina, Marco; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Joshua; Mejía, Jorge; Natoli, Paolo; O'Dwyer, Ian; O'Neill, Hugh; Parendo, Shane; Pina, Agenor; Seiffert, Michael D.; Stebor, Nathan C.; Tello, Camilo; Villa, Fabrizio; Villela, Thyrso; Wade, Lawrence A.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Williams, Brian; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2005-05-01

    We present the first sky maps from the BEAST (Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope) experiment. BEAST consists of a 2.2 m off-axis Gregorian telescope fed by a cryogenic millimeter wavelength focal plane currently consisting of six Q band (40 GHz) and two Ka band (30 GHz) scalar feed horns feeding cryogenic HEMT amplifiers. Data were collected from two balloon-borne flights in 2000, followed by a lengthy ground observing campaign from the 3.8 km altitude University of California White Mountain Research Station. This paper reports the initial results from the ground-based observations. The instrument produced an annular map covering the sky over 33deg<δ<42deg. The maps cover an area of 2470 deg2 with an effective resolution of 23' FWHM at 40 GHz and 30' at 30 GHz. The map rms (smoothed to 30' and excluding Galactic foregrounds) is 57+/-5 μK (Rayleigh-Jeans) at 40 GHz. Comparison with the instrument noise and correcting for 5% atmospheric attenuation gives a cosmic signal rms contribution of 29+/-3 μK (R-J) or 30+/-3 μK relative to a Planck blackbody of 2.7 K. An estimate of the actual cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky signal requires taking into account the l space filter function of our experiment and analysis techniques, carried out in a companion paper. In addition to the robust detection of CMB anisotropies, we find a strong correlation between small portions of our maps and features in recent Hα maps. In this work we describe the data set and analysis techniques leading to the maps, including data selection, filtering, pointing reconstruction, mapmaking algorithms, and systematic effects.

  4. Study of LEO-SAT microwave link for broad-band mobile satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujise, Masayuki; Chujo, Wataru; Chiba, Isamu; Furuhama, Yoji; Kawabata, Kazuaki; Konishi, Yoshihiko

    1993-01-01

    In the field of mobile satellite communications, a system based on low-earth-orbit satellites (LEO-SAT's) such as the Iridium system has been proposed. The LEO-SAT system is able to offer mobile telecommunication services in high-latitude areas. Rain degradation, fading and shadowing are also expected to be decreased when the system is operated at a high elevation angle. Furthermore, the propagation delay generated in the LEO-SAT system is less pronounced than that in the geostationary orbit satellite (GEO-SAT) system and, in voice services, the effect of the delay is almost negligible. We proposed a concept of a broad-band mobile satellite communication system with LEO-SAT's and Optical ISL. In that system, a fixed L-band (1.6/1.5 GHz) multibeam is used to offer narrow band service to the mobile terminals in the entire area covered by a LEO-SAT and steerable Ka-band (30/20 GHz) spot beams are used for the wide band service. In this paper, we present results of a study of LEO-SAT microwave link between a satellite and a mobile terminal for a broad-band mobile satellite communication system. First, the results of link budget calculations are presented and the antennas mounted on satellites are shown. For a future mobile antenna technology, we also show digital beamforming (DBF) techniques. DBF, together with modulation and/or demodulation, is becoming a key technique for mobile antennas with advanced functions such as antenna pattern calibration, correction, and radio interference suppression. In this paper, efficient DBF techniques for transmitting and receiving are presented. Furthermore, an adaptive array antenna system suitable for this LEO-SAT is presented.

  5. Microwave synthesizer using an on-chip Brillouin oscillator.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Lee, Hansuek; Vahala, Kerry J

    2013-01-01

    Low-phase-noise microwave oscillators are important to a wide range of subjects, including communications, radar and metrology. Photonic-based microwave-wave sources now provide record, close-to-carrier phase-noise performance, and compact sources using microcavities are available commercially. Photonics-based solutions address a challenging scaling problem in electronics, increasing attenuation with frequency. A second scaling challenge, however, is to maintain low phase noise in reduced form factor and even integrated systems. On this second front, there has been remarkable progress in the area of microcavity devices with large storage time (high optical quality factor). Here we report generation of highly coherent microwaves using a chip-based device that derives stability from high optical quality factor. The device has a record low electronic white-phase-noise floor for a microcavity-based oscillator and is used as the optical, voltage-controlled oscillator in the first demonstration of a photonic-based, microwave frequency synthesizer. The synthesizer performance is comparable to mid-range commercial devices. PMID:23811993

  6. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  7. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  8. Microwave hydrology: A trilogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.; Johnston, E. J.; Girard, M. A.; Regusters, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave hydrology, as the term in construed in this trilogy, deals with the investigation of important hydrological features on the Earth's surface as they are remotely, and passively, sensed by orbiting microwave receivers. Microwave wavelengths penetrate clouds, foliage, ground cover, and soil, in varying degrees, and reveal the occurrence of standing liquid water on and beneath the surface. The manifestation of liquid water appearing on or near the surface is reported by a microwave receiver as a signal with a low flux level, or, equivalently, a cold temperature. Actually, the surface of the liquid water reflects the low flux level from the cosmic background into the input terminals of the receiver. This trilogy describes and shows by microwave flux images: the hydrological features that sustain Lake Baykal as an extraordinary freshwater resource; manifestations of subsurface water in Iran; and the major water features of the Congo Basin, a rain forest.

  9. Microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  10. Microwave radiation hazards around large microwave antenna.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klascius, A.

    1973-01-01

    The microwave radiation hazards associated with the use of large antennas become increasingly more dangerous to personnel as the transmitters go to ever higher powers. The near-field area is of the greatest concern. It has spill over from subreflector and reflections from nearby objects. Centimeter waves meeting in phase will reinforce each other and create hot spots of microwave energy. This has been measured in front of and around several 26-meter antennas. Hot spots have been found and are going to be the determining factor in delineating safe areas for personnel to work. Better techniques and instruments to measure these fields are needed for the evaluation of hazard areas.

  11. First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Foreground Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Hill, R. S.; Hinshaw, G.; Nolta, M. R.; Odegard, N.; Page, L.; Spergel, D. N.; Weiland, J. L.; Wright, E. L.; Halpern, M.

    2003-01-01

    index is also steep in the WMAP bands, with beta(sub d) approx. = 2.2. Our model is driven to these conclusions by the low level of total foreground contamination at approx. 60 GHz. Microwave and Ha measurements of the ionized gas agree well with one another at about the expected levels. Spinning dust emission is limited to less than 5% of the Ka-band foreground emission. A catalog of 208 point sources is presented. The reliability of the catalog is 98%, i.e., we expect five of the 208 sources to be statistically spurious. The mean spectral index of the point sources is alpha approx. 0(beta approx. -2). Derived source counts suggest a contribution to the anisotropy power from unresolved sources of (15.0 +/- 1.4) x 10(exp -3)micro sq K sr at Q-band and negligible levels at V-band and W-band. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect is shown to be a negligible "contamination" to the maps.

  12. Single-Photon-Resolved Cross-Kerr Interaction for Autonomous Stabilization of Photon-Number States.

    PubMed

    Holland, E T; Vlastakis, B; Heeres, R W; Reagor, M J; Vool, U; Leghtas, Z; Frunzio, L; Kirchmair, G; Devoret, M H; Mirrahimi, M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2015-10-30

    Quantum states can be stabilized in the presence of intrinsic and environmental losses by either applying an active feedback condition on an ancillary system or through reservoir engineering. Reservoir engineering maintains a desired quantum state through a combination of drives and designed entropy evacuation. We propose and implement a quantum-reservoir engineering protocol that stabilizes Fock states in a microwave cavity. This protocol is realized with a circuit quantum electrodynamics platform where a Josephson junction provides direct, nonlinear coupling between two superconducting waveguide cavities. The nonlinear coupling results in a single-photon-resolved cross-Kerr effect between the two cavities enabling a photon-number-dependent coupling to a lossy environment. The quantum state of the microwave cavity is discussed in terms of a net polarization and is analyzed by a measurement of its steady state Wigner function. PMID:26565448

  13. Robust photon entanglement via quantum interference in optomechanical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lin

    2013-06-01

    Entanglement is a key element in quantum information processing. Here, we present schemes to generate robust photon entanglement via optomechanical quantum interfaces in the strong coupling regime. The schemes explore the excitation of the Bogoliubov dark mode and the destructive quantum interference between the bright modes of the interface, similar to electromagnetically induced transparency, to eliminate leading-order effects of the mechanical noise. Both continuous-variable and discrete-state entanglements that are robust against the mechanical noise can be achieved. The schemes can be used to generate entanglement in hybrid quantum systems between, e.g., microwave photon and optical photon.

  14. Experimental demonstration of self-collimation inside a three-dimensional photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaolin; Shi, Shouyuan; Murakowski, Janusz A; Schneider, Garrett J; Schuetz, Christopher A; Prather, Dennis W

    2006-05-01

    We present our experimental demonstration of self-collimation inside a three-dimensional (3D) simple cubic photonic crystal at microwave frequencies. The photonic crystal was designed with unique dispersion property and fabricated by a high precision computer-controlled machine. The self-collimation modes were excited by a grounded waveguide feeding and detected by a scanning monopole. Self-collimation of electromagnetic waves in the 3D photonic crystal was demonstrated by measuring the 3D field distribution, which was shown as a narrow collimated beam inside the 3D photonic crystal but a diverged beam in the absence of the photonic crystal. PMID:16712297

  15. Microwave bonding of MEMS component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bonding of MEMs materials is carried out using microwave. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin of the material. This causes heating in one place more than another. Thereby minimizing the effects of the bonding microwave energy.

  16. Design of photonic crystal splitters/combiners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangin; Park, Ikmo; Lim, Hanjo

    2004-10-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) structures or photonic crystals have attracted a lot of interest since one of their promising applications is to build compact photonic integrated circuits (PIC). One of key components in PICs is a 1 x 2 optical power splitter or a 2 x 1 combiner. Design of 1 x 2 optical power splitters based on photonic crystal has been investigated by several research groups, but no attention has been paid to the design of 2 x 1 optical combiners. In conventional dielectric waveguide based circuits, optical combiners are obtained just by operating the splitters in the opposite direction and the isolation between two input ports in the combiners is naturally achieved. In photonic crystal based circuits, however, we have found that reciprocal operation of the splitters as combiners will not provide proper isolation between the input ports of the combiners. In this work, microwave-circuit concept has been adopted to obtain isolation between two input ports of the combiner and compact optical power splitters/combiners of good performance have been designed using 2-D photonic crystal. Numerical analysis of the designed splitters/combiners has been performed with the finite-difference time-domain method. The designed splitters/combiners show good isolation between input ports in combiner operation with small return losses.

  17. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Nishizuka, N.; Oi, A.; Ohyama, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  18. Microwave drilling of bones.

    PubMed

    Eshet, Yael; Mann, Ronit Rachel; Anaton, Abby; Yacoby, Tomer; Gefen, Amit; Jerby, Eli

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of drilling in fresh wet bone tissue in vitro using the microwave drill method [Jerby et al, 2002], toward testing its applicability in orthopaedic surgery. The microwave drill uses a near-field focused energy (typically, power under approximately 200 W at 2.45-GHz frequency) in order to penetrate bone in a drilling speed of approximately 1 mm/s. The effect of microwave drilling on mechanical properties of whole ovine tibial and chicken femoral bones drilled in vitro was studied using three-point-bending strength and fatigue tests. Properties were compared to those of geometrically similar bones that were equivalently drilled using the currently accepted mechanical rotary drilling method. Strength of mid-shaft, elastic moduli, and cycles to failure in fatigue were statistically indistinguishable between specimen groups assigned for microwave and mechanical drilling. Carbonized margins around the microwave-drilled hole were approximately 15% the hole diameter. Optical and scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the microwave drill produces substantially smoother holes in cortical bone than those produced by a mechanical drill. The hot spot produced by the microwave drill has the potential for overcoming two major problems presently associated with mechanical drilling in cortical and trabecular bone during orthopaedic surgeries: formation of debris and rupture of bone vasculature during drilling.

  19. Jets and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-03-01

    This Letter applies the concept of “jets,” as constructed from calorimeter cell four-vectors, to jets composed (primarily) of photons (or leptons). Thus jets become a superset of both traditional objects such as QCD jets, photons, and electrons, and more unconventional objects such as photon jets and electron jets, defined as collinear photons and electrons, respectively. Since standard objects such as single photons become a subset of jets in this approach, standard jet substructure techniques are incorporated into the photon finder toolbox. Using a (reasonably) realistic calorimeter model we demonstrate that, for a single photon identification efficiency of 80% or above, the use of jet substructure techniques reduces the number of QCD jets faking photons by factors of 2.5 to 4. Depending on the topology of the photon jets, the substructure variables reduce the number of photon jets faking single photons by factors of 10 to 103 at a single photon identification efficiency of 80%.

  20. Microwave coupler and method

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.