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Sample records for kaiparowits plateau utah

  1. Preliminary Investigations of the Distribution and Resources of Coal in the Kaiparowits Plateau, Southern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hettinger, Robert D.; Roberts, L.N.R.; Biewick, L.R.H.; Kirschbaum, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report on the coal resources of the Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah is a contribution to the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) 'National Coal Resource Assessment' (NCRA), a five year effort to identify and characterize the coal beds and coal zones that could potentially provide the fuel for the Nation's coal-derived energy during the first quarter of the twenty-first century. For purposes of the NCRA study, the Nation is divided into regions. Teams of geoscientists, knowledgeable about each region, are developing the data bases and assessing the coal within each region. The five major coal-producing regions of the United States under investigation are: (1) the Appalachian Basin; (2) the Illinois Basin; (3) the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain; (4) the Powder River Basin and the Northern Great Plains; and (5) the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado Plateau. Six areas containing coal deposits in the Rocky Mountain and Colorado Plateau Region have been designated as high priority because of their potential for development. This report on the coal resources of the Kaiparowits Plateau is the first of the six to be completed. The coal quantities reported in this study are entirely 'resources' and represent, as accurately as the data allow, all the coal in the ground in beds greater than one foot thick. These resources are qualified and subdivided by thickness of coal beds, depth to the coal, distance from known data points, and inclination (dip) of the beds. The USGS has not attempted to estimate coal 'reserves' for this region. Reserves are that subset of the resource that could be economically produced at the present time. The coal resources are differentiated into 'identified' and 'hypothetical' following the standard classification system of the USGS (Wood and others, 1983). Identified resources are those within three miles of a measured thickness value, and hypothetical resources are further than three miles from a data point. Coal beds in the Kaiparowits

  2. Tying rock properties from core to depositional processes and examining the relationship through forward seismic reflection modeling in the Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworsky, Karenth

    Nearshore fluvial to tidal transitional depositional systems are becoming increasingly important due to the large number of global hydrocarbon reserves held in such deposits. These deposits are inherently complex due to their heterolithic nature and therefore, interpreting facies and facies relationships in seismic reflection profiles is problematic. The fluvial and tidally influenced nearshore deposits of the late Cretaceous John Henry Member (JHM) of the Straight Cliffs Formation, located in the Kaiparowits Plateau of southern Utah, offers an excellent opportunity to improve our understanding of how the fluvial to tidal transition impacts subsurface petroleum reservoirs and their expression in seismic reflection profiles. The focus of the first chapter is to investigate the impact of heterogeneous depositional environments and their rock properties to model amplitude versus offset (AVO) using a single core. Core EP-25 exhibits lithofacies from a progradational succession, from shoreface through tidal to fluvial. In order to model the most likely lithofacies stacking patterns present in the core, Markov Chain analysis was conducted. Benchtop measurements performed on 1 inch core plugs obtained rock properties (Vp, Vs, density, permeability, and porosity) for each lithofacies. Average rock properties for each lithofacies were used to generate synthetic seismic reflection models of the different upward fining facies associations documented directly from the core, in order to model variations in amplitude versus offset responses as a function of variable tidal influence. The focus of the second chapter is to capture probable 3-dimensional geobody distributions with a particular focus on coal geobody distribution using previously studied cores and outcrops on the plateau. Three different seismic forward models were created ranging in complexity, using cores EP-25, EP-07, density logs, and the nearby outcrop study Left Hand Collet. The rock properties obtained from the

  3. Landform map of the Kaiparowits Coal-Basin area, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, K.A.; Hansen, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A 1:125,000 scale map of the Kaiparowits Coal-Basin area of Utah is presented. The map portrays the shape and erosional resistance of and features, and it is intended to be a modified slope-analysis map for use by planners in their identification of areas suitable for transportation routes and construction sites. Depositional landforms such as alluvial flats, stream courses, dune fields, and alluviated pediments are shown, and a stratigraphic section of the rocks in the area is provided. (JMT)

  4. Cretaceous sedimentation and tectonism in the southeastern Kaiparowits region, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Fred

    1969-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous strata in the southeastern Kaiparowits region of south-central Utah consist of approximately 3,500 feet of interfingering sandstone, mudstone, shale, and coal in the Dakota Formation (oldest), Tropic Shale, Straight Cliffs Formation, and Wahweap Formation (youngest). The formations consist of several depositional facies that can be recognized by characteristic lithologies bedding structures, and fossils; these are the alluvial plain, deltaic plain, lagoonal-paludal, barrier sandstone, and offshore marine facies. The distribution of facies clearly defines the paleogeography of the region during several cycles of marine transgression and regression. The nonmarine beds were deposited on a broad alluvial coastal plain that was bordered on the west and southwest by highlands and on the east and northeast by the Western Interior seaway. The marine beds were deposited whenever the seaway advanced into or across the region. The Dakota Formation and the lower part of the Tropic Shale were deposited in nonmarine and marine environments, while the shoreline advanced generally westward across the region. The middle and upper part of the Tropic Shale and the Tibbet Canyon and Smoky Hollow Members of the Straight Cliffs Formation were deposited in marine and nonmarine environments when the seaway had reached its greatest areal extent and began a gradual northeastward withdrawal. An unconformity at the top of the Smoky Hollow represents a period of erosion and possibly nondeposition before deposition of the John Henry Member of the Straight Cliffs. The John Henry Member grades from nonmarine in the southwest to predominantly marine in the northeast, and was deposited during two relatively minor cycles of transgression and regression. The Drip Tank Member at the top of the Straight Cliffs Formation is a widespread sandstone unit deposited mainly in fluvial environments. Some of the beds in the northeastern part of the region were probably deposited in marine

  5. Facies architecture and depositional environments of the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Eric M.

    2007-04-01

    The Kaiparowits Formation is an unusually thick package of Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian) strata exposed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument of southern Utah, USA. The formation was deposited within the rapidly subsiding Cordilleran foreland basin as part of a thick clastic wedge derived from sources in the Sevier orogenic belt, thrust sheets in southeastern Nevada and southern California, and the Mogollon slope in southwestern Arizona. Channel systems in the Kaiparowits Formation shifted from northeastward to southeastward flow over time, and for a short period of time, sea level rise in the Western Interior Seaway resulted in tidally influenced rivers and/or estuarine systems. Thick floodbasin pond deposits, large suspended-load channels, and poorly developed, hydromorphic paleosols dominate the sedimentary record, and all are suggestive of a relatively wet, subhumid alluvial system. This is supported by extremely rapid sediment accumulation rates (41 cm/ka), and high diversity and abundance of aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. Facies and architectural analysis was performed on the Kaiparowits Formation, resulting in the identification of nine distinct facies associations: 1) intraformational conglomerate, 2) mollusc-shell conglomerate, 3) major tabular sandstone, 4) major lenticular sandstone, 5) minor tabular and lenticular sandstone, 6) finely laminated, calcareous siltstone, 7) inclined heterolithic sandstone and mudstone, 8) sandy mudstone, and 9) carbonaceous mudstone. These facies associations are interpreted as: 1) channel lags, 2) rare channel-hosted storm beds, 3) meandering channels, 4) anastomosing channels, 5) crevasse splays and crevasse channels, 6) lakes, 7) tidally influenced fluvial and/or estuarine channels, 8) mud-dominated floodplains, and 9) swamps and oxbow lakes. Based on this analysis, the formation is subdivided into three informal units, representative of gross changes in alluvial architecture, including facies

  6. Environmental geologic studies of the Kaiparowits coal-basin area, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Kaiparowits coal-basin area may contain as much as 20 billion tons of coal; it is a major coal-resource area and a potentially important energy supply area for the southwestern United States. However, the economic development of this coal could constitute a possible threat to the great natural beauty of the area. The impact caused by an attendant increase in population would be great. The US Geological Survey in 1975 started a series of studies of the Kaiparowits coal-basin area. The results of these studies are now being published as a folio consisting of 12 earth-resource maps showing hydrology, bedrock and surficial geology, coal resources, landslides, landforms, and scenic features related to geology. These maps are designed to help land-use planners and land developers make intelligent decisions on the most desirable use of this rich and beautiful land. 50 refs., 23 figs.

  7. Hydrogeology of the Markagunt Plateau, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2010-01-01

    The Markagunt Plateau, in southwestern Utah, lies at an altitude of about 9,500 feet and is capped primarily by Quaternary-age basalt that overlies Eocene-age freshwater limestone of the Claron Formation. Over large parts of the Markagunt Plateau, dissolution of the Claron limestone and subsequent collapse of the overlying basalt have produced a terrain characterized by sinkholes as much as 1,000 feet across and 100 feet deep. Numerous large springs discharge from the basalt and underlying limestone on the plateau, including Mammoth Spring, one of the largest springs in Utah, with a discharge that can exceed 300 cubic feet per second. Discharge from Mammoth Spring is from the Claron Formation; however, recharge to the spring largely takes place by both focused and diffuse infiltration through the basalt that caps the limestone. Results of dye tracing to Mammoth Spring indicate that recharge originates largely southwest of the spring outside of the Mammoth Creek watershed, as well as from losing reaches along Mammoth Creek. Maximum groundwater travel time to the spring from dye-tracer tests during the snowmelt runoff period was about 1 week. Specific conductance and water temperature data from the spring show an inverse relation to discharge during snowmelt runoff and rainfall events, also indicating short groundwater residence times. Results of major-ion analyses for samples collected from Mammoth and other springs on the plateau indicate calcium-bicarbonate type water containing low (less than 200 mg/L) dissolved-solids concentrations. Investigations in the Navajo Lake area along the southern margin of the plateau have shown that water losing to sinkholes bifurcates and discharges to both Cascade and Duck Creek Springs, which subsequently flow into the Virgin and Sevier River basins, respectively. Groundwater travel times to these springs, on the basis of dye tracing, were about 8.5 and 53 hours, respectively. Similarly, groundwater travel time from Duck Creek

  8. Geologic map of the Kanab 30' x 60' quadrangle, Utah and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sable, E.G.; Hereford, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The 1:100,000-scale geologic map of the sparsely populated Kanab 30' x 60' quadrangle in southernmost Utah and a narrow strip in northernmost Arizona delineates 17 formations and numerous subdivisions of sedimentary rock units of Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary ages; 12 Quaternary alluvial, eolian, and mass-wasting units; and Quaternary basaltic igneous rocks and vents.Units within the Straight Cliffs Formation are correlated with those of the Kaiparowits Plateau. Palynological edidence indicates that the Kaiparowits(?) Formation is older than the type formation in the Kaiparowits Plateau. Structures include parts of the Sevier, Kanab Creek, Johnson Canyon, and Paunsaugunt fault zones. Regional dip is generally northeast at very low angles. Coal beds are presentin the upper unit of the Straight Cliffs Formation, in the Tropic Shale, and in the Dakota Formation.

  9. Evidence for high taxonomic and morphologic tyrannosauroid diversity in the Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian) of the American Southwest and a new short-skulled tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits formation of Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Thomas D.; Williamson, Thomas E.; Britt, Brooks B.; Stadtman, Ken

    2011-03-01

    The fossil record of late Campanian tyrannosauroids of western North America has a geographic gap between the Northern Rocky Mountain Region (Montana, Alberta) and the Southwest (New Mexico, Utah). Until recently, diagnostic tyrannosauroids from the Southwest were unknown until the discovery of Bistahieversor sealeyi from the late Campanian of New Mexico. Here we describe an incomplete skull and postcranial skeleton of an unusual tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits Formation (Late Cretaceous) of Utah that represents a new genus and species, Teratophoneus curriei. Teratophoneus differs from other tyrannosauroids in having a short skull, as indicated by a short and steep maxilla, abrupt angle in the postorbital process of the jugal, laterally oriented paroccipital processes, short basicranium, and reduced number of teeth. Teratophoneus is the sister taxon of the Daspletosaurus + Tyrannosaurus clade and it is the most basal North American tyrannosaurine. The presence of Teratophoneus suggests that dinosaur faunas were regionally endemic in the west during the upper Campanian. The divergence in skull form seen in tyrannosaurines indicates that the skull in this clade had a wide range of adaptive morphotypes.

  10. Evidence for high taxonomic and morphologic tyrannosauroid diversity in the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian) of the American Southwest and a new short-skulled tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits Formation of Utah.

    PubMed

    Carr, Thomas D; Williamson, Thomas E; Britt, Brooks B; Stadtman, Ken

    2011-03-01

    The fossil record of late Campanian tyrannosauroids of western North America has a geographic gap between the Northern Rocky Mountain Region (Montana, Alberta) and the Southwest (New Mexico, Utah). Until recently, diagnostic tyrannosauroids from the Southwest were unknown until the discovery of Bistahieversor sealeyi from the late Campanian of New Mexico. Here we describe an incomplete skull and postcranial skeleton of an unusual tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits Formation (Late Cretaceous) of Utah that represents a new genus and species, Teratophoneus curriei. Teratophoneus differs from other tyrannosauroids in having a short skull, as indicated by a short and steep maxilla, abrupt angle in the postorbital process of the jugal, laterally oriented paroccipital processes, short basicranium, and reduced number of teeth. Teratophoneus is the sister taxon of the Daspletosaurus + Tyrannosaurus clade and it is the most basal North American tyrannosaurine. The presence of Teratophoneus suggests that dinosaur faunas were regionally endemic in the west during the upper Campanian. The divergence in skull form seen in tyrannosaurines indicates that the skull in this clade had a wide range of adaptive morphotypes.

  11. Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    With its myriad of canyons, unusual rock formations and ancient lakebeds, Utah is a geologist's playground. This true-color image of Utah was acquired on June 20, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The dark aquamarine feature in the northern part of the state is the Great Salt Lake. Fourteen thousand years ago, the Great Salt Lake was part of Lake Bonneville, which covered much of northern and western Utah. The extent of the lakebed can be seen in light tan covering much of northern and western Utah and extending into Idaho. (Click for more details on the history of Lake Bonneville.) Other remnants of Lake Bonneville include the Great Salt Lake Desert (the white expanse to the left of the Great Salt Lake) and Lake Utah (the lake to the south of Salt Lake City). The white color of the Great Salt Lake Desert is due to the mineral deposits left by Lake Bonneville as it drained out into the Snake River and then proceeded to dry up. The dark bands running through the center and northeastern part of the state are the western edge of the Rockies. The dark color is likely due to the coniferous vegetation that grows along the range. The tallest mountains in the Utah Rockies are the Uinta Mountains, which can be seen in the northeastern corner of the state bordering Colorado and Wyoming. The white fishbone pattern in the center of the Uinta Mountains is snow that hadn't yet melted. To the southeast, one can see the reddish-orange rocks of the northernmost section of the Colorado Plateau. Utah's well-known desert attractions, including Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Glen Canyon, are located in this region. The long, narrow lake is Lake Powell, created after the construction of Glen Canyon Dam in the 1950s. Image courtesy NASA MODIS Science Team

  12. Discriminating Mining Induced Seismicity from Natural Tectonic Earthquakes in the Wasatch Plateau Region of Central Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, J. R.; Pankow, K. L.; Koper, K. D.; McCarter, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    On average, several hundred earthquakes are located each year within the Wasatch Plateau region of central Utah. This region includes the boundary between the relatively stable Colorado Plateau and the actively extending Basin and Range physiographic provinces. Earthquakes in this region tend to fall in the intermountain seismic belt (ISB), a continuous band of seismicity that extends from Montana to Arizona. While most of the earthquakes in the ISB are of tectonic origin, events in the Wasatch Plateau also include mining induced seismicity (MIS) from local underground coal mining operations. Using a catalog of 16,182 seismic events (-0.25 < M < 4.5) recorded from 1981 to 2011, we use double difference relocation and waveform cross correlation techniques to help discriminate between these two populations of events. Double difference relocation greatly improves the relative locations between the many events that occur in this area. From the relative relocations, spatial differences between event types are used to differentiate between shallow MIS and considerably deeper events associated with tectonic seismicity. Additionally, waveform cross-correlation is used to cluster events with similar waveforms—meaning that events in each cluster should have a similar source location and mechanism—in order to more finely group seismic events occurring in the Wasatch Plateau. The results of this study provide both an increased understanding of the influence mining induced seismicity has on the number of earthquakes detected within this region, as well as better constraints on the deeper tectonic structure.

  13. Selected coal-related ground-water data, Wasatch Plateau-Book Cliffs area, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumsion, C.T.

    1979-01-01

    The Wasatch Plateau-Book Cliffs area in east-central Utah consists of about 8,000 square miles within the upper Colorado River drainage system. Coal production in the area is expected to increase from 8 million tons to as much as 30 million tons annually within the next 10 years. Most sources of water supply will be subjected to possible contamination and increased demands by coal-related municipal and industrial growth in the area. The report presents a compilation of coal-related ground-water data from many unpublished sources for the use of local and regional water planners and users. The report includes generalized stratigraphic sections and hydrologic characteristics of rocks in the Wasatch Plateau-Book Cliffs area , records of selected test holes and water wells, logs of selected test holes and water wells, water levels in selected wells, records of selected springs, records of ground-water discharge from selected mines, and chemical analyses of water from selected test holes, water wells, springs, and mines. (Kosco-USGS)

  14. Anastomosing grabens, low-angle faults, and Tertiary thrust( ) faults, western Markagunt Plateau, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, F.; Sable, E.G. )

    1993-04-01

    A structurally complex terrane composed of grabens and horsts, low-angle faults, Tertiary thrust( ) faults, gravity-slide blocks, and debris deposits has been mapped along the western Markagunt Plateau, east of Parowan and Summit, southwestern Utah. This terrane, structurally situated within the transition between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau provinces, contains Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The structures are mostly Miocene to Oligocene but some are Pleistocene. The oldest structure is the Red Hills low-angle shear zone, interpreted as a shallow structure that decoupled an upper plate composed of a Miocene-Oligocene volcanic ash-flow tuff and volcaniclastic succession from a lower plate of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The period of deformation on the shear zone is bracketed from field relationships between 22.5 and 20 Ma. The graben-horst system trends northeast and formed after about 20 Ma (and probably much later) based on displacement of dated dikes and a laccolith. The central part of the system contains many grabens that merge toward its southerly end to become a single graben. Within these grabens, (1) older structures are preserved, (2) debris eroded from horst walls forms lobe-shaped deposits, (3) Pleistocene basaltic cinder cones have localized along graben-bounding faults, and (4) rock units are locally folded suggesting some component of lateral translation along graben-bounding faults. Megabreccia deposits and landslide debris are common. Megabreccia deposits are interpreted as gravity-slide blocks of Miocene-Oligocene( ) age resulting from formation of the Red Hills shear zone, although some may be related to volcanism, and still others to later deformation. The debris deposits are landslides of Pleistocene-Pliocene( ) age possibly caused by continued uplift of the Markagunt Plateau.

  15. Hydrologic reconnaissance of the Wasatch Plateau-Book Cliffs coal-fields area, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddell, Kidd M.; Contratto, P. Kay; Sumsion, C.T.; Butler, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Data obtained during a hydrologic reconnaissance in 1975-77 in the Wasatch Plateau-Book Cliffs coal-fields area of Utah were correlated with existing long-term data. Maps were prepared showing average precipitation, average streamflow, stream temperature, ground- and surface-water quality, sediment yield, and geology. Recommendations were made for additional study and suggested approaches for continued monitoring in the coalfields areas. During the 1931-75 water years, the minimum discharges for the five major streams that head in the area ranged from about 12,000 to 26,000 acre-feet per year, and the maximum discharges ranged from about 59,000 to 315,000 acre-feet per year. Correlations indicate that 3 years of low-flow records at stream sites in the Wasatch Plateau would allow the development of relationships with long-term sites that can be used to estimate future low-flow records within a standard error of about 20 percent. Most water-quality degradation in streams occurs along the flanks of the Wasatch Plateau and Book Cliffs. In the uplands, dissolved-solids concentrations generally ranged from less than 100 to about 250 milligrams per liter, and in the lowlands, the concentrations ranged from about 250 to more than 6,000 milligrams per liter. Most springs in the Wasatch Plateau and Book Cliffs discharge from the Star Point Sandstone or younger formations, and the water generally contains less than about 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. The discharges of 65 springs ranged from about 0.2 to 200 gallons per minute. The Blackhawk Formation, which is the principal coal-bearing formation, produces water in many of the mines. The dissolved-solids concentration in water discharging from springs and mines in the Blackhawk ranged from about 60 to 800 milligrams per liter. In the lowland areas, the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Maneos Shale appears to have the most potential for subsurface development of water of suitable chemical quality for human

  16. Simulation of reactive transport of injected CO2 on the Colorado Plateau, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, S.P.; Allis, R.G.; Moore, J.; Chidsey, T.; Morgan, C.; Gwynn, W.; Adams, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates injection of CO2 into non-dome-shaped geological structures that do not provide the traps traditionally deemed necessary for the development of artificial CO2 reservoirs. We have developed a conceptual and two numerical models of the geology and groundwater along a cross-section lying approximately NW-SE and in the vicinity of the Hunter power station on the Colorado Plateau, Central Utah and identified a number of potential sequestration sites on this cross-section. Preliminary modeling identified the White Rim Sandstone as appearing to offer the properties required of a successful sequestration site. Detailed modeling of injection of CO2 into the White Rim Sandstone using the reactive chemical simulator ChemTOUGH found that 1000 years after the 30 year injection period began approximately 21% of the injected CO2 was permanently sequestered as a mineral, 52% was beneath the ground surface as a gas or dissolved in the groundwater and 17% had leaked to the surface and leakage to the surface was continuing. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Niche Filtering of Bacteria in Soil and Rock Habitats of the Colorado Plateau Desert, Utah, USA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kevin C.; Archer, Stephen D. J.; Boyle, Rachel H.; Lacap-Bugler, Donnabella C.; Belnap, Jayne; Pointing, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    A common feature of microbial colonization in deserts is biological soil crusts (BSCs), and these comprise a complex community dominated by Cyanobacteria. Rock substrates, particularly sandstone, are also colonized by microbial communities. These are separated by bare sandy soil that also supports microbial colonization. Here we report a high-throughput sequencing study of BSC and cryptoendolith plus adjacent bare soil communities in the Colorado Plateau Desert, Utah, USA. Bare soils supported a community with low levels of recoverable DNA and high evenness, whilst BSC yielded relatively high recoverable DNA, and reduced evenness compared to bare soil due to specialized crust taxa. The cryptoendolithic community displayed the greatest evenness but the lowest diversity, reflecting the highly specialized nature of these communities. A strong substrate-dependent pattern of community assembly was observed, and in particular cyanobacterial taxa were distinct. Soils were virtually devoid of photoautotrophic signatures, BSC was dominated by a closely related group of Microcoleus/Phormidium taxa, whilst cryptoendolithic colonization in sandstone supported almost exclusively a single genus, Chroococcidiopsis. We interpret this as strong evidence for niche filtering of taxa in communities. Local inter-niche recruitment of photoautotrophs may therefore be limited and so communities likely depend significantly on cyanobacterial recruitment from distant sources of similar substrate. We discuss the implication of this finding in terms of conservation and management of desert microbiota. PMID:27725810

  18. A bimillennial-length tree-ring reconstruction of precipitation for the Tavaputs Plateau, Northeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Troy A.; Meko, David M.; Baisan, Christopher H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the extensive network of moisture-sensitive tree-ring chronologies in western North America, relatively few are long enough to document climatic variability before and during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) ca. AD 800-1300. We developed a 2300-yr tree-ring chronology extending to 323 BC utilizing live and remnant Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) from the Tavaputs Plateau in northeastern Utah. A resulting regression model accounts for 70% of the variance of precipitation for the AD 1918-2005 calibration period. Extreme wet and dry periods without modern analogues were identified in the reconstruction. The MCA is marked by several prolonged droughts, especially prominent in the mid AD 1100s and late 1200s, and a lack of wet or dry single-year extremes. The frequency of extended droughts is not markedly different, however, than before or after the MCA. A drought in the early AD 500s surpasses in magnitude any other drought during the last 1800 yr. A set of four long high-resolution records suggests this drought decreased in severity toward the south in the western United States. The spatial pattern is consistent with the western dipole of moisture anomaly driven by El Niño and is also similar to the spatial footprint of the AD 1930s "Dust Bowl" drought.

  19. Hydrology of coal-resource areas in the southern Wasatch Plateau, central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danielson, T.W.; Sylla, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The study defines the surface and groundwater hydrology of coal-resources areas in the Southern Wasatch Plateau in Central Utah and, where possible, predicts the hydrologic impacts of underground mining. Discharge data at four streamflow gaging stations indicated that from 5 to 29% of the average annual precipitation on a drainage runs off streams, mainly during the snowmelt period (spring and summer). Most of the base flow of streams originates as spring discharge in the higher altitudes of drainages. Peak flows, average 7-day flood flows, and flood depths were related to basin characteristics in order to develop flood equations for ungaged sites. Chemical quality of surface water was suitable for most uses. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 97 to 835 milligrams per liter in 61 samples collected throughout the area. Data from wells and coal-test holes, and a comprehensive spring inventory indicate that groundwater occurs in all geologic units exposed in the study area. The coal-bearing Blackhawk Formation and underlying Star Point Sandstone are saturated in most areas. Some future mining operations would require dewatering of the Star Point-Blackhawk aquifer. Most of the springs issue from the Flagstaff Limestone and North Horn Formation above the Star Point-Blackhawk aquifer. It is not known whether water in the Flagstaff and North Horn is perched. Dissolved-solids concentrations in groundwater ranged from 105 to 1,080 milligrams per liter in 87 analyzed samples. Water levels in wells, the discharge of springs, benthic invertebrates in streams, and quantity and quality of mine effluents all need to be monitored in order to detect changes in the hydrologic system caused by coal mining. (USGS)

  20. Formation of Potholes by Surficial and Endolithic Bacteria on the Colorado Plateau Near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, K.; Southam, G.

    2004-05-01

    The area of the Colorado Plateau near Moab, Utah is home to an ecosystem delicately balanced on a substrate of Triassic and Jurassic aeolian sandstones with little to no soil. Any surface feature in which the limited precipitation can be captured helps sustain the desert life in this semi-arid environment. Naturally occurring "potholes" fulfill this function in certain sandstone surfaces. Potholes range in size from shallow depressions to large swimming-pool sized features that can retain water throughout most of the year. In this study we focused on circular potholes that showed no indication of joint control, and held 5 to 9 gallons of water. Their formation is controlled by three types of bacterial growth: 1)black biofilms that line each pothole, 2)bacteria in the accumulated bottom sediments of the potholes and 3)the ubiquitous cryptoendolithic cyanobacterial communities found centimetres beneath the surface of the host sandstone. On-site and in-lab water testing were conducted during the dry season with de-ionized water to quantify the of ion concentrations extracted from the rock as an estimate of the overall bacterial activity and to determine what in the arenitic quartz sandstones is providing sustenance to these communities. ICP-MS showed elevated Ca++ (up to 14 mg/L) and Si++ (up to 2 mg/L) ion concentrations indicating that the calcite cement as well as the quartz grains are being dissolved. Daily fluctuations in phosphate levels were also observed which correlate with on-site water monitoring that showed pronounced diurnal cycling of pH values, between pH 8 and 10, indicating biological activity. Further exploration was conducted using SEM studies identified thick biofilms coating the sandstone surface as well as large fungal populations. The electron microprobe was used to determine distributions of ions in feldspar grains across the grain profile in areas exposed to the biofilms to determine if any local leaching had occurred. Our investigations show

  1. Land and federal mineral ownership coverage for the Uinta Basin, Wasatch Plateau and surrounding areas, northeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, L.H.; Green, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    This Arc/Info coverage contains land status and Federal and State mineral ownership for approximately 25,900 square miles in northeastern Utah. The polygon coverage (which is also provided here as a shapefile) contains three attributes of ownership information for each polygon. One attribute indicates whether the surface is State owned, privately owned, consists of Tribal and Indian lands, or, if Federally owned, which Federal agency manages the land surface. Another attribute indicates where the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) maintains full or partial subsurface mineral rights. The third attribute indicates which energy minerals, if any, are owned by the Federal govenment. This coverage is based on land management status and Federal and State mineral ownership data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the former U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM), and the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration at a scale of 1:100,000. This coverage was compiled primarily to serve the USGS National Oil and Gas Resource Assessment Project in the Uinta-Piceance Basin Province and the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment Project in the Colorado Plateau.

  2. Survey of literature relating to energy development in Utah's Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, A.

    1980-06-01

    This study examines various energy resources in Utah including oil impregnated rocks (oil shale and oil sand deposits), geothermal, coal, uranium, oil and natural gas in terms of the following dimensions: resurce potential and location; resource technology, development and production status; resource development requirements; potential environmental and socio-economic impacts; and transportation tradeoffs. The advantages of minemouth power plants in comparison to combined cycle or hybrid power plants are also examined. Annotative bibliographies of the energy resources are presented in the appendices. Specific topics summarized in these annotative bibliographies include: economics, environmental impacts, water requirements, production technology, and siting requirements.

  3. Potential impacts to perennial springs from tar sand mining, processing, and disposal on the Tavaputs Plateau, Utah, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William P; Frederick, Logan E; Millington, Mallory R; Vala, David; Reese, Barbara K; Freedman, Dina R; Stenten, Christina J; Trauscht, Jacob S; Tingey, Christopher E; Kip Solomon, D; Fernandez, Diego P; Bowen, Gabriel J

    2015-11-01

    Similar to fracking, the development of tar sand mining in the U.S. has moved faster than understanding of potential water quality impacts. Potential water quality impacts of tar sand mining, processing, and disposal to springs in canyons incised approximately 200 m into the Tavaputs Plateau, at the Uinta Basin southern rim, Utah, USA, were evaluated by hydrogeochemical sampling to determine potential sources of recharge, and chemical thermodynamic estimations to determine potential changes in transfer of bitumen compounds to water. Because the ridgetops in an area of the Tavaputs Plateau named PR Spring are starting to be developed for their tar sand resource, there is concern for potential hydrologic connection between these ridgetops and perennial springs in adjacent canyons on which depend ranching families, livestock, wildlife and recreationalists. Samples were collected from perennial springs to examine possible progression with elevation of parameters such as temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, isotopic tracers of phase change, water-rock interaction, and age since recharge. The groundwater age dates indicate that the springs are recharged locally. The progression of hydrogeochemical parameters with elevation, in combination with the relatively short groundwater residence times, indicate that the recharge zone for these springs includes the surrounding ridges, and thereby suggests a hydrologic connection between the mining, processing, disposal area and the springs. Estimations based on chemical thermodynamic approaches indicate that bitumen compounds will have greatly enhanced solubility in water that comes into contact with the residual bitumen-solvent mixture in disposed tailings relative to water that currently comes into contact with natural tar. PMID:26057623

  4. Potential impacts to perennial springs from tar sand mining, processing, and disposal on the Tavaputs Plateau, Utah, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William P; Frederick, Logan E; Millington, Mallory R; Vala, David; Reese, Barbara K; Freedman, Dina R; Stenten, Christina J; Trauscht, Jacob S; Tingey, Christopher E; Kip Solomon, D; Fernandez, Diego P; Bowen, Gabriel J

    2015-11-01

    Similar to fracking, the development of tar sand mining in the U.S. has moved faster than understanding of potential water quality impacts. Potential water quality impacts of tar sand mining, processing, and disposal to springs in canyons incised approximately 200 m into the Tavaputs Plateau, at the Uinta Basin southern rim, Utah, USA, were evaluated by hydrogeochemical sampling to determine potential sources of recharge, and chemical thermodynamic estimations to determine potential changes in transfer of bitumen compounds to water. Because the ridgetops in an area of the Tavaputs Plateau named PR Spring are starting to be developed for their tar sand resource, there is concern for potential hydrologic connection between these ridgetops and perennial springs in adjacent canyons on which depend ranching families, livestock, wildlife and recreationalists. Samples were collected from perennial springs to examine possible progression with elevation of parameters such as temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, isotopic tracers of phase change, water-rock interaction, and age since recharge. The groundwater age dates indicate that the springs are recharged locally. The progression of hydrogeochemical parameters with elevation, in combination with the relatively short groundwater residence times, indicate that the recharge zone for these springs includes the surrounding ridges, and thereby suggests a hydrologic connection between the mining, processing, disposal area and the springs. Estimations based on chemical thermodynamic approaches indicate that bitumen compounds will have greatly enhanced solubility in water that comes into contact with the residual bitumen-solvent mixture in disposed tailings relative to water that currently comes into contact with natural tar.

  5. Evaluation of undiscovered natural gas in the Upper Cretaceous Ferron Coal/Wasatch Plateau Total Petroleum System, Wasatch Plateau and Castle Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, M.E.; Finn, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Total Petroleum System approach was used to estimate undiscovered gas potential of the Wasatch Plateau and Castle Valley, central Utah. The Ferron Coal/Wasatch Plateau Total Petroleum System was geologically defined and subdivided into seven assessment units, six of which were formally evaluated. Geologic data considered in defining the assessment unit boundaries included thermal maturity, coal presence and thickness, overburden thickness, and faulting intensity. Historical production data were also used to estimate volumes of gas from undrilled areas. The one conventional assessment unit includes almost the entire area of the petroleum system and is characterized by known accumulations that occur in structural or combination traps in sandstone reservoirs. The estimated undiscovered conventional producible gas that may be added to reserves of this unit ranges from a low (F95) of 14.8 billion cubic feet (BCFG) [419 million cubic meters (Mm3)] of gas to a high (F5) of 82 BCFG [2321 Mm3] and a mean value of 39.9 BCFG [1130 Mm3]. Continuous gas accumulations are those in which the entire assessment unit is considered to be gas-charged. Within these assessment units, there may be wells drilled that are not economic successes but all are expected to contain gas. Coalbed gas is in this continuous category. Mean estimates of undiscovered gas for the five continuous assessment units are: (1) Northern Coal Fairway/Drunkards Wash-752.3 BCFG [21,323 Mm3]; (2) Central Coal Fairway/Buzzard Bench-536.7 BCFG [15,194 Mm3]; (3) Southern Coal Fairway-152.6 BCFG [4320 Mm3]; (4) Deep (6000 feet plus) Coal and Sandstone-59.1 BCFG [1673 Mm3]; (5) Southern Coal Outcrop-10.6 BCFG [300 Mm3]; and Joes Valley and Musinia Grabens-not assessed.The mean estimate of undiscovered gas for the entire TPS is 1551.2 BCFG [43,914 Mm3]. There is a 95% chance that at least 855.7 BCFG [24,225 Mm3] and a 5% chance that at least 2504 BCFG [70,888 Mm3] of undiscovered producible gas remain in the TPS

  6. Rock formations in the Colorado Plateau of Southeastern Utah and Northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longwell, C.R.; Miser, H.D.; Moore, R.C.; Bryan, Kirk; Paige, Sidney

    1925-01-01

    The field work of which this report is a record was done in the summer and fall of 1921 by members of the United States Geological Survey. A project to build a large storage dam at Lees Ferry, on Colorado River in northern Arizona, called for a detailed topographic survey of the area covered by the project, for the purpose of determining the capacity of the reservoir. This work was undertaken by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southern California Edison Co. Three surveying parties were sent to the field, each accompanied by a geologist, whose specific duty was to study and report on the rock formations within the area to be flooded. One topographic party, under A. T. Fowler, which started at Lees Ferry and worked up stream in Arizona, was accompanied by Kirk Bryan. Another party, under K. W. Trimble, which started near Bluff and worked down the San Juan and thence down the Colorado, was accompanied by H. D. Miser. The third party, under W. R. Chenoweth, worked from Fremont River to the Waterpocket Fold and then returned to Green River, Utah, and traversed Cataract Canyon during the period of low water. C. R. Longwell was with this party until September, when his place was taken by Sidney Paige. Mr. Paige, in company with the Kolb brothers, E. C. La Rue, and Henry Ranch, left the Chenoweth party after Cataract Canyon had been surveyed and rowed down the Colorado to the mouth of the San Juan, where they were joined by Mr. Miser. Then they took a hurried trip by boat down the Colorado to Lees Ferry, making a few short stops and visiting the famous Rainbow Bridge. Thus the geology of the canyons of Colorado and San Juan rivers and of the lower parts of tributary canyons was examined continuously, and reconnaissance work was done in the country back from the rivers. At the same time a fourth party, under R. C. Moore, was mapping parts of Kane, Garfield, and Wayne counties, Utah, to determine whether oil might be found there. The present paper

  7. Hydrogeology of the Mammoth Spring groundwater basin and vicinity, Markagunt Plateau, Garfield, Iron, and Kane Counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2012-01-01

    The Markagunt Plateau, in southwestern Utah, lies at an altitude of about 9,500 feet, largely within Dixie National Forest. The plateau is capped primarily by Tertiary- and Quaternary-age volcanic rocks that overlie Paleocene- to Eocene-age limestone of the Claron Formation, which forms escarpments on the west and south sides of the plateau. In the southwestern part of the plateau, an extensive area of sinkholes has formed that resulted primarily from dissolution of the underlying limestone and subsequent subsidence and (or) collapse of the basalt, producing sinkholes as large as 1,000 feet across and 100 feet deep. Karst development in the Claron Formation likely has been enhanced by high infiltration rates through the basalt. Numerous large springs discharge from the volcanic rocks and underlying limestone on the Markagunt Plateau, including Mammoth Spring, one of the largest in Utah, with discharge that ranges from less than 5 to more than 300 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). In 2007, daily mean peak discharge of Mammoth Spring was bimodal, reaching 54 and 56 ft3/s, while daily mean peak discharge of the spring in 2008 and in 2009 was 199 ft3/s and 224 ft3/s, respectively. In both years, the rise from baseflow, about 6 ft3/s, to peak flow occurred over a 4- to 5-week period. Discharge from Mammoth Spring accounted for about 54 percent of the total peak streamflow in Mammoth Creek in 2007 and 2008, and about 46 percent in 2009, and accounted for most of the total streamflow during the remainder of the year. Results of major-ion analyses for water samples collected from Mammoth and other springs on the plateau during 2006 to 2009 indicated calcium-bicarbonate type water, which contained dissolved-solids concentrations that ranged from 91 to 229 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of major ions, trace elements, and nutrients did not exceed primary or secondary drinking-water standards; however, total and fecal coliform bacteria were present in water from Mammoth and

  8. Hydrogeology of the Mammoth Spring groundwater basin and vicinity, Markagunt Plateau, Garfield, Iron, and Kane Counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2012-01-01

    The Markagunt Plateau, in southwestern Utah, lies at an altitude of about 9,500 feet, largely within Dixie National Forest. The plateau is capped primarily by Tertiary- and Quaternary-age volcanic rocks that overlie Paleocene- to Eocene-age limestone of the Claron Formation, which forms escarpments on the west and south sides of the plateau. In the southwestern part of the plateau, an extensive area of sinkholes has formed that resulted primarily from dissolution of the underlying limestone and subsequent subsidence and (or) collapse of the basalt, producing sinkholes as large as 1,000 feet across and 100 feet deep. Karst development in the Claron Formation likely has been enhanced by high infiltration rates through the basalt. Numerous large springs discharge from the volcanic rocks and underlying limestone on the Markagunt Plateau, including Mammoth Spring, one of the largest in Utah, with discharge that ranges from less than 5 to more than 300 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). In 2007, daily mean peak discharge of Mammoth Spring was bimodal, reaching 54 and 56 ft3/s, while daily mean peak discharge of the spring in 2008 and in 2009 was 199 ft3/s and 224 ft3/s, respectively. In both years, the rise from baseflow, about 6 ft3/s, to peak flow occurred over a 4- to 5-week period. Discharge from Mammoth Spring accounted for about 54 percent of the total peak streamflow in Mammoth Creek in 2007 and 2008, and about 46 percent in 2009, and accounted for most of the total streamflow during the remainder of the year. Results of major-ion analyses for water samples collected from Mammoth and other springs on the plateau during 2006 to 2009 indicated calcium-bicarbonate type water, which contained dissolved-solids concentrations that ranged from 91 to 229 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of major ions, trace elements, and nutrients did not exceed primary or secondary drinking-water standards; however, total and fecal coliform bacteria were present in water from Mammoth and

  9. Fish Lake, Utah - a promising long core site straddling the Great Basin to Colorado Plateau transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, D. W.; Abbott, M. B.; Bailey, C.; Wenrich, E.; Stoner, J. S.; Larsen, D. J.; Finkenbinder, M. S.; Anderson, L.; Brunelle, A.; Carter, V.; Power, M. J.; Hatfield, R. G.; Reilly, B.; Harris, M. S.; Grimm, E. C.; Donovan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Fish Lake (~7x1.5 km and 2696 m asl) is located on the Fish Lake Plateau in central Utah. The Lake occupies a NE-striking tectonic graben; one of a suite of grabens on the Plateau that cut 21-26 Ma volcanic rocks. The lake outflows via Lake Creek to the NE where it joins Sevenmile Creek to become the Fremont River, a tributary to the Colorado River. A bathymetric survey reveals a mean depth of 27 m and a max depth of 37.2 m. The lake bottom slopes from NW to SE with the deepest part near the SE wall, matching the topographic expression of the graben. Nearby Fish Lake Hightop (3545 m) was glaciated with an ice field and outlet glaciers. Exposure ages indicate moraine deposition during Pinedale (15-23 ka) and Bull Lake (130-150 ka) times. One outlet glacier at Pelican Canyon deposited moraines and outwash into the lake but the main basin of the lake was never glaciated. Gravity measurements indicate that lake sediments thicken toward the SE side of the lake and the thickest sediment package is modeled to be between 210 and 240 m. In Feb 2014 we collected cores from Fish Lake using a 9-cm diameter UWITECH coring system in 30.5 m of water. A composite 11.2-m-long core was constructed from overlapping 2 m drives that were taken in triplicate to ensure total recovery and good preservation. Twelve 14C ages and 3 tephra layers of known age define the age model. The oldest 14C age of 32.3±4.2 cal ka BP was taken from 10.6 m. Core lithology, CT scans, and magnetic susceptibility (ms) reveal three sediment packages: an organic-rich, low ms Holocene to post-glacial section, a fine-grained, minerogenic glacial section with high ms, and a short section of inferred pre-LGM sediment with intermediate composition. Extrapolating the age model to the maximum estimated sediment thicknesses suggest sediments may be older than 500-700 ka. Thus Fish Lake is an ideal candidate for long core retrieval as it likely contains paleoclimatic records extending over multiple glacial cycles.

  10. Petrologic and isotopic data from the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone (Mesaverde Group), Wasatch Plateau, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Neil S.; Turner, Christine E.; Peterson, Fred

    2013-01-01

    The presence of discrete minerals associated with coal—whether (1) detrital or authigenic constituents of the coals or in thin mudstone or siltstone units interbedded with coals, or (2) authigenic phases that formed along cleats—might influence its utilization as an energy resource. The build-up of sintered ash deposits on the surfaces of heat exchangers in coal-fired power plants, due to the alteration of minerals during combustion of the coal, can seriously affect the functioning of the boiler and enhance corrosion of combustion equipment. In particular, the presence of sodium in coals has been considered a key factor in the fouling of boilers; however, other elements (such as calcium or magnesium) and the amount of discrete minerals burned with coal can also play a significant role in the inefficiency of and damage to boilers. Previous studies of the quality of coals in the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation of the Wasatch Plateau, Utah, revealed that the sodium content of the coals varied across the region. To better understand the origin and distribution of sodium in these coals, petrologic studies were undertaken within a sedimentological framework to evaluate the timing and geochemical constraints on the emplacement of sodium-bearing minerals, particularly analcime, which previously had been identified in coals in the Blackhawk Formation. Further, the study was broadened to include not just coals in the Blackhawk Formation from various localities across the Wasatch Plateau, but also sandstones interbedded with the coals as well as sandstones in the underlying Star Point Sandstone. The alteration history of the sandstones in both formations was considered a key component of this study because it records the nature and timing of fluids passing through them and the associated precipitation of sodium-bearing minerals; thus, the alteration history could place constraints on the distribution and timing of sodium mineralization in the interbedded or

  11. Thermal state of the lithosphere in the Colorado Plateau - Basin and Range transition zone, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, William Gillespie

    1997-12-01

    New or revised heat flow data are presented for 22 sites in and near the transition zone between the stable Colorado Plateau (CP) province and the extending northeastern Basin and Range (BR) province. Where the transition is marked by high elevations, heat flow is often depressed by recharging groundwater. At one site in the southern Wasatch Mountains, two wells yielded a heat flow estimate apparently free of this disturbance. Heat flow at the site is greater than 90 mW msp{-2} and probably about 150 mW msp{-2}. This site required correction for topography (10-20%), microclimatic effects (5%), paleoclimate (5%) and uplift and erosion (very uncertain, 12 to 50%). The sampling requirements for thermal conductivity of very heterogeneous formations were derived; the thermal conductivity sample at this site must be 30 to 50% larger than conventional statistical arguments suggested. The other reported heat flow sites are located in the central-western CP and adjacent transition zone. Mean heat flow for this region of the CP is 53 ± 9 mW msp{-2}, significantly less than the values of 60 to 65 mW msp{-2} cited for other parts of the CP province. The transition from CP to BR heat flow regimes is within this field survey, and occurs across a distance of about 40 km. Heat flow data from this and earlier studies indicate that the thermal transition is collocated with the eastern edge of the Inter-mountain Seismic Belt; the seismicity occurs only in warm crust. Other regional geophysical data sets were compiled in an attempt to apply independent constraints to the thermal conditions of the lithosphere. At present, seismic, EM and magnetic data do not resolve deviations of deep crustal temperature from quasi-steady geotherms. Therefore these data do not discriminate between alternative hypotheses for the uplift of the CP and the development of the transition zone. A model of crustal augmentation by magmatic underplating is proposed to explain the seismic velocity structure in

  12. Mining-related and tectonic seismicity in the East Mountain area Wasatch Plateau, Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Donna J.; Arabasz, Walter J.

    1989-09-01

    As part of a larger multi-institutional seismic monitoring experiment during June August 1984 in the eastern Wasatch Plateau, Utah, data from a subarray of 20 portable seismographs were used to investigate seismicity in the East Mountain area, an area of active underground coal mining and intense microseismicity. Eight stations of the subarray were concentrated on top of East Mountain, about 600 m above mine level, at an average spacing of 2 to 3 km. The primary objective was the accurate resolution of hypocenters and focal mechanisms for seismic events originating at submine levels. Data from high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and drill-hole sonic logs yielded a detailed velocity model. This model features a strong velocity gradient in the uppermost 1 km, which has a significant effect on takeoff angles for first-arriving P-waves from shallow seismic events. Two hundred epicenters located with a precision of ±500 m cluster within an area about 5 km in diameter and show an evident spatial association with four sites of longwall mining during the study period. A special set of foci rigorously tested for focal-depth reliability indicates submine seismicity predominating within 500 m of mine level and extending at least to 1 km, and perhaps to 2 km, below mine level. Continuous monitoring for a 61-day period (June 15 August 15) bracketed a 16-day mining shutdown (July 7 22) during which significant seismicity, comparable to that observed before the shutdown, was observed. Ten focal mechanisms for seismic events originating at or down to 2 km below mine level nearly all imply reverse faulting, consistent with previous results and the inferred tectonic stress field. Enigmatic events recorded with all dilatational first motions can be fit with double-couple normal-faulting solutions if they in fact occur above mine level, perhaps reflecting overburden subsidence. If these events are constrained to occur at mine level, their first-motion distributions are

  13. Quality of life on the Colorado Plateau: A report to camera-survey collaborators in southeast Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Jonathan G.; Reis-Ruehrwein, Jessica B.; Sexton, Natalie R.; Blahna, Dale J.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, the goal of the UTC has changed from simply encouraging tourism development to understanding the relationship between tourism and community quality of life. Elements of the new UTC mission include: “make Utah a better place to live by increasing the economic contribution of tourism,” and “protect base resources and maintain quality of life for residents and visitors alike” (Utah Division of Travel Development, 1997). The Social, Economic, and Institutional Analysis Section [SEIAS]/ Midcontinent Ecological Science Center/U.S. Geological Survey conducted this research in late spring through winter of 1997 in an effort to answer those questions posed by the collaboration. This report provides an overview of the research and presents summary results. 

  14. Coal-bed methane in Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyoming: Resources, reserves, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, S.N. ); DeBruin, R.H. ); Tremain, C.M. ); Whitehead, N.H. III )

    1993-08-01

    Coal-bed methane reserves of 10 tcf, in-place resources up to 250 tcf, and dramatically increased production rates from Cretaceous and Tertiary formations affirm the importance of the Rocky Mountain gas province well into the 21st century. These resources have been calculated for the individual states and basins using a variety of criteria and methods and the resource numbers are not necessarily comparable. The Book Cliffs, Emery, Wastach Plateau, Kaiparowits Plateau, and Sego coal fields in Utah contain a coal-bed methane resource of 10.4 tcf. The Book Cliffs and Emery coal fields contain 8.3 tcf or 80% of this resource. The San Juan basin, New Mexico and Colorado, has 10 tcf (reserves), 40 tcf (resources) in the Fruitland Formation, and 28 tcf (resources) in the Menefee Formation. The Raton basin, Colorado and New Mexico, has 10.2 tcf of resources in the Raton and Vermejo Formations. The Piceance and Sand Wash basins in Colorado have estimated resources of more than 96 tcf. The Powder River, Green River, Hams Fork, Wind River, Hanna, Rock Creek, and Bighorn coal fields in Wyoming have resources of 54.4 tcf. The Powder River, Wind River, Green River, and Hams Fork coal fields contain 87% of this resource. In August, 1992, coal-bed methane production accounted for 49% of all gas produced from the San Juan basin (New Mexico) and 30% of all New Mexico production. For 1991, coal-bed methane production in Colorado from the San Juan and Piceance basins was 16% of all Colorado gas production.

  15. Stratigraphy and structure of the Sevier thrust belt and proximal foreland-basin system in central Utah: A transect from the Sevier Desert to the Wasatch Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawton, T.F.; Sprinkel, D.A.; Decelles, P.G.; Mitra, G.; Sussman, A.J.; Weiss, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    The Sevier orogenic belt in central Utah comprises four north-northwest trending thrust plates and two structural culminations that record crustal shortening and uplift in late Mesozoic and early Tertiary time. Synorogenic clastic rocks, mostly conglomerate and sandstone, exposed within the thrust belt were deposited in wedge-top and foredeep depozones within the proximal part of the foreland-basin system. The geologic relations preserved between thrust structures and synorogenic deposits demonstrate a foreland-breaking sequence of thrust deformation that was modified by minor out-of-sequence thrust displacement. Structural culminations in the interior part of the thrust belt deformed and uplifted some of the thrust sheets following their emplacement. Strata in the foreland basin indicate that the thrust sheets of central Utah were emplaced between latest Jurassic and Eocene time. The oldest strata of the foredeep depozone (Cedar Mountain Formation) are Neocomian and were derived from the hanging wall of the Canyon Range thrust. The foredeep depozone subsided most rapidly during Albian through Santonian or early Campanian time and accumulated about 2.5 km of conglomeratic strata (Indianola Group). The overlying North Horn Formation accumulated in a wedge-top basin from the Campanian to the Eocene and records propagation of the Gunnison thrust beneath the former foredeep. The Canyon Range Conglomerate of the Canyon Mountains, equivalent to the Indianola Group and the North Horn Formation, was deposited exclusively in a wedge-top setting on the Canyon Range and Pavant thrust sheets. This field trip, a three day, west-to-east traverse of the Sevier orogenic belt in central Utah, visits localities where timing of thrust structures is demonstrated by geometry of cross-cutting relations, growth strata associated with faults and folds, or deformation of foredeep deposits. Stops in the Canyon Mountains emphasize geometry of late structural culminations and relationships of

  16. Aspects of the palynology of the Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic), Colorado Plateau, Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Richard A.

    1982-01-01

    This study deals with 16 palynological samples from Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, that represent six members of the Chinle Formation of Late Triassic age. The samples, in ascending sequence, show a gradual change in the spore-bisaccate ratio from a preponderance of spores to numerical dominance of bisaccate pollen grains. This change is interpreted to indicate a climatic trend toward increasing aridity. The trend is thought to represent the decreasing energy phase of the oldest of three depositional cycles posited by Lupe (1977, 1979). The late Karnian age indicated for the Chinle Formation by pollen and spores is based on material from the lower part of the formation, leaving open the possibility that the upper part of the Chinle may be younger.

  17. 50,000 years of vegetation and climate history on the Colorado Plateau, Utah and Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coats, Larry L.; Cole, Kenneth L.; Mead, Jim I.

    2008-01-01

    Sixty packrat middens were collected in Canyonlands and Grand Canyon National Parks, and these series include sites north of areas that produced previous detailed series from the Colorado Plateau. The exceptionally long time series obtained from each of three sites (> 48,000 14C yr BP to present) include some of the oldest middens yet discovered. Most middens contain a typical late-Wisconsinan glaciation mixture of mesic and xeric taxa, evidence that plant species responded to climate change by range adjustments of elevational distribution based on individual criteria. Differences in elevational range from today for trees and shrubs ranged from no apparent change to as much as 1200 m difference. The oldest middens from Canyonlands NP, however, differ in containing strictly xeric assemblages, including middens incorporating needles of Arizona single-leaf pinyon, far north of its current distribution. Similar-aged middens from the eastern end of Grand Canyon NP contain plants more typical of glacial climates, but also contain fossils of one-seed juniper near its current northern limit in Arizona. Holocene middens reveal the development of modern vegetation assemblages on the Colorado Plateau, recording departures of mesic taxa from low elevation sites, and the arrival of modern dominant components much later.

  18. Tectonic development of Upper Cretaceous to Eocene strata of southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M. )

    1994-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous to Paleogene nonmarine sedimentary rocks of southwest Utah record Sevier foreland basin sedimentation, Laramide-style folding and intermontane sedimentation, and cessation of Laramide deformation. The formations that record this tectonic evolution arc, from oldest to youngest, the Iron Springs, Kaiparowits, Canaan Peak, Grand Castle (informal name), Pine Hollow, and basal part of the Claron. The upper part of the Santonian to lower Campanian( ) Iron Springs Formation represents synorogenic, fluvial deposits derived from the Wah Wah and Blue Mountain thrust sheets of southwestern Utah. The middle to upper Campanian Kaiparowits and upper Campanian( ) to lower Paleocene Canaan Peak Formations are an upward-coarsening sequence derived from southeastern California and southern Nevada. Initial Laramide-style deformation occurred during latest Cretaceous or early Paleocene time, influencing the depositional pattern of the Canaan Peak fluvial system. The lower Paleocene Grand Castle formation represents an east- to southeast-flowing, braided-river system with the same source as the Iron Springs Formation (the Wah Wah and Blue Mountain thrust sheets). Conglomerate of Grand Castle onlaps the easternmost Sevier thrusts and is folded by Laramide structures. Although strata of the Grand Castle formation represent post-thrust and, in part, pre-Laramide deposition, initial development of a south-southwest-trending, Laramide-style upwarp controlled the geometry of the Grand Castle basin. 55 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Review of Available Water-Quality Data for the Southern Colorado Plateau Network and Characterization of Water Quality in Five Selected Park Units in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah, 1925 to 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Juliane B.

    2008-01-01

    Historical water-quality data in the National Park Service Southern Colorado Plateau Network have been collected irregularly and with little followup interpretation, restricting the value of the data. To help address these issues, to inform future water-quality monitoring planning efforts, and to address relevant National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program objectives, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, compiled, reviewed, and summarized available historical water-quality data for 19 park units in the Southern Colorado Plateau Network. The data are described in terms of availability by major water-quality classes, park unit, site type, and selected identified water sources. The report also describes the geology, water resources, water-quality issues, data gaps, and water-quality standard exceedances identified in five of the park units determined to be of high priority. The five park units are Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico, Canyon de Chelly National Monument in Arizona, Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area in Arizona and Utah, and Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. Statistical summaries of water-quality characteristics are presented and considerations for future water-quality monitoring are provided for these five park units.

  20. Rise and Demise of a Southern Laramide Hinterland Plateau, US-Mexico Border Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, T. F.; Clinkscales, C. A.; Jennings, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    New U-Pb geochronology and stratigraphic data sets suggest that an elevated, altiplano-like plateau existed in the backarc region of what is now southern Arizona and southern New Mexico during Late Cretaceous through Paleogene (~28 Ma) time, and indicate that the Laramide province of the US was thus flanked on both its western and southern sides by hinterland plateaus. The Laramide stratigraphic record of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona formed during a short time period spanning 75-70 Ma, as indicated by numerous, newly-dated, interbedded tuff beds. The Laramide deposits (Fort Crittenden Formation of Arizona, Ringbone and Skunk Ranch Formations of Arizona, Cabullona Group of Sonora), which contain growth strata developed adjacent to steep thrust faults, accumulated in lake and lake-margin fan-delta and alluvial-fan settings on the northern margin of a volcanic arc whose main magmatic locus lay in northeastern Sonora and northwestern Chihuahua. By the end of basin development, the arc had migrated northward to occupy the former depocenters, such that intermediate volcanic rocks interfinger with and overlie the lacustrine deposits, and subvolcanic plutons, one with an age of 69 Ma, intrude and cross-cut thrust faults. Laramide strata unconformably overlie lowermost Upper Cretaceous (~97 Ma) strata and contractional structures are unconformably truncated beneath Oligocene (~33 Ma) volcaniclastic rocks. Detritus derived from the Cretaceous arc is abundant in Campanian fluvial strata (Kaiparowits Formation and Mesaverde Group) of the southern Colorado Plateau. East-west normal faults with as much as 3 km of displacement and a related array of conjugate NW- and NE-striking normal faults, many of these previously interpreted as reverse and transcurrent faults, are widespread in ranges of southern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona. These faults post-date Laramide contractional structures and are in turn cut by Neogene N-S normal faults. The east

  1. Major-element evidence for multiple magma batches in the evolution of Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic rocks of the Markagunt Plateau volcanic field, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Nealey, L.D.; Maldonado, F. )

    1993-04-01

    Pearce element ratios (PER) provide an initial understanding of the evolution of Pleistocene and Holocene alkali basalt to trachyandesite magmas of the Markagunt Plateau. The magmas erupted from numerous cinder cones, shield-like centers, and dikes. Vent areas were controlled by structures (e.g., grabens) related to the tectonic evolution of the transition zone between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateaus provinces. The cinder cone-fed basalt flows and a single dike-fed basalt flow are probably older than shield-fed basalt and trachyandesite flows. Chemically, cinder cone- and dike-fed basalt flows are more mafic than shield-fed basalt flows. Trachyandesite flows are latite and benmoreite (58.7--59.7 wt % SiO[sub 2]). PER analysis of flow chemistry indicates that the shield-fed flows represent at leas three cogenetic magma batches, that cinder cone-fed flows must be related to more than one magma batch, but that all andesite is genetically related to a common parent magma. The dike-fed basalt flow is not genetically related to any other magma type. Although several magma batches erupted, chemical variations in the magmatic series are consistent with the fractionation of the observed phenocryst phases: olivine, plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and spinel. This four-phase fractionation assemblage relates compositional differences within each basalt type better than it does the entire magmatic series. Fractionation of no single mineral phase can adequately explain chemical variations in the basaltic magmas of the Markagunt Plateau.

  2. Assessment of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in selected surface water of the National Park Service Northern Colorado Plateau Network, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, from 1972 through 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Juliane B.; Thoma, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrients are a nationally recognized concern for water quality of streams, rivers, groundwater, and water bodies. Nutrient impairment is documented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a primary cause of degradation in lakes and reservoirs, and nutrients are related to organic enrichment and oxygen depletion, which is an important cause of degradation in streams. Recently (2011), an effort to develop State-based numeric nutrient criteria has resulted in renewed emphasis on nutrients in surface water throughout the Nation. In response to this renewed emphasis and to investigate nutrient water quality for Northern Colorado Plateau Network streams, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, assessed total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentration data for 93 sites in or near 14 National Park units for the time period 1972 through 2007.

  3. Autocyclic progradation and allocyclic ravinement of a shoreface: Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of the Panther Sandstone Tongue (Upper Cretaceous, Campanian), Wasatch plateau, Utah, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, F.F.; Aitken, S.A.; Braunberger, W.F.; Chung, P.; Macrae, A.; Meyer, R.O.; Nunez-Betelu, L.; Williams, C.A.; Hol, H.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The Panther Sandstone Tongue of the Star Point Formation exposed in the vicinity of Helper, Utah reflects a coarse-grained, clastic wedge that penetrated the Mancos Shale basin in Early Campanian (Late Cretaceous) time. Panther Sandstone rocks may be grouped into six lithofacies: (1) thin-bedded, bioturbated and rippled, mudstone and very fine-grained sandstone; (2) thin- to medium-bedded, bioturbated, rippled and parallel laminated, mudstone and very fine-grained sandstone; (3) thick- to very thick-bedded HCS and parallel-laminated, mudstone and fine- to medium-grained sandstone; (4) medium- to thick-bedded, Ophiomorpha bioturbated, medium- to coarse-grained sandstone; (5) medium- to very-thick bedded, current bedded and hydroplasticly deformed sandstone, and (6) medium- to thick-bedded, trough cross-stratified and bundle-laminated, fine grained sandstone. Lithofacies are arranged in definable vertical and lateral successions. L. 1, 2 and 3 are upward coarsening and shoaling and are common in the Helper area. L. 5 and 6 are common to the west. L. 4 is a transgressive and ravinement lag that rests on all other lithofacies. Interpreted environments reflect a storm modified, microtidal, strandplain system. Rocks, except L. 4, are contained in a parasequence system that built into the basin during relative sea-level fall. This system prograded episodically suggesting varying sediment supply and event-controlled sediment reworking -- responses associated with autocyclic forcing. In contrast, ravinement decapitated the parasequence intersecting progressively shallower lithofacies. These responses suggest that ravinement was driven by allocyclic forcing, perhaps in response to tectonism in the foreland.

  4. Water-Quality Data for Selected National Park Units within the Southern Colorado Plateau Network, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, Water Years 2005 and 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macy, Jamie P.; Monroe, Stephen A.

    2006-01-01

    The National Park Service initiated a Level 1 Water-Quality Inventory program to provide water-quality data to park managers so informed natural resource management decisions could be made. Level 1 water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey Arizona Water Science Center at 57 sites in 13 National Park units located in the Southern Colorado Plateau Inventory and Monitoring network in water years 2005 and 2006. These data describe the current water-quality at selected sites within the park units and provide information for monitoring future trends. Water samples were collected three times at each type of site including wells, springs, seeps, tinajas, rivers, a lake, and an irrigation ditch. Field measurements were taken at each site and they included pH, specific conductance, temperature, barometric pressure, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, turbidity, and discharge rates where applicable. Water samples collected were sent to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory and analyzed for major ions, trace elements, and nutrients. The National Water Quality Laboratory also analyzed selected samples for mercury and petroleum hydrocarbons. Additional samples at selected sites were collected and analyzed for cyanide, radiochemistry, and suspended sediment by U.S. Geological Survey contract labs. Fecal-indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli) were sampled for at selected sites as another indicator of water quality. Quality control for this study was achieved through proper training of field personnel, use of standard U.S. Geological Survey field and laboratory protocols, collection of sample blanks and replicates, and a thorough review of the water-quality analyses. Measured field pH ranged from 6.0 to 8.8, within normal range for springs and rivers, at most sites. Concentrations of dissolved solids ranged from 48 to 8,680 mg/L and the majority of samples had concentrations of dissolved solids below 900 mg/L. Trace-element concentrations at

  5. Workforce: Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In the decade leading up to 2012, Utah will see the second highest rate of job growth in the U.S. and an increasing demand for well-educated employees. Technology-related professions will see their ranks swell by 43 percent, while healthcare will grow by 42 percent. Teachers' numbers will increase by 37 percent: nearly 24,000 new jobs for…

  6. Zion National Park, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Though the Grand Canyon may receive all the attention due to its tremendous size, the smaller canyons of the Southwest are arguably more sublime. This true-color image of Zion Canyon in southwestern Utah was taken by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus aboard the Landsat 7 satellite on October 10, 2001. Zion Canyon is located in the lower half of the image amidst the crisscross pattern of rock formations. The canyon walls, made of red and white sandstone, rise 2,000-3,000 feet from the canyon floor and are peppered with hanging vegetation. Over a period of four million years, the Virgin River cut a path through the western edge of the Colorado Plateau to form the canyon. The river and its tributaries resemble branches across the gray-green landscape in the upper section of the image. They eventually join the canyon, often as spectacular slot canyons only a few feet wide, and exit at the bottom of the image on the way to the Colorado River. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data provided by the Landsat 7 Science Team and the Arizona Regional Image Archive

  7. Geothermal Technologies Program: Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-06-01

    Geothermal Technologies Program Utah fact sheet describes the geothermal areas and use in Utah, focusing on power generation as well as direct use, including geothermally heated greenhouses, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths.

  8. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  9. Landslides and debris flows in Ephraim Canyon, central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.L.; Fleming, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The geology of 36 km{sup 2} in Ephraim Canyon, on the west side of the Wasatch Plateau, central Utah, was mapped at a scale of 1:12,000 following the occurrence of numerous landslides in 1983. The geologic map shows the distribution of the landslides and debris flows of 1983-86, as well as older landslide deposits, other surficial deposits, and bedrock. Several of the recent landslides are described and illustrated by means of maps or photographs.

  10. State summaries: Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bon, R.L.; Krahulec, K.A.

    2006-01-01

    The value of Utah's mineral production in 2005 was estimated to be a record $3.58 billion. This was $1.26 billion higher than the revised value of $2.32 billion for 2004. All major industry segments gained in value in 2005. In the value of nonfuel mineral production, Utah ranked fourth. The outlook for 2006 is cautiously optimistic. The value of mineral production is projected to increase slightly in 2006 due to increased production of most base and precious metals, coal and most major industrial minerals.

  11. Maps showing distribution of bismuth in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Located in west-central Utach, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale ingeous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau

  12. Maps showing distribution of barium in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Located in west-central Utach, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale ingeous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau

  13. Jurassic crustal deformation in west-central part of Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, F.

    1985-05-01

    Although the Jurassic Period is commonly thought of as a time of tectonic quiescence, updated isopach maps and new sedimentologic information indicate that it was a time of notable crustal deformation on the Colorado Plateau. A significant change in structural style occurred in Middle Jurassic time, especially during the erosion interval that produced the J-3 unconformity. Prior to late Middle Jurassic time, the region had been tilted westward and structural troughs formed in the area of the present-day Circle Cliffs uplift and in the vicinity of the Circle Cliffs and Black Mesa regions were uplifted and the nearby Henry and Kaiparowits regions began to be downwarped as troughs or basins. It cannot be determined if or how the present-day monoclines flexed during the Jurassic. However, the direction of structural tilt across these areas changed from west side down to east side down during the late Middle and early Late Jurassic. The Monument region, the largest and most persistent structural element in the region, changed from a structural bench to a positive structure in the early Late Jurassic. In most cases the positive structures subsided more slowly than adjacent downwarps. Two exceptions during the Late Jurassic are the Black Mesa and Emery uplifts. These are the only uplifts that actually rose above the level of sediment accumulation. Jurassic rocks are not known to contain significant hydrocarbon resources in this region, but their tectonic history may offer clues to the structural history of underlying Paleozoic strata, which are the primary hydrocarbon exploration targets.

  14. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... backdrops for the 2002 Winter Olympics, to be held in Salt Lake City, Utah. The mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for ... western edge of the Rocky Mountains and eastern rim of the Great Basin. This early-winter image pair was acquired by the Multi-angle ...

  15. Utah Paiute Tribal Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Allen C.

    The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Restoration Act (1980) restored federal recognition of the tribe after a quarter century of ambiguous political status, and resulted in significant improvements of educational status of tribal members and intensification of the political presence of Southern Paiutes. Following the Paiute Indian Termination Act…

  16. Chicanos in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, D.; And Others

    Demographic data on the Chicano in Utah and their position relative to various public agencies were gathered. Focus was on the number of Chicanos serving as staff in the agencies; to what degree the agencies served the Chicanos in meeting their needs for a self-sufficient life style; how the Spanish speaking perceived their needs and the ability…

  17. 76 FR 18245 - West Tavaputs Plateau Road Restriction Order, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ..., as follows: The public is prohibited from driving a motorized vehicle on Horse Bench, Jack Canyon... receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Four roads (Horse Bench, Jack... authorized use only. Horse Bench, Jack Canyon, Jack Ridge, and Cedar Ridge Roads in Carbon County,...

  18. The Springdale, Utah, landslide: An extraordinary event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, R.W.; Harp, E.L.

    1996-01-01

    The most dramatic geologic effect of the M-5.7 St. George, Utah earthquake of 2 September 1992 was the triggering of the 14,000,000-m3 Springdale, Utah landslide. The roughly 10 m of landslide movement destroyed three houses, threatened several condominiums, disrupted utility lines, and temporarily closed the southwest entrance to Zion National Park. The seismic triggering of this landslide is puzzling because its distance from the earthquake epicenter, 44 km, is much greater than the farthest distance (18 km) at which similar landslides have been triggered in worldwide earthquakes of the same magnitude. Other Colorado Plateau earthquakes also have produced landslides far beyond worldwide distance limits, which suggests that regional variations in ground-shaking attenuation may require different landslide-triggering distance limits for different seismotectonic regions. Slope stability analysis and historical records of landslide movement suggest that the Springdale landslide was only slightly above limit-equilibrium conditions at the time of the earthquake. Dynamic stability analysis using Newmark's permanent-displacement method indicates coseismic landslide displacement of only 1-8 cm; this rather modest displacement probably induced enough deformation in the montmorillonitic clays along the failure surface to reduce shear strength and destabilize the slide, which continued to move for several hours after the earthquake.

  19. HCMM hydrological analysis in Utah. [Utah lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in analysis of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) infrared and visible observations of the hydrology of Utah Lake is reported. Correlation between HCMM intensities converted to temperature and ground truth temperatures was investigated, and a conversion offset value determined. Ground truth surface temperatures minus HCMM temperatures were plotted against several hydrological parameters. Relationships among visible data, thermal data, and algae concentrations were considered, and summer concentrations of predominant algae species determined. Investigations on the effects of varying algae concentrations on evaporation rates are reported. Efforts to develop a model for evaporation estimation are reported. The relationship between air and water surface temperatures was studied and the temperature distribution in different segments of the lake investigated. Indications of the existence of thermal springs are reported. Correlation of HCMM surface temperature data and depth to groundwater were investigated.

  20. The Manti, Utah, landslide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, R.W.; Johnson, R.B.; Schuster, R.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    PART A: The Manti landslide is in Manti Canyon on the west side of the Wasatch Plateau in central Utah. In early June 1974, coincident with the melting of a snowpack, a rock slump/debris flow occurred on the south rim of Manti Canyon. Part of the slumped material mixed with meltwater and mobilized into a series of debris flows that traveled down the slope a distance of as much as 1.2 km. Most of the flows were deposited either at the base of the steep rocks of the canyon rim or at the site of an old, silted reservoir. A small part of the debris flow deposit stopped on the head of the very large, relatively inactive Manti landslide. The upper part of the landslide began moving as cracks propagated downslope. A little more than a year later, August 1975, movement extended the full length of the old landslide, and about 19 million m 3 of debris about 3 km long and as much as 800 m wide threatened to block the canyon. The upper part of the landslide apparently had moved small amounts between 1939 and 1974. This part of the landslide, identifiable on pre-1974 aerial photographs, consisted of well-defined linears on the landslide flanks and two large internal toe bulges about 2 km downslope from the head. The abrupt reactivation in 1974 proceeded quickly after the debris flows had provided a surcharge in the head and crown area. Movement propagated downslope at 4-5 m/h for the first few days following reactivation. During 1974, the reactivation probably encompassed all the parts of the landslide that had moved small amounts between 1939 and 1974. Movement nearly or completely stopped during the winter of 1974-75, but began again in the spring of 1975. The landslide enlarged from the flanks of the internal toe bulges to Manti Creek at a rate of 2-3 m/h. Movement stopped again during the winter of 1975-76 and began again in the spring of 1976. Thereafter, the displacements have been small compared to earlier. The displacement rates for the landslide were variable depending

  1. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  2. Utah's Educational Reform Programs, 1991-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    In November 1983, the Utah Education Reform Steering Committee issued the report "Education in Utah: A Call to Action." To meet Utah's double challenge of rapid growth and quality enhancement, the report stated that Utah needed to: (1) increase the allocation of financial resources to education; (2) demand reforms in many aspects of education; and…

  3. Maps showing distribution of beryllium in heavy-mineral concentrates and stream sediments, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Located in west-central Utach, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale ingeous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau

  4. New geothermal database for Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackett, Robert E.; ,

    1993-01-01

    The Utah Geological Survey complied a preliminary database consisting of over 800 records on thermal wells and springs in Utah with temperatures of 20??C or greater. Each record consists of 35 fields, including location of the well or spring, temperature, depth, flow-rate, and chemical analyses of water samples. Developed for applications on personal computers, the database will be useful for geochemical, statistical, and other geothermal related studies. A preliminary map of thermal wells and springs in Utah, which accompanies the database, could eventually incorporate heat-flow information, bottom-hole temperatures from oil and gas wells, traces of Quaternary faults, and locations of young volcanic centers.

  5. 75 FR 12562 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... THE UTAH RECLAMATION MITIGATION AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION Central Utah Project Completion Act AGENCY... Mitigation and Conservation Commission; and the Central Utah Water Conservancy District. ACTION: Notice of... Interior (Interior), Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission (Mitigation Commission),...

  6. Poisonous snakebite in Utah.

    PubMed

    Plowman, D M; Reynolds, T L; Joyce, S M

    1995-12-01

    A retrospective study was done of poisonous snakebite in Utah to determine the current epidemiology and scope of treatment, reviewing emergency department logs and other sources statewide for a 69-month period. Of 61 cases of poisonous snakebite identified, 13 occurred in snake hobbyists or venom laboratory personnel and were considered nonaccidental, and 48 were inflicted by native noncaptive snakes. These bites were considered accidental, and all were presumed to be from rattlesnakes. Nearly three fourths of the victims were male, ranging in age from 2 to 56 years (mean, 22 years). Most accidental bites occurred in areas of high human populations, during the summer months, in the afternoon or evening hours, and during recreational activities. Of the 48 bites, 11 (23%) were provoked. Two thirds of bites were on the upper extremities, and a third were on the lower extremities. More than half of the victims had no first-aid treatment recorded. Of those who did receive first aid, many were subjected to possibly harmful treatments, including tourniquets and ice application. The median time to a hospital was 68 minutes, with a range of 15 to 440 minutes. Swelling and discoloration were the most common signs and pain and paresthesia the most common symptoms. Half the bites resulted in minimal or no envenomation, 17 (35%) produced moderate envenomation, and 6 (12%) severe envenomation. Most patients with moderate or severe envenomation received antivenin, but the dosages given were usually less than recommended dosages. Five patients received surgical treatment based on clinical findings. One child died in a snake-handling incident. Long-term morbidity was unknown due to lack of follow-up. The Utah Poison Control Center was poorly utilized as a reporting and informational resource. PMID:8553638

  7. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  8. HCMM hydrological analysis in Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Data reduction and preliminary comparisons and correlations of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission data to ground truth measurements were made. The data covered Utah Lake and the surrounding area. Output modes include a digital hard copy record of the intensity value for each pixel and color graphics. Analyses of non-diatom net plankton (algae), turbidity, nitrogen, phosphorus, and temperatures were made. In addition, infrared data for the agricultural area around Utah lake were also preliminarily examined and compared to depth to groundwater data.

  9. Annotated geothermal bibliography of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Budding, K.E.; Bugden, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The bibliography includes all the Utah geothermal references through 1984. Some 1985 citations are listed. Geological, geophysical, and tectonic maps and reports are included if they cover a high-temperature thermal area. The references are indexed geographically either under (1) United States (national studies), (2) regional - western United States or physiographic province, (3) Utah - statewide and regional, or (4) county. Reports concerning a particular hot spring or thermal area are listed under both the thermal area and the county names.

  10. Dirhinus texanus (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) from Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pech, L.L.; Gates, M.W.; Graham, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    We collected a Dirhinus texanus (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) in Salt Creek Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah. This is the first record for D. texanus in Utah. Copyright ?? 2011 BioOne All rights reserved.

  11. 75 FR 60375 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... January 21, 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 5899). You can also find later actions concerning Utah's program... . John R. Baza, Director, Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining, 1594 West North Temple, Suite 1210,...

  12. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  13. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Utah, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Utah for 2010. Utah implemented new standards and cut scores in math so trend data that include 2009 are not available. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Utah showed across-the-board gains in reading at the basic,…

  14. Mantle structure beneath the western edge of the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sine, C.R.; Wilson, D.; Gao, W.; Grand, S.P.; Aster, R.; Ni, J.; Baldridge, W.S.

    2008-01-01

    Teleseismic traveltime data are inverted for mantle Vp and Vs variations beneath a 1400 km long line of broadband seismometers extending from eastern New Mexico to western Utah. The model spans 600 km beneath the moho with resolution of ???50 km. Inversions show a sharp, large-magnitude velocity contrast across the Colorado Plateau-Great Basin transition extending ???200 km below the crust. Also imaged is a fast anomaly 300 to 600 km beneath the NW portion of the array. Very slow velocities beneath the Great Basin imply partial melting and/or anomalously wet mantle. We propose that the sharp contrast in mantle velocities across the western edge of the Plateau corresponds to differential lithospheric modification, during and following Farallon subduction, across a boundary defining the western extent of unmodified Proterozoic mantle lithosphere. The deep fast anomaly corresponds to thickened Farallon plate or detached continental lithosphere at transition zone depths. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Heat flow in the north-central Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodell, John Michael; Chapman, David S.

    1982-04-01

    We report new heat flow measurements at 25 evenly distributed sites in the north-central Colorado Plateau. Heat flow values computed for these new sites and one previously published site range from 43 to 116 mW m-2 but fall into the following distinct subsets related to physiographic and tectonic elements within the Plateau: (1) heat flow of 51 mW m-2 (12 sites; s.d. 6) in the San Rafael Swell and Green River Desert which constitute the core of the Colorado Plateau at this latitude, (2) heat flows of 69 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 10) and 88 mW m-2 (4 sites; s.d. 19) in successive parallel north-south bands approaching the Wasatch Plateau to the west but still 80 km east of the Basin and Range physiographic boundary, (3) heat flow of 64 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 2) along the Salt Anticline trend which strikes northwest in the region of Moab, Utah. Heat flow results for the entire Colorado Plateau have been reexamined in view of our new results, and the overall pattern supports the concept of a low heat flow `thermal interior' for the plateau surrounded by a periphery some 100 km wide having substantially higher heat flow. Average heat flow in the thermal interior is about 60 mW m-2 compared to 80-90 mW m-2 in the periphery. This regional heat flow pattern supports a model of Tertiary lithospheric thinning under the Colorado Plateau whereby the plateau is still in transient thermal response and a 15-20 m.y. lag between uplift and corresponding surface heat flow anomaly is to be expected. The position of the heat flow transition between our interior and peripheral regions in the northwest plateau is roughly consistent with lateral warming and weakening of the Colorado Plateau lithosphere initiated at the Basin and Range boundary some 20 m.y. ago.

  16. The Shillong Plateau Uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Hazarika, N.; Priestley, K. F.; Kumar, A.; Gaur, V. K.

    2009-12-01

    Modeling of geodetic measurements in northeast India from epochs straddling the 1897 Assam earthquake led Bilham and England (2001) to suggest a pop-up mechanism to explain the uncompensated altitude of the Shillong Plateau. In their model, the plateau is supported by shearing on two reverse faults within the N-S compressional regime of Indo-Eurasian convergence: the Dawki fault and a proposed hidden Oldham fault bounding the plateau on the south and north, respectively. This model was tentatively supported by the crustal velocity model determined along a 7 station N-S receiver function profile extending across the plateau from the Bengal Basin in the south to the Brahmaputra Valley in the north (Mitra et al, 2005). This crustal model provided convincing evidence for a Moho offset across the Dawki fault, however, the nature and depth extent of the proposed Oldham fault was not constrained by the model and remained a matter of speculation. Now with a denser network of stations and an enlarged data set, we determine a refined crustal model for the Shillong Plateau region by simultaneous inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion data at 10 sites in northeast India. Our results show the 3-dimensional variation of the thin crust beneath the plateau extending westward to Tura and east-northeastward to the Mikir Hills. The denser sampling of the crust across the northern edge of the plateau reveals no Moho offset at the location of the proposed Oldham fault, although the Moho does appear to deepen rather abruptly from 33-34~km at the northern edge of the Shillong Plateau to 38-40~km beneath the Brahmaputra Valley at Baihata. This result requires that any fault involving uplift of the plateau, to occur further north of the proposed Oldham fault and continue to the northeastern edge of the Mikir Hills, i.e., bordering the Brahmaputra River and most likely constituting the structural feature that determines the river's east-west course in the region.

  17. The Colorado Plateau IV: shaping conservation through science and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wakeling, Brian F.; Sisk, Thomas D.; van Riper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States, the Colorado Plateau covers some 130,000 square miles of sparsely vegetated plateaus, mesas, canyons, arches, and cliffs in Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. With elevations ranging from 3,000 to 14,000 feet, the natural systems found within the plateau are dramatically varied, from desert to alpine conditions. This book focuses on the integration of science and resource management issues in this unique and highly varied environment. Broken into three subsections, this volume addresses conservation biology, biophysical resources, and inventory and monitoring concerns. The chapters range in content, addressing conservation issues–past, present, and future–on the Colorado Plateau, measurement of human impacts on resources, grazing and wildland-urban interfaces, and tools and methods for monitoring habitats and species. An informative read for people interested in the conservation and natural history of the region, the book will also serve as a valuable reference for those people engaged in the management of cultural and biological resources of the Colorado Plateau, as well as scientists interested in methods and tools for land and resource management throughout the West.

  18. Standards for Utah Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Library Div., Salt Lake City. Dept. of Community and Economic Development.

    This document presents standards for Utah public libraries. The benefits of standards for public libraries and for the state library are listed, and responsibilities, benefits, and characteristics of three types of public libraries (i.e., volunteer, transitional, and certified public libraries) are summarized. Specific standards in the following…

  19. Remembering the University of Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Nineteen essays comprise this personal and historical look at the University of Utah and the relationship between the university, its people, and the community. Essays include: "One Cannot Live Long Enough to Outgrow a University" (Ramona Wilcox Cannon); "Ever in the Freshness of Its Youth" (G. Homer Durham); "The Final Payoff" (David W. Evans);…

  20. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  1. Preliminary geologic section from Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, to Enterprise, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barosh, P.J.

    1967-01-01

    The 154-mile long geologic cross section trends nearly perpendicular to the structural grain of the Basin-Range province in Nevada, and in Utah extends eastward into the transition zone between the Basin-Range and Colorado Plateau provinces. The structure is characterized by complex thrust: faults, involving uppermost Precambrian to lower Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, and normal faults which cut: the thick sequence of Tertiary volcanic rocks as well as older rocks. Some of the normal faults are the result of caldera collapse. The principal normal faults trend northerly west: of Delamar, Nev., and form north-trending basins and ranges. Farther east the principal faults trend northwesterly, and form a moderately rugged highland rather than distinct basins and ranges. The uppermost Precambrian-Paleozoic strata thin markedly eastward across the region. The pre-Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks vary from 32,500 feet: in thickness at the Nevada Test: Site (Harley Barnes, E. N. Hinrichs, F. A. McKeown and P. P. Orkild, written commun., 1963) to 4,500 feet: in the Beaver Dam Mountains in western Utah (Cook, 1960). Thick Mesozoic deposits, similar to those of the Colorado Plateau, are present in western Utah, but are represented in eastern Nevada by only thin patches of Triassic rock.

  2. The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Blackett, R.E.; Shubat, M.A.; Bishop, C.E. ); Chapman, D.S.; Forster, C.B.; Schlinger, C.M. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1990-03-01

    Geological, geophysical and geochemical studies contributed to conceptual hydrologic model of the blind'' (no surface expression), moderate-temperature (greater than 130{degree}C) Newcastle geothermal system, located in the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition zone of southwestern Utah. Temperature gradient measurements define a thermal anomaly centered near the surface trace of the range-bounding Antelope Range fault with and elongate dissipative plume extending north into the adjacent Escalante Valley. Spontaneous potential and resistivity surveys sharply define the geometry of the dominant upflow zone (not yet explored), indicating that most of the thermal fluid issues form a short segment along the Antelope Range fault and discharges into a gently-dipping aquifer. Production wells show that this aquifer lies at a depth between 85 and 95 meter. Electrical surveys also show that some leakage of thermal fluid occurs over a 1.5 km (minimum) interval along the trace of the Antelope Range fault. Major element, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analyses of water samples indicate that the thermal fluid is a mixture of meteoric water derived from recharge areas in the Pine Valley Mountains and cold, shallow groundwater. A northwest-southeast trending system of faults, encompassing a zone of increased fracture permeability, collects meteoric water from the recharge area, allows circulation to a depth of 3 to 5 kilometers, and intersects the northeast-striking Antelope Range fault. We postulate that mineral precipitates form a seal along the Antelope Range fault, preventing the discharge of thermal fluids into basin-fill sediments at depth, and allowing heated fluid to approach the surface. Eventually, continued mineral deposition could result in the development of hot springs at the ground surface.

  3. Plateau Indian Ways with Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The indigenous rhetoric of the Plateau Indians continues to exert a discursive influence on student writing in reservation schools today. Plateau students score low on state-mandated tests and on college writing assignments, in large part because the pervasive personalization of Plateau rhetoric runs counter to the depersonalization of academic…

  4. HCMM hydrological analysis in Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of applying a linear model to HCMM data in hopes of obtaining an accurate linear correlation was investigated. The relationship among HCMM sensed data surface temperature and red reflectivity on Utah Lake and water quality factors including algae concentrations, algae type, and nutrient and turbidity concentrations was established and evaluated. Correlation (composite) images of day infrared and reflectance imagery were assessed to determine if remote sensing offers the capability of using masses of accurate and comprehensive data in calculating evaporation. The effects of algae on temperature and evaporation were studied and the possibility of using satellite thermal data to locate areas within Utah Lake where significant thermal sources exist and areas of near surface groundwater was examined.

  5. Lead Levels in Utah Eagles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle

    2006-10-01

    Lead is a health hazard to most animals, causing adverse effects to the nervous and reproductive systems if in sufficient quantity. Found in most fishing jigs and sinkers, as well as some ammunition used in hunting, this metal can poison wildlife such as eagles. Eagles are raptors, or predatory birds, and their lead exposure would most likely comes from their food -- a fish which has swallowed a sinker or lead shot in carrion (dead animal matter). As part of an ongoing project to investigate the environment lead levels in Utah, the bone lead levels in the wing bones of eagles have been measured for eagle carcasses found throughout Utah. The noninvasive technique of x-ray fluorescence was used, consisting of a Cd-109 radioactive source to activate lead atoms and a HPGe detector with digital electronics to collect the gamma spectra. Preliminary results for the eagles measured to date will be presented.

  6. Paleogeographic and paleotectonic development of Laramide basins of SW Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Initial Laramide-style deformation in SW Utah began in latest Cretaceous (late Campanian or Maastrichtian) time during deposition of the conglomeratic Canaan Peak Formation (TKcp) which thins onto a broad arch located on the northern Paunsaugunt Plateau (Paunsaugunt upwarp). This NNE-SSW trending upward affected sediment dispersal patterns during the early Paleocene and was the southern basin margin for braided fluvial sediments of the Grand Castle Formation (Tgc). These sediments were shed SE, from the inactive Sevier highlands, as far east as the Table Cliff Plateau. Laramide deformation increased during the late( ) Paleocene, after deposition of the Tgc, with the formation of at least two closed basins. During the late( ) Paleocene, the Johns Valley and Upper Valley anticlines, and Circle Cliff Uplift developed with sediment being shed to the SE, E, and SW into the Pine Hollow basin. During initial development of the Pine Hollow basin, the underlying TKcp and Tgc were reworked into the basal Pine Hollow Formation. Small alluvial fans bounded the basin, grading laterally into low-energy fluvial, playa mudflat, and ephemeral lacustrine environments. The basal Claron Formation represents a broad, closed basin that initially developed during the later Paleocene to the SW of the Pine Hollow basin. The Claron basin was bordered by low relief uplands, fluvial floodplains, and calcrete paleosols to the north and moderate relief uplands to the west and east. Shallow lacustrine deposition occurred to the south. Lacustrine onlap of Laramide structures by middle Eocene suggests cessation of Laramide deformation by this time.

  7. Extinct mountain goat ( Oreamnos harringtoni) in Southeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Agenbroad, Larry D.; Phillips, Arthur M.; Middleton, Larry T.

    1987-05-01

    The extinct Harrington's mountain goat ( Oreamnos harringtoni Stock) is predominantly known from dry cave localities in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, in addition to two sites in the Great Basin, Nevada, and from San Josecito Cave, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. A dry shelter in Natural Bridges National Monument, on the central Colorado Plateau, southeastern Utah, preserves numerous remains of the extinct mountain goat in addition to pack rat middens. Remains from a 100-cm stratigraphic profile indicate that O. harringtoni lived on the plateau >39,800 yr B.P., the oldest directly dated find of extinct mountain goat. Plant macrofossils indicate that Engelmann's spruce ( Picea engelmannii), limber pine ( Pinus flexilis), rose ( Rosa cf. woodsii), and Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) grew during the late Pleistocene where a riparian and a pinyon-juniper ( Pinus edulis-Juniperus osteosperma) community now predominates; Douglas fir are found only in mesic, protected, north-facing areas. Limber pine, Douglas fir, bark, and grasses were the major dietary components in the dung. A springtime diet of birch ( Betula) is determined from pollen clumps in dung pellets.

  8. Project PEER: Continuing Education in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hengesbaugh, Jean Houger

    A continuing education program to provide technical training or consultation for laboratory technologists practicing in rural and urban Utah has been established by the Centers for Disease Control and the Utah State Department of Health under the name Project PEER (Pursuing Excellence through Education Regionally). The core of the program is a…

  9. Certification Standards for Utah School Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt lake City. Div. of Staff Development.

    This document presents various standards for the accreditation of Utah public school personnel as developed by the Utah State Board of Education, current as of January 1977. Information presented includes the following: (1) Evaluation, Approval, and Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs; (2) Accreditation of Higher Institutions which Prepare…

  10. 78 FR 9807 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... conditions of approval of the Utah program in the January 21, 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 5899). You can... announced receipt of the proposed amendment in the September 30, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 60375). In... notice (64 FR 70765). Utah's proposed VER definition is functionally identical to and no less...

  11. The Utah Newspaper Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Robert P.

    As part of the United States Newspaper Program, the Marriott Library at the University of Utah undertook the Utah Newspaper Project, a major microfilming project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. This report reviews the background of the project, describes the grant application process, and discusses the activities of: (1) the…

  12. The Utah Migrant - An Education Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    A joint project between the Utah State Board of Education's Division of General Education and the Planning Unit, this survey was conducted for the purpose of harvesting concerns relevant to the total migrant educational program in Utah. The term "concern", refers to an area of apprehension or uncertainty in the area of migrant education. Formal…

  13. 77 FR 73966 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... of the Utah program in the January 21, 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 5899). You can also find later... receipt of the proposed amendment in the September 5, 2012, Federal Register (77 FR 54491), provided an... approved on December 3, 2007 (72 FR 68029) and November 14, 2008 (73 FR 67630). We notified Utah of...

  14. Migration and Life of Hispanics in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallenstein, Nancy L.

    This paper presents a historical and cultural overview of the migration and life of Hispanics in Utah and identifies three themes: search for a better life, need for and acquisition of a sense of belonging, and substance of the Hispanic people. Over the past 4 centuries, Hispanics have migrated to Utah from New Mexico, Mexico, and Central and…

  15. Utah Character Education Action Research Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This booklet contains a synopsis of eight action research projects undertaken by educators from various Utah public schools presented at a series of workshops. Twenty-seven educators representing 19 schools, 9 school districts, and the Utah State Office of Education (USOE) attended the series of 4 full-day workshops held during October, February,…

  16. Utah State Prison Geothermal System

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, L.R.

    1984-07-01

    A geothermal space heating project was recently completed at the Utah State Prison complex at Crystal Hot Springs located near Murray, Utah. The project was initiated in 1978 as a joint U.S. Department of Energy and State of Utah project. Geologic and geophysical investigations initiated in 1979 consist of surface geologic mapping and aeromagnetic and detailed gravity surveys. This exploration program along with several shallow thermal-gradient holes provided the structural details for a subsequent exploration drilling program. The exploration drilling program involved deepening an existing well (SF-1) to 500 ft (150 m) and drilling a new hole (USP/TH-1) to 1000 ft (300 m) to test the extent of the thermal anomaly. Well SF-1 intersected 175)2)F(79)2)C) temperatures in a low permeable quartzite, and well USP/TH-1 intersected highly fractured quartzite in the lower section of the well. A temperature reversal was noted in USP/TH-1 below 700 ft (213 m) with a maximum temperature of 175)2)F(79)2)C) occurring in the zone from 300 to 700 ft (90 to 215 m). Flow testing of USP/TH-1 indicated the well would flow at 1000 gpm with a sustained flow of 400 gpm at a 3.5 psi drawdown over the heating season. Testing also indicated interference with other nearby wells and thermal springs. Fluid production for space heating of the prison facilities took place during the winter of 1983-84. This production will give more data to refine the calculations of reservoir producibility and provide information on the economics of utilizing geothermal fluids for space heating.

  17. Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    As seen from space, the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA (41.5N, 112.5W) appears as two separate bodies of water with a narrow divider in the middle. At the turn of the century, a railroad bridge without culverts, was built across the lake and ever since, the water and salinity levels have been uneqal on either side. Fed by snowmelt from the nearby Wasatch Mountains, the lake in recent years has had record high water levels, threatening to flood the local areas.

  18. Hydrology of Northern Utah Valley, Utah County, Utah, 1975-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cederberg, Jay R.; Gardner, Philip M.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    The ground-water resources of northern Utah Valley, Utah, were assessed during 2003-05 to describe and quantify components of the hydrologic system, determine a hydrologic budget for the basin-fill aquifer, and evaluate changes to the system relative to previous studies. Northern Utah Valley is a horst and graben structure with ground water occurring in both the mountain-block uplands surrounding the valley and in the unconsolidated basin-fill sediments. The principal aquifer in northern Utah Valley occurs in the unconsolidated basin-fill deposits where a deeper unconfined aquifer occurs near the mountain front and laterally grades into multiple confined aquifers near the center of the valley. Sources of water to the basin-fill aquifers occur predominantly as either infiltration of streamflow at or near the interface of the mountain front and valley or as subsurface inflow from the adjacent mountain blocks. Sources of water to the basin-fill aquifers were estimated to average 153,000 (+/- 31,500) acre-feet annually during 1975-2004 with subsurface inflow and infiltration of streamflow being the predominant sources. Discharge from the basin-fill aquifers occurs in the valley lowlands as flow to waterways, drains, ditches, springs, as diffuse seepage, and as discharge from flowing and pumping wells. Ground-water discharge from the basin-fill aquifers during 1975-2004 was estimated to average 166,700 (+/- 25,900) acre-feet/year where discharge to wells for consumptive use and discharge to waterways, drains, ditches, and springs were the principal sources. Measured water levels in wells in northern Utah Valley declined an average of 22 feet from 1981 to 2004. Water-level declines are consistent with a severe regional drought beginning in 1999 and continuing through 2004. Water samples were collected from 36 wells and springs throughout the study area along expected flowpaths. Water samples collected from 34 wells were analyzed for dissolved major ions, nutrients, and

  19. The Colorado Plateau: cultural, biological, and physical research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Kenneth L.; van Riper, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Stretching from the four corners of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah, the Colorado Plateau is a natural laboratory for a wide range of studies. This volume presents 23 original articles drawn from more than 100 research projects presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau. This scientific gathering revolved around research, inventory, and monitoring of lands in the region. The book's contents cover management techniques for cultural, biological, and physical resources, representing collaborative efforts among federal, university, and private sector scientists and land managers. Chapters on cultural concerns cover benchmarks of modern southwestern anthropological knowledge, models of past human activity and impact of modern visitation at newly established national monuments, challenges in implementing the 1964 Wilderness Act, and opportunities for increased federal research on Native American lands. The section on biological resources comprises sixteen chapters, with coverage that ranges from mammalian biogeography to responses of elk at the urban-wildland interface. Additional biological studies include the effects of fire and grazing on vegetation; research on bald eagles at Grand Canyon and tracking wild turkeys using radio collars; and management of palentological resources. Two final chapters on physical resources consider a proposed rerouting of the Rio de Flag River in urban Flagstaff, Arizona, and an examination of past climate patterns over the Plateau, using stream flow records and tree ring data. In light of similarities in habitat and climate across the Colorado Plateau, techniques useful to particular management units have been found to be applicable in many locations. This volume highlights an abundance of research that will prove useful for all of those working in the region, as well as for others seeking comparative studies that integrate research into land management actions.

  20. REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO{sub 2} IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2003-10-21

    Field and laboratory investigations of naturally occurring CO{sub 2}-reservoirs are being conducted to determine the characteristics of potential seal and reservoir units and the extent of the interactions that occur between the host rocks and the CO{sub 2} charged fluids. Efforts have focused on the Farnham Dome, located in central Utah, and the Springer-St. Johns field in Arizona and New Mexico. The Springer-St. Johns field is particularly significant because of the presence of extensive travertine deposits that document release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. CO{sub 2} accumulations at both fields occur in sedimentary rocks typical of CO{sub 2} reservoirs occurring on the Colorado Plateau. The main achievements were: (1) to assess the possibility of CO{sub 2} leakage from the Farnham Dome of central Utah; and (2) prepare a paper for presentation at the 3rd Annual Conference on Carbon Sequestration.

  1. Library outreach: addressing Utah's "Digital Divide".

    PubMed

    McCloskey, K M

    2000-10-01

    A "Digital Divide" in information and technological literacy exists in Utah between small hospitals and clinics in rural areas and the larger health care institutions in the major urban area of the state. The goals of the outreach program of the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah address solutions to this disparity in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine-- Midcontinental Region, the Utah Department of Health, and the Utah Area Health Education Centers. In a circuit-rider approach, an outreach librarian offers classes and demonstrations throughout the state that teach information-access skills to health professionals. Provision of traditional library services to unaffiliated health professionals is integrated into the library's daily workload as a component of the outreach program. The paper describes the history, methodology, administration, funding, impact, and results of the program.

  2. Planned Parenthood Association of Utah v. Dandoy.

    PubMed

    1987-02-01

    Planned Parenthood Association of Utah, a certified Medicaid provider, brought suit in federal court in an effort to compel the Utah Department of Health to reimburse it for family planning and contraceptive services rendered to minors. Both Utah statute and regulation prohibit the use of state funds to provide family planning services for sexually active minors in the absence of written parental consent. The Tenth Circuit, in affirming the district court, held that since the Utah Medicaid program was subsidized by federal funds, reimbursement could not be withheld from certified providers, such as plaintiff, contrary to the federal Medicaid plan. Title XIX of the federal Social Security Act does not require written parental consent.

  3. On the Elementary Firing Line in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzel, Louise

    1971-01-01

    Relates the experiences of a second grade teacher conducting a field trip to a pioneer cabin in Arches National Monument, Moab, Utah. Children participate in activities characteristic of that period. (BL)

  4. 77 FR 54491 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... program in the January 21, 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 5899). You can also find later actions concerning..., (303) 293-5012, kwalker@OSMRE.gov . John R. Baza, Director, Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining,...

  5. Utah Science Activities, Update 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a bureau of the U.S. Department of the Interior, serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. The USGS has become a world leader in the natural sciences thanks to our scientific excellence and responsiveness to society's needs. This newsletter describes some of the current and recently completed USGS earth-science activities in Utah. As an unbiased, multi-disciplinary science organization that focuses on biology, geography, geology, and water, we are dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the landscape, our natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten us. Learn more about our goals and priorities for the coming decade in the USGS Science Strategy at http://www.usgs.gov/science_strategy/ .

  6. Selected hydrologic data for Cedar Valley, Iron County, southwestern Utah, 1930-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howells, James H.; Mason, James L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic data collected by the U. S. Geological Survey from 1930 to 2001 with emphasis on data collected from 1997 to 2001 as part of a study of ground-water resources in Cedar Valley, Iron County, southwestern Utah (fig. 1). Data collected prior to this study are also presented to show long-term trends. Data were collected during this study in cooperation with the Central Iron County Water Conservancy District; Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources; Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality; Cedar City; and Enoch City; as part of a study to better understand the ground-water resources of Cedar Valley and to assess possible effects of increased ground-water withdrawal on water quality. Quality of ground water in Cedar Valley is variable and water suppliers need to know if additional water resources can be developed without drawing water of lower quality into public-supply wells. Cedar Valley is in central Iron County at the transitional boundary between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau physiographic provinces described by Hunt (1974) and covers about 570 mi2. Additional data from wells west of Cedar Valley and to the south in the vicinity of Kanarraville in the Virgin River drainage (Colorado River Basin) adjacent to the study area are included. Cedar Valley is bounded on the east by the Markagunt Plateau and Red Hills, on the southwest by the Harmony Mountains, on the west by a complex of low hills, and on the north by the Black Mountains. Altitudes in the study area range from about 5,300 ft in Mud Spring Canyon to about 10,400 ft at Blowhard Mountain to the east.

  7. An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-07

    The Utah Wind Working Group (UWWG) believes there are currently opportunities to encourage wind power development in the state by seeking changes to the avoided cost tariff paid to qualifying facilities (QFs). These opportunities have arisen as a result of a recent renegotiation of Pacificorp's Schedule 37 tariff for wind QFs under 3 MW, as well as an ongoing examination of Pacificorp's Schedule 38 tariff for wind QFs larger than 3 MW. It is expected that decisions made regarding Schedule 38 will also impact Schedule 37. Through the Laboratory Technical Assistance Program (Lab TAP), the UWWG has requested (through the Utah Energy Office) that LBNL provide technical assistance in determining whether an alternative method of calculating avoided costs that has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QF payments in Utah, and to discuss the pros and cons of this method relative to the methodology recently adopted under Schedule 37 in Utah. To accomplish this scope of work, I begin by summarizing the current method of calculating avoided costs in Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the ''surrogate avoided resource'' or SAR method). I then compare the two methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Next I present Pacificorp's four main objections to the use of the SAR method, and discuss the reasonableness of each objection. Finally, I conclude with a few other potential considerations that might add value to wind QFs in Utah.

  8. Practical Law in Utah. Utah Supplement to "Street Law." Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City. Statewide Clearinghouse on Law-Related Education.

    This textbook for high school students on law in Utah supplements "Street Law: A Course in Practical Law," a program in law-related education in use across the United States. The introduction explains the meaning of law, how laws are made in Utah, and the functions of the state court system. Following chapters elucidate the branches of law,…

  9. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  10. Geology of the central Mineral Mountains, Beaver County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbett, B.S.; Nielson, D.L.

    1980-03-01

    The Mineral Mountains are located in Beaver and Millard Counties, southwestern Utah. The range is a horst located in the transition zone between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau geologic provinces. A multiple-phase Tertiary pluton forms most of the range, with Paleozoic rocks exposed on the north and south and Precambrian metamorphic rocks on the west in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area). Precambrian banded gneiss and Cambrian carbonate rocks have been intruded by foliated granodioritic to monzonitic rocks of uncertain age. The Tertiary pluton consists of six major phases of quartz monzonitic to leucocratic granitic rocks, two diorite stocks, and several more mafic units that form dikes. During uplift of the mountain block, overlying rocks and the upper part of the pluton were partially removed by denudation faulting to the west. The interplay of these low-angle faults and younger northerly trending Basin and Range faults is responsible for the structural control of the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system. The structural complexity of the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA is unique within the range, although the same tectonic style continues throughout the range. During the Quaternary, rhyolite volcanism was active in the central part of the range and basaltic volcanism occurred in the northern portion of the map area. The heat source for the geothermal system is probably related to the Quaternary rhyolite volcanic activity.

  11. Episodic incision of the Colorado River in Glen Canyon, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garvin, C.D.; Hanks, T.C.; Finkel, R.C.; Heimsath, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Incision rates of the Colorado River are integral to understanding the development of the Colorado Plateau. Here we calculate episodic incision rates of the Colorado River based on absolute ages of two levels of Quaternary deposits adjacent to Glen Canyon, Utah, along the north flank of Navajo Mountain. Minimum surface ages are determined by a combination of cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure ages, uranium series and soil-development formation times. Bedrock incision rates of the Colorado River between c. 500 ka and c. 250 ka, and c. 250 ka to present are c. 0??4 m ka-1 and c. 0??7 m ka-1, respectively. These rates are more than double the rates reported in the Grand Canyon, suggesting that the Colorado River above Lees Ferry is out of equilibrium with the lower section of the river. We also determine incision rates of two tributaries to the Colorado River. Oak Creek and Bridge Creek flow off Navajo Mountain into Glen Canyon from the southeast. Oak Creek and Bridge Creek both have incision rates of c. 0??6 m ka-1 over the past c. 100 ka at points about 9 km away from the main stem of the Colorado River. Copyright ?? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Arizona/New Mexico Plateau Ecoregion: Chapter 26 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhlman, Jana; Gass, Leila; Middleton, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Situated between ecoregions of distinctly different topographies and climates, the Arizona/New Mexico Plateau Ecoregion represents a large area of approximately 192,869 km2 (74,467 mi2) that stretches across northern Arizona, central and northwestern New Mexico, and parts of southwestern Colorado; in addition, a small part extends into southeastern Nevada (fig. 1) (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997). Forested, mountainous terrain borders the ecoregion on the northeast (Southern Rockies Ecoregion) and southwest (Arizona/New Mexico Mountains Ecoregion). Warmer and drier climates exist to the south (Chihuahuan Deserts Ecoregion) and west (Mojave Basin and Range Ecoregion). The semiarid grasslands of the western Great Plains are to the east (Southwestern Tablelands Ecoregion), and the tablelands of the Colorado Plateau in Utah and western Colorado lie to the north (Colorado Plateaus Ecoregion). The Arizona/New Mexico Plateau Ecoregion occupies a significant portion of the southern half of the Colorado Plateau.

  13. Radon-hazard potential of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.D.; Solomon, B.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas formed by decay of uranium, and occurs in nearly all geologic materials. Although radon has been shown to be a significant cause of lung cancer in miners, the health hazard from accumulation of radon gas in buildings has only recently been recognized. Indoor-radon hazards depend on both geologic and non-geologic factors. Although non-geologic factors such as construction type, weather, and lifestyles are difficult to measure, geologic factors such as uranium concentration, soil permeability, and depth to ground water can be quantified. Uranium-enriched geologic materials, such as black shales, marine sandstones, and certain granitic, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks, are generally associated with a high radon-hazard potential. Impermeable soil or shallow ground water impedes radon movement and is generally associated with a low radon-hazard potential. A numerical rating system based on these geologic factors has been developed to map radon-hazard potential in Utah. A statewide map shows that the radon-hazard potential of Utah is generally moderate. Assessments of hazard potential from detailed field investigations correlate well with areas of this map. Central Utah has the highest radon-hazard potential, primarily due to uranium-enriched Tertiary volcanic rocks. The radon-hazard potential of eastern Utah is moderate to high, but is generally restricted by low uranium levels. Western Utah, where valley basins with impermeable soils and shallow ground water are common, has the lowest radon-hazard potential.

  14. Utah Article Delivery: A New Model for Consortial Resource Sharing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochan, Carol A.; Lee, Daniel R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the UTAD (Utah Article Delivery) Pilot Project, an innovative resource-sharing service that provides journal articles to the Utah higher education community, developed by the Utah Academic Library Consortium (UALC) in partnership with EBSCO Document Services. Highlights include goals, options considered, challenges, and evaluation. The…

  15. 1. Photocopied from photo 25797, Engineering Dept., Utah Power and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopied from photo 25797, Engineering Dept., Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. 'WHEELON HYDRO-ELECTRIC PLANT (1725 KW) STATION, WEST PENSTOCK, 130 KV TRANSFORMERS AND SWITCHYARD AND EAST AND WEST CANALS. NOV 1914.' - Utah Sugar Company, Wheelon Hydoelectric Plant, Bear River, Fielding, Box Elder County, UT

  16. Utah Career Guide for Adults, 2000-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaine, Connie, Ed.

    This career guide provides Utah job seekers with information leading to job success. Section 1, Getting Started, provides suggestions for committing to a job search. Section 2, Utah Job Trends, identifies the fastest growing occupations or most openings; top 50 occupations; and new Utah jobs. Section 3, Self-Assessment, covers knowing oneself;…

  17. 75 FR 18231 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... of Central Utah Project (CUP) Bonneville Unit water, delivered to Wasatch County, Utah, from... County. The Bonneville Unit of the CUP was authorized to develop a portion of central Utah's water..., under the Bonneville Unit of the CUP. Suburban development in the county has resulted in...

  18. 78 FR 35956 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Subgroup Conference Call

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... person must meet at the BLM, Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Salt Lake City, Utah, in the Monument..., 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101; phone 801-539-4195; or, sfoot@blm.gov...

  19. 76 FR 18244 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Utah RAC will meet Tuesday, May 10, 2011, (8 a.m.-5 p.m.), in Salt Lake City, Utah. ADDRESSES: The Council will meet at the Peery Hotel (Broadway 110 meeting room), 110 West Broadway (300 South), Salt Lake... Office, Bureau of Land Management, P.O. Box 45155, Salt Lake City, Utah 84145-0155; phone (801)...

  20. 76 FR 39434 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Park & Ride, and Friday, August 5, 2011, (8:30 a.m.--3:30 p.m.) in Salt Lake City, Utah. ADDRESSES: On... floor Monument Conference Room, Salt Lake City, Utah. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sherry Foot, Special Programs Coordinator, Utah State Office, Bureau of Land Management, P.O. Box 45155, Salt Lake...

  1. Selenium status of Utah County residents

    SciTech Connect

    Bown, J.W.; Christensen, M.J.

    1986-03-01

    Counties of low and high soil selenium (Se) content appear to be in close proximity in the state of Utah. The Se status of Utah County residents was evaluated by measurement of plasma Se concentration, and plasma, platelet, and erythrocyte (RBC) Se-glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) activity. A Random Digit Dialing procedure was employed to stratify subjects according to sex and annual income (< $10,000, $10-20,000, > $20,000) in a 2 x 3 factorial design, 7 subjects per cell. There were no significant differences due to sex or income. These results suggest (1) the Se status of Utah County residents is similar to that reported for residents of other regions in the US, and (2) no special consideration for income or gender need be made in surveys of population groups to determine Se status.

  2. 76 FR 69296 - University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of Renewed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of Renewed... Test Reactor Licensing Branch, Division of Policy and Rulemaking, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation... University of Utah (UU, the licensee), which authorizes continued operation of the UU TRIGA Nuclear...

  3. Annual Report of the School Programs of Ballet West, the Hansen Planetarium, the Utah Opera Company, and the Utah Symphony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Avery L.; And Others

    The document evaluates the impact of four special fine arts programs in Utah elementary schools, including presentations by the Utah Symphony, Ballet West, the Utah Opera Company, and the Hansen Planetarium. It is divided into two parts. Part I provides an introduction, brief descriptions of the method of the evaluation and basic statistical…

  4. Implementing automatic geographic referencing in Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plott, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    Efforts to use a fully integrated approach to remote sensing in Utah include a realization that data and information are also resources to be managed. A possibility that information acquired for a specific use such as geological application may be of use to others, for instance, to the highway department. Utah is trying to establish a core operation within the state to make some upfront investment in hardware, software, and technical expertise, sufficient to make the operational people in the field aware of what can be done. The key to the operation is to facilitate, coordinate, and educate, so agencies can act for themselves based on their needs, desires, capabilities, and budget.

  5. 1999 ESH&Q Liability Assessment Report of Envirocare of Utah, Inc. Clive, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, D. E.; Vilord, C. E.

    1999-07-01

    This report contains the results of an environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) assessment of the treatment technologies and treatment-related operations that was conducted of Envirocare of Utah, Inc. (EOU). EOU is a lowlevel radioactive and mixed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)- regulated haz.ardous low-level radioactive waste (mixed low-level waste) treatment/disposal facility located near Clive, Utah. An ESH&Q assessment of the EOU Clive, Utah facility treatment technologies and related treatment operations was conducted in mid-April 1999. The assessment was required as part of the technical evaluation of proposals received by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) for modification of a mixed low-level radioactive waste disposal subcontract (No.K79-180572). The EOU Clive, Utah facility is proposed as a potential treatment/disposal facility for mixed low-level radioactive waste regulated under the RCRA and the Atomic Energy Act

  6. Lichens as indicators of elevated levels of environmental lead in Utah Valley, Utah. [Rhizoplaca melanophthalma

    SciTech Connect

    St. Clair, L.L.; Rushforth, S.R.; Newberry, C.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Utah Valley, Utah is a high elevation mountain valley with a moderate population and a large aged integrated steel mill. Fine particulate pollution (PM{sub 10}) levels in the valley are among the highest din the US, particularly during winter inversion periods. Utah Valley also has high levels of carbon monoxide. The local bureau of air quality monitored ambient air lead in Utah Valley for several years through the 1980s. Values as high as 1.35 g/m{sup 3} were noted from this monitoring. Such levels are 90% of the federal ambient air standard of 1.5 g/m{sup 3}. Lichens have long been recognized as bioindicators for heavy metals. Reports of high concentrations of lead in lichen thalli were common prior to the development and use of unleaded fuels. Since that time, lead concentrations in lichen thalli have generally decreased. Recent studies indicate lichen lead levels from clean air areas in the western US range from 10 to 25 ppm. Studies of the umbilicate saxicolous lichen Rhizoplaca melanophthalma in Utah Valley indicate lead levels between 188 and 200 ppm. Excess lead in Utah Valley likely originates from the steel mill and from the high number of vehicles still using leaded fuels.

  7. Selected hydrologic data for southern Utah and Goshen Valleys, Utah, 1890-1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolp, B.J.; Drumiler, M.J.; Brooks, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains hydrologic data collected in southern Utah and Goshen Valleys from 1890 to 1992. Southern Utah and Goshen Valleys are south of Salt Lake City in Utah County, north-central Utah. The area is bounded on the east and south by the Wasarch Range, on the south by Long Ridge, on the west by the East Tintic Mountains and the Mosida Hills, and on the north by a line through about the middle of T. 7 S. Southern Utah Valley and Goshen Valley are divided by the northern tip of Long Ridge, West Mountain, and Utah Lake. The area is in the Basin and Range physiographic province and includes about 390 square miles. Hydrologic data presented include records of over 400 wells. drillers' logs for selected wells, water-level data from wells, well discharge, and chemical analyses of water from about 90 wells. Discharge, water temperature, and specific conductance of water are given for about 15 selected springs and drains, and for streams and canals.

  8. Paleogeographic controls of coal accumulation, Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone, Wasatch Plateau, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Blanchard, L.F.; Sanchez, J.D.; Marley, W.E.; Muldoon, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Considers the paleogeographic controls affecting the accumulation of coals in delta-barrier-island complexes. Progradation, lateral shifting, and abandonment of these complexes created four major landward-thinning tongues.-from Authors

  9. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  10. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  11. Analysis of Utah Career Ladder Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Michael J.; And Others

    This report analyzes the content and development of the 45 school district career ladder plans submitted in 1984 to the Utah State Office of Education. Descriptive commentary and data tables are used to examine (1) the structure and composition of planning committees; (2) teacher evaluation provisions, including changes in evaluation methods, the…

  12. Increased Gonorrhea Cases - Utah, 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joanna; Carlile, Jerry; Dunn, Angela; Evans, Megan; Fratto, Erin; Hartsell, Joel; Meinor, Lynn; Mietchen, Matthew; Nakashima, Allyn

    2016-01-01

    Gonorrhea (caused by infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae) is the second most commonly reported notifiable disease in the United States (1). Left untreated, gonorrhea is associated with serious long-term adverse health effects, including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Infection also facilitates transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (2,3). Effective gonorrhea control relies upon early detection and effective antimicrobial treatment. To assess gonorrhea rate trends in Utah, the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) analyzed Utah National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (UT-NEDSS) data for the state during 2009-2014. After declining during 2009-2011, the statewide gonorrhea rate increased fivefold to 49 cases per 100,000 population in 2014. During 2009-2014, the proportion of cases among women increased from 21% to 39% (decreasing among males from 79% to 61%). Among male patients, the proportion who identified as men who have sex with men (MSM) decreased from 67% to 42%. These demographic changes suggest that increased heterosexual transmission of gonorrhea in Utah might be occurring. Health departments need to work with providers to ensure populations at high risk are being screened and properly treated for gonorrhea. Clinicians need to be aware of increases in the risk for infection among women and non-MSM males when making screening and testing decisions and educate their patients regarding gonorrhea transmission and prevention practices. PMID:27583786

  13. Utah Work-Based Learning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This document presents materials to assist Utah school personnel who are initiating, implementing, or improving work-based learning opportunities for students. The document presents detailed guidelines for creating and maintaining work-based learning systems in schools and resource materials for improving existing work-based opportunities. Formal…

  14. 40 CFR 81.430 - Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Identification of Mandatory Class I Federal Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.430 Utah. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land manager Arches NP 65,098 92-155 USDI-NPS Bryce Canyon NP 35,832 68-277 USDI-NPS Canyonlands NP 337,570...

  15. Utah's First Joint Effort in Vocational Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Richard F.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a tri-district program (in Utah's Granite, Jordan, and Murray school districts) to expand the health career program, which involved 62 field trips scouring the area's hospitals and health care centers, and student work experience opportunities, to expose students from 13 high schools to occupations beyond the traditional doctor and…

  16. 77 FR 67858 - Utah Disaster #UT-00021

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... State of UTAH (FEMA-4088- DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Severe Storm and Flooding. Incident Period.../2012, Private Non- Profit organizations that provide essential services of governmental nature may file... Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage: Non-Profit Organizations With Credit Available...

  17. Utah's Long Range Plan for Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Library Commission, Salt Lake City.

    The plan for the development of library service for the people of Utah is designed to indicate directions for public library service and to define areas of interaction between all types of libraries in and out of the state. It defines the needs of various groups and areas of the state. It lists goals and objectives to help meet these needs and…

  18. 40 CFR 81.345 - Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Classification Date 1 Type Salt Lake City Area: Davis County Attainment Salt Lake County Attainment Rest of State... purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Utah—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type Classification Date Type Salt Lake County 11/15/90 Nonattainment 11/15/90 Moderate. Utah County 11/15/90 Nonattainment...

  19. 40 CFR 81.345 - Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Classification Date 1 Type Salt Lake City Area: Davis County Attainment Salt Lake County Attainment Rest of State... purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Utah—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type Classification Date Type Salt Lake County 11/15/90 Nonattainment 11/15/90 Moderate. Utah County 11/15/90 Nonattainment...

  20. Project Horizon: How Utah Is Reducing Recidivism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daimar

    2000-01-01

    Project Horizon, Utah's statute to reduce the economic and social cost of recidivism, shifted funding for correctional education to the state education agency. Parolees who participated in Project Horizon had an 18-20 percent lower recidivism rate than nonparticipants and found post-release jobs 89 percent of the time. (JOW)

  1. Increased Gonorrhea Cases - Utah, 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joanna; Carlile, Jerry; Dunn, Angela; Evans, Megan; Fratto, Erin; Hartsell, Joel; Meinor, Lynn; Mietchen, Matthew; Nakashima, Allyn

    2016-09-02

    Gonorrhea (caused by infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae) is the second most commonly reported notifiable disease in the United States (1). Left untreated, gonorrhea is associated with serious long-term adverse health effects, including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Infection also facilitates transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (2,3). Effective gonorrhea control relies upon early detection and effective antimicrobial treatment. To assess gonorrhea rate trends in Utah, the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) analyzed Utah National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (UT-NEDSS) data for the state during 2009-2014. After declining during 2009-2011, the statewide gonorrhea rate increased fivefold to 49 cases per 100,000 population in 2014. During 2009-2014, the proportion of cases among women increased from 21% to 39% (decreasing among males from 79% to 61%). Among male patients, the proportion who identified as men who have sex with men (MSM) decreased from 67% to 42%. These demographic changes suggest that increased heterosexual transmission of gonorrhea in Utah might be occurring. Health departments need to work with providers to ensure populations at high risk are being screened and properly treated for gonorrhea. Clinicians need to be aware of increases in the risk for infection among women and non-MSM males when making screening and testing decisions and educate their patients regarding gonorrhea transmission and prevention practices.

  2. Utah Integrated Shop Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveless, Austin G.

    To evaluate the Utah State Board of Education's Integrated Shop Program (ISP) for small rural high schools, 7 ISP schools in their 2nd year (1970-71) of the ISP were compared on 3 measures to 2 selected control schools (small rural high schools that offered vocational agricultural mechanics and industrial arts but did not offer formal courses in…

  3. Utah Youth Suicide Study: Psychological Autopsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskos, Michelle; Olson, Lenora; Halbern, Sarah; Keller, Trisha; Gray, Doug

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a psychological autopsy study to further understand youth suicide in Utah. While traditional psychological autopsy studies primarily focus on the administration of psychometric measures to identify any underlying diagnosis of mental illness for the suicide decedent, we focused our interviews to identify which contacts in the…

  4. 77 FR 34892 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... Register (46 FR 5899). You can also find later actions concerning Utah's program and program amendments at... and follow the instructions. Mail/Hand Delivery/Courier: Kenneth Walker, Chief, Denver Field Division...'s Denver Office. Kenneth Walker, Chief, Denver Field Division, Office of Surface Mining...

  5. The Colorado Plateau: High, Wide, and Windswept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Bibi; Brook, Richard; Fischman, Shelly; Jacobson, LouAnn; Smith, Shelley; Tisdale, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Explores the natural forces that created the Colorado Plateau, examines a few of the myriad plants and animals inhabiting the six life zones on the plateau, and provides an overview of the challenges faced by land managers seeking to care for the plateau's extraordinary life and land forms. Contains 17 references. (WRM)

  6. Geologic Map of the Central Marysvale Volcanic Field, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowley, Peter D.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Steven, Thomas A.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Anderson, John J.; Theissen, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map of the central Marysvale volcanic field, southwestern Utah, shows the geology at 1:100,000 scale of the heart of one of the largest Cenozoic volcanic fields in the Western United States. The map shows the area of 38 degrees 15' to 38 degrees 42'30' N., and 112 degrees to 112 degrees 37'30' W. The Marysvale field occurs mostly in the High Plateaus, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau and structurally a transition zone between the complexly deformed Great Basin to the west and the stable, little-deformed main part of the Colorado Plateau to the east. The western part of the field is in the Great Basin proper. The volcanic rocks and their source intrusions in the volcanic field range in age from about 31 Ma (Oligocene) to about 0.5 Ma (Pleistocene). These rocks overlie sedimentary rocks exposed in the mapped area that range in age from Ordovician to early Cenozoic. The area has been deformed by thrust faults and folds formed during the late Mesozoic to early Cenozoic Sevier deformational event, and later by mostly normal faults and folds of the Miocene to Quaternary basin-range episode. The map revises and updates knowledge gained during a long-term U.S. Geological Survey investigation of the volcanic field, done in part because of its extensive history of mining. The investigation also was done to provide framework geologic knowledge suitable for defining geologic and hydrologic hazards, for locating hydrologic and mineral resources, and for an understanding of geologic processes in the area. A previous geologic map (Cunningham and others, 1983, U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series I-1430-A) covered the same area as this map but was published at 1:50,000 scale and is obsolete due to new data. This new geologic map of the central Marysvale field, here published as U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Investigations Series I-2645-A, is accompanied by gravity and aeromagnetic maps of the same area and the same scale (Campbell and

  7. Two areas of probable holocene deformation in southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.E.; Bucknam, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    Recent geologic studies in southwestern Utah indicate two areas of probable Holocene ground deformation. 1. (1)A narrow arm of Lake Bonneville is known to have extended southward into Escalante Valley as far as Lund, Utah. Remnants of weakly developed shoreline features, which we have recently found, suggest that Lake Bonnevile covered an area of about 800 km2 beyond its previously recognized limits near Lund. Shoreline elevations show a gradual increase from 1553 m near Lund to 1584 m at a point 50 km further southwest, representing a reversal of the pattern that would result from isostatic rebound. The conspicuously flat floor of Escalante Valley covers an additional 100 km2 southward toward Enterprise, where its elevation is greater than 1610 m, but no shoreline features are recognizable; therefore, the former presence of the lake is only suspected. The measured 31-m rise over 50 km and the suspected 57-m rise in elevation over 70 km apparently occurred after Lake Bonnevile abandoned this area. The abandonment could have occurred as recently as 13,000 years ago, in which case the uplift is mainly of Holocene age. It probably has a deep-seated tectonic origin because it is situated above an inferred 9-km upwarp of the mantle that has been reported beneath the southern part of Escalante Valley on the basis of teleseismic P-wave residuals. 2. (2)Numerous closed topographic basins, ranging from a few hundred square meters to 1 km2 in area, are found at various elevations along the west margin of the Colorado Plateau northeast of Cedar City. Geologic mapping in that area indicates that the basins are located over complex structural depressions in which the rocks are faulted and folded. Several of the depressions are perched along the walls of the West Fork of Braffits Creek, one of a few north-draining creeks that have incised deeply into the plateau margin. Extremely active modern erosion by the creek has produced a 6-km-long gorge along which excellent exposures

  8. Petrography and provenance of sandstone, Sunnyside oil-impregnated deposit, Uinta basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, M.D.; Banks, E.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The Sunnyside oil-impregnated arkosic sandstone deposit (Eocene) is located on the southwestern edge of the Uinta basin, northeastern Utah. It is a giant deposit with more than 4.5 billion bbl of in-place bitumen. Thin section, microprobe, and heavy-mineral analyses indicate a mixed provenance of crystalline and sedimentary sources. Primary crystalline detritus was derived from southwestern Colorado several hundred miles distant, sedimentary detritus from locally adjacent Colorado Plateau uplifts. The sandstone was deposited in meandering fluvial settings. Lacustrine rocks of the Green River Formation overlie and underlie and are occasionally interbedded with the fluvial rocks. The average paleocurrent direction is N45/sup 0/E, indicating a source to the southwest. The incongruent relationship between the average paleocurrent direction and postulated source areas is probably related to the presence of the San Rafael swell upwarp, and to the influence on the drainage pattern by streams that drained the orogenic highlands of western Utah and joined the major north-flowing drainage at the northern end of the San Rafael swell. Migration of bitumen into the rocks at Sunnyside from lacustrine sources occurred after authigenic development of spar-size dolomite rhombs, syntaxial albite and quartz overgrowths, and hematite. Development of calcite cement may be related to the introduction of bitumen and associated pore fluids into the sandstone. Correlation of bitumen content with textural data is weak. Incomplete saturation of rocks by bitumen prevents a determination of the effect of mean grain size and percent matrix on saturation.

  9. Climatic and limnologic setting of Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Wurtsbaugh, W.A.; Lamarra, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake is a large alkaline lake on a high plateau on the Utah-Idaho border. The Bear River was partly diverted into the lake in the early twentieth century so that Bear Lake could serve as a reservoir to supply water for hydropower and irrigation downstream, which continues today. The northern Rocky Mountain region is within the belt of the strongest of the westerly winds that transport moisture during the winter and spring over coastal mountain ranges and into the Great Basin and Rocky Mountains. As a result of this dominant winter precipitation pattern, most of the water entering the lake is from snowmelt, but with net evaporation. The dominant solutes in the lake water are Ca 2+, Mg2+, and HCO32-, derived from Paleozoic carbonate rocks in the Bear River Range west of the lake. The lake is saturated with calcite, aragonite, and dolomite at all depths, and produces vast amounts of carbonate minerals. The chemistry of the lake has changed considerably over the past 100 years as a result of the diversion of Bear River. The net effect of the diversion was to dilute the lake water, especially the Mg2+ concentration. Bear Lake is oligotrophic and coprecipitation of phosphate with CaCO3 helps to keep productivity low. However, algal growth is colimited by nitrogen availability. Phytoplankton densities are low, with a mean summer chlorophyll a concentration of 0.4 mg L-1. Phytoplankton are dominated by diatoms, but they have not been studied extensively (but see Moser and Kimball, this volume). Zooplankton densities usually are low (<10 L-1) and highly seasonal, dominated by calanoid copepods and cladocera. Benthic invertebrate densities are extremely low; chironomid larvae are dominant at depths <30 m, and are partially replaced with ostracodes and oligochaetes in deeper water. The ostracode species in water depths >10 m are all endemic. Bear Lake has 13 species of fi sh, four of which are endemic. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  10. Allogenic sedimentary components of Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbaum, J.G.; Dean, W.E.; Reynolds, R.L.; Reheis, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake is a long-lived lake filling a tectonic depression between the Bear River Range to the west and the Bear River Plateau to the east, and straddling the border between Utah and Idaho. Mineralogy, elemental geochemistry, and magnetic properties provide information about variations in provenance of allogenic lithic material in last-glacial-age, quartz-rich sediment in Bear Lake. Grain-size data from the siliciclastic fraction of late-glacial to Holocene carbonate-rich sediments provide information about variations in lake level. For the quartz-rich lower unit, which was deposited while the Bear River fl owed into and out of the lake, four source areas are recognized on the basis of modern fluvial samples with contrasting properties that reflect differences in bedrock geology and in magnetite content from dust. One of these areas is underlain by hematite-rich Uinta Mountain Group rocks in the headwaters of the Bear River. Although Uinta Mountain Group rocks make up a small fraction of the catchment, hematite-rich material from this area is an important component of the lower unit. This material is interpreted to be glacial fl our. Variations in the input of glacial flour are interpreted as having caused quasi-cyclical variations in mineralogical and elemental concentrations, and in magnetic properties within the lower unit. The carbonate-rich younger unit was deposited under conditions similar to those of the modern lake, with the Bear River largely bypassing the lake. For two cores taken in more than 30 m of water, median grain sizes in this unit range from ???6 ??m to more than 30 ??m, with the coarsest grain sizes associated with beach or shallow-water deposits. Similar grain-size variations are observed as a function of water depth in the modern lake and provide the basis for interpreting the core grain-size data in terms of lake level. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  11. 78 FR 23290 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Conference Call Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Management, Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101; phone 801-539-4195... System Strategy. Results of their findings will be presented to the BLM-Utah and the RAC. A...

  12. New constraints on Neogene uplift of the northern Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wijk, J. W.; Raschilla, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous Uinta Basin is located in northeastern Utah within the northern most portion of the Colorado Plateau. The basin's uplift and subsidence history and thermal evolution have impacted the maturity of source beds in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. Using measured data of the petroleum system of the Uinta Basin, we were able to constrain timing and amplitude of uplift of the northern Colorado Plateau. We used sixty wells in a basin modeling study of the Uinta Basin's thermal structure, tectonic history and petroleum system. The wells reached into basement, and four wells provided vitrinite reflectance measurements. Vitrinite reflectance is a measurement of the percentage of reflected light from a polished vitrinite sample. The percentage of reflected light is related to the temperature conditions the sample experienced during burial, and vitrinite reflectance is a maturity indicator that covers a broad temperature range from diagenesis through the latest stages of catagenesis and records the maximum temperature a rock experiences during its burial history All models were calibrated to measured data, including vitrinite reflectance and transformation ratios from Rock-Eval pyrolysis. The models predict that the heat flow ranges from 65 mW/m2 to 45 mW/m2 from south to north in the study area. Additionally, model calibration provides a means for estimating the amount of uplift and erosion in the Uinta Basin. Uplift predicted for the Uinta Basin ranges from ~2050 m to ~2200 m and started in the Late Miocene. Our models also predicted the maturity of the rich oil shales of the Parachute Creek Member.

  13. The Colorado Plateau III: integrating research and resources management for effective conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, Mark K.; van Riper, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States, the Colorado Plateau covers an area of 130,000 square miles. The relatively high semi-arid province boasts nine national parks, sixteen national monuments, many state parks, and dozens of wilderness areas. With the highest concentration of parklands in North America and unique geological and ecological features, the area is of particular interest to researchers. Derived from the Eighth Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau, this third volume in a series of research on the Colorado Plateau expands upon the previous two books. This volume focuses on the integration of science into resource management issues, summarizes what criteria make a successful collaborative effort, outlines land management concerns about drought, provides summaries of current biological, sociological, and archaeological research, and highlights current environmental issues in the Four Corner States of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah. With broad coverage that touches on topics as diverse as historical aspects of pronghorn antelope movement patterns through calculating watershed prescriptions to the role of wind-blown sand in preserving archaeological sites on the Colorado River, this volume stands as a compendium of cuttingedge management-oriented research on the Colorado Plateau. The book also introduces, for the first time, tools that can be used to assist with collaboration efforts among landowners and managers who wish to work together toward preserving resources on the Colorado Plateau and offers a wealth of insights into land management questions for many readers, especially people interested in the natural history, biology, anthropology, wildlife, and cultural management issues of the region.

  14. A late Pleistocene tephra layer in the southern Great Basin and Colorado Plateau derived from Mono Craters, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madsen, D.B.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Thompson, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    A newly identified tephra in stratified deposits in southwestern Utah, dated ???14,000 14C yr B.P., may aid in correlating late Pleistocene deposits across parts of the southern Great Basin and west-central Colorado Plateau. Geochemical analyses of the ash suggest the tephra originated from Mono Craters, California, and most probably correlates with Wilson Creek ash #3. Because the ash is 2 mm thick ???550 km from its source, the event may have been larger than others correlated to Mono Craters eruptions. ?? 2002 University of Washington.

  15. The Pajarito Plateau: a bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathien, Frances Joan; Allen, Craig D.; Steen, Charlie R.

    1993-01-01

    This bibliography is the result of two initially independent projects. As the consulting archaeologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Charlie R. Steen collected entries at the suggestion of the staff of the Environmental Surveillance Group of the Health, Safety, and Environmental Division, HSE-8. The primary purpose was to aid the staff in evaluating cultural resources on LANL lands. In addition to works that related to the archaeology and history of the area, Steen included notations of a few books and articles in other fields such as geology and natural history. It was hoped that they also would be of value to other organizations and to students of past human activities on the Pajarito Plateau. At the same time, the National Park Service (NPS) was planning a major survey of Bandelier National Monument (BNM). As part of this plan, the author was asked to prepare a background document that described research previously carried out in the area, including an annotated bibliography. Although the survey would be limited to the park boundaries, the larger Pajarito Plateau is a more logical study area from physiographic, environmental, and cultural perspectives; hence the focus was on this larger region. Mathien (1986) also included some references to natural resources studies, particularly those initiated by NPS within Bandelier National Monument. Both bibliographies were made available to Colleen Olinger and Beverly Larson of the Health and Environmental Services Group at Los Alamos. They realized that while neither was complete, each included entries missing from the other. Larson suggested the two bibliographies be combined. (At this time, Craig Allen was studying the landscape of the Jemez Mountains [Allen 1984c, 1989]. His investigations included much detailed information on natural resource studies and were added in 1991 and 1992.) To limit the scope of their work, Steen and Mathien had chosen their parameter: the Pajarito Plateau. Geographically, the

  16. Plateau uplift and climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddiman, W.F. ); Kutzbach, J.E. )

    1991-03-01

    The earth of 40 million years ago was a warm, wet place. Forests abounded; grasslands and deserts were rare. Then the planet began to cool. Regional climate extremes developed. Many causes have been postulated, including continental drift and diminishing atmospheric carbon dioxide. The authors offer a new theory: continental uplift created huge plateaus that altered circulation of the atmosphere. The two largest masses of high, rocky terrain in the Northern Hemisphere today are the area encompassing the Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya Mountains and the broad region of the American West centered on the Colorado Plateau. Geologic evidence indicates that these regions rose substantially during the past 40 million years. The authors focused their research on these plateaus.

  17. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the first project year (July 1 through September 30, 2002). This work included producing general descriptions of Utah's major petroleum provinces, gathering field data, and analyzing best practices in the Utah Wyoming thrust belt. Major Utah oil reservoirs and/or source rocks are found in Devonian through Permian, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks. Stratigraphic traps include carbonate buildups and fluvial-deltaic pinchouts, and structural traps include basement-involved and detached faulted anticlines. Best practices used in Utah's oil fields consist of waterflood, carbon-dioxide flood, gas-injection, and horizontal drilling programs. Nitrogen injection and horizontal drilling

  18. Monuments of the Giza Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    The colossal pyramids of the pharaohs Khufu (Cheops), Khafre (Chephren), and Menkaure (Mycerinus) have attracted a huge amount of astronomical interest over the years, both scholarly and popular. Less attention is usually given to the broader context of structures on the Giza Plateau. One of the most notorious ideas connecting the Giza Plateau with astronomy is that the three large pyramids are laid out on the ground so as to reflect the appearance of the three stars of Orion's Belt in the sky. This idea is unsupportable for several reasons but has succeeded in generating huge public interest. Of much greater serious interest is the fact that the three main pyramids were oriented cardinally to extraordinary precision, which raises the questions of why this was important and how it was achieved. Another idea that has attracted serious attention but also some confusion is that the orientations of some narrow shafts within Khufu's pyramid might have been deliberately aligned upon particular stars. The overall layout of monuments on the plateau may certainly have been designed so as to emphasize certain solar phenomena, for symbolic and ideological reasons relating to a dominant sun cult. It is also possible that it formed part of a wider cosmological "master plan" extending to other pyramids and temples up to 20 km distant.

  19. Maps showing distribution of tungsten in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2 ° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio are listed in the selected references. Located in west-central Utah, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in middle and late Cenozoic time. The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be utilized along with geologic and geophysical data to assess the mineral resource potential for this quadrangle. These maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle show the regional distributions of copper in two fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates of drainage sediments.

  20. Maps showing distribution of thorium in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2 ° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio are listed in the selected references. Located in west-central Utah, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in middle and late Cenozoic time. The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be utilized along with geologic and geophysical data to assess the mineral resource potential for this quadrangle. These maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle show the regional distributions of copper in two fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates of drainage sediments.

  1. Maps showing distribution of copper in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2 ° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio are listed in the selected references. Located in west-central Utah, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in middle and late Cenozoic time. The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be utilized along with geologic and geophysical data to assess the mineral resource potential for this quadrangle. These maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle show the regional distributions of copper in two fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates of drainage sediments.

  2. BOX-DEATH HOLLOW ROADLESS AREA, UTAH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weir, Gordon W.; Lane, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, and a search for prospects and mineralized rock in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area, Utah indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the area. Additional exploratory drilling by industry seems warranted if wells elsewhere in the region find oil or gas in strata as yet untested in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area.

  3. Environmental Report Utah State Prison Geothermal Project

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    This environmental report assesses the potential impact of developing a geothermal resource for space heating at the Utah State Prison. Wells will be drilled on prison property for production and for injection to minimize reservoir depletion and provide for convenient disposal of cooled fluid. The most significant environmental concerns are the proper handling of drilling muds during well drilling and the disposal of produced water during well testing. These problems will be handled by following currently accepted practices to reduce the potential risks.

  4. Reconnaissance of the hydrothermal resources of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Geologic factors in the Basin and Range province in Utah are more favorable for the occurrence of geothermal resources than in other areas on the Colorado Plateaus or in the Middle Rocky Mountains. These geologic factors are principally crustal extension and crustal thinning during the last 17 million years. Basalts as young as 10,000 years have been mapped in the area. High-silica volcanic and intrusive rocks of Quaternary age can be used to locate hydrothermal convection systems. Drilling for hot, high-silica, buried rock bodies is most promising in the areas of recent volcanic activity. Southwestern Utah has more geothermal potential than other parts of the Basin and Range province in Utah. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area, and the area to the north as far as 60 kilometers from them probably have the best potential for geothermal development for generation of electricity. Other areas with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than 150/sup 0/C are Thermo, Monroe, Red Hill (in the Monroe-Joseph Known Geothermal Resource Area), Joseph Hot Springs, and the Newcastle area. The rates of heat and water discharge are high at Crater, Meadow, and Hatton Hot Springs, but estimated reservoir temperatures there are less than 150/sup 0/C. Additional exploration is needed to define the potential in three additional areas in the Escalante Desert. 28 figs., 18 tabs.

  5. The Colorado Plateau V: research, environmental planning, and management for collaborative conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villarreal, Miguel L.; van Riper, Carena J.; Johnson, Matthew J.; van Riper, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States, the Colorado Plateau covers some 130,000 square miles of sparsely vegetated plateaus, mesas, canyons, arches, and cliffs in Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. With elevations ranging from 3,000 to 14,000 feet, the natural systems found within the plateau are dramatically varied, from desert to alpine conditions. This volume, the fifth from the University of Arizona Press and the tenth overall, focuses on adaptation of resource management and conservation to climate change and water scarcity, protecting biodiversity through restructured energy policies, ensuring wildlife habitat connectivity across barriers, building effective conservation networks, and exploring new opportunities for education and leadership in conservation science. An informative read for people interested in the conservation and natural history of the region, the book will also serve as a valuable reference for those people engaged in the management of cultural and biological resources of the Colorado Plateau, as well as scientists interested in methods and tools for land and resource management throughout the West.

  6. Climate change and changes in sediment transport capacity in the Colorado Plateau, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, R.T.

    2005-01-01

    Information is presented on changes in the sediment transport capacity of streams of the Colorado Plateau region of the United States. The changes in transport capacity may be due to changes in climate. Changes in the ability of three rivers in the Colorado Plateau to transport sediment were investigated (Paria River at Lees Ferry, Arizona; Sevier River at Hatch, Utah; and Little Colorado at Woodruff, Arizona) using an index to sediment transport potential (or capacity) of the rivers. The index is called a Sediment Transport Capacity Index (STCI). The parameters in the index are calibrated to measured sediment concentrations. Other investigators have postulated that there have been three climate regimes in the Colorado Plateau during the 20th century: 1905-1941, 1942-1977 and 1978-1998. Time series analyses of the STCI showed reasonably clearly that there was a change in the climate about 1941 and a high probability of a change about 1923-1929. The STCI time series for the Sevier River had the expected pattern because the STCI increased in the years following 1997 nearly to the pre-1942 values from lower 1942-1977 values. The Little Colorado River showed a similar pattern, but not nearly to the magnitude suggested by the change in precipitation. The STCI for the Paria River essentially did not change. Changes in sediment transport also are investigated in the lower San Juan River where alterations in the sediment balance of the river may be due to variations in the character of summer precipitation.

  7. Tectonic impact on the dynamics of CO2-rich fluid migration in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadine, E. Z.; Jean Luc, F.; Remy, D.; Battani, A.; Olivier, V.

    2009-12-01

    With the objective to rank the first order parameters acting in the long term CO2 storage, IFP is developing an integrated study based on the analytical results around the natural silici-clastic analogue of the Colorado Plateau in Utah. What are the dominant parameters which governed the fluid/gas migration in front of the Sevier fold-and-thrust Belt, particularly the CO2-enriched ones? Several sites have been investigated in Utah and Idaho provinces; in the Colorado Plateau, East and in front of the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt, as well as in the Basin & Range geological province North and South West of Salt Lake city (Sevier basin). As a first site selection, three distinct structural provinces have been analysed depending on their seal/reservoir characteristics for confinement: the Green River leaking area (Utah), where large WNW-ESE faults (Salt Wash, Little Wash F...) show several water, oil and gas (CO2, HC) seepages; the Basin & Range province (Utah & Idaho provinces) where low-angle normal faults are seismically active (leaking locally); and the Canyonlands zone (Utah), south of the Moab fault, where the system is well confined. The migration pathways used by composite gas and particularly CO2-enriched fluids (in the Green River area) combined with a reducing agent are locally easily recognisable by the bleaching effect where some reservoir levels or the faults pathways have been flushed. The architecture of the paleo and active fluid migration network can thus be mapped. As a second selective ranking, natural gas have been sampled either from oil/gas producing wells in the Moab area and Ferron Valley, or from natural seepages along leaking fault sections or from geysers along the Green-River fault system. The results, based on noble gas isotope analyses (Battani et al, AGU fall meeting 2009) show that 3 distinct provinces can be "isolated", either marked by the occurrence of mantle-derived CO2, or mixed mantle/crustal CO2 signature of varying ratio. How to

  8. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2003-04-01

    Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the second quarter of the first project year (October 1 through December 31, 2002). This work included (1) gathering field and pipeline data to produce a digital oil and gas field and pipeline map, and (2) Uinta Basin well database compilation. The oil and gas field map will help to delineate the various oil plays to be described later in the project. The map will also identify CO{sub 2} resources, and will be useful in the planning and economic evaluation of best practices using CO{sub 2} to flood mature oil reservoirs. The play descriptions will be enhanced with the updated oil and gas pipeline map. It can be used to plan economic evaluation of exploration activities and field development, particularly if H

  9. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

    2003-07-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall

  10. PLATEAU IRIS SYNDROME--CASE SERIES.

    PubMed

    Feraru, Crenguta Ioana; Pantalon, Anca Delia; Chiselita, Dorin; Branisteanu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Plateau iris is characterized by closing the anterior chamber angle due to a large ciliary body or due to its anterior insertion that alters the position of iris periphery in respect to the trabecular meshwork. There are two aspects that need to be differentiated: plateau iris configuration and plateau iris syndrome. The first describes a situation when the iris root is flat and the anterior chamber is not shallow, the latter refers to a post laser iridotomy condition in which a patent iridotomy has removed the relative pupillary block, but goniscopically confirmed angle closure recurs without central shallowing of the anterior chamber. Isolated plateau iris syndrome is rare compared to plateau iris configuration. We hereby present two case reports of plateau iris syndrome in young patients who came to an ophthalmologic consult by chance.

  11. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

    2003-09-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to Arizona. Outcrop

  12. Effectiveness of action to reduce exposure of free-ranging California condors in Arizona and Utah to lead from spent ammunition.

    PubMed

    Green, Rhys E; Hunt, W Grainger; Parish, Christopher N; Newton, Ian

    2008-01-01

    California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) released into the wild in Arizona ranged widely in Arizona and Utah. Previous studies have shown that the blood lead concentrations of many of the birds rise because of ingestion of spent lead ammunition. Condors were routinely recaptured and treated to reduce their lead levels as necessary but, even so, several died from lead poisoning. We used tracking data from VHF and satellite tags, together with the results of routine testing of blood lead concentrations, to estimate daily changes in blood lead level in relation to the location of each bird. The mean daily increment in blood lead concentration depended upon both the location of the bird and the time of year. Birds that spent time during the deer hunting season in two areas in which deer were shot with lead ammunition (Kaibab Plateau (Arizona) and Zion (Utah)) were especially likely to have high blood lead levels. The influence upon blood lead level of presence in a particular area declined with time elapsed since the bird was last there. We estimated the daily blood lead level for each bird and its influence upon daily mortality rate from lead poisoning. Condors with high blood lead over a protracted period were much more likely to die than birds with low blood lead or short-term elevation. We simulated the effect of ending the existing lead exposure reduction measures at Kaibab Plateau, which encourage the voluntary use of non-lead ammunition and removal of gut piles of deer and elk killed using lead ammunition. The estimated mortality rate due to lead in the absence of this program was sufficiently high that the condor population would be expected to decline rapidly. The extension of the existing lead reduction program to cover Zion (Utah), as well as the Kaibab plateau, would be expected to reduce mortality caused by lead substantially and allow the condor population to increase. PMID:19107211

  13. Telepractice Services at Sound Beginnings at Utah State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaiser, Kristina M.; Edwards, Marge; Behl, Diane; Munoz, Karen F.

    2012-01-01

    The Utah State University Sound Beginnings program originated in 2007 as a laboratory school to serve children with hearing loss from birth to age 6 years old living in Northern Utah. Sound Beginnings offers an interdisciplinary listening and spoken language educational option for families through the following services: toddler and preschool…

  14. 40 CFR 282.94 - Utah State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Utah obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Utah State-Administered Program. 282.94 Section 282.94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID...

  15. Spatial Relative Risk Patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Bilder, Deborah A.; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Heightened areas of spatial relative risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), or ASD hotspots, in Utah were identified using adaptive kernel density functions. Children ages four, six, and eight with ASD from multiple birth cohorts were identified by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Each ASD case was gender-matched to…

  16. Five-Year Projected Utah School District Building Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Utah and its school districts share the responsibility for providing adequate school facilities, including developing feasible alternatives to new construction. School facilities are financed primarily with local property taxes supplemented with limited state aid. During summer 1982, Utah's 40 school districts projected their highest priority…

  17. Twice Considered: Charter Schools and Student Achievement in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Yongmei; Rorrer, Andrea K.

    2012-01-01

    A relatively small state, Utah presents an interesting case to study charter schools given its friendly policy environment and its significant growth in charter school enrollment. Based on longitudinal student-level data from 2004 to 2009, this paper utilizes two approaches to evaluate the Utah charter school effectiveness: (a) hierarchical linear…

  18. 77 FR 6141 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... will meet Wednesday, March 28, 2012, (8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.), in Salt Lake City, Utah. ADDRESSES: The Council will meet at the Little America Hotel (Wyoming meeting room), 500 South Main Street, Salt Lake... Office, Bureau of Land Management, P.O. Box 45155, Salt Lake City, Utah 84145-0155; phone (801)...

  19. Utah Youth Risk Behavior Survey Results, 1991, 1993 & 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This report describes results from the 1995 Utah Youth Risk Behavior Survey of Utah's high school students and compares results to selected 1991 and 1993 results. The 76-item survey was identical to the national survey, though it omitted questions about sexual behavior. It examined unintentional and intentional injuries; tobacco, alcohol, and…

  20. Utah Prehistory: Social Studies & Talent Training, Seventh Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Mary Ann

    This unit examines early life in Utah from about 10,500 BC until 1550 AD. Early human culture and changes in lifestyle during the Paleoindian, Archaic, and Formative periods are foci of the unit. The first period studied is the Paleoindian when humans first came to the North American continent and then to Utah and covers the period from 18,000 BC…

  1. Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

    2003-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed

  2. 78 FR 35181 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Revisions to Utah...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... action on R307-1-1 in this action. See 73 FR 51222 (September 2, 2008). Utah's September 15, 2006... 73 FR 51222; (2) added a new section R307-401 (Notice of Intent and Approval Order); \\2\\ (3) added a... Values'' and ``Significant''. In 73 FR 51222 (September 2, 2008), EPA incorporated by reference UAC...

  3. Utah Guidance and Toolkit for Student Learning Objectives: Instructions and Materials. Utah SLOs. Updated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document is intended to help teachers understand and create Student Learning Objectives (SLOs). This resource is a practical guide intended to provide clarity to a complex but worthwhile task. This resource may also be used by administrators for professional learning. As Utah moves toward providing a "Model for Measuring Educator…

  4. Preliminary maps showing ground-water resources in the Lower Colorado River region, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    This atlas was prepared to meet the need for information on the areal distribution, quantity, and availability of ground water in the lower Colorado River region, an area of about 140,000 square miles in parts of Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The lower Colorado River region is divided into three water provinces--the Basin and Range lowlands province, the Plateau uplands province, and the Central highlands province. The annual precipitation in the region ranges from 3 inches near Yuma, Ariz., to as much as 35 inches on the highest peaks, such as those of the Chiricahua Mountains in Arizona. The precipitation in the lowlands ranges from about 10 to 12 inches per year. In the Basin and Range lowlands the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifers can be as much as 130 feet per day. In the Plateau uplands province most of the groundwater occurs in three multiple-aquifer systems. For the most part, the multiple-aquifer systems do not transmit water readily, and the hydraulic conductivity generally is less than 1.3 feet per day. The Central highlands province is a mountainous area that separates the Plateau uplands from the Basin and Range lowlands in most of the lower Colorado region. The principal discharge area for ground water in the highlands occurs along the base of the Mogollon Rim. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Earth's Colorado Plateau and Loess Plateau (Ordos Basin) Comparing with Mars' Thaumasia Plateau: Evidence of Ancient Martian Lithospheric Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Anderson, R. C.; Komatsu, G.; Baker, V. R.; Maruyama, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have identified a terrestrial counterpart of the Colorado Plateau, western United States, called the Loess Plateau (including the Ordos Basin referred to hereafter as LPOB) based on size, shape, and spatial arrangement of landforms. LPOB is located to the west-southwest of Beijing China, and northeast of the Himalayas. Both the Colorado Plateau and LPOB display depressed central parts, rift systems along their southeastern margins, mountainous terrains along their margins, and expansive plains to their east. The Thaumasia Plateau of Mars also displays such features in a similar spatial arrangement. This includes Basin & Range-like terrain to the southwest, similar to the Colorado Plateau, and expansive plains to the east. Both the Colorado Plateau and LPOB occur among highly deformed terrains that have resulted from plate collision, subduction, major crustal shortening, contractional, extensional, and transtensional tectonism, basin formation, and magmatic upwelling and associated emplacement of both mafic and felsic rocks. At the meeting, we will detail the similarities among the Colorado Plateau, LPOB, and the Thaumasia Plateau, and make a case for why the latter may mark ancient lithospheric mobility with similarities to Earth's plate tectonics.

  6. 76 FR 28068 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah State University/College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah State University/College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum, Price, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. ] Notice is here given.... This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's administrative responsibilities...

  7. A History of Bookmobile Library Service in the State of Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Val L.

    There are four library systems in Utah which provide bookmobile library service; the Salt Lake County Library, Salt Lake City Library, San Juan County Library and Utah State Library Commission. This study is limited to bookmobile library service in Utah and to librarians who first began library service. The history of bookmobiles in Utah began in…

  8. The Utah education network: a collaborative model.

    PubMed Central

    Peay, W J; Hess, S H; Sharp, E M

    1994-01-01

    High-speed data communications networks are transforming the operations, services, and roles of libraries. While the installation of the physical network is often the focus of activity, the administrative and political issues are, in fact, fundamental. For libraries to participate in and influence the development of networks, building new partnerships has proven to be an effective strategy. This paper describes the use of this strategy in the development of the Utah Education Network. This participation is essential if libraries are to take full advantage of the technologies and to ensure that networks reflect the fundamental values of the profession. PMID:7841911

  9. MOUNT NAOMI ROADLESS AREA, UTAH AND IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dover, James H.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical surveys, and an examination of mines and prospects were made in the Mount Naomi Roadless Area, Utah and Idaho. No significant precious-metal, base-metal, other trace-metal, or uranium anomalies are apparent in the geochemical data from the Mount Naomi Roadless Area, and no exploration targets were detected. However, a belt of probable resource potential for stratabound copper, lead, and zinc occurrences exists on the west side of the area in limestone and shale. The possibility that oil and gas concentration lie deeply buried beneath the roadless area cannot be evaluated from available data.

  10. REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2003-10-21

    Field and laboratory investigations of naturally occurring CO{sub 2}-reservoirs are being conducted to determine the characteristics of potential seal and reservoir units and the extent of the interactions that occur between the host rocks and the CO{sub 2} charged fluids. Efforts have focused on the Farnham Dome field, located in central Utah, and the Springerville-St. Johns field in Arizona and New Mexico. The Springerville-St. Johns field is particularly significant because of the presence of extensive travertine deposits that document release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. CO{sub 2} accumulations at both fields occur in sedimentary rocks typical of CO{sub 2} reservoirs occurring on the Colorado Plateau. The main achievements during this quarter were: (1) a soil gas flux survey at the Springerville-St Johns field, (2) collection of some soil gas for chemical and isotopic analysis from this field, and (3) collection of travertine samples from an elevation range of over 1000 feet (330 m) for dating the time span of carbonate-saturated spring outflow at this field. Analytical results and interpretations are still in progress. When available they will allow contrast with soil gas measurements from Farnham Dome natural CO{sub 2} field in central Utah, which were reported in the previous quarterly report.

  11. Map showing distribution of thorium in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, shows the regional distribution of thorium in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream-sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  12. Map showing distribution of tin in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, shows the regional distribution of tin in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream-sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  13. Flora of the Orange Cliffs of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, L.M.; Neely, E.E.; Tuhy, J.S.

    1987-04-30

    The Orange Cliffs area, an area rich in oil sands deposits and defined here as part of the Colorado Plateau floristic province, harbors approximately 209 species in 123 genera and 49 families. Because of the potential of exploitation of the oil sands deposits in the area, a species checklist was made and a discussion of physical and floristic aspects of the region is given here. The flora is compared statistically to the San Rafael Swell flora, which is also a subset of the Colorado Plateau. They define six vegetation types and three edaphic communities; these are described and mapped. Of eleven endemic plant species in the Orange Cliffs, three are local and rare. Sites for Astragalus nidularius, A. moencoppensis, and Xylorhiza glabriuscula var. linearifolia are discussed and mapped. 24 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Evaluating the Relationship Between Seismicity and Subsurface Well Activity in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, L. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between seismicity and subsurface well activity is crucial to evaluating the seismic hazard of transient, non-tectonic seismicity. Several studies have demonstrated correlations between increased frequency of earthquake occurrence and the injection/production of fluids (e.g. oil, water) in nearby subsurface wells in intracontinental settings (e.g. Arkansas, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas). Here, we evaluate all earthquake magnitudes for the past 20-30 years across the diverse seismotectonic settings of Utah. We explore earthquakes within 5 km and subsequent to completion dates of oil and gas wells. We compare seismicity rates prior to well establishment with rates after well establishment in an attempt to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic earthquakes in areas of naturally high background seismicity. In a few central Utah locations, we find that the frequency of shallow (0-10 km) earthquakes increased subsequent to completion of gas wells within 5 km, and at depths broadly similar to bottom hole depths. However, these regions typically correspond to mining regions of the Wasatch Plateau, complicating our ability to distinguish between earthquakes related to either well activity or mining. We calculate earthquake density and well density and compare their ratio (earthquakes per area/wells per area) with several published metrics of seismotectonic setting. Areas with a higher earthquake-well ratio are located in relatively high strain regions (determined from GPS) associated with the Intermountain Seismic Belt, but cannot be attributed to any specific Quaternary-active fault. Additionally, higher ratio areas do not appear to coincide with anomalously high heat flow values, where rocks are typically thermally weakened. Incorporation of timing and volume data for well injection/production would allow for more robust temporal statistical analysis and hazard analysis.

  15. Recruiting Quality Majors: New York High School Students Experience the Geology of Southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colberg, M. R.; Eves, R. L.; Lohrengel, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    Southern Utah University (SUU), Division of Geosciences, is faced with seriously increased competition for students within its traditional recruiting area, the direct result of nearby two-year institutions expanding their missions to four-year roles. Because of this increased competition, it is obvious that students must be recruited from new source areas. Research indicates that New York State has one of the most outstanding high school Earth Science programs in the United States, and it became a target area for recruiting quality students to the SUU geoscience program. Located in the Colorado Plateau to Basin and Range transition zone, SUU is situated in one of the most spectacular and diverse geologic regions in the world. SUU is surrounded by classic southwestern geologic exposures and extensive public lands. In order to use this resource to its maximum advantage, a one-week field program was arranged that would accommodate a maximum of 30 students from New York high schools. The target audience is comprised of juniors and seniors who have participated in an Earth science course, and have expressed an interest in a geoscience career. The field program provides students with a positive learning experience, and stresses basic geologic concepts while utilizing the stunning regional geology of southern Utah as an outdoor classroom. Students receive transferable college credit for participation. To make contact with potential participants, a letter was sent to high school principals requesting the name(s) of the earth sciences teacher(s) in the school. The response was limited (apparently principals do not forward materials to faculty members). However, there was sufficient response to conduct a field experience during late July, 2003. This initial offering was extremely successful and received positive reviews from all participants. The final results of this pilot offering are not yet known, but we are convinced that enrollment of students into SUU's program will

  16. 40Ar/39Ar age and chemistry of manganese mineralization in the Moab and Lisbon fault systems, southeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Marjorie A.; Parry, William T.; Petersen, Erich U.; Hall, Chris M.

    2001-04-01

    Diagenetic iron and manganese mineralization is associated with the Moab and Lisbon faults and is an important indicator of fluid flow in Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southeastern Utah. Reducing brines originating from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation (with or without hydrocarbons) mobilized disseminated iron and manganese in the Jurassic sandstones and mixed with shallow, oxygenated groundwater to precipitate both iron and manganese mineralization. Mineralization consists of colliform and concretionary hematite, pyrolusite, and cryptomelane-hollandite that contains 1.33 2.12 wt% K. The 40Ar/39Ar dating of vacuum-encapsulated cryptomelane yields age estimates of 25 20 Ma, indicating mineralization coincident with either a Colorado Plateau uplift episode or La Sal Mountains volcanism.

  17. Stratigraphy of the Morrison and related formations, Colorado Plateau region, a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Lawrence C.; ,

    1955-01-01

    Three subdivisions of the Jurassic rocks of the Colorado Plateau region are: the Glen Canyon group, mainly eolian and fluvial sedimentary rocks; the San Rafael group, marine and marginal marine sedimentary rocks; and the Morrison formation, fluvial and lacustrine sedimentary rocks. In central and eastern Colorado the Morrison formation has not been differ- entiated into members. In eastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and in part of western Colorado, the Morrison may be divided into a lower part and an upper part; each part has two members which are di1Ierentiated on a lithologic basis. Where differentiated, the lower part of the Morrison consists either of the Salt Wash member or the Recapture member or both; these are equivalent in age and inter tongue and intergrade over a broad area in the vicinity of the Four Corners area of New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah. The Salt Wash member is present in eastern Utah and parts of western Colorado, north- eastern Arizona, and northwestern New Mexico. It was formed as a large alluvial plain or 'fan' by an aggrading system of braided streams diverging to the north and east from an apex in south-central Utah. The major source area of the Salt Wash was to the southwest of south-central Utah, probably in west-central Arizona and southeastern California. The member was derived mainly from sedimentary rocks. The Salt Wash deposits grade from predomi- nantly coarse texture at the apex of the 'fan' to predominantly flne texture at the margin of the 'fan'. The Salt Wash member has been arbitrarily divided into four facies: a con- glomera tic sandstone facies, a sandstone and mudstone facies, a claystone and lenticular sandstone facies, and a claystone and limestone facies. The Recapture member of the Morrison formation is present in northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and small areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado near the Four Corners. It was formed as a large alluvial plain

  18. Plateau effects on diurnal circulation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.R.; Tang, M.

    1984-04-01

    The diurnal variation of 850 mb heights, the detailed distribution of which could be assessed by the inclusion of surface data, and of resultant winds over, and in the vicinity of, the Great Basin reveals clearly a plateau-wind circulation during summer. This circulation reverses between day and night and appears to include the low-level jet stream over Texas and Oklahoma, as well as the time of occurrence of thunderstorms. This plateau circulation system interacts with local mountain-valley breeze systems. The thickness of the daytime inflow and nighttime outflow layer over the plateau is approximately 2 km. 19 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  19. Plateau borders of smectic liquid crystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trittel, Torsten; Aldred, Ruth; Stannarius, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the geometrical properties of Plateau borders in an arrangement of connected smectic A free standing films. The geometry is chosen such that a circular Plateau border surrounds a planar smectic film and connects it with two smectic catenoids. It is demonstrated that, similar to soap films, the smectic film geometry can be described by a negative line tension of the circular contact region. Thus, the equilibrium angle between the films depends upon the liquid content in this region, and with increasing liquid content, deviations from Plateau's rule are observed. The experimental results are qualitatively comparable to soap films. A possible origin of slight quantitative differences is discussed.

  20. Seismic Characterization of Coal-Mining Seismicity in Utah for CTBT Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Arabasz, W J; Pechmann, J C

    2001-03-01

    Underground coal mining (down to {approx}0.75 km depth) in the contiguous Wasatch Plateau (WP) and Book Cliffs (BC) mining districts of east-central Utah induces abundant seismicity that is monitored by the University of Utah regional seismic network. This report presents the results of a systematic characterization of mining seismicity (magnitude {le} 4.2) in the WP-BC region from January 1978 to June 2000-together with an evaluation of three seismic events (magnitude {le} 4.3) associated with underground trona mining in southwestern Wyoming during January-August 2000. (Unless specified otherwise, magnitude implies Richter local magnitude, M{sub L}.) The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) undertook this cooperative project to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in research and development relating to monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The project, which formally began February 28, 1998, and ended September 1, 2000, had three basic objectives: (1) Strategically install a three-component broadband digital seismic station in the WP-BC region to ensure the continuous recording of high-quality waveform data to meet the long-term needs of LLNL, UUSS, and other interested parties, including the international CTBT community. (2) Determine source mechanisms--to the extent that available source data and resources allowed--for comparative seismic characterization of stress release in mines versus earthquakes in the WP-BC study region. (3) Gather and report to LLNL local information on mine operations and associated seismicity, including ''ground truth'' for significant events. Following guidance from LLNL's Technical Representative, the focus of Objective 2 was changed slightly to place emphasis on three mining-related events that occurred in and near the study area after the original work plan had been made, thus posing new targets of opportunity. These included: a magnitude 3.8 shock that occurred

  1. Library outreach: addressing Utah's “Digital Divide”

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Kathleen M.

    2000-01-01

    A “Digital Divide” in information and technological literacy exists in Utah between small hospitals and clinics in rural areas and the larger health care institutions in the major urban area of the state. The goals of the outreach program of the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah address solutions to this disparity in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine—Midcontinental Region, the Utah Department of Health, and the Utah Area Health Education Centers. In a circuit-rider approach, an outreach librarian offers classes and demonstrations throughout the state that teach information-access skills to health professionals. Provision of traditional library services to unaffiliated health professionals is integrated into the library's daily workload as a component of the outreach program. The paper describes the history, methodology, administration, funding, impact, and results of the program. PMID:11055305

  2. 76 FR 53926 - Utah; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ..., under Executive Order 12148, as amended, Mark H. Landry, of FEMA is appointed to act as the Federal..., Morgan, Piute, Salt Lake, Sanpete, Sevier, Summit, Tooele, Uintah, Utah, Wasatch, and Weber Counties...

  3. 75 FR 8393 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Significant Impact (FONSI) which documents the selection for implementation of Alternative 1 as presented in... County, Utah. ADDRESSES: Copies of the Final EA and FONSI are available for inspection at: Central...

  4. Prioritizing High-Temperature Geothermal Resources in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackett, R.E.; Brill, T.C.; Sowards, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    The Utah Geological Survey and the Utah Energy Office recently released geothermal resource information for Utah as a "digital atlas." We are now expanding this project to include economic analyses of selected geothermal sites and previously unavailable resource information. The enhancements to the digital atlas will include new resource, demographic, regulatory, economic, and other information to allow analyses of economic factors for comparing and ranking geothermal resource sites in Utah for potential electric power development. New resource information includes temperature gradient and fluid chemistry data, which was previously proprietary. Economic analyses are based upon a project evaluation model to assess capital and operating expenses for a variety of geothermal powerplant configuration scenarios. A review of legal and institutional issues regarding geothermal development coupled with water development will also be included.

  5. 75 FR 2154 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ...), Bonneville Unit, Central Utah Project (CUP). It would provide an opportunity for more effective and efficient management of water, make efficient use of recycled water, provide opportunities for stream and...

  6. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's pneumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  7. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's penumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  8. US hydropower resource assessment for Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Utah.

  9. Yellow Canary uranium deposits, Daggett County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilmarth, Verl Richard

    1953-01-01

    The Yellow Canary uranium deposit is on the west side of Red Creek Canyon in the northern part of the Uinta Mountains, Daggett County, Utah. Two claims have been developed by means of an adit, three opencuts, and several hundred feet of bulldozer trenches. No uranium ore has been produced from this deposit. The deposit is in the pre-Cambrian Red Creek quartzite. This formation is composed of intercalated beds of quartzite, hornblendite, garnet schist, staurolite schist, and quartz-mica schist and is intruded by dioritic dikes. A thick unit of highly fractured white quartzite near the top of the formation contains tyuyamunite as coatings on fracture surfaces. The tyuyamunite is associated with carnotite, volborthite, iron oxides, azurite, malachite, brochantite, and hyalite. The uranium and vanadium minerals are probably alteration products of primary minerals. The uranium content of 15 samples from this property ranged from 0.000 to 0.57 percent.

  10. Antinuclear antibodies in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Turner, W.G.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Peebles, C.; Tan, E.; Olsen, D.M.

    1983-03-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were detected using a mouse kidney substrate in 69 of 238 (29 percent) underground Utah coal miners at a titer of 1:16. At titers of 1:4 and higher, 52 percent were positive. The majority had a speckled pattern and were not directed against any previously characterized antigens. Fifteen of 28 with high titer ANA had reduced complement. The ANA was more apt to be present in those with coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), and as ANA titer increased, the percentage with CWP increased. The ANA increased with both age and coal mine dust exposure. It is hypothesized that ANA and CWP both result from long-term dust exposure, but that there is insufficient evidence to implicate ANA in the pathogenesis of CWP.

  11. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Price Quadrangle, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Franczyk, K.J.; Luft, S.J.; Lupe, R.D.; Peterson, F.; Robinson, K.

    1982-09-01

    One stratigraphic sequence in one area of the Price Quadrangle, Utah has been determined to be favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation of the US Department of Energy. The stratigraphic sequence is the Triassic Chinle Formation, and the area is in the southeastern part of the quadrangle on the San Rafael Swell. The criteria used to determine the favorability of this area are the sandstone-to-shale ratio for the Chinle Formation, and the distribution of possible source rocks for the uranium such as the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone in the northwestern corner of the quadrangle in the Wasatch Mountains has been classified as unevaluated for the occurrence of uranium. All other suitable host rocks for uranium that occur in the quadrangle were judged not to meet the minimum conditions for favorability.

  12. MAJOR PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey

    2003-11-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land-use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the second project year (July 1 through September 30, 2003). This work included (1) describing the Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play, subplays, and outcrop reservoir analogs of the Uinta Green River Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit (Eocene Green River Formation), and (2) technology transfer activities. The Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit can be divided into plays having a dominantly southern sediment source (Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play) and plays having a dominantly northern sediment source (Conventional Northern Uinta Basin Play). The Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play is divided into six subplays: (1) conventional Uteland Butte interval, (2) conventional

  13. Surveillance of traumatic brain injuries in Utah.

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, D J; Jeppson, L; Burnett, C L; Beaudoin, D E; Rheinberger, M M; Sniezek, J E

    1996-01-01

    From 1990 through 1992 we conducted surveillance of cases requiring hospital admission and of fatal cases of traumatic brain injury among residents of Utah and found an annual incidence rate of 108.8 per 100,000 population. The greatest number of injuries occurred among men and persons aged 15 to 24 years. Motor vehicles were the leading cause of injury, followed by falls and assaults. The incidence rate we found is substantially lower than previously published rates of traumatic brain injury. This may be the result of a decrease in the incidence of these injuries in the decade since earlier studies were done, as well as changing hospital admission criteria that serve to exclude less severe cases of injury. Despite the apparent decline in rates, our findings indicate the continued importance of traumatic brain injury as a public health problem and the need to develop more effective prevention strategies that will address the major causes of these injuries. PMID:8987423

  14. Salt Wash Field, Grand Country, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D. )

    1993-08-01

    The Salt Wash field is located 15 miles southeast of Green River, Utah, in the Paradox fold and fault belt. The field was discovered in 1961 and has produced over 1.3 million bbl of oil and 11.6 billion ft[sup 3] of gas from the Mississippian Leadville LImestone. The average surface elevation is 4389 ft above sea level, and the depth to the top of the oil production is form 8500 to 8914 ft. Salt Wash field is an anticline with over 200 ft of closure on top of the Leadville. The producing zone is in the lower Leadville with intercrystalline and vuggy porosity developed in limestone and crystalline dolomitic limestone. The produced oil is a 50 to 53 API gravity crude with a 40[degrees]F pour point. The gas, a mixture of two sources, is predominately nitrogen (>70[sup [approximately

  15. Infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, William C.; Thiros, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    The ground-water hydrology of Panguitch Valley and adjacent areas, south-central Utah, was studied during 1988-90. One objective of the study was to measure ground-water recharge from infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water. Water-level and soil-moisture data were used to estimate travel times for water moving down through the soil profile, and to compare quantities of water reaching the water table after application of flood and sprinkler irrigation. During this study, estimates of travel times from land surface to the water table ranged from 11 days in June 1989 to 2 days in September 1989. Estimates of irrigation water recharging the ground-water system ranged from 25 to 75 percent of the water applied to the flood-irrigated field. Virtually no recharge was apparent for the sprinkler-irrigated field.

  16. Assessment of geothermal resources at Newcastle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackett, Robert E.; Shubat, Michael A.; Chapman, David S.; Forster, Craig B.; Schlinger, Charles M.

    1989-01-01

    Integrated geology, geophysics, and geochemistry studies in the Newcastle area of southwest Utah are used to develop a conceptual geologic model of a blind, moderate-temperature hydrothermal system. Studies using 12 existing and 12 new, thermal gradient test holes, in addition to geologic mapping, gravity surveys, and other investigations have helped define the thermal regime. Preliminary results indicate that the up-flow region is located near the west-facing escarpment of an adjacent mountain range, probably related to the bounding range-front fault. Chemical geothermometers suggest equilibration temperatures ranging from 140??C to 170??C. The highest temperature recorded in the system is 130??C from an exploration well drilled by the Unocal Corporation.

  17. Environmental assessment overview, Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

  18. Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Kimberly

    2012-04-30

    Executive Summary Salt Lake County's Solar Photovoltaic Project - an unprecedented public/private partnership Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars

  19. Dispersal of large branchiopod cysts: Potential movement by wind from potholes on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, T.B.; Wirth, D.

    2008-01-01

    Wind is suspected to be a primary dispersal mechanism for large branchiopod cysts on the Colorado Plateau. We used a wind tunnel to investigate wind velocities capable of moving pothole sediment and cysts from intact and disturbed surfaces. Material moved in the wind tunnel was trapped in filters; cysts were separated from sediment and counted. Undisturbed sediment moved at velocities as low as 5.9 m s-1 (12.3 miles h-1). A single all-terrain vehicle (ATV) track increased the sediment mass collected 10-fold, with particles moving at a wind velocity of only 4.2 m s-1 (8.7 miles h-1). Cysts were recovered from every wind tunnel trial. Measured wind velocities are representative of low-wind speeds measured near Moab, Utah. Wind can move large numbers of cysts to and from potholes on the Colorado Plateau. Our results indicate that large branchiopod cysts move across pothole basins at low-wind speeds; additional work is needed to establish velocities at which cysts move between potholes. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  20. Inherent agricultural constraints in Allegheny Plateau soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    World population increases demand increased agricultural production. This can be accomplished through improved cultivars and production techniques or increased use of previously marginal agricultural regions. In the Allegheny Plateau (AP) region of the Appalachian Mountains, acid soils with toxic ...

  1. Career Plateauing: Implications for Career Development Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Andrew; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reaction to career plateaus depends on the employee's resources as well as the organization's response. Counseling, training and development, job enrichment, and other activities can minimize the stressful effects of involuntary plateauing. (SK)

  2. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the

  3. Intraplate volcanism at the edges of the Colorado Plateau sustained by shear-driven upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Conrad, C. P.; Smith, E. I.; Johnsen, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    amplified as soon as the pockets are intermittently trapped at the edge of a plateau, shuts off as they tunnel beneath the thick plateau's root, and is revived as they rise up on the opposite side. Our models predict that these two main melting stages on either side of the plateau evolve laterally for each individual pocket: they move obliquely to the direction of asthenospheric shear in a manner that depends on the geometry of the plateau. This behavior implies systematic geochemical trends of magmatism parallel to the edge of the plateau for pockets that contain multiple lithologies (e.g., pyroxenite in addition to peridotite). We compare these trends, as well as the predicted volumes and geographical patterns of volcanism, to those observed for Neogene basaltic volcanism around the edges of the Colorado Plateau. For example, geochemical trends along the western edge of the Colorado Plateau in southern Utah indicate an increasing lithospheric signature in magmatism towards the NE (i.e., in the direction of mantle flow). We conclude that SDU may indeed be relevant for relating sublithospheric topography, mantle flow, and mantle heterogeneity to the origin of intraplate volcanism in several continental areas of the world.

  4. Hydrology of Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts, central Utah, and potential effects of coal mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.; Baskin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Alkali Creek coal-lease tract includes about 2,150 acres in the Book Cliffs coal field in central Utah, and the Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tract includes about 3,360 acres in the Wasatch Plateau coal field, also in central Utah. Both the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts are near areas where coal is currently (1987) mined by underground methods from the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation. The Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge areas have intermittent streams in which flow after snowmelt runoff is locally sustained into midsummer by springflow. The only perennial stream is South Fork Corner Canyon Creek in the Castle Valley Ridge area. Peak flow in both areas generally is from snowmelt runoff; however, peak flow from thunderstorm runoff in the Alkali Creek area can exceed that from snowmelt runoff. Estimated annual source-area sediment yield was 0.5 acre-ft/sq mi in the Alkali Creek lease tract and it was 0.3 acre-ft/sq mi in the Castle Valley Ridge lease tract. Groundwater in the Alkali Creek area occurs in perched aquifers in the Flagstaff Limestone and in other formations above the coal-bearing Blackhawk Formation. The principal source of recharge to the aquifers is snowmelt on outcrops. Faults may be major conduits and control the movement of groundwater. Groundwater discharges at formation contacts, between zones of differing permeability within a formation, near faults and into mines. Water sampled from 13 springs in the Alkali Creek area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 273 to 5,210 mg/L. Water sampled from 17 springs in the Castle Valley Ridge area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 208 to 579 mg/L. The composition of water from a recently abandoned part of an active mine the Wasatch Plateau closely resembles that of water discharging from a nearby mine that has been abandoned for more than 30 years. Mining of the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts likely will

  5. University of Utah, Energy Commercialization Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, James

    2014-01-17

    During the Energy Commercialization Center’s (ECC) three years in operation, the only thing constant was change. The world of commercialization and cleantech evolved significantly during the time the ECC was formed and operating, including: the availability of cleantech funding lessoned, the growth of incubators and accelerators skyrocketed, the State of Utah created an office dedicated to energy development, the University of Utah was both praised and criticized for its success in commercialization, and the Federal government temporarily shut down. During the three-year grant there were three principle investigators on the grant, as well as three directors for the University’s Commercialization Office. Change can be hard for an organization,but as we instruct the companies we support, “Fail fast and fail often, because it is the fastest path to success.” Although there were some unanticipated challenges along the way, the local ecosystem is stronger because of the ECC’s efforts. Perhaps the greatest lesson learned was the importance of aligned incentives between key stakeholders in the commercialization process and the need for resources at the company and individual entrepreneur levels. The universities have systems and incentives to commercialize technologies, but creating value and companies generally rest with the individuals and entrepreneurs. Unfortunately the ECC was unable to create a viable mechanism to transfer the commercialization process that successfully aligned incentives and achieve a more effective ecosystem within the Rocky Mountain West. However, the ECC was successful in adding value to the individual ecosystems, and connecting national resources to regional and local needs. Regarding the ECC’s effectiveness in developing a cleantech commercialization ecosystem, initial inroads and relationships were established with key stakeholders. However, incentives, perceived or real competition, differences in commercialization processes, and

  6. Biogeochemical and ecological impacts of livestock grazing in semi-arid southeastern Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, D.P.; Neff, J.C.; Reynolds, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively few studies have examined the ecological and biogeochemical effects of livestock grazing in southeastern Utah. In this study, we evaluated how grazing has affected soil organic carbon and nitrogen to a depth of 50 cm in grasslands located in relict and actively-grazed sites in the Canyonlands physiographic section of the Colorado Plateau. We also evaluated differences in plant ground cover and the spatial distribution of soil resources. Results show that areas used by domestic livestock have 20% less plant cover and 100% less soil organic carbon and nitrogen compared to relict sites browsed by native ungulates. In actively grazed sites, domestic livestock grazing also appears to lead to clustered, rather than random, spatial distribution of soil resources. Magnetic susceptibility, a proxy for soil stability in this region, suggests that grazing increases soil erosion leading to an increase in the area of nutrient-depleted bare ground. Overall, these results, combined with previous studies in the region, suggest that livestock grazing affects both plant cover and soil fertility with potential long-term implications for the sustainability of grazing operations in this semi-arid landscape. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Active salt deformation and rapid, transient incision along the Colorado River near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochems, Andrew P.; Pederson, Joel L.

    2015-04-01

    In certain settings, erosion is driven by and balanced with tectonic uplift, but the evolution of many landscapes is dominated by other factors such as geologic substrate, drainage history, and transient incision. The Colorado Plateau is an example where these controls are debated and where salt deformation is hypothesized to be locally active and driven by differential unloading, although this is unconfirmed and unquantified in most places. We use luminescence-dated Colorado River terraces upstream of Moab, Utah, to quantify rates of salt-driven subsidence and uplift at the local scale. Active deformation in the study area is also supported by patterns of concavity along tributary drainages crossing salt structures. Subsidence in Professor Valley at a time-averaged rate of ~500 m/Myr (meters/million years) is superimposed upon rapid bedrock incision rates that increase from ~600 to ~900 m/Myr upstream through the study area. Such high rates are unexpected given the absence of sources of regional tectonic uplift here. Instead, the incision rate pattern across the greater area is consistent with a transient signal, perhaps still from ancient drainage integration through Grand Canyon far downstream, and then amplified by unloading at both the broad regional scale and at the local canyon scale.

  8. Origin and structural implications of upper Miocene rhyolites in Kingston Canyon, Piute County, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowley, P.D.; Steven, T.A.; Mehnert, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    Kingston Canyon is one of the deepest antecedent canyons in the High Plateaus subprovince of the Colorado Plateaus. Here the E Fork of the Sevier River flows westward transversely across the gently E tilted Sevier Plateau, which is developed on a basin-range fault block uplifted more than 1500m along the Sevier fault zone on the W. Upper Tertiary rhyolites, uncommon in SW Utah, occur both on the northern rim and in the bottom of Kingston Canyon. Those on the northern rim consist of lava flows and volcanic domes of the rhyolite of Forshea Mountain, dated by K/Ar methods at 7.6Ma old. Those in the bottom of Kingston Canyon, the rhyolite of Phonolite Hill, are especially well exposed and provide spectacular examples of a pyroclastic cone whose base is about at river level and a steep-sided volcanic dome emplaced into and through these deposits. The pyroclastic deposits, formerly 500 or more metres thick, consist of airfall, mudflow, and ash-flow(?) material of rhyolite and foreign lithic fragments especially olivine basalt. The dome consists of flow-banded, mostly devitrified rhyolite as much as 500m thick; it has been dated by K/Ar methods at 5.4Ma. In addition to the rhyolites, a dome and lava-flow complex, the rhyodacite of Dry Lake, occurs near the northern rim and is considered to postdate the rhyolite of Forshea Mountain and predate the rhyolite of Phonolite Hill. -from Authors

  9. Map showing distribution of bismuth and cadmium in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle shows the regional distribution of bismuth and cadimum in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  10. Map showing distribution of barium in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle shows the regional distribution of barium in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  11. 77 FR 76069 - Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... Hoffman, Deputy State Director, Lands and Minerals, Utah State Office, Bureau of Land Management, 440 West...: Bureau of Land Management, Utah State Office, Attn: Kent Hoffman, P.O. Box 45155, Salt Lake City,...

  12. 78 FR 70960 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... officers for calendar year 2014. The Utah RAC is tasked to provide collective input on the Utah Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan Amendment and Environmental Impact Statement and to submit a...

  13. 77 FR 24978 - Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Leases, Utah.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Management, 440 West 200 South, Salt Lake City, Utah 84145, phone (801) 539-4063. Persons who use a... to: Bureau of Land Management, Utah State Office, Attn: Kent Hoffman, P.O. Box 45155, Salt Lake...

  14. 78 FR 43225 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ...: Those attending in person must meet at the BLM, Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Salt Lake City... Coordinator, Bureau of Land Management, Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City,...

  15. New Exploration of Kerguelen Plateau Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vially, R.; Roest, W. R.; Loubrieu, B.; Courreges, E.; Lecomte, J.; Patriat, M.; Pierre, D.; Schaming, M.; Schmitz, J.

    2008-12-01

    France ratified the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea in 1996, and has since undertaken an ambitious program of bathymetric and seismic data acquisition (EXTRAPLAC Program) to support claims for the extension of the legal continental shelf, in accordance with Article 76 of this convention. For this purpose, three oceanographic surveys took place on board of the R/V Marion Dufresne II on the Kerguelen Plateau, in Southern Indian Ocean: MD137-Kergueplac1 (February 2004), MD150-Kergueplac2 (October 2005) and MD165-Kergueplac3 (January 2008), operated by the French Polar Institute. Thus, more than 20 000 km of multibeam bathymetric, magnetic and gravimetric profiles, and almost 6 000 km of seismic profiles where acquired during a total of 62 days of survey in the study area. Ifremer's "rapid seismic" system was used, comprised of 4 guns and a 24 trace digital streamer, operated at speeds up to 10 knots. In addition to its use for the Extraplac Program, the data set issued from these surveys gives the opportunity to improve our knowledge of the structure of the Kerguelen Plateau and more particularly of its complex margins. In this poster, we will show the high resolution bathymetry (200 m) data set, that allows us to specify the irregular morphology of the sea floor in the north Kerguelen Plateau, characterised by ridges and volcanoes chains, radial to the plateau, that intersect the oceanic basin on the NE edge of the Kerguelen Plateau. We will also show magnetic and gravity data, which help us to understand the setting up of the oceanic plateau and the kinematics reconstructions. The seismic profiles show that the acoustic basement of the plateau is not much tectonised, and displays a very smooth texture, clearly contrasting it from typical oceanic basement. Both along the edge of the plateau as in the abyssal plain, sediments have variable thicknesses. The sediments on the margin of the plateau are up to 1200 meters thick and display irregular

  16. Cluster growth modeling of plateau erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Colin P.

    1994-01-01

    The pattern of erosion of a plateau along an escarpment may be modeled usng cluster growth techniques, recently popularized in models of drainage network evolution. If erosion on the scarp takes place in discrete events at rates subject to local substrate strength, the whole range of behavior is described by a combination of three cluster growth mechanisms: invasion percolation, Eden growth and diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). These model the relative importance of preexisting substrate strength, background weathering, and seepage weathering and erosion respectively. The rate of seepage processes is determined by the efflux of groundwater at the plateau margin, which in turn is determined by the pressure field in the plateau aquifer. If this process acted alone, it would produce erosion patterns in the form of Laplacian fractals, with groundwater recharge from a distant source, or Poissionian fractals, with groundwater recharge uniform over the plateau. DLA is used to mimic the Laplacian or Poissonian potential field and the corresponding seepage growth process. The scaling structure of clusters grown by pure DLA, invasion percolation, or Eden growth is well known; this study presents a model which combines all three growth mechanisms for the first time. Mixed growth processes create clusters with different scaling properties and morphologies over distinct length scale ranges, and this is demonstrable in natural examples of plateau erosion.

  17. Lake isotope variability in the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Sheng, Y.; Yao, T.; Li, J.

    2010-12-01

    The use of isotopic ratios of meteoric waters has increased rapidly in recent studies of moisture sources, trajectories and other climatic processes over the Tibetan Plateau. However, measurements of δ18O and δD of lake water are scarce. Little is known of isotopic processes in Tibetan lakes. Here we present results from 27 lakes across the plateau. The isotopic results show that the Tibetan lake water line deviates considerably from the regional and global meteoric water lines (Fig. 1). Although many lakes in the plateau have expanded over the last several decades as shown by archived satellite images and reduction in lake salinity, most of the lakes including some freshwater lakes contain water with negative values of d-excess (d). Moreover, there is a negative correlation between d and total dissolved solids (Fig. 2). This study suggests that evaporation has played an important role in regulating water chemical and isotopic compositions of high-altitude lakes in the plateau. Figure 1. Relationship of δ18O and δD in surface waters from open lakes (i.e., lakes with outlets) (open circles) and closed-basin lakes (filled circles) in the Tibetan Plateau. Figure 2. Correlation of deuterium excess (d) and TDS in surface waters from Tibetan lakes.

  18. The Kennecott Utah Copper Refinery modernization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutliff, K. E.; Probert, T. I.; Unger, C. T.; Hoffmann, J. E.; Wells, B. A.; George, D. B.

    1996-08-01

    In early 1992, Kennecott announced plans to modernize and expand the smelter and refinery located near Salt Lake City, Utah. The project increased the smelter capacity from 150,000 tonnes per year to 280,000 tonnes per year and also increased the refinery capacity from 200,000 tonnes per year to meet smelter output. Total cost of the modernization was 882 million. Part I of this paper outlines the scope of the refinery modernization program and describes the implementation of the new technology used there. The technology is based on polymer concrete cells, thoroughly prepared anodes, stainless steel plating blanks, and highly automated materials handling. In Part II, the hydrometallurgical process chemistry employed at the new Kennecott slimes treatment facility is described. The processing philosophy incorporates three major objectives: very-high firstpass recovery of the valuable metals from the slimes with minimal in-process inventory; minimization of the return of impurity metals (e.g., Pb, Sb, As, and Bi) to the smelter circuit; and complete elimination of pyrometallurgical processing with its potential for environmental abuse and precious metals recycle. In both parts, the unit start-ups and initial operating results are presented.

  19. Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.

    PubMed

    Harrist, Alexia; Styczynski, Ashley; Wynn, DonRaphael; Ansari, Safdar; Hopkin, Justin; Rosado-Santos, Harry; Baker, JoDee; Nakashima, Allyn; Atkinson, Annette; Spencer, Melanie; Dean, Debbie; Teachout, Leslie; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Condori, Rene E; Orciari, Lillian; Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Ellison, James; Niezgoda, Michael; Petersen, Brett; Wallace, Ryan; Musgrave, Karl

    2016-06-03

    In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.

  20. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization.

  1. BIRDSEYE, NEPHI, AND SANTAQUIN ROADLESS AREAS, UTAH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Martin L.; Korzeb, Stanley L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral-resource appraisal of the Birdseye, Nephi, And Santaquin Roadless Areas in Utah indicate several areas with probable or substantiated mineral-resource potential. The Eva mine in the Santaquin Roadless Area contains small, demonstrated resources of lead-zinc-silver ore. A probable resource potential for lead, zinc, and silver deposits exists in the area around the Eva mine, and elsewhere in the Birdseye, Nephi, and Santaquin Roadless Areas where Mississipian and Cambrian carbonate rocks occur. A substantiated potential for gypsum is recognized in the southwest corner of the Nephi Roadless Area and a probable resource potential in adjacent areas underlain by the Jurassic Arapien Shale. There are limestone resources for use in cement and smelter flux in the Nephi and Santaquin Roadless Areas, but similar limestone occurs abundantly outside the area. The potential for oil and gas resources cannot be assessed from available data. There are no indications of coal or geothermal resources in the roadless areas.

  2. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considering for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  3. Natural vibration dynamics of Rainbow Bridge, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. R.; Thorne, M. S.; Wood, J. R.; Doyle, S.; Stanfield, E.; White, B.

    2015-12-01

    We measured resonant frequencies of Rainbow Bridge, Utah, one of the world's longest rock spans, during a field experiment recording ambient vibration data. Measurements were generated over 20 hours on March 23-24, 2015 using two broadband three-component seismometers placed on the bridge, and compared to concurrent data from nearby reference stations 20 and 220 m distant. We identified seven distinct modes of vibration for Rainbow Bridge between 1 and 6 Hz. Data for each resonant frequency was then analyzed to determine the frequency-dependent polarization vector in an attempt to clarify mode shapes; e.g. the fundamental mode represents out-of-plane horizontal flexure. We compared experimental data to results of 3D numerical modal analysis, using a new photogrammetric model of Rainbow Bridge generated in this study imported into COMSOL Multiphysics. Results compare well with measured data for seven of the first eight modeled modes, matching vibrational frequencies and polarization orientations generally within 10%. Only predicted mode 6 was not explicitly apparent in our experimental data. Large site-to-reference spectral ratios resolved from experimental data indicate high amplification on the bridge as compared to nearby bedrock.

  4. Runoff conditions in Utah for water year 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordova, Jeffrey T.; Angeroth, Cory E.

    2012-01-01

    In May 2011, the snowpack conditions in the mountains of central and northern Utah had emergency planners and water managers preparing for levels of runoff similar to the record year of 1983. The SNOwpack TELemetry (SNOTEL) records from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) reported that the amount of water contained in the snowpack in May 2011 was greater than it was in either May of 1983 or 2005. Despite the above average snowpack,which lasted into the summer of 2011, runoff from snowmelt in 2011 did not create the widespread damage observed in 1983 and 2005. Cooler than normal temperatures resulted in slower snowmelt rates, which produced a prolonged and elevated runoff. Annual streamflow for water year 2011 was well above average, but few records of peak streamflow were set. The increase in water-surface elevation of Great Salt Lake was also above average. Ten streamgages in central and northern Utah, with records spanning greater than 20 years, have been selected to highlight the runoff conditions in Utah during water year 2011. Streamflow on the Duchesne River near Randlett, Utah, and on the Bear River near Utah-Wyoming state line is affected by several upstream diversions. These two streamgages were included in the analysis because their streamflow records have shown responses to spring snowmelt. The annual streamflow in all 10 of these streamgages was greater than 150 percent of average, and 3 streamgages set new records for total annual streamflow in water year 2011. One streamgage set a new peak streamflow record.

  5. 40 CFR 272.2251 - Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization. 272.2251 Section 272.2251 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Utah § 272.2251 Utah...

  6. 76 FR 9770 - Utah Board of Water Resources Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Hollow reservoir, in Kane, Washington, and Iron Counties, Utah, and Coconino and Mohave Counties, Arizona... hydroelectric turbines, ending at Sand Hollow reservoir, near St. George, Utah. To serve Iron County, the... facility at the existing Sand Hollow reservoir. Applicant Contact: Mr. Eric Millis, Utah Board of...

  7. 76 FR 28074 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT... inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake... remains was made by the Utah Museum of Natural History professional staff......

  8. 40 CFR 272.2251 - Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Utah § 272.2251 Utah State... Utah regulations cited in this paragraph are incorporated by reference as part of the hazardous waste... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part...

  9. 30 CFR 944.25 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 944.25 Section 944.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE UTAH § 944.25 Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following is...

  10. 30 CFR 944.25 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 944.25 Section 944.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE UTAH § 944.25 Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following is...

  11. 30 CFR 944.25 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 944.25 Section 944.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE UTAH § 944.25 Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following is...

  12. 30 CFR 944.25 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 944.25 Section 944.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE UTAH § 944.25 Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following is...

  13. 77 FR 64825 - Notice of Utah's Recreation Resource Advisory Council Conference Call Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Recreation Resource Advisory Council Conference Call Meeting... Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, the Utah Recreation Resource Advisory Council (RecRAC) will host...: In accordance with the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, the 15-member Utah...

  14. 75 FR 8397 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation RAC Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation RAC Meeting AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation... Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation RAC will meet as indicated below....

  15. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and as...) Division of Oil, Gas and Mining, Department of Natural Resources, 3 Triad Center, Suite 350, 355 West...

  16. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and as...) Division of Oil, Gas and Mining, Department of Natural Resources, 3 Triad Center, Suite 350, 355 West...

  17. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and as...) Division of Oil, Gas and Mining, Department of Natural Resources, 3 Triad Center, Suite 350, 355 West...

  18. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and as...) Division of Oil, Gas and Mining, Department of Natural Resources, 3 Triad Center, Suite 350, 355 West...

  19. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and as...) Division of Oil, Gas and Mining, Department of Natural Resources, 3 Triad Center, Suite 350, 355 West...

  20. 30 CFR 944.25 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STATE UTAH § 944.25 Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following is a... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 944.25 Section 944.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION...

  1. Compartment syndrome after tibial plateau fracture☆

    PubMed Central

    Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; dos Santos, Thays Fernanda Avelino; dos Santos, Fernanda Thaysa Avelino; da Costa Filho, Edelson Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are relatively rare, representing around 1.2% of all fractures. The tibia, due to its subcutaneous location and poor muscle coverage, is exposed and suffers large numbers of traumas, not only fractures, but also crush injuries and severe bruising, among others, which at any given moment, could lead compartment syndrome in the patient. The case is reported of a 58-year-old patient who, following a tibial plateau fracture, presented compartment syndrome of the leg and was submitted to decompressive fasciotomy of the four right compartments. After osteosynthesis with internal fixation of the tibial plateau using an L-plate, the patient again developed compartment syndrome. PMID:26229779

  2. The Hikurangi Plateau: Tectonic Ricochet and Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, David; Moresi, Louis; Betts, Peter; Whittaker, Joanne

    2015-04-01

    80 million years between interactions with different subduction systems provided time for the Hikurangi Plateau and Pacific Ocean lithosphere to cool, densify and strengthen. Neogene subduction of the Hikurangi Plateau occurring orthogonal to its Cretaceous predecessor, provides a unique opportunity to explore how changes to the physical properties of oceanic lithosphere affect subduction dynamics. We used Underworld to build mechanically consistent collision models to understand the dynamics of the two Hikurangi collisions. The Hikurangi Plateau is a ~112 Ma, 15km thick oceanic plateau that has been entrained by subduction zones immediately preceding the final break-up of Eastern Gondwana and currently within the active Hikurangi Margin. We explore why attempted subduction of the plateau has resulted in vastly different dynamics on two separate occasions. Slab break-off occured during the collision with Gondwana, currently there is apparent subduction of the plateau underneath New Zealand. At ~100Ma the young, hot Hikurangi Plateau, positively buoyant with respect to the underlying mantle, impacted a Gondwana Margin under rapid extension after the subduction of an mid-ocean ridge 10-15Ma earlier. Modelling of plateaus within young oceanic crust indicates that subduction of the thickened crust was unlikely to occur. Frontal accretion of the plateau and accompanying slab break-off is expected to have occured rapidly after its arrival. The weak, young slab was susceptible to lateral propagation of the ~1500 km window opened by the collision, and break-off would have progressed along the subduction zone inhibiting the "step-back" of the trench seen in older plates. Slab break-off coincided with a world-wide reorganisation of plate velocites, and orogenic collapse along the Gondwana margin characterised by rapid extension and thinning of the over-riding continental plate from ~60 to 30km. Following extension, Zealandia migrated to the NW until the Miocene allowing the

  3. Analysis of Neogene deformation between Beaver, Utah, and Barstow, California: suggestions for altering the extensional paradigm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R. Ernest; Beard, L. Sue; Mankinen, Edward A.; Hillhouse, John W.

    2013-01-01

    For more than two decades, the paradigm of large-magnitude (~250 km), northwest-directed (~N70°W) Neogene extensional lengthening between the Colorado Plateau and Sierra Nevada at the approximate latitude of Las Vegas has remained largely unchallenged, as has the notion that the strain integrates with coeval strains in adjacent regions and with plate-boundary strain. The paradigm depends on poorly constrained interconnectedness of extreme-case lengthening estimated at scattered localities within the region. Here we evaluate the soundness of the inferred strain interconnectedness over an area reaching 600 km southwest from Beaver, Utah, to Barstow, California, and conclude that lengthening is overestimated in most areas and, even if the estimates are valid, lengthening is not interconnected in a way that allows for published versions of province-wide summations. We summarize Neogene strike slip in 13 areas distributed from central Utah to Lake Mead. In general, left-sense shear and associated structures define a broad zone of translation approximately parallel to the eastern boundary of the Basin and Range against the Colorado Plateau, a zone we refer to as the Hingeline shear zone. Areas of steep-axis rotation (ranging to 2500 km2) record N-S shortening rather than unevenly distributed lengthening. In most cases, the rotational shortening and extension-parallel folds and thrusts are coupled to, or absorb, strike slip, thus providing valuable insight into how the discontinuous strike-slip faults are simply parts of a broad zone of continuous strain. The discontinuous nature of strike slip and the complex mixture of extensional, contractional, and steep-axis rotational structures in the Hingeline shear zone are similar to those in the Walker Lane belt in the west part of the Basin and Range, and, together, the two record southward displacement of the central and northern Basin and Range relative to the adjacent Colorado Plateau. Understanding this province

  4. The Use 0f AVIRIS Imagery To Assess Clay Mineralogy And Debris-Flow Potential In Cataract Canyon, Utah: A Preliminary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, Lawrence; Merenyi, Erzsebet

    2004-01-01

    Worldwide debris flows destroy property and take human lives every year (Costa, 1984). As a result of extensive property damage and loss of life there is a pressing need to go beyond just describing the nature and extent of debris flows as they occur. Most of the research into debris-flow initiation has centered on rainfall, slope angle, and existing debris-flow deposits (Costa and Wieczorek, 1987). The factor of source lithology has been recently addressed by studies in the sedimentary terranes of Grand Canyon (Webb et al., 1996; Griffiths et al., 1996) and on the Colorado Plateau as a whole.3 On the Colorado Plateau shales dominated by kaolinite and illite clays are significantly more likely to be recent producers of debris-flows than are shales in which smectite clays dominate.3 Establishing the location of shales and colluvial deposits containing kaolinite and illite clays in sedimentary terranes on the Colorado Plateau is essential to predicting where debris flows are likely to occur. AVIRIS imagery can be used to distinguish between types of clay minerals (Chabrillat et al., 2001), providing the basis for surface-materials maps. The ultimate product of this study will be a model that can be used to estimate the debris-flow hazard in Cataract Canyon, Utah. This model will be based on GIS overlay analysis of debris-flow initiation factor maps, including surface-materials maps derived from AVIRIS data.

  5. Tectonomagmatic Associations on the Central Andean Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Neogene evolution of the Central Andes is characterized by a strong association between plate convergence, mountain building and plateau formation, and magmatism. Plateau uplift by crustal shortening and thickening in the lower crust is broadly coincident with large scale silicic magmatism defined by the Neogene Central Andean ignimbrite province. Of particular interest here are the spatiotemporal correlations between silicic magmatism and tectonic evolution of the Altiplano-Puna plateau. Although magmatism is driven by the subduction-related flux from mantle to crust, the shift to "crustal" magmatism as indicated by elevated crustal isotopic indices after ~10Ma suggests a link between crustal thickening, plateau formation and silicic magmatism. In particular, elevated geotherms associated with crustal thickening and enhanced mantle flux associated with lithospheric delamination may have played a role in thermally preparing the Central Andean crust for enhanced silicic magma production during the extensive Neogene ignimbrite flare-up. Emplacement of these magmas in the upper crust throughout the Neogene may have fuelled a period of significant interaction between magmatism and tectonism on the plateau. With particular reference to the 21° to 24°S segment of the Central Andes, spatial and structural coincidence of calderas of the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex with the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapata-El Toro fault zone suggests significant tectonomagmatic interaction. Location of calderas suggest that these regional faults focused magma intrusion and storage, while spatially and temporally correlated eruption pulses connote a tectonic control. Indeed, current thermomechanical models of magma chamber development and eruption triggering promote a role for external triggering of "perched" upper crustal magma chambers. This might have been achieved by melt-enhanced deformation, or alternatively, significant uplift (~1km) associated with the development of large

  6. Peopling the Tibetan plateau: insights from archaeology.

    PubMed

    Aldenderfer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of the genome of modern Tibetans have revealed the existence of genes thought to provide an adaptive advantage for life at high elevation. Extrapolating from this discovery, some researchers now argue that a Tibetan-Han split occurred no more than 2750 yr ago. This date is implausible, and in this paper I review the archaeological data from the Tibetan plateau as one means by which to examine the veracity of this assertion. Following a review of the general state of knowledge of Tibetan prehistory, which is unfortunately only at its beginnings, I first examine the data that speak to the initial peopling of the plateau and assess the evidence that traces of their presence can be seen in modern Tibetans today. Although the data are sparse, both archaeology and genetics suggest that the plateau was occupied in the Late Pleistocene, perhaps as early as 30,000 yr ago, and that these early peoples have left a genetic signature in modern Tibetans. I then turn to the evidence for later migrations and focus on the question of the timing of the establishment of permanent settled villages on the plateau. Three areas of the plateau-northeastern Qinghai, extreme eastern Tibet, and the Yarlung Tsangpo valley-have evidence of permanent settlements dating from ca. 6500, 5900, and 3750 yr ago, respectively. These data are not consonant with the 2750 yr ago date for the split and suggest at a minimum that the plateau has been occupied substantially longer and, further, that multiple migrations at different times and from different places have created a complex mosaic of population history.

  7. HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN TB

    2011-01-14

    Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by

  8. Climatological characteristics and orographic enhancement of lake-effect precipitation over eastern Lake Ontario and the Tug Hill Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veals, Peter Gregory

    The Tug Hill Plateau of upstate New York rises approximately 500 m above Lake Ontario, observes frequent (often heavy) lake-effect snowfall, and is one of the snowiest regions in the eastern United States. This work presents a climatology of lake-effect precipitation created using data from the KTYX WSR-88D radar situated atop the plateau. Base reflectivity imagery was manually examined to identify lake-effect periods (LEPs) during each cool season (16 Sep--15 May) from 16 Sep 2001--15 May 2014. The most active months for lake effect in this region are December and January. There is a tendency for LEPs to begin within a few hours before and after sunset in the spring and fall, with no such diurnal signal observed in the winter. Correspondingly, lake effect is slightly more frequent at night than during the day. Overall, the diurnal variability is weaker than found over smaller bodies of water such as the Great Salt Lake of Utah. Classification of events by morphological type revealed that broad coverage and long-lake-axis-parallel (LLAP) account for ~72% and ~24% of lake-effect hours, respectively. The diurnal signal for broad coverage (LLAP) events was less (more) pronounced than for LEPs in general. The near-shore areas south and east of Lake Ontario receive the most frequent lake-effect precipitation. The Tug Hill Plateau produces a strong orographic signal, with an echo frequency maximum on the western (typically windward) slope. Data from cooperative observer (COOP) sites and the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) corroborate these radar-derived results. The `broadening' of high echo frequency over the Tug Hill Plateau, as well as the existence of the lake-orographic morphology, may point to inland/orographic intensification and generation of precipitation during some LEPs.

  9. Insufficiency fractures of the tibial plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Manco, L.G.; Schneider, R.; Pavlov, H.

    1983-06-01

    An insufficiency fracture of the tibial plateau may be the cause of knee pain in patients with osteoporosis. The diagnosis is usually not suspected until a bone scan is done, as initial radiographs are often negative or inconclusive and clinical findings are nonspecific and may simulate osteoarthritis or spontaneous osteonecrosis. In five of 165 patients referred for bone scans due to nontraumatic knee pain, a characteristic pattern of intense augmented uptake of radionuclide confined to the tibial plateau led to a presumptive diagnosis of insufficiency fracture, later confirmed on radiographs.

  10. Hydrology of the Price River basin, Utah, with emphasis on selected coal-field areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddell, Kidd M.; Dodge, J.E.; Darby, D.W.; Theobald, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Data obtained during a hydrologic study of the Price River basin, Utah, are used to describe seasonal variations of flow of springs, relation between ground water and surface water, hydraulic properties of the ground-water reservoir, ground-water recharge and discharge, flood characteristics of streams, mineralogic composition and depositional rates of sediments, nutrient and inorganic loading in streams and Scofield Reservoir, and water budgets for selected basins. Additional study and monitoring are needed to detect possible hydrologic changes caused by coal mining. Much of the ground-water discharge from the Star Point Sandstone in the Mesaverde Group in the Wasatch Plateau occurs along faults. In the Book Cliffs, where faulting is less extensive, most of the ground-water discharge is from the Flagstaff Limestone. The Flagstaff Limestone is greatly diffusive, has a small storage coefficient, and contains water which is perched. Springs issuing from the Star Point Sandstone in the Mud Creek drainage (Wasatch Plateau) had recession indexes greater than 365 days per log cycle. Springs issuing at higher altitudes from the Colton Formation and the Flagstaff Limestone in the Soldier Creek area (Book Cliffs) have great seasonal variability, with recession indexes ranging from 24 to 115 days per log cycle. Estimated transmissivities in the Soldier Creek area ranged from 0.003 foot squared per day in the lower part of the Castlegate Sandstone to 0.07 foot squared per day in the Price River Formation. Seepage from the Star Point Sandstone is the major contributor to base flow of the stream in Eccles Canyon (Wasatch Plateau). Gains of as much as 230 gallons per minute occurred near a fault zone which crosses Eccles Canyon at the junction with South Fork Canyon. The potentiometric surface of water in the Blackhawk Formation in the Wasatch Plateau (Mud Creek drainage) and the Book Cliffs (Soldier Creek area) generally is above the coal zones, and dewatering will be necessary

  11. Geothermal assessment of a portion of the Escalante Valley, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Klauk, R.H.; Gourley, C.

    1983-12-01

    In February 1981, the Utah geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) contracted with the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the geothermal potential of an area proposed for a possible Missile Experimental (MX) operations base in the Escalante Valley region of Utah. Exploration techniques employed included a temperature survey, chemical analysis of springs and wells, and temperature-depth measurements in holes of opportunity. The highest water temperatures recorded in the area, with the exceptions of a 60/sup 0/C (140/sup 0/F) geothermal exploration hole and Thermo Hot Springs (42 to 78/sup 0/C or 108 to 172/sup 0/F), were 27 and 28/sup 0/C (81 and 82/sup 0/F) at two wells located northwest of Zane, Utah.

  12. Dung, diet, and the paleoenvironment of the extinct shrub-ox ( Euceratherium collinum) on the Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropf, Manny; Mead, Jim I.; Scott Anderson, R.

    2007-01-01

    Fossil remains of Euceratherium collinum (extinct shrub-ox) have been found throughout North America, including the Grand Canyon. Recent finds from the Escalante River Basin in southern Utah further extend the animal's range into the heart of the Colorado Plateau. E. collinum teeth and a metapodial condyle (foot bone) have been recovered in association with large distinctively shaped dung pellets, a morphology similar to a 'Hershey's Kiss' (HK), from a late Pleistocene dung layer in Bechan Cave. HK dung pellets have also been recovered from other alcoves in the Escalante River Basin including Willow and Fortymile canyons. Detailed analyses of the HK pellets confirmed them to be E. collinum and indicate a browser-type diet dominated (> 95%) by trees and shrubs: Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush), Acacia sp. (acacia), Quercus (oak), and Chrysothamnus (rabbit brush). The retrieval of spring and fall pollen suggests E. collinum was a year-round resident in the Escalante River Basin.

  13. 78 FR 6832 - Notice of Mailing Address Change for the Utah State Office, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Mailing Address Change for the Utah State Office, Salt Lake City, UT... of Land Management (BLM), Utah State Office, in Salt Lake City, Utah, will be changing from P.O. Box 45155-0155 to 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101-1345. The proposed date will...

  14. Creep behavior of Utah oil shale subject to uniaxial loading

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, K.P.; Dana, G.F.; Chen, J.L.

    1982-06-01

    This paper presents results of a study on the creep behavior of Utah oil shale. A Conbel Model 355 pneumatic driven testing machine is used. The set of duplicate test specimens required for creep testing were cut from a single oil shale layer using a wire saw to avoid any surface damage. A rheological model was developed for creep behavior of oil shale as a function of stress level and organic content. Data from creep testing and Fischer assay analyses were used to demonstrate correlation between various stress levels and organic contents for samples taken from the Mahogany Zone of the Parachute Creek Member in Utah's Cowboy Canyon.

  15. Two year's experience under Utah's mens rea insanity law.

    PubMed

    Heinbecker, P

    1986-01-01

    The author examined the records of the seven defendants found not guilty by reason of insanity (NGI) under Utah's mens rea insanity law during the first two years of its operation. In all of the cases the attorneys, judges, and experts seemed unaware of the new law or confused about its meaning. Examination revealed that the findings of insanity were negotiated with either ignorance of or indifference to the mens rea law. Under the mens rea NGI law, the rate of insanity findings for Utah increased.

  16. Utah healthcare system watches over Olympians and spectators.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2002-01-01

    For the first time in Olympic history, a single organization was tapped to provide medical services when Intermountain Health Care (IHC), Salt Lake City, was named for the 2002 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Utah. IHC, a charitable, community owned, integrated, not-for-profit healthcare system serving patients in Utah and Idaho, spent four years developing and implementing a plan to deliver medical services to both Olympians and spectators. Nearly 350 IHC doctors, nurses, physical therapists and other professionals donated their services for the Olympics without compensation as part of their not-for-profit mission. In addition, about 1,000 IHC employees applied to be general volunteers during the games.

  17. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has fond that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 181 figs., 175 tabs.

  18. Timing of the End-Triassic Extinctions on Land: the Moenave Formation on the Southern Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, S. G.; Tanner, L. H.; Geissman, J. W.; Hurley, L. L.; Kozur, H.; Heckert, A.; Kuerschner, W.; Weems, R.

    2010-12-01

    Strata of the Moenave Formation on and adjacent to the southern Colorado Plateau in Utah-Arizona, USA represent one of the best known and most stratigraphically continuous, complete and fossiliferous terrestrial sections across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. We present here a synthesis of new biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic data collected from the Moenave Formation across the outcrop belt, which extends from the St. George area in southwestern Utah to the Tuba City area in northern Arizona. These include, palynomorphs, conchostracans and vertebrate fossils (including footprints) and a composite polarity record based on four magnetostratigraphic sections. Placement of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in strata of the Moenave Formation has long been imprecise and debatable, but these new data (especially the conchostracan) allow us to place the Triassic-Jurassic boundary relatively precisely in the middle part of the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation. This placement supports the conclusion that terrestrial extinctions preceded marine extinctions across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and likely were unrelated to CAMP volcanism.

  19. Mud volcanism at the Manihiki-Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorf, H. )

    1990-06-01

    In February 1987 a complex of mud volcanoes was discovered on the northeastern edge of the Manihiki-Plateau during a cruise of R/V MOANA WAVE. Forty out of about 100 cones coalesce to form an edifice about 25 km in diameter, 1,900 m high, rising from a plateau depth of 3,200 m. SeaMARC II side-scan images suggest radial fluid sediment flow from the center of this feature. Recent foraminiferal ooze was cored from a satellite cone. One dredge haul from the summit of the edifice recovered burrowed limestone with embedded Middle Eocene foraminifera. It suggests that parts of the sedimentary basement cover of the Manihiki Plateau have been mobilized together with pore fluids and moved upward. The causes of the movement as well as its mechanism, however, remain unknown because of the lack of direct measurements. There is a likelihood that overpressured methane, generated from organic carbon-rich sediments, acts as driving force. Therefore, BGR submitted a proposal to the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) to investigate the mud volcano complex and reference area with the most relevant outcropping sedimentary sequence of the northeastern Manihiki Plateau in detail. The preliminary results from these investigations carried out with R/V SONNE in spring of 1990 are presented.

  20. Structure and sedimentary history of Exmouth Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Exon, N.F.; Williamson, P.E.; Von Rad, U.

    1989-03-01

    The large, deep-water Exmouth Plateau off northwestern Australia has been actively explored for petroleum, and a giant gas accumulation has been found. Data from industry and research institutions have established its geological framework. The plateau has a basement of continental crust that was thinned and extended in the Permian. This is overlain by 10 km of Phanerozoic strata, with an average of more than 3 km of Triassic, about 1 km of Jurassic/Cretaceous, and 0.5 km of Cenozoic strata. The plateau separated from other parts of the northern margin of Gondwanaland in the Mesozoic. Latest Triassic and Jurassic rifting formed large north-northeast-trending fault blocks; in the Oxfordian a microcontinent drifted away to the northwest, forming the plateau's northern margin. The other margins developed in the Neocomian as Greater India separated from Australia - the western margin by rifting and the southern by shearing. Terrigenous input declined greatly at that time. This old continental margin, with its relatively thin Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments, was selected by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) for comprehensive and fully integrated sedimentologic, biostratigraphic, paleobathymetric, and subsidence studies.

  1. Central Tibetan Meso-Tethyan oceanic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai-Jun; Xia, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Xiu; Liu, Wei-Liang; Zeng, Lu; Li, Jian-Feng; Xu, Li-Feng

    2014-12-01

    We report the occurrences of the remnants of a Meso-Tethyan oceanic plateau, encompassing an area of ~ 2 × 105 km2 in central Tibet. The plateau remnants include large volumes of pillow basalt formed largely by emergent to subaerial eruption, minor ultramafic intrusives and cumulates, exotic blocks of limestone, radiolarian chert, graywacke, and shale. Isotopic and paleontological dating suggest two major plateau eruptive events at 193-173 Ma and at 128-104 Ma, respectively. The basalts are characterized by enrichment of incompatible elements and a wide range of Sr-Nd isotope composition (initial εNd from -3.71 to + 7.9, initial 87Sr/86Sr from 0.703927 to 0.707618). The trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic data suggest that these basalts are of affinity with those from the Kerguelen and Tethyan plumes, indicative of a plume mantle upwelling origin with involvement of continental material. The wholesale obduction of the Meso-Tethyan oceanic plateau, along with the dismembered normal oceanic crustal fragments, over the Tibetan continental crust could have given rise to perhaps 2 km elevation of central Tibet during the Late Cretaceous.

  2. Regional Seismotectonics in the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Xu, J.; Zhao, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among the depth of lithosphere brittle fracture, seismotectonics and geothermal anomalous active in Tibetan plateau were investigated using the seismic dada from ISC and Chinese seismic net and geothermal data. The results suggest that the region of anomalously geothermal activity almost coincides that of the normal faulting type earthquake. The geothermal anomaly activity region coincides spatially with that of the events deeper than 60 km as well as. The normal faulting earthquakes may be mainly tectonic activity regimes until 110 km deep in the thermal anomaly region. The strike directions of events are likely the N-S direction, coinciding with the strike of the thermal anomaly active belts. The earthquakes align along the normal faults and faulted-depression zone with the N-S direction. The thermal anomaly activity also distributes along the faulted-depression zone. Many events deeper than 60 km exist in the anomalously geothermal activity region in the plateau. Events extend to bottom of the lithosphere of 110km from the surface, like columnar seismic crowd. The lithosphere extends along the E-W direction due to the E-W extensional stress in the central and southern Tibetan plateau, altitude of the plateau. The tensional stress in the E-W results in the lithosphere fractures and the normal faults striking N-S direction, grabens and faulted-depression zones. Thermal material from the asthenosphere wells upward to the surface along deep seismic fractures and faults through the thick crust. The anomalously thermal activities are attributable to the upwelling thermal material from the mantle in the altitude of Tibetan plateau.

  3. Map showing distribution of cadmium and antimony in the nonmagnetic fraction of heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, shows the regional distribution of cadmium and antimony in the nonmagnetic fraction of drainage-sediment samples. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  4. DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN UTAH: A COHORT MORTALITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association of drinking water arsenic and mortality outcome was investigated in a cohort of residents from Millard County, Utah. Median drinking water arsenic concentrations for selected study towns ranged from 14 to 166 ppb and were from public and private samples collected ...

  5. A Schoolmarm All My Life: Personal Narratives from Frontier Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkead, Joyce, Ed.

    This book presents edited versions of the personal narratives of 24 Mormon women who taught school in frontier Utah. Drawn primarily from the archives of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, the accounts detail the women's lives as Mormons, as pioneers, and as teachers and have been edited to focus on the education of women,…

  6. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 46 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations that are: (1) located partially or totally in the adjoining States of Oregon, California,…

  7. Prior Restraint of Utah High School Newspapers by Advisers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, Cynthia Ford; Black, Jay

    Forty-seven high school newspaper advisers from Utah completed a questionnaire to determine their knowledge of First Amendment rights of student journalists, and to determine what variables may affect their publication decisions. Eight composite cases were developed from relevant First Amendment court decisions. Respondents were asked if they…

  8. Deployment of a Pair of 3 M telescopes in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, G.; Adams, B.; Butler, K.; Cardoza, J.; Colin, P.; Hui, C. M.; Kieda, D.; Kirkwood, D.; Kress, D.; Kress, M.; LeBohec, S.; McGuire, C.; Newbold, M.; Nunez, P.; Pham, K.

    2008-12-24

    Two 3 m telescopes are being installed in Grantsville Utah. They are intended for the testing of various approaches to the implementation of intensity interferometry using Cherenkov Telescopes in large arrays as receivers as well as for the testing of novel technology cameras and electronics for ground based gamma-ray astronomy.

  9. Utah Adult Education Services. Adult Education Report 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Major purposes for the preparation of this report on public school adult education in Utah were: to provide the public with a description of achievements, trends, and needs, and with meaningful cost accounting information; to make comparisons and analyses of adult education by program, school district, and year; and to provide the adult education…

  10. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF UTAH VALLEY PARTICLES: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Utah Valley provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the health effects of particulate matter (PM) in humans. The area has had intermittently high particle levels with the principal point source being a steel mill. Due to a labor dispute, the mill was shut down. The closu...

  11. 75 FR 71726 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ...-- Water and Science. ACTION: Notice of availability of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and... a FONSI associated with the Final EA--Realignment of a Portion of the Utah Lake Drainage Basin Water Delivery System. Interior has determined that the proposed action as detailed in the FONSI will not have...

  12. Utah's Broad Voucher Plan Would Break New Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the provisions of a new Utah voucher plan that is hoped to embolden other states to embrace universal-voucher programs. The legislation, the product of a six-year statehouse battle, would provide every public school student who wanted one, a voucher worth $500 per year, while low-income children would receive as much as…

  13. Utah Migrant Education. Annual Evaluation Report, FY 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Dept. of Public Instruction, Salt Lake City.

    In 1982, Utah's migrant education program provided educational and support services to 559 K-12 migrant students in 10 six-to-eight-week summer migrant school projects. Instructional programs included reading, math, language arts, ESL (English as a Second Language), cultural awareness, physical education/recreation, career awareness, vocational…

  14. Parental Attitudes Regarding School-Based Sexuality Education in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steadman, Mindy; Crookston, Benjamin; Page, Randy; Hall, Cougar

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality education programs can be broadly categorized as either risk-avoidance or risk-reduction approaches. Health educators in Utah public schools must teach a state mandated risk-avoidance curriculum which prohibits the advocacy or encouragement of contraception. Multiple national surveys indicate that parents prefer a risk-reduction approach…

  15. Utah Educational Quality Indicators. The Seventh in the Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, David E.; Ross, John D.

    This report, the seventh in a series, summarizes information taken from a variety of ongoing and special studies about education in Utah. The first type of information deals with students' academic achievements and aptitudes. This category includes results from the American College Testing Program, the Scholastic Aptitude Test, the Preliminary…

  16. Status of Teacher Personnel in Utah 1992-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This report provides data regarding the supply of and the demand for teachers as well as the status of currently active teachers in Utah. Statistical data assembled in this report have been divided into five color-coded sections according to the classification of information. The first section, "Total Professional Personnel," covers total number…

  17. The Science Laboratory Experiences of Utah's High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This research investigated the extent to which science laboratory experiences encountered by Utah high school students aligned with reform efforts outlined in national standards documents. Through both quantitative and qualitative methods the findings revealed that while there were instances of alignment found between science laboratory…

  18. A Look at Early Language Learning in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Houton, Jacque Bott

    2013-01-01

    The state of Utah is leading the nation in a surge of new elementary language immersion programs. Their unprecedented growth of programs, over a four-year span, has been both intentional and systemic, taking advantage of a supportive base and promoting language learning as a way to increase economic benefits for the state. While math and science…

  19. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Utah. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater, and…

  20. 75 FR 30421 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Central Utah Project Completion Act AGENCY: Department of the Interior, Office of the Assistant Secretary... with the Environmental Assessment for Wasatch County Water Efficiency Project Recycled Water Project... Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Wasatch County Water Efficiency Project Recycled Water Project....

  1. Teacher Career Ladders in Utah: Perspectives on Early Stages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Ken, Ed.; And Others

    The status of teacher career ladders in Utah is discussed from five different perspectives. Jim Wilson, representing the Legislative Research Analyst's Office and General Counsel of the Legislature, speaks about legislative intent from the past year and what legislators thought would happen and wanted to happen regarding career ladder bills which…

  2. Education in Utah: A Call to Action. Addendum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Clarifications to recommendations made in the Utah Education Reform Committee report, "A Call to Action," are presented in this addendum. Earlier recommendations relating to teachers are revised and clarified and new ones relating to class size, teachers' duties, instructional materials, and the student-parent-school relationship are added.…

  3. Lead Toxicity and Iron Deficiency in Utah Migrant Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliffe, Stephen D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Determines the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, aged 9-72 months. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen percent of all children tested, and 30 percent of those aged 9-23 months, were iron deficient. Hematocrit determination is an insensitive screen for iron deficiency.…

  4. Decentralized Training for Physician's Assistants in Utah: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    An experimental program to provide decentralized training and certification for Utah's physician's assistants unable to leave their own communities is evaluated. Original program goals were met, but it was learned that the methodology is inefficient and the program requires more teaching time than most physicians can contribute. (MSE)

  5. 78 FR 2424 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... November 7, 2005, are subject to processing costs on a case by case basis (43 CFR 3000.10(d)(1), (70 FR 58872, October 7, 2005). The processing cost rules implemented for coal LBAs at 43 CFR 3473.2(f) (70 FR... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land...

  6. 76 FR 63951 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... November 7, 2005, are subject to cost recovery on a case-by-case basis (See 43 CFR 3000.10(d)(1), 70 FR... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that that...

  7. IMPROVING THE PROFICIENCY OF MECHANICAL ACTIVITIES PERFORMED BY UTAH'S AGRICULTURALISTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JARRETT, VON H.

    THE MAJOR PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO--(1) IMPROVE THE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS FOR THE PREPARATION OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS AT UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY, (2) SERVE AS A GUIDE IN CHANGING AND DEVELOPING FUTURE COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS FOR ALL-DAY STUDENTS, (3) DISCOVER THE NEEDS FOR INSERVICE TRAINING PROGRAMS, AND…

  8. Ground-water conditions in the Lake Powell area, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    The Lake Powell area comprises about 2,450 square miles in south-central Utah. It is subdivided into three geographical areas by the Colorado and San Juan Rivers. The Henry Mountains area is north of the Colorado River, the Navajo Mountain area is south of the San Juan River, and the third area is between the Colorado and San Juan Rivers.

  9. Utah Public Library Service: 1995. An Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Sandi

    This annual report of public library services is part of "The Upgrade Process," a tool for Utah's public librarians and library trustees to use as they work to improve the quality and effectiveness of public library service. The process has three major components: public library service standards; a flexible planning process for public library…

  10. Utah Public Library Service, 2001: An Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Sandi

    This annual report of Utah public library services presents data useful for local library planning. This information is presented in two sections: core performance measures and general tables. Statewide summary data and breakouts by the populations of the library jurisdictions are provided for the following core performance measures: (1) visits…

  11. 75 FR 19338 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Milford, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... Group, LLC, authorized assignee of Station KCLS(FM), Channel 269C2, Pioche, Nevada, requesting the substitution of Channel 288C for vacant Channel 285C at Milford, Utah. The reference coordinates for Channel... is available for inspection and copying during normal business hours in the FCC Reference...

  12. Cataloging and Inventorying Instructional Materials in Utah Schools. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This handbook is designed to assist Utah schools in cataloging instructional materials. It is recommended that it be used in all local school and district media programs. This sixth edition attempts to simplify cataloging while retaining the basic elements needed for locating materials. Following a brief introduction, the handbook is divided into…

  13. 3. VIEW FROM MAIN ENTRANCE ROAD SWITCHBACKS FACING EAST. UTAH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW FROM MAIN ENTRANCE ROAD SWITCHBACKS FACING EAST. UTAH HIGHWAY 191 VISIBLE AT RIGHT, PARK MAINTENANCE FACILITY IN FOREGROUND. - Arches National Park Main Entrance Road, Beginning at U.S. Highway 191, approximately 6 miles north of Moab, Moab, Grand County, UT

  14. VIEW FROM MAIN ENTRANCE ROAD SWITCHBACKS FACING EAST. UTAH HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM MAIN ENTRANCE ROAD SWITCHBACKS FACING EAST. UTAH HIGHWAY 191 VISIBLE AT RIGHT, PARK MAINTENANCE FACILITY IN FOREGROUND - Arches National Park Main Entrance Road, Beginning at U.S. Highway 191, approximately 6 miles north of Moab, Moab, Grand County, UT

  15. Higher Education Accounting Manual. Utah Coordinating Council of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Coordinating Council of Higher Education, Salt Lake City.

    Recognition of a critical need for accurate and detailed information to refine the process of budgeting funds for higher education in Utah led to the preparation of this accounting manual for universities and colleges in the state. The manual presents guidelines for the uniform accounting and reporting of financial and statistical data, and is…

  16. Geothermal studies at the University of Utah Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    The University of Utah Research Institute (WRI) is a self-supporting corporation organized in December 1972 under the Utah Non-Profit Corporation Association Act. Under its charter, the Institute is separate in its operations and receives no direct financial support from either the University of Utah or the State of Utah. The charter includes provisions for WRI to conduct both public and proprietary scientific work for governmental agencies, academic institutions, private industry, and individuals. WRI is composed of five divisions, shown in Figure 1: the Earth Science Laboratory (ESL), the Environmental Studies Laboratory (EVSL), the Center for Remote Sensing and Cartography (CRSC), the Engineering Technology Laboratory (ETL) and the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory (APL). The Earth Science Laboratory has a staff of geologists, geochemists and geophysicists who have a broad range of experience in geothermal research and field projects as well as in mineral and petroleum exploration. The Environmental Studies Laboratory offers a variety of technical services and research capabilities in the areas of air quality and visibility, acid precipitation, surface and groundwater contamination, and environmentally caused stress in vegetation. The Center for Remote Sensing and Cartography offers applied research and services with a full range of remote sensing and mapping capability, including satellite and airborne imagery processing and interpretation. The Engineering Technology Laboratory is currently studying the interaction of the human body with electromagnetic radiation. The Atmospheric Physics Laboratory is developing hygroscopic droplet growth theory and orographic seeding models for dispersal of fog.

  17. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, & Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 45 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations located partially or totally in the adjoining states of Oregon, Idaho, California, and New…

  18. Salt Lake City, Utah, Winter 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a snowy, winter view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on February 8, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal

  19. PLATEAUING COSMIC RAY DETECTORS TO ACHIEVE OPTIMUM OPERATING VOLTAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Knoff, E.N.; Peterson, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Through QuarkNet, students across the country have access to cosmic ray detectors in their high school classrooms. These detectors operate using a scintillator material and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A data acquisition (DAQ) board counts cosmic ray hits from the counters. Through an online e-Lab, students can analyze and share their data. In order to collect viable data, the PMTs should operate at their plateau voltages. In these plateau ranges, the number of counts per minute remains relatively constant with small changes in PMT voltage. We sought to plateau the counters in the test array and to clarify the plateauing procedure itself. In order to most effectively plateau the counters, the counters should be stacked and programmed to record the number of coincident hits as well as their singles rates. We also changed the threshold value that a signal must exceed in order to record a hit and replateaued the counters. For counter 1, counter 2, and counter 3, we found plateau voltages around 1V. The singles rate plateau was very small, while the coincidence plateau was very long. The plateau voltages corresponded to a singles rate of 700–850 counts per minute. We found very little effect of changing the threshold voltages. Our chosen plateau voltages produced good performance studies on the e-Lab. Keeping in mind the nature of the experiments conducted by the high school students, we recommend a streamlined plateauing process. Because changing the threshold did not drastically affect the plateau voltage or the performance study, students should choose a threshold value, construct plateau graphs, and analyze their data using a performance study. Even if the counters operate slightly off their plateau voltage, they should deliver good performance studies and return reliable results.

  20. Measures of Child Well-Being in Utah, 2002: Counting the Kids Who Count on Us. Utah KIDS COUNT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haven, Terry, Ed.

    This Kids Count report details statewide trends in the well-being of Utah's children. The statistical portrait is based on 29 indicators of children's well-being in five areas: (1) child health and safety (prenatal care, low birthweight, infant mortality, child injury deaths, injury-related hospital discharges, child abuse, childhood…

  1. Measures of Child Well-Being in Utah, 2003: Counting on a Better Future for Utah's Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haven, Terry, Ed.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Utah's children. The statistical portrait is based on 28 indicators of children's well-being in five areas: (1) child health (prenatal care, low birth-weight births, infant mortality, child injury deaths, injury-related hospital discharges, child abuse, childhood immunizations,…

  2. A Study of the Utah Public School Finance System: Findings and Recommendations of the Utah School Finance Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Equity effects of program growth and diversification on the Utah public education finance system are examined. The degree to which student and taxpayer equity are achieved by district formulas of the Minimum School Program are assessed by analysis of school-related taxation and spending over time, current distribution patterns of state support,…

  3. Educational Issues in Utah: Governance, Legislation, Technology, and Finance. 1994-95 Conditions of Education in Utah Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Patrick F., Ed.; Johnson, Bob L., Jr., Ed.

    This document is the third edition of "Conditions of Education in Utah," covering the 1994-95 academic year. The first three chapters analyze issues relative to distance education and the Internet. Chapters 1 and 2 examine the pros and cons of distance education, and chapter 3 describes the construction, maintenance, and staffing costs associated…

  4. Measures of Child Well-Being in Utah, 2001. A Pledge to Our Children. Utah KIDS COUNT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haven, Terry, Ed.

    This KIDS COUNT report details statewide trends in the well-being of Utah's children. The statistical portrait is based on 26 indicators of children's well-being: (1) prenatal care; (2) low birth weight infants; (3) infant mortality; (4) child injury deaths; (5) unintentional injuries; (6) untreated tooth decay; (7) immunization rates; (8) suicide…

  5. Maps showing distribution of pH, copper, zinc, fluoride, uranium, molybdenum, arsenic, and sulfate in water, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, J.B.; Miller, W.R.; Ficklin, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    These maps show the regional distribution of copper, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, uranium, fluoride, sulfate, and pH in surface and ground water from the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle. This study supplements (Miller and others, 1984a-j) the regional drainage geochemical study done for the Richfield quadrangle under the U.S. Geological Survey’s Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP). Regional sampling was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be used, along with geologic and geophysical data, to assess the mineral resource potential of the Richfield quadrangle. Analytical data used in compiling this report were published previously (McHugh and others, 1981). The Richfield quadrangle in west-central Utah covers the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt that extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 250 km into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range Province, and the eastern third in the High Plateaus of Utah subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time.

  6. PLAN FOR CLOSURE OF HANFORDS CENTRAL PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    AUSTIN, B.A.

    2004-12-15

    This paper summarizes an approach to reduce risk to the public and environment through accelerated closure of Hanford's Central Plateau, based on a plan developed by Fluor Hanford and submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE)-Richland Office, for consideration, in September, 2004. This plan provides a framework and starting point for discussions with regulators and further planning for closure activities on the Plateau. The closure strategy and approach required developing a full inventory of items needing closure as well as identifying and defining technical and regulatory approaches that were compatible with current regulatory processes, reduce risks, and met DOE objectives. This effort, and the paper that follows, integrates closure activities among several contractors and two DOE field offices.

  7. Utah Valley University Field Station at Capitol Reef National Park: A Venue for Improved Student Learning and Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K.; Schultz, M.; Williams, B.; Gay, J.; Johnson, S.; Dunn, P.

    2015-12-01

    The unique geo-environment offered in Capitol Reef National Park and its surrounding areas has a long-standing history of inspiring geological scientific exploration. The Capitol Reef Field Station was established in 2008 as part of collaboration between the National Park and Utah Valley University in order to support teaching and research of the natural environment found within the park and on the Colorado Plateau. The facility itself situated deep within the park, well off any public road system offers state of the art alternative energy and sustainable construction and makes extensive use of passive heating and cooling, in order to maintain its status of being "off-grid." The field station is a 6200 square foot complex of classrooms and dormitories supporting university level education and field studies of the Colorado Plateau. The complex includes a classroom and dining area, professional kitchen, and two separate dormitories, which can sleep up to 24 overnight visitors, while the daytime usage can accommodate up to 40 visitors. The vision of the facility is to support teaching and research toward responsible, respectful, and sustainable stewardship of the natural world - including Interdisciplinary learning between arts and sciences Student internships and service learning in collaboration with the National Park Service Field-based scientific research (as well as inventorying and assessing Park ecosystems changes) Field training in scientific research Collaboration between National Park Service scientists and local, regional, and national institutions The park is situated at 38°N 249°E at elevations greater than 2000 m in Southern Utah. In contrast to the more famous neighboring sister parks such as Zion and Bryce Canyon National Parks, which are in relatively close proximity to large road systems and cities, Capitol Reef offers what is believed to be the darkest night sky in the US. The culmination of features creates an ideal location for studies of the

  8. Physical processes of shallow mafic dike emplacement near the San Rafael Swell, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Gartner, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Some 200 shonkinite dikes, sills, and breccia bodies on the western Colorado Plateau of south-central Utah were intruded from approximately 3.7 to 4.6 Ma, contemporaneous with mafic volcanism along the nearby plateau margin. Thicknesses of dikes range to about 6 m; the log-normal mean thickness is 85 cm. Despite the excellent exposures of essentially all dikes in strata of the Jurassic San Rafael Group, their number is indeterminate from their outcrop and spacing because they are everywhere greatly segmented. By our grouping of almost 2000 dike segments, most dikes are less than 2 km in outcrop length; the longest is 9 km. Because the San Rafael magmas were primitive and probably ascended directly from the mantle, dike lengths in outcrop are much less than their heights. The present exposures probably lie along the irregular upper peripheries of dikes that lengthen and merge with depth. Orientations of steps on dike contacts record local directions of dike-fracture propagation; about half of the measurements plunge less than 30??, showing that lateral propagation at dike peripheries is as important as the vertical propagation ultimately responsible for ascent. The San Rafael dikes, now exposed after erosion of about 0.5-1.5 km, appear to thicken and shorten upward, probably because near-surface vesiculation enhanced magmatic driving pressures. Propagation likely ceased soon after the first dike segments began to feed nearby sills or vented to initiate small-volume eruptions. Most of the dikes are exposed in clastic strata of the Jurassic San Rafael Group. They probably acquired their strikes, however, while ascending along well-developed joints in massive sandstones of the underlying Glen Canyon Group. Rotation of far-field stresses during the emplacement interval cannot account for disparate strikes of the dikes, which vary through 110??, most lying between north and N25??W. Rather, the two regional horizontal principal stresses were probably nearly equal, and so

  9. Electron transport fluxes in potato plateau regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Electron transport fluxes in the potato plateau regime are calculated from the solutions of the drift kinetic equation and fluid equations. It is found that the bootstrap current density remains finite in the region close to the magnetic axis, although it decreases with increasing collision frequency. This finite amount of the bootstrap current in the relatively collisional regime is important in modeling tokamak startup with 100{percent} bootstrap current. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Mid-Late Holocene Arroyo Stratigraphy in Southern Utah; Balance between Climate Forcing and Geomorphic Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, K. E.; Rittenour, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Historic arroyo entrenchment at the turn of the 20th century signified a rapid and widespread change in stream dynamics throughout much of the southwest U.S.A.. Arroyo walls along modern channels expose multiple unconformity-bound sediment packages that record mid-to-late Holocene arroyo cut-fill dynamics. Many of these different-aged periods of aggradation appear to have reached a similar tread height through time, suggesting that a 'geomorphic threshold' may partially control end-member stream grade and the timing of channel entrenchment. However, observations of near-synchronous regional cut-fill events support an alternative hypothesis that climate is a primary control of arroyo dynamics. In order to test the role of allogenic forcing versus autogenic processes on arroyo cut-fill dynamics, three datasets were constructed and analyzed from Johnson Wash (JW), a drainage containing a ~40 km long arroyo in the Grand Staircase region of the Colorado Plateau in south-central Utah. The chronostratigraphy of arroyo cut-fill events was reconstructed using a combination of field observations and age control from radiocarbon (n=57) and optically stimulated luminescence dating (OSL; n=27) collected from 15 stratigraphic sections that bracket episodes of incision and characterize alluvial-fill packages. These data are compared to regional cut-fill chronologies from other arroyo systems. Temporal and spatial variability in catchment averaged erosion rates was quantified using terrestrial in-situ Beryllium-10 measured in quartz from alluvial and colluvial sediment samples (n=24) collected from the modern channel and paleo-arroyo walls located in JW and the adjacent upper Kanab Creek watershed. The third dataset consists of longitudinal profile concavities of the currently entrenched channel and the relict aggraded valley-fill surfaces and is used to identify systematic trends in aggraded versus entrenched channel forms.

  11. Reconnaissance of uranium and copper deposits in parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland B.; Erickson, Ralph L.

    1952-01-01

    Because of the common association of uranium and copper in several of the commercial uranium deposits in the Colorado Plateau Province, a reconnaissance was made of several known deposits of copper disseminated through sandstone to determine whether they might be a source of uranium. In order to obtain more information regarding the relationship between copper, uranium and carbonaceous materials, some of the uraniferious asphaltrite deposits in the Shinarump conglomerate along the west flank of the San Rafael Swell were also investigated briefly. During this reconnaissance 18 deposits were examined in New Mexico, eight in Utah, two in Idaho, and one each in Wyoming and Colorado. No uranium deposits of commercial grade are associated with the copper deposits that were examined. The uraniferous asphaltites in the Shinarump conglomerate of Triassic age on the west flank of the San Rafael Swell, however, are promising from the standpoint of commercial uranium production. Spectrographic analyses of crude oil, asphalt, and bituminous shales show a rather consistent suite of trace metals including vanadium, nickel, copper, cobalt, chromium, lead zinc, and molybdenum. The similarity of the metal assemblage, including uranium of the San Rafael Swell asphaltites, to the metal assemblage in crude oil and other bituminous materials suggests that these metals were concentrated in the asphaltites from petroleum. However, the hypothesis that uranium minerals were already present before the hydrocarbons were introduced and that some sort of replacement or uranium minerals by carbon compounds was effected after the petroleum migrated into the uranium deposit should not be disregarded. The widespread association of uranium with asphaltic material suggests that it also may have been concentrated by some agency connected with the formation of petroleum. The problem of the association of uranium and other trace metals with hydrocarbons should be studied further both in the field and in

  12. Controls of bedrock geochemistry on soil and plant nutrients in Southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, J.C.; Reynolds, R.; Sanford, R.L.; Fernandez, D.; Lamothe, P.

    2006-01-01

    The cold deserts of the Colorado Plateau contain numerous geologically and geochemically distinct sedimentary bedrock types. In the area near Canyonlands National Park in Southeastern Utah, geochemical variation in geologic substrates is related to the depositional environment with higher concentrations of Fe, Al, P, K, and Mg in sediments deposited in alluvial or marine environments and lower concentrations in bedrock derived from eolian sand dunes. Availability of soil nutrients to vegetation is also controlled by the formation of secondary minerals, particularly for P and Ca availability, which, in some geologic settings, appears closely related to variation of CaCO3 and Ca-phosphates in soils. However, the results of this study also indicate that P content is related to bedrock and soil Fe and Al content suggesting that the deposition history of the bedrock and the presence of P-bearing Fe and Al minerals, is important to contemporary P cycling in this region. The relation between bedrock type and exchangeable Mg and K is less clear-cut, despite large variation in bedrock concentrations of these elements. We examined soil nutrient concentrations and foliar nutrient concentration of grasses, shrubs, conifers, and forbs in four geochemically distinct field sites. All four of the functional plant groups had similar proportional responses to variation in soil nutrient availability despite large absolute differences in foliar nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry across species. Foliar P concentration (normalized to N) in particular showed relatively small variation across different geochemical settings despite large variation in soil P availability in these study sites. The limited foliar variation in bedrock-derived nutrients suggests that the dominant plant species in this dryland setting have a remarkably strong capacity to maintain foliar chemistry ratios despite large underlying differences in soil nutrient availability. ?? 2006 Springer Science

  13. Geophysical constraints on the Virgin River Depression, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Glen, J.M.; Jachens, R.C.; Dixon, G.L.; Katzer, T.C.; Morin, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Gravity and aeromagnetic data provide insights into the subsurface lithology and structure of the Virgin River Depression (VRD) of Nevada, Utah, and Arizona. The gravity data indicate that the Quaternary and Tertiary sedimentary deposits hide a complex pre-Cenozoic surface. A north-northwest-trending basement ridge separates the Mesquite and Mormon basins, as evidenced by seismic-reflection, gravity, and aeromagnetic data. The Mesquite basin is very deep, reaching depths of 8?10 km. The Mormon basin reaches thicknesses of 5 km. Its northern margin is very steep and may be characterized by right steps, although this interpretation could change with additional gravity stations. Most of the young (Quaternary), small-displacement faults trend within 10? of due north and occur within the deeper parts of the Mesquite basin north of the Virgin River. South of the Virgin River, only a few, young, small-displacement faults are mapped; the trend of these faults is more northeasterly and parallels the basement topography and is distinct from that of the faults to the north. The Virgin River appears to follow the margin of the basin as it emerges from the plateau. The high-resolution aeromagnetic data outline the extent of shallow volcanic rocks in the Mesquite basin. The north-northwest alignment of volcanic rocks east of Toquop Wash appear to be structurally controlled because of faults imaged on seismic-reflection profiles and because the alignment is nearly perpendicular to the direction of Cenozoic extension. More buried volcanics likely exist to the north and east of the high-resolution aeromagnetic survey. Broader aeromagnetic anomalies beneath pre-Cenozoic basement in the Mormon Mountains and Tule Springs Hills reflect either Precambrian basement or Tertiary intrusions. These rocks are probably barriers to groundwater flow, except where fractured.

  14. Hikurangi Plateau: Crustal structure, rifted formation, and Gondwana subduction history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Bryan; Hoernle, Kaj; Werner, Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    Seismic reflection profiles across the Hikurangi Plateau Large Igneous Province and adjacent margins reveal the faulted volcanic basement and overlying Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary units as well as the structure of the paleoconvergent Gondwana margin at the southern plateau limit. The Hikurangi Plateau crust can be traced 50-100 km southward beneath the Chatham Rise where subduction cessation timing and geometry are interpreted to be variable along the margin. A model fit of the Hikurangi Plateau back against the Manihiki Plateau aligns the Manihiki Scarp with the eastern margin of the Rekohu Embayment. Extensional and rotated block faults which formed during the breakup of the combined Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau are interpreted in seismic sections of the Hikurangi Plateau basement. Guyots and ridge-like seamounts which are widely scattered across the Hikurangi Plateau are interpreted to have formed at 99-89 Ma immediately following Hikurangi Plateau jamming of the Gondwana convergent margin at ˜100 Ma. Volcanism from this period cannot be separately resolved in the seismic reflection data from basement volcanism; hence seamount formation during Manihiki-Hikurangi Plateau emplacement and breakup (125-120 Ma) cannot be ruled out. Seismic reflection data and gravity modeling suggest the 20-Ma-old Hikurangi Plateau choked the Cretaceous Gondwana convergent margin within 5 Ma of entry. Subsequent uplift of the Chatham Rise and slab detachment has led to the deposition of a Mesozoic sedimentary unit that thins from ˜1 km thickness northward across the plateau. The contrast with the present Hikurangi Plateau subduction beneath North Island, New Zealand, suggests a possible buoyancy cutoff range for LIP subduction consistent with earlier modeling.

  15. A century of vegetation instability and resilience on the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, A. E.; Duniway, M.; Miller, M. E.; Webb, R. H.; Belnap, J.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation in dryland ecosystems is highly sensitive to changes in precipitation amount and timing. Globally, forecasted increases in climate aridity and variability in these regions are likely to alter vegetation dramatically. The Colorado Plateau (CP) is an important dryland ecoregion in the southwest United States for which drier and more variable conditions are forecast. The CP is characterized by moderate to high elevations, cold winters, and shallow soils. Vegetation across much of the CP has already undergone significant changes during the past century, that have been largely attributed to grazing intensity and multidecadal shifts in precipitation regime. Long-lived native tree and shrub species (Populus fremontii and Salix exigua) as well as non-natives (Tamarix chinensis and Eleaegnus angustifolia) have filled previously barren streambeds, shifted plant functional type dominance, and remote areas have been colonized by invasive annual plant species. These large shifts in plant functional type have changed leaf area, phenology, and net primary productivity in many habitats, consequently altering the magnitude and timing of evapotranspiration and soil drying. We combine 100 years of historic repeat photography with remote sensing and field observations from across southeastern Utah, USA, to build a model of local water balance with respect to state changes in vegetation, climate, and land use. This model will aid in understanding how vegetation changes influence water cycling, and how climatic and edaphic factors limit the scope of vegetation change.

  16. Avian community responses to juniper woodland structure and thinning treatments on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crow, Claire; van Riper, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We also studied responses of breeding birds to mechanical reduction of pinyon-juniper woodlands scattered across sagebrush steppe in 11 control and 9 treatment plots at Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah, in 2005 and 2006. We surveyed birds in 3.1-ha (7.6-acre) plots during the breeding season before and following treatment. Thinning in April 2006 removed a mean of 92 percent (standard error = 6.4 percent) of the live trees from treatment plots. Two of 14 species, Gray Vireo (Vireo vicinior) and Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), were not detected after thinning. Shrub-nesting birds, including sagebrush specialist Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri), increased in relative abundance in treatment areas compared to controls. However, some species may exhibit a time lag in response, and further changes in community composition and abundance could result. Our findings lend support to the concept that multiple small-scale fuels-reduction treatments, applied over the landscape, may provide the variety of successional stages needed to support a full assemblage of avian species in pinyon-juniper woodlands on the Colorado Plateau. Limiting scale and increasing precision of fuels-reduction projects in pinyon-juniper vegetation communities may maximize the benefits of management to both the pinyon-juniper and sagebrush steppe avian communities. We conclude that small-scale fuels-reduction treatments can benefit many bird species while reducing fire risk and restoring an ecological balance.

  17. The crustal composition of the Falkland Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemt, Claudia; Jokat, Wilfried

    2015-04-01

    The Falkland Islands are situated in the South Atlantic Ocean 500 km east of Patagonia, South America. The islands are part of the Falkland Plateau, which stretches eastward for more than 1500 km. A bathymetric high, the Maurice Ewing Bank, terminates the plateau in the east. Until Late Jurassic the Falkland Islands were part of Gondwana and were located adjacent to the east coast of South Africa. While the Falkland Islands and Maurice Ewing Bank are proved to be of continental composition, the nature and structure of the Falkland Plateau's basement in between is debatable. The first crustal model derived from sonobuoy data contradicts an only recently published 3D-gravity model. To enhance the understanding of Gondwana break-up considering timing, geometry and amount of volcanism, further knowledge about the structure and thickness of the crust is inevitable. During the ANT-XXIX/5 Polarstern cruise seismic refraction measurements were conducted using Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) and Reftek land stations onshore of East Falkland. The OBS were deployed at 78 locations along an approximately 1500 km east-west stretching profile. For the western transect a P-wave velocity model is calculated using 2D-raytracing techniques. The results are presented in combination with potential field data showing the extension of the Falkland Islands basement, the continent-ocean transition zone and the crustal structure of the plateau. On the Falkland Plateau Basin sediment thickness is about 6 km with velocities ranging from 1.7 to 4.1 km/s in the upper part and about 4.7 km/s above basement. The crust is of oceanic composition with an igneous section that is considerably thicker than average oceanic crust (up to 17 km). The velocity structure in the upper crustal part is typical for layer 2 with a velocity gradient ranging from 5.4 km/s to 6.5 km/s and thicknesses between 1.5 km and 4 km. Layer 3 is about 14 km thick with a velocity gradient from 6.6 km/s to 7.6 km/s, which is

  18. The Utah Smelter as Modified for Environmental Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. J.; Beck, R. R.; Weddick, A. J.

    1982-03-01

    The smelting process utilized prior to 1977 at the Kennecott Utah Smelter, namely conventional green-charge reverberatory furnaces and converters, did not lend itself economically to the increased sulfur fixation required to meet ambient air quality standards as imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency. Numerous smelting processes were carefully studied and evaluated. The final selection was the Noranda Continuous Smelting Process, using oxygen-enriched air and producing high-grade matte. Facilities were designed and installed to smelt one million tons of copper concentrate and precipitate per annum. Transition to the new smelting facility began in October 1977 and was completed in May 1978. The modified plant is the only smelter which achieves its total production through the use of the Noranda Process. This paper outlines the history, design, construction, startup, and first four years of operation of the Utah Smelter, and briefly discusses contemplated facility additions for future years.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-08-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide provides Utah consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Technical analysis of prospective photovoltaic systems in Utah.

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2012-02-01

    This report explores the technical feasibility of prospective utility-scale photovoltaic system (PV) deployments in Utah. Sandia National Laboratories worked with Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), a division of PacifiCorp operating in Utah, to evaluate prospective 2-megawatt (MW) PV plants in different locations with respect to energy production and possible impact on the RMP system and customers. The study focused on 2-MW{sub AC} nameplate PV systems of different PV technologies and different tracking configurations. Technical feasibility was evaluated at three different potential locations in the RMP distribution system. An advanced distribution simulation tool was used to conduct detailed time-series analysis on each feeder and provide results on the impacts on voltage, demand, voltage regulation equipment operations, and flicker. Annual energy performance was estimated.

  1. Spatial relative risk patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Utah

    PubMed Central

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Bilder, Deborah; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William

    2015-01-01

    Heightened areas of spatial relative risk for ASD, or ASD hotspots, in Utah were identified using adaptive kernel density functions. Children ages four, six and eight with ASD from multiple birth cohorts were identified by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities (URADD). Each ASD case was gender-matched to 20 birth cohort controls. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of children born inside versus outside ASD hotspots were compared. ASD hotspots were found in the surveillance area for all but one birth cohort and age group sample; maximum relative risk in these hotspots ranged from 1.8 to 3.0. Associations were found between higher socioeconomic status (SES) and birth residence in an ASD hotspot in five out of six birth cohort and age group samples. PMID:25241009

  2. Hospital administrators in a market environment: the case of Utah.

    PubMed

    Dwore, R B; Murray, B P

    1987-11-01

    This study describes selected characteristics of hospital administrators in Utah, who are implementing a market strategy of cost containment. A mail survey was used to query hospital administrators concerning their personal backgrounds, professional practice patterns, and perceived role performance. The questionnaire elicited a 75.6 percent return from a limited universe sample. Analytical results disclose that Utah hospital administrators are relatively young, professionally dynamic, well educated, and subject to frequent career-motivated moves. Using Mintzberg's ten administrative roles, respondents identified two as key: "Leader" ranks as the role performed best, the role second most critical to survival, second best prepared for, second most time-consuming, and second most satisfying. "Entrepreneur" ranks as the role most critical to survival, most satisfying, most deserving of improvement, second least prepared for, and second best performed. Suggestions for innovative ways in which administrators can develop their skills to be better prepared to meet future challenges are listed.

  3. Geology of Utah and Nevada by ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Repetitive ERTS-1 imagery covering Utah and Nevada is studied as an aid in structural geology, mineral exploration, and limnological and hydrological aspects. Limnological features of algal blooms and varying biological activities in Utah Lake and the Great Salt Lake are grossly evident on the imagery with more subtle details detected on the different bands. Major structural breaks, lineages, or trends are abundant throughout the area of study. The correlation of positive aeromagnetic anomalies with the trends suggests near surface intrusive bodies, not yet exposed at the surface, that can be tested for possible associated mineralization by collecting soil-gas at the surface which is analyzed for mercury that is (1) apparently associated with mineralization, (2) escapes as a vapor, and (3) can be readily measured in extremely low amounts of less than 1 ppb by absorption.

  4. Multiple Francisella tularensis subspecies and clades, tularemia outbreak, Utah.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jeannine M; Carlson, Jennifer K; Dietrich, Gabrielle; Eisen, Rebecca J; Coombs, Jana; Janusz, Aimee M; Summers, Jodee; Beard, C Ben; Mead, Paul S

    2008-12-01

    In July 2007, a deer fly-associated outbreak of tularemia occurred in Utah. Human infections were caused by 2 clades (A1 and A2) of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis. Lagomorph carcasses from the area yielded evidence of infection with A1 and A2, as well as F. tularensis subsp. holarctica. These findings indicate that multiple subspecies and clades can cause disease in a localized outbreak of tularemia. PMID:19046524

  5. Lake Powell, SE Utah and NE Arizona, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Glen Canyon National Recreation Area with Lake Powell and Monument Valley in both SE Utah and NE Arizona (36.5N, 110.0W) are well known tourist areas in the southwest. Water from Lake Powell feeds the Colorado River before it rages through the Grand Canyon. The darker green areas indicate the high forested country of Navajo Mountain and Black Mesa in Arizona. Shadows from the many steep sided hills add a near three dimensional effect to the scene.

  6. Utah coal core methane desorption project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey under a cooperative grant, FG21-80MC14257 as amended, with the Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has collected one hundred fifty two coal core samples for determination of methane content by the ''Direct Method.'' These samples along with available samples from previous work have been examined petrographically to determine possible relationships with gas content. Reflectance, maceral analysis, fluorescence analysis, long proximate, and ultimate analyses have been determined.

  7. Lead toxicity and iron deficiency in Utah migrant children.

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, S D; Lee, J; Lutz, L J; Woolley, F R; Baxter, S; Civish, F; Johnson, M

    1989-01-01

    We determined the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, ages 9-72 months, during the summer of 1985. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen per cent of those tested and 30 per cent of the children ages 9-23 months were iron deficient. Hematocrit determinations accurately predicted iron deficiency in only 35 per cent of the children confirmed to have this disorder via erythrocyte protoporphyrin screening. PMID:2650572

  8. Valuation of improved air quality in Utah County, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, C. Arden; Miner, F. Dean

    1988-05-01

    A contingent valuation approach was used to estimate maximum willingness-to-pay for improved air quality in Utah County. Respondents demonstrated a high rate of concern over poor air quality and averaged a willingness-to-pay of 37 per month per household. Noniterative openended questions were used successfully. No information bias was observed but benchmark values did influence bids. Willingness-to-pay for improved air quality was large for both sexes and across all income groups, ages, and occupations.

  9. Airborne infrared mineral mapping survey of Marysvale, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W.; Chang, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared spectroradiometer survey results from flights over the Marysvale, Utah district show that hydrothermal alteration mineralogy can be mapped using very rapid and effective airborne techniques. The system detects alteration mineral absorption band intensities in the infrared spectral region with high sensitivity. The higher resolution spectral features and high spectral differences characteristic of the various clay and carbonate minerals are also readily identified by the instrument allowing the mineralogy to be mapped as well as the mineralization intensity.

  10. Geology of Utah and Nevada by ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two ancient watercourses have been observed on ERTS-1 imagery. These lie in the Waterpocket Fold area, north of the Marble Canyon section of the Colorado River, in Arizona and Utah. A third old watercourse of interest is an ancient canyon of the Colorado and is located on image no. 1156-17260. Image no. 1051-17414 contains some very useful information concerning the hydrology, sedimentology, and biology of Great Salt Lake and Bear Lake in Utah. In Great Salt Lake, there is a sharp line between the portion of the lake north of the railroad causeway and that south of the causeway. There is a marked difference in salinity across the causeway, and this is reflected in different algal species. On the same image, sediment plumes in Bear Lake clearly delineate the circulation pattern, and provide excellent indications of bottom contours over much of the area. Image no. 1051-17420 contains part of Great Salt Lake and all of Utah Lake. The latter displays a very interesting surface pattern which is probably due to an algal bloom which has been swirled into a spiral by the circulation of the lake.

  11. Colorado Plateau magmatism and uplift by warming of heterogeneous lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mousumi; Jordan, Thomas H; Pederson, Joel

    2009-06-18

    The forces that drove rock uplift of the low-relief, high-elevation, tectonically stable Colorado Plateau are the subject of long-standing debate. While the adjacent Basin and Range province and Rio Grande rift province underwent Cenozoic shortening followed by extension, the plateau experienced approximately 2 km of rock uplift without significant internal deformation. Here we propose that warming of the thicker, more iron-depleted Colorado Plateau lithosphere over 35-40 Myr following mid-Cenozoic removal of the Farallon plate from beneath North America is the primary mechanism driving rock uplift. In our model, conductive re-equilibration not only explains the rock uplift of the plateau, but also provides a robust geodynamic interpretation of observed contrasts between the Colorado Plateau margins and the plateau interior. In particular, the model matches the encroachment of Cenozoic magmatism from the margins towards the plateau interior at rates of 3-6 km Myr(-1) and is consistent with lower seismic velocities and more negative Bouguer gravity at the margins than in the plateau interior. We suggest that warming of heterogeneous lithosphere is a powerful mechanism for driving epeirogenic rock uplift of the Colorado Plateau and may be of general importance in plate-interior settings.

  12. Observational facts of sustained departure plateau vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuhua; Gao, Wenliang; Peng, Jun; Xiao, Yuhua

    2014-02-01

    By using the twice-daily atmospheric observation data from 1998 to 2012, station rainfall data, Tropical Rainfall Measure Mission (TRMM) data, as well as the plateau vortex and shear line year book, characteristics of the sustained departure plateau vortexes (SDPVs) are analyzed. Some new useful observational facts and understanding are obtained about the SDPV activities. The following results are obtained. (1) The active period of SDPVs is from June to August, most in July, unlike that of the unsustained departure plateau vortexes (UDPVs), which have same occurrence frequencies in the three summer months. (2) The SDPVs, generated mainly in the Qumalai neighborhood and situated in a sheared surrounding, move eastward or northeastward, while the UDPVs are mainly led by the upper-level trough, and move eastward or southeastward. (3) The SDPVs influence wide areas of China, even far to the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and Vietnam. (4) The SDPVs change their intensities and properties on the way to the east. Most of them become stronger and produce downpour or sustained regional rainstorms to the south of Yellow River. (5) The longer the SDPV sustains, the more baroclinity it has. (6) When an SDPV moves into the sea, its central pressure descends and rainfall increases in all probability. (7) An SDPV might spin over the bend of the Yellow River when there exists a tropical cyclone in the East China Sea. It could also move oppositely to a landed tropical low pressure originated from the sea to the east of Taiwan or from the South China Sea.

  13. Body wave tomography of Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinaghi, A.; Koulakov, I.; Thybo, H.

    2004-12-01

    The inverse teleseismic tomography approach has been adopted to study the P and S velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle across the Iranian Plateau. The method uses phase readings from earthquakes in a study area as reported by stations at teleseismic and regional distances to compute the velocity anomalies in the area. This use of source-receiver reciprocity allows tomographic studies of regions with sparse distribution of seismic stations, if only the region has sufficient seismicity. The input data for the algorithm are the arrival times of events located in Iran which were taken from the ISC catalogue (1964-1996). All the sources were located anew using a 1D spherical Earth model taking into account variable Moho depth and topography. The inversion provides relocation of events which is done simultaneously with calculation of velocity perturbations. With a series of synthetic tests we demonstrate the power of the algorithm to resolve both fancy and realistic anomalies using available earthquake sources and introducing measurement errors and outliers. The velocity anomalies show that the crust and upper mantle below the Iranian Plateau comprises a low velocity domain between the Arabian Plate and the Caspian Block, in agreement with models of the active Iranian plate trapped between the stable Turan plate in the north and the Arabian shield in the south. Our results show clear evidence of subduction at Makran in the southeastern corner of Iran where the oceanic crust of the Oman Sea subducts underneath the Iranian Plateau, a movement which is mainly aseismic. On the other hand, the subduction and collision of the two plates along the Zagros suture zone is highly seismic and in our images appear less consistent than the Makran region.

  14. Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part I. Gravity survey

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.A.; Cook, K.L.

    1983-04-01

    During 1980 and 1981 a total of 569 new gravity stations were taken in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. The new stations were combined with 530 other gravity stations taken in previous surveys which resulted in a compilation of 1099 stations which were used in this study. The additional surveys were undertaken to assist in the evaluation of the area for the possible development of geothermal resources by providing an interpreted structural framework by delineating faults, structural trends, intrusions, thickness of valley fill, and increased density of host rock. The gravity data are presented as (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a 2 mgal contour interval on a scale of 1:100,000 and (2) five generally east-trending gravity profiles. A geologic interpretation of the study area was made from the gravity map and from the interpretive geologic cross sections which were modeled along the gravity profiles.

  15. Going beyond Career Plateau: Using Professional Plateau To Account for Work Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Patrick Chang Boon

    2003-01-01

    Survey responses from 170 of 300 engineers working in Singapore revealed that significant variance in career satisfaction, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions was accounted for by professional plateau, the point at which individuals find their jobs unchallenging with few opportunities for professional development. (Contains 33 references.)…

  16. Oceanic Plateau Overview and Look Ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic plateaus result from fundamental processes in the Earth's interior, and have been implicated as instigators of major worldwide environmental changes. Although the plate tectonics paradigm successfully explains volcanic activity on the Earth's surface associated with seafloor spreading and plate subduction, it does not elucidate the massive flood volcanism that produces oceanic plateaus. Temporal correlations between flood basalts and environmental phenomena such as mass extinctions and oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) are well documented, yet the underlying mechanisms causing these global catastrophes are only beginning to be grasped. Focused investigations of oceanic plateaus have targeted the two largest features globally, the ~120 Ma Ontong Java Plateau (Pacific Ocean) and ~120-95 Ma Kerguelen Plateau/Broken Ridge (Indian Ocean), and the ~145-130 Ma Shatsky Rise (Pacific Ocean). These three features constitute the only oceanic plateaus where igneous basement has been drilled at more than one site. Multiple models - plume, bolide impact, and upwelling eclogite - have been proposed for Ontong Java's origin. The feature correlates temporally with OAE-1a, and interpretation of Sr, Os, and Pb isotopic systems during the time of OAE-1a points to a close linkage between the two, with CO2, Fe, and trace metal emissions from the massive magmatism potentially triggering the event. The Kerguelen Plateau/Broken Ridge is a composite feature that includes flood basalts, depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-related asthenosphere, and continental lithosphere. Models for the Shatsky Rise include mantle plume and fast seafloor spreading. Future studies of oceanic plateaus have the potential to transform our understanding of the Earth system through investigating: 1) magma (and hence mantle source) variability through times; 2) the nature of melting anomalies, i.e., compositional vs. thermal, that produce oceanic plateaus; 3) the precise durations of oceanic plateau events

  17. Seismic Anisotropy Beneath the Southern Puna Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calixto Mory, F. J.; Sandvol, E. A.; Kay, S. M.; Comte, D.; Alvarado, P. M.; Heit, B.; Yuan, X.

    2011-12-01

    The central Andean plateau offers an excellent natural laboratory to study mantle flow along an active continental margin as well as the link between plateau uplift and lithospheric delamination. The region between 25°S to 28°S, known as the southern Puna plateau, is characterized by a number of anomalous features possibly indicative of delamination. A total of 43 US and 30 German broadband three component seismic stations were deployed across the southern Puna plateau for approximately two years. The region of study has the advantage of deep and intermediate depth seismicity beneath the array that can be used to constrain the depth distribution of seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle. Teleseismic shear wave splitting results show a transition from east-west fast directions in the east of the array to east-west and north-south in the middle of the array, beneath Galan, and to predominantly north-south in the west part of the array. Azimuthal analysis of local events shows that the events coming from the North of the array split predominantely in the west-south north-east direction. The events coming from the south show splitting into the south-east north-west. Events coming from the West and East show predominant slab parallel splitting. Furthermore, a comparison of the teleseismic and local splitting lag times would suggest the presence of a significant amount of inter- or sub-slab anisotropy. Surface wave measurements indicate the presence of a high velocity block beneath Galan, a very large ignimbrite volcanic center, at depths between 190km (0.007 Hz) and 150 km (0.009 Hz). This can be interpreted as a delaminated block that has resulted in widespread crustal melting. At those same depths there are two high velocity zones, south east and north west of vicuña pampa. At 105 km (0.0125 Hz) we start to see the slab which seems to be deeping to the south. A low velocity zone further east could be responsible for the flatness of the slab at 26°S. At shallower

  18. Tibial Plateau Fractures in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Rozell, Joshua C; Vemulapalli, Krishna C; Gary, Joshua L; Donegan, Derek J

    2016-09-01

    Tibial plateau fractures are common in the elderly population following a low-energy mechanism. Initial evaluation includes an assessment of the soft tissues and surrounding ligaments. Most fractures involve articular depression leading to joint incongruity. Treatment of these fractures may be complicated by osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and medical comorbidities. Optimal reconstruction should restore the mechanical axis, provide a stable construct for mobilization, and reestablish articular congruity. This is accomplished through a variety of internal or external fixation techniques or with acute arthroplasty. Regardless of the treatment modality, particular focus on preservation and maintenance of the soft tissue envelope is paramount. PMID:27551570

  19. Edwards plateau: Analysis of land cover trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friesen, B.A.; Hester, D.J.; Casey, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Land Cover Trends project studies the rates, causes, and consequences of contemporary (1973-2000) change in land use and land cover in the United States on an ecoregional basis. The Edwards Plateau ecoregion is the focus of this report. Landsat imagery from five dates during a nearly 30-year period are interpreted for randomly selected sample blocks. The resulting data provide the foundation for estimating change. Along with the image analysis, site visits to 90% of the sampled areas, geographical profiles, and socioeconomic data for the ecoregion are synthesized to assess regional driving forces and consequences of change. Complete project methodology can be found in Loveland et al [1].

  20. Physical, Chemical, Ecological, and Age Data and Trench Logs from Surficial Deposits at Hatch Point, Southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Harland L.; Miller, Mark E.; Yount, James C.; Reheis, Marith C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Belnap, Jayne; Lamothe, Paul J.; McGeehan, John P.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data and describes the methodology for physical, chemical and ecological measurements of sediment, soil, and vegetation, as well as age determinations of surficial deposits at Hatch Point, Canyon Rims area, Colorado Plateau, southeastern Utah. The results presented in this report support a study that examines geomorphic and soil factors that may influence boundaries between shrubland and grassland ecosystems in the study area. Shrubland ecosystems dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and grassland ecosystems dominated by native perennial grasses (for example, Hilaria jamesii and Sporabolis sp.) are high-priority conservation targets for the Federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and other resource managers because of their diversity, productivity, and vital importance as wildlife habitat. These ecosystems have been recognized as imperiled on a regional scale since at least the mid-1990s due to habitat loss (type conversions), land-use practices, and invasive exotic plants. In the Intermountain West, the exotic annual cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) is recognized as one of the most pervasive and serious threats to the health of native sagebrush and grassland ecosystems through effects on fire regimes and resource conditions experienced by native species.

  1. Uranium deposits at Shinarump Mesa and some adjacent areas in the Temple Mountain district, Emery County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyant, Donald G.

    1953-01-01

    Deposits of uraniferous hydrocarbons are associated with carnotite in the Shinarump conglomerate of Triassic age at Shinarump Mesa and adjacent areas of the Temple Mountain district in the San Rafael Swell of Emery County, Utah. The irregular ore bodies of carnotite-bearing sandstone are genetically related to lenticular uraniferous ore bodies containing disseminated asphaltitic and humic hydrocarbon in permeable sandstones and were localized indirectly by sedimentary controls. Nearly non-uraniferous bitumen commonly permeates the sandstones in the Shinarump conglomerate and the underlying Moekopi formation in the area. The ore deposits at Temple Mountain have been altered locally by hydrothermal solutions, and in other deposits throughout the area carnotite has been transported by ground and surface water. Uraniferous asphaltite is thought to be the non-volatile residue of an original weakly uraniferous crude oil that migrated into the San Rafael anticline; the ore metals concentrated in the asphaltite as the oil was devolatilized and polymerized. Carnotite is thought to have formed from the asphaltite by ground water leaching. It is concluded that additional study of the genesis of the asphaltitic uranium ores in the San Rafael Swell, of the processes by which the hydrocarbons interact and are modified (such as heat, polymerization, and hydrogenation under the influence of alpha-ray bombardment), of petroleum source beds, and of volcanic intrusive rocks of Tertiary age are of fundamental importance in the continuing study of the uranium deposits on the Colorado Plateau.

  2. Preliminary investigation of the elemental variation and diagenesis of a tabular uranium deposit, La Sal Mine, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Robert A.; Campbell, John A.

    1976-01-01

    Ore in the La Sal mine, San Juan County, Utah, occurs as a typical tabular-type uranium deposit of the-Colorado Plateau. Uranium-vanadium occurs in the Salt Wash Member of the Jurassic Morrison Formation. Chemical and petrographic analyses were used to determine elemental variation and diagenetic aspects across the orebody. Vanadium is concentrated in the dark clay matrix, which constitutes visible ore. Uranium content is greater above the vanadium zone. Calcium, carbonate carbon, and lead show greater than fifty-fold increase across the ore zone, whereas copper and organic carbon show only a several-fold increase. Large molybdenum concentrations are present in and above the tabular layer, and large selenium concentrations occur below the uranium zone within the richest vanadium zone. Iron is enriched in the vanadium horizon. Chromium is depleted from above the ore and strongly enriched below. Elements that vary directly with the vanadium content include magnesium, iron, selenium, zirconium, strontium, titanium, lead, boron, yttrium, and scandium. The diagenetic sequence is as follows: (1) formation of secondary quartz overgrowths as cement; (2) infilling and lining of remaining pores with amber opaline material; (3) formation of vanadium-rich clay matrix, which has replaced overgrowths as well as quartz grains; (4) replacement of overgrowths and detrital grains by calcite; (5) infilling of pores with barite and the introduction of pyrite and marcasite.

  3. A petrographical and geochemical study of quartzose nodules, country rocks, and dike rocks from the Upheaval Dome structure, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeberl, C.; Plescia, J.B.; Hayward, C.L.; Reimold, W.U.

    1999-01-01

    Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA, is a unique structure on the Colorado Plateau. It has earlier been interpreted as an impact structure or as a pinched-off salt diapir. Some subrounded quartzose fragments were found in a ring depression near the eastern margin of the structure and, based on vesicularity and apparent flow structure, the fragments were interpreted by early researchers as 'impactites.' Our petrographic studies show no indication of a high-temperature history and are in agreement with a slow, low-temperature formation of the quartz nodules. Compositionally, the lag deposit samples are almost pure SiO2. They show no chemical similarity to any of the possible target rocks (e.g., Navajo Sandstone), from which they should have formed by melting if they were impactites. Instead, the samples have relatively high contents of elements that indicate fluid interaction (e.g., hydrothermal growth), such as As, Sb, Ba, and U, and show positive Ce anomalies. Thus, we interpret the 'lag deposit samples' as normal low-temperature (hydrothermally-grown?) quartz that show no indication of being impact-derived. In addition, a petrographic and geochemical analysis of a series of dike samples yielded no evidence for shock metamorphism or a meteoritic component.

  4. [Functional difference of malate-aspartate shuttle system in liver between plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) and plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae)].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui-Juan; Rao, Xin-Feng; Wei, Deng-Bang; Wang, Duo-Wei; Wei, Lian; Sun, Sheng-Zhen

    2012-04-25

    To explore the adaptive mechanisms of plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) to the enduring digging activity in the hypoxic environment and of plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) to the sprint running activity, the functional differences of malate-aspartate shuttle system (MA) in liver of plateau zokor and plateau pika were studied. The ratio of liver weight to body weight, the parameters of mitochondria in hepatocyte and the contents of lactic acid in serum were measured; the open reading frame of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (MDH1), mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDH2), and the partial sequence of aspartate glutamate carrier (AGC) and oxoglutarate malate carrier (OMC) genes were cloned and sequenced; MDH1, MDH2, AGC and OMC mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR; the specific activities of MDH1 and MDH2 in liver of plateau zokor and plateau pika were measured using enzymatic methods. The results showed that, (1) the ratio of liver weight to body weight, the number and the specific surface of mitochondria in hepatocyte of plateau zokor were markedly higher than those of plateau pika (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), but the content of lactic acid in serum of plateau pika was significantly higher than that of plateau zokor (P < 0.01); (2) MDH1 and MDH2 mRNA levels as well as their enzymatic activities in liver of plateau zokor were significantly higher than those of plateau pika (P < 0.01 or 0.05), AGC mRNA level of the zokor was significantly higher than that of the pika (P < 0.01), while no difference was found at OMC mRNA level between them (P > 0.05); (3) mRNA level and enzymatic activity of MDH1 was significantly lower than those of MDH2 in the pika liver (P < 0.01), MDH1 mRNA level of plateau zokor was markedly higher than that of MDH2 (P < 0.01), but the activities had no difference between MDH1 and MDH2 in liver of the zokor (P > 0.05). These results indicate that the plateau zokor obtains ATP in the enduring digging activity by enhancing the function of MA

  5. 77 FR 37432 - Final Springfield Plateau Regional Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment and Finding of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... Springfield Plateau Regional Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment (77 FR 1717). The public comment... Fish and Wildlife Service Final Springfield Plateau Regional Restoration Plan and Environmental... the Final Springfield Plateau Regional Restoration Plan (Plan) and Environmental Assessment...

  6. Dust emissions from unpaved roads on the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duniway, M.; Flagg, C.; Belnap, J.

    2013-12-01

    On the Colorado Plateau, elevated levels of aeolian dust have become a major land management and policy concern due to its influence on climate, weather, terrestrial ecosystem dynamics, landscape development and fertility, melting of snow and ice, air quality, and human health. Most desert soil surfaces are stabilized by plants, rocks, and/or physical or biological soil crusts, but once disturbed, sediment production from these surfaces can increase dramatically. Road development and use is a common surface disturbing activity in the region. The extent and density of roads and road networks is rapidly increasing due to continued energy exploration, infrastructure development, and off-highway recreation activities. Though it is well known that unpaved roads produce dust, the relative contribution of dust from existing roads or the implications of future road development to regional dust loading is unknown. To address this need, we have initiated a multifaceted research effort to evaluating dust emissions from unpaved roads regionally. At 34 sites arranged across various road surfaces and soil textures in southeastern Utah, we are: 1) monitoring dust emissions, local wind conditions, and vehicle traffic and 2) evaluating fugitive dust potential using a portable wind tunnel and measuring road characteristics that affect dust production. We will then 3) develop a GIS-based model that integrates results from 1 & 2 to estimate potential dust contributions from current and future scenarios of regional road development. Passive, horizontal sediment traps were installed at three distances downwind from the road edge. One control trap was placed upwind of the samplers to account for local, non-road dust emissions. An electronic vehicle counter and anemometer were also installed at monitoring sites. Dust samples were collected every three months at fixed heights, 15 cm up to 100 cm above the soil surface, from March 2010 to the present. Threshold friction velocities (TFV

  7. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  8. Episodic karstification, Edwards Plateau, central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kastning, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Edwards Plateau and Llano Basin of central Texas form one of the largest contiguous regions of karst in North America (>80,000 km/sup 2/). Solutional phenomena show that several major episodes of karstification are documentable from late Cambrian to Holocene. Relict landforms representing intervals of solutional activity correlate well with the accepted geomorphic chronology for central Texas. Secondary porosity are vertically controlled by lithology, topographic incision of streams, position of the potentiometric surface, and attitude of bedding. Areally, development of karst is strongly influenced by the extent, density, and orientation of fractures and by hydrodynamic characteristics such as points of recharge and discharge, degree of integration of groundwater flow paths, and hydraulic gradients. Early episodes of karstification correspond to intervals of subaerial exposure of carbonate rocks during marine regression or following regional uplift. Paleokarst is prevalent in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequences. Infilled dolines and solution-collapse breccias have been exhumed by extensive regional denudation during the Cenozoic Era. Subaerial conditions during the middle Cretaceous account for infilled solutional cavities within lower Cretaceous carbonate beds. The most extensive karstification began with regional uplift in the early Miocene. Enhanced relief along the Balcones escarpment promoted incision of streams, lowering of water tables, steepened hydraulic gradients, and increases in discharge. Caves at various-elevations attest to sequential dissection of the plateau during the late Quaternary.

  9. 76 FR 68523 - Utah Southern Railroad Company, LLC-Change in Operators Exemption-Iron Bull Railroad Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Surface Transportation Board Utah Southern Railroad Company, LLC--Change in Operators Exemption--Iron Bull... of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to change operators from Iron Bull Railroad Company (IBRC) to USRC... near Iron Springs, Utah, and milepost 14.7 at or near Iron Mountain, Utah, a distance of 14.6 miles...

  10. North Valley/South Valley Survey--Perceptions of Utah Valley State College and the Need for a Branch Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bart R.

    Utah Valley Community College became Utah Valley State College (UVSC) in 1993, due to the increasing need for a four-year, degree-granting institution in Utah County. UVSC now offers 21 four-year programs, and enrollment has been growing at an average rate of 8% per year since 1986. There were 20,946 students enrolled for fall term 2000, and…

  11. An Analysis of the Junior High School Music Education Programs in Utah: Summary Report 1975-76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Results are presented of a study to (1) analyze junior high school music education programs in Utah during 1975-76, (2) assess the professional preparation of the music personnel, and (3) make recommendations for junior high music programs in Utah. Over 200 music teachers in Utah's 40 school districts were surveyed. Eight major questions covered…

  12. Plateau Waves of Intracranial Pressure and Multimodal Brain Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dias, Celeste; Maia, Isabel; Cerejo, Antonio; Smielewski, Peter; Paiva, José-Artur; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe multimodal brain monitoring characteristics during plateau waves of intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with head injury, using ICM+ software for continuous recording. Plateau waves consist of an abrupt elevation of ICP above 40 mmHg for 5-20 min. This is a prospective observational study of patients with head injury who were admitted to a neurocritical care unit and who developed plateau waves. We analyzed 59 plateau waves that occurred in 8 of 18 patients (44 %). At the top of plateau waves arterial blood pressure remained almost constant, but cerebral perfusion pressure, cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygenation, and cerebral oximetry decreased. After plateau waves, patients with a previously better autoregulation status developed hyperemia, demonstrated by an increase in cerebral blood flow and brain oxygenation. Pressure and oxygen cerebrovascular reactivity indexes (pressure reactivity index and ORxshort) increased significantly during the plateau wave as a sign of disruption of autoregulation. Bedside multimodal brain monitoring is important to characterize increases in ICP and give differential diagnoses of plateau waves, as management of this phenomenon differs from that of regular ICP.

  13. Late Holocene temperature fluctuations on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yang; Bra̋uning, Achim; Yafeng, Shi

    2003-11-01

    Proxy data of palaeoclimate, like ice cores, tree rings and lake sediments, document aspects of climate changes on the Tibetan Plateau during the last 2000 years. The results show that the Tibetan Plateau experienced climatic episodes such as the warm intervals during AD 800-1100 and 1150-1400, the "Little Ice Age" between AD 1400 and 1900, and an earlier cold period between the 4th and 6th centuries. In addition, temperatures varied from region to region across the plateau. A warm period from AD 800 to 1100 in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau was contemporaneous with cooling in the southern Tibetan Plateau, which experienced warming between AD 1150 and 1400. Large-scale trends in the temperature history from the northeastern Tibetan Plateau resemble those in eastern China more than the trends from the southern Plateau. The most notable similarities between the temperature variations of the Tibetan Plateau and eastern China are cold phases during AD 1100-1150, 1500-1550, 1650-1700 and 1800-1850.

  14. Thrusting on the Tibetan plateau within the last 5 Ma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kevin; Lucas, Lynette

    1989-01-01

    The Lunpola basin, in the middle of the Tibetan plateau, contains about 4 km of nonmarine sediments deposited since early Cenozoic times. This remarkable structure, localized in the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, has much to teach about how the plateau has developed. The strong evidence for young compression in the basin is emphasized.

  15. 75 FR 44805 - Central Utah Project Completion Act; Notice of Availability, Draft Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... Central Utah Project Completion Act; Notice of Availability, Draft Environmental Assessment (Draft EA); Realignment of a Portion of the Utah Lake Drainage Basin Water Delivery System AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary--Water and Science, Interior ACTION: Notice of Availability, Draft Environmental Assessment...

  16. Focus: A Forum on Teaching and Learning in Utah Community and Technical Colleges, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Don A., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This collection of articles addresses various aspects of curriculum and instruction at Utah's community colleges. First, "Reflections on the Changing Role and Mission of Utah Community and Technical Colleges," by Don A. Carpenter, considers the colleges' role in meeting needs for comprehensiveness, "practical" general education, and curricular…

  17. COM-NET Services, Life Span Learning Programs. Educational Telecommunications to Rural Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seamons, R. Alan

    This report describes the distance education program made available to rural Utah residents by Utah State University via the COM-NET telecommunications system. Both the four distinct delivery networks used and the infrastructure support system are detailed, and information is provided on: student performance and satisfaction with the long distance…

  18. The Impact of the Designing Education for the Future Project in Utah. Report of a Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jay J.; Forsgren, Afton

    This report provides an assessment of the Utah State Board of Education's participation in an 8-State project to improve education. The report offers an evaluation of the status of education in Utah and recommends a practical blueprint for enabling the State to attain national leadership in educational achievement. The project was concerned…

  19. Baseline Survey of Educational Technology Access and Application in Southeastern Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyner, Kathleen; And Others

    Utah's Southeastern Education Service Center has devised a five-phase vision plan for improving the educational technology infrastructure in the southeastern region of the state. The fourth phase involves the creation of the Southeastern Utah Regional Wide Area Network (SURWAN), which will link all K-12 schools to the Internet by 1996. This…

  20. 78 FR 34160 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-In Iron County, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Union Pacific Railroad Company--Abandonment Exemption--In Iron County, Utah... of the line at milepost 31.83 in Cedar City, a total distance of 1.03 miles in Iron County, Utah...

  1. 76 FR 65357 - Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington... cherries grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin and is administered locally by the Cherry Industry Administrative Board (Board). This rule...

  2. Training Interpreter Paraprofessionals to Assist in the Language Assessment of English Language Learners in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoakum, Susie; Manuel-Dupont, Sonia

    1997-01-01

    Describes development of an interpreter paraprofessional (IP) program by Utah State University and Granite (Utah) school district in response to the unavailability of certified interpreters to assist in special education assessment of students who are English Language Learners. Stresses the importance of providing IPs with job-relevant training,…

  3. 75 FR 79327 - Finding of Substantial Inadequacy of Implementation Plan; Call for Utah State Implementation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... 19, 2010 (75 FR 70888). In the November 19, 2010 document, EPA proposed a finding that the Utah State... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Finding of Substantial Inadequacy of Implementation Plan; Call for Utah State... additional information on submitting comments, see the November 19, 2010 (75 FR 70888) proposed rule....

  4. Utah Public Education Funding: The Fiscal Impact of School Choice. School Choice Issues in the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aud, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This study examines Utah's funding system for public education and provides an analysis of the fiscal impact of allowing parents to use a portion of their child's state education funding to attend a school of their choice, public or private. Like many states, Utah is facing pressure to improve its system of public education funding. The state's…

  5. Focus: A Forum on Teaching and Learning in Utah Community and Technical Colleges, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Don A., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    A series of articles is presented on teaching and learning in Utah community and technical colleges. After an editorial comment by J. Marvin Higbee on the goals and purposes of the Utah Association of Community Colleges, V. Lowell Hansen discusses the role of the technical instructor in the information society of the 1980's. Next, Ace G.…

  6. Using A "Portfolio" Strategy To Evaluate Utah's Educational Technology Initiative: Findings and Policy Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergendoller, John R.; And Others

    With the Utah Educational Technology Initiative (ETI), the State has increased its commitment to educational technology. The evaluation of the Utah ETI is built around the concept of portfolio analysis, an evaluation method that incorporates the collection of diverse types of data and enables a number of types of evidence to be used to gauge…

  7. 78 FR 50442 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... file plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Utah State Office, Salt Lake City, Utah..., Bureau of Land Management, Branch of Geographic Sciences, 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City... executed at the request of the Bureau of Reclamation and were necessary to delineate property boundaries...

  8. Wellness Works: A Collaborative Program for Youth and Adults in Rural Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirley, Lindsey; Roark, Mark F.; Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Utah State University Cooperative Extension programming, provided through the historic land-grant system, is one method used to meet the needs of residents located in rural communities. Residents in a Central Utah county need Cooperative Extension programs to address the health and wellness of their rural community. According to the Utah…

  9. Utah State Library Division Library Services and Technology Act Five Year Plan, 2003-2007.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Library Div., Salt Lake City. Dept. of Community and Economic Development.

    This Utah State Library Division Five Year Plan for the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) sets forth the principles, Division mission statement, needs, goals, evaluation plan, and programs for administering Utah's LSTA program from 2003-2007. Targets, programs and activities, and a schedule are presented for the following goals: (1)…

  10. 78 FR 70960 - Utah Resource Advisory Council/Recreation Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Utah Resource Advisory Council/Recreation Resource Advisory Council Meeting..., and the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation Resource Advisory Council (RRAC) will host a meeting/conference...

  11. Knowledge Assessment of Food Safety Managers in Utah and Its Implications on the Exam and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nummer, Brian A.; Guy, Stanley M.; Bentley, Joanne P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Food Safety Manager's Certification is offered through a state-local Extension partnership in Utah using an online course management system. Exams and course materials were created by an Extension Specialist at Utah State Univ. Extension Agents provide exam and curriculum facilitation in each county. This form of distance education enables access…

  12. Utah's Vote Raises Bar on Choice: Voucher Program's Defeat May Lead to Strategy Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2007-01-01

    The Utah plan, which would have been the nation's first universal voucher program, was effectively vetoed by voters before it ever took effect. The defeat of the Utah program through a ballot referendum highlighted again the political vulnerability of such controversial school choice measures. The law's enactment had set off an intense political…

  13. Skeletons, Boondoggles, and Success: Multicultural Education at the University of Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, Raymond J.

    Problems facing multicultural education, implications of these problems for teacher education, and the multicultural teacher education program at the University of Utah are described. Factors operating against multicultural education in Utah include the back to basics movement, the competency movement, the attack on bilingual education, the…

  14. 78 FR 2685 - Central Utah Project Completion Act; East Hobble Creek Restoration Project Draft Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... Office of the Secretary Central Utah Project Completion Act; East Hobble Creek Restoration Project Draft...: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The draft environmental assessment for the East Hobble Creek Restoration... effects of a proposed restoration effort on a portion of Lower Hobble Creek, near Springville, Utah....

  15. 77 FR 47665 - Public Land Order No. 7794; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6941; Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Office, P. O. Box 45155, Salt Lake City, Utah 84145-0155, 801-539-4132, or Dave Watson, Bureau of Land Management, Salt Lake Field Office, 2370 South 2300 West, Salt Lake City, Utah 84119, 801-977-4368. Persons... of the Bonneville Salt Flats, which would otherwise expire on August 5, 2012. DATES: Effective...

  16. Utah Community Partnership for Character Education. Final Evaluation Report, 1995-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Jennifer S.

    This report describes the implementation and results of the Utah Community Partnership for Character Development, a 4-year grant funded by the U.S. Department of Education. The project was initiated in January 1996, in 50 schools from 4 school districts in Salt Lake City (Utah) and neighboring communities. The grant included more than 65 schools…

  17. 76 FR 36143 - Central Utah Project Completion Act: Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment; Block Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ..., Heber Sub-Area Irrigation to M&I Water Conversion, Wasatch County, UT AGENCY: Department of the Interior, Office of the Assistant Secretary-- Water and Science. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Central Utah Water... proposing to administratively convert Central Utah Project (CUP) Bonneville Unit water delivered...

  18. 77 FR 25734 - Notice of Invitation To Participate in Coal Exploration License, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Invitation To Participate in Coal Exploration License, Utah AGENCY... exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Sanpete County, Utah. DATES: The notice of invitation to participate in this coal exploration license was published once each week for...

  19. 76 FR 16808 - Notice of Invitation to Participate In Coal Exploration License, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Invitation to Participate In Coal Exploration License, Utah AGENCY... exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Sevier County, Utah. DATES: The notice of invitation to participate in this coal exploration license was published, once each week for...

  20. 40 CFR 272.2251 - Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Phone (801) 538-6776. (i) The EPA Approved Utah Regulatory Requirements Applicable to the Hazardous... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part 51... State program: (i) Utah Code Annotated, Volume 3A, 1998 Replacement and 1999 Supplement, Title...

  1. Do You Really Want to Know? Elementary Music Personnel and Potential in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Loretta Niebur

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of two articles reporting the results of a study by the author regarding the status of elementary music education in the state of Utah. This article focuses on the qualifications of Utah's elementary music teachers (music certified, elementary classroom certified, artists-in-residence, volunteers, and paraprofessionals) and the…

  2. The role of salt in the structural development of central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witkind, Irving J.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple episodes of diapirism, probably salt generated, have determined the structural pattern of central Utah. The causative salt and other evaporites are integral components of the Arapien Shale of Middle Jurassic age, one of the most unusual stratigraphic units in central Utah.

  3. 76 FR 46805 - Notice of Utah Adoption by Reference of the Pesticide Container Containment Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... regulations. In accordance with State of Utah Agricultural Code, the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food... through E. The State did not request any modification to the federal PCC rules, and with this notice, the EPA Region 8, is formally announcing the adoption by reference with no modifications. FOR...

  4. Utah State Library Division. Library Services & Technology Act: Five Year Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Library, Salt Lake City.

    This five-year plan for the administration of Utah's Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) program contains the following sections: (1) principles; (2) assumptions; (3) the current scene of Utah libraries, including public libraries, academic libraries, school library media centers, and private and research libraries; (4) establishment of…

  5. Surficial geology of the lower Comb Wash, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longpré, Claire I.

    2001-01-01

    The surficial geologic map of lower Comb Wash was produced as part of a master’s thesis for Northern Arizona University Quaternary Sciences program. The map area includes the portion of the Comb Wash alluvial valley between Highway 163 and Highway 95 on the Colorado Plateau in southeastern Utah. The late Quaternary geology of this part of the Colorado Plateau had not previously been mapped in adequate detail. The geologic information in this report will be useful for biological studies, land management and range management for federal, state and private industries. Comb Wash is a south flowing ephemeral tributary of the San Juan River, flanked to the east by Comb Ridge and to the west by Cedar Mesa (Figure 1). The nearest settlement is Bluff, about 7 km to the east of the area. Elevations range from 1951 m where Highway 95 crosses Comb Wash to 1291 m at the confluence with the San Juan River. Primary vehicle access to lower Comb Wash is provided by a well-maintained dirt road that parallels the active channel of Comb Wash between Highway 163 and Highway 95. For much of the year this road can be traversed without the aid of four-wheel drive. However, during inclement weather such as rain or snow the road becomes treacherous even with four-wheel drive. The Comb Wash watershed is public land managed by the Bureau of Land management (BLM) office in Monticello, Utah. The semi-arid climate of Comb Wash and the surrounding area is typical of the Great Basin Desert. Temperature in Bluff, Utah ranges from a minimum of –8° C in January to a maximum of 35° C in July with a mean annual temperature of 9.8° C (U.S. Department of Commerce, 1999). The difference between day and nighttime temperatures is as great as 20° C. Between 1928 and 1998, annual rainfall in Bluff averaged 178 mm per year (U.S. Department of Commerce, 1999). Annual rainfall in Comb Wash averaged 240 mm per year from 1991 to 1999 while Bluff received an average of 193 mm for the same 8 year period

  6. REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO{sub 2} IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2005-02-08

    Soil gas surveys have been carried out on the Colorado Plateau over areas with natural occurrences of CO{sub 2}. At Farnham Dome, Utah, and Springerville-St. Johns, Arizona, proven CO{sub 2} reservoirs occur at 600-800 m depth, but no anomalous soil gas CO{sub 2} flux was detected. Background CO{sub 2} fluxes of up to about 5 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} were common in arid, poorly vegetated areas, and fluxes up to about 20 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} were found at Springerville-St. Johns in heavily vegetated, wet ground adjacent to springs. These elevated fluxes are attributed to shallow root zone activity rather than to a deep upflow of CO{sub 2}. Localized areas of anomalously high CO{sub 2} gas flux ({approx} 100 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) were documented along the Little Grand Wash Fault Zone near Crystal Geyser, Utah and nearby in Ten Mile Graben, but those in Ten Mile Graben are not directly associated with the major faults. In both areas, features with a visible gas flux are present. Isotopic measurements on the CO{sub 2} gas confirm that it originated at depth. Evidence of widespread vein calcite at the surface at Farnham Dome and travertine deposits in the other areas suggests that there has been an outflow of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids in the past. 14C ages of pollen trapped in the travertine at Springerville-St. Johns record a period of CO{sub 2} leakage to the atmosphere between 887 {+-} 35 and 3219 {+-} 30 years BP. No travertine deposits appear to be currently forming. At Springerville-St. Johns, Crystal Geyser and Ten Mile Graben, there are significant outflows of high-bicarbonate water. Movement of CO{sub 2}-rich groundwaters may be the dominant mechanism controlling the mobility of CO{sub 2} today. The very localized nature of the soil gas anomalies, evidence of large scale discharge of CO{sub 2} over a very short period of time and the outflow of ground water containing dissolved CO{sub 2} will present challenges for effective, long term monitoring of CO{sub 2

  7. REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2003-01-30

    Gas reservoirs developed within the Colorado Plateau and Southern Rocky Mountains region are natural laboratories for studying the factors that promote long-term storage of CO{sub 2}. They also provide sites for storing additional CO{sub 2} if it can be separated from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants in this part of the U.S.A. These natural reservoirs are developed primarily in sandstones and dolomites; shales, mudstones and anhydrite form seals. In many fields, stacked reservoirs are present, indicating that the gas has migrated up through the section. There are also geologically young travertine deposits at the surface, and CO{sub 2}-charged groundwater and springs in the vicinity of known CO{sub 2} occurrences. These near-surface geological and hydrological features also provide examples of the environmental effects of leakage of CO{sub 2} from reservoirs, and justify further study. During reporting period covered here (the first quarter of Year 3 of the project, i.e. October 1-December 31, 2002), the main achievements were: (1) Planning workshop for project participants as well as other Utah researchers involved in CO{sub 2} projects (22 October, 2002), and Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City; (2) Presentation of paper to special CO{sub 2} sequestration session at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, Denver, 29 October, 2002; (3) Presentation of paper to special CO{sub 2} sequestration session at the Fall Meeting of American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, 10 December, 2002; (4) Identification of dawsonite (sodium-aluminum carbonate) as a late stage mineral deposited in CO{sub 2} feedzone at Springerville, Arizona; (5) Successful matching of known physical constraints to flow beneath the Hunter cross section being used to simulate the effects of CO{sub 2} injection. In about 1000 years, most injected CO{sub 2} may be lost to the surface from the three shallowest reservoirs considered, assuming no reactive processes; and (6) Inclusion

  8. Position of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and timing of the end-Triassic extinctions on land: Data from the Moenave Formation on the southern Colorado Plateau, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, S.G.; Tanner, L.H.; Donohoo-Hurley, L.; Geissman, J.W.; Kozur, H.W.; Heckert, A.B.; Weems, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    Strata of the Moenave Formation on and adjacent to the southern Colorado Plateau in Utah-Arizona, U.S.A., represent one of the best known and most stratigraphically continuous, complete and fossiliferous terrestrial sections across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. We present a synthesis of new biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic data collected from across the Moenave Formation outcrop belt, which extends from the St. George area in southwestern Utah to the Tuba City area in northern Arizona. These data include palynomorphs, conchostracans and vertebrate fossils (including footprints) and a composite polarity record based on four overlapping magnetostratigraphic sections. Placement of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in strata of the Moenave Formation has long been imprecise and debatable, but these new data (especially the conchostracans) allow us to place the Triassic-Jurassic boundary relatively precisely in the middle part of the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation, stratigraphically well above the highest occurrence of crurotarsan body fossils or footprints. Correlation to marine sections based on this placement indicates that major terrestrial vertebrate extinctions preceded marine extinctions across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and therefore were likely unrelated to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) volcanism. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Intrusive Rock Database for the Digital Geologic Map of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nutt, C.J.; Ludington, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Digital geologic maps offer the promise of rapid and powerful answers to geologic questions using Geographic Information System software (GIS). Using modern GIS and database methods, a specialized derivative map can be easily prepared. An important limitation can be shortcomings in the information provided in the database associated with the digital map, a database which is often based on the legend of the original map. The purpose of this report is to show how the compilation of additional information can, when prepared as a database that can be used with the digital map, be used to create some types of derivative maps that are not possible with the original digital map and database. This Open-file Report consists of computer files with information about intrusive rocks in Utah that can be linked to the Digital Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze et al., 2000), an explanation of how to link the databases and map, and a list of references for the databases. The digital map, which represents the 1:500,000-scale Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze, 1980), can be obtained from the Utah Geological Survey (Map 179DM). Each polygon in the map has a unique identification number. We selected the polygons identified on the geologic map as intrusive rock, and constructed a database (UT_PLUT.xls) that classifies the polygons into plutonic map units (see tables). These plutonic map units are the key information that is used to relate the compiled information to the polygons on the map. The map includes a few polygons that were coded as intrusive on the state map but are largely volcanic rock; in these cases we note the volcanic rock names (rhyolite and latite) as used in the original sources Some polygons identified on the digital state map as intrusive rock were misidentified; these polygons are noted in a separate table of the database, along with some information about their true character. Fields may be empty because of lack of information from references used or difficulty in finding

  10. Radon-hazard potential the Beaver basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    Indoor-radon levels in the Beaver basin of southwestern Utah are the highest recorded to date in Utah, ranging from 17.5 to 495 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Because the U.S. Environment Protection Agency considers indoor-radon levels above 4 pCi/L to represent a risk of lung cancer from long-term exposure, the Utah Geological Survey is preparing a radon-hazard-potential map for the area to help prioritize indoor testing and evaluate the need for radon-resistant construction. Radon is a chemically inert radioactive gas derived from the decay of uranium-238, which is commonly found in rocks and soils. Soil permeability, depth to ground water, and uranium/thorium content of source materials control the mobility and concentration of radon in the soil. Once formed, radon diffuses into the pore space of the soil and then to the atmosphere or into buildings by pressure-driven flow of air or additional diffusion. The Beaver basin has been a topographic and structural depression since late Miocene time. Paleocene to Miocene volcanic and igneous rocks border the basin. Uraniferous alluvial-fan, piedmont-slope, flood-plain, and lacustrine sediments derived from the surrounding volcanic rocks fill the basin. A soil-gas radon and ground radioactivity survey in the Beaver basin shows that soils have high levels of radon gas. In this survey, uranium concentrations range from 3 to 13 parts per million (ppm) and thorium concentrations range from 10 to 48 ppm. Radon concentrations in the soil gas ranged from 85 to 3,500 pCi/L. The highest concentrations of uranium, thorium, and radon gas and the highest radon-hazard-potential are in the well-drained permeable soils in the lower flood- plain deposits that underlie the city of Beaver.

  11. Particulate air pollution and daily mortality on Utah's Wasatch Front.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, C A; Hill, R W; Villegas, G M

    1999-01-01

    Reviews of daily time-series mortality studies from many cities throughout the world suggest that daily mortality counts are associated with short-term changes in particulate matter (PM) air pollution. One U.S. city, however, with conspicuously weak PM-mortality associations was Salt Lake City, Utah; however, relatively robust PM-mortality associations have been observed in a neighboring metropolitan area (Provo/Orem, Utah). The present study explored this apparent discrepancy by collecting, comparing, and analyzing mortality, pollution, and weather data for all three metropolitan areas on Utah's Wasatch Front region of the Wasatch Mountain Range (Ogden, Salt Lake City, and Provo/Orem) for approximately 10 years (1985-1995). Generalized additive Poisson regression models were used to estimate PM-mortality associations while controlling for seasonality, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. Salt Lake City experienced substantially more episodes of high PM that were dominated by windblown dust. When the data were screened to exclude obvious windblown dust episodes and when PM data from multiple monitors were used to construct an estimate of mean exposure for the area, comparable PM-mortality effects were estimated. After screening and by using constructed mean PM [less than/equal to] 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) data, the estimated percent change in mortality associated with a 10-mg/m3 increase in PM10 (and 95% confidence intervals) for the three Wasatch Front metropolitan areas equaled approximately 1. 6% (0.3-2.9), 0.8% (0.3-1.3), and 1.0% (0.2-1.8) for the Ogden, Salt Lake City, and Provo/Orem areas, respectively. We conclude that stagnant air pollution episodes with higher concentrations of primary and secondary combustion-source particles were more associated with elevated mortality than windblown dust episodes with relatively higher concentrations of coarse crustal-derived particles. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10379003

  12. Paleomagnetic dating of burial diagenesis in Mississippian carbonates, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumstein, Angela M.; Elmore, R. Douglas; Engel, Michael H.; Elliot, Crawford; Basu, Ankan

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study is to test models for the origin of widespread secondary magnetizations in the Mississippian Deseret Limestone. The Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone is a source rock for hydrocarbons, and modeling studies indicate that it entered the oil window in the Early Cretaceous during the Sevier orogeny. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from the Deseret Limestone and the stratigraphically equivalent Chainman Shale in central and western Utah indicate that the units contain two ancient magnetizations residing in magnetite. Burial temperatures are too low for the magnetizations to be thermoviscous in origin, and they are interpreted to be chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs). Fold tests from western Utah indicate the presence of a prefolding Triassic to Jurassic CRM. Geochemical (87Sr/86Sr, δ13C, and δ18O) and petrographic analyses suggest that externally derived fluids did not alter these rocks. This CRM was acquired at the beginning of the oil window and is interpreted to be the result of burial diagenesis of organic matter. A second younger CRM in western central Utah is apparently postfolding and is probably Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary in age. On the basis of the thermal modeling, the timing overlaps with the oil window. These results are consistent with a connection between organic matter maturation and remagnetization. Modeling of the smectite-to-illite transformation in the Deseret Limestone suggests a mean age prior to acquisition of both CRMs, although the range for illitization overlaps with the Triassic to Jurassic CRM. The results of this study support the hypothesis that pervasive CRMs can be related to burial diagenetic processes. In addition, paleomagnetism can be used to determine the timing of such processes, which can benefit hydrocarbon exploration efforts.

  13. Loess Plateau storage of Northeastern Tibetan Plateau-derived Yellow River sediment

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Junsheng; Stevens, Thomas; Rittner, Martin; Stockli, Daniel; Garzanti, Eduardo; Limonta, Mara; Bird, Anna; Andò, Sergio; Vermeesch, Pieter; Saylor, Joel; Lu, Huayu; Breecker, Daniel; Hu, Xiaofei; Liu, Shanpin; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Peng, Wenbin; Carter, Andrew; Ji, Shunchuan; Pan, Baotian

    2015-01-01

    Marine accumulations of terrigenous sediment are widely assumed to accurately record climatic- and tectonic-controlled mountain denudation and play an important role in understanding late Cenozoic mountain uplift and global cooling. Underpinning this is the assumption that the majority of sediment eroded from hinterland orogenic belts is transported to and ultimately stored in marine basins with little lag between erosion and deposition. Here we use a detailed and multi-technique sedimentary provenance dataset from the Yellow River to show that substantial amounts of sediment eroded from Northeast Tibet and carried by the river's upper reach are stored in the Chinese Loess Plateau and the western Mu Us desert. This finding revises our understanding of the origin of the Chinese Loess Plateau and provides a potential solution for mismatches between late Cenozoic terrestrial sedimentation and marine geochemistry records, as well as between global CO2 and erosion records. PMID:26449321

  14. Extension of the Yellowstone plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Owyhee plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, D.W.; Hackett, W.R.; Ore, H.T. )

    1990-11-01

    Formation of the late Cenozoic volcanic province comprising the Owyhee plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Yellowstone plateau has been accompanied by east-northeast-directed crustal extension. A new vector of 45 mm/yr, N56{degree}E for the migration of silicic volcanism across the volcanic province is calculated. If migration of volcanism reflects west-southwest continental drift over a mantle plume, a zone of crustal extension must separate the volcanic province from the more slowly moving North American craton. Space-time relations of basin fill in the adjacent Basin and Range province provide evidence for a zone of extension, about 125 km wide, coincident with and east of coeval silicic volcanism. Since 16 Ma, the zone of extension has migrated along with silicic volcanism, maintaining its position between the province and the unextended craton.

  15. Loess Plateau storage of Northeastern Tibetan Plateau-derived Yellow River sediment.

    PubMed

    Nie, Junsheng; Stevens, Thomas; Rittner, Martin; Stockli, Daniel; Garzanti, Eduardo; Limonta, Mara; Bird, Anna; Andò, Sergio; Vermeesch, Pieter; Saylor, Joel; Lu, Huayu; Breecker, Daniel; Hu, Xiaofei; Liu, Shanpin; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Peng, Wenbin; Carter, Andrew; Ji, Shunchuan; Pan, Baotian

    2015-01-01

    Marine accumulations of terrigenous sediment are widely assumed to accurately record climatic- and tectonic-controlled mountain denudation and play an important role in understanding late Cenozoic mountain uplift and global cooling. Underpinning this is the assumption that the majority of sediment eroded from hinterland orogenic belts is transported to and ultimately stored in marine basins with little lag between erosion and deposition. Here we use a detailed and multi-technique sedimentary provenance dataset from the Yellow River to show that substantial amounts of sediment eroded from Northeast Tibet and carried by the river's upper reach are stored in the Chinese Loess Plateau and the western Mu Us desert. This finding revises our understanding of the origin of the Chinese Loess Plateau and provides a potential solution for mismatches between late Cenozoic terrestrial sedimentation and marine geochemistry records, as well as between global CO2 and erosion records. PMID:26449321

  16. Bartonella Species Detected in the Plateau Pikas (Ochotona curzoiae) from Qinghai Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Rao, Hua Xiang; Yu, Juan; Guo, Peng; Ma, Yong Cheng; Liu, Qi Yong; Jiao, Ming; Ma, Zhong Wen; Ge, Hua; Wang, Chun Xiang; Song, Xiu Ping; Shi, Yan; Li, Dong Mei

    2015-09-01

    Bartonella species can infect a variety of mammalian hosts and cause a broad spectrum of diseases in humans, but there have been no reports of Bartonella infection in Ochotonidae. This is the first study to detect Bartonella in plateau pikas in the Qinghai plateau, providing baseline data for the risk assessment of human Bartonella infection in this area. We obtained 15 Bartonella strains from 79 pikas in Binggou and Maixiu areas of Qinghai with a positive rate of 18.99%. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the Bartonella citrate synthase (gltA) gene sequences, most strains were closely related to B. taylorii (3/15) and B. grahamii (12/15). The latter is a pathogenic strain in humans. Our results suggest that a corresponding prevention and control strategy should be taken into consideration in the Qinghai province.

  17. Loess Plateau storage of Northeastern Tibetan Plateau-derived Yellow River sediment.

    PubMed

    Nie, Junsheng; Stevens, Thomas; Rittner, Martin; Stockli, Daniel; Garzanti, Eduardo; Limonta, Mara; Bird, Anna; Andò, Sergio; Vermeesch, Pieter; Saylor, Joel; Lu, Huayu; Breecker, Daniel; Hu, Xiaofei; Liu, Shanpin; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Peng, Wenbin; Carter, Andrew; Ji, Shunchuan; Pan, Baotian

    2015-10-09

    Marine accumulations of terrigenous sediment are widely assumed to accurately record climatic- and tectonic-controlled mountain denudation and play an important role in understanding late Cenozoic mountain uplift and global cooling. Underpinning this is the assumption that the majority of sediment eroded from hinterland orogenic belts is transported to and ultimately stored in marine basins with little lag between erosion and deposition. Here we use a detailed and multi-technique sedimentary provenance dataset from the Yellow River to show that substantial amounts of sediment eroded from Northeast Tibet and carried by the river's upper reach are stored in the Chinese Loess Plateau and the western Mu Us desert. This finding revises our understanding of the origin of the Chinese Loess Plateau and provides a potential solution for mismatches between late Cenozoic terrestrial sedimentation and marine geochemistry records, as well as between global CO2 and erosion records.

  18. Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part II. Water temperature and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Klauk, R.H.; Davis, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    Geothermal reconnaissance techniques have identified five areas in Utah County warranting further investigation for low-temperature geothermal resources. One area in northern Utah Valley is along Utah Lake fault zone and includes Saratoga Hot Springs. Water temperatures within this area range from 21 to 43/sup 0/C. Common ion analyses as well as B and Li concentrations indicate waters sampled in this area are anomalous when compared to other samples from the same aquifer. Two other areas in southern Utah Valley also coincide with the Utah Lake fault zone. Common ion analyses, trace element concentrations, and C1/HCO/sub 3/ ratios distinguish these areas from all other waters in this valley. Temperatures within these southern areas range from 21 to 32/sup 0/C. All three thermal areas are possibly the result of deep circulation of meteoric water being warmed and subsequently migrating upward within the Utah Lake fault zone. The Castilla Hot Springs area has been expanded by this study to include a spring located 3 mi further up Spanish Fork Canyon near the Thistle earthflow. A temperature of 50/sup 0/C was recorded for this spring and chemistry is similar to Castilla. In Goshen Valley, the fifth geothermal area identified, measured temperatures range from 20 to 27/sup 0/C for some wells and springs. Chemical analyses, however, do not discern the location of low-temperature geothermal reservoirs. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Plateau inflation in SUGRA-MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Girish Kumar; Gupta, Gaveshna; Lambiase, Gaetano; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2016-09-01

    We explored a Higgs inflationary scenario in the SUGRA embedding of the MSSM in Einstein frame where the inflaton is contained in the SU (2) Higgs doublet. We include all higher order non-renormalizable terms to the MSSM superpotential and an appropriate Kähler potential which can provide slow-roll inflaton potential in the D-flat direction. In this model, a plateau-like inflation potential can be obtained if the imaginary part of the neutral Higgs acts as the inflaton. The inflationary predictions of this model are consistent with the latest CMB observations. The model represents a successful Higgs inflation scenario in the context of Supergravity and it is compatible with Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model.

  20. Logarithmic correlations in quantum Hall plateau transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain

    2015-07-01

    The critical behavior of quantum Hall transitions in two-dimensional disordered electronic systems can be described by a class of complicated, nonunitary conformal field theories with logarithmic correlations. The nature and the physical origin of these logarithmic correlation functions remain, however, mysterious. Using the replica trick and the underlying symmetries of these quantum critical points, we show here how to construct nonperturbatively disorder-averaged observables in terms of Green's functions that scale logarithmically at criticality. In the case of the spin quantum Hall transition, which may occur in disordered superconductors with spin-rotation symmetry and broken time reversal invariance, we argue that our results are compatible with an alternative approach based on supersymmetry. The generalization to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition is also discussed.

  1. Source Analysis of the Crandall Canyon, Utah, Mine Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Dreger, D S; Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2008-02-28

    Analysis of seismograms from a magnitude 3.9 seismic event on August 6, 2007 in central Utah reveals an anomalous radiation pattern that is contrary to that expected for a tectonic earthquake, and which is dominated by an implosive component. The results show the seismic event is best modeled as a shallow underground collapse. Interestingly, large transverse surface waves require a smaller additional non-collapse source component that represents either faulting in the rocks above the mine workings or deformation of the medium surrounding the mine.

  2. Remote sensing and uranium exploration at Lisbon Valley, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.; Niesen, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the joint NASA-Geosat uranium test case program, aircraft-acquired multispectral scanner data are used to investigate the distribution of bleaching in Windgate sandstone exposed in Lisbon Valley anticline, Utah. It is noted that all of the large ore bodies contained in lower Chinle Triassic age or Cutler Permian age strata in this area lie beneath or closely adjacent to such bleached outcrops. The geographic coincidences reported here are seen as inviting renewed interest in speculation of a causal relation between occurrences of Mississippian-Pennsylvanian oil and gas in this area and of Triassic uranium accumulation and rock bleaching.

  3. EDITORIAL: Integrated assessments of environmental change on the Tibetan Plateau Integrated assessments of environmental change on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yongwei; Yao, Tandong

    2009-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is one of the Earth's most sensitive regions in responding to climate change due to its extremely high altitude and the presence of permafrost and glaciers. The cryosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere of the plateau have been undergoing significant changes. Due to the low human population density, environmental changes on the plateau are largely driven by natural processes. Thus, the plateau provides a unique and comprehensive site for global change studies. This focus issue on Climate Change on the Tibetan Plateau aims to address both paleo and recent environmental changes across the plateau to facilitate our understanding of this remote and under-studied area. We invited a wide spectrum of contributions to address climate change, permafrost degradation, glacier/snow/ice dynamics, lake dynamics, land- cover/land-use changes, and their interactions on the plateau. Collectively, the diverse contributions in this special issue are expected to present the recent advancement of the above topics and beyond. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Climate Change on the Tibetan Plateau Contents Does a weekend effect in diurnal temperature range exist in the eastern and central Tibetan Plateau? Qinglong You, Shichang Kang, Wolfgang-Albert Flügel, Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo, Yuping Yan, Yanwei Xu and Jie Huang Diurnal variations of summertime precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau in relation to orographically-induced regional circulations Xiaodong Liu, Aijuan Bai and Changhai Liu Lake-level fluctuations since the Last Glaciation in Selin Co (lake), Central Tibet, investigated using optically stimulated luminescence dating of beach ridges Dewen Li, Yingkui Li, Baoqi Ma, Guocheng Dong, Liqiang Wang and Junxiang Zhao Recent changes in Imja Glacial Lake and its damming moraine in the Nepal Himalaya revealed by in situ surveys and multi-temporal ASTER imagery Koji Fujita, Akiko Sakai, Takayuki Nuimura, Satoru Yamaguchi and Rishi R Sharma Changes

  4. Simulation of ground-water flow and solute transport in the Glen Canyon aquifer, East-Central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freethey, Geoffrey W.; Stolp, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    The extraction of methane from coal beds in the Ferron coal trend in central Utah started in the mid-1980s. Beginning in 1994, water from the extraction process was pressure injected into the Glen Canyon aquifer. The lateral extent of the aquifer that could be affected by injection is about 7,600 square miles. To address regional-scale effects of injection over a decadal time frame, a conceptual model of ground-water movement and transport of dissolved solids was formulated. A numerical model that incorporates aquifer concepts was then constructed and used to simulate injection. The Glen Canyon aquifer within the study area is conceptualized in two parts-an active area of ground-water flow and solute transport that exists between recharge areas in the San Rafael Swell and Desert, Waterpocket Fold, and Henry Mountains and discharge locations along the Muddy, Dirty Devil, San Rafael, and Green Rivers. An area of little or negligible ground-water flow exists north of Price, Utah, and beneath the Wasatch Plateau. Pressurized injection of coal-bed methane production water occurs in this area where dissolved-solids concentrations can be more than 100,000 milligrams per liter. Injection has the potential to increase hydrologic interaction with the active flow area, where dissolved-solids concentrations are generally less than 3,000 milligrams per liter. Pressurized injection of coal-bed methane production water in 1994 initiated a net addition of flow and mass of solutes into the Glen Canyon aquifer. To better understand the regional scale hydrologic interaction between the two areas of the Glen Canyon aquifer, pressurized injection was numerically simulated. Data constraints precluded development of a fully calibrated simulation; instead, an uncalibrated model was constructed that is a plausible representation of the conceptual flow and solute-transport processes. The amount of injected water over the 36-year simulation period is about 25,000 acre-feet. As a result

  5. Drainage Evolution during the Uplift of the Central Anatolia Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, G. Y.; Meijers, M. J.; Willenbring, J. K.; Kaymakci, N.; Whitney, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Central Anatolian plateau formed in the past 8-6 Myrs, associated to a change in tectonic regime, from contraction to extensional escape tectonics. We have examined the response of the river drainage of Central Anatolia to the rise of the plateau uplift and to the formation of the Anatolian microplate, tracking changes in drainage organization. Anatolia experienced widespread rock uplift and erosion in the Late Oligocene, generating a narrow, steep, and quickly eroding mountain range above the future southern plateau margin. A regionally widespread marine transgression resulted from wholesale foundering of this orogen in Early Miocene time. Widespread planation surfaces overlapped by Miocene marine carbonates bevel this topography, indicating that relief had been reduced to a low elevation pedimented landscape by the end of the Middle Miocene. Plateau uplift initiated around 11 My ago in Eastern Anatolia; it was echoed in Central Anatolia by a short-lived phase of contraction and localized uplifts that predate escape tectonics and mark the beginning of the current topographic differentiation of the southern plateau margin. The through-going drainage network inherited disintegrated, and a vast zone of inward drainage formed at the location of the future plateau interior. Between 8 and 6 My, the southern plateau margin (i.e. the Tauride Mountains) emerged. δ18O analyses on lacustrine and pedogenic carbonates show that the southern plateau margin, if not the plateau interior, had experienced enough uplift by 5 My to generate a substantial rain shadow over the plateau interior. Being disconnected from the regional base level from the start, the plateau interior was able to rise without experiencing substantial dissection. It reconnected to all surrounding sediment sinks (Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and Persian Gulf) over the past 5 My. We discuss the mechanisms that have driven this reconnection. Bottom-up processes of integration such as drainage divide retreat

  6. Fish Lake, Utah - shallow seismic investigation of a lake-filled high-altitude graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M. S.; Oliviera-Manna, M.; Bailey, C.; Marchetti, D. W.; Brunelle, A.; Abbott, M. B.; Larsen, D. J.; Stoner, J. S.; Grimm, E. C.; Donovan, J.; Anderson, L.; Power, M. J.; Chavez, V.; Carter, V.; Hart, I.

    2015-12-01

    Fish Lake formed in a portion of the 20-km x 2.5-km wide NE-SW trending graben within the High Plateaus of Utah, on the border between the Basin and Range to the west and the Canyon Lands east. This presentation focuses on the shallow seismic stratigraphic architecture of the lake. Marchetti et al. (this meeting) focuses details of a shallow core collected in 2014. With a lake surface at 2700m, avg. depth of 27m (max 37m), the lake is flanked NW by a 15° slope up to a formerly glaciated Hightop plateau (3545m) and is bound to the SE by a 30° NW facing slope off the Mytoge crest (3050m). The drainage basin is 74 km2 with ~75% of the catchment draining the Hightop from four distinct streams. Pelican Canyon (glaciated) and Doctor Canyon (unglaciated) provide most drainage into the basin, with Bowery and Twin creeks draining only the slope. These streams flow through organic-rich meadows at the edge of the lake. Only one small stream drains NW into the lake from the small Crater Lakes graben (2850m) off the Mytoge. Bathymetric surveys in the lake highlight a submerged moraine to the NE, a gently sloping bottom that reaches maximum depth off the steep wall to the SE, and small delta-form features off each of the creeks on the NW edge. Chirp seismic surveys (2-16 kHz) consistently penetrate the upper 40-m (up to ~55m). The oldest visible reflectors rise into the submerged moraine to the NE, ending in a complex set of truncated and discontinuous beds eluding to soft sediment push at the front of the glacier. Along the edge near the creeks to the NW, multiple sets of downlapping reflectors, gas pockets, and chaotic beds with lobate tops define what we interpret as deltaic deposition, possible lower lake levels with marsh systems, and slope failures. The majority of the lake is underlain by flat-lying reflectors that bound sedimentary packages spanning the entirety of the basin interior. The uppermost layers have recently been cored where seismic reflectors are continuous

  7. Magma differentiation in shallow sills controlled by compaction and surface tension: San Rafael desert, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, M.; Savov, I. P.; Connor, C.

    2010-12-01

    Veinlets, veins, sheet or layers of syenite are common structures found in alkaline basalt sills. The mechanism usually invoked to explain their formation are liquid immiscibility, multiple intrusion or crystal fractionation from primitive mafic melt. Syenite veins of few centimeters to sheets of up to 1-2 m thick are ubiquitous in remarkably well-exposed sills of the San Rafael subvolcanic field in the Colorado Plateau, Utah. In some of these exposures we have found an intriguing configuration in which the main body of the alkaline sill is underlain by a lower density sheet of syenite of ~ 1 m thick. The contact is flat and is not a chilled margin, therefore a multiple intrusion scenario with long intervals between injections can be disregarded. This implies that both layers were fluid at the time of magma emplacement. As the more felsic less dense syenite is at the bottom of the sill any mechanism governed exclusively by bouyancy would be problematic. In an attempt to shed light on this apparent riddle we propose the following geological scenario: The sill is built by continuous injections. Magma starts to cool and fractional crystallization operates at this stage to differentiate the alkaline magma into syenite. By the time ~60% of crystallization is attained the system can be described as two-phase flow consisting of pore-syenite melt in hot-creeping matrix. The forces acting to segregate melt into veins or sheets are the gravitational force and surface tension. When surface tension is stronger than the gravitational force, differences in average curvature or surface tension translates into pressure differences that drive melt flow from low to high porosity regions. If the last injections occur at the bottom of the sill a syenite layer may be formed. With the aid of dimensional analysis and two-phase numerical models that account for gravitational compaction and surface tension effects, we explore the conditions that allow for centimeter-scale veins to meter

  8. Exhumation of the central Wasatch Mountains, Utah: 2. Thermokinematic model of exhumation, erosion, and thermochronometer interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Todd A.; Willett, Sean D.; Armstrong, Phillip A.; Chapman, Davis S.

    2003-03-01

    The Wasatch fault is a ˜370 km long normal fault in Utah that marks the boundary between the stable Colorado Plateau to the east and the extending Basin and Range to the west. Understanding the thermokinematic evolution of this fault can provide insights into intracontinental extensional tectonics and deformation processes in other rift zones (e.g., East Africa Rift, Transantarctic Mountains). We explore the thermokinematics of footwall exhumation and erosion in the Cottonwood Intrusive Belt of the central Wasatch Mountains. Emphasis is placed on using low-temperature thermochronometers to quantify (1) the spatial and temporal variability of exhumation and erosion rates, (2) the geometry of footwall tilt, (3) the fault dip angle, and (4) the magnitude and duration of exhumation. These processes are investigated using two-dimensional (2-D) thermal-kinematic models coupled with cooling-rate-dependent kinetic models which predict exhumed apatite fission track (AFT) and (U-Th)/He ages. The range of model parameters considered includes footwall exhumation and erosion rates at the fault between 0.2 and 2.0 mm yr-1, footwall tilt hinge positions between 15 and 40 km distance from the fault, a single planar normal fault with dip angles of 45° and 60°, and exhumation magnitudes of up to 15 km at the fault. Simulations include the formation of a low thermal conductivity sedimentary basin and erosion of heat-producing layers. Erosion maintains a constant topographic profile. The kinematic and exhumation history of the Wasatch Mountains is investigated by comparing model predicted thermochronometer ages to observed AFT, ZFT, and (U-Th)/He ages. Predicted and observed ages are compared using a reduced chi-square analysis to determine a best fit kinematic model for the Wasatch Mountains. The preferred model includes exhumation occurring on either a 45° or 60° dipping fault, a footwall hinge located a minimum of 20-25 km from the fault, and a step decrease (deceleration) in

  9. The Paleoflood Record of the Upper Colorado River near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, N.; Harden, T.; Baker, V. R.; Weisheit, J. S.; Cline, M. L.; Halevi, R.; Dohrenwend, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The paleoflood record of the Upper Colorado River was reconstructed 17 km upstream of the town of Moab, Utah (drainage area about 62,470 km2) using paleostage indicaters. The 4.5 km long study reach is a bedrock canyon incised some 300-350 m into the sandstone of the Colorado Plateau with a general gradient of 0.0004. The largest floods documented at the Cisco gauging station (1914-2011) - 30 km upstream, is the historical 1884 flood - 3540 m3s-1, the 1917 flood - 2175 m3s-1 and the 1984 flood - 1990 m3s-1. The paleostage indicators in the form of slackwater deposits and driftwood lines at this site are up to 15 m above the summer water discharge of July 2005 (425 m3 s-1). The detailed paleoflood stratigraphy was performed using a series of 14 pits across the SWD relict with a depth of up to 2 m. Dating of the paleoflood deposits include 14 OSL ages and 4 radiocarbon ages of wooden debris and charcoal. The canyon and channel geometry was reconstructed using a field survey of 24 cross sections during 2005. In 2010 a complementary survey of the underwater channel geometry using a sonar was conducted. Water surface profiles, peak discharges and hydraulic analyses where preformed using HECRAS hydraulic program. The water surface profiles were calibrated using the observed water levels of the floods of 25-26.5.2005 - 1140 m3s-1 and the 25-26 June 2011 - 260 m3s-1. The results indicate evidence of about 40 floods that occurred during the last 2140 +/- 220 years. The flow regime for the high-magnitude floods is subcritical and the canyon is relatively narrow, therefore the peak discharges are very sensitive to Manning`s n roughness coefficient. Due to the very low gradient the discharge results are also sensitive to the initial boundary conditions downstream. The peak discharges range from about 1600 m3s-1 and up to between 8,500 and 10,500 m3s-1 depending on the Manning n. At least 2 floods in this record exceeded the conservative value (8500 m3s-1) which is higher than

  10. Botulism from drinking prison-made illicit alcohol - Utah 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    Foodborne botulism is a rare, potentially fatal paralytic illness caused by eating food contaminated by Clostridium botulinum toxin. It occurs most often as a single case not linked to others by a common food source. As a result of improvements in food canning, when outbreaks do occur, they typically involve fewer than five persons. During October 2-4 2011, eight maximum security inmates at the Utah State Prison in Salt Lake County were diagnosed with foodborne botulism. An investigation by Salt Lake Valley Heath Department, Utah Department of Health, and CDC identified pruno, an illicit alcoholic brew, as the vehicle. The principal ingredients in pruno are fruit, sugar, and water. Many additional ingredients, including root vegetables, are sometimes added, depending on the availability of foods in prison. A baked potato saved from a meal served weeks earlier and added to the pruno was the suspected source of C. botulinum spores. Many of the affected inmates suffered severe morbidity, and some required prolonged hospitalizations. Knowing the link between pruno and botulism might help public health and correctional authorities prevent future outbreaks, respond quickly with appropriate health-care to inmates with acute descending paralysis and/or other symptoms, and reduce associated treatment costs to states.

  11. Respiratory hospital admissions associated with PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache Valleys

    SciTech Connect

    Pope CA, I.I.I. )

    1991-03-01

    This study assessed the association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache valleys during April 1985 through March 1989. Utah and Salt Lake valleys had high levels of PM10 pollution that violated both the annual and 24-h standards issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Much lower PM10 levels occurred in the Cache Valley. Utah Valley experienced the intermittent operation of its primary source of PM10 pollution: an integrated steel mill. Bronchitis and asthma admissions for preschool-age children were approximately twice as frequent in Utah Valley when the steel mill was operating versus when it was not. Similar differences were not observed in Salt Lake or Cache valleys. Even though Cache Valley had higher smoking rates and lower temperatures in winter than did Utah Valley, per capita bronchitis and asthma admissions for all ages were approximately twice as high in Utah Valley. During the period when the steel mill was closed, differences in per capita admissions between Utah and Cache valleys narrowed considerably. Regression analysis also demonstrated a statistical association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution. The results suggest that PM10 pollution plays a role in the incidence and severity of respiratory disease.

  12. Central Plateau Cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site - 12504

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Jonathan

    2012-07-01

    The discussion of Hanford's Central Plateau includes significant work in and around the center of the Hanford Site - located about 7 miles from the Columbia River. The Central Plateau is the area to which operations will be shrunk in 2015 when River Corridor cleanup is complete. This work includes retrieval and disposal of buried waste from miles of trenches; the cleanup and closure of massive processing canyons; the clean-out and demolition to 'slab on grade' of the high-hazard Plutonium Finishing Plant; installation of key groundwater treatment facilities to contain and shrink plumes of contaminated groundwater; demolition of all other unneeded facilities; and the completion of decisions about remaining Central Plateau waste sites. A stated goal of EM has been to shrink the footprint of active cleanup to less than 10 square miles by 2020. By the end of FY2011, Hanford will have reduced the active footprint of cleanup by 64 percent exceeding the goal of 49 percent. By 2015, Hanford will reduce the active footprint of cleanup by more than 90 percent. The remaining footprint reduction will occur between 2015 and 2020. The Central Plateau is a 75-square-mile region near the center of the Hanford Site including the area designated in the Hanford Comprehensive Land Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (DOE 1999) and Record of Decision (64 FR 61615) as the Industrial-Exclusive Area, a rectangular area of about 20 square miles in the center of the Central Plateau. The Industrial-Exclusive Area contains the 200 East and 200 West Areas that have been used primarily for Hanford's nuclear fuel processing and waste management and disposal activities. The Central Plateau also encompasses the 200 Area CERCLA National Priorities List site. The Central Plateau has a large physical inventory of chemical processing and support facilities, tank systems, liquid and solid waste disposal and storage facilities, utility systems, administrative facilities, and groundwater monitoring

  13. Reactive Multiphase behavior of CO2 in Saline Aquifers beneath the Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2002-06-30

    Gas reservoirs developed within the Colorado Plateau and Southern Rocky Mountains region are natural laboratories for studying the factors that promote long-term storage of CO{sub 2}. They also provide sites for storing additional CO{sub 2} if it can be separated from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants in this part of the U.S.A. These natural reservoirs are developed primarily in sandstones and dolomites; shales, mudstones and anhydrite form seals. In many fields, stacked reservoirs are present, indicating that the gas has migrated up through the section. There are also geologically young travertine deposits at the surface, and CO{sub 2}-charged groundwater and springs in the vicinity of known CO{sub 2} occurrences. These near-surface geological and hydrological features also provide examples of the environmental effects of leakage of CO{sub 2} from reservoirs, and justify further study. During reporting period covered here (the second quarter of Year 2 of the project, i.e. January 1-March 31, 2002), the main achievements were: (1) Field trips to the central Utah and eastern Arizona travertine areas to collect data and water samples to support study of surface CO{sub 2}-rich fluid leakage in these two areas. (2) Partial completion of a manuscript on natural analogues CO{sub 2} leakage from subsurface reservoirs. The remaining section on the chemistry of the fluids is in progress. (3) Improvements to CHEMTOUGH code to incorporate kinetic effects on reaction progress. (4) Submission of two abstracts (based on the above work) to the topical session at the upcoming GSA meeting in Denver titled ''Experimental, Field, and Modeling Studies of Geological Carbon Sequestration''. (5) Submission of paper to upcoming GGHT-6 conference in Kyoto. Co-PI S. White will attend this conference, and will also be involved in three other papers.

  14. Avian community responses to vegetation structure within chained and hand-cut pinyon-juniper woodlands on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Riper, Charles; Crow, Claire

    2012-01-01

    We investigated relationships between breeding birds and vegetation characteristics in fuels-reduction treatment areas within pinyon-juniper woodlands at locations over the Colorado Plateau. The goal of this study was to document differences in avian community responses to two types of pinyon-juniper fuels-reduction treatments (chained vs. hand-cut), relative to control sites. We selected 73 vegetation plots in southern Utah and northern Arizona, of which 33 had been previously thinned by handcutting or chaining, and 40 control plots in untreated pinyon-juniper woodlands. At the 73 locations we documented vegetation structure and counted birds within 3.1 ha circular plots during the 2005 and 2006 breeding seasons. We focused in particular on the effects of fuels-reduction treatments to 16 bird species that are considered pinyon-juniper obligates. We found that density of pinyon pines was the most important variable in predicting bird species richness in all treatments and at control sites. Abundance of Brewer’s Sparrow (Spizella breweri) was negatively related to chained, but positively related to hand cut areas. Vesper Sparrow (Poocetes graminius) abundance was negatively related to both chaining and handcutting. Within 16 pinyon-juniper obligate bird species, abundance of five was positively related to pinyon-pine density, while two were positively related to juniper density. These responses, along with other bird-vegetation relationships influenced by treatment type, need to be considered by land managers when planning fuels reduction treatments in pinyon-juniper woodland habitat in the Colorado Plateau.

  15. End member models for Andean Plateau uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. B.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    Diverse techniques have been applied over the past decade to quantify the uplift history of the central Andean Plateau (AP). In this study, opposing models for surface uplift are evaluated including: a rapid rise of ˜ 2.5 km ˜ 10-6 Ma and a slow and steady rise since ˜ 40 Ma. These end member models are evaluated by synthesizing observations of the AP lithosphere and the history of deformation, sedimentation, exhumation, magmatism, uplift, and fluvial incision. Structural and geophysical studies estimate variable shortening magnitudes (˜ 530-150 km) involving cover-to-basement rocks, an isostatically-compensated thick crust (˜ 80-65 km), high heat flow, and zones of variable velocity and attenuation in the crust and mantle. These observations have invoked interpretations such as a hot/weak lithosphere, partial melt, crustal flow, and perhaps current, localized delamination, but do not provide strong support for massive delamination required by the rapid uplift model. Deformation and associated exhumation began ˜ 60-40 Ma and generally migrated eastward with consistent long-term average shortening rates (˜ 12-8 mm/yr) in Bolivia, favoring the slow uplift model. Volcanic and helium isotope evidence show an AP-wide zone of shallow mantle melting and thin lithosphere that has existed since ˜ 25 Ma, which is inconsistent with the rapid rise model that suggests lithospheric thinning occurred 10-6 Ma. Paleoaltimetry data suggest a rapid ˜ 2.5 km elevation gain 10 to 6 Ma, but are equally consistent within error with a linear rise since ≥ 25 Ma. Widespread fluvial incision (2.5-1 km) occurred along the western flank since ˜ 11-8 Ma and may be associated with surface uplift as proposed by the rapid rise model. However, the paleoaltimetry and incision data can also be explained by regional climate change associated with plateau uplift. Implications of these results for reconstructions of AP evolution are that: (1) substantial deformation of a weak lithosphere is

  16. Comparison of ground-based measurements of natural radiation to airborne radiation survey data on transects from coastal California to the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffer, P. W.; Hernández, L.; Messina, P.; Dearaujo, J.; Li, A.; Hicks, A.; White, L.

    2008-12-01

    Natural gamma radiation measurements were collected with a hand-held Geiger counter at nearly 400 locations on two general transects across the southwestern United States. The data are used to provide ground-truth comparison to published airborne radiation surveys of the region. The first transect was collected by high school students in the SF-ROCKS program at San Francisco State University in the summer of 2008 starting in San Francisco. Data were collected across the Sierra Nevada Range on I-80, and across Highway 50 in Nevada, and I-70 in Utah. Data were collected in and around Great Basin, Arches, Capitol Reef, Bryce, and Zion National Parks, and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. A second transect extends from San José, California to Flagstaff, Arizona and includes the Mojave National Reserve, Death Valley region, and locations throughout the Navajo Reservation region in northern Arizona and western New Mexico. Radiation data (with GPS reference) were collected from all the major sedimentary rock formations and igneous rocks of the Colorado Plateau and from many igneous and metamorphic rocks throughout the Great Basin and southern California deserts. Anomalously high localized levels were noted in selected sedimentary units associated with uranium exploration targets in the Colorado Plateau region, and in caverns and rock fissures where radon gas (and accumulation of derivative fission products) are the inferred sources.

  17. Incision into the eastern Andean Plateau during Pliocene cooling.

    PubMed

    Lease, Richard O; Ehlers, Todd A

    2013-08-16

    Canyon incision into mountain topography is commonly used as a proxy for surface uplift driven by tectonic or geodynamic processes, but climatic changes can also instigate incision. The ~1250-kilometer (km)-long eastern margin of the Andean Plateau hosts a series of 1.5- to 2.5-km-deep canyons that cross major deformation zones. Using (U-Th)/He thermochronology, we document a transition from Miocene faulting to Pliocene canyon incision across the northeastern plateau margin. Regionally, widespread Pliocene incision into the eastern plateau margin is concurrent with a shift in global climate from early Pliocene warmth to late Pliocene cooling. Enhanced moisture transport onto the Andean Plateau driven by sea surface temperature changes during cooling is the likely pacemaker for canyon incision. PMID:23950534

  18. Groundwater resources of the Columbia Plateau regional aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahle, Sue C.; Vaccaro, John J.

    2015-09-22

    The Columbia Plateau is a wide basalt plateau between the Cascade Range and the Rocky Mountains that covers parts of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The climate over much of the Columbia Plateau is semiarid with precipitation ranging from 7 to 15 in/yr in the central part (Vaccaro and others, 2015), yet the area supports a $6 billion per year agricultural industry, including the production of apples, corn, grapes, hops, mint, potatoes, stone fruit, and wheat. Groundwater pumpage and surface-water diversions supply water to irrigated croplands that account for about 5 percent of the Nation’s irrigated lands. Groundwater also is the primary source of drinking water for about 1.3 million people living on the plateau.

  19. THE LONG-LIVED UV ''PLATEAU'' OF SN 2012aw

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Pritchard, Tyler A.; Kuin, Paul; Brown, Peter J.; Botticella, Maria Teresa; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Frey, Lucille H.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Maund, Justyn R.; Fraser, Morgan

    2013-02-10

    Observations with the Swift UV Optical Telescope have unambiguously uncovered for the first time a long-lived, UV ''plateau'' in a Type II-P supernova (SN). Although this flattening in slope is hinted at in a few other SNe, due to its proximity and minimal line-of-sight extinction, SN 2012aw has afforded the first opportunity to clearly observe this UV plateau. The observations of SN 2012aw revealed all Swift UV and u-band light curves initially declined rapidly, but 27 days after the explosion the light curves flattened. Some possible sources of the UV plateau are the same thermal process that causes the optical plateau, heating from radioactive decay, or a combination of both processes.

  20. (U-Th)/He dating and chemistry of diagenetic Fe- and Mn-oxides in Mesozoic sandstones of the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, P. W.; Chan, M. A.; Evenson, N.

    2013-12-01

    Diagenetic mobilization and redeposition of solutes by groundwater in sedimentary rocks commonly concentrates Fe- and Mn-oxides into concretions and other types of local cement-mineral masses. Remarkable examples come from Mesozoic sandstones of the Colorado Plateau, where ancient groundwater flow produced locally abundant pipes, cones, sheets, and spheroidal concretions defined by high concentrations of hematite, goethite, and Mn-oxides. These diagenetic oxides provide striking analogies to similar features on Mars that have also been interpreted as indicators of ancient groundwater flow. Despite their potential for understanding fluid migration, diagenesis, and Martian hydrogeology, the origin and significance of these concretionary features are still poorly understood. A fundamental limitation to our understanding is a huge lack of temporal constraints on their age of formation and possible subsequent modification. To better understand the history and compositions of these features we measured (U-Th)/He ages and trace element compositions of 75 diagenetic Fe- and Mn-oxide samples from a dozen locations in northern Arizona and southern Utah, and performed step-heating He diffusion experiments on Fe- and Mn-oxide samples. We find (U-Th)/He ages ranging from 0.2 to 25 Ma, with the majority of ages between 0.3 and 5 Ma. One sample of Mn-oxide from near Moab, Utah yields a reproducible (U-Th)/He age of 2.36 × 0.09 Ma (1σ, n=5). Small hematite-dominated concretions from SW Utah and another hematite cement from SE Utah are consistently the oldest, reaching ages of 25 Ma, near the 40Ar/39Ar step-heating plateau observed in Mn oxides by Chan et al. (2001). Other samples, including goethite-dominated Moqui marbles from the Paria Plateau, and Fe- and mixed Fe-Mn-oxides from various areas are mostly Plio-Pleistocene. The range of ages and compositions is not easily explained by a wide range of formation ages, nor by diffusive loss of He from unretentive domains. Instead

  1. Continental crust beneath the Agulhas Plateau, Southwest Indian Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Tucholke, B.E.; Houtz, R.E.; Barrett, D.M.

    1981-05-10

    The Agulhas Plateau lies 500 km off the Cape of Good Hope in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Acoustic basement beneath the northern one third of this large, aseismic structural high has rugged morphology, but basement in the south is anomalously smooth, excepting a 30- to 90-km-wide zone with irregular relief that trends south-southwest through the center of the plateau. Seismic refraction profiles across the southern plateau indicate that the zone of irregular acoustic basement overlies thickened oceanic crust and that continental crust, locally thinned and intruded by basalts, underlies several regions of smooth acoustic basement. Recovery of quartzo-feldspathic gneisses in dredge hauls confirms the presence of continental crust. The smoothness of acoustic basement probably results from erosion (perhaps initially subaerial) of topographic highs with depositions and cementation of debris in ponds to form high-velocity beds. Basalt flows and sills also may contribute locally to form smooth basement. The rugged basement of the northern plateau appears to be of oceanic origin. A plate reconstruction to the time of initial opening of the South Atlantic places the continental part of the southern plateau adjacent to the southern edge of the Falkland Plateau, and both abut the western Mozambique Ridge. Both the Agulhas and Falkland plateaus were displaced westward during initial rifting in the Early Cretaceous. Formation of an RRR triple junction at the northern edge of the Agulhas continental fragment during middle Cretaceous time may explain the origin of the rugged, thickened oceanic crust beneath plateau as well as the apparent extension of the continental crust and intrusion of basaltic magmas beneath the southern plateau.

  2. The Qinghai-Tibetan plateau: how high do Tibetans live?

    PubMed

    Wu, T

    2001-01-01

    A lower incidence of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) has apparently been observed in Tibetans in comparison to Andeans of South America. In the past, the hypothesis of "geographic differences" has been constructed to explain these population differences. In order to assess the importance of this hypothesis in the development of CMS, this article will first review the geographic factors of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau where Tibetans live. The plateau is bounded by the Himalayas in the southwest and the Kunlun and Aljin mountains in the northeast. It towers over southwestern China at an average elevation of 4000 m above sea level and is known as "the roof of the world." Covering more than 2.5 million km(2), the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau is the highest and largest plateau in the world. The plateau has a highland continental climate and a very complex topography with great variations. Second, at what altitude do Tibetans live? In 1990 it was estimated that 4,594,188 Tibetans live on the plateau, with 53% living at an altitude over 3500 m. Fairly large numbers (about 600,000) live at an altitude exceeding 4500 m in the Chantong-Qingnan area. People of Tibetan ethnic descent are lifelong high-altitude residents and cannot easily move to higher or lower elevations. Over 90% of the population are engaged in farming and herding. The upper altitude limit of crops is around 4500 m, while the nomads reside above 4800 m and 5500 m. Recently, mining activities in the plateau have sustained a part of the population that lives permanently at altitudes between 3700 and 6000 m. Therefore, the Tibetans living in the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau live at an altitude as high as the Andeans in South America. Thus the apparently low incidence of CMS in Tibetans cannot be ascribed to "geographic differences." We propose that the genetic adaptation to hypoxia that has occurred in Tibetans is of importance in CMS.

  3. Blowing Snow Over the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahesh, Ashwin; Eager, Rebecca; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of blowing snow over Antarctica have been limited greatly by the remoteness and harsh conditions of the region. Space-based observations are also of lesser value than elsewhere, given the similarities between ice clouds and snow-covered surfaces, both at infrared and visible wavelengths. It is only in recent years that routine ground-based observation programs have acquired sufficient data to overcome the gap in our understanding of surface blowing snow. In this paper, observations of blowing snow from visual observers' records as well as ground-based spectral and lidar programs at South Pole station are analyzed to obtain the first climatology of blowing snow over the Antarctic plateau. Occurrence frequencies, correlation with wind direction and speed, typical layer heights, as well as optical depths are determined. Blowing snow is seen in roughly one third of the visual observations and occurs under a narrow range of wind directions. The near-surface layers typically a few hundred meters thick emit radiances similar to those from thin clouds. Because blowing snow remains close to the surface and is frequently present, it will produce small biases in space-borne altimetry; these must be properly estimated and corrected.

  4. Dendroclimatic reconstructions for the southern Colorado plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.S.; Funkhouser, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    A geographical network of climate sensitive tree-ring chronologies consisting of 25 archaeological sequences and two bristlecone pine series provides the basis for high resolution reconstructions of low and high frequency climatic variability on the southern Colorado Plateau over the last 1,500 years. Qualitative and quantitative dendroclimatic analyses of these data produce annual retrodictions of yearly and seasonal precipitation and summer Palmer Drought Severity Indices for each station and reconstructions of regional scale patterns in climatic variability. These reconstructions provide detailed information on climatic fluctuations that affected biotic and human populations as well as long-term baseline data for evaluating present-day climate and estimating future climatic trends. When integrated with other measures of past environmental variability, these reconstructions specify periods of favorable and unfavorable environmental conditions that would have affected past human populations of the region. The severest degradation, which occurred between A.D. 1250 and 1450, probably was causally related to numerous cultural changes that occurred at the end of the l3th century including the Anasazi abandonment of the Four Comers area. Projecting environmental patterns that characterized the last two millennia into the future indicates potential hazards to long term uranium mill waste disposal and containment and the potential and limitations of environmental restoration.

  5. Does the climate warming hiatus exist over the Tibetan Plateau?

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Anmin; Xiao, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The surface air temperature change over the Tibetan Plateau is determined based on historical observations from 1980 to 2013. In contrast to the cooling trend in the rest of China, and the global warming hiatus post-1990s, an accelerated warming trend has appeared over the Tibetan Plateau during 1998–2013 (0.25 °C decade−1), compared with that during 1980–1997 (0.21 °C decade−1). Further results indicate that, to some degree, such an accelerated warming trend might be attributable to cloud–radiation feedback. The increased nocturnal cloud over the northern Tibetan Plateau would warm the nighttime temperature via enhanced atmospheric back-radiation, while the decreased daytime cloud over the southern Tibetan Plateau would induce the daytime sunshine duration to increase, resulting in surface air temperature warming. Meanwhile, the in situ surface wind speed has recovered gradually since 1998, and thus the energy concentration cannot explain the accelerated warming trend over the Tibetan Plateau after the 1990s. It is suggested that cloud–radiation feedback may play an important role in modulating the recent accelerated warming trend over the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:26329678

  6. Does the climate warming hiatus exist over the Tibetan Plateau?

    PubMed

    Duan, Anmin; Xiao, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The surface air temperature change over the Tibetan Plateau is determined based on historical observations from 1980 to 2013. In contrast to the cooling trend in the rest of China, and the global warming hiatus post-1990s, an accelerated warming trend has appeared over the Tibetan Plateau during 1998-2013 (0.25 °C decade(-1)), compared with that during 1980-1997 (0.21 °C decade(-1)). Further results indicate that, to some degree, such an accelerated warming trend might be attributable to cloud-radiation feedback. The increased nocturnal cloud over the northern Tibetan Plateau would warm the nighttime temperature via enhanced atmospheric back-radiation, while the decreased daytime cloud over the southern Tibetan Plateau would induce the daytime sunshine duration to increase, resulting in surface air temperature warming. Meanwhile, the in situ surface wind speed has recovered gradually since 1998, and thus the energy concentration cannot explain the accelerated warming trend over the Tibetan Plateau after the 1990s. It is suggested that cloud-radiation feedback may play an important role in modulating the recent accelerated warming trend over the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:26329678

  7. Investigations of the gravity profile below the Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W. B.; Han, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Scientists pay great attention to the structure and dynamics of the Tibetan plateau due to the fact that it is a natural experiment site for geoscience studies. The gravity profiles below the Tibetan plateau with successive high-accuracy play more and more significant role in studying the structure and evolution of the Tibetan plateau. This study focuses on determining the inner gravity field of the Tibetan plateau until to the depth of D and interpret possible mechanism of the gravity profile below the Tibetan plateau, especially reinvestigating the isostasy problem (Pratt hypothesis and Airy hypothesis). The inner gravity field below the Tibetan plateau is determined based on a simple technique (i.e. a combination of Newtonian integral, downward continuation of gravity field, and "remove-restore" scheme) and the following datasets: the external Earth gravitational model EGM2008 and the digital topographic model DTM2006.0 released by NGA (National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, USA), and the crust density distribution model CRUST2.0 released by NGS (National Geological Survey, USA). This study is supported by Natural Science Foundation China (grant No.40974015; No.41174011).

  8. Ramp Angle, Not Plateau Height, Influences Transition Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2016-10-01

    In a previous study, we found that participants modified how they transitioned onto and off of ramp configurations depending upon the incline. While the transition strategies were originally attributed to ramp angles, it is possible that the plateau influenced the strategies since the final surface height also differed. Ultimately, for the current study, we hypothesized that an individual's transition strategies would have significant main effects for ramp angle, but not plateau height. Twelve healthy, young adults transitioned onto 3 distinct ramp configurations, a 2.4-m ramp angled at 12.5° ending at a plateau height of 53 cm, a 1.2-m ramp angled at 23.5° ending at a plateau height of 53 cm, and a 2.4-m ramp angled at 23.5° ending at a plateau height of 99.5 cm. Kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activity were measured during the stance phase before contacting the ramp. In support of our hypothesis, impact peak, active peak, and all of the muscle activity variables had a significant main effect for ramp angle, with greater vertical force peaks and muscle activity on steeper ramp transitions. These findings support our previous interpretation that individuals use estimations of ramp angle, not plateau height, to determine their transition strategies.

  9. A Precambrian-Cambrian oil play in southern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lillis, P.G.; Palacas, J.G.; Warden, A.

    1995-06-01

    The potential of the Precambrian Chuar Group as a petroleum source rock in southern Utah and northern Arizona resulted in the drilling of two wildcat wells in 1994. Both wells penetrated the Cambrian Tapeats Sandstone (the target reservoir rock) and presumably Precambrian rocks. The first well, Burnett Federal 36-1, was drilled east of Kanab, Utah (sec.36, T.34S., R.3W.) to a total depth of 5,365 ft and encountered Precambrian (?) reddish-brown sedimentary rocks at 4,790 ft. The Tapeats Sandstone had live oil shows and minor CO{sub 2} (?) gas shows. The second well, BHP Federal 28-1, was drilled near Capitol Reef (sec.28, T.33S., R.7E.) to a total depth of 6,185 ft and encountered the Tapeats Sandstone at 5,922 ft and Precambrian (?) phyllite at 6,125 ft. The upper Paleozoic rocks had abundant live oil/tar shows, and the Cambrian Bright Angel Shale and Tapeats Sandstone had numerous oil shows. There were no gas shows in the well except for a large CO{sub 2} gas kick in the Tapeats Sandstone. A drill-stem test from 5,950 to 6,185 ft yielded mostly CO{sub 2} (92%) and nitrogen gas (6%) and minor amounts of helium, argon, hydrogen, and methane. The {delta}{sup 13}C of the CO{sub 2} is -3.9 per mil PDB. The chemical composition of the extracted oil in the Cambrian sandstones is significantly different than oils produced from the Upper Valley field (upper Paleozoic reservoirs) and the tar sands that are widespread throughout southern and central Utah. However, the oil composition is similar in several aspects to the composition of some of the Precambrian Chuar Group bitumen extracts from the Grand Canyon area in Arizona. The encouraging features of both wells are the good reservoir characteristics and oil shows in the Tapeats Sandstone. In the BHP well the oil appears to be a new oil type, possibly derived from Precambrian or Cambrian source rocks.

  10. Space Radar Image of Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image of Salt Lake City, Utah, illustrates the different land use patterns that are present in the Utah Valley. Salt Lake City lies between the shores of the Great Salt Lake (the dark area on the left side of the image) and the Wasatch Front Range (the mountains in the upper half of the image). The Salt Lake City area is of great interest to urban planners because of the combination of lake, valley and alpine environments that coexist in the region. Much of the southern shore of the Great Salt Lake is a waterfowl management area. The green grid pattern in the right center of the image is Salt Lake City and its surrounding communities. The Salt Lake City airport is visible as the brown rectangle near the center of the image. Interstate Highway 15 runs from the middle right edge to the upper left of the image. The bright white patch east of Interstate 15 is the downtown area, including Temple Square and the state capitol. The University of Utah campus is the yellowish area that lies at the base of the mountains, east of Temple Square. The large reservoir in the lower left center is a mine tailings pond. The semi-circular feature in the mountains at the bottom edge of the image is the Kennecott Copper Mine. The area shown is 60 kilometers by 40 kilometers (37 miles by 25 miles) and is centered at 40.6 degrees north latitude, 112.0 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper left. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 10, 1994. The colors in this image represent the following radar channels and polarizations: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  11. The Inception of the Colorado Plateau Coring Project: Filling the Triassic Geochronologic Gap and Providing a Continuous Record of Continental Environmental Change in Western Equatorial Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.; Olsen, P. E.; Kent, D. V.; Irmis, R. B.; Gehrels, G. E.; Mundil, R.; Parker, W.; Bachmann, G. H.; Kurschner, W. M.; Sha, J.

    2014-12-01

    properties, including XRF data. The core will then be transported to the Rutgers University for sampling. The planning team is contemplating Phase Two options (e.g., the Middle to Lower Triassic marine-influenced section west of the Colorado Plateau (St. George, Utah) area or the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic sequence in the Comb Ridge area (Bluff, Utah)).

  12. Paleomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy of the lower Glen Canyon and upper Chinle Groups, Jurassic-Triassic of northern Arizona and northeast Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Garza, Roberto S.; Geissman, John W.; Lucas, Spencer G.

    2003-04-01

    Twenty-eight selected sites (individual beds) in the Moenave Formation at the Echo Cliffs, northern Arizona, strata give a Hettangian paleomagnetic pole at 63.7°N, 59.7°E (dp = 2.6°, dm = 5.1°). The Wingate Sandstone and Rock Point Formation at Comb Ridge, southeast Utah, provide a Rhaetian paleopole at 57.4°N, 56.6°E (N = 16 sites; dp = 3.4, dm = 6.5). High unblocking temperatures (>600°C), high coercivity, and data analyses indicate that the characteristic magnetization is primarily a chemical remanence residing in hematite. The Hettangian and Rhaetian poles are statistically indistinguishable (at 95% confidence), they resemble existing data for the Glen Canyon Group, and they provide further validation to the J1 cusp of the North American apparent pole wander path (APWP). The red siltstone and upper members of the Chinle Group, on the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, northern Utah, define a Rhaetian pole at 51.6°N, 70.9°E (N = 20 sites; dp = 3.5°, dm = 6.9°). The Gartra and upper members of the Chinle Group in the north flank of the Uinta Mountains, give paleopoles at 52.0°N, 100.3°E (N = 6 sites; dp = 5.4°, dm = 10.5°) and 50.9°N, 50.1°E (N = 5 sites; dp = 8.8°, dm = 17.5°), respectively. These data indicate no significant rotation of the Uinta Mountains with respect to the craton. In total, data for the plateau and its bordering region of Cenozoic uplifts support estimates of small rotation of the plateau and provide evidence against the hypothesis of a Late Triassic standstill of the North American APWP. Our magnetostratigraphic results are consistent with lithographic and biostratigraphic data that place the Triassic-Jurassic boundary within the Dinosaur Canyon Member of the Moenave Formation, not at a regional hiatus.

  13. Exploring the cliff retreat response to base level change using SFM photogrammetry and cosmogenic 36Cl, Coal Cliffs, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, C.; Ward, D.

    2015-12-01

    The retreat of cliffbands is an important erosional process within the relatively undeformed sedimentary layers of the Colorado Plateau. Many iconic cliff landforms, including those of Monument Valley and Grand Canyon, are maintained by the interaction of these different rock types. A several kilometer thickness of incised sandstone and shale formations allow this region to act as a natural laboratory for studying the effects of variable lithologies on landscape evolution. Cliffband morphology and retreat on the plateau are controlled by several factors that may vary over time and space, including lithology, rate and distribution of rockfall debris, bedrock structure, baselevel, and climate. The relative importance of each factor in setting rates of cliff retreat are not entirely clear. Because regional headwaters are commonly sourced at cliff bases, these landforms are often the final and slowest areas to respond to baselevel changes, allowing rockfall and other local stochastic processes to overwhelm the erosional response to a baselevel forcing. The roles of these processes are difficult to assess because very few measurements of retreat rates over geomorphic timescales (103-106 years) have been produced, and thus changes in cliffband position through time have only been constrained by inferences made from the regional erosional history. Here, we control for climate and rock type by focusing on a continuous, 40-kilometer section of the lithologically consistent Coal Cliffs in Emery County, Utah. This area presents several natural experiments illustrating cliffband response to different forcings, including relict surfaces reflecting a baselevel change, drainage divides across which the adjustment to base level change may be asynchronous, a zone wherein the caprock layer has been removed by backscarp erosion, and a generally continuous gradient in cliff height from 50 to >200 meters along the cliffline. We employ terrestrial Cl36 exposure dating on terraces, talus

  14. Microsatellite primers in Agave utahensis (Asparagaceae), a keystone species in the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau1

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Charlee; Maughan, Peter J.; Clouse, Jared; Stewart, J. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Utah agave (Agave utahensis) and its putative subspecies, A. utahensis subsp. kaibabensis and A. utahensis subsp. utahensis, are keystone species of the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau in the southwestern United States. Here we developed microsatellite markers to study population structure and genetic diversity of the two subspecies of A. utahensis. • Methods and Results: We analyzed 22,386 454-pyrosequencing large contigs (>400 bp), derived from a genome reduction experiment consisting of A. utahensis accessions, for putative microsatellites. The use of unique multiplex barcodes for each of the Agave accessions allowed for the identification of putatively polymorphic microsatellites based solely on sequence alignment analysis. We report the characteristics of 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci based on a panel of 104 individuals from the two subspecies. The number of alleles per locus varied from three to eight, with an average of 5.5 alleles per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.038 to 0.777 and 0.038 to 0.707, respectively. • Conclusions: The microsatellites identified here will be invaluable for future studies of population structure, polyploidy, and genetic diversity across the species. PMID:25225631

  15. Igneous activity and related ore deposits in the western and southern Tushar Mountains, Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steven, Thomas A.

    1984-01-01

    16 m.y. old may exist near Indian Creek just west of the Mount Belknap caldera. Geophysical evidence confirms the probability of a buried pluton near Indian Creek, and also indicates that another buried pluton probably exists beneath the 9-m.y.-old mineralized area at Sheep Rock. The mineral potential of the different hydrothermal systems, and the types of minerals deposited probably vary considerably from one period of mineralization to another and from one depth environment to another within a given system. PART B: The Big John caldera, on the western flank of the Tushar Mountains in the Marysvale volcanic field in west-central Utah, formed 23-22 m.y. ago in response to ash-flow eruptions of the Delano Peak Tuff Member of the Bullion Canyon Volcanics. These eruptions were near the end of the period of Oligocene-early Miocene calc-alkalic igneous activity that built a broad volcanic plateau in this part of Utah. About 22 m.y. ago, the composition of rocks erupted changed to a bimodal assemblage of mafic and silicic volcanics that was erupted episodically through the remainder of Cenozoic time. The alkali rhyolites are uranium rich in part, and are associated with all the known uranium deposits in the Marysvale volcanic field. The Big John caldera was a broad drained basin whose floor was covered by a layer of stream gravels when ash flows from the western source area of the Mount Belknap Volcanics filled the caldera with the Joe Lott Tuff Member about 19 m.y. ago. Devitrified and zeolitized rocks in the caldera fill have lost one-quarter to one-half of the uranium contained in the original magma. This mobilized uranium probably moved into the hydrologic regime, and some may have been redeposited in stream gravels underlying the Joe Lott within the caldera, or in gravels filling the original drainage channel that extended south from the caldera.

  16. 76 FR 66080 - Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... royalties accruing from July 1, 2011, the date of termination. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kent Hoffman..., or letter to: Bureau of Land Management, Utah State Office, Attn: Kent Hoffman, P.O. Box 45155,...

  17. 78 FR 4341 - Approval, Disapproval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans; State of Utah; Regional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... the Federal Register on December 14, 2012 (77 FR 74355), the following corrections are made: 1. On... State of Utah on May 26, 2011 that addresses regional haze. The final rule preamble inadvertently...

  18. Utah State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The Utah State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Utah. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Utah. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Utah.

  19. Utah Marbles and Mars Blueberries: Comparitive Terrestrial Analogs for Hematite Concretions on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. A.; Beitler, B.; Parry, W. T.; Ormö, J.; Komatsu, G.

    2005-03-01

    Compelling comparisons show why Utah iron oxide-cemented "marbles" are a good analog for Mars hematite "blueberries". Terrestrial examples offer valuable models for interpreting the diagenetic history and importance of water on Mars.

  20. 75 FR 64985 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Utah Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... Audit and next steps in developing a resource directory of human rights agencies/organizations in the... the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) that a planning meeting of the Utah Advisory Committee...

  1. It's About Time for Autism Reform Legislation in Utah.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    On 3 April 2014, Governor Gary Herbert signed into law a health insurance reform bill that requires private insurers to cover autism therapy. Specifically, SB57 requires state-regulated health plans to cover applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapy. While early diagnosis and intervention can reduce the long-term cost of autism, families are finding themselves bankrupt in order to pay for ABA therapy. Currently, 37 states, and the District of Columbia have enacted insurance reform laws. Ensuring that children with autism receive proper therapy is a serious public health issue. Utah was right to pass reform legislation because it properly benefits and safeguards the interests of affected children in promoting their well-being and participation in society.

  2. Final report for Utah State's SciDAC CEMM contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Eric Held

    2008-05-13

    This document represents a summary of work carried out at Utah State University in conjunction with the Center for Extended Magnetohyrodynamic Modeling (CEMM). The principal investigator, Dr. Eric Held, was aided in this work by two former graduate students, Drs. John James and Michael Addae-Kagyah, who completed their PhD's while being partially funded by CEMM monies. In addtion, Dr. Jeong-Young Ji, a postdoctoral researcher and Mukta Sharma, a graduate student were supported. The work associated with this grant focused on developing an efficient, hybrid fluid/kinetic model for fusion plasmas. Specifically, expressions for the parallel heat fluxes and stresses in magnetized plasmas were implemented and exercised in the NIMROD plasma fluid code.

  3. Subsurface-temperature data for some wells in western Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rush, F. Eugene

    1977-01-01

    This hydrothermal reconnaissance of the State of Utah contains temperature-profile data for 30 wells. Most of the wells were small-diameter geothermal-exploration wells. Some were stock, domestic, or irrigation wells. Temperatures were measured using thermistor, 4-conductor cable, and a digital multimeter. Meter readings were in ohms, but were converted to temperature by a calibration graph. The electronic thermometer is capable of an accuracy to 0.01 deg C, and the highest temperature measured was 107.80 deg C in the only well to have measurements of 100 deg C or higher. Because of variations in field conditions, the temperature data in many wells probably is accurate only to 0.1 deg C. Depths below land surface were measured using a sheave and attached counter. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Seepage study of Mapleton Lateral Canal near Mapleton, Utah, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkowske, Chris D.; Phillips, Jeff V.

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted during the summer of 2003 on Mapleton Lateral Canal near Mapleton, Utah, to determine gain or loss of flow in the canal from seepage. Measurements were made in May, June, July, and September of 2003. The uppermost reach of the canal had an apparent average loss of 2.6 cubic feet per second. The next reach downstream showed an apparent average gain of 1.4 cubic feet per second. The next three downstream reaches had apparent average losses of 2.4, 2.5, and 2.7 cubic feet per second. The apparent average net loss from the canal was 8.8 cubic feet per second, or a loss of 30 percent of the total discharge measured at the head of the canal.

  5. Shocked materials from the Dutch Peak diamictite, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.; Bunch, T. E.; Oberbeck, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence of shock metamorphism in the Dutch Peak diamictite in the Sheeprock Mountains, Utah, is reported. The Dutch Peak diamictite is of Proterozoic age and is a minor part of the Dutch Peak formation. A shocked sample, specimen A250, was collected during a brief visit of the Harker Canyon area of the Sheeprock Mountains. This sample consists of equant, anhedral grains of quartz, K-feldspar, and plagioclase. The crystallographic orientation of 244 lamellae systems in 106 grains was measured. It is presently difficult to evaluate the significance of this single specimen. Without additional and substantial field work, and petrographic characterization of this formation, a number of scenarios for the presence of a shocked clast and the emplacement of the entire formation remain viable.

  6. Satellite microwave observations of the Utah Great Salt Lake Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dellwig, L. F.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave data acquired over the Great Salt Lake Desert by sensors aboard Skylab and Nimbus 5 indicate that microwave emission and backscatter were strongly influenced by contributions from subsurface layers of sediment saturated with brine. This phenomenon was observed by Skylab's S-194 radiometer operating at 1.4 GHz, S-193 RADSCAT (Radiometer-Scatterometer) operating at 13.9 GHz and the Nimbus 5 ESMR (Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer) operating at 19.35 GHz. The availability of ESMR data over an 18 month period allowed an investigation of temporal variations. Aircraft 1.4 GHz radiometer data acquired two days after one of the Skylab passes confirm the satellites observations. Data from the ESMR revealed similar responses over the Bolivian deserts, which have geologic features similar to those of the Utah desert.

  7. Exploration targets in the Great Basin of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.; Chidsey, T.C. Jr. )

    1993-08-01

    Three types of petroleum exploration targets are present in the Great Basin of Utah: structural traps in Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks, unconformity traps of buried hills of Paleozoic rocks draped by Tertiary deposits, and structural traps related to thrusting where a wide variety of potential reservoir rocks are juxtaposed against Paleozoic source rocks. Tertiary targets are delineated by seismic surveys and consist of tilted fault blocks and faulted anticlines. The only success to date is Amoco's West Rozel field, in Great Salt Lake, which has in-place reserves estimated at 100 million to 1 billion bbl of oil, but is presently uneconomic. The oil is low gravity (4[degrees] API) with an extremely high sulfur content (12.5%). Little exploration has been done for these targets since the early 1980s when Amoco decided not to develop the field due to high water-cut and costs for offshore development.

  8. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wells Quadrangle, Nevada, Idaho, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Proffitt, J.L.; Mayerson, D.L.; Parker, D.P.; Wolverson, N.; Antrim, D.; Berg, J.; Witzel, F.

    1982-08-01

    The Wells 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Nevada, Idaho, and Utah, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria to delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Our investigation has resulted in the delineation of areas that contain Tertiary sedimentary rocks favorable for hydroallogenic deposits in the Mountain City area (Favorable Area A) and in the Oxley Peak area north of Wells (Favorable Area B). Environments considered to be unfavorable for uranium deposits include Tertiary felsic volcanic, felsic plutonic, intermediate to mafic volcanic, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Precambrian rocks, and most Tertiary sedimentary rocks located outside the favorable areas. Present-day basins are unevaluated environments because of a paucity of adequate outcrop and subsurface data. However, the scarce data indicate that some characteristics favorable for uranium deposits are present in the Susie Creek-Tule Valley-Wild Horse basin, the Contact-Granite Range-Tijuana John stocks area, the Charleston Reservoir area, and the Wells-Marys River basin.

  9. Domestic violence: efficacy of health provider training in Utah.

    PubMed

    Allert, C S; Chalkley, C; Whitney, J R; Librett, A

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to improve the identification, treatment, and referral of domestic violence victims by prehospital care providers (Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics) and emergency department personnel. The training focused on the definition of domestic violence, procedures to use when questioning patients about abuse, Utah's mandatory reporting law, and the referral of victims to community resources. While the training did improve the participant's knowledge concerning referral options and the law, health care providers still did not believe that domestic violence was a problem in their community. Although providers felt confident asking questions about abuse, the providers did not question patients unless they suspected domestic violence was the cause of the injury. Further training needs to be offered to staff to encourage regular screening for all adult patients.

  10. Style and timing of frontal structures, thrust belt, Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, T.F.

    1985-07-01

    The Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in central Utah may be divided into a western belt of Precambrian to lower Mesozoic strata shortened above ramp-style thrust faults and an eastern belt of folded middle to upper Mesozoic rocks. Shortening in the eastern foldbelt occurred above a bedding-plane thrust fault system that terminates within a thick section of Jurassic shale, siltstone, and anhydrite. Demonstrable synthrusting deposits within the region are late Early to Late Cretaceous in age. The age of synorogenic deposits and structural relations of postorogenic strata indicate that deformation was complete by the close of the Cretaceous or early Paleocene, and support a thrust mechanism for much of the folding in the region.

  11. Summary of space imagery studies in Utah and Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An enhanced enlargement of a S190B color image at a scale of 1/19,200 of the Bingham porphyry copper deposit has compared a geological map of the area with the space imagery map as fair for the intrusion boundaries and total lack of quality for mapping the sediments. Hydrothermal alteration is only slightly evident on space imagery at Bingham, but in the Tintic mining district and the volcanic piles of the Keg and Thomas ranges, Utah, hydrothermal alteration is readily mapped on color enlargements of S190B. Several sites of calderas were recognized and new ones located on space imagery. One of the tools developed is a mercury soil-gas analyzer that is becoming significant as an aid in locating hidden mineralized zones which were suggested from space imagery. In addition, this tool is a prime aid in locating and better delineating geothermal sites.

  12. Concretions in Exhumed Channels Near Hanksville Utah: Implications for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Jonathan; Stoker, Carol R.

    2011-01-01

    The landscape near Hanksville, Utah, contains a diversity of Mars analogue features. These included segmented and inverted anatasomosing palaeochannels exhumed from the Late Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation that hosts abundant small carbonate concretions. The exhumed and inverted channels closely resemble many seen on the surface of Mars in satellite imagery and which may be visited by surface missions in the near future. The channels contain a wealth of palaeo-environmental information, but intrinsically difficult terrain would make their study challenging on Mars. We show that an unexhumed channel feature can be detected geophysically, this may allow their study in more easily accessed terrain. The concretions morphologically and in their surface expression parallel the haematite blue berries that are strewn across the surface of Meridiani Planum on Mars. They are best developed in poorly cemented medium to coarse channel sandstones and appear to have formed early in the diagenetic history.

  13. Deep resistivity structure in southwestern Utah and its geothermal significance

    SciTech Connect

    Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in southwestern Utah have yielded a model of resistivity structure in this area to a depth of about 100 km. The MT observations are strongly affected by Great Basin graben sedimentary fill, which constitutes conductive upper-crustal lateral inhomogeneity and requires simulation using two- and three-dimensional modeling algorithms before deeper portions of the resistivity section can be resolved. Included in the model is a layer of low resistivity (20 ..cap omega..-m) residing from 35 to 65 km depth. Sensitivity tests of the data to the structure weigh strongly against the top of this layer being as shallow as 25 km and against the conductivity and thickness of the layer being highly correlated. No intra-crustal low-resistivity layer is indicated by the MT data.

  14. It's About Time for Autism Reform Legislation in Utah.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    On 3 April 2014, Governor Gary Herbert signed into law a health insurance reform bill that requires private insurers to cover autism therapy. Specifically, SB57 requires state-regulated health plans to cover applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapy. While early diagnosis and intervention can reduce the long-term cost of autism, families are finding themselves bankrupt in order to pay for ABA therapy. Currently, 37 states, and the District of Columbia have enacted insurance reform laws. Ensuring that children with autism receive proper therapy is a serious public health issue. Utah was right to pass reform legislation because it properly benefits and safeguards the interests of affected children in promoting their well-being and participation in society. PMID:25395093

  15. Chiral topological superconductor and half-integer conductance plateau from quantum anomalous Hall plateau transition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Quan; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-31

    Here, we propose to realize a two-dimensional chiral topological superconducting (TSC) state from the quantum anomalous Hall plateau transition in a magnetic topological insulator thin film through the proximity effect to a conventional s -wave superconductor. This state has a full pairing gap in the bulk and a single chiral Majorana mode at the edge. The optimal condition for realizing such chiral TSC is to have inequivalent superconducting pairing amplitudes on top and bottom surfaces of the doped magnetic topological insulator. We further propose several transport experiments to detect the chiral TSC. One unique signature is that the conductance will be quantized into a half-integer plateau at the coercive field in this hybrid system. In particular, with the point contact formed by a superconducting junction, the conductance oscillates between e2 /2h and e2 /h with the frequency determined by the voltage across the junction. We close by discussing the feasibility of these experimental proposals.

  16. Chiral topological superconductor and half-integer conductance plateau from quantum anomalous Hall plateau transition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Quan; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-31

    Here, we propose to realize a two-dimensional chiral topological superconducting (TSC) state from the quantum anomalous Hall plateau transition in a magnetic topological insulator thin film through the proximity effect to a conventional s -wave superconductor. This state has a full pairing gap in the bulk and a single chiral Majorana mode at the edge. The optimal condition for realizing such chiral TSC is to have inequivalent superconducting pairing amplitudes on top and bottom surfaces of the doped magnetic topological insulator. We further propose several transport experiments to detect the chiral TSC. One unique signature is that the conductance willmore » be quantized into a half-integer plateau at the coercive field in this hybrid system. In particular, with the point contact formed by a superconducting junction, the conductance oscillates between e2 /2h and e2 /h with the frequency determined by the voltage across the junction. We close by discussing the feasibility of these experimental proposals.« less

  17. False alarms and mine seismicity: An example from the Gentry Mountain mining region, Utah. Los Alamos Source Region Project

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.R.

    1992-09-23

    Mining regions are a cause of concern for monitoring of nuclear test ban treaties because they present the opportunity for clandestine nuclear tests (i.e. decoupled explosions). Mining operations are often characterized by high seismicity rates and can provide the cover for excavating voids for decoupling. Chemical explosions (seemingly as part of normal mining activities) can be used to complicate the signals from a simultaneous decoupled nuclear explosion. Thus, most concern about mines has dealt with the issue of missed violations to a test ban treaty. In this study, we raise the diplomatic concern of false alarms associated with mining activities. Numerous reports and papers have been published about anomalous seismicity associated with mining activities. As part of a large discrimination study in the western US (Taylor et al., 1989), we had one earthquake that was consistently classified as an explosion. The magnitude 3.5 disturbance occurred on May 14, 1981 and was conspicuous in its lack of Love waves, relative lack of high- frequency energy, low Lg/Pg ratio, and high m{sub b} {minus} M{sub s}. A moment-tensor solution by Patton and Zandt (1991) indicated the event had a large implosional component. The event occurred in the Gentry Mountain coal mining region in the eastern Wasatch Plateau, Utah. Using a simple source representation, we modeled the event as a tabular excavation collapse that occurred as a result of normal mining activities. This study raises the importance of having a good catalogue of seismic data and information about mining activities from potential proliferant nations.

  18. Secondary Fe- and Mn-Oxides Associated with Faults Near Moab, Utah: Records of Past Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, V. H.; Reiners, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary Fe- and Mn-oxides are locally common near faults and fractures, and as cements within sandstones of the Colorado Plateau, and provide evidence of past fluid-flow. Here we describe textural, mineralogic, and geochronologic observations from fault-zone Fe- and Mn-oxide mineralization in Flat Iron Mesa, near Moab, Utah. Several hypotheses have been proposed for their origin, including reactions associated with the mixing of deep reduced and near-surface oxygenated waters. We integrate field observations, detailed SEM and petrographic observations, geochemical models, (U-Th)/He and Ar/Ar dating, and other data to develop interpretations of the formation of these deposits. SEM imaging shows that sandstone matrix cement adjacent to the faults follows two precipitation sequences: Fe-oxide followed by barite and Fe-oxide followed by Mn-oxide. Dense oxide layers also accumulated in cm-scale fractures near faults, and show the following precipitation sequence: Fe-oxide, barite, Ba rich Mn-oxide, and pure Mn-oxide. The latter sequence is observed at larger scale across faults in one site in Flat Iron Mesa. Our new He dates for Mn-oxides are 1.7-2.9 Ma while Fe-oxide dates are 2.7-3.0 Ma. If these dates represent formation ages, they are consistent with the interpreted precipitation sequence but would require protracted mineralization over Ma-timescales. Alternatively, they may represent varying degrees of He retentivity in earlier formed deposits. Previous Ar/Ar dates have been interpreted as a 20-25 Ma formation age. Ongoing Ar/Ar and He diffusion studies will resolve this discordance. Assuming the previous Ar dates do not reflect contamination by detrital K-bearing phases and do reflect oxide formation, potential interpretations for the younger He ages include recent U-Th addition, recrystallization, later oxide growth, or large diffusive He loss at low temperatures.

  19. Late quaternary plant zonation and climate in southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Betancourt, J.L.

    1984-01-31

    Plant macrofossils from packrat middens in two southeastern Utah caves outline development of modern plant zonation from the late Wisconsin. Allen Canyon Cave (2195 m) and Fishmouth Cave (1585 m) are located along a continuous gradient of outcropping Navajo Sandstone that extends from the Abajo Mountains south to the San Juan River. By holding the site constant, changes in the floral composition for a plot of less than one hectare can be observed, even if sporadically, over tens of millennia. At Allen Canyon Cave, Engelmann spruce-alpine fir forest was replaced by the present vegetation consisting of pinyon-juniper woodland on exposed ridgetops and cliffside stands of Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and aspen. Xerophytic woodland plants such as pinyon, plains prickly pear, and narrowleaf yucca arrived sometime in the middle Holocene between 7200 and 3400 B.P. At Fishmouth Cave, Utah juniper in Holocene middens replaced blue spruce, limber pine, Douglas fir, and dwarf and Rocky Mountain junipers in late Wisconsin samples. Quantitative climatic estimates are derived for the late Wisconsin by applying vertical gradients for temperature and precipitation to the amount of vegetation depression. The Fishmouth Cave sequence indicates a minimum lowering of 850 m for blue spruce, limber pine, and dwarf juniper. A depression of at least 700 m for Engelmann spruce and alpine fir is suggested for the Allen Canyon locality. Use of conservatively low gradients for stations below 2080 m yields a 3-4 C cooling from present mean annual temperature and 35 to 60% more rainfall than today. Steeper gradients associated with more mountainous terrain suggest a 5 C lowering in temperature and up to 120% increase over modern precipitation. 81 references, 6 figures, 10 tables.

  20. PRODUCTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  1. The University of Utah Urban Undertaking (U4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Bares, R.; Mendoza, D. L.; Fasoli, B.; Bowling, D. R.; Garcia, M. A.; Buchert, M.; Pataki, D. E.; Crosman, E.; Horel, J.; Catharine, D.; Strong, C.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Utah is leading efforts to understand the spatiotemporal patterns in both emissions and concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria pollutants within urban systems. The urbanized corridor in northern Utah along the Wasatch Front, anchored by Salt Lake City, is undergoing rapid population growth that is projected to double in the next few decades. The Wasatch Front offers multiple advantages as an unique "urban laboratory": urban regions in multiple valleys spanning numerous orders of magnitude in population, each with unique airsheds, well-defined boundary conditions along deserts and tall mountains, strong signals during cold air pool events, seasonal contrasts in pollution, and a legacy of productive partnerships with local stakeholders and governments. We will show results from GHG measurements from the Wasatch Front, including one of the longest running continuous CO2 records in urban areas. Complementing this record are comprehensive meteorological observations and GHG/pollutant concentrations on mobile platforms: light rail, helicopter, and research vans. Variations in the GHG and pollutant observations illustrate human behavior and the resulting "urban metabolism" taking place on hourly, weekly, and seasonal cycles, resulting in a coupling between GHG and criteria pollutants. Moreover, these observations illustrate systematic spatial gradients in GHG and pollutant distributions between and within urban areas, traced to underlying gradients in population, energy use, terrain, and land use. Over decadal time scales the observations reveal growth of the "urban dome" due to expanding urban development. Using numerical models of the atmosphere, we further link concentrations of GHG and air quality-relevant pollutants to underlying emissions at the neighborhood scale as well as urban planning considerations.

  2. Institutional support for the Utah Consortium for Energy Research and Education. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Scope of the Consortium plan was the marshalling of the academic research resources, as well as the appropriate non-academic resources within Utah to pursue energy-related research activities: Solving Social and Economic Problems Related to Energy Development, Institutional Support for Research, Investigation of Labile Compounds from the Pyrolysis of Oil Shale in High Vaccum, Manpower Requirement for Geothermal Energy Development, and Utah/Great Basin Energy Facility Siting Study.

  3. Low-BTU gas in the Rocky Mountain region - Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Tremain, C.M. ); Broadhead, R.E. ); Chidsey, T.C. Jr. ); Doelger, M. ); Morgan, C.D. )

    1993-08-01

    There are over 100 reservoirs in Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, and Utah that produce or could produce low-BTU (heating value less than 900 BTU/ft[sup 3]) gas. Reservoirs range in age from Devonian to Cretaceous; reservoir lithologies include both carbonates and sandstones. Frequently, the low-BTU gas (CO[sub 2], N[sub 2], and He) is a byproduct of normal hydrocarbon production. CO[sub 2]-rich gas occurs in southwest to east-central Utah, in the southeastern Paradox basin (Utah and Colorado), in the North Park basin (Colorado), in southeast Colorado and northeast New Mexico, and in the Green River and Wind River basins (Wyoming). Five fields produce nearly pure (98%) CO[sub 2]. The 1990 annual CO[sub 2] production from these fields was North and South McCallum (Colorado), 1.7 bcf; McElmo (Colorado), 205 bcf; Sheep Mountain (Colorado), 70.7 bcf; and Bravo Dome (New Mexico), 119.7 bcf. Big Piney-LaBarge (Wyoming) produced 120 bcf of CO[sub 2] (at a concentration of 65%) in 1990. Most of the CO[sub 2] is used in enhanced oil recovery. Nitrogen-rich gas is found in the southern Green River basin (Utah and Wyoming), east flank of the San Rafael uplift (Utah), northern Paradox basin (Utah), Uncompahgre uplift (Utah and Colorado), Douglas Creek arch (Colorado), Hugoton embayment (Colorado), Las Animas arch (Colorado), Permian basin (New Mexico), and Four Corners platform (New Mexico). Helium is sometimes associated with the nitrogen and in concentrations of up to 8% in New Mexico and Colorado, 2.8% in Utah, and 1% in Wyoming.

  4. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes ( M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the Wells and Coppersmith (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the Burkhard and Grünthal (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  5. Data, network, and application: technical description of the Utah RODS Winter Olympic Biosurveillance System.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Fu-Chiang; Espino, Jeremy U.; Wagner, Michael M.; Gesteland, Per; Ivanov, Oleg; Olszewski, Robert T.; Liu, Zhen; Zeng, Xiaoming; Chapman, Wendy; Wong, Weng Keen; Moore, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Given the post September 11th climate of possible bioterrorist attacks and the high profile 2002 Winter Olympics in the Salt Lake City, Utah, we challenged ourselves to deploy a computer-based real-time automated biosurveillance system for Utah, the Utah Real-time Outbreak and Disease Surveillance system (Utah RODS), in six weeks using our existing Real-time Outbreak and Disease Surveillance (RODS) architecture. During the Olympics, Utah RODS received real-time HL-7 admission messages from 10 emergency departments and 20 walk-in clinics. It collected free-text chief complaints, categorized them into one of seven prodromes classes using natural language processing, and provided a web interface for real-time display of time series graphs, geographic information system output, outbreak algorithm alerts, and details of the cases. The system detected two possible outbreaks that were dismissed as the natural result of increasing rates of Influenza. Utah RODS allowed us to further understand the complexities underlying the rapid deployment of a RODS-like system. PMID:12463938

  6. Field guide to geologic excursions in southwestern Utah and adjacent areas of Arizona and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, William R.; Lund, William R.

    2002-01-01

    This field guide contains road logs for field trips planned in conjunction with the 2002 Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the Geological Society of America held at Southern Utah University in Cedar City, Utah. There are a total of eight field trips, covering various locations and topics in southwestern Utah and adjacent areas of Arizona and Nevada. In addition, the field guide contains a road log for a set of Geological Engineering Field Camp Exercises run annually by the University of Missouri at Rolla in and around Cedar City. Two of the field trips address structural aspects of the geology in southwestern Utah and northwestern Arizona; two trips deal with ground water in the region; and along with the Field Camp Exercises, one trip, to the Grand Staircase, is designed specifically for educators. The remaining trips examine the volcanology and mineral resources of a large area in and around the Tusher Mountains in Utah; marine and brackish water strata in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument; and the Pine Valley Mountains, which are cored by what may be the largest known laccolith in the world. The "Three Corners" area of Utah, Arizona, and Nevada is home to truly world-class geology, and I am confident that all of the 2002 Rocky Mountain Section meeting attendees will find a field trip suited to their interests.

  7. The Colorado Plateau II: biophysical, socioeconomic, and cultural research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, David J.; van Riper, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The publication of The Colorado Plateau: Cultural, Biological, and Physical Research in 2004 marked a timely summation of current research in the Four Corners states. This new volume, derived from the seventh Biennial Conference on the Colorado Plateau in 2003, complements the previous book by focusing on the integration of science into resource management issues. The 32 chapters range in content from measuring human impacts on cultural resources, through grazing and the wildland-urban interface issues, to parameters of climate change on the Plateau. The book also introduces economic perspectives by considering shifting patterns and regional disparities in the Colorado Plateau economy. A series of chapters on mountain lions explores the human-wildland interface. These chapters deal with the entire spectrum of challenges associated with managing this large mammal species in Arizona and on the Colorado Plateau, conveying a wealth of timely information of interest to wildlife managers and enthusiasts. Another provocative set of chapters on biophysical resources explores the management of forest restoration, from the micro scale all the way up to large-scale GIS analyses of ponderosa pine ecosystems on the Colorado Plateau. Given recent concerns for forest health in the wake of fires, severe drought, and bark-beetle infestation, these chapters will prove enlightening for forest service, park service, and land management professionals at both the federal and state level, as well as general readers interested in how forest management practices will ultimately affect their recreation activities. With broad coverage that touches on topics as diverse as movement patterns of rattlesnakes, calculating watersheds, and rescuing looted rockshelters, this volume stands as a compendium of cutting-edge research on the Colorado Plateau that offers a wealth of insights for many scholars.

  8. Linking the Galapagos hotspot and the Caribbean Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerlich, Rainer; Clark, Stuart R.; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2014-05-01

    Wide agreement exists that the Caribbean plate has a Pacific origin and that parts of it depict an igneous Plateau of up to 20 km thick crust. However, the origin of this thickened crust remains debated. One of the first suggestions for its origin was the arrival of a plume, whose remnant might be the Galapagos hotspot. More recently, it has been argued that reconstruction models predicted the Galapagos hotspot a thousand or more kilometres away from the Caribbean plate at the time of Plateau formation (~88 ?? 94 Ma). These authors primarily relied on the Caribbean Plateau moving into its present position relative to the Americas only in the last few million years. Secondarily, the authors assumed that the hotspot was fixed in an Indian-Atlantic hotspot reference frame. Here, we explore the idea that the Plateau moved into position around the time of the initiation of convergence between the North and South America, about 54.5 Ma. In addition, we adopt a fixed Pacific hotspot reference frame and compare our results to the recently developed Global Moving Hotspot Reference Frame. We show that both frames lead to good correlations between the paleo-positions of the Caribbean Plate and the Galapagos hotspot. As this result is consistent with abundant geochemical evidence that lends support for both a plume origin as well as the similarity between the Galapagos hotspot and rocks from the Plateau itself, we argue that alternative mechanisms to explain the thickened crust of the Caribbean Plateau are unnecessary. Additionally, based on our new plate reconstruction model, we present an age distribution of the lithosphere underneath the thickened crust of the Caribbean Plateau that has remained speculative until now.

  9. Installation restoration program final remedial investigation report IRP sites 8 and 10. 151st air refueling group Utah Air National Guard, Salt Lake City, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the results from a Remedial Investigation (RI) for two sites at the Utah Air National Guard (UANG) Base located in Salt Lake City, Utah. The two sites investigated are identified as Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site 8, a former underground storage tank (UST) location, and IRP Site 10, an existing petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL) yard. The RI was conducted as outlined in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan prepared by Stone Webster and submitted to and approved by the ANG in May 1993. The field work associated with the RI was performed in June, July, and August 1995.

  10. Characterization of intrabasin faulting and deformation for earthquake hazards in southern Utah Valley, Utah, from high-resolution seismic imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; McBride, John H.; Tomlinson, Iris

    2012-01-01

    We conducted active and passive seismic imaging investigations along a 5.6-km-long, east–west transect ending at the mapped trace of the Wasatch fault in southern Utah Valley. Using two-dimensional (2D) P-wave seismic reflection data, we imaged basin deformation and faulting to a depth of 1.4 km and developed a detailed interval velocity model for prestack depth migration and 2D ground-motion simulations. Passive-source microtremor data acquired at two sites along the seismic reflection transect resolve S-wave velocities of approximately 200 m/s at the surface to about 900 m/s at 160 m depth and confirm a substantial thickening of low-velocity material westward into the valley. From the P-wave reflection profile, we interpret shallow (100–600 m) bedrock deformation extending from the surface trace of the Wasatch fault to roughly 1.5 km west into the valley. The bedrock deformation is caused by multiple interpreted fault splays displacing fault blocks downward to the west of the range front. Further west in the valley, the P-wave data reveal subhorizontal horizons from approximately 90 to 900 m depth that vary in thickness and whose dip increases with depth eastward toward the Wasatch fault. Another inferred fault about 4 km west of the mapped Wasatch fault displaces horizons within the valley to as shallow as 100 m depth. The overall deformational pattern imaged in our data is consistent with the Wasatch fault migrating eastward through time and with the abandonment of earlier synextensional faults, as part of the evolution of an inferred 20-km-wide half-graben structure within Utah Valley. Finite-difference 2D modeling suggests the imaged subsurface basin geometry can cause fourfold variation in peak ground velocity over distances of 300 m.

  11. Prokaryotic Community Structure Driven by Salinity and Ionic Concentrations in Plateau Lakes of the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Miao, Li-Li; Wang, Fang; Chu, Li-Min; Wang, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    The prokaryotic community composition and diversity and the distribution patterns at various taxonomic levels across gradients of salinity and physiochemical properties in the surface waters of seven plateau lakes in the Qaidam Basin, Tibetan Plateau, were evaluated using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. These lakes included Lakes Keluke (salinity, <1 g/liter), Qing (salinity, 5.5 to 6.6 g/liter), Tuosu (salinity, 24 to 35 g/liter), Dasugan (salinity, 30 to 33 g/liter), Gahai (salinity, 92 to 96 g/liter), Xiaochaidan (salinity, 94 to 99 g/liter), and Gasikule (salinity, 317 to 344 g/liter). The communities were dominated by Bacteria in lakes with salinities of <100 g/liter and by Archaea in Lake Gasikule. The clades At12OctB3 and Salinibacter, previously reported only in hypersaline environments, were found in a hyposaline lake (salinity, 5.5 to 6.6 g/liter) at an abundance of ∼1.0%, indicating their ecological plasticity. Salinity and the concentrations of the chemical ions whose concentrations covary with salinity (Mg2+, K+, Cl−, Na+, SO42−, and Ca2+) were found to be the primary environmental factors that directly or indirectly determined the composition and diversity at the level of individual clades as well as entire prokaryotic communities. The distribution patterns of two phyla, five classes, five orders, five families, and three genera were well predicted by salinity. The variation of the prokaryotic community structure also significantly correlated with the dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, the total nitrogen concentration, and the PO43− concentration. Such correlations varied depending on the taxonomic level, demonstrating the importance of comprehensive correlation analyses at various taxonomic levels in evaluating the effects of environmental variable factors on prokaryotic community structures. Our findings clarify the distribution patterns of the prokaryotic community composition in plateau lakes at the levels of individual clades as well as whole

  12. Prokaryotic Community Structure Driven by Salinity and Ionic Concentrations in Plateau Lakes of the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Miao, Li-Li; Wang, Fang; Chu, Li-Min; Wang, Jia-Li; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2016-03-01

    The prokaryotic community composition and diversity and the distribution patterns at various taxonomic levels across gradients of salinity and physiochemical properties in the surface waters of seven plateau lakes in the Qaidam Basin, Tibetan Plateau, were evaluated using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. These lakes included Lakes Keluke (salinity, <1 g/liter), Qing (salinity, 5.5 to 6.6 g/liter), Tuosu (salinity, 24 to 35 g/liter), Dasugan (salinity, 30 to 33 g/liter), Gahai (salinity, 92 to 96 g/liter), Xiaochaidan (salinity, 94 to 99 g/liter), and Gasikule (salinity, 317 to 344 g/liter). The communities were dominated by Bacteria in lakes with salinities of <100 g/liter and by Archaea in Lake Gasikule. The clades At12OctB3 and Salinibacter, previously reported only in hypersaline environments, were found in a hyposaline lake (salinity, 5.5 to 6.6 g/liter) at an abundance of ∼1.0%, indicating their ecological plasticity. Salinity and the concentrations of the chemical ions whose concentrations covary with salinity (Mg(2+), K(+), Cl(-), Na(+), SO4 (2-), and Ca(2+)) were found to be the primary environmental factors that directly or indirectly determined the composition and diversity at the level of individual clades as well as entire prokaryotic communities. The distribution patterns of two phyla, five classes, five orders, five families, and three genera were well predicted by salinity. The variation of the prokaryotic community structure also significantly correlated with the dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, the total nitrogen concentration, and the PO4 (3-) concentration. Such correlations varied depending on the taxonomic level, demonstrating the importance of comprehensive correlation analyses at various taxonomic levels in evaluating the effects of environmental variable factors on prokaryotic community structures. Our findings clarify the distribution patterns of the prokaryotic community composition in plateau lakes at the levels of individual clades as

  13. Constraints on the early uplift history of the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengshan; Zhao, Xixi; Liu, Zhifei; Lippert, Peter C; Graham, Stephan A; Coe, Robert S; Yi, Haisheng; Zhu, Lidong; Liu, Shun; Li, Yalin

    2008-04-01

    The surface uplift history of the Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya is among the most interesting topics in geosciences because of its effect on regional and global climate during Cenozoic time, its influence on monsoon intensity, and its reflection of the dynamics of continental plateaus. Models of plateau growth vary in time, from pre-India-Asia collision (e.g., approximately 100 Ma ago) to gradual uplift after the India-Asia collision (e.g., approximately 55 Ma ago) and to more recent abrupt uplift (<7 Ma ago), and vary in space, from northward stepwise growth of topography to simultaneous surface uplift across the plateau. Here, we improve that understanding by presenting geologic and geophysical data from north-central Tibet, including magnetostratigraphy, sedimentology, paleocurrent measurements, and (40)Ar/(39)Ar and fission-track studies, to show that the central plateau was elevated by 40 Ma ago. Regions south and north of the central plateau gained elevation significantly later. During Eocene time, the northern boundary of the protoplateau was in the region of the Tanggula Shan. Elevation gain started in pre-Eocene time in the Lhasa and Qiangtang terranes and expanded throughout the Neogene toward its present southern and northern margins in the Himalaya and Qilian Shan. PMID:18362353

  14. Morphological characteristics of posterolateral articular fragments in tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Gao; Zhi-Jun, Pan; Qiang, Zheng; Hang, Li

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of posterolateral tibial plateau fractures is controversial, and information regarding this specific fracture pattern is lacking. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the frequency and morphological features of posterolateral articular fragments in tibial plateau fractures. A retrospective radiographic and chart review was performed on a consecutive series of patients who sustained tibial plateau fractures between May 2008 and August 2012. The articular surface area, maximum posterior cortical height, sagittal fracture angle, and amount of displacement were measured on computed tomography scans using the Picture and Archiving Communication System. Thirty-six (15%) of 242 injuries demonstrated a posterolateral fracture fragment comprising a mean 14.3% of the articular surface of the total tibial plateau (range, 8% to 32%). Mean major articular fragment angle was 23° (range, 62° to -43°), mean maximum posterior cortical height was 29 mm (range, 18 to 42 mm), and mean sagittal fracture angle was 77° (range, 58° to 97°). The posterolateral plateau articular fracture fragment has morphological characteristics of a conically shaped fragment with a relatively small articular surface area and sagittal fracture angle. Recognizing these morphological features will help the clinician formulate an effective surgical plan.

  15. Rapid Loss of Lakes on the Mongolian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, S.; Fang, J.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, S.; Shen, H.; Hu, H.; Tang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Guo, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Lakes are widely distributed on the Mongolian Plateau and as critical water sources have sustained Mongolian pastures for hundreds of years. However, the plateau has experienced significant lake shrinkage and grassland degradation during the past several decades. To quantify the changes in all the lakes on the plateau and the associated driving factors, we performed a satellite-based survey using multi-temporal Landsat images from the 1970s to 2000s, combining with ground-based censuses. Our results document a rapid loss of lakes on the plateau in the past decades: the number of lakes with a water surface area >1 km2 decreased from 785 in the late 1980s to 577 in 2010, with a greater rate of decrease (34.0%) in Inner Mongolia of China than in Mongolia (17.6%). This decrease has been particularly pronounced since the late 1990s in Inner Mongolia and the number of lakes >10 km2 has declined by 30.0%. The statistical analyses suggested that in Mongolia precipitation was the dominant driver for the lake changes, while in Inner Mongolia coal mining was most important in its grassland area and irrigation was the leading factor in its cultivated area. The deterioration of lakes is expected to continue in the following decades not only because of changing climate but also increasing exploitation of underground mineral and groundwater resources on the plateau. To protect grasslands and the indigenous nomads, effective action is urgently required to save these valuable lakes from further deterioration.

  16. Constraints on the early uplift history of the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengshan; Zhao, Xixi; Liu, Zhifei; Lippert, Peter C.; Graham, Stephan A.; Coe, Robert S.; Yi, Haisheng; Zhu, Lidong; Liu, Shun; Li, Yalin

    2008-01-01

    The surface uplift history of the Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya is among the most interesting topics in geosciences because of its effect on regional and global climate during Cenozoic time, its influence on monsoon intensity, and its reflection of the dynamics of continental plateaus. Models of plateau growth vary in time, from pre-India-Asia collision (e.g., ≈100 Ma ago) to gradual uplift after the India-Asia collision (e.g., ≈55 Ma ago) and to more recent abrupt uplift (<7 Ma ago), and vary in space, from northward stepwise growth of topography to simultaneous surface uplift across the plateau. Here, we improve that understanding by presenting geologic and geophysical data from north-central Tibet, including magnetostratigraphy, sedimentology, paleocurrent measurements, and 40Ar/39Ar and fission-track studies, to show that the central plateau was elevated by 40 Ma ago. Regions south and north of the central plateau gained elevation significantly later. During Eocene time, the northern boundary of the protoplateau was in the region of the Tanggula Shan. Elevation gain started in pre-Eocene time in the Lhasa and Qiangtang terranes and expanded throughout the Neogene toward its present southern and northern margins in the Himalaya and Qilian Shan. PMID:18362353

  17. Latest quaternary volcanism in the St. George Basin, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, V.T. III; Green, J.D.; Nusbaum, R.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The St. George Basin was the site of mafic volcanism from about 6 Ma to 1 ka. The nature of latest Quaternary volcanism is of interest because the Basin is recognized as a low temperature (< 90C) geothermal resource area and it is part of the transition zone between the Basin and Range Province and the Colorado Plateau. The authors have studied the geochemistry, mineralogy, and aerial distribution of two of the youngest eruptions centers: (1) Veyo Volcano; and (2) the Diamond Valley scoria cones (DVSC). Veyo Volcano erupted basaltic andesite, beginning with an explosive stage marked by a 0.5 m basal Plinian layer. Later eruptions alternated between quiescent and Strombolian-styles. Phenocrysts include clear plagioclase, sieve-texture plagioclase, olivine and rare augite. The DVSC and associated Santa Clara lava flow are tholeiitic basalt, consisting of olivine phenocrysts, and rare plagioclase phenocrysts. Based on preliminary geochemical data, Diamond Valley rocks exhibit lower incompatible element ratios compared to mafic rocks on the Markagunt Plateau and transition zone rocks. In contrast, Veyo Volcano rocks are similar to transition zone mafic rocks with regard to incompatible element abundances.

  18. Bedrock geology of the northern Columbia Plateau and adjacent areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, D. A.; Wright, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau is surrounded by a complex assemblage of highly deformed Precambrian to lower Tertiary continental and oceanic rocks that reflects numerous episodes of continental accretion. The plateau itself is comprised of the Columbia River basalt group formed between about 16.5 x 1 million years B.P. and 6 x 1 million years B.P. Eruptions were infrequent between about 14 and 6 x 1 million years B.P., allowing time for erosion and deformation between successive outpourings. The present-day courses of much of the Snake River, and parts of the Columbia River, across the plateau date from this time. Basalt produced during this waning activity is more heterogeneous chemically and isotopically than older flows, reflecting its prolonged period of volcanism.

  19. Fukushima Nuclear Accident Recorded in Tibetan Plateau Snow Pits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ninglian; Wu, Xiaobo; Kehrwald, Natalie; Li, Zhen; Li, Quanlian; Jiang, Xi; Pu, Jianchen

    2015-01-01

    The β radioactivity of snow-pit samples collected in the spring of 2011 on four Tibetan Plateau glaciers demonstrate a remarkable peak in each snow pit profile, with peaks about ten to tens of times higher than background levels. The timing of these peaks suggests that the high radioactivity resulted from the Fukushima nuclear accident that occurred on March 11, 2011 in eastern Japan. Fallout monitoring studies demonstrate that this radioactive material was transported by the westerlies across the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The depth of the peak β radioactivity in each snow pit compared with observational precipitation records, suggests that the radioactive fallout reached the Tibetan Plateau and was deposited on glacier surfaces in late March 2011, or approximately 20 days after the nuclear accident. The radioactive fallout existed in the atmosphere over the Tibetan Plateau for about one month. PMID:25658094

  20. Geologic applications of ERTS images on the Colorado Plateau, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Billingsley, F. C.; Elston, D. P.; Lucchitta, I.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Three areas in central and northern Arizona centered on the (1) Verde Valley, (2) Coconino Plateau, and (3) Shivwits Plateau were studied using ERTS photography. Useful applications results include: (1) upgrading of the existing state geologic map of the Verde Valley region; (2) detection of long NW trending lineaments in the basalt cap SE of Flagstaff which may be favorable locations for drilling for new water supplies; (3) tracing of the Bright Angel and Butte faults to twice their previously known length and correlating the extensions with modern seismic events, showing these faults to be present-day earthquake hazards; (4) discovering and successfully drilling perched sandstone aquifers in the Kaibab Limestone on the Coconino Plateau; and (5) determining the relationship between the Shivwits lavas and the formation of the lower Grand Canyon and showing that the lavas should be an excellent aquifer, as yet untapped.