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Sample records for kaire torn jonne

  1. Torn Paper Birds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson for third-grade students that begins with an examination of bird prints done by John James Audubon and moves into the students creating their own torn paper birds. Introduces the students to the beauty of birds and focuses on the environmental issues that face birds and their habitats. (CMK)

  2. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  3. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  4. Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 August 2013 (historical) Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients Many ... arthroscopic partial meniscectomy that involves surgically removing the torn part of the meniscus and stabilizing it, or ...

  5. The METEOR trial: no rush to repair a torn meniscus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Gil; Kwoh, C Kent

    2014-04-01

    It is uncertain whether arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is better than physical therapy in patients who have a symptomatic torn meniscus on top of osteoarthritis of the knee. The Meniscal Repair in Osteoarthritis Research (METEOR) trial concluded that physical therapy is acceptable at first, and that surgery is not routinely needed. In patients assigned to physical therapy who eventually needed surgery, the delay resulting from a trial of conservative management did not impair outcomes at 12 months from the initial presentation. Here, we analyze the background, design, findings, and clinical implications of the METEOR trial. PMID:24692441

  6. Arthroscopic Recognition and Repair of the Torn Subscapularis Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the subscapularis has historically received less attention than posterosuperior rotator cuff tears, repair of a torn subscapularis tendon is critically important to restoring anatomy and achieving the best functional outcome possible. Arthroscopic repair begins with proper recognition of the tear. A systematic approach can then be used to arthroscopically repair all types of subscapularis tendon tears, from partial tears to full-thickness tears, as well as those which are retracted and have adhesions medially. Subscapularis footprint restoration can be accomplished with a variety of repair techniques that must be matched to the extent of the tear and mobility of the tendon. PMID:24400185

  7. The METEOR trial: no rush to repair a torn meniscus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Gil; Kwoh, C Kent

    2014-04-01

    It is uncertain whether arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is better than physical therapy in patients who have a symptomatic torn meniscus on top of osteoarthritis of the knee. The Meniscal Repair in Osteoarthritis Research (METEOR) trial concluded that physical therapy is acceptable at first, and that surgery is not routinely needed. In patients assigned to physical therapy who eventually needed surgery, the delay resulting from a trial of conservative management did not impair outcomes at 12 months from the initial presentation. Here, we analyze the background, design, findings, and clinical implications of the METEOR trial.

  8. Lubricin distribution in the torn human anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dafang; Cheriyan, Thomas; Martin, Scott D; Gomoll, Andreas H; Schmid, Thomas M; Spector, Myron

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to: (1) determine the distribution of lubricin in the human torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscus; (2) determine the distribution of lubricin in the human intact ACL and meniscus; (3) and identify potential cellular sources of lubricin in these tissues. Ten torn ACLs and six torn menisci were obtained from surgeries; for comparison, 11 intact ACLs and 13 intact menisci were obtained from total knee replacements. Samples were formalin fixed and processed for immunohistochemical staining with a monoclonal antibody for lubricin. In torn ACLs and menisci, lubricin was generally found as a discrete layer covering the torn surface. No surface lubricin staining was found on the transected edges produced during excision. Lubricin was also found on the native surfaces of intact ACLs and menisci. In all tissues, lubricin was found in the matrix and intracellularly. The surface layer of lubricin coating torn edges of ACLs and menisci may interfere with the integrative healing process needed for repair.

  9. Symptomatic Bilateral Torn Discoid Medial Meniscus Treated with Saucerization and Suture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Discoid meniscus is an anatomical congenital anomaly more often found in the lateral meniscus. A discoid medial meniscus is a very rare anomaly, and even more rare is to diagnose a bilateral discoid medial meniscus although the real prevalence of this situation is unknown because not all the discoid medial menisci are symptomatic and if the contralateral knee is not symptomatic then it is not usually studied. The standard treatment of this kind of pathology is partial meniscectomy. Currently the tendency is to be very conservative so suture and saucerization of a torn discoid meniscus when possible are gaining support. We present the case of a 13-year-old patient who was diagnosed with symptomatic torn bilateral discoid medial meniscus treated by suturing the tear and saucerization. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case reported of bilateral torn discoid medial meniscus treated in this manner in the same patient. PMID:27656305

  10. Symptomatic Bilateral Torn Discoid Medial Meniscus Treated with Saucerization and Suture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Discoid meniscus is an anatomical congenital anomaly more often found in the lateral meniscus. A discoid medial meniscus is a very rare anomaly, and even more rare is to diagnose a bilateral discoid medial meniscus although the real prevalence of this situation is unknown because not all the discoid medial menisci are symptomatic and if the contralateral knee is not symptomatic then it is not usually studied. The standard treatment of this kind of pathology is partial meniscectomy. Currently the tendency is to be very conservative so suture and saucerization of a torn discoid meniscus when possible are gaining support. We present the case of a 13-year-old patient who was diagnosed with symptomatic torn bilateral discoid medial meniscus treated by suturing the tear and saucerization. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case reported of bilateral torn discoid medial meniscus treated in this manner in the same patient.

  11. Sit Down with Sabin: Margaret Torn: The Carbon Cycle Like You've Never Seen It (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Sabin; Torn, Margaret

    2011-07-06

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory soil scientist Margaret Torn appears July 6, 2011 on "Sit Down with Sabin," a weekly conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Berkeley Lab staff about innovative science. Torn discusses how she travels the world to learn more about soil's huge role in the global carbon cycle. Brought to you by Berkeley Lab Public Affairs.

  12. Torn between Two Worlds: Overcoming Resistance to Second-Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariza, Eileen N.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses Steven, a classic example of an individual who was torn between two cultural worlds. His mother was Puerto Rican, but she was raised in upper New York State. She and his birth father divorced, she remarried, and the family moved to Puerto Rico, because the company for which Steven's Anglo stepfather worked was…

  13. Comparing normal and torn rotator cuff tendons using dynamic shear analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, S; Holland, C; Vollrath, F; Carr, A J

    2011-07-01

    This study reports the application of a novel method for quantitatively determining differences in the mechanical properties of healthy and torn rotator cuff tissues. In order to overcome problems of stress risers at the grip-tendon interface that can obscure mechanical measurements of small tendons, we conducted our investigation using dynamic shear analysis. Rotator cuff tendon specimens were obtained from 100 patients during shoulder surgery. They included 82 differently sized tears and 18 matched controls. We subjected biopsy samples of 3 mm in diameter to oscillatory deformation under compression using dynamic shear analysis. The storage modulus (G') was calculated as an indicator of mechanical integrity. Normal tendons had a significantly higher storage modulus than torn tendons, indicating that torn tendons are mechanically weaker than normal tendons (p = 0.003). Normal tendons had a significantly higher mean shear modulus than tendons with massive tears (p < 0.01). Dynamic shear analysis allows the determination of shear mechanical properties of small tissue specimens obtained intra-operatively that could not be studied by conventional methods of tensile testing. These methods could be employed to investigate other musculoskeletal tissues. This pilot study provides some insight into mechanisms that might contribute to the failure of repair surgery, and with future application could help direct the most appropriate treatment for specific rotator cuff tears.

  14. Torn discoid lateral meniscus treated using partial central meniscectomy and suture of the peripheral tear.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo; Uchio, Yuji; Kuriwaka, Masakazu; Shinomiya, Rikuo

    2004-05-01

    We present the cases of 5 patients with a torn discoid lateral meniscus treated using partial central meniscectomy in conjunction with the suture repair of the tear. The patients were 4 boys and 1 girl with a mean age of 15.4 years (range, 11 to 17). Preoperatively, all patients complained of knee pain during daily or sports activities. At the final follow-up evaluation, more than 2 years later, 4 patients' conditions were graded as excellent and 1 patient's condition was graded as fair according to Ikeuchi's grading scale. The average Lysholm score improved from 83.4 points (range, 70-90) to 95.8 points (range, 89-100) postoperatively. In the 3 patients who underwent second-look arthroscopy, complete healing was seen in 2 patients. One patient had severe degenerative changes in the meniscus; the repaired site was not united and required an additional partial meniscectomy along the tear. We believe that with the current advancement in arthroscopic meniscal repair techniques, a partial central meniscectomy in conjunction with the suture repair of the peripheral tear can be effective treatment for patients with a torn complete or incomplete discoid meniscus.

  15. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Failure modes and fracture toughness in partially torn ligaments and tendons.

    PubMed

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Hyoung, Peter S; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-07-01

    Ligaments and tendons are commonly torn during injury, yet the likelihood that untreated initial tears could lead to further tearing or even full rupture has proven challenging to predict. In this work, porcine Achilles tendon and human anterior longitudinal ligament samples were tested using both standard fracture toughness methods and complex loading conditions. Failure modes for each of 14 distinct testing cases were evaluated using a total of 131 soft tissue tests. Results showed that these soft tissues were able to completely resist any further crack propagation of an initial tear, regardless of fiber orientation or applied loading condition. Consequently, the major concern for patients with tendon or ligament tears is likely not reduction in ultimate tissue strength due to stress risers at the tip of the tear, but rather a question of whether or not the remaining cross-section is large enough to support the anticipated loading.

  17. Stock-outs, uncertainty and improvisation in access to healthcare in war-torn Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Muyinda, Herbert; Mugisha, James

    2015-12-01

    Stock-outs, also known as shortages or complete absence of a particular inventory, in public health facilities have become a hallmark in Uganda's health system making the notions of persistent doubt in access to healthcare - uncertainty, and doing more with less - 'improvisation', very pronounced. The situation becomes more critical in post-conflict areas with an over whelming burden of preexisting and conflict-related ailments amidst weak health systems. Particularly in the war-torn Northern Uganda, the intersection between the effects of violent conflict and shortage of medications is striking. There are problems getting the right type of medications to the right people at the right time, causing persistent shortages and uncertainty in access to healthcare. With reference to patients on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART), we present temporal trends in access to healthcare in the context of medication shortages in conflict-affected areas. We examine uncertainties in access to care, and how patients, medical practitioners, and the state - the key actors in the domain of supplying and utilizing medicines, respond. Our observation is that, while improvisation is a feature of biomedicine and facilitates problem solving in daily life, it is largely contextual. Given the rapidly evolving contexts and social and professional sensitivities that characterize war affected areas, there is a need for deliberate healthcare programs tailored to the unique needs of people and to the shaping of appropriate policies in post-conflict settings, which call for more North-South collaboration on equal terms. PMID:26524996

  18. REHABILITATION OF A PARTIALLY TORN DISTAL TRICEPS TENDON AFTER PLATELET RICH PLASMA INJECTION: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Kolber, Morey J.; Salamh, Paul A.; Hanney, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is an emerging non‐surgical intervention used for the treatment of tendon and ligament pathology. Despite the growing popularity of PRP in musculoskeletal medicine, there is a paucity of research that describes appropriate rehabilitation procedures following this intervention. Case Description: This case report presents the rehabilitation strategy used following a PRP injection for a patient with a partially torn distal triceps tendon who previously failed physical therapy interventions. Outcome: The patient returned to light weight training and coaching activity after completing 15 visits over a 3 month period. One month after discharge, the patient reported pain‐free activities of daily living and a return to previously performed gym activities. Discussion: PRP presents a viable treatment option for individuals who are recalcitrant to conservative interventions yet elect to avoid more invasive surgical measures. Despite the growing popularity of PRP, a paucity of evidence exists to guide physical therapists in the rehabilitation process of these patients. The rehabilitation strategies used in a patient who had a PRP injection for a partial triceps tendon tear are outlined. Although this case report highlights a successful rehabilitation outcome, future research regarding the concomitant effects of PRP injection and rehabilitation for tendon pathology are needed. Level of Evidence: 4‐Case Report PMID:23772345

  19. Stock-outs, uncertainty and improvisation in access to healthcare in war-torn Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Muyinda, Herbert; Mugisha, James

    2015-12-01

    Stock-outs, also known as shortages or complete absence of a particular inventory, in public health facilities have become a hallmark in Uganda's health system making the notions of persistent doubt in access to healthcare - uncertainty, and doing more with less - 'improvisation', very pronounced. The situation becomes more critical in post-conflict areas with an over whelming burden of preexisting and conflict-related ailments amidst weak health systems. Particularly in the war-torn Northern Uganda, the intersection between the effects of violent conflict and shortage of medications is striking. There are problems getting the right type of medications to the right people at the right time, causing persistent shortages and uncertainty in access to healthcare. With reference to patients on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART), we present temporal trends in access to healthcare in the context of medication shortages in conflict-affected areas. We examine uncertainties in access to care, and how patients, medical practitioners, and the state - the key actors in the domain of supplying and utilizing medicines, respond. Our observation is that, while improvisation is a feature of biomedicine and facilitates problem solving in daily life, it is largely contextual. Given the rapidly evolving contexts and social and professional sensitivities that characterize war affected areas, there is a need for deliberate healthcare programs tailored to the unique needs of people and to the shaping of appropriate policies in post-conflict settings, which call for more North-South collaboration on equal terms.

  20. Epidemiology and Clinical Burden of Malaria in the War-Torn Area, Orakzai Agency in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Asad Mustafa; Hussain, Irfan; Malik, Sumera Kausar; Lee, Jung Hun; Cho, Ill Hwan; Kim, Young Bae; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Military conflict has been a major challenge in the detection and control of emerging infectious diseases such as malaria. It poses issues associated with enhancing emergence and transmission of infectious diseases by destroying infrastructure and collapsing healthcare systems. The Orakzai agency in Pakistan has witnessed a series of intense violence and destruction. Military conflicts and instability in Afghanistan have resulted in the migration of refugees into the area and possible introduction of many infectious disease epidemics. Due to the ongoing violence and Talibanization, it has been a challenge to conduct an epidemiological study. Methodology/Principal Findings All patients were sampled within the transmission season. After a detailed clinical investigation of patients, data were recorded. Baseline venous blood samples were taken for microscopy and nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) analysis. Plasmodium species were detected using nested PCR (nPCR) and amplification of the small subunit ribosomal ribonucleic acid (ssrRNA) genes using the primer pairs. We report a clinical assessment of the epidemic situation of malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax (86.5%) and Plasmodium falciparum (11.79%) infections with analysis of complications in patients such as decompensated shock (41%), anemia (8.98%), hypoglycaemia (7.3%), multiple convulsions (6.7%), hyperpyrexia (6.17%), jaundice (5%), and hyperparasitaemia (4.49%). Conclusions/Significance This overlooked distribution of P. vivax should be considered by malaria control strategy makers in the world and by the Government of Pakistan. In our study, children were the most susceptible population to malaria infection while they were the least expected to use satisfactory prevention strategies in such a war-torn deprived region. Local health authorities should initiate malaria awareness programs in schools and malaria-related education should be further promoted at the local level reaching out to both

  1. Repair of a torn medial meniscus with an anteromedial meniscofemoral ligament in an anterior cruciate ligament-injured knee.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Masayuki; Miyama, Takahide; Nagayama, Yoshihiro; Shino, Konsei

    2011-05-01

    We report a rare case of longitudinal tear of the anterior segment of the medial meniscus in association with the anteromedial meniscofemoral ligament (AMMFL) in an anterior cruciate ligament-injured knee. The tear was repaired, and the anterior horn was transferred to the tibia using the pull-out technique after excising the AMMFL. Repeat arthroscopy performed 7 months postoperatively revealed that the medial meniscus had completely healed and the anterior horn was firmly fixed to the tibia. Two years after the surgery, the patient could play basketball without any symptom. A posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiograph did not show any narrowing of the medial joint space. Considering the excellent healing observed in this case, preservation of the meniscus should be considered despite an association between a torn meniscus and an anomalous insertion.

  2. Torn in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-10-01

    The US presidential elections represent an important cornerstone for both US and global energy policies. The continuation of current policies aimed at the low carbon energy transition should not be taken for granted.

  3. Matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact portion of those tendons.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Alessandro; Cesari, Eugenio; Garofalo, Raffaele; Gigante, Antonio; Conti, Marco; Markopoulos, Nikolaos; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated whether matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are involved in extracellular matrix remodelling and degradation of chronic rotator cuff tears. Tendon samples were harvested from 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear. Supraspinatus specimens were harvested en bloc from the arthroscopically intact middle portion of the tendon, more than 1 cm lateral to the torn edge, from the lateral edge of the tear, and from the superior margin of the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon, used as control. The collagenases, the stromelysins, and the tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease arrays were analyzed blindly by multiplex sandwich ELISA in each specimen. Histological evidence of tendinopathy was present in all patients with a rotator cuff tear, but not in the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon. There were significantly increased levels of MMP 1, MMP 2, MMP 3, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in all specimens examined, including the macroscopically intact portion of the supraspinatus tendon and the subscapularis (control specimens). The levels of specific matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact tendons. These changes extended medially to the site of tendon tear, and to other tendons. PMID:24367772

  4. Teachers Torn over Religion, Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2005-01-01

    When science teachers in a small Pennsylvania town were asked to read a statement to their classes that introduced students to the concept of "intelligent design," they refused, citing legal and professional obligations. This article discusses teacher's views on religion and evolution and how their opinions influenced religion's place in science…

  5. Girl's Schooling in War-Torn Somalia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A civil war has raged in Somalia since 1991. The civil war was the final blow to an already collapsed education system. Somalia has received little research and policy attention yet children, especially girls, are very vulnerable during times of conflict. The different gender roles, activities, and status in society create gender differentiated…

  6. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these procedures create a scar that helps seal the retina to the back of the eye. ... around the retinal tear. The scarring that results seals the retina to the underlying tissue, helping to ...

  7. Teaching in War-Torn Belfast: Reading, Writing, Rioting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Arturo F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    This article describes the educational situation in Belfast--the divided sympathies on the part of the students, the segregation, the possible hardening of the students. Also considered are the difficulties of teachers in this war situation. (JA)

  8. Astronomers detect matter torn apart by black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Astronomers have used two different telescopes simultaneously to study the violent flares from the supermassive black hole in the centre of the Milky Way. They have detected outbursts from this region, known as Sagittarius A*, which reveal material being stretched out as it orbits in the intense gravity close to the central black hole. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 41/08 Submillimetre and infrared view of the Galactic Centre The team of European and US astronomers used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, both in Chile, to study light from Sagittarius A* at near-infrared wavelengths and the longer submillimetre wavelengths respectively. This is the first time that astronomers have caught a flare with these telescopes simultaneously. The telescopes' location in the southern hemisphere provides the best vantage point for studying the Galactic Centre. "Observations like this, over a range of wavelengths, are really the only way to understand what's going on close to the black hole," says Andreas Eckart of the University of Cologne, who led the team. Sagittarius A* is located at the centre of our own Milky Way Galaxy at a distance from Earth of about 26 000 light-years. It is a supermassive black hole with a mass of about four million times that of the Sun. Most, if not all, galaxies are thought to have a supermassive black hole in their centre. "Sagittarius A* is unique, because it is the nearest of these monster black holes, lying within our own galaxy," explains team member Frederick K. Baganoff of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, USA. "Only for this one object can our current telescopes detect these relatively faint flares from material orbiting just outside the event horizon." The emission from Sagittarius A* is thought to come from gas thrown off by stars, which then orbits and falls into the black hole. Making the simultaneous observations required careful planning between teams at the two telescopes. After several nights waiting at the two observatory sites, they struck lucky. "At the VLT, as soon as we pointed the telescope at Sagittarius A* we saw it was active, and getting brighter by the minute. We immediately picked up the phone and alerted our colleagues at the APEX telescope," says Gunther Witzel, a PhD student from the University of Cologne. Macarena García-Marín, also from Cologne, was waiting at APEX, where the observatory team had made a special effort to keep the instrument on standby. "As soon as we got the call we were very excited and had to work really fast so as not to lose crucial data from Sagittarius A*. We took over from the regular observations, and were in time to catch the flares," she explains. Over the next six hours, the team detected violently variable infrared emission, with four major flares from Sagittarius A* . The submillimetre-wavelength results also showed flares, but, crucially, this occurred about one and a half hours after the infrared flares. The researchers explain that this time delay is probably caused by the rapid expansion, at speeds of about 5 million km/h, of the clouds of gas that are emitting the flares. This expansion causes changes in the character of the emission over time, and hence the time delay between the infrared and submillimetre flares. Although speeds of 5 million km/h may seem fast, this is only 0.5% of the speed of light. To escape from the very strong gravity so close to the black hole, the gas would have to be travelling at half the speed of light - 100 times faster than detected - and so the researchers believe that the gas cannot be streaming out in a jet. Instead, they suspect that a blob of gas orbiting close to the black hole is being stretched out, like dough in a mixing bowl, and this is causing the expansion. The simultaneous combination of the VLT and APEX telescopes has proved to be a powerful way to study the flares at multiple wavelengths. The team hope that future observations will let them prove their proposed model, and discover more about this mysterious region at the centre of our Galaxy.

  9. Teachers Using Learning Styles: Torn between Research and Accountability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of instruments reporting learning/cognitive style with school pupils is of particular interest, because most research on them focuses on applications in higher education, training and the adult workplace, where criticisms of their integrity, reliability and validity have been significant. This study examines two such popular…

  10. Teaching Career Skills in War-Torn Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliah, Elaine

    2006-01-01

    While western Iraq's Anbar province was making headlines with its voter turnout this past December 2005, a quieter turnout of its young men was making headway graduating from school. In Habbaniyah, a volatile city where rockets and mortars destroy buildings and lives all too suddenly and frequently, the Iraq Construction Apprentice Program (ICAP)…

  11. Oil flow resumes in war torn onshore Neutral Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-09

    Oil production has resumed in the war ravaged onshore fields of the Neutral Zone between Saudi Arabia and Kuwait 1 year after the end of Persian Gulf War. Initial production of about 40,000 b/d is expected to rise to 60,000 b/d by year end. This paper reports that prior to the January-February 1991 war to oust occupying Iraqi military forces from Kuwait, the Neutral Zone's Wafra, South Umm Gudair, and South Fuwaris onshore fields produced about 135,000 b/d.

  12. Torn apart: membrane rupture in muscular dystrophies and associated cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lammerding, Jan; Lee, Richard T.

    2007-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by mutations in cytoskeletal proteins that render cells more susceptible to strain-induced injury in mechanically active tissues such as skeletal or cardiac muscle. In this issue of the JCI, Han et al. report that dysferlin participates in membrane resealing in cardiomyocytes and that exercise results in increased membrane damage and disturbed cardiac function in dysferlin-deficient mice (see the related article beginning on page 1805). Thus, in addition to repetitive membrane damage, inadequate membrane repair may participate in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophies and cardiomyopathies. PMID:17607350

  13. Child undernutrition in war-torn society: the Ethiopian experience.

    PubMed

    Yohannes Kinfu, A

    1999-07-01

    Using data from a cross-sectional nutrition survey conducted in rural Ethiopia between March and April 1992, roughly a year after the end of one of the longest civil wars in modern human history, this study attempts to document the magnitude and correlates of childhood undernutrition in Ethiopia. Findings from the study reveal that, at the time of the survey, 59% of children in the country were exposed to long-term or chronic undernutrition (stunted); about 4% were suffering from acute problems (wasted); and about the same proportion were both stunted and wasted. Less than a third of the country's children had normal growth. The logistic-binomial regression results demonstrated the existence of significant clustering of risks of undernutrition within areas of residence and notable differentials by age of child, duration of breast-feeding, age at introduction of supplementary foods and number of under-five siblings. Significant variations were also noted by age of household head, per capita land holding, religious affiliation and prevalence of endemic diseases in an area.

  14. Perspective: A Pull in Two Directions--Mothers Torn between Work and Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Anne Pleshette

    2004-01-01

    This article was excerpted from the author's "The 7 Stages of Motherhood: Making the Most of Your Life as a Mom," published by Alfred A. Knopf in 2004. The author describes the experiences of several professional women, including herself, returning to work from maternity leave. The article examines the varied and sometimes ambivalent responses…

  15. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult.

  16. Torn apart by Divorce: When a Family Is Shattered to Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Gigi; Kamps, Brian; Lopez, Kate; McAlister, Christine; Wright, Cheri

    This brief handout set begins with a scenario that has a teacher discover that one of the best students in the class is facing the breakup of her parent's marriage. The student thinks it is "all my fault." A fact sheet on divorce and its effects on children follows. Psychological and economic effects of divorce on children are listed. Facts about…

  17. A 76-year old man with a torn Freedom SOLO bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Laurens W; Li, Wilson W; van der Meulen, Jan; de Mol, Bas A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a 76-year old male who presented with progressive dyspnoea. He underwent an aortic valve replacement with a Freedom SOLO bioprosthesis 6 years ago. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a moderate-to-severe leakage of the Freedom SOLO bioprosthesis. During surgical reintervention, a partial tear of the left coronary cusp was seen from the commissure of the right coronary cusp to its base. After radiographic and microscopic examination, no clear cause was found for the failure of this Freedom SOLO bioprosthesis. To our knowledge, this is the third failure of a Freedom SOLO bioprosthesis reported in the literature. When the long-term follow-up of the Freedom SOLO bioprosthesis is available, it has to be compared with other bioprosthesis for long-term durability.

  18. Human Integration through Olympism Education: A Pragmatic Engagement of Youths in a War-Torn Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanayakkara, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    This paper delineates the findings of a mixed methods study that investigated how Olympism education could strengthen competencies of human integration through delivery of physical, social, and critical literacy and conflict resolution literacy. The study introduced a curriculum model integrating Olympism values and conflict resolution strategies…

  19. Sexual Violence toward Children and Youth in War-Torn Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Malemo Kalisya, Luc; Lussy Justin, Paluku; Kimona, Christophe; Nyavandu, Kavira; Mukekulu Eugenie, Kamabu; Jonathan, Kasereka Muhindo Lusi; Claude, Kasereka Masumbuko; Hawkes, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background The epidemic of gender-based violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has garnered popular media attention, but is incompletely described in the medical literature to date. In particular, the relative importance of militarized compared to civilian rape and the impact on vulnerable populations merits further study. We describe a retrospective case series of sexual abuse among children and youth in eastern DRC. Methods Medical records of patients treated for sexual assault at HEAL Africa Hospital, Goma, DRC between 2006 and 2008 were reviewed. Information extracted from the chart record was summarized using descriptive statistics, with comparative statistics to examine differences between pediatric (≤18 yrs) and adult patients. Findings 440 pediatric and 54 adult sexual abuse cases were identified. Children and youth were more often assaulted by someone known to the family (74% vs 30%, OR 6.7 [95%CI 3.6–12], p<0.001), and less frequently by military personnel (13% vs 48%, OR 0.14 [95%CI 0.075–0.26], p<0.001). Delayed presentation for medical care (>72 hours after the assault) was more common in pediatric patients (53% vs 33%, OR 2.2 [95%CI 1.2–4.0], p = 0.007). Physical signs of sexual abuse, including lesions of the posterior fourchette, hymeneal tears, and anal lesions, were more commonly observed in children and youth (84% vs 69%, OR 2.3 [95%CI 1.3–4.4], p = 0.006). Nine (2.9%) pediatrics patients were HIV-positive at presentation, compared to 5.3% of adults (p = 0.34). Interpretation World media attention has focused on violent rape as a weapon of war in the DRC. Our data highlight some neglected but important and distinct aspects of the ongoing epidemic of sexual violence: sexual abuse of children and youth. PMID:21267467

  20. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult. PMID:6499313

  1. Rapid Deployment of International Tele-Intensive Care Unit Services in War-Torn Syria.

    PubMed

    Moughrabieh, Anas; Weinert, Craig

    2016-02-01

    The conflict in Syria has created the largest humanitarian emergency of the twenty-first century. The 4-year Syrian conflict has destroyed hospitals and severely reduced the capacity of intensive care units (ICUs) and on-site intensivists. The crisis has triggered attempts from abroad to support the medical care of severely injured and acutely ill civilians inside Syria, including application of telemedicine. Within the United States, tele-ICU programs have been operating for more than a decade, albeit with high start-up costs and generally long development times. With the benefit of lessons drawn from those domestic models, the Syria Tele-ICU program was launched in December 2012 to manage the care of ICU patients in parts of Syria by using inexpensive, off-the-shelf video cameras, free social media applications, and a volunteer network of Arabic-speaking intensivists in North America and Europe. Within 1 year, 90 patients per month in three ICUs were receiving tele-ICU services. At the end of 2015, a network of approximately 20 participating intensivists was providing clinical decision support 24 hours per day to five civilian ICUs in Syria. The volunteer clinicians manage patients at a distance of more than 6,000 miles, separated by seven or eight time zones between North America and Syria. The program is implementing a cloud-based electronic medical record for physician documentation and a medication administration record for nurses. There are virtual chat rooms for patient rounds, radiology review, and trainee teaching. The early success of the program shows how a small number of committed physicians can use inexpensive equipment spawned by the Internet revolution to support from afar civilian health care delivery in a high-conflict country.

  2. Torn between Study and Leisure: How Motivational Conflicts Relate to Students' Academic and Social Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grund, Axel; Brassler, Nina K.; Fries, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Research on motivational conflicts indicates that students' difficulties during studying may result from tempting alternatives in the leisure domain. In the present set of studies, we addressed the question of whether academic motivation inversely has negative spillover effects on students' leisure-related functioning, too. In the first 2 studies…

  3. Torn in Two: An Examiniation of Elementary School Counselors' Perceptions on Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesto, Casper

    2013-01-01

    The American School Counselor Association (ASCA; The ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs, 2005) developed the ASCA National Model to define the prescribed roles and functions of the professional school counselor. Although the national model initially defines school counselors' roles, counselors find it difficult to…

  4. Determinants of Children's Mental Health in War-Torn Settings: Translating Research Into Action.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kenneth E; Jordans, Mark J D

    2016-06-01

    Research on the mental health and psychosocial wellbeing of children in conflict-affected settings has undergone a significant paradigm shift in recent years. Earlier studies based on a war exposure model primarily emphasized the effects of direct exposure to armed conflict; this has gradually given way to a broader understanding of the diverse pathways by which organized violence affects children. A robustly supported comprehensive model includes risk factors at multiple points in time (prior war exposure, ongoing daily stressors) and at all levels of the social ecology. In particular, findings suggest that material deprivation and a set of family variables, including harsh parenting, parental distress, and witnessing intimate partner violence, are important mediators of the relationship between armed conflict and children's wellbeing. To date, however, interventions aimed at supporting war-affected children's wellbeing, both preventive and treatment-focused, have focused primarily on direct work with children, while paying only modest attention to ongoing risk factors in their families and broader environments. Possible reasons for the ongoing prioritization of child-focused interventions are considered, and examples are provided of recent evidence-based interventions that have reduced toxic stressors (harsh parenting and the use of violent discipline by teachers) in conflict-affected communities. PMID:27091645

  5. [Instances of alienation: portrait of the torn patient. 2. Medical apparatus and dominant discourses].

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Friedrich; Bourquin, Céline; Saraga, Michael

    2014-02-12

    The first part of the article focused on the individual mechanisms--body, psyche and relational context--alienating the patient. The second part addresses alienating mechanisms related to the medical apparatus and the dominant discourses produced within and by society. The aim is not to comprehensively list possible mechanisms, but to discuss some of them using illustrative examples. PMID:24620461

  6. Two war-torn soldiers: combat-related trauma through an intersubjective lens.

    PubMed

    Carr, Russell B

    2013-01-01

    The author, himself an Iraq war veteran, presents a contemporary psychodynamic understanding, known as intersubjective therapy, of combat-related Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). At the onset of this case example, the patient was highly suicidal and his PTSD symptoms had not responded to a first-line treatment: manualized cognitive processing therapy. Robert Stolorow's intersubjective, psychodynamic approach to traumatic emotional experiences was then selected for treatment, and illustrates how combat in Afghanistan shattered this soldier's world and self experience. Therapeutic action arises from this intersubjective perspective by providing a relational home so that unendurable emotions can be borne, processed, and integrated to achieve a more constant and individualized sense of self. Being a two-person model of therapy, the author also describes how his work with this traumatized soldier affected him, ultimately contributing to his own sense of authentic existing. The author discusses the need for therapists to recognize and acknowledge to traumatized patients their shared finitude and the ubiquity of trauma. In the Postscript, the patient describes what he felt was therapeutic and contrasts this to his previous experiences with manualized cognitive processing therapy.

  7. Coming to Terms with the Past: Lessons from War-Torn Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nina K.

    Countries are increasingly facing the question of transgenerational transmission of trauma from their previous acts of war, ethnic cleansing, and genocide. How countries choose to confront that past has significance on the future course of their society. Truth commissions have been used in many countries as a means to collect accounts of torture,…

  8. Rapid Deployment of International Tele-Intensive Care Unit Services in War-Torn Syria.

    PubMed

    Moughrabieh, Anas; Weinert, Craig

    2016-02-01

    The conflict in Syria has created the largest humanitarian emergency of the twenty-first century. The 4-year Syrian conflict has destroyed hospitals and severely reduced the capacity of intensive care units (ICUs) and on-site intensivists. The crisis has triggered attempts from abroad to support the medical care of severely injured and acutely ill civilians inside Syria, including application of telemedicine. Within the United States, tele-ICU programs have been operating for more than a decade, albeit with high start-up costs and generally long development times. With the benefit of lessons drawn from those domestic models, the Syria Tele-ICU program was launched in December 2012 to manage the care of ICU patients in parts of Syria by using inexpensive, off-the-shelf video cameras, free social media applications, and a volunteer network of Arabic-speaking intensivists in North America and Europe. Within 1 year, 90 patients per month in three ICUs were receiving tele-ICU services. At the end of 2015, a network of approximately 20 participating intensivists was providing clinical decision support 24 hours per day to five civilian ICUs in Syria. The volunteer clinicians manage patients at a distance of more than 6,000 miles, separated by seven or eight time zones between North America and Syria. The program is implementing a cloud-based electronic medical record for physician documentation and a medication administration record for nurses. There are virtual chat rooms for patient rounds, radiology review, and trainee teaching. The early success of the program shows how a small number of committed physicians can use inexpensive equipment spawned by the Internet revolution to support from afar civilian health care delivery in a high-conflict country. PMID:26788827

  9. Colour polymorphism torn apart by opposing positive frequency-dependent selection, yet maintained in space.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Swanne P; Kokko, Hanna; Rojas, Bibiana; Nokelainen, Ossi; Mappes, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    Polymorphic warning signals in aposematic species are enigmatic because predator learning and discrimination should select for the most common coloration, resulting in positive frequency-dependent survival selection. Here, we investigated whether differential mating success could create sufficiently strong negative frequency-dependent selection for rare morphs to explain polymorphic (white and yellow) warning coloration in male wood tiger moths (Parasemia plantaginis). We conducted an experiment in semi-natural conditions where we estimated mating success for both white and yellow male moths under three different morph frequencies. Contrary to expectations, mating success was positively frequency-dependent: white morph males had high relative fitness when common, likewise yellow morph males had high relative fitness when instead they were common. We hence built a model parameterized with our data to examine whether polymorphism can be maintained despite two sources of positive frequency dependence. The model includes known spatial variation in the survival advantage enjoyed by the yellow morph and assumes that relative mating success follows our experimentally derived values. It predicts that polymorphism is possible under migration for up to approximately 20% exchange of individuals between subpopulations in each generation. Our results suggest that differential mating success combined with spatial variation in predator communities may operate as a selection mosaic that prevents complete fixation of either morph.

  10. [Instances of alienation: portrait of the torn patient. I. Individual and context].

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Friedrich; Bourquin, Céline; Saraga, Michael

    2014-02-12

    While the past decades were marked by an increased interest for the existential situation of man suffering from disease, the mechanisms alienating the patient from himself and from his context have been poorly investigated. These mechanisms, though operating in a dynamic interaction, will be discussed here sequentially. The first part of this article focuses on individual mechanisms of alienation emerging from the relationship the patient establishes with his body and psyche and on those related to his relational context. The aim is not to comprehensively describe these phenomena, but to discuss--based on clinical vignettes--some examples and their implications. The second part of the article describes some mechanisms of alienation that are incorporated in the medical apparatus and the dominant discourses. PMID:24620460

  11. Primary health care in Ethiopia under three political systems: community participation in a war-torn society.

    PubMed

    Kloos, H

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines primary health care (PHC) development with an emphasis on community participation in Ethiopia under the feudal regime of emperor Haile Sellassie, the socialist/military rule of Mengistu Haile Mariam and the sprouting democracy and free market economy of Meles Zenawi. In spite of the rapid expansion of primary care under Mengistu, community participation was hampered by the protracted war and centralized, urban-based, bureaucratic approaches and attitudes that failed to promote an enabling environment for community participation. The socialist government, although implementing various community programs and expanding the rural health services, did not succeed in revolutionizing the health services. A comparative examination of the democratized rebel health services of the Eritrean People's Liberation Front (EPLF) and the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF) illustrates the inconsistencies between stated policies of the Ethiopian government and actual strategies, and identifies factors promoting and impeding participatory health care development in a war environment. Achievements, opportunities and potential dangers to PHC and community participation in the post-war era characterized by economic progress, democratization, decentralization, lingering ethnic conflict and private initiatives are briefly described. PMID:9460830

  12. War is the Enemy of Health. Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine in War-Torn Syria.

    PubMed

    Sahloul, Mohammed Z; Monla-Hassan, Jaber; Sankari, Abdulghani; Kherallah, Mazen; Atassi, Bassel; Badr, Safwan; Abbara, Aula; Sparrow, Annie

    2016-02-01

    The Syrian crisis, now in its fifth year, has created an unprecedented strain on health services and systems due to the protracted nature of the warfare, the targeting of medics and health care infrastructure, the exodus of physicians and nurses, the shortage of medical supplies and medications, and the disruption of medical education and training. Within a few short years, the life expectancy of resident Syrians has declined by 20 years. Over the first 4 years of the conflict, more than 75,000 civilians died from injuries incurred in the violence. More than twice as many civilians, including many women and children, have died prematurely of infectious and noninfectious chronic diseases for want of adequate health care. Doctors, local administrators, and nongovernmental organizations are struggling to manage the consequences of the conflict under substandard conditions, often using unorthodox methods of health care delivery in field hospitals and remotely by telehealth communication. Much-needed medical supplies are channeled through dangerous routes across the borders from Lebanon, Jordan, and Turkey. Physicians in the United States and other western nations have helped Syrian physicians make the most of the situation by providing training on introducing innovations in technology and treatment. Portable ultrasound machines have been introduced and are being used extensively in the management of trauma and shock. This report, prepared by members of the Syrian American Medical Society, documents current needs for health care relief within Syria, focusing on pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine, and some of the efforts currently underway to meet those needs.

  13. War is the Enemy of Health. Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine in War-Torn Syria.

    PubMed

    Sahloul, Mohammed Z; Monla-Hassan, Jaber; Sankari, Abdulghani; Kherallah, Mazen; Atassi, Bassel; Badr, Safwan; Abbara, Aula; Sparrow, Annie

    2016-02-01

    The Syrian crisis, now in its fifth year, has created an unprecedented strain on health services and systems due to the protracted nature of the warfare, the targeting of medics and health care infrastructure, the exodus of physicians and nurses, the shortage of medical supplies and medications, and the disruption of medical education and training. Within a few short years, the life expectancy of resident Syrians has declined by 20 years. Over the first 4 years of the conflict, more than 75,000 civilians died from injuries incurred in the violence. More than twice as many civilians, including many women and children, have died prematurely of infectious and noninfectious chronic diseases for want of adequate health care. Doctors, local administrators, and nongovernmental organizations are struggling to manage the consequences of the conflict under substandard conditions, often using unorthodox methods of health care delivery in field hospitals and remotely by telehealth communication. Much-needed medical supplies are channeled through dangerous routes across the borders from Lebanon, Jordan, and Turkey. Physicians in the United States and other western nations have helped Syrian physicians make the most of the situation by providing training on introducing innovations in technology and treatment. Portable ultrasound machines have been introduced and are being used extensively in the management of trauma and shock. This report, prepared by members of the Syrian American Medical Society, documents current needs for health care relief within Syria, focusing on pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine, and some of the efforts currently underway to meet those needs. PMID:26784922

  14. Simulation of High-Latitude Hydrological Processes in the Torne-Kalix Basin: PILPS Phase 2(e). 3; Equivalent Model Representation and Sensitivity Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowling, Laura C.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Nijssen, Bart; Polcher, Jan; Koster, Randal D.; Lohmann, Dag; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Project for Intercomparison of Land Surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) Phase 2(e) showed that in cold regions the annual runoff production in Land Surface Schemes (LSSs) is closely related to the maximum snow accumulation, which in turn is controlled in large part by winter sublimation. To help further explain the relationship between snow cover, turbulent exchanges and runoff production, a simple equivalent model-(SEM) was devised to reproduce the seasonal and annual fluxes simulated by 13 LSSs that participated in PILPS Phase 2(e). The design of the SEM relates the annual partitioning of precipitation and energy in the LSSs to three primary parameters: snow albedo, effective aerodynamic resistance and evaporation efficiency. Isolation of each of the parameters showed that the annual runoff production was most sensitive to the aerodynamic resistance. The SEM was somewhat successful in reproducing the observed LSS response to a decrease in shortwave radiation and changes in wind speed forcings. SEM parameters derived from the reduced shortwave forcings suggested that increased winter stability suppressed turbulent heat fluxes over snow. Because winter sensible heat fluxes were largely negative, reductions in winter shortwave radiation imply an increase in annual average sensible heat.

  15. Entomological investigations on malaria vectors in some war-torn areas in the trincomalee district of sri lanka after settlement of 30-year civil disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gunathilaka, Nayana; Hapugoda, Menaka; Abeyewickreme, Wimaladharma; Wickremasinghe, Rajitha

    2015-01-01

    Background. Malaria was an endemic problem in Trincomalee District, Eastern Province of Sri Lanka. Very few recent data concerning Anopheles are available which transmit malaria. Therefore, the aim of this study is to identify various Anopheles species and the dynamics of anophelines including malaria vectors in Trincomalee District for effective vector control under the current malaria elimination program embarked in the country. Method. Entomological surveys were conducted on a monthly basis, using five entomological techniques, namely, indoor hand collection (HC), window trap collection (WTC), cattle-baited net collection (CBNC), and cattle-baited hut collection (CBHC) from June 2010 to June 2012 in 32 study areas under five entomological sentinel sites. Results. Seventeen anopheline species were encountered, of which Anopheles subpictus was the predominant species in all sampling methods. It is noted that A. culicifacies and A. subpictus have adapted to breed in polluted water in urban settings which may cause serious implications on the epidemiology of malaria in the country. Conclusions. It is important to determine the abundance, biology, distribution, and relationship with climatic factors of main and secondary malaria vectors in Sri Lanka in order to initiate evidence based controlling programs under the current malaria elimination program in Sri Lanka. PMID:25789195

  16. Skiers thumb - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pulled or torn away from the bone. Grade 1: Ligaments are stretched, but not torn. This ... injury. It can improve with some light stretching. Grade 2: Ligaments are partially torn. This injury may ...

  17. What Are Knee Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sprain." The ACL is most often stretched or torn (or both) by a sudden twisting motion. The ... tendinitis (inflammation of a tendon) to a ruptured (torn) tendon. Torn tendons most often occur from: Overusing ...

  18. Knee Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... be FRACTURED and/or you may have seriously TORN some LIGAMENTS in the internal area of the ... the stairs? Yes Your symptoms may be from TORN CARTILAGE, a TORN LIGAMENT or CHONDROMALACIA PATELLAE, the ...

  19. Erb-Duchenne and Dejerine-Klumpke Palsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... most severe type, in which the nerve is torn from the spine; rupture, in which the nerve is torn but not at the spinal attachment; neuroma, in which the nerve has torn and healed but scar tissue puts pressure on ...

  20. Knee Arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or an EKG (electrocardiogram). Surgery Arthroscopic picture of torn anterior cruciate ligament [yellow star]. Almost all arthroscopic ... most commonly used for: • Removal or repair of torn meniscal cartilage • Reconstruction of a torn anterior cruciate ...

  1. Shoulder Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... have any questions about the possible side effects. Torn Rotator Cuff Rotator cuff tendons often become inflamed ... perform arthroscopic or open surgical repair of the torn rotator cuff. Treatment for a torn rotator cuff ...

  2. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    PubMed

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for an implant appropriate to the unique technique of protecting a partial ACL tear. In addition, it has no critical point of ACL substitute failure at the site of its anchoring to the bone (compared to the previously used PET/PCL substitute). Key words: knee stabilisation, stifle surgery, ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, UHMWPE, nylon monofilament thread, biodegradable screw, bone anchor.

  3. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    PubMed

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for an implant appropriate to the unique technique of protecting a partial ACL tear. In addition, it has no critical point of ACL substitute failure at the site of its anchoring to the bone (compared to the previously used PET/PCL substitute). Key words: knee stabilisation, stifle surgery, ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, UHMWPE, nylon monofilament thread, biodegradable screw, bone anchor. PMID:26317294

  4. Sprains, Strains and Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... are useful for finding soft issue injuries (including torn ligaments) and stress fractures. Treatment will depend on ... weeks. Professional athletes may undergo surgery to repair torn ligaments. Oral anti-inflammatory medication, such as ibuprofen, ...

  5. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  6. Subtalar Arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and subtalar joint has ligaments that can be torn with injury. If the ligaments heal with thick ... being removed from the subtalar joint has been torn and healed in an abnormal and often thickened ...

  7. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  8. What Are Shoulder Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... between the collarbone and the shoulder blade are torn. The injury is most often caused by a ... others can be very painful. Treatment for a torn rotator cuff depends on age, health, how severe ...

  9. 19 CFR 181.62 - Commercial samples of negligible value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the equivalent amount in the currency of Canada or Mexico, or which are so marked, torn, perforated... are properly marked, torn, perforated or otherwise treated prior to arrival in the United States...

  10. 19 CFR 181.62 - Commercial samples of negligible value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the equivalent amount in the currency of Canada or Mexico, or which are so marked, torn, perforated... are properly marked, torn, perforated or otherwise treated prior to arrival in the United States...

  11. 19 CFR 181.62 - Commercial samples of negligible value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the equivalent amount in the currency of Canada or Mexico, or which are so marked, torn, perforated... are properly marked, torn, perforated or otherwise treated prior to arrival in the United States...

  12. Rotator cuff repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder and arm bones. The tendons can be torn from overuse or injury. ... Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff is usually very successful at relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure is less predictable at returning strength ...

  13. 19 CFR 181.62 - Commercial samples of negligible value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the equivalent amount in the currency of Canada or Mexico, or which are so marked, torn, perforated... are properly marked, torn, perforated or otherwise treated prior to arrival in the United States...

  14. 7 CFR 42.113 - Defects of label, marking, or code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Minor Not specified method 101 Missing (when required) 102 Loose or improperly applied 201 Torn or mutilated 202 Torn or scratched, obliterating any markings on the label 103 Text illegible or incomplete...

  15. 19 CFR 181.62 - Commercial samples of negligible value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the equivalent amount in the currency of Canada or Mexico, or which are so marked, torn, perforated... are properly marked, torn, perforated or otherwise treated prior to arrival in the United States...

  16. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprains A sprain means you've stretched or torn a ligament. Common knee sprains usually involve damage ... A strain means you've partly or completely torn a muscle or tendon. With knee strains, you ...

  17. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... often occur among active teens, especially athletes. A torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) — a ligament that helps ... the more serious injuries. Teens who have a torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football ...

  18. Shoulder Pain and Common Shoulder Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... and muscles around the shoulder become loose or torn, dislocations can occur repeatedly. Recurring dislocations, which may ... involve arthroscopy to remove scar tissue or repair torn tissues, or traditional, open procedures for larger reconstructions ...

  19. Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgical Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... topic.cfm?topic=A00064 Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff most o en involves re-attaching ... Recommended Your doctor may recommend surgery for a torn rotator cuff if your pain does not improve ...

  20. Sports Hernia (Athletic Pubalgia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pubic bone (adductors) are also stretched or torn. Cause Sports activities that involve planting the feet ... may need to consider surgery to repair the torn tissues. Page ( 2 ) AAOS does not endorse any ...

  1. What Are Sprains and Strains?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sprain, one or more ligaments is stretched or torn. What Causes a Sprain? Where Do Sprains Usually ... strain, a muscle or tendon is stretched or torn. What Causes Strains? A strain is caused by ...

  2. Lisfranc (Midfoot) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... broken or ligaments that support the midfoot are torn. The severity of the injury can vary from ... bones are broken (fractured) or the ligaments are torn (ruptured). Injuries can vary, from a simple injury ...

  3. The Bio-accessibility of Synthetic Fe-Organo Complexes in Subsurface Soil with Elevated Temperature: a Proxy for the Vulnerability of Mineral Associated Carbon to Warming Rachel C. Porras, Peter S. Nico, and Margaret Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, R. C.; Hicks Pries, C.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, subsurface soils (>30 cm) represent an important reservoir of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the vulnerability of this deep SOC and, in particular mineral-associated SOC, to warming, and its potential to amplify the effects of climate change is highly uncertain. To gain insight into the bio-accessibility and temperature sensitivity of mineral-associated organic C, we conducted a series of incubations using soils collected from three depths (0-10, 50-60, and 80-90 cm) under coniferous forest. The soils are moderately acidic (mean pH=6.5) sandy, mixed, mesic Ultic Haploxeralfs. To understand how mechanisms controlling SOC bio-accessibilty or temperature sensitivity differ with depth and with the properties of Fe-organo complexes (i.e.,degree of crystallinity, amount of reactive surface area, or surface saturation), we used a 13C labeled glucose substrate to prepare synthetic Fe-organo complexes spanning a range of crystallinity and mineral surface saturation. The synthetic Fe-organo complexes were then added to soil from three depths. The soils containing the 13C labeled Fe-organo adduct were incubated at two temperatures (ambient and +4°C) and respired 13CO2 was measured and used to estimate flux rates. Differences in measured 13CO2 fluxes as a function of depth, surface loading, and mineral properties are discussed in terms of their implications for the temperature sensitivity of mineral protected organic carbon in subsurface soils.

  4. [The quarrel of 1843 on the "relationship between the physical and the moral" in the causes of insanity].

    PubMed

    Carbonel, Frederic

    2010-12-01

    Moreau de Jonnès, in his statistical Documents on France, published in 1835, and in his Statistics of the Insane, recorded "idiocy" and "epilepsy" among the physical causes of insanity. In contrast, Parchappe held that "epilepsy" and "idiocy "constituted" in no way, real causes" of insanity. They were singular diseases, different from "madness". Their "cause" was "an imperfection of organization, and this is an essential cause", he emphasized, that was purely organic and physiological. During this quarrel, which occurred in 1843, Dr Parchappe wanted to make a clean sweep of medical data which did not differentiate sufficiently between the "moral" and "physical" causes of insanity.

  5. 40 CFR 63.11468 - What are the monitoring requirements for new and existing sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) using EPA Method 22 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7). (b) If the results of the visual inspection or VE... baghouse, including but not limited to air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other...) Inspecting the fabric filter for air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition...

  6. 40 CFR 63.11468 - What are the monitoring requirements for new and existing sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) using EPA Method 22 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7). (b) If the results of the visual inspection or VE... baghouse, including but not limited to air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other...) Inspecting the fabric filter for air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition...

  7. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Mar. 01, 2016 How does a detached or torn retina affect your vision? If a retinal tear is occurring, you may ...

  8. 124. Historic American Buildings Survey R.A. Waugh, Photographer October 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. Historic American Buildings Survey R.A. Waugh, Photographer October 1936 CHAIR RAIL FOUND AS HOUSE WAS BEING TORN DOWN - Colonel Paul Wentworth House, Dover Street (moved to MA, Dover), Dover, Strafford County, NH

  9. 123. Historic American Buildings Survey R.A. Waugh, Photographer October 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. Historic American Buildings Survey R.A. Waugh, Photographer October 1936 LOOM STRETCHER FOUND AS HOUSE WAS BEING TORN DOWN - Colonel Paul Wentworth House, Dover Street (moved to MA, Dover), Dover, Strafford County, NH

  10. Art Experiences for Young Children with Severe Visual Imapairments: Report from the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Anna M.

    1987-01-01

    Ten guidelines are offered for providing art experiences for blind young children include adding sound, smell, or taste whenever possible. Suggested activities include making styrofoam-toothpick sculptures, box sculptures, tape and feather collages, torn paper collages, and fingerpaintings. (DB)

  11. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  12. 3 CFR 8986 - Proclamation 8986 of May 24, 2013. National Hurricane Preparedness Week, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...—great cities plunged into darkness, homes swept away with the tide, families whose worlds were torn... most importantly, discussing what to do in a disaster and developing a plan that everyone knows. If...

  13. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... BACK PAIN? There are many possible causes of low back pain, including stretched (strained) muscles, torn or stretched (sprained) ... appear to be at an increased risk for low back pain in comparison to the general population (estimates range ...

  14. Nausea and Vomiting (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. Mental changes. Loss of appetite . Malnutrition . Dehydration . A torn esophagus. Broken bones. Reopening of ... motion sickness. A history of morning sickness. Dehydration . Malnutrition . Recent surgery . Radiation therapy . Patients who have acute ...

  15. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Perry E. Borchers, Photographer, 1953 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Perry E. Borchers, Photographer, 1953 VIEW DURING RECONSTRUCTION SHOWING ALTAR END OF OLD BUILDING TORN AWAY. - Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains, Eighth & Plum Streets, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH

  16. Afghanistan: NGOs and Women in the Front Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Chris

    1998-01-01

    In conflict-torn Afghanistan, international nongovernmental organizations are attempting to build indigenous capacity for development. Strategies include support for women, involvement of local elders, and integration of internal and external value systems. (SK)

  17. 134. Historic American Buildings Survey R.A. WAUGH, Photographer October 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    134. Historic American Buildings Survey R.A. WAUGH, Photographer October 1936 ELEVATION 1st. FLOOR WEST FIREPLACE AS IT WAS BEING TORN OUT - Colonel Paul Wentworth House, Dover Street (moved to MA, Dover), Dover, Strafford County, NH

  18. 6. Southwest corner of Monadnock Mill Overseer's House. There were ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Southwest corner of Monadnock Mill Overseer's House. There were originally two of these structures. The other one was torn down in 1976. - Monadnock Mills, 15 Water Street, Claremont, Sullivan County, NH

  19. 142. Historic American Buildings Survey R.A. Waugh, Photographer October 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    142. Historic American Buildings Survey R.A. Waugh, Photographer October 1936 LEAN-TO OVENS-SECTION WITH FRONT WALL TORN DOWN - Colonel Paul Wentworth House, Dover Street (moved to MA, Dover), Dover, Strafford County, NH

  20. Shoulder Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... bursitis, torn rotator cuffs, frozen shoulder, fractures and arthritis. Usually shoulder problems are treated with RICE. This stands for Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. Other treatments include exercise, medicines to reduce pain and swelling, and surgery ...

  1. Leg pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - leg; Aches - leg; Cramps - leg ... Leg pain can be due to a muscle cramp (also called a charley horse ). Common causes of ... a long time An injury can also cause leg pain from: A torn or overstretched muscle ( strain ) ...

  2. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  3. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  4. 7 CFR 51.3064 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... appearance is materially affected; (b) Pulled stems when the exposed stem cavity is excessively deep, or when skin surrounding the stem cavity is more than slightly torn; (c) Russeting or similar...

  5. Engorgement

    MedlinePlus

    ... that many breastfeeding women have found effective involves cabbage. Clean, refrigerated cabbage leaves can be either torn into smaller pieces ... first. Held in place by the bra, the cabbage is left against the breast as desired or ...

  6. Insufficient cervix

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following problems are more likely to occur: Miscarriage in the 2nd trimester Labor begins too early, ... torn cervix from an earlier birth Having past miscarriages by the 4th month Having past late-term ...

  7. A Novel Arthroscopic Inside-Out Repair Technique for PASTA Lesions.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Lindsey S; Cooper, Anna R; Elfar, John C

    2014-10-01

    There is no current consensus in the literature on the optimal technique for surgical treatment of partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA) lesions, although most techniques described to date require takedown of the partially torn tendon or passage of an anchor through the already damaged tendon. We describe a novel inside-out repair technique for partial articular surface supraspinatus tears that does not require further disruption of the partially torn tendon by passage of an anchor. PMID:25473607

  8. A Novel Arthroscopic Inside-Out Repair Technique for PASTA Lesions.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Lindsey S; Cooper, Anna R; Elfar, John C

    2014-10-01

    There is no current consensus in the literature on the optimal technique for surgical treatment of partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA) lesions, although most techniques described to date require takedown of the partially torn tendon or passage of an anchor through the already damaged tendon. We describe a novel inside-out repair technique for partial articular surface supraspinatus tears that does not require further disruption of the partially torn tendon by passage of an anchor.

  9. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F.; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  10. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles.

    PubMed

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  11. Sonographic diagnosis of an acute Stener lesion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Ross; Welk, Aaron B; Battaglia, Patrick J; Scali, Frank; Nunez, Mero; Kettner, Norman W

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the use of diagnostic ultrasound to diagnose a Stener lesion in a patient who presented for conservative care of thumb pain following a fall on an outstretched hand. Conventional radiographic images demonstrated an avulsion fracture at the ulnar aspect of the base of the first proximal phalanx. Diagnostic ultrasound revealed a torn ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb that was displaced proximal to the adductor aponeurosis, consistent with a Stener lesion. Dynamic imaging with ultrasound confirmed displacement of the fully torn ligament. Surgical repair followed the diagnosis. Diagnostic ultrasound in this case provided an accurate diagnosis obviating further imaging. This allowed an optimal outcome due to early intervention.

  12. Editorial Commentary: Ligamentum Teres Tears and Femoroacetabular Impingement: Complex Coexistence of Impingement and Instability.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    In a large Level IV case series of 2,213 hip arthroscopies with the diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement, the intraoperative status of the ligamentum teres (LT) was recorded as normal in 11%, frayed and/or partially torn in 88%, and completely torn in 1.5% of hips. Although specific physical examination maneuvers for detecting LT tears were not available early in the study period, thus limiting a detailed assessment of such tests, the authors identified that female gender, a lower lateral center edge angle, a higher Tonnis angle, and capsular laxity were all associated with complete LT tears. This study further supports the complex coexistence of impingement and instability.

  13. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 15, 1935 LOOKING SOUTH IN CROSS HALL AT REAR OF MAIN HALL, SHOWING STONE ALTAR AND DOOR TORN OPEN BY THE FED. TROOPS DURING THE WAR - Colonel Goodloe House, Tuscumbia, Colbert County, AL

  14. Achieving Synergies through Generic Skills: A Strength of Online Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, Barnard; Brook, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Educators are often torn between impositions of the institution in which they work and the imperatives of their individual courses or units and the impact this tension might have on student satisfaction with the learning experience. It is common to hear that students must graduate with multiple generic attributes or skills, yet these skills may…

  15. The War in Man; Media and Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsen, Frederick D.; Bret, Jane

    The authors present a picture of contemporary man torn by conflicting forces, caught in a psychic house divided against itself, a victim of war between media and machines. Machines, they state, represent the rationalistic tradition which has brought man to the brink of psychic and social disaster. The media they see as offering hope--true…

  16. Engulfed in Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torricelli, Graciela D.

    1975-01-01

    Although women are gaining the rights to higher education and to employment in the professions they are still expected to care unfailingly for home and family. Women are torn between their professional lives and their domestic lives. Middle class women free from class obligations must help the less fortunate women. (MR)

  17. Who Cares about One Blood in This Global Society? A Qualitative Study of South Korea's Reunification Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Yoo Jin

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examined South Korean teenagers' views on North Korea and possible reunification. In-depth interviews conducted with fourteen (14) South Korean high school students reported that these teenagers were torn about whether or not they should support reunification. While students acknowledged the lack of dialogue and discussion…

  18. A Structuration Theory Analysis of the Refugee Action Support Program in Greater Western Sydney

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Loshini

    2009-01-01

    This article uses Gidden's structuration theory to analyse the Refugee Action Support program in Greater Western Sydney. The study shows that many refugee students in Australian high schools experience difficulty with academic transition in mainstream classrooms due to their previous experiences in war-torn countries. As a result of the trauma…

  19. Khmer American: Identity and Moral Education in a Diasporic Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Hefner, Nancy J.

    This book describes the immigration of tens of thousands of Cambodian refugees to the United States from their war-torn country in the early 1980s, highlighting the efforts of Khmer Americans to recreate the fabric of culture and identity in the aftermath of the Khmer holocaust. Based on long-term research among Cambodians residing in metropolitan…

  20. Falling into Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity that connects art, science, and nature in which elementary school students learn about deciduous trees. Explains that students create a torn-tissue collage, using fall colors for a background and drawing a silhouette of a tree without leaves on top of the background with black crayon. (CMK)

  1. Creative Expression Workshops for Immigrant and Refugee Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Cecile; Singh, Abha; Lacroix, Louise; Bagilishya, Deogratias; Measham, Toby

    2004-01-01

    The number of immigrant and refugee children coming from war-torn countries is increasing in North America. Over the past decades, creative expression activities have been increasingly recognized as a useful way to work with migrant and refugee children. These activities have been used to help them to construct meaning, to structure identity, and…

  2. A Developmental Model of Reading Acquisition Based upon Early Scaffolding Errors and Subsequent Vowel Inferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Robert; Stuart, Morag

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the processes that predict reading acquisition. Associations between (a) scaffolding errors (e.g., "torn" misread as "town" or "tarn"), other reading errors, and later reading and (b) vowel and rime inferences and later reading were explored. To assess both of these issues, 50 6-year-old children were shown a number of CVC…

  3. Conflicts between On-Task and Off-Task Behaviors in the Classroom: The Influences of Parental Monitoring, Peer Value Orientations, Students' Goals, and Their Value Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilian, Britta; Hofer, Manfred; Kuhnle, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Students in class are sometimes torn between following the lesson and engaging in off-task behavior. In this paper, instead of classifying it as a form of deviant behavior, off-task behavior is reconstructed as a manifestation of students multiple motivations in the classroom. The study examines whether parental monitoring, peer value…

  4. Curls of My Dreams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art activity in which students draw ribbons (thin watercolor paper that, when torn, will stand up in a curling fashion). Explains in detail the assignment in which students used pencil rendering or charcoal pencil depending on the type of paper used for the assignment. (CMK)

  5. It's a Wrap! A Study of Installations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project for junior and senior high school students called the wrapped chair project where students wrapped chairs using torn sheets in the style of artists, Christo Javacheff and Jeanne-Claude de-Guillebon. Explains that students created thumbnail sketches and drew their finished drawing in either charcoal or chalk. (CMK)

  6. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  7. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse

    SciTech Connect

    D. Egan

    2010-04-14

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  8. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema

    Hubbard, Susan

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  9. Prophetic Pragmatism? Post-Conflict Educational Development in Aceh and Mindanao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Jeffrey Ayala

    2009-01-01

    This essay critically examines the relevance of Cornel West's (1989) conception of "prophetic pragmatism" as a theoretical framework for educational development in post-conflict settings torn by religious, socioeconomic, and cultural tensions. It examines the concept through the conflict and post-conflict experiences of the Indonesian province of…

  10. "This Is Why We Need a GSA"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilman, Carrie

    2007-01-01

    For several weeks last spring, fliers announcing Sennett Middle School's Gay-Straight Alliance were torn from the hallways, revealing a hidden message to the culprits about why the club was important in the first place. Safe spaces can be hard to come by when you are a middle school student, especially if you are lesbian, gay, bisexual or…

  11. Helping Immigrant and Refugee Students Succeed: It's Not Just What Happens in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugler, Eileen Gale; Price, Olga Acosta

    2009-01-01

    A child who seems disinterested may actually be depressed, living with parents who themselves are disengaged and depressed as they struggle to adjust. A student with violent outbursts, who might just appear undisciplined, can be reliving the emotion of a turbulent event in a war-torn country, experiencing a heightened "flight or fight" response.…

  12. Balfour's Mission to Palestine: Science, Strategy, and the Inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macleod, Roy

    2008-01-01

    In 1925, A.J. Balfour, first Earl Balfour and author of the famous "Balfour Declaration", attended the inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. His education and experience of foreign policy equipped him to take a prominent role. However, the conditions of strife-torn Palestine weighed heavily upon him, and raised wider interests of…

  13. Demanding Divestment from Sudan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asquith, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Bowing to student demands to "stop supporting genocide," the University of California regents voted earlier this year to divest millions of dollars from companies working in the war-torn African nation of Sudan, the first major public university in the nation to take such action. Since student protests on the subject began at Harvard University in…

  14. Humanizing the Data Processor and His Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Jim

    The modern educator works in a society threatened by several potential revolutions and torn by the conflict between the philosophies of materialism and humanism. In this situation the data processor has a unique opportunity to contribute to educational efficiency and to human harmony, provided he adopts certain premises and procedures. Regarding…

  15. Black Bodies, White Rural Spaces: Disturbing Practices of Unbelonging for "Refugee" Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgeworth, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    In global times, when the forced migration of refugees from war-torn countries like Sudan impacts the demography of once ethnically homogenous schooling spaces, I consider the need to better understand the geographical making of racism. This article explores the lived experience of two newly arrived Sudanese students studying at a rural high…

  16. The Russian Federation Islamic Republic of Dagestan: Curricular Decentralization, Social Cohesion, and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Jana Sackman

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the curricular decentralization-sociopolitical stability nexus in the predominantly Muslim Russian Federation Republic of Dagestan, adjacent to war-torn Chechnya. Concomitant with the metamorphoses taking place in the economic and political sectors of society is the overhaul of institutionalized education. A major reform…

  17. Education in North Yemen: Problems and Hopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saif, Philip S.

    The background of the educational system in North Yemen is reviewed and some of the problems facing the system are described. The findings from examining documents and on-site visitations are summarized as follows: (1) the view is confirmed that developing countries with long history and cultural heritage are torn between keeping their traditions…

  18. Contradictions in Girls' Education in a Post-Conflict Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharkey, Donna

    2008-01-01

    It is broadly assumed that following armed conflict, education is a crucial means to support the transformation of society from war-torn to reconstructed. In spite of this, it is often the case that girls face considerable in-school challenges. Using a social ecological framework, this article examines these challenges for a cohort of adolescent…

  19. An American Montessori Teacher's Experience in Sri Lanka

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Irene

    2006-01-01

    What can Montessorians learn from teaching in a war-torn country, and what can they hope to share with others in the process? These questions were much on the author's mind when she went to Sri Lanka in the summer of 2003. This article contains excerpts from e-mails the author sent home, chronicling her experience teaching two high school English…

  20. Black, White and Red All Over.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a short art assignment that stresses basic design principles for students in elementary through secondary education. States that students receive four pieces of paper, use one for background, and the others are cut or torn into different shapes. Explains that the students create compositions using asymmetrical balance. (CMK)

  1. Acculturation Factors that Influence Mexican American Students and Their Success in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Dorothy K.

    2008-01-01

    Mexican American adolescents are now the largest linguistically and culturally diverse ethnic group in our schools today. Acculturation difficulties of adapting to a new culture may effect adolescent achievement in school. Mexican American adolescents may be torn between their ethnic heritage and the culture of the U.S. They must master a new…

  2. A Community of Caring: Reaching Out to the Children of Kosovo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Reports on an educator's mission to examine the status of young children and early childhood education in war-torn Kosovo. Relates the story of a 10-year-old girl and her family during and after the hostilities. Describes relief efforts of Americans and American organizations, particularly Mercy Corps International, Children's Resources…

  3. Technology in Support of Middle Grade Mathematics: What Have We Learned?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrero, Shannon; Walker, Norman; Dugdale, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Use of technology in middle grade mathematics is controversial. Major policy documents have teachers torn between enthusiasm for technology-facilitated mathematical investigation and cautions about undermining students' computational skills. This article examines research concerning use of computers and calculators in mathematics at the middle…

  4. Beyond "Culture Clash" Understandings of Immigrant Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Bic

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the ways in which the experiences of immigrant youth and families in U.S. schools and society have been conceptualized primarily as conflicts between immigrant cultures and dominant U.S. culture. Exemplified by the discourse of culture clash or of immigrants being torn between two worlds, this prevalent understanding…

  5. Keeping the Bar Low: Why Russia's Nonresident Fathers Accept Narrow Fatherhood Ideals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utrata, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Although most Russian nonresident fathers feel torn between old and new ideals of fatherhood, they end up accepting older, narrow ideals. Fathers reproduce the dominant gender discourse, which deems men irresponsible and infantile and diminishes the importance of fathers. On the basis of extensive fieldwork, including in-depth interviews (N = 21)…

  6. Children, Education and War: Reaching Education for All (EFA) Objectives in Countries Affected by Conflict. Conflict Prevention and Reconstruction Unit Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Marc

    Conflict's path of devastation and chaos has dramatically slowed the ability of war-torn countries to reach the Education for All (EFA) goals adopted in Dakar (April 2000). This paper describes the situation confronting children, their families, and governments in conflict countries and describes the challenges of reaching universal primary…

  7. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... torn rotator cuff is usually successful in relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure may not always return strength to ... may not fully heal. Stiffness, weakness, and chronic pain may still be ... are not followed. Older patients (over age 65). Smoking.

  8. 7 CFR 51.2657 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2657 Serious damage. Serious damage means any... healed; (d) Cracks which are not well healed; and, (e) Pulled stems with skin or flesh of cherry torn or which causes the cherry to leak....

  9. Parents Can Guide Children through the World of Two Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasi, Mary Jane

    2005-01-01

    Many parents in the United States who speak and value a language other than English feel torn-between wanting their children to develop age-appropriate fluency and literacy in the language of their heritage, and wanting their children to acquire English as quickly and flawlessly as possible. When parents support communication in and acquisition of…

  10. Last Call

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    From the bleached blond hair with black tips to the intentionally torn clothes to the tattoo on her arm, Annie looked and acted like a rebel from the first day she set foot in the author's literature classroom. In this article, the author describes how the journal for literature class had been instrumental in finding out about Annie's life and how…

  11. Rotator Cuff Damage: Reexamining the Causes and Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1988-01-01

    Sports medicine specialists are beginning to reexamine the causes and treatments of rotator cuff problems, questioning the role of primary impingement in a deficient or torn cuff and trying new surgical procedures as alternatives to the traditional open acromioplasty. (Author/CB)

  12. 18. View from East Rock, c. 1920 Photocopied from a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View from East Rock, c. 1920 Photocopied from a print from glass negative no. 6476 by Thomas S. Bronson, NHCHSL. An aerial view of the armory site evidently after the row of stone houses for married employees had been torn down. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  13. Somalia: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on Conoco which completed its second well and prepared to drill a third on three blocks. Pecten and Mobil signed a joint venture agreement to explore a 14.9-million-ac block offshore. Most drilling plans were delayed following intensification of fighting in the civil war-torn country.

  14. One-Shot Library Instruction and Cambourne's Theory of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masuchika, Glenn Norio; Boldt, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Librarians who teach one-shot library instruction classes (one-time, one- to three-hour classes to students who are assumed to be novice researchers) are often torn between two pedagogic approaches: a "critical mass" pedagogy emphasizing a minimum amount of databases that must be introduced with little time for student searching, and a…

  15. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  16. Urethral substitution with ileum in traumatic bladder neck-vagina fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kannaiyan, Lavanya; Sen, Sudipta

    2009-01-01

    A five-year-old girl presented with post traumatic urinary incontinence secondary to rupture of the bladder neck into the vagina. Operative repair included a midline exposure with resection of the symphysis pubis, separation of the bladder neck from the vagina, repair of the torn bladder neck and urethral substitution with ileum. Normal continence and voiding was achieved. PMID:20671853

  17. Chemical modulation of agonistic display in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, D W; Bronstein, P M; Bonventre, J

    1976-02-01

    Mirror-induced aggressive display of male Siamese fighting fish was reduced by water-borne traces of (a) a pair of male combatants, (b) a nondisplaying fish of either sex, and (c) bits of torn cadual fin. These findings may indicate a mechanism whereby males tolerate the presence of conspecifics to permit nonagressive social interactions.

  18. Other Causes of Leg Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the same position for a long time Injuries caused by: A torn or overstretched muscle (strain) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon (tendinitis) Shin splints—pain in the front of your leg related to overuse or repetitive pounding Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , which occurs when ...

  19. Congo: Elections and the Battle for Mineral Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Twenty million voters cast ballots July 30, 2006, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo's first free election since 1960. A runoff election three months later, between transitional president Joseph Kabila and transitional vice president Jean-Pierre Bemba, gave Kabila a mandate to lead the war-torn nation for five more years. The elections, in…

  20. Funny Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Presents a torn-paper and gadget-print activity for younger students, specifically pre-kindergarten to first grade, that can be done any time over the school year or at Halloween. Discusses how the students create their funny faces and lists the materials needed. (CMK)

  1. Steal These Ideas! Winning Activities from Real Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several winning activities for students in the classroom. These activities include: (1) making Abraham Lincoln costumes; (2) creating frosty scenes from torn-paper collage for a grammar activity; (3) listening to Dr. Martin Luther King's "I have a Dream" speech; (4) hosting an architectural challenge for a kindergarten class;…

  2. Picture Books and the Art of Collage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prudhoe, Catherine M.

    2003-01-01

    Explores how teachers can use picture book illustrations to teach children the art of collage. Focuses on three children's picture books and offers art activities showcasing three collage techniques: (1) cut and torn paper collage; (2) photomontage; and (3) texture collages and collage constructions. Relates each activity to the National Standards…

  3. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  4. Pesticides detected in surface waters and fish of the Red River of the North drainage basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    Pesticide data have been collected in the Red River Basin by various Federal, State, and local agencies. Tornes and Brigham (1994) recently summarized many of these historical data. This paper summarizes selected data collected as part of the NAWQA program during 1992-93, and briefly compares these data to historical data and to pesticide usage.

  5. [100th anniversary of the Oskar-Helene-Heim - an obituary].

    PubMed

    Jüttemann, A

    2014-12-01

    The Oskar-Helene-Heim is one of the birthplaces of German orthopaedic clinics. The clinic was demolished in winter 2013/2014. Almost all of the historic buildings of the traditional specialist hospital in south-west Berlin were torn down in in the preparation for a housing project. The history of this facility is briefly described in this article. PMID:25531517

  6. 7 CFR 457.139 - Fresh market tomato (dollar plan) crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... tomato—A tomato that: (1) Has a glossy waxy skin that cannot be torn by scraping; (2) Has well-formed... tomatoes must be planted to be considered fall, winter or spring-planted tomatoes. Potential production—The...-irrigated practices are not applicable. 3. Amounts of Insurance and Production Stages (a) In addition to...

  7. Of people, particles and prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Penny; Greene, Anne; Mears, Matt; Spacecadet1; Green, Christian; Hunt, Devin J.; Berglyd Olsen, Veronica K.; Ilya, Komarov; Pierpont, Elaine; Gillman, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    In reply to Louise Mayor's feature article “Where people and particles collide”, about the experiences of researchers at CERN who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), efforts to make LGBT CERN an officially recognized club, and incidents where posters advertising the club have been torn down or defaced (March pp31-36, http://ow.ly/YVP2Z).

  8. Smashing Cosmopolitanism: The Neo-Liberal Destruction of Cosmopolitan Education in East-Central Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imre, Robert J.; Millei, Zsuzsa

    2009-01-01

    Critiques that seek to examine cosmopolitanism as a concept suffer from a severe popularity problem. Rather than engage in this pro/con debate, we are interested in demonstrating that cosmopolitanism can wax and wane, ebb and flow, and has appeared as a grounding ideology for educational programs before, only to be torn asunder by those seeking to…

  9. From Cambodians to Bosnians: Interventions for Refugee Families Suffering from War Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Roger; Yuen, Francis K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Provides impressionistic reflection of how human service agencies in San Jose, California have helped refugee families from war-torn Cambodia and Bosnia. Summarizes some of the lessons learned from working with refugee families. Notes that the experiences have influenced the capacity- building, empowering, and mentoring aspects of a new…

  10. Preparing Pre-Service Teachers for Multicultural Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Premier, Jessica Aimee; Miller, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Cultural diversity is evident throughout schools in Victoria, Australia. Many students are new arrivals from war-torn countries including Sudan, Afghanistan and Iraq. To what extent do teacher training courses in Victoria prepare pre-service teachers to cater for the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students? This paper…

  11. Looking at Racial Segregation: An Exploratory Case Study of a Predominately Somali Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, a group of concerned parents who had arrived in the United States as refugees from war-torn Somalia received approval from their local school district to establish the Iftin Charter School (ICS). The K-8 school continues to engender hope and intellectual strength in its students and parents. ICS finds itself uniquely equipped to meet the…

  12. A Role for English Language Teachers in Trauma Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medley, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Because English language teachers should take into account the social-psychological situation of the students they teach, they must be sensitive to the effects of traumatic stress among learners. Refugee and immigrant children are frequently survivors of trauma, along with their peers in crisis-torn English as a foreign language settings around…

  13. Posttraumatic Psychological Distress and Resettlement: The Need for a Different Practice in Assisting Refugee Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacroix, Marie; Sabbah, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Social work practitioners are increasingly confronted with couples and families who have come from war-torn countries. Refugees may have experienced genocide, organized violence, ethnic wars, displacement, and losses of various kinds. Such experiences will often be carried through the post-migratory period and obscure legitimate individual and…

  14. Of people, particles and prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Penny; Greene, Anne; Mears, Matt; Spacecadet1; Green, Christian; Hunt, Devin J.; Berglyd Olsen, Veronica K.; Ilya, Komarov; Pierpont, Elaine; Gillman, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    In reply to Louise Mayor's feature article “Where people and particles collide”, about the experiences of researchers at CERN who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), efforts to make LGBT CERN an officially recognized club, and incidents where posters advertising the club have been torn down or defaced (March pp31–36, http://ow.ly/YVP2Z).

  15. Themes and Symbols in Two Plays by LeRoi Jones: "The Baptism" and "The Toilet"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mootry, Maria K.

    1969-01-01

    Shows the dramatization of a dichotomy in attitudes toward the Church among Black people in the play The Baptism", and the dilemma of a young Black man torn between the code of violence of his Black friends and the more socially acceptable ways of his white friends in the play The Toilet". (KG)

  16. Electrocardiogram, heart movement and heart rate in the awake gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia).

    PubMed

    Germer, Carina M; Tomaz, Juliana M; Carvalho, Ana F; Bassani, Rosana A; Bassani, José W M

    2015-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is the simplest and most effective non-invasive method to assess the electrical activity of the heart and to obtain information on the heart rate (HR) and rhythm. Because information on the HR of very small reptiles (body mass <10 g) is still scarce in the literature, in the present work we describe a procedure for recording the ECG in non-anesthetized geckos (Hemidactylus mabouia, Moreau de Jonnès, 1818) under different conditions, namely manual restraint (MR), spontaneous tonic immobility (TI), and in the non-restrained condition (NR). In the gecko ECG, the P, QRS and T waves were clearly distinguishable. The HR was 2.83 ± 0.02 Hz under MR, which was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than the HR under the TI (1.65 ± 0.09 Hz) and NR (1.60 ± 0.10 Hz) conditions. Spontaneously beating isolated gecko hearts contracted at 0.84 ± 0.03 Hz. The in vitro beating rate was affected in a concentration-dependent fashion by adrenoceptor stimulation with noradrenaline, as well as by the muscarinic cholinergic agonist carbachol, which produced significant positive and negative chronotropic effects, respectively (p < 0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first report on the ECG morphology and HR values in geckos, particularly under TI. The methodology and instrumentation developed here are useful for non-invasive in vivo physiological and pharmacological studies in small reptiles without the need of physical restraint or anesthesia.

  17. Enhanced Bone-Tendon-Bone Approach for Open Anterior Cruciate Ligament Replacement With Conservation of the Joint Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Sebastian Gottfried; Thomas, Tom Sascha; Tafuro, Luca; Thomas, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic procedures for ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common standard. However, there are strong alternatives to this standard. The purpose of this study is to present a precise, fast, and minimally invasive but open procedure for reconstruction of the ruptured ACL. The torn ACL is substituted by a widely used bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autograft. After the BPTB graft has been harvested, the Hoffa body is exposed and mobilized ventrally. The surgeon then has a free view of the remnants of the torn ACL, which are to be removed completely. Through the tibial and femoral footprints of the ACL, a tunnel is drilled under a direct view, thus ensuring optimal anatomic positioning of the BPTB graft. The described approach is simple in handling and advantageous because all steps are performed under a direct view, which improves overall precision and intraoperative functional control. PMID:26900562

  18. Deterioration of polymethyl methacrylate dentures in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Hanako; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Sasaki, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-made prostheses used in the oral cavity were evaluated by multimodal assessment in order to elucidate the biodeterioration of PMMA. In used dentures (UD), the micro-Vickers hardness of the polished denture surface and denture basal surface was lower than that of the torn surface (p<0.05), whereas the shaved surface approximately 100 µm from the polished surface showed a similar value to the torn surface. By contrast, there were no differences among these surfaces in new resin (NR). The volatile content of UD was higher than that of NR (p<0.05). Component analysis by ATR-FTIR showed specific spectra (1,700-1,400 cm(-1)) only in UD. This study revealed that PMMA deteriorated during long-term use in the oral cavity in terms of hardness and volatile content with component alteration, and suggests the involvement of biodeterioration, possibly due to saliva and oral microbiota.

  19. The path of ambivalence: tracing the pull of opposing evaluations using mouse trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Iris K.; van Harreveld, Frenk; Rotteveel, Mark; Topolinski, Sascha; van der Pligt, Joop; Schwarz, Norbert; Koole, Sander L.

    2015-01-01

    Ambivalence refers to a psychological conflict between opposing evaluations, often experienced as being torn between alternatives. This dynamic aspect of ambivalence is hard to capture with outcome-focused measures, such as response times or self-report. To gain more insight into ambivalence as it unfolds, the current work uses an embodied measure of pull, drawing on research in dynamic systems. In three studies, using different materials, we tracked people’s mouse movements as they chose between negative and positive evaluations of attitude objects. When participants evaluated ambivalent attitude objects, their mouse trajectories showed more pull of the non-chosen evaluative option than when they evaluated univalent attitude objects, revealing that participants were literally torn between the two opposing evaluations. We address the relationship of this dynamic measure to response time and self-reports of ambivalence and discuss implications and avenues for future research. PMID:26236267

  20. Reconstruction of recurrent diaphragmatic eventration with an elongated polytetrafluoroethylene sheet

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Masaki; Sonobe, Makoto; Bando, Toru; Date, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 31-year old woman with recurrence of left diaphragmatic eventration 3 years after a previous surgery for this condition. At the initial occurrence, she had experienced dyspnoea on exercise and subsequently underwent laparoscopic plication of the diaphragm with an endo-stapler at a local hospital. Immediately after the operation, the diaphragm was torn and the intestine entered the thorax. Therefore, plication involving sewing was performed. Then, 3 years later, the patient again experienced dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having recurrence of left diaphragmatic eventration. Observation under thoracoscopy revealed that the centre of the left diaphragm was thin but not torn. We reconstructed the left diaphragm with an elongated polytetrafluoroethylene sheet on the naïve diaphragm. The patient was discharged from our hospital 5 days after surgery. Her respiratory function improved and she has not experienced recurrence. PMID:23644727

  1. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Kim, Jin Goo; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  2. Editorial Commentary: Ligamentum Teres Tears and Femoroacetabular Impingement: Complex Coexistence of Impingement and Instability.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    In a large Level IV case series of 2,213 hip arthroscopies with the diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement, the intraoperative status of the ligamentum teres (LT) was recorded as normal in 11%, frayed and/or partially torn in 88%, and completely torn in 1.5% of hips. Although specific physical examination maneuvers for detecting LT tears were not available early in the study period, thus limiting a detailed assessment of such tests, the authors identified that female gender, a lower lateral center edge angle, a higher Tonnis angle, and capsular laxity were all associated with complete LT tears. This study further supports the complex coexistence of impingement and instability. PMID:27373179

  3. Sonographic diagnosis of an acute Stener lesion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Ross; Welk, Aaron B; Battaglia, Patrick J; Scali, Frank; Nunez, Mero; Kettner, Norman W

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the use of diagnostic ultrasound to diagnose a Stener lesion in a patient who presented for conservative care of thumb pain following a fall on an outstretched hand. Conventional radiographic images demonstrated an avulsion fracture at the ulnar aspect of the base of the first proximal phalanx. Diagnostic ultrasound revealed a torn ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb that was displaced proximal to the adductor aponeurosis, consistent with a Stener lesion. Dynamic imaging with ultrasound confirmed displacement of the fully torn ligament. Surgical repair followed the diagnosis. Diagnostic ultrasound in this case provided an accurate diagnosis obviating further imaging. This allowed an optimal outcome due to early intervention. PMID:27298646

  4. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Kim, Jin Goo; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus.

  5. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  6. An emergency response team for membrane repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2005-01-01

    On demand, rapid Ca(2+)-triggered homotypic and exocytic membrane-fusion events are required to repair a torn plasma membrane, and we propose that this emergency-based fusion differs fundamentally from other rapid, triggered fusion reactions. Emergency fusion might use a specialized protein and organelle emergency response team that can simultaneously promote impromptu homotypic fusion events between organelles and exocytic fusion events along the vertices between these fusion products and the plasma membrane.

  7. Horizontal and Vertical Stabilization of Acute Unstable Acromioclavicular Joint Injuries Arthroscopy-Assisted

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Sarasquete Reiriz, Juan; Besalduch, Marina; Petrica, Alexandru; Escolà, Ana; Rodriguez, Joaquim; Fallone, Jan Carlo

    2015-01-01

    We describe the technical aspects of an arthroscopy-assisted procedure indicated for the management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries, consisting of a synthetic augmentation of both the coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments, that anatomically reproduces the coracoclavicular biomechanics and offers fixation that keeps the torn ends of the ligaments facing one another, thus allowing healing of the native structures without the need for a second surgical procedure for metal hardware removal. PMID:26870653

  8. Rapid In Vivo Multicomponent T2 Mapping of Human Knee Menisci

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Samsonov, Alexey; Wilson, John J.; Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Block, Walter F.; Kijowski, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare multicomponent T2 parameters of menisci measured using Multicomponent Driven Equilibrium Single Pulse Observation of T1 and T2 (mcDESPOT) in asymptomatic volunteers and osteoarthritis (OA) patients with intact and torn menisci. Materials and Methods The prospective study was performed with Institutional Review Board approval and with all subjects signing written informed consent. mcDESPOT was performed on the knee joint of 12 asymptomatic volunteers and 14 patients with knee OA. Single-component T2 relaxation time (T2Single), T2 relaxation time of the fast relaxing water component (T2F), and the slow relaxing water component (T2S), and fraction of the fast relaxing water component (FF) of the medial and lateral menisci were measured. Multivariate linear regression models were used to compare mcDESPOT parameters between normal menisci in asymptomatic volunteers, intact menisci in OA patients, and torn menisci in OA patients with adjustment for differences in age between subjects. Results The mean mcDESPOT parameters for normal menisci in asymptomatic volunteers, intact menisci in OA patients, and torn menisci in OA patients were respectively 16.1 msec, 18.8 msec, and 22.7 msec for T2Single; 9.0 msec, 10.0 msec, and 11.1 msec for T2F; 24.4 msec, 27.7 msec, and 31.4 msec for T2S; and 34%, 32%, 27% for FF. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in T2Single, T2F, T2S, and FF between the three groups of menisci. Conclusion The menisci of OA patients had significantly higher T2Single, T2F, and T2S and significantly lower FF than normal menisci in asymptomatic volunteers with greater changes in multicomponent T2 parameters noted in torn than intact menisci in OA patients. PMID:25847733

  9. Secrets of the Soil (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Eoin; Northen, Trent; Jansson, Janet; Torn, Margaret

    2011-11-07

    Four Berkeley Lab scientists unveil the "Secrets of the Soil"at this Nov. 7, 2011 Science at the Theater event. Eoin Brodie, Janet Jansson, Margaret Torn and Trent Northen talk about their research and how soil could hold the key to our climate and energy future.The discussion was moderated by John Harte, who holds a joint professorship in the Energy and Resources Group and the Ecosystem Sciences Division of UC Berkeley's College of Natural Resources

  10. Precambrian crustal evolution in relation to geodynamics and supercontinents: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, Tamer S.; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    More than a century ago, Alfred Wegener explored the origin of continents in his work: "Die Entstehung der Kontinente" (Wegener, 1912, 1915) which provided the core idea of plate tectonics. However, significantly before this work, the idea of "continental drift" was hypothesized by Abraham Ortelius in 1596 with the suggestion that the Americas were torn away from Europe and Africa by earthquakes and floods, and that these continents were once united.

  11. Confusion about a little observatory: the history of the first high school observatory (German Title: Verwirrung um eine kleine Sternwarte: Die Geschichte der ersten Chemnitzer Schulsternwarte )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfitzner, Elvira

    By means of a small watercolor, painted by a musicologist, the existence of the highschool observatory of Chemnitz was rediscovered. The small observatory was build in 1893 by means of funds and a donation: after WW I it was also used for popular education. During Nazi times, the observatory fell into neglect, and the mechanical damage made it impossible to put it back into operation after WW II The building was torn down in 1964 and forgotten.

  12. Blowing DNA bubbles.

    PubMed

    Severin, N; Zhuang, W; Ecker, C; Kalachev, A A; Sokolov, I M; Rabe, J P

    2006-11-01

    We report here experimental observations which indicate that topologically or covalently formed polymer loops embedded in an ultrathin liquid film on a solid substrate can be "blown" into circular "bubbles" during scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging. In particular, supercoiled vector DNA has been unraveled, moved, stretched, and overstretched to two times its B-form length and then torn apart. We attribute the blowing of the DNA bubbles to the interaction of the tapping SFM tip with the ultrathin liquid film.

  13. China`s quest for security in the post cold war world. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.S.

    1996-07-29

    The author argues that despite all the estimates that the post-Tiananmen People`s Republic of China is about to take the stage as a world power, the reality is far different. He believes that China, in fact, is a weak nation torn by internal economic and environmental problems. The author asserts that its communist leadership is desperately trying to put the democracy genie back in its bottle even while supporting a Leninist-capitalist economic approach which, ultimately, cannot succeed.

  14. "Construction of new library in 1963". Photo no. 7. Administration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "Construction of new library in 1963". Photo no. 7. Administration Building, north part of west front, showing chimney, iron gates, and art stone, decoration of the main entrance. Note also the difference between the ground floor and second floor windows. Original print size 11x14 inches, torn at top center. - San Bernardino Valley College, Classics Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Phantom energy accretion onto black holes in a cyclic universe

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Chengyi

    2008-09-15

    Black holes pose a serious problem in cyclic or oscillating cosmology. It is speculated that, in the cyclic universe with phantom turnarounds, black holes will be torn apart by phantom energy prior to turnaround before they can create any problems. In this paper, using the mechanism of phantom accretion onto black holes, we find that black holes do not disappear before phantom turnaround. But the remanent black holes will not cause any problems due to Hawking evaporation.

  16. Strip of heat-recoverable articles

    SciTech Connect

    McLoughlin, R.H.; Kirkham, S.W.

    1985-01-29

    A strip of hollow heat-recoverable articles formed side-by-side by tear welding two lengths of polymeric material together at intervals so that individual articles may be torn off. A preferred method of making the strip involves cross-linking after the tear welding, heating the strip, and inflating the hollow articles to render them heat-recoverable by introducing pressure via an interconnecting passage formed for that purpose during the tear welding.

  17. "A Bldg. 1960's". Photo no. 670. Administration Building, north part ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "A Bldg. 1960's". Photo no. 670. Administration Building, north part of west front, showing chimney, iron gates, and art stone decoration of the main entrance. Note also the difference between the ground floor and second floor windows. Original print size 11x14 inches, torn at top center. - San Bernardino Valley College, Classics Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  18. Galaxy disruption in a halo of dark matter.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Duncan A; Beasley, Michael A; Bekki, Kenji; Brodie, Jean P; Strader, Jay

    2003-08-29

    The relics of disrupted satellite galaxies have been found around the Milky Way and Andromeda, but direct evidence of a satellite galaxy in the early stages of disruption has remained elusive. We have discovered a dwarf satellite galaxy in the process of being torn apart by gravitational tidal forces as it merges with a larger galaxy's dark matter halo. Our results illustrate the morphological transformation of dwarf galaxies by tidal interaction and the continued buildup of galaxy halos.

  19. Isometric immersions, energy minimization and self-similar buckling in non-Euclidean elastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John; Sharon, Eran; Shearman, Toby; Venkataramani, Shankar C.

    2016-04-01

    The edges of torn plastic sheets and growing leaves often display hierarchical buckling patterns. We show that this complex morphology i) emerges even in zero strain configurations, and ii) is driven by a competition between the two principal curvatures, rather than between bending and stretching. We identify the key role of branch point (or “monkey saddle”) singularities in generating complex wrinkling patterns in isometric immersions, and show how they arise naturally from minimizing the elastic energy.

  20. Atlantic brant--human commensalism on eelgrass beds in New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, R.E.; Obrecht, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    Atlantic Brant Branta bernicla hrota in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey, have established a commensal feeding relationship with man. Small flocks feed 3-5 m from clam fishermen on Zostera torn from the sea bottom by the fishing activities. Background material on the availability and digestibility of different brant foods is presented. This commensalism gives the Brant an efficient food gathering opportunity and permits them to exploit Zostera which might otherwise be unavailable to them.

  1. Skylab 2 Farewell View from the Departing Skylab Command/Service Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This overhead view of the Skylab Space Station was taken from the Departing Skylab Command/Service Module during the Skylab 2's final fly-around inspection. The single solar panel is quite evident as well as the parasol solar shield, rigged to replace the missing micrometeoroid shield. Both the second solar panel and the micrometeoroid shield were torn away during a mishap in the original Skylab 1 liftoff and orbital insertion.

  2. What would you do? Acute extension block caused by anterior cruciate ligament tear: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pedowitz, R A; Garrett, W E

    1996-08-01

    Acute knee locking is usually attributed to a displaced meniscus tear. This case involved late diagnosis of mechanical extension block caused by anterior displacement of a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with impingement in extension. Definitive reconstruction was delayed after debridement of the ACL stump to improve preoperative range of motion. Despite this, the patient still had difficulty regaining extension after surgery. Early treatment of mechanical extension block may facilitate motion recovery after ACL reconstruction.

  3. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke A.; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  4. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke; Korhonen, Johanna; Yasuyuki Aono,

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  5. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke A.; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality. PMID:27113125

  6. What's under the long line of heavy rocks? Waves can tell us. (Seismic tomography of the lithosphere below the Midcontinent Rift)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolin, E.

    2015-12-01

    A long long time ago, the middle of my home land started to tear. But it didn't tear all the way, and actually the torn part ended up getting pushed back together. This left a long line of heavy rocks in the top part of the ground. We don't know why the tearing stopped instead of forming a new big water place in the middle of the land. We also didn't know know if the deeper ground still looked like it was torn too, because we couldn't see it very well. We hoped by looking at the deep ground, we could figure out why the tearing stopped. I make pictures of the deep under ground places using waves that are made when the ground breaks quickly. I look at waves that go through the torn area and try to match them. I match the real waves by making my own pretend waves and changing how fast they move through the ground. After I match a lot of waves, I put them all together to make a picture that shows what's deep under ground.

  7. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320-570 years.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke A; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443-2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693-2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  8. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang-Yin Ling, Carrie; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M.; Tonks, Catherine A.; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2010-04-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment.

  9. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320-570 years.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke A; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443-2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693-2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality. PMID:27113125

  10. Pen Rearing and Imprinting of Fall Chinook Salmon, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Jerry F.; Macy, Thomas L.; Gardenier, James T.; Beeman, John W.

    1986-12-01

    Pen rearing studies during 1986 completed the second of three years intended for rearing and releasing upriver bright fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from two study sites, a backwater and a pond, adjacent to the Columbia River; both areas are located in the Jonn Day Reservoir. Results of this study in 1984 and 1985 showed that fish could be successfully reared in net pens and that growth and physiological development of the off-station reared fish proceeded at a faster rate than in fish reared at a hatchery. Transfer of fish from the hatchery to off-station sites at Social Security Pond (pond) and Rock Creek (backwater) during early March increased the period of rearing in 1986 by about four weeks. The increased period of rearing allowed all treatments of fed fish to reach a minimum weight of YU fish/lb by release. Differences in growth of fed fish between regular density treatments and additional, high density treatments (double and triple the regular densities) were not significantly different (P > 0.05), but growth of all fed fish reared off-station was again significantly better than that of hatchery reared fish (P < 0.05), Mortalities in all groups of fed fish were low. Physiological development of fed fish was similar in all treatments. At release, development of fish at Social Security Pond appeared to be somewhat ahead of fish at Rock Creek on the same dates however, none of the groups of fed fish achieved a high state of smoltification by release. Unfed fish grew poorly over the redring period, and at release were significantly smaller than either fed groups at the off-station sites, or the control groups reared at the hatchery (P < 0.05). Development of unfed fish toward smoltification was much slower than of fed fish. Mortality of all groups of unfed fish, including the barrier net, was relatively low. Health of all fish reared off-station remained good over the rearing period, and no outbreaks of disease were noted. On-site marking and

  11. Morphological observations on the diapausing blastocyst of some macropodid marsupials.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J

    1981-03-01

    Diapausing blastocysts from the uteri of females of 11 macropodid species were fixed, torn, flattened and stained for examination of the protoderm. The protoderm remained undifferentiated and unilaminar throughout diapause. The number of cells in the protoderm did not vary with age in Macropus rufus or M. eugenii. Protoderm cell number decreased slightly with age in M. rufogriseus banksianus and appeared to decrease in Potorous tridactylus. The diameter of the shell did not change appreciably with age, and the sizes of the blastocysts of different species were similar.

  12. 53. VIEW OF THE W.J. MILLER SAWMILL IN DAWSON AFTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. VIEW OF THE W.J. MILLER SAWMILL IN DAWSON AFTER FIRE DESTROYED THE MILL 1936. PHOTOGRAPH SHOWS SOME REMAINING STRUCTURES LOOKING EAST TO WEST ON SITE. LOCOMOTIVE WAS USED TO DELIVER LOGS TO I.P. MILLER SAWMILL AT WEST END OF MILL POND. BELOW LARGE BUILDING ARE TWO BAYS WHERE HOG FUEL WAS LOADED ONTO RAILROAD CARS. ON RIGHT SIDE OF LARGE STORAGE AREA. CENTER BUILDING ALONG RAILROAD IS BLACKSMITH SHOP. STRUCTURES WERE LATER TORN DOWN. PHOTOGRAPHER: UNKNOWN. DATE: 1938. COURTESY OF RALPH HULL. - Hull-Oakes Lumber Company, 23837 Dawson Road, Monroe, Benton County, OR

  13. Clinical implementation of a scrubless chlorhexidine/ethanol pre-operative surgical hand rub.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Richard; Theoret, Sylvie; Dion, Danielle; Pellerin, Michel

    2008-06-01

    The objective of surgical scrubbing is to reduce the bioburden on the hands of the surgical team in hope that if gloves are punctured or torn, the number of bacteria released at the operation site will be minimal and therefore reduce the risk of site infection. Long procedures with scrubbing and soaping can, however, be counterproductive because with repetition they tend to cause skin abrasions, damages and injuries without further reducing the risk of bacterial release. Within a general review of OR processes, it was decided to substitute to the standard surgical scrub a "new" scrubless pre-op surgical hand rub procedure. This article summarizes the results.

  14. Employee and government access to personnel files: rights and requirements.

    PubMed

    Fox, J C; Ostling, P J

    1979-01-01

    A maze of record-keeping, disclosure, and privacy statutes and regulations, with accompanying case law, have created a boom in privacy law. Employers find themselves caught in this rising tide, torn between the often conflicting requirements. The issue of access to employee files--by employees, government, and unions--is one of the most difficult issues in this complicated situation. This article discusses recent developments in the field and aims to help readers thread their way through the maze of contradictions and pitfalls confronting employers.

  15. History of Lung Diseases of Coal Miners in Great BritainPART III, 1920-1952*

    PubMed Central

    Meiklejohn, Andrew

    1952-01-01

    All sciences are connected; they lend each other material aid as parts of one great whole, each doing its own work not for itself alone but for the other parts, as the eye guides the whole body and the foot sustains it and leads it from place to place. As with an eye torn out or a foot cut off, so it is with the different departments of knowledge; none can attain its proper result separately, since all are parts of one and the same complete wisdom. ROGER BACON (1214-1294). PMID:14944741

  16. The Importance of the Intercondylar Notch in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Jaén, Tomás; López-Alcorocho, Juan Manuel; Rodriguez-Iñigo, Elena; Castellán, Fabián; Hernández, Juan Carlos; Guillén-García, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background The factors associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are not completely clear. Some studies have shown that patients with a narrow intercondylar notch have a predisposition for ACL tears. Purpose To determine the relationship between the α angle and intercondylar notch width measurements and ACL tears. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A total of 530 patients (308 with ACL rupture, 222 with healthy ACLs) were included in this study. The α angle and intercondylar width were measured from magnetic resonance images (MRIs). Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the influence of the variables on ACL status (normal or torn). Odds ratios (ORs) and their respective 95% CIs were also calculated. Results No significant differences in patient age and the affected knee were found between patients with normal or torn ACLs. The mean α angle was higher in patients with a torn ACL than in those with an intact one (57.5° ± 5.5° vs 56.2° ± 4.5°; P = .009). Intercondylar width was significantly lower in patients with a torn ACL than in those with an intact one (18.2 ± 3.1 vs 19.5 ± 3.6 mm; P < .001). A highly significant difference between men and women was found for mean intercondylar notch width (19.3 ± 3.3 vs 17.4 ± 3.1 mm; P < .001). In a logistic regression model, sex, intercondylar width, and α angle were statistically significant when adjusted for age. Conclusion Study results suggest that the ACL tears are associated with a narrow intercondylar notch and a high α angle, and that tears occur more frequently in men than in women. Clinical Relevance The model proposed in this study could be used by the physician in the medical office as a tool to identify the risk factors that may predispose a patient for a potential ACL tear. PMID:26535388

  17. Developing a concept of hope from a human science perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, C E

    2000-07-01

    This article explores concept development from a human science perspective and uses concept inventing, a method described by Parse, for developing the concept of hope as inspired by the Taiwanese folk song "Mending a Torn Fish Net." The synthesized definition is hope is resolute picturing of the possibilities amid the restrictions-opportunities of communion-aloneness while creatively metamorphosing. This definition is explicitly connected to the three principles of Parse's theory of human becoming. Reflections on research and practice are provided. PMID:11847805

  18. Application of X-ray Refraction-Contrast to Medical Joint Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shimao, Daisuke; Mori, Koichi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Ando, Masami

    2004-05-12

    The refraction-contrast X-ray imaging technique using synchrotron X-ray has been applied to an 8 mm sliced distal end of a human femur involving ligament and articular cartilage at 15 keV. It was shown that this technique can clearly depict the fine structures of the ligament, its torn surface and substantial articular cartilage at near the just Bragg angular position. The entrance surface dose necessary for each image was approximately 4 mGy by using an imaging plate. This imaging technique may become a powerful tool for depicting abnormalities of the ligament and articular cartilage.

  19. The Tunguska comet or the great Siberian mystery explosion of 1908

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1986-01-01

    The boat disintegrates, hurling men and animals into the freezing river. The farmer's shirt is scorched off his back; the tramp is blown off his feet, his ports and pans scattering like shrapnel. One of the trappers standing in the doorway of the trading post is knocked unconscious, overcome by the searing heat; the tents of the nomads are torn loose, the men and dogs inside being rolled over the ground like leaves in a gale. All that remain of the reindeer are charred carcasses. The forest has been turning into a crackling inferno, and a black fireball rises into the air. 

  20. Person-Locator System Based On Wristband Radio Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick W.; Blaes, Brent R.; Chandler, Charles W.

    1995-01-01

    Computerized system based on wristband radio frequency (RF), passive transponders is being developed for use in real-time tracking of individuals in custodial institutions like prisons and mental hospitals. Includes monitoring system that contains central computer connected to low-power, high-frequency central transceiver. Transceiver connected to miniature transceiver nodes mounted unobtrusively at known locations throughout the institution. Wristband transponders embedded in common hospital wristbands. Wristbands tamperproof: each contains embedded wire loop which, when broken or torn off and discarded, causes wristband to disappear from system, thus causing alarm. Individuals could be located in a timely fashion at relatively low cost.

  1. The Subscapularis Interlocking Stitch for the Arthroscopic Treatment of Subscapularis Tendon Tears at the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Jörn; Schwalba, Knut; Hedtmann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of subscapularis function is essential for long-term maintenance of good clinical results for both traumatic and nontraumatic rotator cuff tears. The anatomic repair of partially and completely torn tendons from the footprint at the lesser tuberosity is the goal of surgical repair. The described technique, with a combination of an interlocking stitch and additional mattress sutures using a double-loaded suture anchor, provides reduction of the retracted tendon, sufficient pullout strength, and compression of the tendon to the footprint to facilitate healing. PMID:26900550

  2. Shark skin: a function in feeding.

    PubMed

    Southall, E J; Sims, D W

    2003-08-01

    Dermal denticles are unique tooth-like structures embedded in the skin of sharks and rays that protect them from predators and ectoparasites, reduce mechanical abrasion and possibly minimize swimming-induced drag. Here, we show that juvenile lesser spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) also use this body armour to anchor food items near their tail so that bite-sized pieces can be torn away by rapid jaw and head movements. This scale-rasp behaviour is novel among fishes and suggests a new role for skin in the feeding ecology of sharks. Scale rasping may be important ecologically because it could function to increase the dietary breadth and growth potential of juveniles.

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    PubMed

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed. PMID:26545750

  4. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    PubMed

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed.

  5. All-Endoscopic Single-Row Repair of Full-Thickness Gluteus Medius Tears

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Grzybowski, Jeffrey S.; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2016-01-01

    Abductor tendon tears typically develop insidiously in middle-aged women and can lead to debilitating lateral hip pain and a Trendelenburg limp. The gluteus medius tendon is most commonly torn and may show fatty degeneration over time, similar to the rotator cuff muscles of the shoulder. Endoscopic repair offers a therapeutic alternative to traditional open techniques. This article describes the workup, examination, and endoscopic repair of a full-thickness gluteus medius tear presenting as lateral hip pain and weakness. The surgical repair for this case used a single-row suture anchor technique. In addition, the indications and technique for a double-row repair will be discussed. PMID:27073767

  6. Acute medial elbow ruptures.

    PubMed

    Norwood, L A; Shook, J A; Andrews, J R

    1981-01-01

    Disruption of the ulnar collateral ligament, flexor muscles, and anterior elbow capsule may result from valgus vector forces and subsequently cause difficulty in throwing, pulling, pushing and catching. Complete medial elbow tears were diagnosed acutely in four elbows by abduction stress tests at 15 degrees of flexion. Three elbows had associated ulnar nerve compression. We repaired torn medial structures by direct suture without ligamentous reconstruction. We also decompressed ulnar nerves and performed one anterior transposition. Full range of motion, strength, and return to previous functional level was attained without infection, neurovascular compression, or myositis ossificans.

  7. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx.

  8. The Trifid Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of the Trifid Nebula reveals a stellar nursery being torn apart by a nearby massive star. Embryonic stars are forming within an ill-fated cloud of dust and gas, which is destined to be eaten away by the glare from the massive neighbor. The cloud is about 8 light years away from the nebula' s central star. This stellar activity is a beautiful example of how the life cycle of stars like our Sun is intimately cornected with their more powerful siblings. Residing in the constellation Sagittarius, the Trifid Nebula is about 9,000 light years from Earth.

  9. Realtors granted exemption for nondisclosure of AIDS.

    PubMed

    1998-05-15

    Idaho enacted legislation protecting real estate agents in situations where they are asked to violate an HIV patient's privacy. Would-be buyers often ask for a psychological impact statement, including whether the home has been a crime site or whether the owners have HIV, about a property in which they are interested. Senate Bill 1313 has guidelines for realtors, who in the past were torn between disclosure and privacy. If buyers request the information in writing, the agent must ask for the owner's consent to release the information. The buyers must be told if the owner declines. The law shields realtors from legal liability once the requirements are met. PMID:11365332

  10. A new day: Challenger and space flight thereafter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonputtkamer, Jesco

    1986-01-01

    On January 28, 1986, at an altitude of 14 kilometers, the Space Shuttle Challenger was torn apart by an explosion of the external tank. The effects of the accident are undoubtedly far-reaching; they have broad repercussions that affect NASA's international partner organizations. The effects of the postponed shuttle flights on European space programs are discussed. A review of the German participation in the American space program is presented. The need to continue the future projects such as the space station is examined in light of its importance as a springboard for further exploration.

  11. Discoid medial meniscus with a horizontal cleavage tear: a juvenile who suffered for 3 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingqing; Gao, Shijun; Chen, Baicheng

    2012-09-01

    It is very rare to see medial discoid meniscus, and there have been only 82 knees in 61 cases reported to date. The investigators found discoid medial meniscus with horizontal cleavage tear in a 13-year-old juvenile who had been injured while playing basketball, and endured for 3 years. Both magnetic resonance images and the arthroscopic findings were presented. Saucerization of the torn discoid medial meniscus was performed successfully, and the clinical outcomes were satisfying according to the follow-up of 14 months.

  12. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma using a sitting and standing female adult voxel simulators exposure to photons in antero-posterior irradiation geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. R.; Galeano, D. C.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Due to the difficulty in implementing invasive techniques for calculations of dose for some exposure scenarios, computational simulators have been created to represent as realistically as possible the structures of the human body and through radiation transport simulations to obtain conversion coefficients (CCs) to estimate dose. In most published papers simulators are implemented in the standing posture and this may not describe a real scenario of exposure. In this work we developed exposure scenarios in the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code using a female simulator in standing and sitting postures. The simulator was irradiated in the antero-posterior (AP) geometry by a plane source of monoenergetic photons with energy from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (HT/Kair) were calculated for both scenarios and compared. The results show that the percentage difference of CCs for the organs of the head and thorax was not significant (less than 5%) since the anatomic position of the organs is the same in both postures. The percentage difference is more significant to the ovaries (71% for photon energy of 20 keV), to the bladder (39% at 60 keV) and to the uterus (37% at 100 keV) due to different processes of radiation interactions in the legs of the simulator when its posture is changed. For organs and tissues that are distributed throughout the entire body, such as bone (21% at 100 keV) and muscle (30% at 80 keV) the percentage difference of CCs reflects a reduction of interaction of photons with the legs of the simulator. Therefore, the calculation of conversion coefficients using simulators in the sitting posture is relevant for a more accurate dose estimation in real exposures to radiation.

  13. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma for photons using a male adult voxel simulator in sitting and standing posture with geometry of irradiation antero-posterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Cavalcante, F. R.; Carvalho, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    The dose conversion coefficient (DCC) is important to quantify and assess effective doses associated with medical, professional and public exposures. The calculation of DCCs using anthropomorphic simulators and radiation transport codes is justified since in-vivo measurement of effective dose is extremely difficult and not practical for occupational dosimetry. DCCs have been published by the ICRP using simulators in a standing posture, which is not always applicable to all exposure scenarios, providing an inaccurate dose estimation. The aim of this work was to calculate DCCs for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H/Kair) using the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code and the VOXTISS8 adult male voxel simulator in sitting and standing postures. In both postures, the simulator was irradiated by a plane source of monoenergetic photons in antero-posterior (AP) geometry. The photon energy ranged from 15 keV to 2 MeV. The DCCs for both postures were compared and the DCCs for the standing simulator were higher. For certain organs, the difference of DCCs were more significant, as in gonads (48% higher), bladder (16% higher) and colon (11% higher). As these organs are positioned in the abdominal region, the posture of the anthropomorphic simulator modifies the form in which the radiation is transported and how the energy is deposited. It was also noted that the average percentage difference of conversion coefficients was 33% for the bone marrow, 11% for the skin, 13% for the bone surface and 31% for the muscle. For other organs, the percentage difference of the DCCs for both postures was not relevant (less than 5%) due to no anatomical changes in the organs of the head, chest and upper abdomen. We can conclude that is important to obtain DCCs using different postures from those present in the scientific literature.

  14. Load limiting energy absorbing lightweight debris catcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the representative embodiment of the invention disclosed, a load limiting, energy absorbing net is arranged to overlay a normally-covered vent opening in the rear bulkhead of the space orbiter vehicle. Spatially-disposed flexible retainer straps are extended from the net and respectively secured to bulkhead brackets spaced around the vent opening. The intermediate portions of the straps are doubled over and stitched together in a pattern enabling the doubled-over portions to progressively separate at a predicable load designed to be well below the tensile capability of the straps as the stitches are successively torn apart by the forces imposed on the retainer members whenever the cover plate is explosively separated from the bulkhead and propelled into the net. By arranging these stitches to be successively torn away at a load below the strap strength in response to forces acting on the retainers that are less than the combined strength of the retainers, this tearing action serves as a predictable compact energy absorber for safely halting the cover plate as the retainers are extended as the net is deployed. The invention further includes a block of an energy-absorbing material positioned in the net for receiving loose debris produced by the explosive release of the cover plate.

  15. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10–27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction. PMID:26229890

  16. Ditching Investigation of a 1/18-Scale Model of the North American B-45 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Thompson, William C.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation of a 1/18-scale dynamically similar model of the North American B-45 airplane was made to observe the ditching behavior and determine the proper landing technique to be used in an emergency water landing. Various conditions of damage were simulated to determine the behavior which probably would occur in a full-scale ditching. The behavior of the model was determined from high-speed motion-picture records, time-history acceleration records, and visual observations. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the maximum nose-high attitude with the landing flaps full down for minimum landing speed. During the ditching, the nose-wheel and bomb-bay doors probably will be torn away and the rear of the fuselage flooded. A violent dive will very likely occur. Longitudinal decelerations of approximately 5g and vertical accelerations of approximately -6g (including gravity) will be experienced near the pilots' compartment. Ditching braces installed in the bomb bay will tend to improve the behavior slightly but will be torn away along with the bomb-bay doors. A hydroflap installed ahead of the nose-wheel doors will eliminate the dive and failure of the nose-wheel doors, and substantially reduce the motions and accelerations.

  17. Tomographic search for missing link between the ancient Farallon subduction and the present Cocos subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatov, Alexei; Fukao, Yoshio

    2005-03-01

    A striking feature of the tomographic images of the Earth's mid-mantle is the long, high-velocity belt extending in a north-south direction under the North and South American continents, which is believed to be the remnant subduction of the Farallon Plate. In the Oligocene epoch the North Farallon Plate subduction terminated off Baja California and the South Farallon Plate broke into the Cocos and Nazca plates. This important period of the Farallon subduction history is not clearly understood, due in part to the lack of high-resolution tomographic images. Our P-wave tomographic image of the mantle below Mexico indicates that the currently subducting slab of the Cocos Plate is torn apart from the already subducted slab of the ancient Farallon Plate in a region behind the slab window or slab gap off Baja California. We suggest that the southeastward advance of this slab tearing was synchronous with the counter-clockwise rotation of the Cocos Plate against the eastward to northeastward subduction of the ancient Farallon Plate. The Cocos slab torn apart from the deeper Farallon slab dips to the north to northeast with its strike oblique to the trench axis. This slab configuration delineates well with the intermediate-depth earthquake activity and the volcanic activity known as the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Further to the south of the slab tearing of the subducted slab continues from the deeper Farallon part to the shallower Cocos part but with considerable distortion in the shallower part.

  18. Significance of the orbital floor in zygomatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Crewe, T C

    1978-08-01

    Fifty years after the publication of Harold Gillies' work, an assessment of zygomatic injuries is made, in the light of a half century of medical advances. Recent experience suggests that the fractured orbital floor is the commonest and most significant component of all zygomatic injuries. Exploration of 582 floors in the last 5 years revealed that over 20% had true blowout fractures, without damage to the orbital rim. A further 5% had torn periosteum with only minimal bony damage. Only two cases (0.3%) had fractures of the rim without a blown-out floor. The significance of floor damage is considered. This is usually more severe than expected. Even minimal damage--torn periosteum alone--may be followed by severe late sequelae, out of proportion to the magnitude of the apparent injury. If such sequelae develop late, their relationship to the injury is not suspected. The related soft tissues are very vulnerable. Vigorous manipulation of the malar (or maxilla in LeFort II injuries) does as much damage to them, as did the original trauma. Our therapy should be designed to protect these tissues during necessary manipulation.

  19. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10-27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction.

  20. Document reconstruction by layout analysis of snippets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, Florian; Diem, Markus; Sablatnig, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Document analysis is done to analyze entire forms (e.g. intelligent form analysis, table detection) or to describe the layout/structure of a document. Also skew detection of scanned documents is performed to support OCR algorithms that are sensitive to skew. In this paper document analysis is applied to snippets of torn documents to calculate features for the reconstruction. Documents can either be destroyed by the intention to make the printed content unavailable (e.g. tax fraud investigation, business crime) or due to time induced degeneration of ancient documents (e.g. bad storage conditions). Current reconstruction methods for manually torn documents deal with the shape, inpainting and texture synthesis techniques. In this paper the possibility of document analysis techniques of snippets to support the matching algorithm by considering additional features are shown. This implies a rotational analysis, a color analysis and a line detection. As a future work it is planned to extend the feature set with the paper type (blank, checked, lined), the type of the writing (handwritten vs. machine printed) and the text layout of a snippet (text size, line spacing). Preliminary results show that these pre-processing steps can be performed reliably on a real dataset consisting of 690 snippets.

  1. Utilities are doing too much breaker maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Heising, C. )

    1994-12-01

    Many breaker failures occur after the breaker has been torn down for maintenance because some error was made in reassembling it. Utilities now can get a better understanding of circuit breaker reliability as the result of a worldwide survey conducted by the International Conference on Large High-Voltage Electric Systems (Cigre) of the reliability of circuit breakers 63 kV and above. The most significant finding is that the rate of major failures have dropped drastically with the introduction of modern SF[sub 6] breakers (from 1.58 to 0.67 per 100 breaker-years). But the rate of minor failures - such as gas leaks, which require maintenance and add to the operating cost - has increased by 30%. Incorrect maintenance causes far fewer failures in modern breakers, simply because they have to be torn down less frequently. Only 15% as many major failures and 77% as many minor failures can be attributed to incorrect maintenance. The failure to open or close on command are still the dominant major-failure modes of circuit breakers. 4 tabs.

  2. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, J P

    1995-01-01

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved.

  3. Medial collateral ligament healing after posttraumatic radial head arthroplasty: A retrospective study of 33 cases with a mean follow-up of 73 months.

    PubMed

    Wapler, Carl; Fontaine, Christian; Mesnil, Pierre; Chantelot, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Comminuted radial head fractures are usually associated with destabilizing lesions of the elbow. The radial head prosthesis (RHP) is a therapeutic alternative when fracture fixation is impossible, as it restores one of the elbow's secondary stabilizers. The aim of this study was to assess healing of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) after implantation of a RHP. All patients implanted with a RHP during the 2003-2012 period were eligible for follow-up ultrasound evaluation of MCL healing. A clinical evaluation with standardized tests (DASH and MEPS) was performed and the patients asked to evaluate their elbow's stability during the same follow-up visit. Out of the 33 eligible patients, 20 were included with a mean follow-up of 73 months. The MCL had been torn in 15 of these 20 patients; the MCL appeared healed on the ultrasound images in 13 patients. The elbow was considered subjectively stable in 19 patients. The mean DASH score was 21.4 (±16.67) and the mean MEPS was 84.7 (±13.9); these scores were 17.19 (±14.0) and 88.3 (±10.9) for patients with a healed MCL, versus 32.5 (±10.6) and 70 (±0.0) for patients with a non-healed MCL. Our findings suggest that a torn MCL can heal after RHP implantation, even without surgical ligament repair or reattachment.

  4. A cross-sectional study assessing the residual bio-efficacy and durability of field-distributed long-lasting insecticidal nets in malaria endemic ethnic communities of Assam, Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Dev, Vas; Barman, Keshab; Khound, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) are being promoted for malaria vector control in the northeastern Indian state of Assam. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the current residual bio-efficacy and durability of both the Olyset(®) and PermaNet(®)2.0 LLINs that were distributed earlier in 2009, 2011 and 2013 to help formulate informed policy regarding net procurement, supplies and replacement. The study was undertaken in three different malaria endemic blocks of Assam during the period of June to October of 2014. The residual bio-efficacies were ascertained using the WHO cone-bioassay method for mosquito mortality post-exposure and corroborated with the ring-net assay for the median knockdown times of both types of LLINs in use by these communities. Cross-sectional community surveys were distributed to assess net ownership, utilization, community practices and the physical conditions of the nets in terms of being torn and the numbers of holes per position. Both the Olyset(®) and PermaNet(®)2.0 LLINs that were distributed in 2009 (i.e., nearly after five years of community usage) were completely torn, worn out and obsolete. However, the LLINs distributed in 2011 (i.e., three years of community usage) retained their residual bio-efficacies in susceptibility ranges that varied from 57% to 79%. However, for the LLINs that were distributed in 2013, the observed residual efficacy was adequate and resulted in a mosquito mortality rate >80 percent. Of the two types of LLINs inspected, the Olyset(®)nets were more durable and robust in terms of being torn less frequently (37.1%, 39/105) compared with the PermaNet(®)2.0 nets (51.8%, 204/394). Regarding the LLINs that were distributed in 2013, all were physically intact and in good condition. The majority of the distributed LLINs (99.2%, 639/644) were still in the possession of the householders of the surveyed populations. This study revealed that the serviceable life of the nets was slightly less than

  5. [The power of the notion of resistance in the mental health field: a case study on the life of rural communities whitin the Colombian armed conflict].

    PubMed

    Arias López, Beatriz Elena

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study is to identify individual, family and/or community responses of resistance within protracted armed conflict. We conducted a case study with members of rural communities in the municipality of San Francisco, in the eastern area of Antioquia, Colombia, combining biographical and ethnographical approaches. The primary results show that, along with the suffering generated by the experience of armed conflict, rural community members also display a repertoire of multiple and diverse resistance strategies. Resistance is for them an active response and a way to re-weave the fabric torn by the experience. As a type of affirmative opposition, resistance is a powerful category for the entire mental health field, in that it highlights the creativity and capacity for transformation of individuals. In this way, the category allows for overcoming the limits of the conventional biomedical view that tends to pathologize individual and social responses in scenarios of severe distress.

  6. [Greater trochanteric pain syndrome of the hip].

    PubMed

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Thein, Rafael

    2014-02-01

    Lateral pain of the hip with point tenderness at the Greater Trochanter is a common musculoskeletal complaint. It is frequently diagnosed as trochanteric bursitis; however, this term is inaccurate because of evident non-inflammatory pathologies, particularly of the abductor tendons of the hip. It is important to differentiate this extra-articular source from an intra-articular or a lower back source of pain. Imaging is useful in cases of trauma, prolonged pain or uncertain diagnosis. Non-operative treatment that involves modifying activities, physiotherapy, analgesics, steroid injections and shock wave therapy is usually helpful. Nevertheless, despite the above treatments, about one third of the patients suffer from chronic pain and disability. These patients may be candidates for operative intervention. Currently, there are endoscopic surgical techniques for local decompression, bursectomy and suture of torn tendons similar to surgery used in the shoulder. PMID:24716427

  7. 7. View of interior of Lock No. 2 on George ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of interior of Lock No. 2 on George washington 'Potowmack' Canal at Great Falls, Virginia. This lock is about 15 ft. in depth and possibly 70 or 60 ft. in length. Some 15 or 20 years ago, when a restoration was crudely attempted, the old oaken flooring, which was invariably placed at the bottom of canal locks, was roughly torn up and destroyed. The trunks and stumps of gigantic trees still remain from this restorative effort, and their girth indicates again the antiquity of this evidence of George Washington's work as an engineer. The stones are of the red Seneca type and were evidently ferried from the Maryland side above the dam and then brought by sled or rollers to this location. These stones were beautifully hand-cut and fitted with ... - Potowmack Company: Great Falls Canal, Lock No. 2, Great Falls, Fairfax County, VA

  8. 37. GARRET, SOUTH HALF, LOOKING WEST. The trusses and joists ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. GARRET, SOUTH HALF, LOOKING WEST. The trusses and joists date from the 1755 Greater Meeting House. When this building was being torn down in 1812, these trusses were incorporated into the new Twelfth Street Meeting House. The trusses and joists were all pit sawn. The lower strut of the truss center posts were added in 1812 with iron strapping tieing them into the older members. Many of the joist tenons broke off in the transfer for reuse, so ledgers were provided to support the joists in 1812. At the Greater Meeting House the space between the queen posts was the Monthly Meeting Room. Evidence still exists for its plaster walls and ceiling. The suspended wood air duct dates from 1852. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. [Memisa in Afganistan: reconstruction of primary health care in a country during civil war and with restricted freedom of movement for women].

    PubMed

    Liem, L

    1999-01-30

    Afghanistan has the number five position in the world with regard to child mortality and ranks number two with regard to child mortality and ranks number two with regard to maternal death. Towards the end of 1994 Memisa agreed to assist IbnSina, an Afghan non-governmental organization which had been asked to rehabilitate basic health services in 4 regions via their existing immunization programme. After the withdrawal of the Russian army, the country is being torn apart by fighting bands of extremists. The rapid and successful rise of the Taliban, a movement of armed islamic fundamentalist students, puts severe restrictions on public life and on the rights of women, and makes it even more difficult to set up a health care system which is equally accessible to men and women. IbnSina-Memisa strives to revive health care in 4 regions and to cope with the logistic and cultural constraints which have to be faced.

  10. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Repair: An Old Idea With a New Wrinkle.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    At our practice, we have successfully treated thousands of overhead athletes with the modified Jobe technique of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) repair. We used this technique regardless of the amount and location of the pathology encountered at the time of surgery. We asked whether the availability of modern anchor and suture technology, vast clinical experience with these injuries and their outcomes, and even biologic additives could be applied to some of these patients to achieve an equal or superior outcome in less time. This led us to create a construct that could be used to not only repair the torn native UCL tissue to bone, but also span the anatomic native ligament from its origin to its insertion. This construct includes an ultra-strong collagen coated tape attached at the anatomic insertions of the ligament using two 3.5-mm nonabsorbable PEEK corkscrew anchors and a suture through the eyelet of one of the anchors.

  11. Gloves against mineral oils and mechanical hazards: composites of carboxylated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Rzymski, Władysław M; Malesa, Monika; Borkowska, Urszula; Oleksy, Mariusz

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to permeation of noxious chemical substances should be accompanied by resistance to mechanical factors because the glove material may be torn, cut or punctured in the workplace. This study reports on glove materials, protecting against mineral oils and mechanical hazards, made of carboxylated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The obtained materials were characterized by a very high resistance of the produced materials to oil permeation (breakthrough time > 480 min). The mechanical properties, and especially tear resistance, of the studied materials were improved after the addition of modified bentonite (nanofiller) to the XNBR latex mixture. The nanocomposite meets the requirements in terms of parameters characterizing tear, abrasion, cut and puncture resistance. Therefore, the developed material may be used for the production of multifunctional protective gloves. PMID:26757889

  12. The choices we make as teachers.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, D S

    2016-01-01

    "She wasn't like you...wasn't like any politician I've ever known." Ethan Kanin, Secretary of State about US president Allison Taylor in the US serial, 24. When an ethical dilemma arises, the choices we make decide our ethical concerns and moral position in a given situation. In the TV serial, 24, the US president faces such an ethical dilemma when she has to either cover up for her daughter's crime or get her arrested. She is torn between the role of a mother and that of a President. She chooses her sworn duty to protect the country and has her daughter arrested. She gives precedence to her duty as the President of a country over her mother's role. PMID:27474702

  13. The Thermodynamic and Kinetic Aspects of Power Ultrasound Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hao

    Most high intensity or power ultrasound applications involve a special transmission mode of sound waves in a medium that is composed of consecutive compressions and rarefactions. Since the propagation of such longitudinal waves is normally associated with a liquid medium, the use of power ultrasound is often termed as sonication. When the negative pressure in the rarefaction phase surpasses the tensile stress of the liquid, the liquid will be torn apart and cavities will be formed (Leighton, 1994). The inception of cavitation and the subsequent mechanical and chemical effects rising from the cavitation activity enable interactions between the acoustic energy and food and biological systems being processed. Such interactions take place at microscopic levels as the average diameters of cavitation bubbles are at 150-170 μm, for bubbles generated in water by 20 kHz ultrasound transducers (Awad, 1996; Vago, 1992).

  14. Dragonfly: an implementation of the expand–maximize–compress algorithm for single-particle imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Ayyer, Kartik; Lan, Ti-Yen; Elser, Veit; Loh, N. Duane

    2016-01-01

    Single-particle imaging (SPI) with X-ray free-electron lasers has the potential to change fundamentally how biomacromolecules are imaged. The structure would be derived from millions of diffraction patterns, each from a different copy of the macromolecule before it is torn apart by radiation damage. The challenges posed by the resultant data stream are staggering: millions of incomplete, noisy and un-oriented patterns have to be computationally assembled into a three-dimensional intensity map and then phase reconstructed. In this paper, the Dragonfly software package is described, based on a parallel implementation of the expand–maximize–compress reconstruction algorithm that is well suited for this task. Auxiliary modules to simulate SPI data streams are also included to assess the feasibility of proposed SPI experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, California, USA. PMID:27504078

  15. Pure Varus Injury to the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Ho; Lee, Jung Ha; Chang, Chong Bum

    2015-06-01

    A 30-year-old male was involved in a car accident. Radiographs revealed a depressed marginal fracture of the medial tibial plateau and an avulsion fracture of the fibular head. Magnetic resonance imaging showed avulsion fracture of Gerdy's tubercle, injury to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), posterior horn of the medial meniscus, and the attachments of the lateral collateral ligament and the biceps femoris tendon. The depressed fracture of the medial tibial plateau was elevated and stabilized using a cannulated screw and washer. The injured lateral and posterolateral corner (PLC) structures were repaired and augmented by PLC reconstruction. However, the avulsion fracture of Gerdy's tubercle was not fixed because it was minimally displaced and the torn PCL was also not repaired or reconstructed. We present a unique case of pure varus injury to the knee joint. This case contributes to our understanding of the mechanism of knee injury and provides insight regarding appropriate treatment plans for this type of injury. PMID:26217477

  16. Plastic deformation and wear process at a surface during unlubricated sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The plastic deformation and wear of a 304 stainless steel surface sliding against an aluminum oxide rider with a spherical surface (the radius of curvature: 1.3 cm) were observed by using scanning electron and optical microscopes. Experiments were conducted in a vacuum of one million Pa and in an environment of fifty thousandth Pa of chlorine gas at 25 C. The load was 500 grams and the sliding velocity was 0.5 centimeter per second. The deformed surface layer which accumulates and develops successively is left behind the rider, and step shaped proturbances are developed even after single pass sliding under both environmental conditions. A fully developed surface layer is gradually torn off leaving a characteristic pattern. The mechanism for tearing away of the surface layer from the contact area and sliding track contour is explained assuming the simplified process of material removal based on the adhesion theory for the wear of materials.

  17. Plastic deformation at surface during unlubricated sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The plastic deformation and wear of 304 stainless-steel surface slid against an aluminum oxide rider were observed by using a scanning electron microscope and an optical microscope. Experiments were conducted in a vacuum of 0.000001 Pa and in an environment of 0.0005 Pa chlorine gas at 25 C. The load was 500 grams and the sliding velocity was 0.5 centimeter per second. The deformed surface layer which accumulates and develops successively is left behind the rider, and step-shaped protuberances are developed even after single pass sliding under both environmental conditions. A fully developed surface layer is gradually torn off leaving a characteristic pattern. These observations result from both adhesion and an adhesive wear mechanism.

  18. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina; Bae, Kee Jeong

    2016-10-01

    "Buttonholing" of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. PMID:27502623

  19. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Repair: An Old Idea With a New Wrinkle.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    At our practice, we have successfully treated thousands of overhead athletes with the modified Jobe technique of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) repair. We used this technique regardless of the amount and location of the pathology encountered at the time of surgery. We asked whether the availability of modern anchor and suture technology, vast clinical experience with these injuries and their outcomes, and even biologic additives could be applied to some of these patients to achieve an equal or superior outcome in less time. This led us to create a construct that could be used to not only repair the torn native UCL tissue to bone, but also span the anatomic native ligament from its origin to its insertion. This construct includes an ultra-strong collagen coated tape attached at the anatomic insertions of the ligament using two 3.5-mm nonabsorbable PEEK corkscrew anchors and a suture through the eyelet of one of the anchors. PMID:26991563

  20. Ultrasound of the pectoralis major muscle after reverse shoulder arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mascarinas, Angelie L; Newman, Joel S; Warner, Jon J P; Jain, Nitin B

    2014-12-01

    Only a few reports exist in the literature for sonographic assessment of the pectoralis major muscle. Presented is a case of pectoralis major muscle atrophy as a cause of persistent internal rotation weakness diagnosed via ultrasound in a patient with multiple previous surgeries and contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging because of a shoulder implant. This patient's physical examination suggested an abnormal contour of the pectoralis major muscle on contraction, so he was referred for diagnostic ultrasound. The ultrasound was key to guiding the management of this patient because surgical repair of a torn pectoralis major muscle was planned if this was found. No pectoralis major tear or rupture was seen on ultrasound, but there was evidence of pectoralis major muscle atrophy. Accordingly, surgery was avoided and the patient was able to continue with his physical therapy program.

  1. Edge state magnetism in zigzag-interfaced graphene via spin susceptibility measurements

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, T. L.; Shelankov, A. L.; Zyrianova, A. A.; Veinger, A. I.; Tisnek, T. V.; Lähderanta, E.; Shames, A. I.; Okotrub, A. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Chekhova, G. N.; Pinakov, D. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Šljivančanin, Ž.

    2015-01-01

    Development of graphene spintronic devices relies on transforming it into a material with a spin order. Attempts to make graphene magnetic by introducing zigzag edge states have failed due to energetically unstable structure of torn zigzag edges. Here, we report on the formation of nanoridges, i.e., stable crystallographically oriented fluorine monoatomic chains, and provide experimental evidence for strongly coupled magnetic states at the graphene-fluorographene interfaces. From the first principle calculations, the spins at the localized edge states are ferromagnetically ordered within each of the zigzag interface whereas the spin interaction across a nanoridge is antiferromagnetic. Magnetic susceptibility data agree with this physical picture and exhibit behaviour typical of quantum spin-ladder system with ferromagnetic legs and antiferromagnetic rungs. The exchange coupling constant along the rungs is measured to be 450 K. The coupling is strong enough to consider graphene with fluorine nanoridges as a candidate for a room temperature spintronics material. PMID:26307529

  2. Edge state magnetism in zigzag-interfaced graphene via spin susceptibility measurements.

    PubMed

    Makarova, T L; Shelankov, A L; Zyrianova, A A; Veinger, A I; Tisnek, T V; Lähderanta, E; Shames, A I; Okotrub, A V; Bulusheva, L G; Chekhova, G N; Pinakov, D V; Asanov, I P; Šljivančanin, Ž

    2015-01-01

    Development of graphene spintronic devices relies on transforming it into a material with a spin order. Attempts to make graphene magnetic by introducing zigzag edge states have failed due to energetically unstable structure of torn zigzag edges. Here, we report on the formation of nanoridges, i.e., stable crystallographically oriented fluorine monoatomic chains, and provide experimental evidence for strongly coupled magnetic states at the graphene-fluorographene interfaces. From the first principle calculations, the spins at the localized edge states are ferromagnetically ordered within each of the zigzag interface whereas the spin interaction across a nanoridge is antiferromagnetic. Magnetic susceptibility data agree with this physical picture and exhibit behaviour typical of quantum spin-ladder system with ferromagnetic legs and antiferromagnetic rungs. The exchange coupling constant along the rungs is measured to be 450 K. The coupling is strong enough to consider graphene with fluorine nanoridges as a candidate for a room temperature spintronics material.

  3. Massive young clusters in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, Jesús

    We analyze the properties of the Massive Young Clusters in the Local Group, concentrating on the youngest segment of this population and, more specifically, on the two best studied cases: 30 Doradus and NGC 604. 30 Doradus is a Super Star Cluster and will likely evolve to become a Globular Cluster in the future. NGC 604, on the other hand, is a Scaled OB Association that will be torn apart by the tidal effects of its host galaxy, M33. Given their extreme youth, each cluster is surrounded by a Giant H II Region produced by the high ionizing fluxes from O and WR stars. The two Giant H II Regions are found to be rather thin structures located on the surfaces of Giant Molecular Clouds, and their geometry turns out to be not too different from that of classical H II regions such as the Orion or Eagle Nebulae.

  4. Bridge-Enhanced ACL Repair: A Review of the Science and the Pathway through FDA Investigational Device Approval

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Perrone, Gabriel S.; Roberts, Gordon; Murray, Martha M.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are currently treated with replacement of the torn ligament with a graft of tendon harvested from elsewhere in the knee. This procedure, called "ACL reconstruction," is excellent for restoring gross stability to the knee; however, there are relatively high graft failure rates in adolescent patients,4, 12, 60 and the ACL reconstruction procedure does not prevent the premature osteoarthritis seen in patients after an ACL injury.1, 46, 52 Thus, new solutions are needed for ACL injuries. Researchers have been investigating the use of scaffolds, growth factors and cells to supplement a suture repair of the ACL (bio-enhanced repair). In this paper, we will review the varied approaches, which have been investigated for stimulating ACL healing and repair in preclinical models and how one of these technologies was able to move from promising preclinical results to FDA acceptance of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application for a first-in-human study. PMID:25631206

  5. Replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee with deep frozen bone-tendon-bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Than, P; Bálint, L; Domán, I; Szabó, G

    1999-01-01

    Surgical treatment of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and consequent knee instability showed great development over the last decade. Arthroscopic techniques and the use of different allogenic tissues became a routine. Between 1995 and 1998, 31 knees in 30 patients underwent ACL reconstruction of the knee with fresh-frozen allografts at the Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Pécs, Hungary. The operations were performed with arthroscopic technique. This paper retrospectively assesses the outcomes with an average follow up of 28 months, which showed good results in most of the cases. The authors reviewed the literature emphasizing advantages and disadvantages of the method with special interest to possible complications resulting from the use of allografts: graft rejection, graft re-rupture, transmission of infection and synovitis evoked by immune response.

  6. High velocity clouds in nearby disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, Eric; Bregman, Joel N.; Roberts, Morton S.; Brinks, Elias

    1993-01-01

    Clouds of neutral hydrogen in our galaxy with the absolute value of v greater than 100 km/s cover approximately 10 percent of the sky to a limiting column density of 1 x 10(exp 18) cm(exp -2). These high velocity clouds (HVCs) may dominate the kinetic energy of neutral hydrogen in non-circular motion, and are an important though poorly understood component of galactic gas. It has been suggested that the HVCs can be reproduced by a combination of three phenomena: a galactic fountain driven by disk supernovae which would account for most of the HVCs, material tidally torn from the Magellanic Clouds, and an outer arm complex which is associated with the large scale structure of the warped galactic disk. We sought to detect HVCs in external galaxies in order to test the galactic fountain model.

  7. A possible relativistic jetted outburst from a massive black hole fed by a tidally disrupted star.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Joshua S; Giannios, Dimitrios; Metzger, Brian D; Cenko, S Bradley; Perley, Daniel A; Butler, Nathaniel R; Tanvir, Nial R; Levan, Andrew J; O'Brien, Paul T; Strubbe, Linda E; De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Lee, William H; Nayakshin, Sergei; Quataert, Eliot; King, Andrew R; Cucchiara, Antonino; Guillochon, James; Bower, Geoffrey C; Fruchter, Andrew S; Morgan, Adam N; van der Horst, Alexander J

    2011-07-01

    Gas accretion onto some massive black holes (MBHs) at the centers of galaxies actively powers luminous emission, but most MBHs are considered dormant. Occasionally, a star passing too near an MBH is torn apart by gravitational forces, leading to a bright tidal disruption flare (TDF). Although the high-energy transient Sw 1644+57 initially displayed none of the theoretically anticipated (nor previously observed) TDF characteristics, we show that observations suggest a sudden accretion event onto a central MBH of mass about 10(6) to 10(7) solar masses. There is evidence for a mildly relativistic outflow, jet collimation, and a spectrum characterized by synchrotron and inverse Compton processes; this leads to a natural analogy of Sw 1644+57 to a temporary smaller-scale blazar.

  8. [Youth from cultural communities].

    PubMed

    Alvarado, E

    1993-01-01

    In Québec, young immigrants must adapt themselves at the same time as their families to the changes imposed by a society which is itself experiencing problems related to minorities and language conflicts. Parents, which have high hopes for their young, are torn between their own values and those of the new nation. Because immigrants families, especially mothers, have a poor understanding of the language, as well as the educational and social services, it is difficult for them to avoid being labelled in the academic and legal worlds. Discipline is often at the centre of problems with teens. The conflict between generations takes on special meaning, as youth are able to adapt faster and easier to the new society's culture. Nevertheless, placing value on cultural origins can help youth challenge racism and rejection. The author believes that more effort should be invested in information services for parents, as well as in schools and their cultural and pedagogical adaptation measures.

  9. A 46-year-old man with excruciating shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Olafsson, Eric J; Zeni, Tallal; Wilkes, David S

    2005-03-01

    A 46-year-old man with no significant medical history presented to his local emergency department complaining of excruciating right shoulder pain. The patient was in his usual state of excellent health until 4 days prior, when right shoulder pain developed while he was using a chainsaw to cut wood. The next day, flu-like symptoms developed with fevers, chills, and headache. An MRI revealed that the right pectoralis major was torn from its attachment to the acromion. His shoulder pain intensified despite treatment with hydrocodone and acetaminophen, and the flu-like symptoms progressed over the next 2 days. Finally, on the day of hospital admission, he was weak and unable to arise out of bed. He was taken by family members to the local emergency department.

  10. Flow studies in a wet steam turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. H.; Pouchot, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    The design and test results of a four stage wet vapor turbine operating with slightly superheated inlet steam and expanding to 10% exit moisture are presented. High speed movies at 3000 frames per second of liquid movement on the pressure side and along the trailing edge of the last stator blade are discussed along with back lighted photographs of moisture drops as they were torn from the stator blade trailing edge. Movies at lower framing rates were also taken of the exit of the last rotating blade and the casing moisture removal slot located in line with the rotor blade shroud. Also moisture removal data are presented of casing slot removal at the exit of the third and fourth rotor blades and for slots located in the trailing edge of the last stator blade. Finally, the degradation of turbine thermodynamic performance due to condensation formation and movement is discussed.

  11. Investigation of the Alexander L. Kielland failure-metallurgical and fracture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Almar-Naess, A.; Haagensen, P.J.; Lian, B.; Moan, T.; Simonsen, T.

    1984-03-01

    On March 27, 1980, the semi-submersible platform Alexander L. Kielland broke down in a storm in the North Sea, resulting in a loss of 123 lives. The investigation subsequently performed by the inquiry commission showed that one of the lower tubular bracings had failed by fatigue. As a result, the vertical leg attached to it was torn off, and the platform capsized. The fatigue fracture had started from a double fillet weld joining a 0.325-m tubular attachment to the bracing. The fillet welds were partially cracked in the early history of the platform due to lammelar tearing. Cumulative damage calculations indicated that the design fatigue life of the bracing was inadequate.

  12. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surface Morphologies of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy at Liquid Nitrogen (Ln2) Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties and fracture surface morphologies were evaluated for a commercial epoxy resin toughened with two types of core-shell rubber (CSR) toughening agents (Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and MX960). The impact resistance (R) was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The resulting fracture surface morphologies were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fractographic observations of the CSR toughened epoxy tested at ambient temperature, showed a fracture as characterized by slender dendrite textures with large voids. The increasing number of dendrites and decreasing size of scale-like texture with more CSR particles corresponded with increased R. As the temperature decreased to Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2), the fracture surfaces showed a fracture characterized by a rough, torn texture containing many river markings and deep furrows.

  13. Ultrahigh interlayer friction in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niguès, A.; Siria, A.; Vincent, P.; Poncharal, P.; Bocquet, L.

    2014-07-01

    Friction at the nanoscale has revealed a wealth of behaviours that depart strongly from the long-standing macroscopic laws of Amontons-Coulomb. Here, by using a ‘Christmas cracker’-type of system in which a multiwalled nanotube is torn apart between a quartz-tuning-fork-based atomic force microscope (TF-AFM) and a nanomanipulator, we compare the mechanical response of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) during the fracture and telescopic sliding of the layers. We found that the interlayer friction for insulating BNNTs results in ultrahigh viscous-like dissipation that is proportional to the contact area, whereas for the semimetallic CNTs the sliding friction vanishes within experimental uncertainty. We ascribe this difference to the ionic character of the BN, which allows charge localization. The interlayer viscous friction of BNNTs suggests that BNNT membranes could serve as extremely efficient shock-absorbing surfaces.

  14. Shark skin: a function in feeding.

    PubMed Central

    Southall, E J; Sims, D W

    2003-01-01

    Dermal denticles are unique tooth-like structures embedded in the skin of sharks and rays that protect them from predators and ectoparasites, reduce mechanical abrasion and possibly minimize swimming-induced drag. Here, we show that juvenile lesser spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) also use this body armour to anchor food items near their tail so that bite-sized pieces can be torn away by rapid jaw and head movements. This scale-rasp behaviour is novel among fishes and suggests a new role for skin in the feeding ecology of sharks. Scale rasping may be important ecologically because it could function to increase the dietary breadth and growth potential of juveniles. PMID:12952633

  15. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-01-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  16. Cerebral contusions: re-evaluation of the mechanism of their development.

    PubMed

    Gurdjian, E S

    1976-01-01

    At the present writing, the biomechanics of "coup-contrecoup" contusions may be summarized as follows: 1) "Coup" contusions are caused by the slapping effect of discrete areas of inbeding bone during impact. "Contrecoup" contusions are caused by the movements of the brain against irregular and rough bony enviornment. 2) When the head is relatively fixed, a blunt discrete impact causes a "coup" lesion with no "contrecoup" effect. 3) When the head is free to move, a blunt impact will cause a contrecoup lesion or lesions and no "coup" effect. 4) "Fracture contusion" is caused by the slapping effect of the fracture site on the outbending cerebral surface. In such cases, occassionally the dura may be torn. 5) Deeper contusions in the substance of the brain are due to inertial stresses from relative movements and pressure gradients. 6) Contusions of the cerebral tonsils are due to their relative movements at the posterior fossa-foramen magnum junction.

  17. Gloves against mineral oils and mechanical hazards: composites of carboxylated acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber latex

    PubMed Central

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Rzymski, Władysław M.; Malesa, Monika; Borkowska, Urszula; Oleksy, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to permeation of noxious chemical substances should be accompanied by resistance to mechanical factors because the glove material may be torn, cut or punctured in the workplace. This study reports on glove materials, protecting against mineral oils and mechanical hazards, made of carboxylated acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The obtained materials were characterized by a very high resistance of the produced materials to oil permeation (breakthrough time > 480 min). The mechanical properties, and especially tear resistance, of the studied materials were improved after the addition of modified bentonite (nanofiller) to the XNBR latex mixture. The nanocomposite meets the requirements in terms of parameters characterizing tear, abrasion, cut and puncture resistance. Therefore, the developed material may be used for the production of multifunctional protective gloves. PMID:26757889

  18. Pathognomonic symptom associated with lightning strike: Lichtenberg figure.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Mehmet; Tanrikulu, Nazmiye; Turkdogan, Kenan Ahmet; Yigit, Eda

    2015-02-01

    Lightning strikes especially occur during spring and summer months in the afternoons when there is heavy rain. In deaths resulting from lightning strike, there may either be no evidence on the dead person's clothes or body, or there may be burnt or torn patches on their clothes and lichtenberg figures specific to lightning strikes on their bodies. In such cases that also have a comorbid of cognitive dysfunction, since there is generally amnesia, having these figures during the physical examination has a valuable place in early diagnosis and quick treatment. This paper presents a case of lightning strike that was found to have Lichtenberg figures on the back and right leg after secondary examination. PMID:25842563

  19. Land subsidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    In November 1966, sixty percent of Venice, Italy, is inundated by a storm surge that causes waters in the Venetian lagoon to rise more than 6 feet. On December 28, 1971, a janitor at the Washington Elementary School in Johnston City, Illinois, discovers sever cracking of the school. In January 1972, the school is abandoned and subsequently razed. In the 1970's, five homes in New Orleans, Louisiana, are destroyed by gas explosins. In May 198, a 350 feet diameter sink-hole forms in a business area in Winter Park, Florida, and swallows a home and parts of several businesses. In August 1983, Hurricane Alicia slams into the texas Gulf Coast near Houston, Texas, and devastates the 500 home Brownwood subdivision on the north end of Galveston Bay. Homes are torn from their foundations and reduced to rubble. 

  20. Ultrahigh interlayer friction in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Niguès, A; Siria, A; Vincent, P; Poncharal, P; Bocquet, L

    2014-07-01

    Friction at the nanoscale has revealed a wealth of behaviours that depart strongly from the long-standing macroscopic laws of Amontons-Coulomb. Here, by using a 'Christmas cracker'-type of system in which a multiwalled nanotube is torn apart between a quartz-tuning-fork-based atomic force microscope (TF-AFM) and a nanomanipulator, we compare the mechanical response of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) during the fracture and telescopic sliding of the layers. We found that the interlayer friction for insulating BNNTs results in ultrahigh viscous-like dissipation that is proportional to the contact area, whereas for the semimetallic CNTs the sliding friction vanishes within experimental uncertainty. We ascribe this difference to the ionic character of the BN, which allows charge localization. The interlayer viscous friction of BNNTs suggests that BNNT membranes could serve as extremely efficient shock-absorbing surfaces.

  1. KSC-04PD-1776

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lewis (left) and Damon Petty clean up hurricane debris inside the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). Much of the roof was torn off by Hurricane Frances as it passed over Central Florida during the Labor Day weekend. Undamaged equipment has been moved to the RLV hangar at KSC. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph.

  2. Dynamic forces on agglomerated particles caused by high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the acoustic forces on particles and agglomerates caused by high-intensity ultrasound in gaseous atmosphere are derived by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Sound induced forces cause an oscillating stress scenario where the primary particles of an agglomerate are alternatingly pressed together and torn apart with the frequency of the applied wave. A comparison of the calculated acoustic forces with respect to the inter particle adhesion forces from Van-der-Waals and liquid bridge interactions reveals that the separation forces may reach the same order of magnitude for 80 μm sized SiO2-particles. Hence, with finite probability acoustically agitated gases may de-agglomerate/disperse solid agglomerate structures. This effect is confirmed by dispersion experiments in an acoustic particle levitation setup. PMID:24152872

  3. On the effect of sea spray on the aerodynamic surface drag under severe winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Ezhova, Ekaterina; Soustova, Irina; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effect of the sea spray on the air-sea momentum exchange during the entire "life cycle" of a droplet, torn off the crest of a steep surface wave, and its fall down to the water, in the framework of a model covering the following aspects of the phenomenon: (1) motion of heavy particle in the driving air flow (equations of motion); (2) structure of the wind field (wind velocity, wave-induced disturbances, turbulent fluctuations); (3) generation of the sea spray; and (4) statistics of droplets (size distribution, wind speed dependence). It is demonstrated that the sea spray in strong winds leads to an increase in the surface drag up to 40 % on the assumption that the velocity profile is neutral.

  4. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project approach to building dismantlement and demolition

    SciTech Connect

    Spittler, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    When remediation began at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), there were 41 buildings on site. Twenty-nine of these buildings were ancillary structures and were not used for processing radioactive material. Most of these have been torn down. The remaining 12 buildings were used for uranium and thorium processing or were major support structures, such as the laboratory. Two of the buildings were major processing operations occurred were successfully demolished in February of this year. Demolition of all structures will be complete in September of this year. To give an understanding of the magnitude of the work, the following is a description of the physical characteristics of the green salt building. This building was used to convert brown oxide (UO3) to green salt (UF4), which is the last intermediate step in purifying the mostly yellow cake feed material into uranium metal.

  5. Geophysical investigations of French Drain 116-B-9, and Dry Well 116-B-10, 100 B/C Area

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, K.A.; Fassett, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    French Drain 116-B-9 and Dry Well 116-B-10 are both located within the 100 B/C-2 Operable Unit, 100 B/C Area (Figure 1). The 116-B-9 French Drain is approximately 4 ft in diameter by 3 ft deep. The exact location or use of the drain in not clear. The 116-B-10 Dry Well is a 3 ft-diameter, tile-lined well on a concrete slab, 7 ft below the surface, overlain by a manhole cover (DOE-RL 1991). The exact location of the well is uncertain. The objective of the survey was to locate the Dry Well and the French Drain. The area to be investigated had several buildings in the area which subsequently have been torn down. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) was the geophysical method chosen for the investigation.

  6. Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Attansi, E.D.; DeYoung, J.H. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports that the outlook for exploration depends on the economic health of the mining industry and, in turn, general economic conditions. It is too early to determine the overall impact of the cessation of hostilities in the Persian Gulf War. Its conclusion would allow funds to be redirected to individual country's economies. The rebuilding of the war-damaged countries will probably translate into net increases in demand for the minerals industry. A return to stability in energy costs will also benefit the mining industry. Alternatively, the capital requirements to rebuild war-torn countries could put some strain on capital markets and affect the funds available for private commercial investment. Along with increasing the cost of capital to mining operations, a capital shortage could stall recovery of western industrialized economies that are currently in recession.

  7. The Emission Signatures of Tidal Disrption Events in the UV and Optical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallefors, Valentina; Arcavi, Iair

    2016-06-01

    A Tidal Disruption Event (TDE) occurs when a star approaching a Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH) is torn apart by tidal forces. Sometimes these events are accompanied by X-ray, UV and/or optical flares. TDEs can help us study SMBHs, accretion physics and possibly galactic dynamics. Using observations obtained by the Swift Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope (UVOT), we study the emission of several TDEs classified by broad H and/or He II lines in their optical spectra. This recently-identified class of transients emits mostly in the UV. UV data is thus important for constraining the total luminosity and effective temperatures of these events - parameters crucial for modeling the still undetermined emission mechanisms.

  8. Initiation and growth of mesa corrosion attack during CO{sub 2} corrosion of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Nyborg, R.

    1998-12-31

    The initiation and development of mesa corrosion attack during CO{sub 2} corrosion of carbon steel has been studied in flow loop experiments performed at 80 C and pH 5.8. Video recordings of growing mesa attacks have been performed in a test section with a glass window in the corrosion loop. These observations have shown that the mesa attack can grow both laterally and in depth below a lid of original corrosion film before the film is torn away stepwise by the flow. Possible mechanisms for initiation of mesa corrosion attack are discussed based on the observations from the video recordings. Mesa attacks can result from several small local attacks growing together into one large mesa attack.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of cBN/WCCo composites obtained by the pulse plasma sintering (PPS) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, A.; Rosiński, M.; Płocińska, M.; Szawłowski, J.

    2011-10-01

    The cBN/cemented carbide containing 30vol% of cBN particles was produced using a mixture of a 6wt% Co added-WC powder, with a WC grain size of 0.4 μm and a cBN powder with a grain size ranging from 4 to 40 μm. The mixture was sintered to produce a plate, 20 mm in diameter, 3 mm thick. The sintering processes were conducted at temperature of 1100°C under a load of 100 MPa. The phase composition, density, hardness and micro structure of the sintered parts thus obtained were examined. The fractures through the WCCo/cBN composite showed the cBN particles torn out from the cemented carbide matrix were only few, whereas most of them have cleaved along the fracture plane. This gives evidence that the bond at the WCCo/cBN interface is mechanically strong.

  10. Identification of a starting point of breast skin tears during chicken plucking.

    PubMed

    Pitcovski, J; Ohana, N; Amzaleg, L; Krispel, S; Bercovich, D; Pinchasov, Y

    1997-02-01

    A site (STP) was identified on the skin of the chicken, during defeathering in the slaughter house, at which about 90% of breast skin tears started. This site is on the ventral side of the pectoral tract area. There was no difference in location of this site with respect to different commercial lines, sexes, flocks, or time of the day. In order to demonstrate the importance of a small skin tear to ultimate damage, defeathered chickens with a minor tear at a particular site and undamaged defeathered chickens were passed through the defeathering machine a second time. Thirty-six percent of the STP chickens were torn further, but only a small percentage (about 4%) of the undamaged chickens were harmed.

  11. The First Air-Temperature Measurements for the Purposes of Battlefield Operations?.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgré, S.; Neumann, J.

    1986-03-01

    Close to the end of the severe winter 1808/09, a Russian force crossed the ice-bound Gulf of Bothnia from Finland to Sweden with the purpose of forcing Sweden to desist from taking sides with Great Britain against Napoléon. General major von Berg, one of the commanders of the force, took meteorological observations, including air-temperature measurements, during the crossing, a record of which he left behind in a journal. These air-temperature measurements appear to be the first of their kind in the history of land-based military forces.In the discussion of the meteorological conditions of the above-mentioned harsh winter, use is made of unpublished meteorological measurements at Umcaå, Sweden, and at Ylitomio (Över-Torneå), Finland. The latter were conducted by Johan Portin, a pioneer of meteorological observations near the Arctic Circle.

  12. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  13. Informed Consent at Gunpoint: When Psychiatry Affects Gun Ownership.

    PubMed

    Candilis, Philip J; Khurana, Gagandeep; Leong, Gregory B; Weinstock, Robert

    2015-06-01

    As states take more steps to connect patients' gun ownership to their mental health, psychiatrists are being asked to provide mental health information after clinical interviews as well as after confiscation. This move into the patient-physician relationship raises new questions about how psychiatrists should obtain informed consent when interviews may result in reports to legal authorities. Consent warnings are already practiced more in the breach than in the observance and informed consent is imperfect at its best. In communities torn by controversies surrounding gun control, vehement political views will further influence these established themes to result in unprecedented pressures on patient confidentiality. This analysis draws on new movements in ethical theory and behavioral medicine that go beyond balancing principles to question the use of psychiatry in firearm reporting, and support a vigorous practice of informed consent to protect both individuals and the communities they live in.

  14. A Possible Relativistic Jetted Outburst from a Massive Black Hole Fed by a Tidally Disrupted Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Joshua S.; Giannios, Dimitrios; Metzger, Brian D.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Tanvir, Nial R.; Levan, Andrew J.; O'Brien, Paul T.; Strubbe, Linda E.; De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Lee, William H.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Quataert, Eliot; King, Andrew R.; Cucchiara, Antonino; Guillochon, James; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Morgan, Adam N.; van der Horst, Alexander J.

    2011-07-01

    Gas accretion onto some massive black holes (MBHs) at the centers of galaxies actively powers luminous emission, but most MBHs are considered dormant. Occasionally, a star passing too near an MBH is torn apart by gravitational forces, leading to a bright tidal disruption flare (TDF). Although the high-energy transient Sw 1644+57 initially displayed none of the theoretically anticipated (nor previously observed) TDF characteristics, we show that observations suggest a sudden accretion event onto a central MBH of mass about 106 to 107 solar masses. There is evidence for a mildly relativistic outflow, jet collimation, and a spectrum characterized by synchrotron and inverse Compton processes; this leads to a natural analogy of Sw 1644+57 to a temporary smaller-scale blazar.

  15. [The power of the notion of resistance in the mental health field: a case study on the life of rural communities whitin the Colombian armed conflict].

    PubMed

    Arias López, Beatriz Elena

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study is to identify individual, family and/or community responses of resistance within protracted armed conflict. We conducted a case study with members of rural communities in the municipality of San Francisco, in the eastern area of Antioquia, Colombia, combining biographical and ethnographical approaches. The primary results show that, along with the suffering generated by the experience of armed conflict, rural community members also display a repertoire of multiple and diverse resistance strategies. Resistance is for them an active response and a way to re-weave the fabric torn by the experience. As a type of affirmative opposition, resistance is a powerful category for the entire mental health field, in that it highlights the creativity and capacity for transformation of individuals. In this way, the category allows for overcoming the limits of the conventional biomedical view that tends to pathologize individual and social responses in scenarios of severe distress. PMID:25237800

  16. ULTRASOUND OF THE PECTORALIS MAJOR MUSCLE AFTER REVERSE SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Mascarinas, Angelie L.; Newman, Joel S.; Warner, Jon J.P.; Jain, Nitin B.

    2014-01-01

    Only a few reports exist in the literature for sonographic assessment of the pectoralis major muscle. We present a case of pectoralis major muscle atrophy as a cause of persistent internal rotation weakness diagnosed via ultrasound in a patient with multiple prior surgeries and contraindication to MRI due to a shoulder implant. This patient’s physical examination suggested an abnormal contour of the pectoralis major muscle on contraction, so he was referred for diagnostic ultrasound. The ultrasound was key to guiding the management of this patient since a surgical repair of a torn pectoralis major muscle was planned if this was found. No pectoralis major tear or rupture was seen on ultrasound, but there was evidence of pectoralis major muscle atrophy. Accordingly, surgery was avoided and the patient was able to continue with his physical therapy program. PMID:25251253

  17. The thread of depression throughout the life and works of Leo Tolstoy.

    PubMed

    Anargyros-Klinger, Annie

    2002-04-01

    Tolstoy, the author of two masterpieces, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, remains a writer of genius. Yet, after writing War and Peace, his existence had been torn apart by a serious depression. This depression, which was melancholic in character, almost destroyed him and, once he had finished Anna Karenina, led him to want to renounce not only sexuality but also literary creation and material possessions. Through examining Tolstoy's life and work, the author tries to uncover the underground paths of this depression, which emerged brutally in the middle of his life, and to understand why his creative genius dried up. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Tolstoy turned away from his artistic work, declaring that 'art is not only useless but even harmful', and thereafter devoted himself to philosophical, political and religious writings. These new sublimations would help him to recover his health.

  18. THE THREAD OF DEPRESSION THROUGHOUT THE LIFE AND WORKS OF LEO TOLSTOY.

    PubMed

    Anargyros-Klinger, Annie

    2002-04-01

    Tolstoy, the author of two masterpieces, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, remains a writer of genius. Yet, after writing War and Peace, his existence had been torn apart by a serious depression. This depression, which was melancholic in character, almost destroyed him and, once he had finished Anna Karenina, led him to want to renounce not only sexuality but also literary creation and material possessions. Through examining Tolstoy's life and work, the author tries to uncover the underground paths of this depression, which emerged brutally in the middle of his life, and to understand why his creative genius dried up. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Tolstoy turned away from his artistic work, declaring that 'art is not only useless but even harmful', and thereafter devoted himself to philosophical, political and religious writings. These new sublimations would help him to recover his health.

  19. Tularemia Outbreak Investigation in Kosovo: Case Control and Environmental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dedushaj, Isuf; Gjini, Ardiana; Jorgensen, Tine Rikke; Cotter, Benvon; Lieftucht, Alfons; D’Ancona, Fortunato; Dennis, David T.; Kosoy, Michael A.; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Grunow, Roland; Kalaveshi, Ariana; Gashi, Luljeta; Humolli, Isme

    2002-01-01

    A large outbreak of tularemia occurred in Kosovo in the early postwar period, 1999-2000. Epidemiologic and environmental investigations were conducted to identify sources of infection, modes of transmission, and household risk factors. Case and control status was verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, and microagglutination assay. A total of 327 serologically confirmed cases of tularemia pharyngitis and cervical lymphadenitis were identified in 21 of 29 Kosovo municipalities. Matched analysis of 46 case households and 76 control households suggested that infection was transmitted through contaminated food or water and that the source of infection was rodents. Environmental circumstances in war-torn Kosovo led to epizootic rodent tularemia and its spread to resettled rural populations living under circumstances of substandard housing, hygiene, and sanitation. PMID:11749751

  20. Replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee with deep frozen bone-tendon-bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Than, P; Bálint, L; Domán, I; Szabó, G

    1999-01-01

    Surgical treatment of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and consequent knee instability showed great development over the last decade. Arthroscopic techniques and the use of different allogenic tissues became a routine. Between 1995 and 1998, 31 knees in 30 patients underwent ACL reconstruction of the knee with fresh-frozen allografts at the Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Pécs, Hungary. The operations were performed with arthroscopic technique. This paper retrospectively assesses the outcomes with an average follow up of 28 months, which showed good results in most of the cases. The authors reviewed the literature emphasizing advantages and disadvantages of the method with special interest to possible complications resulting from the use of allografts: graft rejection, graft re-rupture, transmission of infection and synovitis evoked by immune response. PMID:10853785

  1. Oil and turmoil: America faces OPEC and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Rustow, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Middle-East expert Rustow traces the chain of events that placed economic power in an unstable region. He recounts how European imperialists acquired and surrendered their positions of domination, how nationalists such as Nasser and Qaddafi sought to manipulate the superpowers, and how leaders such as Sadat and Begin wrestled with war and peace. Meanwhile, the oil industry's Seven Sisters lost their preeminence as OPEC grew from a loose confederacy of oil shiekdoms into a cartel strong enough to shake the world economy. Rustow analyzes the confusion in oil-consuming countries that led to long gasoline lines one year and talk of an oil glut and OPEC's collapse the next. He puts into context Washington's uneven efforts to bring stability to the strife-torn Middle East. 221 references, 3 figures, 7 tables.

  2. A Lagrange multiplier based divide and conquer finite element algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, C.

    1991-01-01

    A novel domain decomposition method based on a hybrid variational principle is presented. Prior to any computation, a given finite element mesh is torn into a set of totally disconnected submeshes. First, an incomplete solution is computed in each subdomain. Next, the compatibility of the displacement field at the interface nodes is enforced via discrete, polynomial and/or piecewise polynomial Lagrange multipliers. In the static case, each floating subdomain induces a local singularity that is resolved very efficiently. The interface problem associated with this domain decomposition method is, in general, indefinite and of variable size. A dedicated conjugate projected gradient algorithm is developed for solving the latter problem when it is not feasible to explicitly assemble the interface operator. When implemented on local memory multiprocessors, the proposed methodology requires less interprocessor communication than the classical method of substructuring. It is also suitable for parallel/vector computers with shared memory and compares favorably with factorization based parallel direct methods.

  3. Kalman detection of landmines in metal detector array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeynayake, Canicious G.; Chant, Ian J.; Nash, Graeme

    2003-09-01

    Tens of millions of mines are currently buried in a number of countries around the world. They cause injuries to civilians and economic damage to war-torn countries by restricting the civilian access to huge agricultural lands. Rapid Route and Area Mine Neutralisation System (RRAMNS) is a Capability Technology Demonstrator (CTD) conducted by Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) in Australia. The detection system consists of three sensors: a metal detector array, an array of ground penetrating radar (GPR), and forward looking infrared and visual imaging systems. The Kalman filter-based detection technique has previously been shown to be a powerful tool for detection of landmines from metal detector data. In this paper scalar Kalman filter-based detection algorithm has been extended to the multi-dimensional case. The new version of the detection technique has been successfully implemented in RRAMNS real-time mine detection system.

  4. Hymen care for unmarried Muslim females: role of the forensic consultant in gynaecology interventions.

    PubMed

    Abder-Rahman, H A

    2009-01-01

    This case series illustrates the role of the forensic consultant in hymen care for unmarried Muslim females exposed to gynaecology interventions. The age range of the 12 females attending University of Jordan Hospital in Amman was 35 days to 28 years. Gynaecology interventions included the use of a vaginoscope, circular resection of the hymen in cases of congenital imperforate hymen, evacuation of perineal abscess and evaluation of a torn hymen. The forensic consultant provides a valuable role in reassuring patients and parents about procedures used to avoid rupturing the hymen, and in protecting the gynaecologist's and patients' rights by providing reports of the status of the hymen before and after intervention in cases where damage is unavoidable.

  5. The struggle of giving up personal goals: affective, physiological, and cognitive consequences of an action crisis.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Veronika; Herrmann, Marcel; Schüler, Julia

    2013-12-01

    A critical phase in goal striving occurs when setbacks accumulate and goal disengagement becomes an issue. This critical phase is conceptualized as an action crisis and assumed to be characterized by an intrapsychic conflict in which the individual becomes torn between further goal pursuit and goal disengagement. Our theorizing converges with Klinger's conceptualization of goal disengagement as a process, rather than a discrete event. Two longitudinal field studies tested and found support for the hypothesis that an action crisis not only compromises an individual's psychological and physiological well-being, but also dampens the cognitive evaluation of the respective goal. In Study 3, marathon runners experiencing an action crisis in their goal of running marathons showed a stronger cortisol secretion and a lower performance in the race 2 weeks later. Results are interpreted in terms of action-phase-specific mindsets with a focus on self-regulatory processes in goal disengagement.

  6. Postoperative imaging in femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Tobias J; Dora, Claudio; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2013-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been recognized as a common cause of pain, limited range of motion, and development of early osteoarthritis of the hip in adolescents and adults. Current surgical approaches include femoral osteochondroplasty, acetabular rim resection, and reattachment of torn labrum as either open surgical or arthroscopic techniques as well as periacetabular osteotomy. Conventional radiographs are routinely obtained in the postoperative setting. In addition, MRI serves for work-up in patients with persistent or recurrent groin pain after surgery. Inappropriate correction of the underlying femoral or acetabular osseous abnormality, insufficiency fractures of the femoral neck due to bone resection, intra-articular adhesions, ongoing joint degeneration including advanced cartilage damage, iatrogenic cartilage injury, retear of the labrum, rarely avascular necrosis of the femoral head, defects of the hip joint capsule, or heterotopic ossification might be observed after surgery for FAI. PMID:23787981

  7. Spontaneous healing of a displaced bucket-handle tear of the lateral meniscus in a child.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Hwi; Song, Jae Gwang; Kwon, Jae Ho; Kang, Kyung Woon; Shah, Daviesh; Nha, Kyung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Bucket-handle tears less frequently occur in the lateral meniscus than in the medial meniscus. An 11-year-old male patient complained of painful swelling and locking due to a displaced bucket-handle tear of the lateral meniscus. We recommended an arthroscopic surgery; however, the patient left the hospital without surgical treatment. Six weeks afterwards, he returned without any complain of pain and he regained full range of motion. The final follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed reduction of the torn meniscal fragment without any signal changes suggestive of a meniscal tear. We report a rare case of an isolated displaced bucket-handle tear of the lateral meniscus in an 11-year-old patient that healed spontaneously without surgical intervention.

  8. Ho:YAG laser arthroscopy of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisto, Domenick J.; Blazina, Martin E.; Hirsh, Linda C.

    1994-09-01

    The HO:YAG laser is a near-contact laser with a capacity to ablate or cut tissues. The ablation function allows the surgeon to remove meniscal tissue, lyse and resect adhesions, melt loose bodies, and dissolve inflamed synovium. The cutting function of the laser is utilized to perform a lateral release or resect torn menisci. The laser can also be utilized to drill holes in Grade IV chondromalacic lesions to initiate a healing response. The laser has been embraced by orthopaedic surgeons because of its shape and versatility. The tip is only 2 mm wide and can be delivered into the tight posterior compartments of the knee with no damaging contact with the articular surfaces. The laser coagulates as it works and bleeding is minimized. The laser can function both as a cutting and ablating tool. The laser can also drill holes into subchondral bone to, hopefully, initiate a healing response.

  9. Spontaneous Recurrent Hemarthrosis of the Knee: A Report of Two Cases with a Source of Bleeding Detected during Arthroscopic Surgery of the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Eisuke; Hiraoka, Hisatada

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of the spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee. In these cases lateral meniscus was severely torn and a small tubular soft tissue with pulsation was identified on the synovium in the posterolateral corner during arthroscopic surgery of the knee joint. Gentle grasping of this tissue by forceps led to pulsating bleeding, which stopped by electrocoagulation. This soft tissue was considered a source of bleeding, since no recurrence of hemarthrosis was observed for more than four years after surgery. It was highly probable that this soft tissue was the ruptured end of the lateral inferior genicular artery or its branch. This case report strongly supports the theory that the bleeding from the peripheral arteries of the posterior portion of the lateral meniscus is the cause of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee. PMID:27703824

  10. Lightning strike in golf practice.

    PubMed

    Elena-Sorando, E; Galeano-Ricaño, N; Agulló-Domingo, A; Cimorra-Moreno, G; Gil-Castillo, C

    2006-03-31

    The case is presented of a golfer who was struck by lightning while playing golf during a thunderstorm. The patient was found lying unconscious on wet grass with his clothes scorched and his spiked golf shoes torn. He had suffered dermal burns affecting the neck, thorax, abdomen, and upper and lower limbs (10% total body surface area), without any cardiovascular or respiratory disturbances. It may be hypothesized that the lightning current went over the outside of the patient, causing ignition of his clothes. Treatment included monitoring, adequate fluid management, debridement, and topical treatment (silver sulphadiazine). Complete healing of the wounds was achieved in two weeks. After three years' follow-up, the patient had no sequelae. PMID:21991022

  11. Mapping the human genome--friend or foe?

    PubMed

    McLean, S A

    1994-11-01

    The Human Genome Project represents one of science's most significant advances. It offers to individuals and communities the capacity to make informed and autonomous decisions. However, it also poses fundamental questions which, it is argued, should be in contemplation now. If mechanisms for the resolution of these issues are not in place before the conclusion of the project, and are not available to guide and control its progress, individual privacy may be seriously affected. Employers, insurers and many other groups may seek access to information which would otherwise be confidential to the individual; families may be torn apart by the information held by one member in respect of the collective gene pool of the family unit. The law has a key role to play in encouraging the sensible use of this information, whilst at the same time protecting individuals and their rights.

  12. Essentials of anterior cruciate ligament rupture management.

    PubMed

    Klinge, Stephen A; Sawyer, Gregory A; Hulstyn, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee injury and an understanding of current medical knowledge regarding its management is essential. Accurate and prompt diagnosis requires an awareness of injury mechanisms and risk factors, common symptoms and physical/radiologic findings. Early mobilization and physical therapy improves outcomes regardless of treatment modality. Many older patients regain sufficient stability and function after non-operative rehabilitation. Early ACL reconstruction is appropriate for younger patients and those who engage in activities requiring frequent pivoting and rapid direction changes. ACL surgery involves reconstruction of the torn ligament tissue with various replacement graft options, each with advantages and disadvantages. The guidance of a knowledgeable and experienced therapist is required throughout an intensive and prolonged rehabilitation course. Generally excellent outcomes and low complication rates are expected, but treatment does not prevent late osteoarthritis.

  13. First do no harm? Female hysteria, trauma, and the (bio)logic of violence in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    In Iraq, women are frequently rushed to the hospital in severe anxiety, diagnosed by medical professionals in local hospitals as "hysterical." The treatments proffered are often disturbingly violent in their own right, indicating the normalization of violence in the conflict zone and the rationalizing discourses of biomedicine to this end. Based on fieldwork in the northern Kurdish region, held to be a prosperous beacon of "postconflict" stability in an otherwise war-torn country, I consider the ways in which neoliberal interventionist agendas, medical technologies in the aftermath of war, and gendered narratives of the Kurdish nation coalesce to valorize particular forms of suffering while devaluing others as both inherently "feminine" and devoid of either agency or recuperative value. I argue that the violence of such biomedical beliefs forms a "natural" rationalized corollary of wider logics of violence in the war zone, and that both inscribe non-normative expressions of trauma in gendered terms.

  14. Posteroinferior acromioclavicular dislocation with supraspinatus tear. A case report.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, K; Hamada, K; Gotoh, M; Miyazaki, S; Fukuda, H

    1998-08-01

    A 20-year-old man was treated for posteroinferior acromioclavicular dislocation. The diagnosis was based on standard radiographs and intraoperative findings. The distal end of the clavicle had impaled the supraspinatus muscle. Open reduction was performed 2 weeks after injury, followed by wire fixation of the acromioclavicular joint and repair of the torn superior acromioclavicular ligament and coracoclavicular ligaments. Two years after the procedure, standard radiographs revealed normal anatomic alignment of the acromioclavicular joint, with pain free range of motion. Active elevation in the scapular plane was 180 degrees, active external rotation was 80 degrees in the anatomic position, and passive internal rotation was to the T5 vertebra. The patient returned to playing baseball and tennis and was satisfied with the postoperative result.

  15. The Rationale for Identifying Clinical Predictors Modifiable by Tissue Engineering for Translational Models

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Warren R.

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a “bedside-to-bench” approach as a model to improve clinical outcomes for patients through functional tissue engineering (TE). The link between the highest level of clinical research and evaluation criteria for musculoskeletal TE is in identifying clinically proven predictors that are amenable to functional TE. The TE solutions developed in the laboratory should then be tested in translational models to evaluate efficacy and safety prior to controlled clinical trials. The best available evidence for potentially decreasing the incidence of radiographically confirmed osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury is preservation of meniscus function. Meniscus tears occur concurrently in ∼50% of anterior cruciate ligament tears. TE could promote repair of torn meniscus and/or replacement of meniscus loss because meniscus tear is a proven predictor of clinically relevant outcomes (such as osteoarthritis) in patients and is amenable to a potential TE solution. PMID:20078240

  16. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks.

  17. Making a good thing even better

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, S.

    1997-05-01

    The demolition industry is a $2-billion-a-year industry that generates up to 25% of the waste stream in some parts of the US. According to the National Association of Demolition Contractors (NADC, Doylestown, PA), approximately 900 companies are involved in this trade, although no reliable figures exist on how many square feet of buildings are torn down each year or how many tons of materials are actually handled. As landfill tipping fees have increased, this very competitive industry has developed a variety of alternatives to disposal. Diversion rates between 60--80% are typical in the industry and, depending on the type of building involved, much higher rates are achievable. Although the demolition industry often diverts its debris at rates of 60--80%, higher rates are achievable. All it takes is a few small changes in the economic landscape to increase the demand for materials and reduce the costs associated with their recovery.

  18. Rupture of anterior lens capsule from blunt ocular injury.

    PubMed

    Banitt, Michael R; Malta, João B; Mian, Shahzad I; Soong, H Kaz

    2009-05-01

    We report 3 cases of blunt trauma causing rupture of the anterior lens capsule with cataract formation. The injuries were caused by a paintball gun, a ball-bearing air pistol, and an aluminum rivet. In all 3 cases, the anterior capsule tears were central and the posterior capsules and zonules intact; uneventful cataract extraction with implantation of an intraocular lens was performed. The postoperative visual acuities was 20/40 in 1 case and 20/20 in the other 2 cases. We propose that the anterior lens capsule may have been torn by direct contusion from rapid focal indentation of the cornea onto the lens (coup injury) or by a fluid-mechanical, anteriorly directed rebound of the vitreous, bursting open the anterior capsule (contrecoup injury).

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell applications to tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendons are often subject to age related degenerative changes that coincide with a diminished regenerative capacity. Torn tendons often heal by forming scar tissue that is structurally weaker than healthy native tendon tissue, predisposing to mechanical failure. There is increasing interest in providing biological stimuli to increase the tendon reparative response. Stem cells in particular are an exciting and promising prospect as they have the potential to provide appropriate cellular signals to encourage neotendon formation during repair rather than scar tissue. Currently, a number of issues need to be investigated further before it can be determined whether stem cells are an effective and safe therapeutic option for encouraging tendon repair. This review explores the in-vitro and invivo evidence assessing the effect of stem cells on tendon healing, as well as the potential clinical applications. PMID:23738300

  20. The coastal fishes and fisheries of the Socotra Archipelago, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Zajonz, Uwe; Lavergne, Edouard; Klaus, Rebecca; Krupp, Friedhelm; Aideed, Moteah Sheikh; Saeed, Fouad Naseeb

    2016-04-30

    The Socotra Archipelago is situated in the Gulf of Aden where tropical and "pseudo-temperate" conditions combine to create a unique marine ecosystem. The diversity, ecology, productivity and fisheries of the coastal fish assemblages are still relatively understudied and no update of the scientific knowledge existed. The islands support unique coastal and coral-associated fish assemblages in spite of the limited biogenic reef frameworks. Fish diversity is the highest among comparable Arabian eco-regions, and fish biomass productivity high too by Indian Ocean standards. The production of the once traditionally-managed small-scale fishery is severely declining and whether it is sustainable nowadays is extremely doubtful. At a time when Yemen is torn apart by a severe political and humanitarian crisis it is timely to review and update the current state of knowledge for scientists and managers, and thereby ease access to existing information, facilitating follow-on studies and evidence-based conservation and fisheries management.

  1. Review: Modelling of meniscus of knee joint during soccer kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azrul Hisham Mohd Adib, Mohd; Firdaus Jaafar, Mohd

    2013-12-01

    Knee is a part of the body that located between thigh and shank is one of the most complicated and largest joints in the human body. The common injuries that occur are ligaments, meniscus or bone fracture. During soccer games, the knee is the most critical part that will easily injure due to the shock from an external impact. Torn meniscus is one of the effects. This study will investigate the effect towards the meniscus within the knee joint during soccer ball kicking. We conduct a literary review of 14 journals that discuss the general view of meniscus and also soccer kicking. The selected topics for this review paper are meniscal function, meniscal movement, meniscal tears and also instep kick. As a finding, statistics show that most meniscal tears (73%) occurred in athletes who were soccer players, basketball players or skiers. The tear is frequently happening at the medial side rather than lateral side with a percentage of 70%.

  2. Pathognomonic symptom associated with lightning strike: Lichtenberg figure.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Mehmet; Tanrikulu, Nazmiye; Turkdogan, Kenan Ahmet; Yigit, Eda

    2015-02-01

    Lightning strikes especially occur during spring and summer months in the afternoons when there is heavy rain. In deaths resulting from lightning strike, there may either be no evidence on the dead person's clothes or body, or there may be burnt or torn patches on their clothes and lichtenberg figures specific to lightning strikes on their bodies. In such cases that also have a comorbid of cognitive dysfunction, since there is generally amnesia, having these figures during the physical examination has a valuable place in early diagnosis and quick treatment. This paper presents a case of lightning strike that was found to have Lichtenberg figures on the back and right leg after secondary examination.

  3. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations.

    PubMed

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks. PMID:26501413

  4. The Palestinian/Israeli Conflict: a geopolitical identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Ira

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the author considers that the large-group dynamics in certain war-torn, hot spots throughout the world are symptoms of a "geopolitical identity disorder." He extrapolates from the model of the severely traumatized psyche in dissociative identity disorder in which there is so much intolerable emotion, destructive aggression and conflict that different selves with different identities develop which are unable to recognize how interdependent and related they actually are. In the most extreme cases, one dissociated self tries to kill off "the other" in order to gain exclusive control of the body and make it comply with his or her wishes and vision. In actuality, however, such an attempt is a dissociated suicide plan with lethal implications. This model is applied to the Palestinian/Israeli situation where there is a deadly battle over the land. A clinical vignette is offered to illustrate these ideas and offer possibilities for help.

  5. Payload bay doors and radiator panels familiarization handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godbold, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The structure and mechanisms associated with the Payload Bay Doors (PLBDs) and the radiator panels are detailed. The PLBDs allow the radiator panels to be exposed to space, protect payloads from contamination, and provide an aerodynamic fairing over the payload bay. The radiator panels dissipate heat from the orbiter and regulate hydraulic fluid temperature. Contamination in the payload bay can hinder the success of missions. Therefore, the contamination control barrier which the PLBDs provide must be efficient in keeping the bay free from contaminants. The aerodynamic fairing the PLBDs provide prevents the orbiter from being torn apart by aerodynamic forces. These facts make the PLBDs and radiator panels mission critical elements of the Space Shuttle.

  6. [The influence of sports injuries on sport participation and work].

    PubMed

    Nel, D; Smit, P J; Stoker, D J

    1979-03-17

    The incidence and complications of sport injuries in athletics, basketball, gymnastics, hockey, netball, cricket, tennis and soccer were analysed from questionnaire responses of 239 sport participants in Pretoria. Lower limb injuries were most common (73%). Torn tendomuscular organs represented 29,3% of the total number of injuries; sprains, strains and dislocations 35,9%; and fractures 20,5%. Medical treatment was sought by 62,8% of the patients. A total of 60,7% of the subjects was advised to suspend further participation in sport, but 30,6% failed to do so and more than half of these again sustained injuries. Those who were booked off from work totalled 18,0%, but a further 4,5% stayed away from work voluntarily.

  7. Arthroscopy of the wrist: anatomy and classification of carpal instability.

    PubMed

    Cooney, W P; Dobyns, J H; Linscheid, R L

    1990-01-01

    Carpal instability can be defined as the lack of ligamentous and skeletal support adequate to maintain a wrist stable to external forces of pinch and grasp. This instability may be static or dynamic. It has been classified as (a) carpal instability, dissociated (CID), a situation in which one or more of the ligaments are torn, and (b) carpal instability, nondissociative (CIND), a situation in which the ligaments are intact but stretched. Carpal instability can also be the result of carpal bone malalignment from various causes. Arthroscopy can be particularly useful in assessing carpal instability, however arthrography with contrast medium, fluoroscopy, and stress loading should precede this arthroscopic assessment. Arthroscopy allows visualization of the volar radiocarpal and ulnocarpal ligaments of the wrist, and the arthroscopic examination can be combined with manual manipulation of the carpal bones to detect laxity of those ligaments, to examine stability of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral interosseous ligaments, and to show instability of the distal radioulnar joint.

  8. The thread of depression throughout the life and works of Leo Tolstoy.

    PubMed

    Anargyros-Klinger, Annie

    2002-04-01

    Tolstoy, the author of two masterpieces, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, remains a writer of genius. Yet, after writing War and Peace, his existence had been torn apart by a serious depression. This depression, which was melancholic in character, almost destroyed him and, once he had finished Anna Karenina, led him to want to renounce not only sexuality but also literary creation and material possessions. Through examining Tolstoy's life and work, the author tries to uncover the underground paths of this depression, which emerged brutally in the middle of his life, and to understand why his creative genius dried up. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Tolstoy turned away from his artistic work, declaring that 'art is not only useless but even harmful', and thereafter devoted himself to philosophical, political and religious writings. These new sublimations would help him to recover his health. PMID:12040704

  9. Mechanized and natural soil-to-air transfer of trifluralin and prometryn from a cotton field in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Holmén, Britt A; Kasumba, John; Hiscox, April; Wang, Junming; Miller, David

    2013-10-16

    Two pre-emergence herbicides (trifluralin and prometryn) were applied on a cotton field in Las Cruces, New Mexico, and their atmospheric particle and gas-phase concentrations were measured during mechanized soil preparation and natural wind erosion sampling events before and after herbicide application. Air sampling was conducted using samplers mounted at various heights from the ground and at various locations on the field. During mechanized soil management with a disk harrow, sampling occurred at two distances from the tractor ("near-source", 4 m downwind and "far-source", 20-100 m from the disking tractor). Natural background (no disking) sampling events occurred during daytime and at night. Both herbicides were quantifiable for all postapplication sampling events, including background sampling that occurred 8, 38, and 40 days after herbicide application. Average concentrations in both the gas and particle phases ranged from about 10 to 350 ng/m(3). Averaging by event type, mean total prometryn concentrations were 2 (night background) to 8 (near-source) times higher than the corresponding trifluralin concentrations. Prometryn/trifluralin ratios were higher in airborne samples than in soil, indicative of trifluralin losses during daytime sampling, possibly via atmospheric reactions. Prometryn particle phase mass fractions were generally higher than those for trifluralin for all sampling events, consistent with Kair/soil-oc partition coefficients, and particle-phase mass fractions were higher for near-source disking and daytime background sampling compared to far-source and nighttime. Daytime natural background prometryn concentrations could be as high as those measured during disking, and background samples showed significant relationships to meteorological parameters (air temperature, relative humidity, and dewpoint). Mechanical disturbance by tilling operations reduced the ability to predict airborne herbicide concentrations on the basis of meteorological

  10. Soft X-Ray Exposure Testing of FEP Teflon for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.

    1998-01-01

    The FEP Teflon (DuPont) multilayer insulation (MLI) thermal-control blanket material on the Hubble Space Telescope is degrading in the space environment. During the first Hubble servicing mission in 1993, after 3.6 years in low Earth orbit, aluminized and silvered FEP Teflon MLI thermal-control blanket materials were retrieved. These materials have been jointly analyzed by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for degradation induced in the space environment (ref. 1). Solar-facing blanket materials were found to be embrittled with through-the-thickness cracking in the 5-mil FEP. During the second Hubble servicing mission in 1997, astronauts noticed that several blankets had large areas with tears. The torn FEP was curled up in some areas, exposing the underlying materials to the space environment. This tearing problem, and the associated curling up of torn areas, could lead to over-heating of the telescope and to particulate contamination. A Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board was assembled by Goddard to investigate and identify the degradation mechanism of the FEP, to identify and characterize replacement materials, and to estimate the extent of damage at the time of the third servicing mission in 1999. A small piece of FEP retrieved during the second servicing mission is being evaluated by this failure review board along with materials from the first servicing mission. Since the first servicing mission, and as part of the failure review board, Lewis has been exposing FEP to soft x-rays to help determine the damage mechanisms of FEP in the space environment. Soft x-rays, which can penetrate into the bulk of FEP, are generated during solar flares and appear to be contributing to the degradation of the Hubble MLI.

  11. Diary of an astronaut: examination of the remains of the late Israeli astronaut Colonel Ilan Ramon's Crew Notebook recovered after the loss of NASA's space shuttle Columbia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon; Sin-David, Laser

    2007-05-01

    Two months after the fatal re-entering into the Earth's atmosphere of Columbia flight STS-107, the remains of Israeli astronaut Colonel Ilan Ramon's Crew Notebook were found strewn in a field in San Augustine County, TX. The random pile of papers was found to have survived the calamity of the Shuttle's disintegration remarkably well. Most of the papers recovered were torn and/or washed out to varying degrees but only mildly charred around the edges. The sheets of paper could be categorized into four groups: Group I: eight sides of paper written while in space in black ink and in pencil--Ramon's personal diary; the writing on these eight sides of paper survived well and is only missing where the pages were torn. Small fragments found in the field were physically matched to holes in the pages thus locating their original positions in the text. Group II: six sides of technical preparation notes written by Ramon before the mission. The writing on these pages was washed out entirely, but much of it was visualized using infrared luminescence. Group III: eight sides of personal notes prepared by Ramon before the mission written in blue ink. The writing on these pages was barely visible to the naked eye and not visualized by infrared luminescence, but was made largely legible by digital enhancement imaging. Group IV: a few sides of printed technical information. These pages were mostly intact and were not examined at length as they contained standard printed material. After completion of examinations at the Questioned Document Laboratory of the Israel Police, the diary was transferred to the Paper Conservation Department of the Israel Museum for preservation and strengthening treatments.

  12. Warping and tearing of misaligned circumbinary disks around eccentric supermassive black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaki, K.; Sohn, B.W.; Jung, T.; Zhao, G.; Okazaki, A.T.; Naito, T. E-mail: bwsohn@kasi.re.kr E-mail: thjung@kasi.re.kr E-mail: tsuguya@ygu.ac.jp

    2015-07-01

    We study the warping and tearing of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on an eccentric orbit. The circumbinary disk is significantly misaligned with the binary orbital plane, and is subject to the time-dependent tidal torques. In principle, such a disk is warped and precesses, and is torn into mutually misaligned rings in the region, where the tidal precession torques are stronger than the local viscous torques. We derive the tidal-warp and tearing radii of the misaligned circumbinary disks around eccentric SMBH binaries. We find that in disks with the viscosity parameter α larger than a critical value depending on the disk aspect ratio, the disk warping appears outside the tearing radius. This condition is expressed for small amplitude warps as α > √H/(3r) for H/r∼<0.1, where H is the disk scale height. If α < √H/(3r), only the disk tearing occurs because the tidal warp radius is inside the tearing radius, where most of disk material is likely to rapidly accrete onto SMBHs. In warped and torn disks, both the tidal-warp and the tearing radii most strongly depend on the binary semi-major axis, although they also mildly depend on the other orbital and disk parameters. This strong dependence enables us to estimate the semi-major axis, once the tidal warp or tearing radius is determined observationally: for the tidal warp radius of 0.1 pc, the semi-major axis is estimated to be ∼10{sup −2} pc for 10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙} black hole with typical orbital and disk parameters. We also briefly discuss the possibility that central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are supermassive black hole binaries.

  13. The potential of optical coherence tomography in meniscal tear characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hang-yin; Guo, Shuguang; Thieman, Kelley M.; Wise, Brent T.; Pozzi, Antonio; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2009-02-01

    Meniscal tear is one of the most common knee injuries leading to pain and discomfort. Partial and total meniscectomies have been widely used to treat the avascular meniscal injuries in which tears do not heal spontaneously. However, the meniscectomies would cause an alteration of the tibiofemoral contact mechanics resulting in progressive osteoarthritis (OA). To mitigate the progression of OA, maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is recommended. The clinical challenge is deciding which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and which part of damaged tissues should be removed. Current diagnosis techniques such as arthroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging can provide macrostructural information of menisci, but the microstructural changes that occur prior to the observable meniscal tears cannot be identified by these techniques. Serving as a nondestructive optical biopsy, optical coherence tomography (OCT), a newly developed imaging modality, can provide high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissues and has been shown its capabilty in arthroscopic evaulation of articular cartilage. Our research was to demonstrate the potential of using OCT for nondestructive characterization of the histopathology of different types of meniscal tears from clinical cases in dogs, providing a fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of meniscal tears. First, cross-sectional images of torn canine menisci obtained from the OCT and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were be compared. By studying the organization of collegan fibrils in torn menisci from the SEM images, the feasibility of using OCT to characterize the organization of collegan fibrils was elucidated. Moreover, the crack size of meniscal tears was quantatitively measured from the OCT images. Changes in the crack size of the tear may be useful for understanding the failure mechanism of meniscal tears.

  14. The fracture properties and mechanical design of human fingernails.

    PubMed

    Farren, L; Shayler, S; Ennos, A R

    2004-02-01

    Fingernails are a characteristic feature of primates, and are composed of three layers of the fibrous composite keratin. This study examined the structure and fracture properties of human fingernails to determine how they resist bending forces while preventing fractures running longitudinally into the nail bed. Nail clippings were first torn manually to examine the preferred crack direction. Next, scissor cutting tests were carried out to compare the fracture toughness of central and outer areas in both the transverse and longitudinal direction. The fracture toughness of each of the three isolated layers was also measured in this way to determine their relative contributions to the toughness. Finally, the structure was examined by carrying out scanning electron microscopy of free fracture surfaces and polarized light microscopy of nail sections. When nails were torn, cracks were always diverted transversely, parallel to the free edge of the nail. Cutting tests showed that this occurred because the energy to cut nails transversely, at approximately 3 kJ m(-2), was about half that needed (approx. 6 kJ m(-2)) to cut them longitudinally. This anisotropy was imparted by the thick intermediate layer, which comprises long, narrow cells that are oriented transversely; the energy needed to cut this layer transversely was only a quarter of that needed to cut it longitudinally. In contrast the tile-like cells in the thinner dorsal and ventral layers showed isotropic behaviour. They probably act to increase the nail's bending strength, and as they wrap around the edge of the nail, they also help prevent cracks from forming. These results cast light on the mechanical behaviour and care of fingernails.

  15. Andic soils : mineralogical effect onto organic matter dynamics, organic matter effect onto mineral dynamics, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Amundson, Ronald; Balesdent, Jérome; Borschneck, Daniel; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Colin, Fabrice; de Junet, Alexis; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Legros, Samuel; Levard, Clément; Masion, Armand; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Rose, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    From a strictly mineralogical point of view, weathering of volcanic glass produces secondary phases that are short range ordered alumino-silicates (SRO-AlSi). These are imogolite tubes (2 to 3 nm of diameter) and allophane supposedly spheres (3.5 to 5 nm). Their local structure is composed of a curved gibbsite Al layer and Si tetrahedra in the vacancies (Q0). Proto-imogolites have the same local structure but are roof-shape nanoparticles likely representing the precursors of imogolite and allophanes (Levard et al. 2010). These structures and sizes give to the SRO-AlSi large specific surfaces and high reactivities. In some natural sites, imogolites and allophanes are formed in large quantities. Aging of these phases may lead to the formation of more stable minerals (halloysite, kaolinite and gibbsite) (Torn et al 1997). In natural environments, when the weathering of volcanic glass is associated with the establishment of vegetation, the soils formed are generally andosols. These soils are particularly rich in organic matter (OM), which is explained by the high ability of SRO-AlSi mineral phases to form bonds with organic compounds. In a first order "bulk" approach, it is considered that these bonds strongly stabilize the organic compounds as their mean age can reach more than 10 kyrs in some studied sites (Basile-Doelsch et al. 2005; Torn et al. 1997). However, the structure of the mineral phases present in andosols deserves more attention. Traditionally, the presence in the SRO-AlSi andosols was shown by selective dissolution approaches by oxalate and pyrophosphate. Using spectroscopic methods, mineralogical analysis of SRO-AlSi in andosols samples showed that these mineral phases were neither imogolites nor allophanes as originally supposed, but only less organized structures remained in a state of proto-imogolites (Basile-Doelsch al. 2005 ; Levard et al., 2012). The presence of OM would have an inhibitory effect on the formation of secondary mineral phases, by

  16. Spin Complicates Eccentric BH-NS Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    When a neutron star (NS) has a glancing encounter with a black hole (BH), its spin has a significant effect on the outcome, according to new simulations run by William East of Stanford University and his collaborators. Spotting an Eccentric Merger. In a traditional BH-NS merger, the two objects orbit each other quasi-circularly as they spiral in. But there's another kind of merger that's possible in high-density environments like galactic nuclei or globular clusters: a dynamical capture merger, in which a NS and BH pass each other just close enough that the gravity of the black hole "catches" the NS, leading the two objects to merge with very eccentric orbits. During an eccentric merger, the NS can be torn apart -- at which point some fraction of the tidally-disrupted material will escape the system, while some fraction instead accretes back onto the BH. Knowing these fractions is important for being able to model the expected electromagnetic signatures for the merger: the unbound material can power transients like kilonovae, whereas the accreting material may be the cause of short gamma-ray bursts. The amount of material available for events like these would change their observable strengths. Testing the Effects of Spin. To see whether NS spin has an impact on the behavior of the merger, East and collaborators use a general-relativistic hydrodynamic code to simulate the glancing encounter of a BH and a NS with dimensionless spin between a=0 (non-spinning) and a=0.756 (rotation period of 1 ms). They also vary the separation of the first encounter. The group finds that changing the NS's spin can change a number of outcomes of the merger. To start with, it can affect whether the NS is captured by the BH, or if the encounter is glancing and then both objects carry on their merry way. And if the NS is trapped by the BH and torn apart, then the higher the NS's spin, the more matter outside of the BH ends up unbound, instead of getting trapped into an accretion disk

  17. Human β-NGF gene transferred to cat corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen-Juan; Liu, Min; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Wang, Chuan-Fu; Hu, Li-Ting; Liu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM To transfect the cat corneal endothelial cells (CECs) with recombinant human β-nerve growth factor gene adeno-associated virus (AAV-β-NGF) and to observe the effect of the expressed β-NGF protein on the proliferation activity of cat CECs. METHODS The endothelium of cat cornea was torn under the microscope and rapidly cultivated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) to form single layer CECs and the passage 2 endothelial cells were used in this experiment. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was constructed. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was transferred into cat CECs directly. Three groups were as following: normal CEC control group, CEC-AAV control group and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group. Forty-eight hours after transfection, the total RNA was extracted from the CEC by Trizol. The expression of the β-NGF target gene detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction; proliferation activity of the transfected CEC detected at 48h by MTT assay; the percentage of G1 cells among CECs after transfect was detected by flow cytometry method (FCM); cell morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast microscope. RESULTS The torn endothelium culture technique rapidly cultivated single layer cat corneal endothelial cells. The self-designed primers for the target gene and reference gene were efficient and special confirmed through electrophoresis analysis and DNA sequencing. Forty-eight hours after transfect, the human β-NGF gene mRNA detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05); there was significant difference between two control groups and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group (P<0.05). MTT assay showed that transfect of recombinant AAV-β-NGF promoted the proliferation activity of cat CEC, while there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05). FCM result

  18. Acromioclavicular joint instability: anatomy, biomechanics and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Maristella F; DE Ieso, Carmine; Milano, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint instability is a common source of pain and disability. The injury is most commonly a result of a direct impact to the AC joint. The AC joint is surrounded by a capsule and has an intra-articular synovium and an articular cartilage interface. An articular disc is usually present in the joint, but this varies in size and shape. The AC joint capsule is quite thin, but has considerable ligamentous support; there are four AC ligaments: superior, inferior, anterior and posterior. The coracoclavicular (CC) ligament complex consists of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments. They insert on the posteromedial and anterolateral region of the undersurface of the distal clavicle, respectively. The coracoid origin of the trapezoid covers the posterior half of the coracoid dorsum; the conoid origin is more posterior on the base of the coracoid. Several biomechanical studies showed that horizontal stability of the AC joint is mediated by the AC ligaments while vertical stability is mediated by the CC ligaments. The radiographic classification of AC joint injuries described by Rockwood includes six types: in type I injuries the AC ligaments are sprained, but the joint is intact; in type II injuries, the AC ligaments are torn, but the CC ligaments are intact; in type III injuries both the AC and the CC ligaments are torn; type IV injuries are characterized by complete dislocation with posterior displacement of the distal clavicle into or through the fascia of the trapezius; type V injuries are characterized by a greater degree of soft tissue damage; type VI injuries are inferior AC joint dislocations into a subacromial or subcoracoid position. The diagnosis of AC joint instability can be based on historical data, physical examination and imaging studies. The cross body adduction stress test has the greatest sensitivity, followed by the AC resisted extension test and the O'Brien test. Proper radiographic evaluation of the AC joint is necessary. The Zanca view

  19. A stitch in time: a cross-sectional survey looking at long lasting insecticide-treated bed net ownership, utilization and attrition in SNNPR, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since 2002/03, an estimated 4.7 million nets have been distributed in the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples Region (SNNPR) among an at risk population of approximately 10 million people. Evidence from the region suggests that large-scale net ownership rapidly increased over a relatively short period of time. However, little is known about how coverage is being maintained given that the last mass distribution was in 2006/2007. This study sought to determine the status of current net ownership, utilization and rate of long lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN) loss in the previous three years in the context of planning for future net distribution to try to achieve sustainable universal coverage. Methods A total of 750 household respondents were interviewed across malarious, rural kebeles of SNNPR. Households were randomly selected following a two-stage cluster sampling design where kebeles were defined as clusters. Kebeles were chosen using proportional population sampling (PPS), and 25 households within 30 kebeles randomly chosen. Results Approximately 67.5% (95%CI: 64.1–70.8) of households currently owned at least one net. An estimated 31.0% (95%CI 27.9–34.4) of all nets owned in the previous three years had been discarded by owners, the majority of whom considered the nets too torn, old or dirty (79.9%: 95%CI 75.8–84.0). Households reported that one-third of nets (33.7%) were less than one year old when they were discarded. The majority (58.8%) of currently owned nets had ‘good’ structural integrity according to a proportionate Hole Index. Nearly two-thirds of households (60.6%) reported using their nets the previous night. The overriding reason for not using nets was that they were too torn (45.7%, 95% CI 39.1–50.7). Yet, few households are making repairs to their nets (3.7%, 95% CI: 2.4–5.1). Conclusions Results suggest that the life span of nets may be shorter than previously thought, with little maintenance by their owners

  20. Closed internal degloving injury with conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsing-Lin; Lee, Wei-Che; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Chen, Chao-Wen

    2008-02-01

    In the emergency department, we frequently manage patients with multiple contusions and bruise over the trunk without severe injuries. Emergency department discharge is a common option for these patients, and we may neglect the existence of closed internal degloving injury, which is a soft tissue injury with pelvic trauma, combining the subcutaneous tissue torn away from the underlying fascia followed by a cavity being filled with hematoma and liquefied fat created in the next few days (Harefuah 2006;145:111-3:66, J Trauma 1997;42:1046). We report the unusual occurrence of this entity in an 18-year-old man. He encountered a scooter accident and experienced a few days of hospitalization because of thoracispinal (T10 and T11) process fracture. He was discharged, but a fluctuating mass developed at the lumbar area 10 days later. The comprehensive survey excluded the cerebrospinal fluid leakage associated with spinal fracture, and internal degloving injury was diagnosed. Percutaneous drainage with compressive bondage was aggressively used. Even though the treatment course was time consuming, the lesion eventually disappeared 10 months after his first visit. PMID:18272136

  1. Developing nursing's future role: a challenge for the millennium: 1.

    PubMed

    Naughton, M; Nolan, M

    Over the past decade health care in general and nursing in particular have experienced a period of unprecedented change resulting from a variety of factors including demography, advances in technology and the introduction of differing service delivery systems. For nursing this has created a number of tensions, especially between professional aspirations and the demands of a new managerial culture. Many nurses have found themselves torn between the push towards the ideal of individualized holistic care and the reality of resource constrained environments. The new White Paper 'The New NHS: Modern, Dependable' (Secretary of State for Health, 1997) heralds a move away from the 'short termism' of the internal market towards a partnership model of integrated care. It also reaffirms the Government's commitment to further develop the role of the nurse. This article, the first of two, considers the challenges nurses face in responding to a managerial agenda while simultaneously maintaining the development of the nursing profession. The opportunities afforded by the recent White Paper are identified and the need to address a number of current tensions are highlighted. Developments at the Northern General Hospital in Sheffield are briefly described, with the results of a major survey being presented in the second article.

  2. [Léonie Chaptal (1873-1937), architect of the nursing profession].

    PubMed

    Diebolt, Evelyne

    2012-06-01

    Léonie Chaptal was a wealthy heiress. She had an excellent education that she completed on her own initiative. Between 30 and 40 years old, she founded and managed health charities in a popular and disadvantaged district of Paris. She was interested in all the aspects of life, from birth to death. Though fervent, she lived as an officially laic liberal catholic woman. Her noticeable competency brought her to sit at the Conseil supérieur de l'Assistance publique (Welfare services), where some national decisions of public health were made. Her action against tuberculosis was acknowledged worldwide. She opened a training school in nursing care from 1905, and participated to the national and international debates on this theme of training. During the Great War, she was particularly active. In the 1920s, she presented a report on nursing education which immediately gave rise to the drafting of a decree which structured nursing schools and programs in France, as well as the obtaining of a nursing diploma after two years of studies at school. But to practice, this diploma was not required, what depreciated the function. After having created the French association ANIDEF, she became the president of the International Council of Nurses. Between the wars, the practice of the nursing profession was far below Léonie's aspiration, who was torn between her opponents: some Republicans little likely to favour women's work and some Catholics attached to claim their faith.

  3. Globalisation, complex humanitarian emergencies and health.

    PubMed

    O'Dempsey, T J D; Munslow, B

    2006-01-01

    A new political economy of conflict has emerged in the aftermath of colonialism and the Cold War. Complex political emergencies have been simmering in the post-colonial world for more than three decades. Intra-country armed conflict, often combined with natural disasters, at present contributes to the displacement of over 20 million people world-wide. The international community remains profoundly uncomfortable with the complex political emergencies of the new era, torn between the respect for national sovereignty upon which the international political system of the United Nations and other agencies is built, and the growth of concern with human rights and a burgeoning International Humanitarian Law. Globalisation may have brought many benefits to some but there are also many losers. The Word Bank and the International Monetary Fund imposed structural adjustment policies to ensure debt repayment and economic restructuring that have resulted in a net reduction in expenditure on health, education and development. A downward spiral has been created of debt, disease, malnutrition, missed education, economic entrapment, poverty, powerlessness, marginalization, migration and instability. Africa's complex political emergencies are particularly virulent and tenacious. Three examples that are among the most serious humanitarian emergencies to have faced the world in recent times--those in Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Sudan--are reviewed here in detail. The political evolution of these emergencies and their impact on the health of the affected populations are also explored. PMID:16899151

  4. Communist coalmining union activists and postwar reconstruction, 1945-52: Germany, Poland, and Britain

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, N.; Prazmowska, A.J.; Heith, H.

    2006-01-15

    The demand for coal in war-torn Europe after VE Day gave coalmining trade unions unprecedented bargaining leverage. Miners' incomes had been depressed throughout the interwar period, and they were now anxious to recover their past high wages and improve their conditions. In several key European countries, Communists were prominent among the leadership of mining trade unions. Communist miners' leaders Willi Agatz, Edward Gierek and Arthur Horner each faced unprecedented opportunities and challenges at the onset of the Cold War in 1948, as they sought to fuse their parallel identities as committed and influential Communists and as conscientious trade union negotiators in these newly advantageous circumstances. Each of these three 'revolutionary' trade unionists pursued strategies that revived the position of miners, without undermining the potential for economic recovery in their respective countries - for which an uninterrupted supply of coal remained critical. A comparative study of the personal and political experiences of the three Communist miners' leaders enhances our understanding of the evolution of Communist trade unionism in the early postwar period.

  5. In-place filter testing summary

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, J.P.; Garcia, E.D.; Ortega, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    The most common method of identifying particle penetration through a filter or adsorber system is through the performance of a periodic penetration test, i.e., in-place test or leak test using an aerosol or gas vapor to challenge the filter or adsorber system. The aerosol is usually formed by vaporization of a liquid, di-2(ethelhexyl sebacate) (DEHS), and allowed to condense to form liquid particles of a certain size and distribution. The gas vapor is formed by vaporization of Freon 11 liquid. The periodic penetration test, although conducted annually, can and has been demonstrated to show the beginning degradation of a filter or adsorber system. Other evidence of penetration can include detection of radiation downstream of the filter system or the existence of an unusually low pressure drop across the filter, i.e., torn filter, etc. However, these kinds of occurrences show up instantaneously and could release radioactive material to the atmosphere before the systems could be shut down. When a filter system fails the in--place test or is showing evidence of.filter or component degradation, corrective measures are put into place in order to return,the system back to its best operating condition. This report presents a summary of all filter tests.

  6. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1993-01-01

    We study out Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are not on top of a mountain may once have been on the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of the Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  7. IL-17A mediates inflammatory and tissue remodelling events in early human tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Neal L.; Akbar, Moeed; Campbell, Abigail L.; Reilly, James H.; Kerr, Shauna C.; McLean, Michael; Frleta-Gilchrist, Marina; Fazzi, Umberto G.; Leach, William J.; Rooney, Brian P.; Crowe, Lindsay A. N.; Murrell, George A. C.; McInnes, Iain B.

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, inflammatory mediators are considered crucial to the onset and perpetuation of tendinopathy. We sought evidence of interleukin 17A (IL-17A) expression in early human tendinopathy and thereafter, explored mechanisms whereby IL-17A mediated inflammation and tissue remodeling in human tenocytes. Torn supraspinatus tendon (established pathology) and matched intact subscapularis tendon (representing ‘early pathology’) along with control biopsies were collected from patients undergoing shoulder surgery. Markers of inflammation and IL-17A were quantified by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Human tendon cells were derived from hamstring tendon obtained during ACL reconstruction. In vitro effects of IL-17A upon tenocytes were measured using RT-PCR, multiplex cytokine assays, apoptotic proteomic profiling, immunohistochemistry and annexin V FACS staining. Increased expression of IL-17A was detected in ‘early tendinopathy’ compared to both matched samples and non-matched control samples (p < 0.01) by RT-PCR and immunostaining. Double immunofluoresence staining revealed IL-17A expression in leukocyte subsets including mast cells, macrophages and T cells. IL-17A treated tenocytes exhibited increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (p < 0.001), altered matrix regulation (p < 0.01) with increased Collagen type III and increased expression of several apoptosis related factors. We propose IL-17A as an inflammatory mediator within the early tendinopathy processes thus providing novel therapeutic approaches in the management of tendon disorders. PMID:27263531

  8. High-strength, ultra-thin and fiber-reinforced pHEMA artificial skin.

    PubMed

    Young, C D; Wu, J R; Tsou, T L

    1998-10-01

    Membranes of pHEMA-based composites were manufactured by adding various kinds of weaved and knitted fabrics and fibers into a deionized water solution of HEMA monomer, EGDMA cross-linker and BIE initiator, and followed by polymerization under ultraviolet radiation. By varying the amount of initial water addition (IWA), the dimensional change of pHEMA matrix from the newly fabricated state to the eventually swollen state could be adjusted to reduce the swellability mismatch with the fabrics and the possibility of the swollen membranes becoming folded and curled was avoided. Mechanical properties of the fiber-reinforced pHEMA composites, including yielding strength, maximum strength, Young's modulus and elongation at break, are improved evidently depending on the mechanical characteristics of additives applied. The involvement of fabrics and fibers in the soft pHEMA matrix also provides an alternative of making the ultra-thin membranes to overcome the problem of easily being torn during handling. In addition, some of these membranes also exhibit an improvement in water transmission rate.

  9. Deep India meets deep Asia: Lithospheric indentation, delamination and break-off under Pamir and Hindu Kush (Central Asia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kufner, Sofia-Katerina; Schurr, Bernd; Sippl, Christian; Yuan, Xiaohui; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Akbar, Arib s./of Mohammad; Ischuk, Anatoly; Murodkulov, Shohrukh; Schneider, Felix; Mechie, James; Tilmann, Frederik

    2016-02-01

    Subduction of buoyant continental lithosphere is one of the least understood plate-tectonic processes. Yet under the Pamir-Hindu Kush, at the northwestern margin of the India-Asia collision zone, unusual deep earthquakes and seismic velocity anomalies suggest subduction of Asian and Indian lithosphere. Here, we report new precise earthquake hypocenters, detailed tomographic images and earthquake source mechanisms, which allow distinguishing a narrow sliver of Indian lithosphere beneath the deepest Hindu Kush earthquakes and a broad, arcuate slab of Asian lithosphere beneath the Pamir. We suggest that this double subduction zone arises by contrasting modes of convergence under the Pamir and Hindu Kush, imposed by the different mechanical properties of the three types of lithosphere involved. While the buoyant northwestern salient of Cratonic India bulldozes into Cratonic Asia, forcing delamination and rollback of its lithosphere, India's thinned western continental margin separates from Cratonic India and subducts beneath Asia. This torn-off narrow plate sliver forms a prominent high-velocity anomaly down to the mantle transition zone. Our images show that its uppermost section is thinned or already severed and that intermediate depth earthquakes cluster at the neck connecting it to the deeper slab, providing a rare glimpse at the ephemeral process of slab break-off.

  10. Reeling in the textiles at Row Clothing Enterprises

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, H.

    1997-12-01

    While a handful of textile processing centers in operation today can date their roots back to the turn of this century or before, Row Clothing Enterprises (Baltimore) first opened its doors in 1985. Soon after, it climbed its way to becoming one of the premier textile processing businesses in the country. And what they want most of all is usable clothing--the discards of American secondhand clothing stores. The company exports 100% of the usable clothing it recovers paying institutions as much as $150 a ton for the material. Graders also sort the material into piles headed for the mutilating, or fiber-shredding, machine. While not all the material is shredded, it does provide more opportunities for resale. Whatever Row cannot resell as clothing--because it is soiled or torn--gets processed into industrial wiping cloths, if it is cotton. Clothing made from wool and polyester is sent to woolen and polyester fiber mills to be made into new clothing. While 80% of Row`s wiper market is domestic, 80% of its fiber market is overseas.

  11. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-01-01

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair. PMID:25206505

  12. Multinet growth in the cell wall of Nitella.

    PubMed

    GREEN, P B

    1960-04-01

    Plant cell walls typically consist of crystalline microfibrils embedded in a non-crystalline matrix. The growing cylindrical Nitella cell wall contains microfibrils predominantly oriented in the transverse direction. The present study has shown that the transversely oriented microfibrils are primarily located toward the inner surface of the wall and that, proceeding outward from the inner surface, the wall contains microfibrils of ever poorer transverse orientation, the fibrils being randomly or axially arranged in the outermost regions of the wall. Because cell expansion is primarily in the axial direction, the texture of the fibrillar elements of the wall can be explained by assuming that new microfibrils of transverse orientation are added only at the inner surface of the wall and that they become passively reoriented to the axial direction during cell elongation. The described structure corresponds to that proposed by Roelofsen and Houwink for cells showing "multi-net growth." The demonstration of a continuous gradient of microfibrillar arrangement and its partial quantitative description was accomplished by the analysis, with the polarized light and interference microscopes, of wedge-like torn edges of developing cell walls which were 1 micron or less in optical thickness.

  13. Speaking in the claustrum: the psychodynamics of stuttering.

    PubMed

    Plänkers, T

    1999-04-01

    The author outlines the psychoanalytic theory of stuttering and, discussing material from the analysis of a stutterer and its transference and countertransference processes, puts forward a new hypothesis of the psychodynamics of stuttering in conjunction with Meltzer's theory of the claustrum. He argues that the stutterer is working out intolerable experiences of separation from the primary object and a resulting catastrophic experience of the oedipal situation through an unconscious fantasy in which anal qualities are conferred on the internal maternal object by a predominating hatred. The intrusive identification of parts of the self in the maternal rectum gives rise to a claustrophobic experiential world in which all obstacles that are encountered between self and object must be eliminated. The anal-sadistic object space of the claustrum is projected on to the external object space and thus also on to the mouth as the origin of the sound envelope, where it produces both a lifeless sound envelope and a torn content, i.e. stuttered sounds, words and sentences. Correspondingly, a dead speech melody and broken words have their parallels in object relations that are characterised by an attack on linking and by psychic withdrawal. PMID:10363181

  14. Six decades of educational multilateralism in a globalising world: The history of the UNESCO Institute in Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfert, Maren

    2013-07-01

    Created in 1945 as a specialised agency of the United Nations (UN), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) was given, among other mandates, the task of reconstructing education systems devastated during the Second World War. UNESCO, in turn, and after some debate about an engagement in Germany, founded the UNESCO Institute for Education (UIE) in Hamburg in 1952. This paper traces the development of an institute which was founded to contribute to social renewal in war-torn Germany and Europe, functioned as a mediator between Western and Eastern countries during the Cold War and later shifted its geographical focus to developing countries. The institute was instrumental in conceptualising lifelong learning as a global educational paradigm, as well as in shaping the shift from education to learning and the concept of literacy as a "continuum". The author is particularly interested in the nature of the institute's niche which secured its survival in the uncertain domain of educational multilateralism in the past six decades.

  15. Feline pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism and insulin resistance due to a plurihormonal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Cross, Emily; Moreland, Richard; Wallack, Seth

    2012-02-01

    A 12-year-old female spayed domestic short-haired cat presented for lethargy, poor hair coat, alopecia, difficulty walking, and mild polyuria/polydipsia. The cat's skin tore easily in the neck area during routine restraint for blood draw. Physical examination, blood analysis, and ultrasound imaging were all consistent with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) with secondary insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus, which was nonketotic. Insulin therapy, fluids, and diet change were initiated for the diabetes mellitus and the owner reported improvement in clinical signs although the blood glucose measurements remained elevated. Surgical repair of the torn skin was successful. Although a guarded prognosis was given to the owner because of an advanced stage of hyperadrenocorticism, and the limited treatment options currently available for feline PDH, trilostane was agreed on as an initial therapeutic option. The day trilostane was to be initiated, the cat presented with dyspnea and the owner chose to euthanize. Because of the rarity of hyperadrenocorticism disease in the cat, permission was obtained by the owner for a necropsy to confirm suspected PDH as the underlying cause for insulin resistance and skin fragility syndrome.

  16. Methods used during gross necropsy to determine watercraft-related mortality in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Lightsey, Jessica D; Rommel, Sentiel A; Costidis, Alexander M; Pitchford, Thomas D

    2006-09-01

    Between 1993 and 2003, 713 (24%) of 2,940 dead Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) recovered from Florida waters and examined were killed by watercraft-induced trauma. It was determined that this mortality was the result of watercraft trauma because the external wound patterns and the internal lesions seen during gross necropsy are recognizable and diagnostic. This study documents the methods used in determining watercraft-related mortality during gross necropsy and explains why these findings are diagnostic. Watercraft can inflict sharp- and blunt-force trauma to manatees, and both types of trauma can lead to mortality. This mortality may be a direct result of the sharp and blunt forces or from the chronic effects resulting from either force. In cases in which death is caused by a chronic wound-related complication, the original incident is usually considered to be the cause of death. Once a cause of death is determined, it is recorded in an extensive database and is used by Federal and state managers in developing strategies for the conservation of the manatee. Common sequelae to watercraft-induced trauma include skin lesions, torn muscles, fractured and luxated bones, lacerated internal organs, hemothorax, pneumothorax, pyothorax, hydrothorax, abdominal hemorrhage and ascites, and pyoperitoneum.

  17. Computer vision techniques for semi-automatic reconstruction of ripped-up documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smet, Patrick; De Bock, Johan; Corluy, Els

    2003-08-01

    This paper investigates the use of computer vision techniques to aid in the semi-automatic reconstruction of torn or ripped-up documents. First, we discuss a procedure for obtaining a digital database of a given set of paper fragments using a flatbed image scanner, a brightly coloured scanner background, and a region growing algorithm. The contour of each segmented piece of paper is then traced around using a chain code algorithm and the contours are annotated by calculating a set of feature vectors. Next, the contours of the fragments are matched against each other using the annotated feature information and a string matching algorithm. Finally, the matching results are used to reposition the paper fragments so that a jigsaw puzzle reconstruction of the document can be obtained. For each of the three major components, i.e., segmentation, matching, and global document reconstruction, we briefly discuss a set of prototype GUI tools for guiding and presenting the obtained results. We discuss the performance and the reconstruction results that can be obtained, and show that the proposed framework can offer an interesting set of tools to forensic investigators.

  18. Geochemical evidence for the melting of subducting oceanic lithosphere at plate edges.

    PubMed

    Yogodzinski, G M; Lees, J M; Churikova, T G; Dorendorf, F; Wöerner, G; Volynets, O N

    2001-01-25

    Most island-arc magmatism appears to result from the lowering of the melting point of peridotite within the wedge of mantle above subducting slabs owing to the introduction of fluids from the dehydration of subducting oceanic crust. Volcanic rocks interpreted to contain a component of melt (not just a fluid) from the subducting slab itself are uncommon, but possible examples have been recognized in the Aleutian islands, Baja California, Patagonia and elsewhere. The geochemically distinctive rocks from these areas, termed 'adakites, are often associated with subducting plates that are young and warm, and therefore thought to be more prone to melting. But the subducting lithosphere in some adakite locations (such as the Aleutian islands) appears to be too old and hence too cold to melt. This implies either that our interpretation of adakite geochemistry is incorrect, or that our understanding of the tectonic context of adakites is incomplete. Here we present geochemical data from the Kamchatka peninsula and the Aleutian islands that reaffirms the slab-melt interpretation of adakites, but in the tectonic context of the exposure to mantle flow around the edge of a torn subducting plate. We conclude that adakites are likely to form whenever the edge of a subducting plate is warmed or ablated by mantle flow. The use of adakites as tracers for such plate geometry may improve our understanding of magma genesis and thermal structure in a variety of subduction-zone environments. PMID:11206543

  19. Efficacy of thigh protectors in preventing thigh haematomas.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B

    2000-03-01

    Thigh haematomas are extremely common in Australian Rules Football (ARF). This is in contrast to contact sports overseas, the likely reason is the increased use of thigh protectors as part of team uniforms in contact sports such as American football. Thigh haematomas can have a significant impact on an athlete's performance, ranging from short term performance impairment, muscle deconditioning and compartment syndromes, to long term problems, such as career threatening myositis ossificans and possibly muscle tears. To assess the efficacy of thigh protectors made for Australian Football, a prospective study was undertaken involving two teams in the elite junior (U 18) VSFL competition in SE Australia. One team wore thigh protectors over the course of the season while the other team acted as controls and did not wear thigh protectors. The control group suffered nine thigh haematomas, while the protected group had none (p<0.01). The possible de-conditioning effect of the haematomas was evidenced by two of the control group suffering torn quadriceps within four weeks of the haematoma. The protectors were generally well tolerated by all but one player, except in hot conditions, when they were uncomfortable. PMID:10839226

  20. Securin degradation is mediated by fzy and fzr, and is required for complete chromatid separation but not for cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Zur, Amit; Brandeis, Michael

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the ubiquitination and degradation patterns of the human securin/PTTG protein. We show that, in contrast to budding yeast pds1, securin degradation is catalyzed by both fzy (fizzy/cdc20) and fzr (fizzy-related/cdh1/hct1). Both fzy and fzr also induce the APC/C to ubiquitinate securin in vitro. Securin degradation is mediated by an RXXL destruction box and a KEN box, and is inhibited only when both sequences are mutated. Interestingly, the non-degradable securin mutant is also partially ubiquitinated by fzy and fzr in vitro. Expressing the non-degradable securin mutant in cells frequently resulted in incomplete chromatid separation and gave rise to daughter cells connected by a thin chromatin fiber, presumably of chromosomes that failed to split completely. Strikingly, the mutant securin did not prevent the majority of sister chromatids from separating completely, nor did it prevent mitotic cyclin degradation and cytokinesis. This phenotype, reminiscent of the fission yeast cut (cells untimely torn) phenotype, is reported here for the first time in mammals. PMID:11179223

  1. “8 Plate”: An Alternative Device to Fix Highly Recurrent Traumatic Anterior Gleno-Humeral Instability in Patients with Severe Impairment of the Anterior Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Tudisco, C; Bisicchia, S; Savarese, E; Ippolito, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is still debate about the best treatment option for highly recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in patients with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and/or recurrence after either arthroscopic or open capsulorrhaphy. Materials and Methods: The clinical and radiological findings of 7 patients treated with an open capsulorrhaphy stabilized with an “8 plate” for a highly recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and a large Bankart lesion were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up evaluation included VAS for pain, Constant-Murley, Simple Shoulder Test, ASES, UCLA, Quick DASH, Rowe, Walsch-Duplay scores, as well as X-rays of the operated shoulder. Results: At follow-up none of the patients reported subsequent dislocations. Range of motion of the shoulder was complete in all cases, but one. Results of the functional scoring systems were satisfactory. X-rays showed no osteolysis and good position of the plate. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature about an open capsular tensioning and Bankart lesion repair performed with an “8 plate”. We believe that this is a reliable and effective procedure to address traumatic anterior re-dislocation of the gleno-humeral joint when the capsule is extensively torn and frayed or in revision cases. Moreover the “8 plate” is ideal to be applied in such a narrow space on the slant surface of the scapular neck close to the glenoid rim. PMID:25621080

  2. Ethical codes in humanitarian emergencies: from practice to research?

    PubMed

    Black, Richard

    2003-06-01

    Notable strides have been made in recent years to develop codes of conduct for humanitarian intervention in conflicts on the part of international NGOs and UN organisations. Yet engagement by the academic and broader research communities with humanitarian crises and ongoing complex political emergencies remains relatively ad hoc and unregulated beyond the basic ethical guidelines and norms developed within universities for research in general, and within the governing and representative bodies of particular academic disciplines. This paper draws on a case study of research on humanitarian assistance to Liberia during that country's civil war from 1989 to 1996. The difficulties faced by humanitarian agencies in Liberia led to the development of two key sets of ethical guidelines for humanitarian intervention: the Joint Policy of Operations (JPO) and Principles and Policies of Humanitarian Operations (PPHO). This paper seeks to address what lessons, if any, these ethical guidelines, together with different experiences of conducting research in war-torn Liberia, can provide in terms of the role of academic researchers--and research itself--in humanitarian crises.

  3. Domino boudinage under layer-parallel simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The boudin segments of a torn competent layer experience synthetic rotation in layer-parallel simple shear. As long as the individual segments in a boudin train are constrained by their neighbors, even a highly viscous boudin deforms internally to create the necessary space for rotation. The rotation rate is then much smaller compared to the case of an isolated segment. Hence, a small tilt of boudin segments is not indicative of low strain. The rotation rate at this stage largely depends on the aspect ratio of the boudin segments and the scaled gap width. Once the tilted boudins are no longer constrained by their neighbors, the rotation rate greatly accelerates. In the case of a low viscosity ratio between the boudins and the host, the boudin segments develop complex shapes, which may give an impression of shear-band boudins forming under the opposite shear sense. We furthermore investigate the behavior of boudin trains of finite length. The terminal segments are displaced out of the shear plane, deforming into isoclinal folds, and separate into groups of boudin segments that rotate into the shear direction and eventually lead to an overall chaotic appearance of the structure. Natural examples of domino boudinage from a high shear -strain detachment zone in the Western Cyclades (Greece) show many similarities with the modeled structures suggesting that, under simple shear deformation, the rotation and separation of boudin segments is an indicator for high shear strain.

  4. Linear and nonlinear evolution of the ion resonance instability in cylindrical traps: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2015-07-15

    Numerical experiments have been performed to investigate the linear and nonlinear dynamics, and energetics of the ion resonance instability in cylindrically confined nonneutral plasma. The instability is excited on a set of parametrically different unstable equilibria of a cylindrical nonneutral cloud, composed of electrons partially neutralized by a much heavier ion species of single ionization. A particle-in-cell code has been developed and employed to carry out these simulations. The results obtained from the initial exponential growth phase of the instability in these numerical experiments are in agreement with the linearised analytical model of the ion resonance instability. As the simulations delve much further in time beyond the exponential growth phase, very interesting nonlinear phenomena of the ion resonance instability are revealed, such as a process of simultaneous wave breaking of the excited poloidal mode on the ion cloud and pinching of the poloidal perturbations on the electron cloud. This simultaneous nonlinear dynamics of the two components is associated with an energy transfer process from the electrons to the ions. At later stages there is heating induced cross-field transport of the heavier ions and tearing across the pinches on the electron cloud followed by an inverse cascade of the torn sections.

  5. Reconstructed animation from four-phase grip MRI of the wrist with ulnar-sided pain.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Wada, T; Iba, K; Aoki, M; Tamakawa, M; Yamashita, T

    2013-09-01

    In order to visualize dynamic variations related to ulnar-sided wrist pain, animation was reconstructed from T2* coronal-sectioned magnetic resonance imaging in each of the four phases of grip motion for nine wrists in patients with ulnar pain. Eight of the nine wrists showed a positive ulnar variance of less than 2 mm. Ulnocarpal impaction and triangular fibrocartilage complex injury were assessed on the basis of animation and arthroscopy, respectively. Animation revealed ulnocarpal impaction in four wrists. In one of the four wrists, the torn portion of the articular disc was impinged between the ulnar head and ulnar proximal side of the lunate. In another wrist, the ulnar head impacted the lunate directly through the defect in the articular disc that had previously been excised. An ulnar shortening osteotomy successfully relieved ulnar wrist pain in all four cases with both ulnocarpal impaction and Palmer's Class II triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. This method demonstrated impairment of the articular disc and longitudinal instability of the distal radioulnar joint simultaneously and should be of value in investigating dynamic pathophysiology causing ulnar wrist pain.

  6. Investigations of the structural stability of metal hydride composites by in-situ neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrig, Kai; Pohlmann, Carsten; Gondek, Łukasz; Figiel, Henryk; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Manke, Ingo; Banhart, John; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Metal hydride composites (MHC) with expanded natural graphite (ENG) exhibiting enhanced thermal conductivity and reduced porosity compared to metal hydride powders can enable a reversible, compact and safe way for hydrogen storage. In this study, neutron imaging during cyclic hydrogenation was utilized to investigate the structural stability and the spatial-temporal hydrogen concentration of application-oriented MHC with 40 mm in diameter compared to a loose metal hydride powder. In particular, swelling and shrinking effects of a radially confined MHC which could freely expand upwards were studied. It was found that the loose powder bed was easily torn apart during dehydrogenation, which leads to increased thermal resistance within the hydride bed. In contrast, the thermal resistance between MHC and container wall was minimized since the initial gap closes during initial hydrogenation and does not reopen thereafter. Further cyclic hydrogenation caused MHC volume changes, i.e. an almost reversible swelling/shrinking (so-called "MHC breathing"). Moreover, neutron imaging allowed for the observation of reaction fronts within the MHC and the powder bed that are governed by the heat transfer.

  7. In Situ Growth of Highly Adhesive Surface Layer on Titanium Foil as Durable Counter Electrodes for Efficient Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wantao; Xu, Peng; Guo, Yanjun; Lin, Yuan; Yin, Xiong; Tang, Guangshi; He, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Counter electrodes (CEs) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are usually fabricated by depositing catalytic materials on substrates. The poor adhesion of the catalytic material to the substrate often results in the exfoliation of catalytic materials, and then the deterioration of cell performance or even the failure of DSCs. In this study, a highly adhesive surface layer is in situ grown on the titanium foil via a facile process and applied as CEs for DSCs. The DSCs applying such CEs demonstrate decent power conversion efficiencies, 6.26% and 4.37% for rigid and flexible devices, respectively. The adhesion of the surface layer to the metal substrate is so strong that the photovoltaic performance of the devices is well retained even after the CEs are bended for 20 cycles and torn twice with adhesive tape. The results reported here indicate that the in situ growth of highly adhesive surface layers on metal substrate is a promising way to prepare durable CEs for efficient DSCs. PMID:27694905

  8. Facial injuries following hyena attack in rural eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Fell, M J; Ayalew, Y; McClenaghan, F C; McGurk, M

    2014-12-01

    Hyenas are effective hunters and will consider humans as potential prey if the need and opportunity arise. This study describes the circumstances of hyena attacks, the patterns of injuries sustained, and reconstruction in a resource-poor setting. As part of a charitable surgical mission to Ethiopia in 2012, 45 patients with facial deformities were reviewed, of whom four were victims of hyena attacks. A semi-structured interview was performed to ascertain the circumstances of the attack and the subsequent consequences. The age of the victims at the time of attack varied from 5 to 50 years. The attacks occurred when the victims were alone and vulnerable and took place in outdoor open spaces, during the evening or at night. The initial lunge was made to the facial area; if the jaws closed on the facial bones they were crushed, but in all cases the soft tissues were grasped and torn from the underlying bone. Reconstruction was dictated by the extent of soft tissue loss but could normally be obtained by use of local or regional flaps. Hyenas have been shown to attack humans in a predictable way and cause injuries that typically involve the soft tissues of the face. PMID:25132572

  9. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1999-01-01

    We study our Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are now on top of a mountain may once have been at the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the Sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  10. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  11. The application of 3D image processing to studies of the musculoskeletal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Bruce Elliot; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Siegler, Sorin; Winkelstein, Beth A.

    2009-10-01

    Three dimensional renditions of anatomical structures are commonly used to improve visualization, surgical planning, and patient education. However, such 3D images also contain information which is not readily apparent, and which can be mined to elucidate, for example, such parameters as joint kinematics, spacial relationships, and distortions of those relationships with movement. Here we describe two series of experiments which demonstrate the functional application of 3D imaging. The first concerns the joints of the ankle complex, where the usual description of motions in the talocrural joint is shown to be incomplete, and where the roles of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments are clarified in ankle sprains. Also, the biomechanical effects of two common surgical procedures for repairing torn ligaments were examined. The second series of experiments explores changes in the anatomical relationships between nerve elements and the cervical vertebrae with changes in neck position. They provide preliminary evidence that morphological differences may exist between asymptomatic subjects and patients with radiculopathy in certain positions, even when conventional imaging shows no difference.

  12. Sports cardiology: lessons from the past and perspectives for the future.

    PubMed

    Leischik, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of myocardial damage as a result of endurance sport has been known about since ancient times. According to a leg-end, a soldier named Pheidippides (more likely Philippides) dropped dead after run-ning from war-torn Marathon to Athens with the news of victory. Millennia later, we do not know whether he was a soldier or a courier, or whether he really ran the entire 240 km from Athens to Sparta and then back from Marathon to Athens. What is clear however, is that his death went down in history as the first documented exercise-related death and provides a tangible starting-point for the discipline of sport cardiology. Sports cardiology today covers a broad range of areas; from patients with cardiomyopathies, coronary disease and metabolic syndrome through to fitness fans, high-performance athletes and those with physically demanding professions. The following editorial introduces the primary topics for discussion to be included in the F1000Research channel Sports cardiology with the hope that this will evoke open, controversial and broad discourse in the form of reviews and original research papers in this important field. PMID:26097692

  13. Advances in arthroscopy-indications and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Carr, Andrew J; Price, Andrew J; Glyn-Jones, Sion; Rees, Jonathan L

    2015-02-01

    Advances in optical technology, instrumentation and implants now enable arthroscopic surgery to be performed on all large joints and most small joints of the limbs. Arthroscopic techniques are usually a development of surgical procedures previously performed through a large open incision, although the critical element of each procedure (for example removal of a torn meniscus) usually remains unchanged. The smaller size of incisions and reduction in tissue damage associated with arthroscopic surgery can reduce morbidity and complications. Therapeutic arthroscopy now encompasses excision, reconstruction and replacement of damaged or abnormal tissue. Improvements in the accuracy of MRI, CT and high-definition ultrasonography have limited the use of diagnostic arthroscopy to rare indications, but in the past 10 years the rates of some arthroscopic surgeries have increased by over 7-fold. Considerable variation in the type and utilization of arthroscopic procedures exists in practice, partly explained by the slow diffusion of new techniques and technology, but also by differences in clinician and patient beliefs and expectations. This Review reflects on both the success of arthroscopy and the general lack of evidence-based assessment of the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic procedures-a clear sign that more clinical trials in this field are required.

  14. Single channel currents from excised patches of muscle membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Horn, R; Patlak, J

    1980-01-01

    The currents through single acetylcholine-activated channels were measured on membrane fragments that had been torn from rat muscle myotubes with patch pipettes. The membrane fragments were sealed into the pipette by using the "gigohm-seal" technique of Neher, which also permitted voltage clamp of the membrane via the patch electrode. Membrane patches were excited by sudden withdrawal of the electrode from the cell. Substitution of fluoride for chloride ions in the bathing solution could prevent or reverse the tendency for the membrane at the electrode tip to seal over into a closed vesicle. The single membrane layer at the electrode tip could remain functional for up to 30 min. The apparent single channel conductance was minimally affected by excision. The current-voltage relationships for the single channel currents show that the inside (i.e., cytoplasmic surface) of the membrane fragment was exposed to the bathing solution. In symmetric Na solutions the current-voltage curve was nearly linear and reversed at approximately 0 mV. In other bathing solutions from 40 to 500 mM NaF, the observed zero current potential was close to that predicted by the Nernst equation. We present evidence that internal Na interacts with the channel, causing both saturation of outward current and block of inward current. At + 100 mV the apparent dissociation constant for internal Na was 138 mM. PMID:6256772

  15. Lesions of rat skeletal muscle after local block of acetylcholinesterase and neuromuscular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mense, S; Simons, D G; Hoheisel, U; Quenzer, B

    2003-06-01

    In skeletal muscle, a local increase of acetylcholine (ACh) in a few end plates has been hypothesized to cause the formation of contraction knots that can be found in myofascial trigger points. To test this hypothesis in rats, small amounts of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor [diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP)] were injected into the proximal half of the gastrocnemius muscle, and the muscle nerve was electrically stimulated for 30-60 min for induction of muscle twitches. The distal half of the muscle, which performed the same contractions, served as a control to assess the effects of the twitches without DFP. Sections of the muscle were evaluated for morphological changes in relation to the location of blocked end plates. Compared with the distal half of the muscle, the DFP-injected proximal half exhibited significantly higher numbers of abnormally contracted fibers (local contractures), torn fibers, and longitudinal stripes. DFP-injected animals in which the muscle nerve was not stimulated and that were allowed to survive for 24 h exhibited the same lesions but in smaller numbers. The data indicate that an increased concentration of ACh in a few end plates causes damage to muscle fibers. The results support the assumption that a dysfunctional end plate exhibiting increased release of ACh may be the starting point for regional abnormal contractions, which are thought to be essential for the formation of myofascial trigger points.

  16. Leadership lessons from the Chilean mine rescue.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Faaiza; Edmondson, Amy C; Leonard, Herman B

    2013-01-01

    Three years ago, when a cave-in at the San José mine in Chile trapped 33 men under 700,000 metric tons of rock, experts estimated the probability of getting them out alive at less than 1%. Yet, after spending a record 69 days underground, all 33 were hoisted up to safety. The inspiring story of their rescue is a case study in how to lead in situations where the stakes, risk, and uncertainty are incredibly high and time pressure is intense. Today executives often find themselves in similar straits. When they do, many feel torn. Should they be directive, taking charge and commanding action? Or should they be empowering, enabling innovation and experimentation? As the successful example of André Sougarret, the chief of the mine rescue operation, shows, the answer is yes--to both. The choice is a false dichotomy. Implementing this dual approach involves three key tasks. Each has directive and enabling components. The first task is envisioning, which requires instilling both realism and hope. The second task is enrolling, which means setting clear boundaries for who is on and off the team, but inviting in helpful collaborators. The third task is engaging--leading disciplined execution while encouraging innovation and experimentation. The authors of this article describe how Sougarret ably juggled all of these tasks, orchestrating the efforts of hundreds of people from different organizations, areas of expertise, and countries in an extraordinary mission that overcame impossible odds.

  17. How Traumatic Violence Permanently Changes Shopping Behavior.

    PubMed

    Sigirci, Ozge; Rockmore, Marc; Wansink, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic experiences - such as combat, living in a conflict country or war-torn nation, or experiencing a violent crime or natural disaster - change social relationships and may also influence a life-time of consumer relationships with brands and shopping. Our focus on this previously overlooked area is centered on an analysis of the long-term shopping habits of 355 combat veterans. We show that those who experienced heavy trauma (e.g., heavy combat) exhibited similar disconnection from brands as others have experienced in social relationships. They became more transactional in that they were more open to switching brands, to trying new products, and buying the least expensive alternative (p < 0.01). In contrast, those who had experienced a light trauma were more influenced by ads and more open to buying brands even when they cost more (p < 0.00). Trauma, such as combat, may change one's decision horizon. Functionality and price become more important, which is consistent with the idea that they are more focused on the present moment than on building on the past or saving for the future.

  18. High Mobility and Low Use of Malaria Preventive Measures Among the Jarai Male Youth Along the Cambodia-Vietnam Border.

    PubMed

    Gryseels, Charlotte; Peeters Grietens, Koen; Dierickx, Susan; Xuan, Xa Nguyen; Uk, Sambunny; Bannister-Tyrrell, Melanie; Trienekens, Suzan; Ribera, Joan Muela; Hausmann-Muela, Susanna; Gerrets, René; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Sochantha, Tho; Coosemans, Marc; Erhart, Annette

    2015-10-01

    Malaria control along the Vietnam-Cambodia border presents a challenge for both countries' malaria elimination targets as the region is forested, inhabited by ethnic minority populations, and potentially characterized by early and outdoor malaria transmission. A mixed methods study assessed the vulnerability to malaria among the Jarai population living on both sides of the border in the provinces of Ratanakiri (Cambodia) and Gia Lai (Vietnam). A qualitative study generated preliminary hypotheses that were quantified in two surveys, one targeting youth (N = 498) and the other household leaders (N = 449). Jarai male youth, especially in Cambodia, had lower uptake of preventive measures (57.4%) and more often stayed overnight in the deep forest (35.8%) compared with the female youth and the adult population. Among male youth, a high-risk subgroup was identified that regularly slept at friends' homes or outdoors, who had fewer bed nets (32.5%) that were torn more often (77.8%). The vulnerability of Jarai youth to malaria could be attributed to the transitional character of youth itself, implying less fixed sleeping arrangements in nonpermanent spaces or non-bed sites. Additional tools such as long-lasting hammock nets could be suitable as they are in line with current practices.

  19. Detailed shoulder MRI findings in manual wheelchair users with shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Melissa M B; Van Straaten, Meegan G; Murthy, Naveen S; Braman, Jonathan P; Zanella, Elia; Zhao, Kristin D

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder pain and pathology are common in manual wheelchair (MWC) users with paraplegia, and the biomechanical mechanism of injury is largely unknown. Establishing patterns of MRI characteristics in MWC users would help advance understanding of the mechanical etiology of rotator cuff disease, thus improving the logic for prescribed interventions. The purpose of this study was to report detailed shoulder MRI findings in a sample of 10 MWC users with anterolateral shoulder pain. The imaging assessments were performed using our standardized MRI Assessment of the Shoulder (MAS) guide. The tendon most commonly torn was the supraspinatus at the insertion site in the anterior portion in either the intrasubstance or articular region. Additionally, widespread tendinopathy, CA ligament thickening, subacromial bursitis, labral tears, and AC joint degenerative arthrosis and edema were common. Further reporting of detailed shoulder imaging findings is needed to confirm patterns of tears in MWC users regarding probable tendon tear zone, region, and portion. This investigation was a small sample observational study and did not yield data that can define patterns of pathology. However, synthesis of detailed findings from multiple studies could define patterns of pathological MRI findings allowing for associations of imaging findings to risk factors including specific activities. PMID:25180192

  20. Numerical Simulation of Fast-mode Magnetosonic Waves Excited by Plasmoid Ejections in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liping; Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Peter, Hardi; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Shaohua; Feng, Xueshang

    2015-02-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory has directly imaged the fast-propagating magnetosonic waves (FMWs) successively propagating outward along coronal magnetic funnels. In this study we perform a numerical investigation of the excitation of FMWs in the interchange reconnection scenario, with footpoint shearing flow being used to energize the system and drive the reconnection. The modeling results show that as a result of magnetic reconnection, the plasma in the current sheet is heated up by Joule dissipation to ~10 MK and is ejected rapidly, developing the hot outflows. Meanwhile, the current sheet is torn into plasmoids, which are shot quickly both upward and downward. When the plasmoids reach the outflow regions, they impact and collide with the ambient magnetic field there, which consecutively launches FMWs. The FMWs propagate outward divergently away from the impact regions, with a phase speed of the Alfvén speed of ~1000 km s-1. In the k - ω diagram of the Fourier wave power, the FMWs display a broad frequency distribution with a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation. With the WKB approximation, at the distance of 15 Mm from the wave source region, we estimate the energy flux of FMWs to be E ~ 7.0 × 106 erg cm-2 s-1, which is ~50 times smaller than the energy flux related to the tube-channeled reconnection outflow. These simulation results indicate that energetically and dynamically the outflow is far more important than the waves.

  1. Mechanical injury and repair of cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To concisely review the field of cell plasma membrane disruption (torn cell surface) and repair. MAIN POINTS: Plasma membrane disruption is a common form of cell injury under physiologic conditions, after trauma, in certain muscular dystrophies, and during certain forms of clinical intervention. Rapid repair of a disruption is essential to cell survival and involves a complex and active cell response that includes membrane fusion and cytoskeletal activation. Tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, adapt to a disruption injury by hypertrophying. Cells adapt by increasing the efficiency of their resealing response. CONCLUSION: Plasma membrane disruption is an important cellular event in both health and disease. The disruption repair mechanism is now well understood at the cellular level, but much remains to be learned at the molecular level. Cell and tissue level adaptational responses to the disruption either prevent its further occurrence or facilitate future repairs. Therapeutically useful drugs might result if, using this accumulating knowledge, chemical agents can be developed that can enhance repair or adaptive responses.

  2. How Traumatic Violence Permanently Changes Shopping Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sigirci, Ozge; Rockmore, Marc; Wansink, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic experiences – such as combat, living in a conflict country or war-torn nation, or experiencing a violent crime or natural disaster – change social relationships and may also influence a life-time of consumer relationships with brands and shopping. Our focus on this previously overlooked area is centered on an analysis of the long-term shopping habits of 355 combat veterans. We show that those who experienced heavy trauma (e.g., heavy combat) exhibited similar disconnection from brands as others have experienced in social relationships. They became more transactional in that they were more open to switching brands, to trying new products, and buying the least expensive alternative (p < 0.01). In contrast, those who had experienced a light trauma were more influenced by ads and more open to buying brands even when they cost more (p < 0.00). Trauma, such as combat, may change one’s decision horizon. Functionality and price become more important, which is consistent with the idea that they are more focused on the present moment than on building on the past or saving for the future. PMID:27656152

  3. Facial injuries following hyena attack in rural eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Fell, M J; Ayalew, Y; McClenaghan, F C; McGurk, M

    2014-12-01

    Hyenas are effective hunters and will consider humans as potential prey if the need and opportunity arise. This study describes the circumstances of hyena attacks, the patterns of injuries sustained, and reconstruction in a resource-poor setting. As part of a charitable surgical mission to Ethiopia in 2012, 45 patients with facial deformities were reviewed, of whom four were victims of hyena attacks. A semi-structured interview was performed to ascertain the circumstances of the attack and the subsequent consequences. The age of the victims at the time of attack varied from 5 to 50 years. The attacks occurred when the victims were alone and vulnerable and took place in outdoor open spaces, during the evening or at night. The initial lunge was made to the facial area; if the jaws closed on the facial bones they were crushed, but in all cases the soft tissues were grasped and torn from the underlying bone. Reconstruction was dictated by the extent of soft tissue loss but could normally be obtained by use of local or regional flaps. Hyenas have been shown to attack humans in a predictable way and cause injuries that typically involve the soft tissues of the face.

  4. Repeating Fast Radio Bursts from Highly Magnetized Pulsars Traveling through Asteroid Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z. G.; Wang, J. S.; Wu, X. F.; Huang, Y. F.

    2016-09-01

    Very recently, Spitler et al. and Scholz et al. reported their detections of 16 additional bright bursts in the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is inconsistent with all of the catastrophic event models put forward previously for hypothetically non-repeating FRBs. Here, we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through the asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from such a pulsar encountering a large number of asteroids in the belt. During each pulsar-asteroid impact, an electric field induced outside of the asteroid has such a large component parallel to the stellar magnetic field that electrons are torn off the asteroidal surface and accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies instantaneously. The subsequent movement of these electrons along magnetic field lines will cause coherent curvature radiation, which can account for all of the properties of an FRB. In addition, this model can self-consistently explain the typical duration, luminosity, and repetitive rate of the 17 bursts of FRB 121102. The predicted occurrence rate of repeating FRB sources may imply that our model would be testable in the next few years.

  5. Analysis of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Capsulotomy Cutting Edges and Manual Capsulorhexis Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Giovanni; Buratto, Lucio; Schiano-Lomoriello, Domenico; Pileri, Marco; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n = 5, and Victus, n = 5). In addition, five manual CCC (n = 5) were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA). Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa) and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq), were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P < 0.05) than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature. PMID:25505977

  6. Abnormal seismological and magmatic processes controlled by the tearing South American flat slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiashun; Liu, Lijun

    2016-09-01

    The influence of flat slab subduction on the formation of intra-slab earthquakes, volcanic activities and mantle seismic velocity anomalies remains unclear. We attempt to better understand these processes by simulating the two flat slabs in Peru and Chile using data-orientated geodynamic models. Our results successfully reproduce the observed flat slabs as mainly due to two subducting aseismic ridges. In contrast to the traditional view of flat-slab subduction, we find that these slabs are internally torn, as is due to the 3D nature of the subducting buoyancy features. This broken slab configuration, confirmed by regional tomography, naturally explains the abnormal distribution of and stress regimes associated with the intermediate-depth earthquakes. We further show that the slab tearing process could also better explain the formation of adakitic and ore-forming magmatism, the evolution of the magmatic arc, and the enigmatic mantle seismic structures beneath these regions. We propose that slab tearing may represent a common result of buoyancy feature subduction and that the resulting mantle processes could affect the long-term geodynamic evolution of continents.

  7. High Mobility and Low Use of Malaria Preventive Measures among the Jarai Male Youth along the Cambodia–Vietnam Border

    PubMed Central

    Gryseels, Charlotte; Peeters Grietens, Koen; Dierickx, Susan; Xuan, Xa Nguyen; Uk, Sambunny; Bannister-Tyrrell, Melanie; Trienekens, Suzan; Ribera, Joan Muela; Hausmann-Muela, Susanna; Gerrets, René; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Sochantha, Tho; Coosemans, Marc; Erhart, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Malaria control along the Vietnam–Cambodia border presents a challenge for both countries' malaria elimination targets as the region is forested, inhabited by ethnic minority populations, and potentially characterized by early and outdoor malaria transmission. A mixed methods study assessed the vulnerability to malaria among the Jarai population living on both sides of the border in the provinces of Ratanakiri (Cambodia) and Gia Lai (Vietnam). A qualitative study generated preliminary hypotheses that were quantified in two surveys, one targeting youth (N = 498) and the other household leaders (N = 449). Jarai male youth, especially in Cambodia, had lower uptake of preventive measures (57.4%) and more often stayed overnight in the deep forest (35.8%) compared with the female youth and the adult population. Among male youth, a high-risk subgroup was identified that regularly slept at friends' homes or outdoors, who had fewer bed nets (32.5%) that were torn more often (77.8%). The vulnerability of Jarai youth to malaria could be attributed to the transitional character of youth itself, implying less fixed sleeping arrangements in nonpermanent spaces or non-bed sites. Additional tools such as long-lasting hammock nets could be suitable as they are in line with current practices. PMID:26283747

  8. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Ellen

    2014-05-22

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  9. Regenerative repair of damaged meniscus with autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Lee, Sang Hee

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as pluripotent cells found in numerous human tissues, including bone marrow and adipose tissue. Such MSCs, isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue, have been shown to differentiate into bone and cartilage, along with other types of tissues. Therefore, MSCs represent a promising new therapy in regenerative medicine. The initial treatment of meniscus tear of the knee is managed conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy. When such conservative treatment fails, an arthroscopic resection of the meniscus is necessary. However, the major drawback of the meniscectomy is an early onset of osteoarthritis. Therefore, an effective and noninvasive treatment for patients with continuous knee pain due to damaged meniscus has been sought. Here, we present a review, highlighting the possible regenerative mechanisms of damaged meniscus with MSCs (especially adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs)), along with a case of successful repair of torn meniscus with significant reduction of knee pain by percutaneous injection of autologous ASCs into an adult human knee.

  10. The Use of Remote Sensing Data for Advancing America's Energy Policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valinia, Azita; Seery, Bernard D.

    2010-01-01

    After briefly reviewing America's Energy Policy laid out by the Obama Administration, we outline how a Global Carbon Observing System designed to monitor Carbon from space can provide the necessary data and tools to equip decision makers with the knowledge necessary to formulate effective energy use and practices policy. To stabilize greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere in a manner that it does not interfere with the Earth's climate system (which is one of the goals of United Nations Framework for Convention on Climate Change) requires vastly improved prediction of the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. This in torn requires a robust understanding of the carbon exchange mechanisms between atmosphere, land, and oceans and a clear understanding of the sources and sinks (i.e. uptake and storage) of CO2. We discuss how the Carbon Observing System from space aids in better understanding of the connection between the carbon cycle and climate change and provides more accurate predictions of atmospheric CO2 concentration. It also enables implementation of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation policies such as cap and trade programs, international climate treaties, as well as formulation of effective energy use policies.

  11. [The analyst's pregnancy: fantasy or reality? Or does the reality surpass the fiction?].

    PubMed

    Hazan, M

    1990-11-01

    This article focuses on the pregnancy of analysts and its impact on the (reality) within analytical treatment. In this situation, the analyst on the one hand is caught between words and action, and on the other hand, begins to realize her pregnancy has an effect on patients, namely through emotional intensification of transference, almost instant awareness of the pregnancy by some, which incidentally sometimes leads to silence in the form of denial or inhibition. The analyst herself, in a transferential reaction, could seek to break the silence, along with the interrelation, while being torn between the "maternal preoccupations" directed toward her child as well as toward her patient. Beyond the study of attitudes or stereotyped themes, this article tries of identify the "transference dynamics" brought on by the issue of an analyst's pregnancy. In conclusion, the analyst's pregnancy, during the course of treatment, appears to distance itself from its event-related qualities and transforms itself into a mix of fantasy and reality, which can be analyzed like a dream or a deep-rooted souvenir.

  12. Articular cartilage friction increases in hip joints after the removal of acetabular labrum.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongnam; Ito, Hiroshi; Kourtis, Lampros; Safran, Marc R; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2012-02-01

    The acetabular labrum is believed to have a sealing function. However, a torn labrum may not effectively prevent joint fluid from escaping a compressed joint, resulting in impaired lubrication. We aimed to understand the role of the acetabular labrum in maintaining a low friction environment in the hip joint. We did this by measuring the resistance to rotation (RTR) of the hip, which reflects the friction of the articular cartilage surface, following focal and complete labrectomy. Five cadaveric hips without evidence of osteoarthritis and impingement were tested. We measured resistance to rotation of the hip joint during 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 times body weight (BW) cyclic loading in the intact hip, and after focal and complete labrectomy. Resistance to rotation, which reflects articular cartilage friction in an intact hip was significantly increased following focal labrectomy at 1-3 BW loading, and following complete labrectomy at all load levels. The acetabular labrum appears to maintain a low friction environment, possibly by sealing the joint from fluid exudation. Even focal labrectomy may result in increased joint friction, a condition that may be detrimental to articular cartilage and lead to osteoarthritis.

  13. Globalisation, complex humanitarian emergencies and health.

    PubMed

    O'Dempsey, T J D; Munslow, B

    2006-01-01

    A new political economy of conflict has emerged in the aftermath of colonialism and the Cold War. Complex political emergencies have been simmering in the post-colonial world for more than three decades. Intra-country armed conflict, often combined with natural disasters, at present contributes to the displacement of over 20 million people world-wide. The international community remains profoundly uncomfortable with the complex political emergencies of the new era, torn between the respect for national sovereignty upon which the international political system of the United Nations and other agencies is built, and the growth of concern with human rights and a burgeoning International Humanitarian Law. Globalisation may have brought many benefits to some but there are also many losers. The Word Bank and the International Monetary Fund imposed structural adjustment policies to ensure debt repayment and economic restructuring that have resulted in a net reduction in expenditure on health, education and development. A downward spiral has been created of debt, disease, malnutrition, missed education, economic entrapment, poverty, powerlessness, marginalization, migration and instability. Africa's complex political emergencies are particularly virulent and tenacious. Three examples that are among the most serious humanitarian emergencies to have faced the world in recent times--those in Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Sudan--are reviewed here in detail. The political evolution of these emergencies and their impact on the health of the affected populations are also explored.

  14. Imaging appearance of entrapped periosteum within a distal femoral Salter-Harris II fracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Johnathan; Abel, Mark F; Fox, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Salter Harris II fractures of the distal femur are associated with a high incidence of complications, especially premature physeal closure. Many risk factors for this high rate of premature physeal closure have been proposed. More recently, entrapment of periosteum within the physis has been suggested as an additional predisposing factor for premature physeal closure. The radiographic diagnosis of entrapped soft tissues, including periosteum, can be suggested in the setting of a Salter-Harris II fracture when the fracture does not reduce and physeal widening >3 mm remains. We report a patient who sustained a distal femoral Salter-Harris II fracture following a valgus injury. The patient had persistent distal medial physeal widening >5 mm following attempted reduction. A subsequent MRI revealed a torn periosteum entrapped within the distal femoral physis. Following removal of the periosteum, the patient developed a leg length discrepancy which required physiodesis of the contralateral distal femur. We present this case to raise awareness of the importance of having a high index of suspicion of periosteal entrapment in the setting of Salter-Harris II fractures since most consider entrapped periosteum an indication for surgery.

  15. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p < 0.0001) and a specificity of 67% (p < 0.0001). The strongest predictors of rotator cuff repairability were tear size (p < 0.001) and age (p = 0.004). Sonographic assessments of tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  16. Tunicate-Inspired Gallic Acid/Metal Ion Complex for Instant and Efficient Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Prajatelistia, Ekavianty; Ju, Sung-Won; Sanandiya, Naresh D; Jun, Sang Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-04-20

    Dentin hypersensitivity is sharp and unpleasant pains caused by exposed dentinal tubules when enamel outside of the tooth wears away. The occlusion of dentinal tubules via in situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite is the best method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity. Commercially available dental desensitizers are generally effective only on a specific area and are relatively toxic, and their performance usually depends on the skill of the clinician. Here, a facile and efficient dentin hypersensitivity treatment with remarkable aesthetic improvement inspired by the tunicate-self-healing process is reported. As pyrogallol groups in tunicate proteins conjugate with metal ions to heal the torn body armor of a tunicate, the ingenious mechanism by introducing gallic acid (GA) as a cheap, abundant, and edible alternative to the pyrogallol groups of the tunicate combined with a varied daily intake of metal ion sources is mimicked. In particular, the GA/Fe(3+) complex exhibits the most promising results, to the instant ≈52% blockage in tubules within 4 min and ≈87% after 7 d of immersion in artificial saliva. Overall, the GA/metal ion complex-mediated coating is facile, instant, and effective, and is suggested as an aesthetic solution for treating dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:26867019

  17. Methods used during gross necropsy to determine watercraft-related mortality in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Lightsey, Jessica D; Rommel, Sentiel A; Costidis, Alexander M; Pitchford, Thomas D

    2006-09-01

    Between 1993 and 2003, 713 (24%) of 2,940 dead Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) recovered from Florida waters and examined were killed by watercraft-induced trauma. It was determined that this mortality was the result of watercraft trauma because the external wound patterns and the internal lesions seen during gross necropsy are recognizable and diagnostic. This study documents the methods used in determining watercraft-related mortality during gross necropsy and explains why these findings are diagnostic. Watercraft can inflict sharp- and blunt-force trauma to manatees, and both types of trauma can lead to mortality. This mortality may be a direct result of the sharp and blunt forces or from the chronic effects resulting from either force. In cases in which death is caused by a chronic wound-related complication, the original incident is usually considered to be the cause of death. Once a cause of death is determined, it is recorded in an extensive database and is used by Federal and state managers in developing strategies for the conservation of the manatee. Common sequelae to watercraft-induced trauma include skin lesions, torn muscles, fractured and luxated bones, lacerated internal organs, hemothorax, pneumothorax, pyothorax, hydrothorax, abdominal hemorrhage and ascites, and pyoperitoneum. PMID:17319124

  18. Arthroscopically assisted anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Seo, Young-Jin; Noh, Kyu-Cheol; Patro, Bishu Prasad; Kim, Do-Young

    2011-07-01

    We describe a method of arthroscopically assisted, mini-open, anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament. This method restores both components of the native ligament with the aim of achieving maximum stability with minimal disruption of the normal anatomy. Using the same principles of ligament reconstruction that are employed in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created following the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments and an autologous graft is fixed using a PEEK screw. Adequate healing of the ligament occurs within the bone, to prevent stress risers with an appropriate working length. This procedure is unique, as it replaces the torn ligament with a natural substitute, in the appropriate location, through a minimally invasive procedure. This technique would be suitable for treatment of patients with either grade III or V acute acromioclavicular dislocations. Clinical outcomes for the first 13 consecutive patients treated with this procedure are reported, revealing excellent satisfaction rates with a Constant score of 96.6 at final follow-up.

  19. Macrobrecciation at a Plate Boundary: The Iskenderun Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sine, C. R.; Brumbaugh, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    The area of intersection of the East Anatolian and the Dead Sea fault zones in southeast Turkey and northwest Syria represents the intersection of three tectonic Plates: African,Anatolian, and Arabian. Widespread deformation occurs in the area of the plate triple junction including the presence of multiple faults bounding plate fragments along the plate tectonic boundaries. Earthquake fault plane solutions and epicenter clustering in the area of the intersectiong fault zones has been used to identify plate fragments. This study delineates a plate boundary near the mouth of the Gulf of Iskenderun based on linear trends in epicenters and the orientation of fault plane solution nodal planes. The boundary located near the mouth of the Gulf of Iskenderun is proposed to be the southern boundary of a plate fragment roughly the size of the state of Delaware, herein named the Iskenderun block. Plate motions and moho depths suggest that the Iskenderun block is a promontory that was originally joined to the African plate and has been caught up in the deformation at the Anatolian-Arabian-African triple junction and has been subsequently torn from the African plate.

  20. Tectonic analysis of Baja California and Parras shear belt in Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Gawad, M. (Principal Investigator); Tubbesing, L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geological correlation of terrain across the Gulf of California using ERTS-1 imagery revealed significant similarities between Isla Tiburon, Isla Angel de la Guarda, and the San Carlos Range in mainland Mexico. ERTS-1 imagery was used to check the validity of the existence of major trans-Baja fault zones. ERTS-1 imagery also shows that high albedo sediments similar to known late Tertiary marine sediments are widespread in southern and middle Baja and extend in places to the eastern side of the Peninsula. Major faults in northern Mexico and across the border in the United States were mapped, and ample evidence was found that the Parras and parts of the Texas lineament are belts of major transverse shear faults in areas outside the supposed limit of the Texas and Parras lineaments. A fundamental concept which may help explain many complexities in the tectonic development is beginning to emerge: The southwestern part of North America was torn by massive left-lateral shear of transverse trend (east-west) during the compressive stage of the late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic. This tectonic style has changed into tensional rifting (Basin and Range) and right-lateral shear later in the Cenozoic and Quaternary.

  1. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McGehee, Ellen

    2016-07-12

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  2. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory East Area radioactively contaminated surplus facilities: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, W.H.; Fassnacht, G.F.; Moe, H.J.

    1987-07-01

    ANL has decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) seven radiologically contaminated surplus facilities at its Illinois site: a ''Hot'' Machine Shop (Building 17) and support facilities; Fan House No. 1 (Building 37), Fan House No. 2 (Building 38), the Pangborn Dust Collector (Building 41), and the Industrial Waste Treatment Plant (Building 34) for exhaust air from machining of radioactive materials. Also included were a Nuclear Materials Storage Vault (Building 16F) and a Nuclear Research Laboratory (Building 22). The D and D work involved dismantling of all process equipment and associated plumbing, ductwork, drain lines, etc. After radiation surveys, floor and wall coverings, suspended ceilings, room partitions, pipe, conduit and electrical gear were taken down as necessary. In addition, underground sewers were excavated. The grounds around each facility were also thoroughly surveyed. Contaminated materials and soil were packaged and shipped to a low-level waste burial site, while nonactive debris was buried in the ANL landfill. Clean, reusable items were saved, and clean metal scrap was sold for salvage. After the decommissioning work, each building was torn down and the site relandscaped. The project was completed in 1985, ahead of schedule, with substantial savings.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Surgical Options for Medial Collateral Ligament Repair in Terrible Triad Injury of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Taku; Nobuta, Shingo; Aizawa, Toshitake; Sasajima, Koichi; Nakajima, Soichi; Honda, Masahito; Oki, Gosuke; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the clinical and radiologic outcomes in patients with terrible triad injury, who underwent surgical treatment with or without the medial collateral ligament (MCL) repair. Fourteen patients who underwent surgery with a minimum of 12-month follow-up (mean, 17 months) were reviewed. Based on the systematic treatment protocol, radial head fracture, lateral collateral ligament, and coracoid fracture were treated. Subsequently, torn MCL was repaired in 7 patients, whereas in the remaining 7 patients, the MCL was not treated. Range of motion, elbow function, and radiographs regarding the arthrosis and heterotopic ossification were assessed. At final follow-up, no significant differences were found in elbow motion or function between the groups with and without MCL repair; except the pronation and supination which had superior range in repair group. In contrast, radiologic findings such as the arthrosis were seen more frequently in patients without MCL repair than those with repair. Our results indicate the effect of MCL repair on elbow motion and function might be small, whereas osteoarthritic changes occurred more frequently in elbows without MCL repair. PMID:27761222

  4. Physical evidence for a glue holding mineralized collagen fibrils together in bone*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, P.

    2005-03-01

    Evidence from Atomic Force Microscope indentation, pulling and imaging, and macroscopic testing and enzymatic digestion, suggests that collagen fibrils and mineral plates are not the only components of bone with mechanical roles. A ``glue'' appears to bind mineralized collagen fibrils together. Order of magnitude calculations show that less than 1% by weight of this ``glue'' profoundly affects bone fracture resistance, as it involves a remarkable natural toughening and strengthening system: sacrificial bonds and hidden length. This system dissipates large amounts of work against entropic forces while stretching out the hidden length that is exposed when sacrificial bonds break. This appears to occur when mineralized collagen fibrils are torn apart or slid against each other during bone fracture. In bone, this system depends on multivalent positive ions such as calcium ions, which allows us to follow its influence up to macroscopic fracture testing levels. Many bone matrix proteoglycans and glycoproteins have negatively charged groups at physiological pHs that could be bound together into sacrificial bonds by multivalent positive ions, and are thus natural candidates for this ``glue.'' We cannot rule out a possible involvement of nonfibrillar collagen. Precisely which candidates are involved is yet to be determined. *NSF MRL DMR00-80034, NIH GM65354, NASA BiMAT URETI NCC-1-02037 (00000532), Veeco, USARL ARO DAAD19-03-D-0004

  5. A model for liquid film in steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Amelie; Marcelet, Meryem; Herard, Jean-Marc; Dorey, Jean-Marc; Lance, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Wetness in steam turbines induces losses and erosion. Drops are created due to the fast expansion of the steam (homogeneous nucleation) and the impurities in the steam (heterogeneous nucleation). The droplets grow and some among them settle on the blade leading to a thin liquid film. This film may then be atomized into coarse water drops which crash on the following blades. The liquid film configuration is a thin film on a curved surface, created by the drop deposit and under high steam friction. In steam turbines, the liquid film is subject to high rotational effect (rotor) and/or to negative gravity. Moreover, due to interfacial instabilities, some drops are torn off from the film. The retained approach is an integral formulation of the Navier-Stokes equation (or shallow water equation) with specific terms. The derivation of these equations requires some closure laws for the convection contributions, the Coriolis terms and for terms related to the additional mass coming from the drops deposit. Once chosen, mathematical and mechanical analyses are performed (hyperbolicity, entropy, galilean and rotational invariance). A two-dimensional code has been developed based on finite volume method to simulate numerically this liquid film model for steam turbines.

  6. Warfare in biodiversity hotspots.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Thor; Brooks, Thomas M; Da Fonseca, Gustavo A B; Hoffmann, Michael; Lamoreux, John F; Machlis, Gary; Mittermeier, Cristina G; Mittermeier, Russell A; Pilgrim, John D

    2009-06-01

    Conservation efforts are only as sustainable as the social and political context within which they take place. The weakening or collapse of sociopolitical frameworks during wartime can lead to habitat destruction and the erosion of conservation policies, but in some cases, may also confer ecological benefits through altered settlement patterns and reduced resource exploitation. Over 90% of the major armed conflicts between 1950 and 2000 occurred within countries containing biodiversity hotspots, and more than 80% took place directly within hotspot areas. Less than one-third of the 34 recognized hotspots escaped significant conflict during this period, and most suffered repeated episodes of violence. This pattern was remarkably consistent over these 5 decades. Evidence from the war-torn Eastern Afromontane hotspot suggests that biodiversity conservation is improved when international nongovernmental organizations support local protected area staff and remain engaged throughout the conflict. With biodiversity hotspots concentrated in politically volatile regions, the conservation community must maintain continuous involvement during periods of war, and biodiversity conservation should be incorporated into military, reconstruction, and humanitarian programs in the world's conflict zones. PMID:19236450

  7. Heliconia phenotypic diversity based on qualitative descriptors.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, W N R; Martins, L S S; Castro, C E F; Carvalho Filho, J L S; Loges, V

    2014-04-17

    The aim of this study was to characterize Heliconia genotypes phenotypically using 26 qualitative descriptors. The evaluations were conducted in five flowering stems per clump in three replicates of 22 Heliconia genotypes. Data were subjected to multivariate analysis, the Mahalanobis dissimilarity measure was estimated, and the dendrogram was generated using the nearest neighbor method. From the values generated by the dissimilarity matrix and the clusters formed among the Heliconia genotypes studied, the phenotypic characterizations that best differentiated the genotypes were: pseudostem and wax green tone (light or dark green), leaf-wax petiole, the petiole hair, cleft margin at the base of the petiole, midrib underside shade of green, wax midrib underside, color sheet (light or dark green), unequal lamina base, torn limb, inflorescence-wax, position of inflorescence, bract leaf in apex, twisting of the rachis, and type of bloom. These results will be applied in the preparation of a catalog for Heliconia descriptors, in the selection of different genotypes with most promising characteristics for crosses, and for the characterization of new genotypes to be introduced in germplasm collections.

  8. Using automatic particle counting to monitor aluminum cold mill coolant{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    A comprehensive program of testing and evaluation of aluminum cold rolling coolant conditions has been conducted using an automatic particle counting instrument. The project had three objectives. First, there was a need to know at what level of coolant particle contamination is surface cleanliness of an aluminum sheet affected during the rolling process. Secondly, is application of particle counting technology a reliable tool for troubleshooting coolant filtration systems and finally, what are the advantages of analyzing rolling coolants for contamination levels? A testing program was designed and performed over a two-year period. The test results revealed that mineral seal and synthetic-type coolants can begin to affect aluminum sheet surface cleanliness levels when particle sizes greater than five microns are in excess of 10,000 particles power 100 milliliters of rolling coolant. After performing over 3,000 separate tests, it was very clean that particle count levels are direct indicators of how well a filtration facility is performing. Through the application of particle counting, a number of conditions in coolant filtration facilities can be readily detected. Such items as defective filter valving, torn or fractured filter cloth, damaged filter parts, improper equipment operation and many other factors will directly impact the operation of aluminum cold rolling coolant filters. 11 figs.

  9. Nucleus-dependent sarcomere assembly is mediated by the LINC complex.

    PubMed

    Auld, Alexander L; Folker, Eric S

    2016-08-01

    Two defining characteristics of muscle cells are the many precisely positioned nuclei and the linearly arranged sarcomeres, yet the relationship between these two features is not known. We show that nuclear positioning precedes sarcomere formation. Furthermore, ZASP-GFP, a Z-line protein, colocalizes with F-actin in puncta at the cytoplasmic face of nuclei before sarcomere assembly. In embryos with mispositioned nuclei, ZASP-GFP is still recruited to the nuclei before its incorporation into sarcomeres. Furthermore, the first sarcomeres appear in positions close to the nuclei, regardless of nuclear position. These data suggest that the interaction between sarcomere proteins and nuclei is not dependent on properly positioned nuclei. Mechanistically, ZASP-GFP localization to the cytoplasmic face of the nucleus did require the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Muscle-specific depletion of klarsicht (nesprin) or klariod (SUN) blocked the recruitment of ZASP-GFP to the nucleus during the early stages of sarcomere assembly. As a result, sarcomeres were poorly formed and the general myofibril network was less stable, incomplete, and/or torn. These data suggest that the nucleus, through the LINC complex, is crucial for the proper assembly and stability of the sarcomere network. PMID:27307582

  10. Evaluation of the failure of the HP nozzle block at the Nebraska City Station

    SciTech Connect

    Karloff, J.A.; Weins, W.N.

    1995-12-31

    Since the start-up of the Nebraska City Station unit in 1978, the nozzle block section of the high pressure turbine has had to be replaced or repaired each time this section of the turbine was disassembled. In nearly all cases the damage was limited to the lower half of the nozzle block, where many airfoils had been chipped away. This damage not only dramatically increased maintenance costs, but also reduced the efficiency of the nozzle block. The objective of this report is to evaluate if corrosion-fatigue is part of the failure mechanism and what role if any solid particle erosion played in this process. Results and analysis show that both corrosion and SPE were shown to be minor contributors in the failure analysis process. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs revealed that fatigue was the major contributor in the failure. It is speculated that the blade passing pressure disturbance caused the trailing edge of the nozzle to vacillate. As the metal reached its fatigue limit, minute fatigue cracks began to form parallel and in a direction opposite to the steam flow. When a crack grew large enough, part of the metal would be torn away leaving the ``chipped`` away appearance. SPE may have initially accelerated the crack growth by decreasing the thickness of the trailing edge. Intergranular corrosion; which was shown to be present, could have weakened the metal at its grain boundaries essentially reducing its fatigue strength.

  11. Membrane repair of human skeletal muscle cells requires Annexin-A5.

    PubMed

    Carmeille, Romain; Bouvet, Flora; Tan, Sisareuth; Croissant, Coralie; Gounou, Céline; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Brisson, Alain R; Bouter, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Defect in membrane repair contributes to the development of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) and Miyoshi myopathy. In healthy skeletal muscle, unraveling membrane repair mechanisms requires to establish an exhaustive list of the components of the resealing machinery. Here we show that human myotubes rendered deficient for Annexin-A5 (AnxA5) suffer from a severe defect in membrane resealing. This defect is rescued by the addition of recombinant AnxA5 while an AnxA5 mutant, which is unable to form 2D protein arrays, has no effect. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we show that AnxA5 binds to the edges of the torn membrane, as early as a few seconds after sarcolemma injury, where it probably self-assembles into 2D arrays. In addition, we observed that membrane resealing is associated with the presence of a cluster of lipid vesicles at the wounded site. AnxA5 is present at the surface of these vesicles and may thus participate in plugging the cell membrane disruption. Finally, we show that AnxA5 behaves similarly in myotubes from a muscle cell line established from a patient suffering from LGMD2B, a myopathy due to dysferlin mutations, which indicates that trafficking of AnxA5 during sarcolemma damage is independent of the presence of dysferlin. PMID:27286750

  12. The mechanism of brittle fracture in a microalloyed steel: Part 2. Mechanistic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, D.P.; Howden, D.G.; Clark, W.A.T.

    2000-03-01

    In Part 1 of this study, cuboidally shaped inclusions were found to be responsible for cleavage initiation in a low-carbon, microalloyed steel. In Part 2, electron microdiffraction was used to identify these inclusions as the fcc phase (NaCl prototype) in the titanium-nitrogen system. A model for cleavage as induced by these inclusions is proposed. A microcrack begins on one side of the TiN inclusion, propagates to the other side, and then transfers into the matrix. Initiation at a particular location in the particle is believed to be caused by dislocation pileup impingement and stress concentrations such as crystal defects and surface irregularities within the TiN. Dislocations in the TiN inclusions were imaged by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After the TiN microcrack transfers into the matrix, propagation spreads radially. From the area of crack transfer, two simultaneous propagation paths reverse directions and rotate around the particle. The particle separates these cracks for a short distance, they travel on different cleavage planes, and upon rejoining, a ridge of torn matrix is created. The location of this ridge can be used to infer where cleavage began in the TiN and where the microcrack transferred into the matrix. Tessellated residual stresses arising from differential thermal contraction between the TiN and the matrix are suggested to increase the cleavage-initiating potency of TiN inclusions.

  13. Theory of monodispersion of liquids by gravitational and electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskov, A.A.; Shiryaeva, S.O.; Grigor'ev, A.I. )

    1993-06-01

    It is shown that the drop regime of the electrostatic monodispersion of liquid from the meniscus on the tip of the capillary through which the liquid is supplied takes place under the joint action of equally directed gravitational and electric forces with the gravitational forces playing a decisive role. With the increase of electric forces, with other conditions equal, the size of torn away drops decreases, while their charges and the frequency of emission increase. When the contribution of gravitational forces to the detachment of the drop from the tip of the capillary tube becomes negligible as compared to electric forces, the transition to the harmonic regime of the monodispersion of the fluid occurs. The parameters of drops simulated in this regime, as well as the existence of different zones of harmonic monodispersion, are subject to adequate physical theoretical analysis within the framework of the thermodynamic approach on the basis of the principle of the minimum scattering of energy in the stationary nonequilibrium process.

  14. IL-17A mediates inflammatory and tissue remodelling events in early human tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Millar, Neal L; Akbar, Moeed; Campbell, Abigail L; Reilly, James H; Kerr, Shauna C; McLean, Michael; Frleta-Gilchrist, Marina; Fazzi, Umberto G; Leach, William J; Rooney, Brian P; Crowe, Lindsay A N; Murrell, George A C; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, inflammatory mediators are considered crucial to the onset and perpetuation of tendinopathy. We sought evidence of interleukin 17A (IL-17A) expression in early human tendinopathy and thereafter, explored mechanisms whereby IL-17A mediated inflammation and tissue remodeling in human tenocytes. Torn supraspinatus tendon (established pathology) and matched intact subscapularis tendon (representing 'early pathology') along with control biopsies were collected from patients undergoing shoulder surgery. Markers of inflammation and IL-17A were quantified by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Human tendon cells were derived from hamstring tendon obtained during ACL reconstruction. In vitro effects of IL-17A upon tenocytes were measured using RT-PCR, multiplex cytokine assays, apoptotic proteomic profiling, immunohistochemistry and annexin V FACS staining. Increased expression of IL-17A was detected in 'early tendinopathy' compared to both matched samples and non-matched control samples (p < 0.01) by RT-PCR and immunostaining. Double immunofluoresence staining revealed IL-17A expression in leukocyte subsets including mast cells, macrophages and T cells. IL-17A treated tenocytes exhibited increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (p < 0.001), altered matrix regulation (p < 0.01) with increased Collagen type III and increased expression of several apoptosis related factors. We propose IL-17A as an inflammatory mediator within the early tendinopathy processes thus providing novel therapeutic approaches in the management of tendon disorders. PMID:27263531

  15. Digging the city

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S.L.

    1996-02-01

    For city dwellers and commuters, major construction and repair projects by underground utilities have traditionally meant torn-up streets, detours, snarled traffic, flaring tempers and other urban headaches. For store and business owners, utility projects also have frequently been harmful to the bottom line. Customer parking often is curtailed and deliveries are missed because of street excavations, and business hours may even have to be cut because of interruptions in utility service. But natural gas utilities in major cities across the country are working hard to change that reality. Their effort has two major focuses: community-relations programs that anticipate problems and ease tensions between the utility and local residents and business owners, and new technologies that drastically limit the amount of excavation that needs to be done in repairing or replacing gas distribution lines. The paper describes a case study in the community-relations side of the equation which involved a recent project by Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG and E) in the congested streets of San Francisco`s famed Chinatown.

  16. TRANSIENT BRIGHTENINGS ASSOCIATED WITH FLUX CANCELLATION ALONG A FILAMENT CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Muglach, K. E-mail: karin.muglach@nasa.gov

    2013-02-15

    Filament channels coincide with large-scale polarity inversion lines of the photospheric magnetic field, where flux cancellation continually takes place. High-cadence Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) images recorded in He II 30.4 nm and Fe IX 17.1 nm during 2010 August 22 reveal numerous transient brightenings occurring along the edge of a filament channel within a decaying active region, where SDO line-of-sight magnetograms show strong opposite-polarity flux in close contact. The brightenings are elongated along the direction of the filament channel, with linear extents of several arcseconds, and typically last a few minutes; they sometimes have the form of multiple two-sided ejections with speeds on the order of 100 km s{sup -1}. Remarkably, some of the brightenings rapidly develop into larger scale events, forming sheetlike structures that are eventually torn apart by the diverging flows in the filament channel and ejected in opposite directions. We interpret the brightenings as resulting from reconnections among filament-channel field lines having one footpoint located in the region of canceling flux. In some cases, the flow patterns that develop in the channel may bring successive horizontal loops together and cause a cascade to larger scales.

  17. Tidal Disruption Events Prefer Unusual Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcavi, Iair; French, K. Decker; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2016-06-01

    A star passing close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) can be torn apart in a Tidal Disruption Events (TDE). TDEs that are accompanied by observable flares are now being discovered in transient surveys and are revealing the presence and the properties of otherwise-quiescent SMBHs. Recently, it was discovered that TDEs show a strong preference for rare post-starburst galaxies, (i.e. galaxies that have undergone intense star formation but are no longer forming stars today). We quantify this preference and find that TDEs are approximately 30-200 times more likely to occur in post-starburst hosts (compared to the general SDSS galaxy population), with the enhancement factor depending on the star formation history of the galaxy. This surprising host-galaxy preference connects the until-now disparate TDE subclasses of UV/optical-dominated TDEs and X-ray-dominated TDEs, and serves as the basis for TDE-targeted transient surveys. Post-starburst galaxies may be post-mergers, with binary SMBH systems that are still spiraling in. Such systems could enhance the TDE rate, but it is not yet clear if models can quantitatively reproduce the observed enhancement. Alternative explanations for enhanced TDE rate in post-starbursts include non-spherical post-merger central potentials and enhanced rates of giant stars.

  18. Plans for first oil production revived in two Sudanese fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-03

    A Vancouver, British Columbia, independent and its Sudanese partner have filed a development plan with the government of Sudan to produce an initial 40,000 b/d from Heglig and Unity oil fields in Sudan. Arakis Energy Corp., and the private Sudanese company State Petroleum Corp. (SPC) want to begin the first commercial hydrocarbon production in the destitute, war torn country. They are picking up where Chevron Corp. left off after years of grappling with an ambitious, costly - and ultimately futile - effort to export crude-oil from Sudan. After finding almost 300 million bbl of oil in Sudan during the early 1980s, Chevron scuttled a $2 billion project to export 50,000 b/d of Sudanese crude in 1986. It drilled 90 wells and sank more than $1 billion into the project. But it dropped the plan, citing the 1986 collapse of oil prices and concerns over security after repeated guerrilla attacks delayed work. The paper details the project.

  19. Mode-analytical Examination of Vortex Dynamics of a Pure Electron Plasma in the Relaxation to a Meta-equilibrium Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Yosuke; Kiwamoto, Yasuhito; Soga, Yukihiro; Aoki, Jun; Ito, Kiyokazu; Sanpei, Akio; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2006-10-18

    Vortex patches of intense density generated by the diocotron instability in a magnetized pure electron plasma merge each other accompanied by the production of filaments and finally relax to a bell shape distribution surrounded by a halo of low-density electrons. Here we reexamine the vortical dynamics in terms of the time evolution of the power spectrum in the mode-number space. Triggered by the instability, the initial axisymmetric ring distribution is deformed and torn into mesoscopic blobs, and a distribution of radial flux is generated around the blobs. In the merging process between vortex patches, the energy spectrum expands toward higher mode-number space, while the dominant mode shifts downward to lower mode numbers as this process proceeds. The turbulent period characterized by the repeated mergers is accompanied by a fast reduction of the enstrophy. During this relaxation the energy and the angular momentum of the whole plasma system remain conserved. In a slow process after the rapid relaxation a convex profile appears in the density distribution accompanied by the recovery of a symmetric distribution of the azimuthal flux. The spectra in the final state concentrate at symmetric modes with a slight contribution from orbiting motion of the plasma column.

  20. High-efficiency flotation of coarse and fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, B.W.; Conway, C.J.; Jameson, G.J.

    1995-10-01

    The flotation of coal in the fine and coarse particle size ranges presents particular problems. Fine or ultra-fine coal less than 100 microns presents a challenge to conventional flotation machines because the rate of capture of the coal particles can be very low, so longer residence times are needed. Also, conventional mechanical cells are not normally designed with froth properties in mind. Froth drainage may be inadequate, leading to excessive entrainment of ash. The upper limit of flotation of coal is normally put at about 500 {micro}m (30 mesh). It appears that, in mechanical cells, coarser particles tend to be torn away from bubbles in the turbulent environment created by the impeller. In this paper, results are presented from plant trials of a high-intensity flotation column of novel design, namely the Jameson cell. Extensive trials have been conducted on coal slurries with a top size of around 1 mm. Size-by size analysis shows that it is possible to achieve high yields of low ash product over the whole particle size range.

  1. A camerate-rich late carboniferous (Moscovian) crinoid fauna from volcanic conglomerate, Xinjiang, People's Republic of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, N.G.; Waters, J.A.; Maples, C.G.; Marcus, S.A.; Liao, Z.-T.

    1996-01-01

    A low-diversity camerate-rich crinoid fauna from the Qijiagou Formation, Taoshigo Valley near Turpan, Xinjiang-Uygar Autonomous Region, China was collected during field work in May, 1993. The crinoid fauna is dominated by species of Platycrinites. Other camerate crinoids include a species in the Paragaricocrinidae, Actinocrinites, a hexacrinitid, and an acrocrinoid. The only other non-North American occurrence of this latter family is Springeracrocrinus from the Moscovian of Russia. In addition to the camerates, there are several advanced cladid inadunates more typical of Upper Carboniferous crinoid faunas, including an erisocrinoid (possibly Sinocrinus), Graphiocrinus, ?Cromyocrinus, and an agassizocrinoid (Petschoracrinus) represented by partly fused infrabasal cones. A single radial plate with angustary facet may represent a cyathocrinoid, There also is a catillocrinoid, assigned here to Paracatillocrinus. The fauna, which resembles Moscovian crinoids described from Russia, is preserved in graded volcanic conglomeratic debris flows that overlie a carbonate mound and contain clasts up to 3 m in dimension. The crinoids are fragmentary, with many calyces seemingly torn into two or three pieces and dumped in with the pyroclastic debris. Camerates are represented by large thecal scraps consisting of numerous plates, or by large individual plates or circlets. Other fossils include rare solitary rugose corals, tabular bryozoans, Neospirifer, and other fragmentary brachiopods. We suspect that the crinoids may have been swept off of a nearby carbonate mound and deposited as debris-flow bedload.

  2. The influence of breed and sex on the incidence of mortalities and skin tears in broiler carcasses.

    PubMed

    Casey, N H; Smith, G A; Crosley, R I

    1989-06-01

    The effects of nutrition, breed and sex on the incidence of mortalities and of skin tears on broiler carcasses were studied. Both sexes of 2 breeds, Hubbard and Ross, were given 4 dietary treatments consisting of a normal level of vitamin and mineral premix plus 300 ppm furazolidone, twice normal premix inclusion level plus 300 ppm furazolidone, a normal level of vitamin and mineral premix, and twice normal mineral premix inclusion level. A coccidiostat containing the active ingredient halofuginone was included at 6 ppm, twice the recommended dosage. Starter, grower and finisher diets were fed respectively up to Day 20, Day 30 and Day 48. Group growth performances, mortalities and the incidence of torn skin were monitored on both the live birds and carcasses. The effect of the different nutritional treatments on skin tears was not significant (P = 0.9533), as was the breed effect (P = 0.0547). However, the effect of sex was significant (P = 0.0044), the incidence in hens being higher. Mortalities among the Hubbard were significantly greater than among the Ross (P = 0.0001). Hens showed a slightly higher mortality rate than roosters, tending towards significance at the 5% level (P = 0.0554).

  3. The “Labral Bridge”: A Novel Technique for Arthroscopic Anatomic Knotless Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Roman C.; Hofbauer, Marcus; Platzer, Patrick; Moen, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors is widely considered a mainstay for surgical treatment of anterior shoulder instability after recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations. Traditionally, the displaced capsulolabral complex is restored and firmly attached to the glenoid by placing multiple suture anchors individually from a 5- to 3-o'clock position. A variety of different techniques using different anchor designs and materials have been described. Knotless anchors are widely used nowadays for shoulder instability repair, providing a fast and secure way of labral fixation with favorable long-term outcomes. However, these techniques result in a concentrated point load of the reduced labrum to the glenoid at each suture anchor. We describe a technique, developed by the first author, using a 1.5-mm LabralTape (Arthrex, Naples, FL) in combination with knotless suture anchors (3.5-mm PEEK [polyether ether ketone] PushLock anchors; Arthrex), for hybrid fixation of the labrum. The LabralTape is used to secure the torn labrum to the glenoid between each suture anchor, thus potentially providing a more even pressure distribution. PMID:26052499

  4. Romancing the boundary: client masculinities in the Chinese sex industry.

    PubMed

    Kong, Travis S K

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on 24 in-depth interviews and 2 focus-group discussions conducted since 2012 with Hong Kong heterosexual men who buy sex in order to examine men's level of physical and emotional engagement with sex workers under two dominant sexual scripts in contemporary Hong Kong. Torn between companionate sexuality, with its companionate model of relationships, and recreational sexuality, with its promiscuous model of sexual pleasure, Hong Kong male clients seek to satisfy their sexual and affective needs through commercial sexual relationships. The term (meaning 'chicken worm', connoting a 'McSex' form of masculinity) refers to those men who seek impersonal sexual release with as many women as they wish, while the term (meaning 'sunken boat' and connoting a 'Titanic' form of masculinity) refers to those men who seek an intense level of emotional intimacy with sex workers. Between these two contrasting types, the majority of respondents fall into a form of 'bounded' masculinity characteristic of men who emphasise control and balance by seeking emotionally responsive women in a time-bound romance. By comparing clients' variations in the level of physical and emotional engagement with sex workers, this paper seeks to understand individual differences in client types and offers a new understanding of Chinese male sexuality and relationship formation, and the corresponding health risks (e.g., sexual, emotional) associated with each type.

  5. Hyporheic zone hydrologic science: A historical account of its emergence and a prospectus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2015-05-01

    The hyporheic zone, defined by shallow subsurface pathways through river beds and banks beginning and ending at the river, is an integral and unique component of fluvial systems. It hosts myriad hydrologically controlled processes that are potentially coupled in complex ways. Understanding these processes and the connections between them is critical since these processes are not only important locally but integrate to impact increasingly larger scale biogeochemical functioning of the river corridor up to the river network scale. Thus, the hyporheic zone continues to be a growing research focus for many hydrologists for more than half the history of Water Resources Research. This manuscript partly summarizes the historical development of hyporheic zone hydrologic science as gleaned from papers published in Water Resources Research, from the birth of the concept of the hyporheic zone as a hydrologic black box (sometimes referred to as transient storage zone), to its adolescent years of being torn between occasionally competing research perspectives of interrogating the hyporheic zone from a surface or subsurface view, to its mature emergence as an interdisciplinary research field that employs the wide array of state-of-the-art tools available to the modern hydrologist. The field is vibrant and moving in the right direction of addressing critical fundamental and applied questions with no clear end in sight in its growth. There are exciting opportunities for scientists that are able to tightly link the allied fields of geology, geomorphology, hydrology, geochemistry, and ecology to tackle the many open problems in hyporheic zone science.

  6. Blue sensors : technology and cooperative monitoring in UN peacekeeping.

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, A. Walter Dr.

    2004-04-01

    For over a half-century, the soldiers and civilians deployed to conflict areas in UN peacekeeping operations have monitored ceasefires and peace agreements of many types with varying degrees of effectiveness. Though there has been a significant evolution of peacekeeping, especially in the 1990s, with many new monitoring functions, the UN has yet to incorporate monitoring technologies into its operations in a systematic fashion. Rather, the level of technology depends largely on the contributing nations and the individual field commanders. In most missions, sensor technology has not been used at all. So the UN has not been able to fully benefit from the sensor technology revolution that has seen effectiveness greatly amplified and costs plummet. This paper argues that monitoring technologies need not replace the human factor, which is essential for confidence building in conflict areas, but they can make peacekeepers more effective, more knowledgeable and safer. Airborne, ground and underground sensors can allow peacekeepers to do better monitoring over larger areas, in rugged terrain, at night (when most infractions occur) and in adverse weather conditions. Technology also allows new ways to share gathered information with the parties to create confidence and, hence, better pre-conditions for peace. In the future sensors should become 'tools of the trade' to help the UN keep the peace in war-torn areas.

  7. Magma Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  8. Nucleus-dependent sarcomere assembly is mediated by the LINC complex

    PubMed Central

    Auld, Alexander L.; Folker, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Two defining characteristics of muscle cells are the many precisely positioned nuclei and the linearly arranged sarcomeres, yet the relationship between these two features is not known. We show that nuclear positioning precedes sarcomere formation. Furthermore, ZASP-GFP, a Z-line protein, colocalizes with F-actin in puncta at the cytoplasmic face of nuclei before sarcomere assembly. In embryos with mispositioned nuclei, ZASP-GFP is still recruited to the nuclei before its incorporation into sarcomeres. Furthermore, the first sarcomeres appear in positions close to the nuclei, regardless of nuclear position. These data suggest that the interaction between sarcomere proteins and nuclei is not dependent on properly positioned nuclei. Mechanistically, ZASP-GFP localization to the cytoplasmic face of the nucleus did require the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Muscle-specific depletion of klarsicht (nesprin) or klariod (SUN) blocked the recruitment of ZASP-GFP to the nucleus during the early stages of sarcomere assembly. As a result, sarcomeres were poorly formed and the general myofibril network was less stable, incomplete, and/or torn. These data suggest that the nucleus, through the LINC complex, is crucial for the proper assembly and stability of the sarcomere network. PMID:27307582

  9. Tree-ring dating of meteorite fall in Sikhote-Alin, Eastern Siberia - Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantucci, R.; Di Martino, Mario; Serra, Romano

    2012-01-01

    This research deals with the fall of the Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite on the morning of 12 February 1947, at about 00:38 h Utrecht, in a remote area in the territory of Primorsky Krai in Eastern Siberia (46°09‧36″N, 134°39‧22″E). The area engulfed by the meteoritic fall was around 48 km2, with an elliptic form and thousands of craters. Around the large craters the trees were torn out by the roots and laid radially to the craters at a distance of 10-20 m; the more distant trees had broken tops. This research investigated through dendrocronology n.6 Scots pine trees (Pinus Sibirica) close to one of the main impact craters. The analysis of growth anomalies has shown a sudden decrease since 1947 for 4-8 years after the meteoritic impact. Tree growth stress, detected in 1947, was analysed in detail through wood microsection that confirmed the winter season (rest vegetative period) of the event. The growth stress is mainly due to the lost crown (needle lost) and it did not seem to be caused due to direct damages on trunk and branches (missing of resin ducts).

  10. A dual injury of the shoulder: acromioclavicular joint dislocation (type IV) coupled with ipsilateral mid-shaft clavicle fracture.

    PubMed

    Madi, Sandesh; Pandey, Vivek; Khanna, Vikrant; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-11-23

    A direct blow to the shoulder, as may be sustained in a road traffic accident (RTA), can result in various combinations of fracture dislocations in the shoulder joint complex. Among these, a rare variety is an acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation coupled with ipsilateral mid-shaft clavicle fracture. Diverse treatment options have been described in the literature, ranging from non-operative and operative, to hybrid management. Treatment for this complex injury is predominantly dictated by the type of dislocation and displacement of the clavicle fracture, as well as age and demand of the patient. Acute high grades of ACJ dislocation require restoration of the coracoclavicular relationship (in place of torn coracoclavicular (CC) ligament) by some form of internal fixation, thereby maintaining the ACJ reduction. An arthroscopic reinstatement of the coracoclavicular relationship using a dog bone button and fibre tape implant for this composite injury pattern has not been previously described. Furthermore, a comprehensive review of the literature associated with this injury pattern is briefly described.

  11. Biomechanical Effect of Margin Convergence Techniques: Quantitative Assessment of Supraspinatus Muscle Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sperling, John W.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Although the margin convergence (MC) technique has been recognized as an option for rotator cuff repair, little is known about the biomechanical effect on repaired rotator cuff muscle, especially after supplemented footprint repair. The purpose of this study was to assess the passive stiffness changes of the supraspinatus (SSP) muscle after MC techniques using shear wave elastography (SWE). A 30 × 40-mm U-shaped rotator cuff tear was created in 8 cadaveric shoulders. Each specimen was repaired with 6 types of MC technique (1-, 2-, 3-suture MC with/without footprint repair, in a random order) at 30° glenohumeral abduction. Passive stiffness of four anatomical regions in the SSP muscle was measured based on an established SWE method. Data were obtained from the SSP muscle at 0° abduction under 8 different conditions: intact (before making a tear), torn, and postoperative conditions with 6 techniques. MC techniques using 1-, or 2-suture combined with footprint repair showed significantly higher stiffness values than the intact condition. Passive stiffness of the SSP muscle was highest after a 1-suture MC with footprint repair for all regions when compared among all repair procedures. There was no significant difference between the intact condition and a 3-suture MC with footprint repair. MC techniques with single stitch and subsequent footprint repair may have adverse effects on muscle properties and tensile loading on repair, increasing the risk of retear of repairs. Adding more MC stitches could reverse these adverse effects. PMID:27583402

  12. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  13. Effect of tissue properties, shape and orientation of microcalcifications on vulnerable cap stability using different hyperelastic constitutive models

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Luis; Kelly-Arnold, Adreanne; Maldonado, Natalia; Laudier, Damien; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of all cardiovascular deaths associated with acute coronary syndrome occur when the thin fibrous cap tissue overlying the necrotic core in a coronary vessel is torn, ripped or fissured under the action of high blood pressure. From a biomechanics point of view, the rupture of an atheroma is due to increased mechanical stresses in the lesion, in which the ultimate stress (i.e. peak circumferential stress (PCS) at failure) of the tissue is exceeded. Several factors including the cap thickness, morphology, residual stresses and tissue composition of the atheroma have been shown to affect the PCS. Also important, we recently demonstrated that microcalcifications (µCalcs) > 5 µm are a common feature in human atheroma caps, which behave as local stress concentrators, increasing the local tissue stress by at least a factor of two surpassing the ultimate stress threshold for cap tissue rupture. In the present study, we used both idealized µCalcs with spherical shape and actual µCalcs from human coronary atherosclerotic caps, to determine their effect on increasing the circumferential stress in the fibroatheroma cap using different hyperelastic constitutive models. We have found that the stress concentration factor (SCF) produced by µCalcs in the fibroatheroma cap is affected by the material tissue properties, µCalcs spacing, aspect ratio and their alignment relative to the tensile axis of the cap. PMID:24503048

  14. Effect of tissue properties, shape and orientation of microcalcifications on vulnerable cap stability using different hyperelastic constitutive models.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Luis; Kelly-Arnold, Adreanne; Maldonado, Natalia; Laudier, Damien; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-03-01

    Approximately half of all cardiovascular deaths associated with acute coronary syndrome occur when the thin fibrous cap tissue overlying the necrotic core in a coronary vessel is torn, ripped or fissured under the action of high blood pressure. From a biomechanics point of view, the rupture of an atheroma is due to increased mechanical stresses in the lesion, in which the ultimate stress (i.e. peak circumferential stress (PCS) at failure) of the tissue is exceeded. Several factors including the cap thickness, morphology, residual stresses and tissue composition of the atheroma have been shown to affect the PCS. Also important, we recently demonstrated that microcalcifications (μCalcs>5 µm are a common feature in human atheroma caps, which behave as local stress concentrators, increasing the local tissue stress by at least a factor of two surpassing the ultimate stress threshold for cap tissue rupture. In the present study, we used both idealized µCalcs with spherical shape and actual µCalcs from human coronary atherosclerotic caps, to determine their effect on increasing the circumferential stress in the fibroatheroma cap using different hyperelastic constitutive models. We have found that the stress concentration factor (SCF) produced by μCalcs in the fibroatheroma cap is affected by the material tissue properties, μCalcs spacing, aspect ratio and their alignment relative to the tensile axis of the cap. PMID:24503048

  15. Mathematical modeling and simulation of the evolution of plaques in blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifan; Jäger, Willi; Neuss-Radu, Maria; Richter, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a model is developed for the evolution of plaques in arteries, which is one of the main causes for the blockage of blood flow. Plaque rupture and spread of torn-off material may cause closures in the down-stream vessel system and lead to ischemic brain or myocardial infarctions. The model covers the flow of blood and its interaction with the vessel wall. It is based on the assumption that the penetration of monocytes from the blood flow into the vessel wall, and the accumulation of foam cells increasing the volume, are main factors for the growth of plaques. The dynamics of the vessel wall is governed by a deformation gradient, which is given as composition of a purely elastic tensor, and a tensor modeling the biologically caused volume growth. An equation for the evolution of the metric is derived quantifying the changing geometry of the vessel wall. To calculate numerically the solutions of the arising free boundary problem, the model system of partial differential equations is transformed to an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) formulation, where all equations are given in fixed domains. The numerical calculations are using newly developed algorithms for ALE systems. The results of the simulations, obtained for realistic system parameters, are in good qualitative agreement with observations. They demonstrate that the basic modeling assumption can be justified. The increase of stresses in the vessel wall can be computed. Medical treatment tries to prevent critical stress values, which may cause plaque rupture and its consequences.

  16. Larynx Trauma and Hyoid Bone Fracture after Bite Injury in Dog: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Manchi, George; Brunnberg, Mathias M.; Shahid, Muhammad; Al Aiyan, Ahmad; Brunnberg, Leo; Stein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intraoperatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles, and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient’s severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea that underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome. PMID:27579303

  17. Romancing the boundary: client masculinities in the Chinese sex industry.

    PubMed

    Kong, Travis S K

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on 24 in-depth interviews and 2 focus-group discussions conducted since 2012 with Hong Kong heterosexual men who buy sex in order to examine men's level of physical and emotional engagement with sex workers under two dominant sexual scripts in contemporary Hong Kong. Torn between companionate sexuality, with its companionate model of relationships, and recreational sexuality, with its promiscuous model of sexual pleasure, Hong Kong male clients seek to satisfy their sexual and affective needs through commercial sexual relationships. The term (meaning 'chicken worm', connoting a 'McSex' form of masculinity) refers to those men who seek impersonal sexual release with as many women as they wish, while the term (meaning 'sunken boat' and connoting a 'Titanic' form of masculinity) refers to those men who seek an intense level of emotional intimacy with sex workers. Between these two contrasting types, the majority of respondents fall into a form of 'bounded' masculinity characteristic of men who emphasise control and balance by seeking emotionally responsive women in a time-bound romance. By comparing clients' variations in the level of physical and emotional engagement with sex workers, this paper seeks to understand individual differences in client types and offers a new understanding of Chinese male sexuality and relationship formation, and the corresponding health risks (e.g., sexual, emotional) associated with each type. PMID:25686625

  18. Biomechanical Effect of Margin Convergence Techniques: Quantitative Assessment of Supraspinatus Muscle Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Although the margin convergence (MC) technique has been recognized as an option for rotator cuff repair, little is known about the biomechanical effect on repaired rotator cuff muscle, especially after supplemented footprint repair. The purpose of this study was to assess the passive stiffness changes of the supraspinatus (SSP) muscle after MC techniques using shear wave elastography (SWE). A 30 × 40-mm U-shaped rotator cuff tear was created in 8 cadaveric shoulders. Each specimen was repaired with 6 types of MC technique (1-, 2-, 3-suture MC with/without footprint repair, in a random order) at 30° glenohumeral abduction. Passive stiffness of four anatomical regions in the SSP muscle was measured based on an established SWE method. Data were obtained from the SSP muscle at 0° abduction under 8 different conditions: intact (before making a tear), torn, and postoperative conditions with 6 techniques. MC techniques using 1-, or 2-suture combined with footprint repair showed significantly higher stiffness values than the intact condition. Passive stiffness of the SSP muscle was highest after a 1-suture MC with footprint repair for all regions when compared among all repair procedures. There was no significant difference between the intact condition and a 3-suture MC with footprint repair. MC techniques with single stitch and subsequent footprint repair may have adverse effects on muscle properties and tensile loading on repair, increasing the risk of retear of repairs. Adding more MC stitches could reverse these adverse effects. PMID:27583402

  19. The role of graft materials in suture augmentation for tendon repairs and reattachment.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Iesaka, Kazuho

    2005-08-01

    Various biomaterials have been used to augment sutures for the repair and reattachment of tendons. This study examined four different graft materials in a simple and reproducible model using chicken Achilles tendons to determine the strength and mechanism of suture reinforcement of tendon repairs. The graft materials tested were Gore-Tex(R) Soft Tissue Patch, Graftjacket, bovine pericardium, and an experimental graft material from Xylos Corporation. Testing was performed in shear to simulate forces on a torn tendon repair and pull-off to simulate those on a tendon reattachment to bone. Compared to unaugmented suture, grafts increased suture fixation strength from 10% to 60% in shear and from 0% to 36% in pull-off with the bovine pericardium graft, providing significant improvement in both tests. In no cases (even unaugmented) did the suture pull directly through the tendon, but instead sliced along it, demonstrating that the interface between the suture and the tendon determines fixation strength. Grafts function by increasing the area, friction, and nature of this interface, not by acting as a barrier for suture pull-through. PMID:15981174

  20. Measuring Regional Changes in Damaged Tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Catherine Kayt Vincent

    Mechanical properties of tendon predict tendon health and function, but measuring these properties in vivo is difficult. An ultrasound-based (US) analysis technique called acoustoelastography (AE) uses load-dependent changes in the reflected US signal to estimate tissue stiffness non-invasively. This thesis explores whether AE can provide information about stiffness alteration resulting from tendon tears both ex vivo and in vivo. An ex vivo ovine infraspinatus tendon model suggests that the relative load transmitted by the different tendon layers transmit different fractions of the load and that ultrasound echo intensity change during cyclic loading decreases, becoming less consistent once the tendon is torn. An in vivo human tibialis anterior tendon model using electrically stimulated twitch contractions investigated the feasibility of measuring the effect in vivo. Four of the five subjects showed the expected change and that the muscle contraction times calculated using the average grayscale echo intensity change compared favorably with the times calculated based on the force data. Finally an AE pilot study with patients who had rotator cuff tendon tears found that controlling the applied load and the US view of the system will be crucial to a successful in vivo study.

  1. How Traumatic Violence Permanently Changes Shopping Behavior.

    PubMed

    Sigirci, Ozge; Rockmore, Marc; Wansink, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic experiences - such as combat, living in a conflict country or war-torn nation, or experiencing a violent crime or natural disaster - change social relationships and may also influence a life-time of consumer relationships with brands and shopping. Our focus on this previously overlooked area is centered on an analysis of the long-term shopping habits of 355 combat veterans. We show that those who experienced heavy trauma (e.g., heavy combat) exhibited similar disconnection from brands as others have experienced in social relationships. They became more transactional in that they were more open to switching brands, to trying new products, and buying the least expensive alternative (p < 0.01). In contrast, those who had experienced a light trauma were more influenced by ads and more open to buying brands even when they cost more (p < 0.00). Trauma, such as combat, may change one's decision horizon. Functionality and price become more important, which is consistent with the idea that they are more focused on the present moment than on building on the past or saving for the future. PMID:27656152

  2. Tadeus Reichstein, co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine: on the occasion of the 110th anniversary of his birth in Poland.

    PubMed

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Sulkowska, Mariola; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2007-01-01

    Tadeus Reichstein (1897-1996) was the first scientist born in Poland to receive the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (1950) for the "discovery of hormones of the adrenal cortex, their structure and biological effects", as stated by the Nobel Prize Committee. His family being deeply devoted to Polish cultural and historical heritage, his first name was given to him after Tadeus Kosciuszko, a chief commander of the 18th century Polish uprising named the Kosciuszko Insurrection. As a child, he emigrated with his family to Switzerland, where he was much later to become involved in numerous research studies on steroids on an international scale. It was Tadeus Reichstein who isolated and synthesized desoxycorticosterone, which still remains the drug of first choice in the treatment of Addison's disease. Additionally, thanks to his strategy for the mass production of Vitamin C, the cost of this agent was drastically reduced thus enabling its widespread therapeutic use. In our divided world so often torn by tremendous conflicts, there is a great need to both remember and commemorate such distinguished people as Tadeus Reichstein who, despite the apparent "borders" between different nationalities and cultures, have demonstrated through their work the huge need for harmonious collaboration in the development of science.

  3. Pseudocyclops: two cases of ACL graft partial tears mimicking cyclops lesions on MRI.

    PubMed

    Simpfendorfer, Claus; Miniaci, Anthony; Subhas, Naveen; Winalski, Carl S; Ilaslan, Hakan

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is a common surgical procedure, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure has excellent success rates, complications such as mechanical impingement, graft rupture, and arthrofibrosis can occur, often necessitating additional surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become a valuable tool in evaluating complications after ACL reconstruction. We report two cases of ACL reconstruction complicated by arthroscopically proven partial graft tears. In both cases the torn anterior graft fibers were flipped into the intercondylar notch, mimicking anterior arthrofibrosis, i.e., a "cyclops lesion," on MR imaging. Careful review of the direction of graft fibers on MR imaging in the "pseudocyclops" lesions can help differentiate these partial tears from the fibrosis of a true cyclops. The "pseudocyclops" lesion is a previously undescribed MR imaging sign of partial ACL graft tear. Larger studies are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the sign, as well as the clinical importance of these partial graft tears. PMID:25620690

  4. Lost and found dark matter in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, A.; Stoehr, F.; Mamon, G. A.; Cox, T. J.; Novak, G. S.; Primack, J. R.

    2005-09-01

    There is strong evidence that the mass of the Universe is dominated by dark matter, which exerts gravitational attraction but whose exact nature is unknown. In particular, all galaxies are believed to be embedded in massive haloes of dark matter. This view has recently been challenged by the observation of surprisingly low random stellar velocities in the outskirts of ordinary elliptical galaxies, which has been interpreted as indicating a lack of dark matter. Here we show that the low velocities are in fact compatible with galaxy formation in dark-matter haloes. Using numerical simulations of disk-galaxy mergers, we find that the stellar orbits in the outer regions of the resulting ellipticals are very elongated. These stars were torn by tidal forces from their original galaxies during the first close passage and put on outgoing trajectories. The elongated orbits, combined with the steeply falling density profile of the observed tracers, explain the observed low velocities even in the presence of large amounts of dark matter. Projection effects when viewing a triaxial elliptical can lead to even lower observed velocities along certain lines of sight.

  5. Using three-dimensional gait data for foot/ankle orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Gwyneth; Roy, Kevin; Chester, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a forty year old male who sustained a torn carotid during strenuous physical activity. This was followed by a right hemispheric stroke due to a clot associated with the carotid. Upon recovery, the patient's gait was characterized as hemiparetic with a stiff-knee pattern, a fixed flexion deformity of the toe flexors, and a hindfoot varus. Based on clinical exams and radiographs, the surgical treatment plan was established and consisted of correction of the forefoot deformities, possible hamstrings lengthening, and tendon transfer of the posterior tibial tendon to the dorsolateral foot. To aid in surgical planning, a three-dimensional gait analysis was conducted using a state-of-the-art motion capture system. Data from this analysis provided insight into the pathomechanics of the patient's gait pattern. A forefoot driven hindfoot varus was evident from the presurgical data and the tendon transfer procedure was deemed unnecessary. A computer was used in the OR to provide surgeons with animations of the patient's gait and graphical results as needed. A second gait analysis was conducted 6 weeks post surgery, shortly after cast removal. Post-surgical gait data showed improved foot segment orientation and position. Motion capture data provides clinicians with detailed information on the multisegment kinematics of foot motion during gait, before and during surgery. Further, treatment effectiveness can be evaluated by repeating gait analyses after recovery. PMID:19997521

  6. The experience of being a partner to a spinal cord injured person: A phenomenological-hermeneutic study

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative focuses on the personal experiences of partners to a spinal cord injured person. Using a Ricoeurian phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, we analysed seven partners’ narratives 1 and 2 years after their partner's injury. The study revealed how the injury was experienced from the partners’ perspective through the aftermath. In the acute phase after the injury, partners also felt harmed, and support was needed in relation to their own daily activities, eating, resting, and managing distress. During the institutionalized rehabilitation, partners felt torn between supporting the injured partner and the demanding tasks of everyday life outside the institution. After discharge, partners struggled for the injured partner to regain a well-functioning everyday life and for reestablishing life as a couple. The partner struggled to manage the overwhelming amount of everyday tasks. Some sought to reestablish their usual functions outside the family, whereas others focused on establishing a new life together. The partners experienced much distress and appreciated the support they got, but felt that they were mainly left to manage the difficult process on their own. PMID:22007262

  7. [The body, point of references for youths living on the street or their quest for a territory giving a sense of belonging.].

    PubMed

    Aubin, D

    2000-01-01

    Many youths and young adults "living on the streets" wear or inscribe on their bodies distinctive signs: nicknames, torn or skilfully cut out clothes, restructured or inspired from another time, flamboyant hair colour and hairstyle, tattoo, piercing, painted masks on their face. Yet, the society in which they are brought up is marked by historical discontinuity and the values enhanced are that of excessive consumption likely to entail an over-investment to what pertains to the body. Our clinical observations as well as an incursion into the literature on tattoo and mask have brought us to draw notions of ritual, identification and transformation as tools of understanding various transformations having the body as object. The experiences of Stéphane and Lydia who took the risk of speaking through the therapeutic process, conveys their quest for a territory giving them a sense of belonging as well as an effort to appropriate their personal and often divided history inscribed within the body or its attributes. PMID:18253585

  8. Meteorologists from the University of Tokyo: Their Exodus to the United States Following World War II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, John M.

    1993-07-01

    The emigration of 11 young Japanese meteorologists to the United States following World War II is investigated. Their move is examined with the benefit of a historical backdrop that includes a study of the socioeconomic conditions in Japan and the education that they received at the University of Tokyo. Oral histories and letters of reminiscence from these scientists are used with standard source material to reconstruct the conditions of postwar Japan. The principal results of the study are that 1) these scientists were among the intellectual elite, because of the rigorous screening process in the Japanese educational system; 2) their scientific education was fundamentally grounded in traditional physics and a wide range of geophysical sciences; 3) they all experienced austere living conditions and poor job prospects in the war-torn Japanese economy; and 4) they made a strong scientific connection with U.S. researchers in the areas of numerical experimentation and numerical weather prediction, which facilitated their move to the United States.

  9. Influence of meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane on the knee contact mechanics.

    PubMed

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Witkowski, Wojciech; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Zarzycki, Witold

    2015-06-01

    We present a three dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution and menisci deformation in the human knee joint. The study is based on the Open Knee model with the geometry of the lateral meniscus which shows some degenerative disorders. The nonlinear analysis of the knee joint under compressive axial load is performed. We present results for intact knee, knee with complete radial posterior meniscus root tear and knee with total meniscectomy of medial or lateral meniscus. We investigate how the meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane influences knee-joint mechanics by comparing the results for flat (degenerated) lateral and normal medial meniscus. Specifically, the deformation of the menisci in the coronal plane and the corresponding stress values in cartilages are studied. By analysing contact resultant force acting on the menisci in axial plane we have shown that restricted extrusion of the torn lateral meniscus can be attributed to small slope of its cross section in the coronal plane. Additionally, the change of the contact area and the resultant force acting on the menisci as the function of compressive load are investigated.

  10. The use of teaching portfolios to promote excellence and scholarship in nurse education.

    PubMed

    Corry, Margarita; Timmins, Fiona

    2009-11-01

    Achieving excellence in nurse education and demonstrating scholarship in teaching is a challenge for nurse educators who find themselves torn between maintaining high standards in nurse education and their own need for recognition and promotion in an environment that primarily favours research and publications over excellence in teaching. The use of a teaching portfolio is a way to display excellence in nurse education and to provide a public display of teaching scholarship. While not a new concept in nursing education, it has some originality in its application to practising nurse educators. However, the requirement for and guidelines on the development of a portfolio for nurse educators (other than those undertaking educational training) has been little explored. The aim of this paper is to explore the concept of a teaching portfolio as a vehicle to demonstrate excellence and scholarship among seasoned nurse educators. The process of developing a teaching portfolio at one university setting is outlined, so that other teachers are enlightened to the potential benefits of this activity.

  11. A novel silk-based artificial ligament and tricalcium phosphate/polyether ether ketone anchor for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - safety and efficacy in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; He, Jiankang; Bian, Weiguo; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Wenyou; Li, Dichen; Snedeker, Jess G

    2014-08-01

    Loss of ligament graft tension in early postoperative stages following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can come from a variety of factors, with slow graft integration to bone being widely viewed as a chief culprit. Toward an off-the-shelf ACL graft that can rapidly integrate to host tissue, we have developed a silk-based ACL graft combined with a tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/polyether ether ketone anchor. In the present study we tested the safety and efficacy of this concept in a porcine model, with postoperative assessments at 3months (n=10) and 6months (n=4). Biomechanical tests were performed after euthanization, with ultimate tensile strengths at 3months of ∼370N and at 6months of ∼566N - comparable to autograft and allograft performance in this animal model. Comprehensive histological observations revealed that TCP substantially enhanced silk graft to bone attachment. Interdigitation of soft and hard tissues was observed, with regenerated fibrocartilage characterizing a transitional zone from silk graft to bone that was similar to native ligament bone attachments. We conclude that both initial stability and robust long-term biological attachment were consistently achieved using the tested construct, supporting a large potential for silk-TCP combinations in the repair of the torn ACL.

  12. High Mobility and Low Use of Malaria Preventive Measures Among the Jarai Male Youth Along the Cambodia-Vietnam Border.

    PubMed

    Gryseels, Charlotte; Peeters Grietens, Koen; Dierickx, Susan; Xuan, Xa Nguyen; Uk, Sambunny; Bannister-Tyrrell, Melanie; Trienekens, Suzan; Ribera, Joan Muela; Hausmann-Muela, Susanna; Gerrets, René; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Sochantha, Tho; Coosemans, Marc; Erhart, Annette

    2015-10-01

    Malaria control along the Vietnam-Cambodia border presents a challenge for both countries' malaria elimination targets as the region is forested, inhabited by ethnic minority populations, and potentially characterized by early and outdoor malaria transmission. A mixed methods study assessed the vulnerability to malaria among the Jarai population living on both sides of the border in the provinces of Ratanakiri (Cambodia) and Gia Lai (Vietnam). A qualitative study generated preliminary hypotheses that were quantified in two surveys, one targeting youth (N = 498) and the other household leaders (N = 449). Jarai male youth, especially in Cambodia, had lower uptake of preventive measures (57.4%) and more often stayed overnight in the deep forest (35.8%) compared with the female youth and the adult population. Among male youth, a high-risk subgroup was identified that regularly slept at friends' homes or outdoors, who had fewer bed nets (32.5%) that were torn more often (77.8%). The vulnerability of Jarai youth to malaria could be attributed to the transitional character of youth itself, implying less fixed sleeping arrangements in nonpermanent spaces or non-bed sites. Additional tools such as long-lasting hammock nets could be suitable as they are in line with current practices. PMID:26283747

  13. Increased muscle activation following motor imagery during the rehabilitation of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Florent; Guillot, Aymeric; Collet, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is the mental representation of an action without any concomitant movement. MI has been used frequently after peripheral injuries to decrease pain and facilitate rehabilitation. However, little is known about the effects of MI on muscle activation underlying the motor recovery. This study aimed to assess the therapeutic effects of MI on the activation of lower limb muscles, as well as on the time course of functional recovery and pain after surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Twelve patients with a torn ACL were randomly assigned to a MI or control group, who both received a series of physiotherapy. Electromyographic activity of the quadriceps, pain, anthropometrical data, and lower limb motor ability were measured throughout a 12-session therapy. The data provided evidence that MI elicited greater muscle activation, even though imagery practice did not result in pain decrease. Muscle activation increase might originate from a redistribution of the central neuronal activity, as there was no anthropometric change in lower limb muscles after imagery practice. This study confirmed the effectiveness of integrating MI in a rehabilitation process by facilitating muscular properties recovery following motor impairment. MI may thus be considered a reliable adjunct therapy to help injured patients to recover motor functions after reconstructive surgery of ACL.

  14. Children and mothers in war: an outcome study of a psychosocial intervention program.

    PubMed

    Dybdahl, R

    2001-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects on children (age: M = 5.5 years) in war-torn Bosnia and Herzegovina of a psychosocial intervention program consisting of weekly group meetings for mothers for 5 months. An additional aim was to investigate the children's psychosocial functioning and the mental health of their mothers. Internally displaced mother-child dyads were randomly assigned to an intervention group receiving psychosocial support and basic medical care (n = 42) or to a control group receiving medical care only (n = 45). Participants took part in interviews and tests to provide information about war exposure, mental health, psychosocial functioning, intellectual abilities, and physical health. Results showed that although all participants were exposed to severe trauma, their manifestations of distress varied considerably. The intervention program had a positive effect on mothers' mental health, children's weight gain, and several measures of children's psychosocial functioning and mental health, whereas there was no difference between the two groups on other measures. The findings have implications for policy. PMID:11480943

  15. The coastal fishes and fisheries of the Socotra Archipelago, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Zajonz, Uwe; Lavergne, Edouard; Klaus, Rebecca; Krupp, Friedhelm; Aideed, Moteah Sheikh; Saeed, Fouad Naseeb

    2016-04-30

    The Socotra Archipelago is situated in the Gulf of Aden where tropical and "pseudo-temperate" conditions combine to create a unique marine ecosystem. The diversity, ecology, productivity and fisheries of the coastal fish assemblages are still relatively understudied and no update of the scientific knowledge existed. The islands support unique coastal and coral-associated fish assemblages in spite of the limited biogenic reef frameworks. Fish diversity is the highest among comparable Arabian eco-regions, and fish biomass productivity high too by Indian Ocean standards. The production of the once traditionally-managed small-scale fishery is severely declining and whether it is sustainable nowadays is extremely doubtful. At a time when Yemen is torn apart by a severe political and humanitarian crisis it is timely to review and update the current state of knowledge for scientists and managers, and thereby ease access to existing information, facilitating follow-on studies and evidence-based conservation and fisheries management. PMID:26795842

  16. Novel therapeutic use of polysaccharide nanosheets for arachnoid plasty and enhancement of venous tensile strength in rat microneurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Otani, Naoki; Kinoshita, Manabu; Fujie, Toshinori; Saito, Akihiro; Takeoka, Shinji; Saitoh, Daizoh; Hagisawa, Kohsuke; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Shima, Katsuji

    2013-02-01

    Subdural effusion sometimes occurs during neurosurgery after opening the Sylvian fissure, due to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage from the torn arachnoid membrane. Unexpected bleeding from the fragile bridging veins may also result from brain retraction. Neurosurgeons must always watch carefully for these complications during surgery. To prevent such complications, we have attempted the clinical application of a polysaccharide nanosheet that is semi-absorbent and has a potent physical adhesive strength to investigate its therapeutic utility for arachnoid plasty and enhancement of bridging vein tensile strength in Sprague-Dawley rats. The use of overlapping nanosheets completely prevented CSF leakage from injured arachnoid membranes in the cerebral cortex. No inflammatory infiltration was observed on the cerebral surface after 6 months of follow up. In addition, the use of nanosheet bandages significantly reinforced venous tensile strength. This reinforcement increased with the number of overlaid nanosheets. We report that polysaccharide nanosheets can be used for arachnoid plasty without chemical bonding agents and for reinforcement of venous tensile strength in rat vessels. Nanosheets may be an effective neurosurgical tool. PMID:23219826

  17. Plastic deformation and wear process at a surface during unlubricated sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The plastic deformation and wear of a 304 stainless steel surface sliding against an aluminum oxide rider with a spherical surface (the radius of curvature: 1.3 cm) were observed by using scanning electron and optical microscopes. Experiments were conducted in a vacuum of one million Pa and in an environment of fifty thousandth Pa of chlorine gas at 25 C. The load was 500 grams and the sliding velocity was 0.5 centimeter per second. The deformed surface layer which accumulates and develops successively is left behind the rider, and step shaped proturbances are developed even after single pass sliding under both environmental conditions. A fully developed surface layer is gradually torn off leaving a characteristic pattern. The mechanism for tearing away of the surface layer from the contact area and sliding track contour is explained assuming the simplified process of material removal based on the adhesion theory for the wear of materials. Previously announced in STAR as N82-32735

  18. A Case of Extragonadal Teratoma in the Pouch of Douglas and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Mamoru; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Morii, Eiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Mature cystic teratoma is a germ cell tumor of the ovaries and is often observed in clinical practice. However, extragonadal teratomas are rare tumors and have been reported outside the ovaries, (e.g., in the greater omentum). The mechanism underlying the development of extragonadal teratomas remains unknown. We encountered a case of extragonadal teratoma in the pouch of Douglas that appeared to be a parasitic dermoid cyst. From our experience and the literature review, we discuss the potential mechanism leading to the development of extragonadal teratomas. A 41-year-old nonpregnant woman was referred to our department due to myoma and anemia. A 4-cm asymptomatic mass in the pouch of Douglas was observed, and the patient was diagnosed with ovarian mature cystic teratoma. She underwent laparoscopic surgery, and intraoperative findings revealed that the fallopian tube was injured and torn, and a residual small ovary was observed in the left side of the ovary. A tumor measuring approximately 4 cm observed in the pouch of Douglas was extracted without rupturing. The tumor was diagnosed as a parasitic dermoid cyst by macroscopic and histopathological findings. Auto-amputation could be the underlying mechanism that leads to an isolated parasitic dermoid cyst in the pouch of Douglas.

  19. Polysulfones for conservation in the ethylene-polymer industry

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Meyer; Yoo, Hee Ju; Elling, David; Bernstein, Philip; Varker, Alan E.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation of ethylene-SO/sub 2/ polysulfone copolymers by cobalt-60 gamma irradiation, as well as by chemical catalysis, as a means of incorporating a polluting waste material such as SO/sub 2/ into useful ethylene polymers and also for the purpose of conserving ethylene feedstock is described. The physical properties of the copolymer were determined, and it was found that the copolymer is soluble in ethylene diamine and its homologues, hot concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and cold 45% KOH. Also found was that it had no glass transition temperature, Tg, and no crystalline melting temperature, Tm, but had a decomposition temperature near 350/sup 0/C. The copolymer was pressure molded into discs at elevated temperatures, 150 to 200/sup 0/C, which had a high degree of hardness but were brittle and inhomogeneous (partly clear and partly cloudy). Sheets of the copolymer were also prepared by mixing the powdered copolymer with 4 to 5% Teflon powder on a hot tow-roll mill. The sheets thus prepared had low strength and were easily torn, but were somewhat porous and oil-absorbent. The addition of small quantities of a third monomer resulted in products containing copolymers of the modifying monomer. These modified polymers appeared soluble in common solvents. A summary of accomplishments, conclusions, and suggestions for future work are presented.

  20. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-02-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that qualitatively undergoes the same forces acting in whiplash and shows the same behavior is used to analyze the kinematics of both the head and the cervical spine and the resulting neck loads. The rapid acceleration during a whiplash event causes the extension and flexion of the cervical spine, which in turn can cause dislocated vertebrae, torn ligaments, intervertebral disc herniation, and other trauma that appear to be the likely causes of subsequent painful headache or neck pain symptoms. Thus, whiplash provides a connection between the dynamics of the human body and physics. Its treatment can enliven the usual teaching in kinematics, and both theoretical and experimental approaches provide an interesting biological context to teach introductory principles of mechanics.

  1. Tearing of thin spherical shells adhered to equally curved rigid substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Connor; Lee, Anna; Marthelot, Joel; Reis, Pedro

    Lasik (Laser-Assisted in Situ Keratomileusis) eye surgery involves the tearing of the corneal epithelium to remodel the corneal stroma for corrections such as myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. One issue with this procedure is that during the tearing of the corneal epithelium, if the two propagating cracks coalesce, a flap detaches which could cause significant complications in the recovery of the patient. We seek to gain a predictive physical understanding of this process by performing precision desktop experiments on an analogue model system. First, thin spherical shells of nearly uniform thickness are fabricated by the coating of hemispherical molds with a polymer solution, which upon curing yields an elastic and brittle structure. We then create two notches near the equator of the shell and tear a flap by pulling tangentially to the spherical substrate, towards its pole. The resulting fracture paths are characterized by high-resolution 3D digital scanning. Our primary focus is on establishing how the positive Gaussian curvature of the system affects the path of the crack tip. Our results are directly contrasted against previous studies on systems with zero Gaussian curvature, where films were torn from planar and cylindrical substrates.

  2. Preparation and culture of rat lens epithelial explants for studying terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Peggy S; Gao, Chun Y; Saravanamuthu, Senthil S

    2009-01-01

    The anterior surface of the ocular lens is covered by a monolayer of epithelial cells, which proliferate in an annular zone underlying the ciliary body. Following division, these cells migrate posteriorly, where FGF diffusing from the retina induces them to differentiate into a posterior array of elongated lens fiber cells, which compose the bulk of the lens. Differentiation of lens epithelial cells into lens fibers can be induced in vitro by culturing explants of the central region of the anterior epithelium in the presence of FGF-2. Explants are prepared from lenses of neonatal rats by removing the lens from the eye and grasping the lens capsule on the posterior side with dissecting tweezers. The posterior capsule is then gently torn open and pressed down into the plastic bottom of a tissue culture dish. The peripheral regions of the explant are removed with a scalpel and the central area is then cultured in the presence of 100 ng/ml FGF-2 for as long as 2-3 weeks, depending on the parameters to be studied. Since epithelial cells in cultured explants differentiate in approximate synchrony over a period of days to weeks, the time course of signaling and gene expression can be determined using molecular, biochemical, and pharmacological techniques. Immunofluorescence microscopy is a powerful adjunct to these methods as it demonstrates the subcellular localization of proteins of interest and can reveal the physiological consequences of experimental manipulations of signaling pathways. PMID:19773734

  3. How Traumatic Violence Permanently Changes Shopping Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sigirci, Ozge; Rockmore, Marc; Wansink, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic experiences – such as combat, living in a conflict country or war-torn nation, or experiencing a violent crime or natural disaster – change social relationships and may also influence a life-time of consumer relationships with brands and shopping. Our focus on this previously overlooked area is centered on an analysis of the long-term shopping habits of 355 combat veterans. We show that those who experienced heavy trauma (e.g., heavy combat) exhibited similar disconnection from brands as others have experienced in social relationships. They became more transactional in that they were more open to switching brands, to trying new products, and buying the least expensive alternative (p < 0.01). In contrast, those who had experienced a light trauma were more influenced by ads and more open to buying brands even when they cost more (p < 0.00). Trauma, such as combat, may change one’s decision horizon. Functionality and price become more important, which is consistent with the idea that they are more focused on the present moment than on building on the past or saving for the future.

  4. [Extended prevention of uterine cervix cancer].

    PubMed

    Müller, H G

    1979-01-01

    A transverse-oval os uteri or Emmet' tear are the result of a tear at the mouth of the womb during final cervical dilatation. Furthermore, they are the cause of a more or less developed ectopia and combined cervical and vaginal fluor with concomitant colpitis. These alterations also represent the foundation not the cause, of a development of cervical carcinoma. In the sense of prophylactic reasoning the elimination of the symptoms mentioned above should be considered. -- The use of the speculum and care of the suture of the nearly always torn os uteri after each delivery must be the first step to avoid the development of a collum carcinoma. -- In the second place, electrocoagulation or shallow conisation with subsequent coagulation and cryo-surgical treatment of the ectopia has to be carried out. -- Therefore the obstetrician decides whether the patient -- in view of developing a collum carcinoma -- becomes a risk patient. He has to ensure that an almost normal portio uteri returns without ectropion and Emmet'tear and also without cervical and vaginal fluor, which could trouble the patient considerably. -- After every delivery, therefore, the speculum should be used. At the same time a cervix tear haemorrhage, one of the most frequent exsanguinations, can be avoided.

  5. Larynx Trauma and Hyoid Bone Fracture after Bite Injury in Dog: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Manchi, George; Brunnberg, Mathias M; Shahid, Muhammad; Al Aiyan, Ahmad; Brunnberg, Leo; Stein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intraoperatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles, and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient's severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea that underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome. PMID:27579303

  6. Arthroscopic treatment of symptomatic type D medial plica.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Mustafa; Asik, Mehmet; Akpinar, Sercan; Ciftci, Feyyaz; Cesur, Necip; Tandogan, Reha N

    2008-12-01

    We aimed to review the results of subtotal arthroscopic resection of symptomatic type D medial plica. We retrospectively evaluated 23 knees with symptomatic type D medial plica in 22 patients without other intra-articular pathology. All patients complained of chronic knee pain that had not been alleviated by medical treatment or physical therapy. In only three (13%) of the patients studied was the plica diagnosed pre-operatively with magnetic resonance imaging. The type D medial plicae in our series were classified as fenestrated (14 knees), torn (5 knees), or reduplicated (4 knees). Fibrotic changes in the plicae and degenerative changes on the medial femoral condyle were found in 16 knees Patellofemoral chondromalacia was present in three knees Arthroscopic partial resection was performed in all patients. Comparative Lysholm Knee Scale scores before and after surgery revealed a significant clinical improvement (pre-operative status, 67.19 +/- 8.05 vs. post-operative status, 90.57 +/- 9.80; P < 0.001). Type D medial plica should be considered as a possible cause of chronic knee pain. Arthroscopic partial resection of the plicae in symptomatic patients gives satisfactory results.

  7. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-07-25

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair.

  8. Phantosmia as a meteorological forecaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, S. R.; Hirsch, A. R.

    2013-09-01

    In normosmics, olfactory ability has been found to vary with ambient humidity, barometric pressure, and season. While hallucinated sensations of phantom pain associated with changes in weather have been described, a linkage to chemosensory hallucinations has heretofore not been reported. A 64-year-old white male with Parkinson's disease presents with 5 years of phantosmia of a smoky burnt wood which changed to onion-gas and then to a noxious skunk-onion excrement odor. Absent upon waking it increases over the day and persists for hours. When severe, there appears a phantom taste with the same qualities as the odor. It is exacerbated by factors that manipulate intranasal pressure, such as coughing. When eating or sniffing, the actual flavors replace the phantosmia. Since onset, he noted the intensity and frequency of the phantosmia forecasted the weather. Two to 3 h before a storm, the phantosmia intensifies from a level 0 to a 7-10, which persists through the entire thunderstorm. Twenty years prior, he reported the ability to forecast the weather, based on pain in a torn meniscus, which vanished after surgical repair. Extensive olfactory testing demonstrates underlying hyposmia. Possible mechanisms for such chemosensory-meteorological linkage includes: air pressure induced synesthesia, disinhibition of spontaneous olfactory discharge, exacerbation of ectopic discharge, affect mediated somatic sensory amplification, and misattribution error with expectation and recall bias. This is the first reported case of weather-induced exacerbation of phantosmia. Further investigation of the connection between chemosensory complaints and ambient weather is warranted.

  9. Deactivation completed at historic Hanford Fuels Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses deactivation work which was completed as of March 31, 1994 at the 308 Fuels Development Laboratory (FDL) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The decision to deactivate the structure, formerly known as the Plutonium Fabrication Pilot Plant (PFPP), was driven by a 1980s Department of Energy (DOE) decision that plutonium fuels should not be fabricated in areas near the Site`s boundaries, as well as by changing facility structural requirements. Inventory transfer has been followed by the cleanout and stabilization of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and enriched uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) residues and powders in the facility`s equipment and duct work. The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was one of America`s primary arsenals of nuclear defense production for nearly 50 years beginning in World War II. Approximately 53 metric tons of weapons grade plutonium, over half of the national supply and about one quarter of the world`s supply, were produced at Hanford between 1944 and 1989. Today, many Site buildings are undergoing deactivation, a precursor phase to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The primary difference between the two activities is that equipment and structural items are not removed or torn down in deactivation. However, utilities are disconnected, and special nuclear materials (SNM) as well as hazardous and pyrophoric substances are removed from structures undergoing this process.

  10. Analysis of femtosecond laser assisted capsulotomy cutting edges and manual capsulorhexis using environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Giovanni; Buratto, Lucio; Schiano-Lomoriello, Domenico; Pileri, Marco; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n = 5, and Victus, n = 5). In addition, five manual CCC (n = 5) were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA). Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa) and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq), were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P < 0.05) than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  11. Speaking in the claustrum: the psychodynamics of stuttering.

    PubMed

    Plänkers, T

    1999-04-01

    The author outlines the psychoanalytic theory of stuttering and, discussing material from the analysis of a stutterer and its transference and countertransference processes, puts forward a new hypothesis of the psychodynamics of stuttering in conjunction with Meltzer's theory of the claustrum. He argues that the stutterer is working out intolerable experiences of separation from the primary object and a resulting catastrophic experience of the oedipal situation through an unconscious fantasy in which anal qualities are conferred on the internal maternal object by a predominating hatred. The intrusive identification of parts of the self in the maternal rectum gives rise to a claustrophobic experiential world in which all obstacles that are encountered between self and object must be eliminated. The anal-sadistic object space of the claustrum is projected on to the external object space and thus also on to the mouth as the origin of the sound envelope, where it produces both a lifeless sound envelope and a torn content, i.e. stuttered sounds, words and sentences. Correspondingly, a dead speech melody and broken words have their parallels in object relations that are characterised by an attack on linking and by psychic withdrawal.

  12. Geochemical evidence for the melting of subducting oceanic lithosphere at plate edges.

    PubMed

    Yogodzinski, G M; Lees, J M; Churikova, T G; Dorendorf, F; Wöerner, G; Volynets, O N

    2001-01-25

    Most island-arc magmatism appears to result from the lowering of the melting point of peridotite within the wedge of mantle above subducting slabs owing to the introduction of fluids from the dehydration of subducting oceanic crust. Volcanic rocks interpreted to contain a component of melt (not just a fluid) from the subducting slab itself are uncommon, but possible examples have been recognized in the Aleutian islands, Baja California, Patagonia and elsewhere. The geochemically distinctive rocks from these areas, termed 'adakites, are often associated with subducting plates that are young and warm, and therefore thought to be more prone to melting. But the subducting lithosphere in some adakite locations (such as the Aleutian islands) appears to be too old and hence too cold to melt. This implies either that our interpretation of adakite geochemistry is incorrect, or that our understanding of the tectonic context of adakites is incomplete. Here we present geochemical data from the Kamchatka peninsula and the Aleutian islands that reaffirms the slab-melt interpretation of adakites, but in the tectonic context of the exposure to mantle flow around the edge of a torn subducting plate. We conclude that adakites are likely to form whenever the edge of a subducting plate is warmed or ablated by mantle flow. The use of adakites as tracers for such plate geometry may improve our understanding of magma genesis and thermal structure in a variety of subduction-zone environments.

  13. Electron Acceleration in a Dynamically Evolved Current Sheet Under Solar Coronal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Du, A. M.; Feng, Xueshang; Cao, Xin; Lu, Quanming; Yang, Liping; Chen, Gengxiong; Zhang, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Electron acceleration in a drastically evolved current sheet under solar coronal conditions is investigated via the combined 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and test-particle approaches. Having a high magnetic Reynolds number (105), the long, thin current sheet is torn into a chain of magnetic islands, which grow in size and coalesce with each other. The acceleration of electrons is explored in three typical evolution phases: when several large magnetic islands are formed (phase 1), two of these islands are approaching each other (phase 2), and almost merging into a "monster" magnetic island (phase 3). The results show that for all three phases electrons with an initial Maxwell distribution evolve into a heavy-tailed distribution and more than 20 % of the electrons can be accelerated higher than 200 keV within 0.1 second and some of them can even be energized up to MeV ranges. The lower-energy electrons are located away from the magnetic separatrices and the higher-energy electrons are inside the magnetic islands. The most energetic electrons have a tendency to be around the outer regions of the magnetic islands or to appear in the small secondary magnetic islands. It is the trapping effect of the magnetic islands and the distributions of E p that determine the acceleration and spatial distributions of the energetic electrons.

  14. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Koshi N.; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Kazuo; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  15. Comparative analysis of below-knee prosthetic socket liner materials.

    PubMed

    Emrich, R; Slater, K

    1998-01-01

    Four materials used in lining prosthetic sockets were compared for their potential usefulness in below-knee applications. Tests carried out included determinations of resistance to compression, resistance to flexural abrasion and coefficients (static and dynamic) of friction. These tests were designed, respectively, to assess changes occurring during end-use brought about by extensive application of compressive or shear force, and to predict the ability to retain contact with the body and socket. Of the four materials in the study (Bock-Lite, Pedilin, polyurethane and silicone), Bock-Lite and silicone had high compression resistance, Bock-Lite had good resistance to flexural abrasion, and polyurethane and silicone had high coefficients of frictional resistance. Thus, Bock-Lite will be the most durable of the four materials but, since it had the lowest frictional coefficient, it may slip in use. Conversely, silicone and polyurethane, which will be retained in position more easily, are easily torn or compressed, so are likely to need replacement more frequently.

  16. Sports cardiology: lessons from the past and perspectives for the future

    PubMed Central

    Leischik, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of myocardial damage as a result of endurance sport has been known about since ancient times. According to a leg­end, a soldier named Pheidippides (more likely Philippides) dropped dead after run­ning from war-torn Marathon to Athens with the news of victory. Millennia later, we do not know whether he was a soldier or a courier, or whether he really ran the entire 240 km from Athens to Sparta and then back from Marathon to Athens. What is clear however, is that his death went down in history as the first documented exercise-related death and provides a tangible starting-point for the discipline of sport cardiology. Sports cardiology today covers a broad range of areas; from patients with cardiomyopathies, coronary disease and metabolic syndrome through to fitness fans, high-performance athletes and those with physically demanding professions. The following editorial introduces the primary topics for discussion to be included in the F1000Research channel Sports cardiology with the hope that this will evoke open, controversial and broad discourse in the form of reviews and original research papers in this important field. PMID:26097692

  17. Discrete element modeling of boudinage: Insights on rock rheology, matrix flow, and evolution of geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2012-01-01

    We use discrete element model simulations to model the full boudinage process from initial fracturing of intact material to post-fracture flow of material into gaps between fragments and to investigate the role which the material properties of the weak and strong layers play in this process. The models are deformed in 2D plane strain under a range of confining stresses, in coaxial bulk flow. Results show that the material properties, i.e. Mohr-Coulomb or quasi-viscous for the matrix and elastic-brittle for the competent layer, lead to the development of natural looking boudin morphologies and deformation patterns in the matrix. The details of the matrix rheology only have a minor influence on the morphology of the boudins. By varying the material properties of the competent layer between fully brittle and semi-ductile we obtain a wide range of deformation patterns ranging from pinch-and-swell structures to a variety of boudin types including drawn, shear band and straight sided torn boudins. In a number of models we observe rotation of the boudin blocks despite the applied deformation being purely coaxial. These rotations are generally related to asymmetrical (rhombic) boudin shapes. Some features observed in natural boudins such as concave block faces or the formation of veins between fragments are not modeled because pore fluids are not yet included in our model.

  18. Anatomic Reconstruction Technique for a Plantar Calcaneonavicular (Spring) Ligament Tear.

    PubMed

    Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Shabat, Shay; Brin, Yaron S; Feldman, Viktor; Kish, Benny; Nyska, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acquired flatfoot deformity in adults is usually due to partial or complete tearing of the posterior tibial tendon, with secondary failure of other structures such as the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament (SL), which maintain the medial longitudinal arch. In flexible cases, the tibialis posterior can be replaced with the flexor digitorum longus. It is common practice to suture the SL directly in the case of a tear; however, if the tear is complete, suturing directly to the ligament alone will not be possible. Reconstruction of the ligament is needed; however, no validated methods are available to reconstruct this ligament. The operative technique of SL reconstruction described in this report as a part of acquired flatfoot deformity reconstruction consists of augmenting remnants of the spring from the navicularis to the sustentaculum tali and suspending it to the medial malleolus using 2-mm-wide, long-chain polyethylene suture tape. This technique results in the firm anatomic reconstruction of the SL, in addition to "classic" medial arch reconstruction. We recommend SL reconstruction for medial arch reconstruction when the SL is torn. PMID:26253476

  19. Controlling Malaria in Western Pacific with Mosquito Nets Treated with Pyrethroids in Village Communities, 1979-1999.

    PubMed

    Self, Lee

    2016-07-01

    Insecticide-treated mosquito nets were first put to practical use in the Western Pacific Region. Less than a decade after conducting workshops and other promotional activities, millions of people were protected by 1989. This occurred before the availability of commercially produced pretreated nets and before global funding for mass net distribution. This paper describes the sequence of steps leading to regional control success. The beginning stages in 1979 recognized that treating torn mosquito nets was a viable control option. Basic net treatment procedures were established by 1983 and workshops were held the next 2 years in China, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, and Vietnam. Malaria staff became convinced of net benefits and were motivated to impart their knowledge to others. Village inhabitants soaked the nets in washbasins containing permethrin or deltamethrin solution, then dried them horizontally on mats. By the 1990s, the population protected by nets had appreciably increased, and regional malaria cases confirmed by microscopy were markedly reduced. This coincided with commercial interest to mass-produce pretreated mosquito nets for worldwide use. PMID:26880771

  20. Heparin coating durability on artificial heart valves studied by XPS and antithrombin binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, E M E; Larsson, R; Sánchez, J; Rensmo, H; Gelius, U; Siegbahn, H

    2006-04-15

    The durability and functionality of a heparin coating on artificial heart valve leaflets were evaluated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by the coatings' capacity to bind antithrombin. Current methods for accelerated life-time testing are based on exposing leaflets to water solutions. In this paper a method is explored, in which heart valve leaflets were exposed to a continuous high shear rate (4 L/min) of human citrated plasma. It was found that the heparin coating was stable and wear resistant enough to still be present after 3 weeks and to have about the same antithrombin uptake as coatings not exposed to circulating plasma. It was, however, partly destroyed by the test as found using XPS. We suggest that heparin chains from the upper layer of heparin have been torn off from the carrier chain, in combination with loss of heparin conjugate and plasma deposition in patches. This study showed that XPS provides additional information to biological measurements such as antithrombin uptake. XPS is therefore a valuable technique not only to characterize biomaterials but also to evaluate the effect of a performance test.

  1. A Stellar Stream Surrounds the Whale Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    The -cold dark matter cosmological model predicts that galaxies are assembled through the disruption and absorption of small satellite dwarf galaxies by their larger hosts. A recent study argues that NGC 4631, otherwise known as the Whale galaxy, shows evidence of such a recent merger in the form of an enormous stellar stream extending from it.Stream SignaturesAccording to the -CDM model, stellar tidal streams should be a ubiquitous feature among galaxies. When satellite dwarf galaxies are torn apart, they spread out into such streams before ultimately feeding the host galaxy. Unfortunately, these streams are very faint, so were only recently starting to detect these features.Stellar tidal streams have been discovered around the Milky Way and Andromeda, providing evidence of these galaxies growth via recent (within the last 8 Gyr) mergers. But discovering stellar streams around other Milky Way-like galaxies would help us to determine if the model of hierarchical galaxy assembly applies generally.To this end, the Stellar Tidal Stream Survey, led by PI David Martnez-Delgado (Center for Astronomy of Heidelberg University), is carrying out the first systematic survey of stellar tidal streams. In a recent study, Martnez-Delgado and collaborators present their detection of a giant (85 kpc long!) stellar tidal stream extending into the halo of NGC 4631, the Whale galaxy.Modeling a SatelliteThe top image is a snapshot from an N-body simulation of a single dwarf satellite, 3.5 Gyr after it started interacting with the Whale galaxy. The satellite has been torn apart and spread into a stream that reproduces observations, which are shown in the lower image (scale is not the same). [Martnez-Delgado et al. 2015]The Whale galaxy is a nearby edge-on spiral galaxy interacting with a second spiral, NGC 4656. But the authors dont believe that the Whale galaxys giant tidal stellar stream is caused by its interactions with NGC 4656. Instead, based on their observations, they believe

  2. Massive Black Hole Implicated in Stellar Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Magellan telescopes suggest that a dense stellar remnant has been ripped apart by a black hole a thousand times as massive as the Sun. If confirmed, this discovery would be a cosmic double play: it would be strong evidence for an intermediate mass black hole, which has been a hotly debated topic, and would mark the first time such a black hole has been caught tearing a star apart. This scenario is based on Chandra observations, which revealed an unusually luminous source of X-rays in a dense cluster of old stars, and optical observations that showed a peculiar mix of elements associated with the X-ray emission. Taken together, a case can be made that the X-ray emission is produced by debris from a disrupted white dwarf star that is heated as it falls towards a massive black hole. The optical emission comes from debris further out that is illuminated by these X-rays. The intensity of the X-ray emission places the source in the "ultraluminous X-ray source" or ULX category, meaning that it is more luminous than any known stellar X-ray source, but less luminous than the bright X-ray sources (active galactic nuclei) associated with supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. The nature of ULXs is a mystery, but one suggestion is that some ULXs are black holes with masses between about a hundred and several thousand times that of the Sun, a range intermediate between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes located in the nuclei of galaxies. This ULX is in a globular cluster, a very old and crowded conglomeration of stars. Astronomers have suspected that globular clusters could contain intermediate-mass black holes, but conclusive evidence for this has been elusive. "Astronomers have made cases for stars being torn apart by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies before, but this is the first good evidence for such an event in a globular cluster," said Jimmy Irwin of the University

  3. Building Halos by Digesting Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    We think galactic halos are built through the addition of material from the smaller subhalos of satellites digested by their hosts. Though most of the stars in Milky-Way-mass halos were probably formed in situ, many were instead accumulated over time, as orbiting dwarf galaxies were torn apart and their stars flung throughout the host galaxy. A recent set of simulations has examined this brutal formation process.In the authors simulations, a subhalo first falls into the host halo. At this point, it can either survive to present day as a satellite galaxy, or it can be destroyed, its stars scattering throughout the host halo. [Deason et al. 2016]Subhalo FateThere are many open questions about the growth of Milky-Way-mass halos from the accretion of subhalos. Which subhalos are torn apart and accreted, and which ones survive intact? Are more small or large subhalos accreted? Does subhalo accretion affect the host galaxys metallicity? And what can we learn from all of this about the Milky Ways formation history?In a recently published study, a team of scientists from Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory set out to answer these questions using a suite of 45 zoom-in simulations of Milky-Way-mass halos. Led by Alis Deason, the team tracked the accretion history of these 45 test galaxies to determine how their halos were built.Piecing Together HistoryDeason and collaborators reach several new and interesting conclusions based on the outcomes of their simulations.Average accreted stellar mass from destroyed dwarfs for each host halo, as a function of the time of the last major accretion event. More stellar mass is accreted in more recent accretion events. [Deason et al. 2016]Most of the stellar mass accreted by the Milky-Way-mass halos typically comes from only one or two destroyed dwarfs. The accreted dwarfs are usually low-mass if they were accreted early on in the simulation (i.e., in the early universe), and high-mass if they were accreted

  4. Comet 'Bites the Dust' Around Dead Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared Spectrometer Graph

    This artist's concept illustrates a comet being torn to shreds around a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29-38. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope observed a cloud of dust around this white dwarf that may have been generated from this type of comet disruption. The findings suggest that a host of other comet survivors may still orbit in this long-dead solar system.

    The white dwarf G29-38 began life as a star that was about three times as massive as our sun. Its death involved the same steps that the sun will ultimately undergo billions of years from now. According to theory, the G29-38 star became brighter and brighter as it aged, until it bloated up into a dying star called a red giant. This red giant was large enough to engulf and evaporate any terrestrial planets like Earth that happened to be in its way. Later, the red giant shed its outer atmosphere, leaving behind a shrunken skeleton of star, called a white dwarf. If the star did host a planetary system, outer planets akin to Jupiter and Neptune and a remote ring of icy comets would remain.

    The Spitzer observations provide observational evidence for this orbiting outpost of comet survivors. Astronomers speculate that one such comet was knocked into the inner regions of G29-38, possibly by an outer planet. As the comet approached very close to the white dwarf, it may have been torn apart by the star's tidal forces. Eventually, all that would be left of the comet is a disk of dust.

    This illustration shows a comet in the process of being pulverized: part of it still exists as a chain of small clumps, while the rest has already spread out into a dusty disk. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 broke apart in a similar fashion when it plunged into Jupiter in 1994. Evidence for Comets Found in Dead Star's Dust The graph of data, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope indicates that a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29

  5. Sea spray production by bag breakup mode of fragmentation of the air-water interface at strong and hurricane wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kozlov, Dmitry; Sergeev, Daniil; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-04-01

    Sea sprays is a typical element of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) of large importance for marine meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and climate studies. They are considered as a crucial factor in the development of hurricanes and severe extratropical storms, since they can significantly enhance exchange of mass, heat and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere. This exchange is directly provided by spume droplets with the sizes from 10 microns to a few millimeters mechanically torn off the crests of a breaking waves and fall down to the ocean due to gravity. The fluxes associated with the spray are determined by the rate of droplet production at the surface quantified by the sea spray generation function (SSGF), defined as the number of spray particles of radius r produced from the unit area of water surface in unit time. However, the mechanism of spume droplets' formation is unknown and empirical estimates of SSGF varied over six orders of magnitude; therefore, the production rate of large sea spray droplets is not adequately described and there are significant uncertainties in estimations of exchange processes in hurricanes. Experimental core of our work comprise laboratory experiments employing high-speed video-filming, which have made it possible to disclose how water surface looks like at extremely strong winds and how exactly droplets are torn off wave crests. We classified events responsible for spume droplet, including bursting of submerged bubbles, generation and breakup of "projections" or liquid filaments (Koa, 1981) and "bag breakup", namely, inflating and consequent blowing of short-lived, sail-like pieces of the water-surface film, "bags". The process is similar to "bag-breakup" mode of fragmentation of liquid droplets and jets in gaseous flows. Basing on statistical analysis of results of these experiments we show that the main mechanism of spray-generation is attributed to "bag-breakup mechanism On the base of general principles

  6. A Preferred Home for Disrupted Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Observed burps from the shredding of stars by supermassive black holes suggest that this behavior is more common in an unusual type of galaxy. A new study has examined NGC 3156, an example from this galaxy type, to better understand what causes this preference.Stellar BetrayalAn artists illustration of a tidal disruption event, in which a star is sent on a plunging orbit near a supermassive black hole and is subsequently torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. [NASA/CXC/M.Weiss]Tidal disruption events (TDEs) are events where a star plunges too close to a supermassive black hole and is torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. Weve observed roughly a dozen of these violent events in the last five years, and we expect to finds hundreds to thousands more with future surveys.TDEs are triggered when a star is sent on a plunging orbit close to a supermassive black hole. But what sends the star into harms way? One possible culprit is a dynamical mechanism known as two-body relaxation. In this process, stars orbiting a black hole undergo individual starstar interactions that, with a close enough encounter, can send them on plunging orbits.Choosing an Unusual HostOne puzzle with TDEs is that they tend to be preferentially found in rather unusual galaxies: galaxies that recently exhibited a lot of star formation but are now quiescent. In particular, several of the TDEs have been discovered in what are known as E+A galaxies, a rare subtype of elliptical galaxy that has recently undergone a major starburst.Since this subtype makes up only ~0.1% of all galaxies, its surprising that weve found so many TDEs in E+A galaxies so far. So why the preference?In an effort to answer this question, two scientists, Nicholas Stone (Einstein Fellow at Columbia University) and Sjoert van Velzen (Hubble Fellow at Johns Hopkins University), have teamed up to examine a nearby E+A galaxy, NGC 3156.Tidal disruption rates as a function of central supermassive-black-hole mass. The blue curve

  7. An explanation for the chotic structure of the poles based on a new concept concerning the formation of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguignes, M.

    Observations made by Moon probes, and in particular the topological cartography of the surface of the Moon carried out by the probe CLEMENTINE, showed highly chaotic structures with a high density of craters concentrated around a vast central depression. The Sun's light only falls on the summits of the craters and thus the bottom may always be in darkness. This has led to the assumption that water could be trapped in the deepest areas, an idea which has suddenly inspired a certain amount of research into the presence of water at the poles (STANKEVICH et al. 2001,. HUBBARD et al 2002) Based on the hypothesis that the Moon was formed from matter torn from the Earth by the force of the tides of Jupiter (SEGUIGNES, 2002), we suggest a plausible hypothesis for the formation of the polar regions of the Moon. The circumference of the Moon is - that of the circumference of the Earth. The matter out of which it was formed had the same dimension. This matter, which was torn from the Earth and then became its satellite, was subjected to the forces of gravity of the newly-formed Moon. During the process whereby the Moon's crust closed over under the force of its own gravity, parts of the crust at the polar regions were subjected to a dual effect : A central collapse due to the fact there was not enough magmatic material to support them ; A topological shrinking due to the fact that the crust was being transformed from a surface spread out over thousand km to an area covering only a few hundred km. Although the North pole experienced only the mechanism of shrinkage, at the South pole a dual phenomenon occurred : a shrinking of the same kind as that seen at the North pole and an inadequate supply of magma from the Earth due to the Moon's rotation while it was becoming a satellite. Conclusion Understanding the chaotic nature of the polar regions of the Moon provides much precious information on : the structure of the proto-Earth's crust, which was violently broken up in these

  8. Succession and failure.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, Frank V; Galford, Robert M

    2004-06-01

    Norman Windom, the chairman of Tiverton Media, may not know much about the world of popular music, but he does fancy himself a careful planner and a superb judge of managerial talent. That's why he's been grooming COO Sean Kinnane, a Wharton-minted numbers man, to take over an important division, Aleph Records, and one day Tiverton itself. But Derek Solomon, Aleph's 68-year-old CEO and founder, remains a creative force and a father figure to the label's artists. What's more, he's touchy about anything that might slow down Aleph's responses to the market's ever-shifting preferences--or that might call into question his indispensability. Though Sean dutifully participates in Tiverton's broad-based and elaborate executive development plan, he senses that Aleph's future leadership structure is uncertain. As impatient as he is ambitious, he announces that he's leaving Tiverton for more suitable pastures. Several of his associates, also unsure about their fate within Aleph, are following him out the door. In one fell swoop, they've torn Norman's proud succession plan apart. What kind of plan should the board adopt going forward? Commenting on this fictional case study are Francis N. Bonsignore, a senior vice president at Marsh & McLennan; Michelle L. Buck, a clinical associate professor of management and organizations at Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management; Jon Younger, who heads leadership development at National City Corporation, a financial holding company in Cleveland; and Thomas Leppert, the chairman and CEO of the Turner Corporation, a large construction company in Dallas. PMID:15202285

  9. The Effects of Rainfall on the Population Dynamics of an Endangered Aquatic Plant, Schoenoplectus gemmifer (Cyperaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Koshi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Yoshimura, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The conservation of aquatic plants in river ecosystems should consider the wash-out (away) problem resulting from severe rainfall. The aquatic plant Schoenoplectus gemmifer is an endangered species endemic to Japan. Our previous study reported that the population size of S. gemmifer in Hamamatsu city, Japan, had decreased by one-tenth because many individuals had been washed out by a series of heavy rains in 2004. However, there is insufficient information on the ecological nature of this endangered aquatic plant for adequate conservation. In this paper, we report the population dynamics of one population in Hamamatsu city from 2004 to 2012 in relation to rainfall. We surveyed the number and growing location of all living individuals in the population 300 times during the study period. To examine the temporal changes of individual plants, we also counted the number of culms for 38 individuals in four observations among 300 records. Decreases and increases in the population size of this plant were associated with washing out and the settlement of gemmae (vegetative propagation), respectively. The major cause of the reduction in the population size was an increase in the number of washed-out individuals and not the decreased settlement of gemmae. The wash-out rates for small and large individuals were not significantly different. Small individuals having a stream form with linear leaves resisted flooding, and large individuals were often partially torn off by flooding events. Modification of river basins to reduce the flow velocity may be effective for the conservation of S. gemmifer. PMID:27327439

  10. Optical Measurement Center Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, H.; Abercromby, K.; Mulrooney, M.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, an optical measurement center (OMC) was created to measure the photometric signatures of debris pieces. Initially, the OMC was equipped with a 300 W xenon arc lamp, a SBIG 512 x 512 ST8X MEI CCD camera with standard Johnson filters, and a Lynx 6 robotic arm with five degrees of freedom. As research progressed, modifications were made to the equipment. A customized rotary table was built to overcome the robot s limitation of 180 degree wrist rotation and provide complete 360 degree rotation with little human interaction. This change allowed an initial phase angle (source-object-camera angle) of roughly 5 degrees to be adjusted to 7, 10, 15, 18, 20, 25, or 28 degrees. Additionally, the Johnson R and I CCD filters were replaced with the standard astronomical filters suite (Bessell R,I). In an effort to reduce object saturation, the two generic aperture stops were replaced with neutral density filters. Initially data were taken with aluminum debris pieces from the European Space Operations Centre ESOC2 ground test and more recently with samples from a thermal multi-layered insulation (MLI) commonly used on rocket bodies and satellites. The ESOC2 data provided light curve analysis for one type of material but many different shapes, including flat, bent, curled, folded, and torn. The MLI samples are roughly the same size and shape, but have different surfaces that give rise to interesting photometric light curves. In addition, filter photometry was conducted on the MLI pieces, a process that also will be used on the ESOC2 samples. While obtaining light curve data an anomalous drop in intensity was observed when the table revolved through the second 180 degree rotation. Investigation revealed that the robot s wrist rotation is not reliable past 80 degrees, thus the object may be at slightly different angles at the 180 degree transition. To limit this effect, the initial rotation position begins with the object s minimal surface area facing the camera.

  11. Fault system polarity: A matter of chance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpfer, Martin; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Walsh, John; Nicol, Andy; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Many normal fault systems and, on a smaller scale, fracture boudinage exhibit asymmetry so that one fault dip direction dominates. The fraction of throw (or heave) accommodated by faults with the same dip direction in relation to the total fault system throw (or heave) is a quantitative measure of fault system asymmetry and termed 'polarity'. It is a common belief that the formation of domino and shear band boudinage with a monoclinic symmetry requires a component of layer parallel shearing, whereas torn boudins reflect coaxial flow. Moreover, domains of parallel faults are frequently used to infer the presence of a common décollement. Here we show, using Distinct Element Method (DEM) models in which rock is represented by an assemblage of bonded circular particles, that asymmetric fault systems can emerge under symmetric boundary conditions. The pre-requisite for the development of domains of parallel faults is however that the medium surrounding the brittle layer has a very low strength. We demonstrate that, if the 'competence' contrast between the brittle layer and the surrounding material ('jacket', or 'matrix') is high, the fault dip directions and hence fault system polarity can be explained using a random process. The results imply that domains of parallel faults are, for the conditions and properties used in our models, in fact a matter of chance. Our models suggest that domino and shear band boudinage can be an unreliable shear-sense indicator. Moreover, the presence of a décollement should not be inferred on the basis of a domain of parallel faults only.

  12. Biomechanical Comparison Between Bashti Bone Plug Technique and Biodegradable Screw for Fixation of Grafts in Ligament surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashti, Kaveh; Tahmasebi, Mohammad N; Kaseb, Hasan; Farahmand, Farzam; Akbar, Mohammad; Mobini, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ligament reconstruction is a common procedure in orthopedic surgery. Although several popular techniques are currently in use, new methods are proposed for secure fixation of the tendon graft into the bone tunnel. Purposes: We sought to introduce our new technique of Bashti bone plug for fixation of soft tissue graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to compare its biomechanical features with conventional absorbable interference screw technique in a bovine model. Methods: Twenty pairs of bovine knees were harvested after death. Soft tissue was removed and the Achilles tendon was harvested to be used as an ACL graft. It was secured into the bone tunnel on the tibial side via two different methods: Bashti Bone Plug technique and conventional screw method. Biomechanical strength was measured using 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading on the graft. Pull out strength was also tested until the graft fails. Results: No graft failure was observed after 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading in either fixation methods. When testing for pull out failure, 21 tendons (53%) were torn and 19 tendons (48%) slipped out. No fixation failure occurred, which did not reveal a significant difference between the bone plug or interference screw group (P=0.11). The mean pull out force until failure of the graft was 496±66 N in the screw group and 503±67 N in the bone plug group (P=0.76). Conclusions: Our suggested fixation technique of Bashti bone plug is a native, cheap, and feasible method that provides comparable biomechanical strength with interference screw when soft tissue fixation was attempted in bovine model. PMID:25692166

  13. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a comparison between bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts and fourstrand hamstring grafts

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Mohammad; Sarzaeem, Mohammad Mahdi; Kazemian, Gholam Hossein; Najafi, Farideh; Najafi, Mohammad Amin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disruption of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common ligamentous injury of the knee. The choice of graft for (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. This prospective, randomized clinical trial aimed to compare clinical results of bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts and four-strand semitendinosus-gracilis (ST) grafts for ACL reconstruction over a 3-year follow-up interval. Methods: Seventy-one patients with an average age of 29± 4.5yearswere treated for torn ACL between 2008 and 2009. Forty-sixpatients underwent reconstruction with BPTB autograft, and 41 were treated with ST autograft. At the time of final follow-up, 37 patients in patella group and 34 patients in hamstring group were evaluated in terms of return to pre-injury activity level, pain, knee stability, range of motion, IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) score and complications. Results: At 36thmonth of follow-up, 34 (92%) and 28 (82%) patients in BPTB and ST group, respectively had good-to-excellent IKDC score (p > 0.05). The activity levels were higher in BPTB group (p> 0.05). At 3rd yearof follow up, the Lachman test was graded normal, for 23 (62%) and 11 (32%) patients in BPTB and ST group, respectively (p=0.019). Regarding the pivot-shift test, 29 (79%) and 15 (44%) patients in patella and hamstring group, respectively had normal test at the latest follow-up (p=0.021).There were no significant differences in terms of thigh circumference difference, effusion, knee range of motion, pain and complications. Conclusion: The results indicate a trend toward increased graft laxity and pivot-shift grades in patients undergoing reconstruction with hamstring autograft compared with patella tendon. However, the two groups had comparable results in terms of activity level and knee function. PMID:25694992

  14. Political Activity at Harvard College Observatory in the Shapley ERA (1921-1952): Controversy and Consequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, Barbara L.

    1993-12-01

    Soon after Harlow Shapley became director of HCO in 1921, he established himself as a scientist who would speak out and take action on national and international issues. Recognizing the importance of international cooperation in astronomy, he frequently traveled abroad and in turn invited foreign scientists to visit and work at HCO. By the mid-1930s, Shapley was actively rescuing refugee scientists in war-torn Europe and placing them in American universities. Both Harvard and the FBI took note of his activities. Shapley feared intervention of any kind from either academia or the government. Desperate for funding, however, he finally went to Washington and lobbied Congress to set up the NSF. Through 1945, when Truman succeeded Roosevelt, Shapley pursued his political activities freely. That year he travelled to Moscow to represent Harvard at the 220th anniversary celebration of the Academy of Sciences. In Moscow he advocated international cooperation between Soviet and American scientists. Consequently, Shapley was subpoenaed for interrogation in 1946 by John Rankin, who served during the Truman administration as a one-man committee to investigate un-American activities. The ordeal infuriated Shapley. Headlines about it infuriated some Harvard alumni who urged the university to fire him. Although Shapley was nearing retirement, President Conant stood by his right to keep his job. By 1950, when Senator Joseph McCarthy was compiling a list of Communist sympathizers in the State Department, the FBI had a dossier on Shapley. McCarthy subpoenaed Shapley, but could not intimidate him. The Senator continued the witch hunt with Shapley's associates. First he harassed Martha Betz Shapley, then Donald Menzel. Both cleared themselves. Other associates, such as Bart Bok, were spared. Ultimately, the interrogation worked in Menzel's favor. It disassociated him from Shapley's ideology and political activities. When the Harvard Corporation sought the next director of HCO, Menzel

  15. Why patients have a moral obligation to give care to clinicians.

    PubMed

    Buetow, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Progress is being made in transitioning from clinicians who are torn between caring for patients and populations, to clinicians who are partnering with patients to care for patients as people. However, the focus is still on what patients and others can do for patients, however defined. For clinicians whose interests must be similarly respected for their own sake and because they are integrally related to those of patients, what can and should patients do? Patients can be exempted from some normal social roles but are generally recognized to have moral obligations in health care. One of these obligations is caregiving to clinicians within the limits of each patient's capability. My paper moves this obligation beyond the ceremonial order of etiquette characterizing public statements on how patients should relate to others. It goes beyond a patient-centred ethic that is consumerist in nature, to a person-centred one that recognizes patients typically as moral agents who are dignified by recognizing the obligation to give as well as receive care as sincere benevolence. This obligation derives objective justification from divine command. It is also consistent, however, both with what people, if ignorant of their social role, would objectively produce for a hypothetical social contract, and with virtues constitutive of human nature and a relational and communitarian understanding of what it is to be a person. Including sentiment (intuition) and personal conscience, this relational identity makes caregiving intrinsically meaningful, yet caregiving also has an instrumental value to patients and clinicians. Its self-enforcement by patients will depend on their moral code and on society making caregiving achievable for them. A moral obligation for patient caregiving may then be specified to require patients to reflect on and invest in relationships in which they can feel and show care for others sincerely and respectfully.

  16. Caught between intending and doing: older people ideating on a self-chosen death

    PubMed Central

    van Wijngaarden, Els; Leget, Carlo; Goossensen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper is to provide insight into what it means to live with the intention to end life at a self-chosen moment from an insider perspective. Setting Participants who lived independent or semidependent throughout the Netherlands. Participants 25 Dutch older citizens (mean age of 82 years) participated. They were ideating on a self-chosen death because they considered their lives to be no longer worth living. Inclusion criteria were that they: (1) considered their lives to be ‘completed’; (2) suffered from the prospect of living on; (3) currently wished to die; (4) were 70 years of age or older; (5) were not terminally ill; (6) considered themselves to be mentally competent; (7) considered their death wish reasonable. Design In this qualitative study, in-depth interviews were carried out in the participants’ everyday home environment (median lasting 1.56 h). Verbatim transcripts were analysed based on the principles of phenomenological thematic analysis. Results The liminality or ‘in-betweenness’ of intending and actually performing self-directed death (or not) is characterised as a constant feeling of being torn explicated by the following pairs of themes: (1) detachment and attachment; (2) rational and non-rational considerations; (3) taking control and lingering uncertainty; (4) resisting interference and longing for support; (5) legitimacy and illegitimacy. Conclusions Our findings show that the in-between period emerges as a considerable, existential challenge with both rational and non-rational concerns and thoughts, rather than a calculative, coherent sum of rational considerations. Our study highlights the need to take due consideration of all ambiguities and ambivalences present after a putatively rational decision has been made in order to develop careful policy and support for this particular group of older people. PMID:26781505

  17. Mineralogical Controls over Carbon Storage and Residence Times in Grassland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, D.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.; Spycher, N.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains approximately three times more carbon than the atmosphere and terrestrial vegetation contain combined. However, it is not well understood why some SOM persists for a long time while other SOM decomposes quickly. For future climate predictions, representing soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics accurately in Earth system models is essential. Soil minerals stabilize organic carbon in soil; however, there are gaps in our understanding of how soil mineralogy controls the quantity and turnover of long-residence-time organic carbon. To investigate the impact of soil mineralogy on SOM dynamics, we used a new model (Biotic and Abiotic Model of SOM—BAMS1 [Riley et al., 2014]) integrated with a three-dimensional, multiphase reactive transport solver (TOUGHREACT). The model represents bacterial and fungal activity, archetypal polymer and monomer carbon substrate groups, aqueous chemistry, gaseous diffusion, aqueous advection and diffusion, and adsorption and desorption processes. BAMS1 can predict bulk SOM and radiocarbon signatures without resorting to an arbitrary depth-dependent decline in SOM turnover rates. Results show a reasonable match between observed and simulated depth-resolved SOM and ∆14C in grassland ecosystems (soils formed on terraces south of Eureka, California, and the Central Chernozem Region of Russia) and were consistent with expectations of depth-resolved profiles of lignin content and fungi:aerobic bacteria ratios. Results also suggest that clay-mineral surface area and soil sorption coefficients constitute dominant controls over organic carbon stocks and residence times, respectively. Bibliography: Riley, W.J., F.M. Maggi, M. Kleber, M.S. Torn, J.Y. Tang, D. Dwivedi, and N. Guerry (2014), Long residence times of rapidly decomposable soil organic matter: application of a multi-phase, multi-component, and vertically resolved model (BAMS1) to soil carbon dynamics, Geoscientific Model Development, vol. 7, 1335

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of humanitarian relief interventions: visceral leishmaniasis treatment in the Sudan.

    PubMed

    Griekspoor, A; Sondorp, E; Vos, T

    1999-03-01

    Spending by aid agencies on emergencies has quadrupled over the last decade, to over US$6 billion. To date, cost-effectiveness has seldom been considered in the prioritization and evaluation of emergency interventions. The sheer volume of resources spent on humanitarian aid and the chronicity of many humanitarian interventions call for more attention to be paid to the issue of 'value for money'. In this paper we present data from a major humanitarian crisis, an epidemic of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in war-torn Sudan. The special circumstances provided us, in retrospect, with unusually accurate data on excess mortality, costs of the intervention and its effects, thus allowing us to express cost-effectiveness as the cost per Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. The cost-effectiveness ratio, of US$18.40 per DALY (uncertainty range between US$13.53 and US$27.63), places the treatment of VL in Sudan among health interventions considered 'very good value for money' (interventions of less than US$25 per DALY). We discuss the usefulness of this analysis to the internal management of the VL programme, the procurement of funds for the programme, and more generally, to priority setting in humanitarian relief interventions. We feel that in evaluations of emergency interventions attempts could be made more often to perform cost-effectiveness analyses, including the use of DALYs, provided that the outcomes of these analyses are seen in the broad context of the emergency situation and its consequences on the affected population. This paper provides a first contribution to what is hoped to become an international database of cost-effectiveness studies of health interventions during relief operations, which use a comparable measure of health outcome such as the DALY. PMID:10351471

  19. Crust and lithosphere structure of the northwestern U.S. with ambient noise tomography: Terrane accretion and Cascade arc development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiying; Humphreys, Eugene D.; Yao, Huajian; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2011-04-01

    To address the tectonic and magmatic modifications of the Pacific Northwest lithosphere, including transformation of the Farallon oceanic terrane "Siletzia" into continent, we study the crust and uppermost mantle of the Pacific Northwest with fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave ambient noise tomography using periods 6-40 s, resolving isotropic shear-wave velocity structure from the surface to 70 km depth (3 crustal layers and 2 upper mantle layers). We optimize this estimate with the aid of a neighborhood search algorithm, which we also use with receiver functions to estimate Moho depth. Horizontal node spacing is 0.25°. The EarthScope Transportable Array, the Wallowa array, a portion of the High Lava Plains array, and seven permanent stations are joined to achieve high resolution. Very slow western Columbia Basin upper crust above very fast lower crust expresses the large Eocene sedimentary basins above a magmatically underplated crust of extended Siletzia lithosphere. High-velocity lower crust in adjacent areas to the east and south represents Siletzia thrust under the pre-accretion North America forearc. This interpretation is supported by an anomalous absence of post-accretion magmatism in these areas, implying an absence of slab removal. The southeast termination of the fast lower crust is especially strong and sharp about 35 km southeast of the Klamath-Blue Mountains gravity lineament, suggesting the Farallon slab to the southeast was torn away. The Columbia River Flood Basalts erupted at ~ 16 Ma, apparently creating a hole of diameter ~ 150 km in the edge of the underthrust Siletzia lithosphere. The magmatically active Oregon Cascade arc is slow at all depths, and the much less active Washington Cascades tend to have a volcano-centered structure that is slow in the lower crust but fast in the upper crust and upper mantle. This structure suggests that magmatic intrusion has increased upper crustal velocity, but that the higher temperatures beneath the active

  20. [Practical Use Evaluation of Aluminum Packaging for Medicinal Products Based on Universal Design].

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kazuya; Hidaka, Takashi; Marubashi, Koichi; Takagi, Hirokazu; Kamimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Many pharmacists have requested optimization of aluminum packaging of medicinal products in terms of usability. To improve operational efficiency of aluminum packaging, we used Universal Design (UD)-based approach, which enables products to be used properly and consistently regardless of users. The UD-pack used in this research is composed of a film that can be easily opened and torn linear. Here, we compared the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging by evaluating the practical use of each under the cooperation of 24 pharmacists. Following opening and removal of contents of one sample for both types of packaging, monitors were asked which type was easier to use in each case. Also, monitors were to repeat the opening and removal of contents of five samples in a row, and were asked the same question. Monitors were recorded by digital camera to measure the time required to finish the procedure for five samples in a row. After opening one sample, approximately 83% of monitors preferred the UD-pack, and after opening five samples, all (100%) preferred the UD-pack. Regarding the time required for opening five samples and removing the contents measured by analyzing the recorded video, the UD-pack significantly reduced the time required for all monitors. The average time ratio of the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging was approximately 59%, and no significant difference was observed between male and female pharmacists. Our results indicate the UD-pack improves ease of opening and removal of contents and increases efficiency of dispensing in a clinical setting compared with conventional aluminum packaging.