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Sample records for kaire torn jonne

  1. Torn Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louis J.

    1975-01-01

    Colored construction paper was used to develop an interesting, creative experience for elementary and high school students, who learned to appreciate and to understand the torn paper innovation in art. Examples of this tearing technique are found in works by Picasso, Motherwell, Vincenti, and Matisse. (Author/RK)

  2. Torn Paper Birds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson for third-grade students that begins with an examination of bird prints done by John James Audubon and moves into the students creating their own torn paper birds. Introduces the students to the beauty of birds and focuses on the environmental issues that face birds and their habitats. (CMK)

  3. Cartilage Delamination Flap Mimicking a Torn Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Amit Kanta, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a chondral delamination lesion due to medial parapatellar plica friction syndrome involving the medial femoral condyle. This mimicked a torn medial meniscus in clinical and radiological presentation. Arthroscopy revealed a chondral delamination flap, which was debrided. Diagnosis of chondral lesions in the knee can be challenging. Clinical examination and MRI have good accuracy for diagnosis and should be used in tandem. Early diagnosis and treatment of chondral lesions are important to prevent progression to early osteoarthritis. PMID:28070434

  4. The METEOR trial: no rush to repair a torn meniscus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Gil; Kwoh, C Kent

    2014-04-01

    It is uncertain whether arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is better than physical therapy in patients who have a symptomatic torn meniscus on top of osteoarthritis of the knee. The Meniscal Repair in Osteoarthritis Research (METEOR) trial concluded that physical therapy is acceptable at first, and that surgery is not routinely needed. In patients assigned to physical therapy who eventually needed surgery, the delay resulting from a trial of conservative management did not impair outcomes at 12 months from the initial presentation. Here, we analyze the background, design, findings, and clinical implications of the METEOR trial.

  5. Sit Down with Sabin: Margaret Torn: The Carbon Cycle Like You've Never Seen It (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Sabin; Torn, Margaret

    2011-07-06

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory soil scientist Margaret Torn appears July 6, 2011 on "Sit Down with Sabin," a weekly conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Berkeley Lab staff about innovative science. Torn discusses how she travels the world to learn more about soil's huge role in the global carbon cycle. Brought to you by Berkeley Lab Public Affairs.

  6. Torn between Two Worlds: Overcoming Resistance to Second-Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariza, Eileen N.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses Steven, a classic example of an individual who was torn between two cultural worlds. His mother was Puerto Rican, but she was raised in upper New York State. She and his birth father divorced, she remarried, and the family moved to Puerto Rico, because the company for which Steven's Anglo stepfather worked was…

  7. Anatomical discrimination of the differences between torn mesentery tissue and internal organ-surface primo-vessels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghun; Ryu, Yeonhee; Yun, Yungju; Lee, Sungwon; Kwon, Ohsang; Kim, Jaehyo; Sohn, Inchul; Ahn, Seonghun

    2010-03-01

    The most difficult step in the morphological study of the internal organ-surface primo-vessel (Bong-Han duct) system is the correct identification of samples, due to similarities between torn mesentery and primo-vessel tissue. Without proper sample discernment, the subsequent parts of morphological studies cannot be trusted. Here, we present differences between torn mesentery and primo-vessel tissues as determined by minimal operation, using stereoscopic and microscopic observation. Stereoscopic observation revealed that torn mesentery is tightly connected to the organ surface and does not branch; the detached margin has a fan-shaped membrane without any swollen portions. Primo-vessels are slightly connected to the organ surface and branched, while detached margins lack a membrane and possess a swelling termed the primo-node (Bong-Han corpuscle). Microscopic observation shows bundle patterns in primo-vessel tissue, but irregular arrangement in torn mesentery tissue. These characteristics can be used to distinguish torn mesentery from primo-vessels.

  8. Torn human rotator cuff tendons have reduced collagen thermal properties on differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Salma; Holland, Christopher; Porter, David; Tirlapur, Uday K; Vollrath, Fritz; Carr, Andrew J

    2011-12-01

    The cause of the high failure rates often observed following rotator cuff tendon repairs, particularly massive tears, is not fully understood. Collagen structural changes have been shown to alter tendon thermal and mechanical properties. This study aimed to form a quantitative rather than qualitative assessment, of whether differences in collagen structure and integrity existed between small biopsies of normal, small, and massive rotator cuff tears using differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal properties were measured for 28 human biopsies taken intra-operatively from normal, small, and massive rotator cuff tendon tears in this powered study. Denaturation temperatures are represented by T(onset) (°C) and T(peak) (°C). The T(onset) is proposed to represent water-amide hydrogen bond breakage and resulting protein backbone mobility. T(peak) reportedly corresponds to the temperature at which the majority of proteins fall out of solution. Denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) should correlate with the amount of triple helical structure that is denatured. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy allowed quantitative validation. Small and massive rotator cuff tears had significantly higher T(onset), T(peak), and ΔH compared to controls. Polarized light microscopy of torn tendons confirmed greater collagen structural disruption compared to controls. These novel findings suggest greater quantifiable collagen structural disruption in rotator cuff tears, compared to controls. This study offers insight into possible mechanisms for the reduced strength of torn tendons and may explain why repaired tendons fail to heal.

  9. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Stock-outs, uncertainty and improvisation in access to healthcare in war-torn Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Muyinda, Herbert; Mugisha, James

    2015-12-01

    Stock-outs, also known as shortages or complete absence of a particular inventory, in public health facilities have become a hallmark in Uganda's health system making the notions of persistent doubt in access to healthcare - uncertainty, and doing more with less - 'improvisation', very pronounced. The situation becomes more critical in post-conflict areas with an over whelming burden of preexisting and conflict-related ailments amidst weak health systems. Particularly in the war-torn Northern Uganda, the intersection between the effects of violent conflict and shortage of medications is striking. There are problems getting the right type of medications to the right people at the right time, causing persistent shortages and uncertainty in access to healthcare. With reference to patients on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART), we present temporal trends in access to healthcare in the context of medication shortages in conflict-affected areas. We examine uncertainties in access to care, and how patients, medical practitioners, and the state - the key actors in the domain of supplying and utilizing medicines, respond. Our observation is that, while improvisation is a feature of biomedicine and facilitates problem solving in daily life, it is largely contextual. Given the rapidly evolving contexts and social and professional sensitivities that characterize war affected areas, there is a need for deliberate healthcare programs tailored to the unique needs of people and to the shaping of appropriate policies in post-conflict settings, which call for more North-South collaboration on equal terms.

  11. REHABILITATION OF A PARTIALLY TORN DISTAL TRICEPS TENDON AFTER PLATELET RICH PLASMA INJECTION: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Kolber, Morey J.; Salamh, Paul A.; Hanney, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is an emerging non‐surgical intervention used for the treatment of tendon and ligament pathology. Despite the growing popularity of PRP in musculoskeletal medicine, there is a paucity of research that describes appropriate rehabilitation procedures following this intervention. Case Description: This case report presents the rehabilitation strategy used following a PRP injection for a patient with a partially torn distal triceps tendon who previously failed physical therapy interventions. Outcome: The patient returned to light weight training and coaching activity after completing 15 visits over a 3 month period. One month after discharge, the patient reported pain‐free activities of daily living and a return to previously performed gym activities. Discussion: PRP presents a viable treatment option for individuals who are recalcitrant to conservative interventions yet elect to avoid more invasive surgical measures. Despite the growing popularity of PRP, a paucity of evidence exists to guide physical therapists in the rehabilitation process of these patients. The rehabilitation strategies used in a patient who had a PRP injection for a partial triceps tendon tear are outlined. Although this case report highlights a successful rehabilitation outcome, future research regarding the concomitant effects of PRP injection and rehabilitation for tendon pathology are needed. Level of Evidence: 4‐Case Report PMID:23772345

  12. Epidemiology and Clinical Burden of Malaria in the War-Torn Area, Orakzai Agency in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Asad Mustafa; Hussain, Irfan; Malik, Sumera Kausar; Lee, Jung Hun; Cho, Ill Hwan; Kim, Young Bae; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Military conflict has been a major challenge in the detection and control of emerging infectious diseases such as malaria. It poses issues associated with enhancing emergence and transmission of infectious diseases by destroying infrastructure and collapsing healthcare systems. The Orakzai agency in Pakistan has witnessed a series of intense violence and destruction. Military conflicts and instability in Afghanistan have resulted in the migration of refugees into the area and possible introduction of many infectious disease epidemics. Due to the ongoing violence and Talibanization, it has been a challenge to conduct an epidemiological study. Methodology/Principal Findings All patients were sampled within the transmission season. After a detailed clinical investigation of patients, data were recorded. Baseline venous blood samples were taken for microscopy and nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) analysis. Plasmodium species were detected using nested PCR (nPCR) and amplification of the small subunit ribosomal ribonucleic acid (ssrRNA) genes using the primer pairs. We report a clinical assessment of the epidemic situation of malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax (86.5%) and Plasmodium falciparum (11.79%) infections with analysis of complications in patients such as decompensated shock (41%), anemia (8.98%), hypoglycaemia (7.3%), multiple convulsions (6.7%), hyperpyrexia (6.17%), jaundice (5%), and hyperparasitaemia (4.49%). Conclusions/Significance This overlooked distribution of P. vivax should be considered by malaria control strategy makers in the world and by the Government of Pakistan. In our study, children were the most susceptible population to malaria infection while they were the least expected to use satisfactory prevention strategies in such a war-torn deprived region. Local health authorities should initiate malaria awareness programs in schools and malaria-related education should be further promoted at the local level reaching out to both

  13. Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine: Addressing the Vexing Problem of Persistent Muscle Atrophy in the Chronically Torn Human Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gretchen A.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent muscle atrophy in the chronically torn rotator cuff is a significant obstacle for treatment and recovery. Large atrophic changes are predictive of poor surgical and nonsurgical outcomes and frequently fail to resolve even following functional restoration of loading and rehabilitation. New insights into the processes of muscle atrophy and recovery gained through studies in developmental biology combined with the novel tools and strategies emerging in regenerative medicine provide new avenues to combat the vexing problem of muscle atrophy in the rotator cuff. Moving these treatment strategies forward likely will involve the combination of surgery, biologic/cellular agents, and physical interventions, as increasing experimental evidence points to the beneficial interaction between biologic therapies and physiologic stresses. Thus, the physical therapy profession is poised to play a significant role in defining the success of these combinatorial therapies. This perspective article will provide an overview of the developmental biology and regenerative medicine strategies currently under investigation to combat muscle atrophy and how they may integrate into the current and future practice of physical therapy. PMID:26847008

  14. Girl's Schooling in War-Torn Somalia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A civil war has raged in Somalia since 1991. The civil war was the final blow to an already collapsed education system. Somalia has received little research and policy attention yet children, especially girls, are very vulnerable during times of conflict. The different gender roles, activities, and status in society create gender differentiated…

  15. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses ...

  16. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses ...

  17. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses ...

  18. A Report on the KAIR Survey of Information Sharing Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Sheree P.; Osborne, Jeanne S.

    The purpose of this study was to assess the need for information about transfer students of both "sending" institutions (schools from which students transfer) and "receiving" institutions (schools to which students transfer) and to assess also the institutions' capacity for and willingness to enter into data-sharing activities.…

  19. Keeping Faith with our War-Torn: Rebuilding Broken Spirits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    broken spirit. It is difficult to assess the effectiveness of the mental health treatment of wounded warriors. A mental health provider cannot x-ray the...identifying the breadth of this problem is that there is no national system for keeping track of veterans who have mental health problems. Neither the...suffer mental health issues and perhaps commit suicide. As they leave the very institutions that give them a sense of belonging and meaning, the

  20. Astronomers detect matter torn apart by black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Astronomers have used two different telescopes simultaneously to study the violent flares from the supermassive black hole in the centre of the Milky Way. They have detected outbursts from this region, known as Sagittarius A*, which reveal material being stretched out as it orbits in the intense gravity close to the central black hole. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 41/08 Submillimetre and infrared view of the Galactic Centre The team of European and US astronomers used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, both in Chile, to study light from Sagittarius A* at near-infrared wavelengths and the longer submillimetre wavelengths respectively. This is the first time that astronomers have caught a flare with these telescopes simultaneously. The telescopes' location in the southern hemisphere provides the best vantage point for studying the Galactic Centre. "Observations like this, over a range of wavelengths, are really the only way to understand what's going on close to the black hole," says Andreas Eckart of the University of Cologne, who led the team. Sagittarius A* is located at the centre of our own Milky Way Galaxy at a distance from Earth of about 26 000 light-years. It is a supermassive black hole with a mass of about four million times that of the Sun. Most, if not all, galaxies are thought to have a supermassive black hole in their centre. "Sagittarius A* is unique, because it is the nearest of these monster black holes, lying within our own galaxy," explains team member Frederick K. Baganoff of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, USA. "Only for this one object can our current telescopes detect these relatively faint flares from material orbiting just outside the event horizon." The emission from Sagittarius A* is thought to come from gas thrown off by stars, which then orbits and falls into the black hole. Making the simultaneous observations required careful planning between teams at the two telescopes. After several nights waiting at the two observatory sites, they struck lucky. "At the VLT, as soon as we pointed the telescope at Sagittarius A* we saw it was active, and getting brighter by the minute. We immediately picked up the phone and alerted our colleagues at the APEX telescope," says Gunther Witzel, a PhD student from the University of Cologne. Macarena García-Marín, also from Cologne, was waiting at APEX, where the observatory team had made a special effort to keep the instrument on standby. "As soon as we got the call we were very excited and had to work really fast so as not to lose crucial data from Sagittarius A*. We took over from the regular observations, and were in time to catch the flares," she explains. Over the next six hours, the team detected violently variable infrared emission, with four major flares from Sagittarius A* . The submillimetre-wavelength results also showed flares, but, crucially, this occurred about one and a half hours after the infrared flares. The researchers explain that this time delay is probably caused by the rapid expansion, at speeds of about 5 million km/h, of the clouds of gas that are emitting the flares. This expansion causes changes in the character of the emission over time, and hence the time delay between the infrared and submillimetre flares. Although speeds of 5 million km/h may seem fast, this is only 0.5% of the speed of light. To escape from the very strong gravity so close to the black hole, the gas would have to be travelling at half the speed of light - 100 times faster than detected - and so the researchers believe that the gas cannot be streaming out in a jet. Instead, they suspect that a blob of gas orbiting close to the black hole is being stretched out, like dough in a mixing bowl, and this is causing the expansion. The simultaneous combination of the VLT and APEX telescopes has proved to be a powerful way to study the flares at multiple wavelengths. The team hope that future observations will let them prove their proposed model, and discover more about this mysterious region at the centre of our Galaxy.

  1. Teaching in War-Torn Belfast: Reading, Writing, Rioting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Arturo F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    This article describes the educational situation in Belfast--the divided sympathies on the part of the students, the segregation, the possible hardening of the students. Also considered are the difficulties of teachers in this war situation. (JA)

  2. Teachers Using Learning Styles: Torn between Research and Accountability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of instruments reporting learning/cognitive style with school pupils is of particular interest, because most research on them focuses on applications in higher education, training and the adult workplace, where criticisms of their integrity, reliability and validity have been significant. This study examines two such popular…

  3. On Feeling Torn About One’s Sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Windsor-Shellard, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Three studies offer novel evidence addressing the consequences of explicit–implicit sexual orientation (SO) ambivalence. In Study 1, self-identified straight females completed explicit and implicit measures of SO. The results revealed that participants with greater SO ambivalence took longer responding to explicit questions about their sexual preferences, an effect moderated by the direction of ambivalence. Study 2 replicated this effect using a different paradigm. Study 3 included self-identified straight and gay female and male participants; participants completed explicit and implicit measures of SO, plus measures of self-esteem and affect regarding their SO. Among straight participants, the response time results replicated the findings of Studies 1 and 2. Among gay participants, trends suggested that SO ambivalence influenced time spent deliberating on explicit questions relevant to sexuality, but in a different way. Furthermore, the amount and direction of SO ambivalence was related to self-esteem. PMID:24972940

  4. Muscle progenitor cell regenerative capacity in the torn rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gretchen A; Farris, Ashley L; Sato, Eugene; Gibbons, Michael; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R; Engler, Adam J

    2015-03-01

    Chronic rotator cuff (RC) tears affect a large portion of the population and result in substantial upper extremity impairment, shoulder weakness, pain, and limited range of motion. Regardless of surgical or conservative treatment, persistent atrophic muscle changes limit functional restoration and may contribute to surgical failure. We hypothesized that deficits in the skeletal muscle progenitor (SMP) cell pool could contribute to poor muscle recovery following tendon repair. Biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing arthroscopic RC surgery. The SMP population was quantified, isolated, and assayed in culture for its ability to proliferate and fuse in vitro and in vivo. The SMP population was larger in muscles from cuffs with partial tears compared with no tears or full thickness tears. However, SMPs from muscles in the partial tear group also exhibited reduced proliferative ability. Cells from all cuff states were able to fuse robustly in culture and engraft when injected into injured mouse muscle, suggesting that when given the correct signals, SMPs are capable of contributing to muscle hypertrophy and regeneration regardless of tear severity. The fact that this does not appear to happen in vivo helps focus future therapeutic targets for promoting muscle recovery following rotator cuff repairs and may help improve clinical outcomes.

  5. [Therapy optimization studies torn between science and funding].

    PubMed

    Freund, M

    2002-01-01

    There is no doubt that clinical studies are valuable cornerstones in the development of rational diagnostics and therapy, for the patients' safety, for quality assurance as well as for the development of a body of evidence in medicine. Well recognized multicentric study groups are active in several medical disciplines in Germany. Public funding resources however are miserable as compared to other countries. For example in hematology and oncology funds are almost exclusively available by private foundations as the Deutsche Krebshilfe only. Additionally physicians and institutions who are actively promoting clinical studies have to pay charges for patients' insurance and for registration of studies by the authorities. Furthermore there are increasing difficulties obtaining reimbursement for patients' care in clinical studies. In this context outdated regulations of the German Sozialgesetzbuch V lawbook play an important role. In summary a pronounced reform deficit paired with bureocratic tendencies has become manifested. The most important demands are in this situation: a reliable and realistic regulatory basis for treatment-related clinical studies has to be created. Studies on treatment strategies with registered drugs have to be free from the obligatory patients' insurance which is required for study with non-registered drugs. It has to be clarified that in these studies some regulations of good clinical practice as obligatory external monitoring and source data verification are not feasible and will not be required. The Sozialgesetzbuch V has to be adapted and the actual ban of clinical studies in private practice has to be ended. Treatment related clinical studies have to be free from charges of ethical committees and regulatory authorities. Thereby the financial overload of clinical studies could be reduced and some motivation for further bureocratic proliferation is removed. Finally a longterm, reliable funding resource has to be created independently from the pharmaceutical industry. A possible model could be a foundation for treatment-related studies which is financed by public funds and by funds from the reimbursement companies.

  6. Oil flow resumes in war torn onshore Neutral Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-09

    Oil production has resumed in the war ravaged onshore fields of the Neutral Zone between Saudi Arabia and Kuwait 1 year after the end of Persian Gulf War. Initial production of about 40,000 b/d is expected to rise to 60,000 b/d by year end. This paper reports that prior to the January-February 1991 war to oust occupying Iraqi military forces from Kuwait, the Neutral Zone's Wafra, South Umm Gudair, and South Fuwaris onshore fields produced about 135,000 b/d.

  7. Feeding ecology of a nocturnal invasive alien lizard species, Hemidactylus mabouia Moreau de Jonnès, 1818 (Gekkonidae), living in an outcrop rocky area in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F D; Anjos, L A

    2007-08-01

    We studied in fieldwork, the feeding ecology of a Hemidactylus mabouia population from southeastern Brazil throughout one year in a region with marked climatic seasonality. A sampling of availability of arthropods in the environment was carried out, which evidenced that the availability of food resources influenced the composition of the diet of H. mabouia. There were no seasonal differences on diet composition, which may be due to the relatively constant availability on prey throughout the year. In general, this population can be classified as generalist and opportunistic regarding diet. There was a high food niche overlap among juveniles and adults, although juvenile lizards tend to eat higher number of prey (but in lower volume) when compared to adult lizards. The ability to exploit a wide array of prey in an efficient way, maintaining a positive energetic balance, may be a factor determining the efficiency of this exotic species to occupy invaded areas.

  8. Torn: Social Expectations Concerning Forgiveness Among Women Who Have Experienced Intrafamilial Child Sexual Abuse.

    PubMed

    Tener, Dafna; Eisikovits, Zvi

    2015-06-30

    The authors examine how women who experienced intrafamilial child sexual abuse (IFCSA) perceive social expectations of society toward forgiveness, how they incorporate IFCSA and reconstruct their life stories in relation to these expectations, and the costs and gains from such reconstructions. This is part of a larger study on the phenomenology of forgiveness for IFCSA among grown women. Twenty Jewish Israeli women who had experienced IFCSA were interviewed in depth. Interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analyses lead to four types of social expectations: forgiveness by forgetting, avenging, family preservation through forgiveness, and satisfying the voyeuristic needs of society, which has limited interest in forgiveness. These contradictory expectations are discussed in light of the cultural context and the experience of the women interviewed. Implications for practice are suggested.

  9. Torn apart by Divorce: When a Family Is Shattered to Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Gigi; Kamps, Brian; Lopez, Kate; McAlister, Christine; Wright, Cheri

    This brief handout set begins with a scenario that has a teacher discover that one of the best students in the class is facing the breakup of her parent's marriage. The student thinks it is "all my fault." A fact sheet on divorce and its effects on children follows. Psychological and economic effects of divorce on children are listed. Facts about…

  10. Torn in Two: An Examiniation of Elementary School Counselors' Perceptions on Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesto, Casper

    2013-01-01

    The American School Counselor Association (ASCA; The ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs, 2005) developed the ASCA National Model to define the prescribed roles and functions of the professional school counselor. Although the national model initially defines school counselors' roles, counselors find it difficult to…

  11. Perspective: A Pull in Two Directions--Mothers Torn between Work and Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Anne Pleshette

    2004-01-01

    This article was excerpted from the author's "The 7 Stages of Motherhood: Making the Most of Your Life as a Mom," published by Alfred A. Knopf in 2004. The author describes the experiences of several professional women, including herself, returning to work from maternity leave. The article examines the varied and sometimes ambivalent responses…

  12. Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgeons. In the Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research (MeTeOR) trial, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in ... receive physical therapy. The researchers plan to monitor MeTeOR participants over five years to determine if long- ...

  13. Coming to Terms with the Past: Lessons from War-Torn Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nina K.

    Countries are increasingly facing the question of transgenerational transmission of trauma from their previous acts of war, ethnic cleansing, and genocide. How countries choose to confront that past has significance on the future course of their society. Truth commissions have been used in many countries as a means to collect accounts of torture,…

  14. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult.

  15. Colour polymorphism torn apart by opposing positive frequency-dependent selection, yet maintained in space.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Swanne P; Kokko, Hanna; Rojas, Bibiana; Nokelainen, Ossi; Mappes, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    Polymorphic warning signals in aposematic species are enigmatic because predator learning and discrimination should select for the most common coloration, resulting in positive frequency-dependent survival selection. Here, we investigated whether differential mating success could create sufficiently strong negative frequency-dependent selection for rare morphs to explain polymorphic (white and yellow) warning coloration in male wood tiger moths (Parasemia plantaginis). We conducted an experiment in semi-natural conditions where we estimated mating success for both white and yellow male moths under three different morph frequencies. Contrary to expectations, mating success was positively frequency-dependent: white morph males had high relative fitness when common, likewise yellow morph males had high relative fitness when instead they were common. We hence built a model parameterized with our data to examine whether polymorphism can be maintained despite two sources of positive frequency dependence. The model includes known spatial variation in the survival advantage enjoyed by the yellow morph and assumes that relative mating success follows our experimentally derived values. It predicts that polymorphism is possible under migration for up to approximately 20% exchange of individuals between subpopulations in each generation. Our results suggest that differential mating success combined with spatial variation in predator communities may operate as a selection mosaic that prevents complete fixation of either morph.

  16. Torn between Two Worlds: Overcoming Resistance to Second-Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariza, Eileen N.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences and eventual success of teaching Spanish as a Second Language in Puerto Rico. Notes one student's success in eradicating his self-imposed barriers to learning a second language. Discusses three key principles for building a safe learning climate for students. (SR)

  17. Human Integration through Olympism Education: A Pragmatic Engagement of Youths in a War-Torn Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanayakkara, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    This paper delineates the findings of a mixed methods study that investigated how Olympism education could strengthen competencies of human integration through delivery of physical, social, and critical literacy and conflict resolution literacy. The study introduced a curriculum model integrating Olympism values and conflict resolution strategies…

  18. Rapid Deployment of International Tele-Intensive Care Unit Services in War-Torn Syria.

    PubMed

    Moughrabieh, Anas; Weinert, Craig

    2016-02-01

    The conflict in Syria has created the largest humanitarian emergency of the twenty-first century. The 4-year Syrian conflict has destroyed hospitals and severely reduced the capacity of intensive care units (ICUs) and on-site intensivists. The crisis has triggered attempts from abroad to support the medical care of severely injured and acutely ill civilians inside Syria, including application of telemedicine. Within the United States, tele-ICU programs have been operating for more than a decade, albeit with high start-up costs and generally long development times. With the benefit of lessons drawn from those domestic models, the Syria Tele-ICU program was launched in December 2012 to manage the care of ICU patients in parts of Syria by using inexpensive, off-the-shelf video cameras, free social media applications, and a volunteer network of Arabic-speaking intensivists in North America and Europe. Within 1 year, 90 patients per month in three ICUs were receiving tele-ICU services. At the end of 2015, a network of approximately 20 participating intensivists was providing clinical decision support 24 hours per day to five civilian ICUs in Syria. The volunteer clinicians manage patients at a distance of more than 6,000 miles, separated by seven or eight time zones between North America and Syria. The program is implementing a cloud-based electronic medical record for physician documentation and a medication administration record for nurses. There are virtual chat rooms for patient rounds, radiology review, and trainee teaching. The early success of the program shows how a small number of committed physicians can use inexpensive equipment spawned by the Internet revolution to support from afar civilian health care delivery in a high-conflict country.

  19. Two war-torn soldiers: combat-related trauma through an intersubjective lens.

    PubMed

    Carr, Russell B

    2013-01-01

    The author, himself an Iraq war veteran, presents a contemporary psychodynamic understanding, known as intersubjective therapy, of combat-related Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). At the onset of this case example, the patient was highly suicidal and his PTSD symptoms had not responded to a first-line treatment: manualized cognitive processing therapy. Robert Stolorow's intersubjective, psychodynamic approach to traumatic emotional experiences was then selected for treatment, and illustrates how combat in Afghanistan shattered this soldier's world and self experience. Therapeutic action arises from this intersubjective perspective by providing a relational home so that unendurable emotions can be borne, processed, and integrated to achieve a more constant and individualized sense of self. Being a two-person model of therapy, the author also describes how his work with this traumatized soldier affected him, ultimately contributing to his own sense of authentic existing. The author discusses the need for therapists to recognize and acknowledge to traumatized patients their shared finitude and the ubiquity of trauma. In the Postscript, the patient describes what he felt was therapeutic and contrasts this to his previous experiences with manualized cognitive processing therapy.

  20. Torn between Two Worlds: Hybridity and In-Between Identity Recognition in Goli Taraqqi's "Two Worlds"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabankare, Nasser Najafi; Mehrabi, Bahar

    2014-01-01

    As one of the contemporary Iranian women writers living in the U.S, Goli Taraqqi's fiction is mostly concerned with pains and difficulties of migrant Iranian women in other countries. Bearing a biographical resemblance, her sequence collection to "Scattered Memories," entitled "Two Worlds" retells interrelated short stories of…

  1. Effects of corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid on torn rotator cuff tendons in vitro and in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Gotoh, Masafumi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Ohta, Keisuke; Nakamura, Keiichirou; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Shirachi, Isao; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shirahama, Masahiro; Shiba, Naoto; Matsueda, Satoko

    2015-10-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) or hyaluronic acid (HA) is used in subacromial injection for the conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears (RCT); this study addresses the question of how CS and HA affect the tendon tissue and fibroblasts in vitro and in rats. Cell proliferation assays were performed in human tendon fibroblasts from RCT. Rats underwent surgery to create RCT, and the surgical sites were injected with CS or HA. The rotator cuff tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing, microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and ultrastructural analysis. Cell proliferation was significantly decreased with CS in vitro (p < 0.05). Maximal load of CS-treated tendons was significantly decreased compared with that of HA-treated tendons (p < 0.05), as well as PCNA(+) cells at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Ultrastructural observations of the CS-treated rats detected apoptosis of tendon fibroblasts 24 h after surgery. Histological and biomechanical data 4 weeks after surgery were not significant among the three groups. Unlike HA, CS caused cell death, and inhibition of the proliferation of tendon fibroblasts, leading to a delay of tendon healing involved and a subsequent decrease of biomechanical strength at the surgical site.

  2. Comparison of endoscopic and two-incision techniques for reconstructing a torn anterior cruciate ligament using hamstring tendons.

    PubMed

    Howell, S M; Deutsch, M L

    1999-09-01

    This study compared the differences in clinical outcome between an endoscopic (67 of 70) and two-incision (41 of 49) technique used to reconstruct tom anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) using a double-looped semitendinosus and gracilis (DLSTG) graft. In both techniques, the graft was placed without roof impingement, the looped end of the graft was fixed around a post with bone compaction, and the free ends were fixed with either double staples or a soft tissue washer(s). No graft required suture fixation. The postoperative treatment featured an aggressive rehabilitation protocol without a brace, and allowed unrestricted sports participation 4 months after reconstruction. Age, sex distribution, duration from injury to surgery, and preoperative laxity were not significantly different between treatment groups. The operative time for the endoscopic technique averaged 48 minutes less than the two-incision technique. There were no significant differences in thigh circumference, knee extension, stability, and the single leg hop test between the two treatment groups at 4 and 24 months. Ninety-one percent of the knees in the endoscopic group and 90% in the two-incision group had less than a 3 mm increase in anterior translation compared with the normal knee using the manual maximum test (KT-1000) and had either a normal or near normal knee (IKDC score) at 2 years. A second surgery for removal of painful, prominent hardware was required in 21% of the subjects in the endoscopic group and 12% of the subjects in the two-incision treatment group. Patients preferred the endoscopic technique because the result was more cosmetic and aggressive rehabilitation could be accomplished without the assistance of a physical therapist. Unfortunately, objective stability could not be restored in about 10% of knees with either technique. Reoperation for removal of prominent staples and washers continues to be the primary source of postoperative morbidity.

  3. Faith and Hope in a War-Torn Land: The US Army Chaplaincy in the Balkans, 1995-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    accidents, aircraft crashes, and suicides . In these instances of death, grief, loss, frustration, and pain, there were Army chaplains to minister to...0) became predomi- nant. Tito was born in northwestern Croatia and left school as a teenager to work. He soon became aware of communist labor...Allied Commander in Europe from 1997 to 2000, called Milosevic “a supremely manipulative liar and a bully ,” and one who was full of “self-interest

  4. War is the Enemy of Health. Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine in War-Torn Syria.

    PubMed

    Sahloul, Mohammed Z; Monla-Hassan, Jaber; Sankari, Abdulghani; Kherallah, Mazen; Atassi, Bassel; Badr, Safwan; Abbara, Aula; Sparrow, Annie

    2016-02-01

    The Syrian crisis, now in its fifth year, has created an unprecedented strain on health services and systems due to the protracted nature of the warfare, the targeting of medics and health care infrastructure, the exodus of physicians and nurses, the shortage of medical supplies and medications, and the disruption of medical education and training. Within a few short years, the life expectancy of resident Syrians has declined by 20 years. Over the first 4 years of the conflict, more than 75,000 civilians died from injuries incurred in the violence. More than twice as many civilians, including many women and children, have died prematurely of infectious and noninfectious chronic diseases for want of adequate health care. Doctors, local administrators, and nongovernmental organizations are struggling to manage the consequences of the conflict under substandard conditions, often using unorthodox methods of health care delivery in field hospitals and remotely by telehealth communication. Much-needed medical supplies are channeled through dangerous routes across the borders from Lebanon, Jordan, and Turkey. Physicians in the United States and other western nations have helped Syrian physicians make the most of the situation by providing training on introducing innovations in technology and treatment. Portable ultrasound machines have been introduced and are being used extensively in the management of trauma and shock. This report, prepared by members of the Syrian American Medical Society, documents current needs for health care relief within Syria, focusing on pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine, and some of the efforts currently underway to meet those needs.

  5. Is maternal education a social vaccine for childhood malaria infection? A cross-sectional study from war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cary; Claude, Kasereka Masumbuko; Kibendelwa, Zacharie Tsongo; Brooks, Hannah; Zheng, Xiaonan; Hawkes, Michael

    2017-03-01

    In zones of violent conflict in the tropics, social disruption leads to elevated child mortality, of which malaria is the leading cause. Understanding the social determinants of malaria transmission may be helpful to optimize malaria control efforts. We conducted a cross-sectional study of healthy children aged 2 months to 5 years attending well-child and/or immunization visits in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Six hundred and forty-seven children were tested for malaria antigenemia by rapid diagnostic test and the accompanying parent or legal guardian simultaneously completed a survey questionnaire related to demographics, socioeconomic status, maternal education, as well as bednet use and recent febrile illness. We examined the associations between variables using multivariable logistic regression analysis, chi-squared statistic, Fisher's exact test, and Spearman's rank correlation, as appropriate. One hundred and twenty-three out of the 647 (19%) children in the study tested positive for malaria. Higher levels of maternal education were associated with a lower risk of malaria in their children. The prevalence of malaria in children of mothers with no education, primary school, and beyond primary was 41/138 (30%), 41/241 (17%), and 39/262 (15%), respectively (p = 0.001). In a multivariable logistic regression model adjusting for the effect of a child's age and study site, the following remained significant predictors of malaria antigenemia: maternal education, number of children under five per household, and HIV serostatus. Higher maternal education, through several putative causal pathways, was associated with lower malaria prevalence among children in the DRC. Our findings suggest that maternal education might be an effective 'social vaccine' against malaria in the DRC and globally.

  6. Effect of glenohumeral abduction angle on the mechanical interaction between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons for the intact, partial-thickness torn, and repaired supraspinatus tendon conditions.

    PubMed

    Andarawis-Puri, Nelly; Kuntz, Andrew F; Ramsey, Matthew L; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2010-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears are difficult to manage because of the structural and mechanical inhomogeneity of the supraspinatus tendon. Previously, we showed that with the arm at the side, the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons mechanically interact such that conditions that increase supraspinatus tendon strain, such as load or full-thickness tears, also increase infraspinatus tendon strain. This suggests that the infraspinatus tendon may shield the supraspinatus tendon from further injury while becoming at increased risk of injury itself. In this study, the effect of glenohumeral abduction angle on the interaction between the two tendons was evaluated for supraspinatus tendon partial-thickness tears and two repair techniques. Principal strains were quantified in both tendons for 0 degrees , 30 degrees , and 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction. Results showed that interaction between the two tendons is interrupted by an increase in abduction angle for all supraspinatus tendon conditions evaluated. Infraspinatus tendon strain was lower at 30 degrees and 60 degrees than at 0 degrees abduction angle. In conclusion, interaction between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons is interrupted with increase in abduction angle. Additionally, 30 degrees abduction should be further evaluated for management of rotator cuff tears and repairs as it is the angle at which both supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon strain is decreased.

  7. Simulation of High-Latitude Hydrological Processes in the Torne-Kalix Basin: PILPS Phase 2(e). 3; Equivalent Model Representation and Sensitivity Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowling, Laura C.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Nijssen, Bart; Polcher, Jan; Koster, Randal D.; Lohmann, Dag; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Project for Intercomparison of Land Surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) Phase 2(e) showed that in cold regions the annual runoff production in Land Surface Schemes (LSSs) is closely related to the maximum snow accumulation, which in turn is controlled in large part by winter sublimation. To help further explain the relationship between snow cover, turbulent exchanges and runoff production, a simple equivalent model-(SEM) was devised to reproduce the seasonal and annual fluxes simulated by 13 LSSs that participated in PILPS Phase 2(e). The design of the SEM relates the annual partitioning of precipitation and energy in the LSSs to three primary parameters: snow albedo, effective aerodynamic resistance and evaporation efficiency. Isolation of each of the parameters showed that the annual runoff production was most sensitive to the aerodynamic resistance. The SEM was somewhat successful in reproducing the observed LSS response to a decrease in shortwave radiation and changes in wind speed forcings. SEM parameters derived from the reduced shortwave forcings suggested that increased winter stability suppressed turbulent heat fluxes over snow. Because winter sensible heat fluxes were largely negative, reductions in winter shortwave radiation imply an increase in annual average sensible heat.

  8. Analysis of Remote Trauma Transfers in South Central Texas with Comparison with Current US Combat Operations: Results of the RemTORN-I Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Shawn Salter, RN, BSN, LP, CCFP-C, Ronald Stewart, MD, Brian Eastridge, MD, Eric Epley, NREMT-P, and Lorne Blackbourne, MD, San Antonio, Texas BACKGROUND...combat wounded. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012;73:S38YS42. 6. Eastridge BJ, Hardin M, Cantrell J, et al. Died of wounds on the battlefield: causation

  9. New wearable walking-type continuous passive motion device for postsurgery walking rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong; Nakamura, Masahiro; Horiuchi, Tadahiro; Kohno, Hideki; Takahashi, Rei; Terada, Hidetsugu; Haro, Hirotaka

    2013-07-01

    While total knee arthroplasty is useful for treating osteoarthritis of the knee, the success of this treatment depends on effective rehabilitation. The goal of this study was to develop an assistive device for post-total knee arthroplasty patients for walking rehabilitation and for shortening the hospitalization period. We developed a brace electronic assist system termed the knee assistive instrument for walking rehabilitation (KAI-R) to illustrate the need for training during postoperative rehabilitation. Sixteen osteoarthritis patients (1 male and 15 females; average age 68.9 years) who underwent total knee arthroplasty were analyzed before operation and 2-4 weeks after operation, and 25 healthy individuals (14 males and 11 females; average age 26.2 years) formed the control group. Based on the pre- and postoperative data on peak knee flexion angle, foot height, and walking velocity, we developed the KAI-R, which consists of an assistive mechanism for the knee joint, a hip joint support system, and a foot pressure sensor system and is driven by a CPU board that generates the walking pattern. We then tested the walking gait in seven healthy volunteers with and without KAI-R assistance. KAI-R increased the peak flexion angle of the knee and foot height in all seven volunteers; their range of motion of the knee joint was increased. However, KAI-R also decreased the walking velocity of subjects, which was explained by reaction delay and slightly compromised physical balance, which was caused by wearing the KAI-R. KAI-R is useful for gait improvement. In future studies, KAI-R will be investigated in a clinical trial for its ability for walking rehabilitation in post-total knee arthroplasty patients.

  10. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    PubMed

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for an implant appropriate to the unique technique of protecting a partial ACL tear. In addition, it has no critical point of ACL substitute failure at the site of its anchoring to the bone (compared to the previously used PET/PCL substitute). Key words: knee stabilisation, stifle surgery, ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, UHMWPE, nylon monofilament thread, biodegradable screw, bone anchor.

  11. Effect of Two-Stage Aging on Microstructure of 7075 Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    which particular microstructural characteristic is of greatest significance in the stress corrosion behavior of 7075 in a high strength condition. 2...is expected that RRA may provide less improvement in the stress corrosion behavior of 7050 than of I I 7075 . Data from these tests would allow...I v h EFFECT OF TWO-STAGE AGING ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF 7075 ALUMINUM ALLOYS RE- 627 "Final Report E April 1981 "by 7! Jonn M. Papazian OT i. Prepared

  12. Comparison of pediatric radiation dose and vessel visibility on angiographic systems using piglets as a surrogate: anti-scatter grid removal vs lower detector air kerma settings with a grid - a preclinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Keith J; Racadio, John M; Abruzzo, Todd A; Johnson, Neil D; Patel, Manish N; Kukreja, Kamlesh U; den Hartog, Mark J H; Hoonaert, Bart P A; Nachabe, Rami A

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to reduce pediatric doses while maintaining or improv-ing image quality scores without removing the grid from X-ray beam. This study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Three piglets (5, 14, and 20 kg) were imaged using six different selectable detector air kerma (Kair) per frame values (100%, 70%, 50%, 35%, 25%, 17.5%) with and without the grid. Number of distal branches visualized with diagnostic confidence relative to the injected vessel defined image quality score. Five pediatric interventional radiologists evaluated all images. Image quality score and piglet Kair were statistically compared using analysis of variance and receiver operating curve analysis to define the preferred dose setting and use of grid for a visibility of 2nd and 3rd order vessel branches. Grid removal reduced both dose to subject and imaging quality by 26%. Third order branches could only be visualized with the grid present; 100% detector Kair was required for smallest pig, while 70% detector Kair was adequate for the two larger pigs. Second order branches could be visualized with grid at 17.5% detector Kair for all three pig sizes. Without the grid, 50%, 35%, and 35% detector Kair were required for smallest to largest pig, respectively. Grid removal reduces both dose and image quality score. Image quality scores can be maintained with less dose to subject with the grid in the beam as opposed to removed. Smaller anatomy requires more dose to the detector to achieve the same image quality score.

  13. Knee arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) Torn or damaged ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 51. Read More ACL reconstruction Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury Baker cyst ...

  14. Shoulder arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ball and socket joint) A torn or damaged biceps tendon A torn rotator cuff A bone spur ... repair. Using arthroscopy for rotator cuff repairs or tendinitis usually relieves the pain, but you may not ...

  15. The Bio-accessibility of Synthetic Fe-Organo Complexes in Subsurface Soil with Elevated Temperature: a Proxy for the Vulnerability of Mineral Associated Carbon to Warming Rachel C. Porras, Peter S. Nico, and Margaret Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, R. C.; Hicks Pries, C.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, subsurface soils (>30 cm) represent an important reservoir of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the vulnerability of this deep SOC and, in particular mineral-associated SOC, to warming, and its potential to amplify the effects of climate change is highly uncertain. To gain insight into the bio-accessibility and temperature sensitivity of mineral-associated organic C, we conducted a series of incubations using soils collected from three depths (0-10, 50-60, and 80-90 cm) under coniferous forest. The soils are moderately acidic (mean pH=6.5) sandy, mixed, mesic Ultic Haploxeralfs. To understand how mechanisms controlling SOC bio-accessibilty or temperature sensitivity differ with depth and with the properties of Fe-organo complexes (i.e.,degree of crystallinity, amount of reactive surface area, or surface saturation), we used a 13C labeled glucose substrate to prepare synthetic Fe-organo complexes spanning a range of crystallinity and mineral surface saturation. The synthetic Fe-organo complexes were then added to soil from three depths. The soils containing the 13C labeled Fe-organo adduct were incubated at two temperatures (ambient and +4°C) and respired 13CO2 was measured and used to estimate flux rates. Differences in measured 13CO2 fluxes as a function of depth, surface loading, and mineral properties are discussed in terms of their implications for the temperature sensitivity of mineral protected organic carbon in subsurface soils.

  16. [The quarrel of 1843 on the "relationship between the physical and the moral" in the causes of insanity].

    PubMed

    Carbonel, Frederic

    2010-12-01

    Moreau de Jonnès, in his statistical Documents on France, published in 1835, and in his Statistics of the Insane, recorded "idiocy" and "epilepsy" among the physical causes of insanity. In contrast, Parchappe held that "epilepsy" and "idiocy "constituted" in no way, real causes" of insanity. They were singular diseases, different from "madness". Their "cause" was "an imperfection of organization, and this is an essential cause", he emphasized, that was purely organic and physiological. During this quarrel, which occurred in 1843, Dr Parchappe wanted to make a clean sweep of medical data which did not differentiate sufficiently between the "moral" and "physical" causes of insanity.

  17. 7 CFR 29.3032 - Injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., insects, or weather conditions; insecticides, fungicides, or cell growth inhibitors; nutritional... dead, burnt, hail-cut, torn, broken, frostbitten, sunburned, sunscalded, scorched, fire-killed,...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3032 - Injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., insects, or weather conditions; insecticides, fungicides, or cell growth inhibitors; nutritional... dead, burnt, hail-cut, torn, broken, frostbitten, sunburned, sunscalded, scorched, fire-killed,...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3032 - Injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., insects, or weather conditions; insecticides, fungicides, or cell growth inhibitors; nutritional... dead, burnt, hail-cut, torn, broken, frostbitten, sunburned, sunscalded, scorched, fire-killed,...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3032 - Injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., insects, or weather conditions; insecticides, fungicides, or cell growth inhibitors; nutritional... dead, burnt, hail-cut, torn, broken, frostbitten, sunburned, sunscalded, scorched, fire-killed,...

  1. 78 FR 58967 - Airworthiness Directives; ATR-GIE Avions de Transport Régional Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... would require a one-time general visual inspection for damaged (worn, torn, or abraded) or missing seals.... This AD requires a general visual inspection for damaged or missing seals between the nacelle lower... visual inspection for damaged (worn, torn, or abraded) and missing shims and seals, between the...

  2. 7 CFR 30.18 - Injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... deformed leaves; or tobacco hurt by insects; or tobacco affected by wild-fire, black fire, rust, frogeye... has been torn or broken, frozen or frosted, sunburned or scalded, scorched or fire-killed,...

  3. 7 CFR 30.18 - Injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... deformed leaves; or tobacco hurt by insects; or tobacco affected by wild-fire, black fire, rust, frogeye... has been torn or broken, frozen or frosted, sunburned or scalded, scorched or fire-killed,...

  4. 7 CFR 30.18 - Injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... deformed leaves; or tobacco hurt by insects; or tobacco affected by wild-fire, black fire, rust, frogeye... has been torn or broken, frozen or frosted, sunburned or scalded, scorched or fire-killed,...

  5. 7 CFR 30.18 - Injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... deformed leaves; or tobacco hurt by insects; or tobacco affected by wild-fire, black fire, rust, frogeye... has been torn or broken, frozen or frosted, sunburned or scalded, scorched or fire-killed,...

  6. 7 CFR 30.18 - Injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... deformed leaves; or tobacco hurt by insects; or tobacco affected by wild-fire, black fire, rust, frogeye... has been torn or broken, frozen or frosted, sunburned or scalded, scorched or fire-killed,...

  7. 7 CFR 51.3069 - Very serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Cuts or other skin breaks when not healed and penetrating into the flesh of the fruit, or any skin... the skin surrounding the exposed stem cavity is torn more than an aggregate area of a circle...

  8. Basics for Handling Food Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... selecting your non-perishables. · Never choose meat or poultry in packaging that is torn or leaking. · Do ... 0 °F or below. · Cook or freeze fresh poultry, fish, ground meats, and variety meats within 2 ...

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) ... and Recovery Coping With an ACL Injury About ACL Injuries A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is ...

  10. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries ... Treatment Coping With an MCL Injury About MCL Injuries A torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a ...

  11. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs when the tissue and muscles of the pelvic floor no longer support the pelvic organs resulting in ... organ prolapse. Supporting muscles and tissue of the pelvic floor may become torn or stretched because of labor ...

  12. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACL connect your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia). If either ligament is torn, it might cause ... ligaments connect the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments form an " ...

  13. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) Inflamed or damaged ... surgery Knee pain Meniscal allograft transplantation Patient Instructions ACL reconstruction - discharge Getting your home ready - knee or ...

  14. Broken kneecap - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Patella fracture ... your activity if you have a very minor fracture. More likely, your knee will be placed in ... your knee injury. If you have a severe fracture, or if your tendon is torn, you may ...

  15. What Are Knee Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... main types of tendon injuries and disorders are: Tendinitis and ruptured tendons Osgood-Schlatter disease Iliotibial band syndrome Tendon injuries range from tendinitis (inflammation of a tendon) to a ruptured (torn) ...

  16. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  17. ACL reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... This increases the chance you may have a meniscus tear. ACL reconstruction may be used for these ... When other ligaments are also injured When your meniscus is torn Before surgery, talk to your health ...

  18. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee problems such as: a torn knee disc (meniscus) a damaged knee bone (patella) a damaged ligament ... surgeon can see the ligaments, the knee disc (meniscus), the knee bone (patella), the lining of the ...

  19. Shoulder Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... injured. Common problems include Sprains and strains Dislocations Separations Tendinitis Bursitis Torn rotator cuffs Frozen shoulder Fractures Arthritis Health care providers diagnose shoulder problems by using your medical history, a physical exam, and imaging tests. Often, the first treatment ...

  20. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and layers of connective tissue, which are called fascia, become weakened, stretched, or are torn the pelvic ... delivery) can cause injury to the muscles or fascia of the pelvic floor. The increased pressure of ...

  1. Art Experiences for Young Children with Severe Visual Imapairments: Report from the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Anna M.

    1987-01-01

    Ten guidelines are offered for providing art experiences for blind young children include adding sound, smell, or taste whenever possible. Suggested activities include making styrofoam-toothpick sculptures, box sculptures, tape and feather collages, torn paper collages, and fingerpaintings. (DB)

  2. 77 FR 34283 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... a torn out aspirator due to the aspirator interfering with the extrusion lip of the OWS enclosure... out aspirator due to the aspirator interfering with the extrusion lip of the OWS enclosure during...

  3. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football and soccer. More severe injuries happen when the ... the things you love — like running or playing football, field hockey, or softball — can be frustrating. If ...

  4. 7 CFR 51.3064 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... appearance is materially affected; (b) Pulled stems when the exposed stem cavity is excessively deep, or when skin surrounding the stem cavity is more than slightly torn; (c) Russeting or similar...

  5. 7 CFR 51.3064 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... appearance is materially affected; (b) Pulled stems when the exposed stem cavity is excessively deep, or when skin surrounding the stem cavity is more than slightly torn; (c) Russeting or similar...

  6. Enhancing Human Resource Capability in the Tanzania Peoples Defense Force (TPDF)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    undoubtedly one of Tanzania’s as well as Africa’s most valuable assets (Shauri, 1999). Wildlife is a source of government revenue from the tourism industry...the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union changed the strategic environment. Refugees from conflict torn areas, poaching, small arms...changed the strategic environment. Refugees from conflict torn areas, poaching, small arms proliferation, political and religious fundamentalism, drug

  7. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F.; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  8. Sonographic diagnosis of an acute Stener lesion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Ross; Welk, Aaron B; Battaglia, Patrick J; Scali, Frank; Nunez, Mero; Kettner, Norman W

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the use of diagnostic ultrasound to diagnose a Stener lesion in a patient who presented for conservative care of thumb pain following a fall on an outstretched hand. Conventional radiographic images demonstrated an avulsion fracture at the ulnar aspect of the base of the first proximal phalanx. Diagnostic ultrasound revealed a torn ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb that was displaced proximal to the adductor aponeurosis, consistent with a Stener lesion. Dynamic imaging with ultrasound confirmed displacement of the fully torn ligament. Surgical repair followed the diagnosis. Diagnostic ultrasound in this case provided an accurate diagnosis obviating further imaging. This allowed an optimal outcome due to early intervention.

  9. The Kore complex: on a woman's inheritance of her mother's failed Oedipus complex.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Hellerau, Cordelia

    2010-10-01

    The Greek myth of Kore/Persephone captures a particular psychopathology of women who are torn between a deadened and often asexual husband (Hades) and an ongoing close relationship with a caretaking mother (Demeter). Psychoanalytic work often reveals that these women live in the shadow of their mothers' failed oedipal complex. Their identificatory preoccupation with maternal object preservation disrupted or distorted their oedipal development, and ever since continues to serve as a defense against sexual strivings. Thus, these women are trapped in a Kore complex: as maiden caretakers, they remain attached to and torn between a "grain mother" and a grandfather transference object.

  10. Editorial Commentary: Ligamentum Teres Tears and Femoroacetabular Impingement: Complex Coexistence of Impingement and Instability.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    In a large Level IV case series of 2,213 hip arthroscopies with the diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement, the intraoperative status of the ligamentum teres (LT) was recorded as normal in 11%, frayed and/or partially torn in 88%, and completely torn in 1.5% of hips. Although specific physical examination maneuvers for detecting LT tears were not available early in the study period, thus limiting a detailed assessment of such tests, the authors identified that female gender, a lower lateral center edge angle, a higher Tonnis angle, and capsular laxity were all associated with complete LT tears. This study further supports the complex coexistence of impingement and instability.

  11. First reports of ectoparasites collected from wild-caught exotic reptiles in Florida.

    PubMed

    Corn, Joseph L; Mertins, James W; Hanson, Britta; Snow, Skip

    2011-01-01

    We collected ectoparasites from 27 of 51 wild-caught, free-ranging exotic reptiles examined in Florida from 2003 to 2008. Sampled animals represented eight species, five of which yielded ectoparasites. Reported new parasite distribution records for the United States include the following: the first collection of the African tick Amblyomma latum (Koch) from a wild-caught animal [ball python, Python regius (Shaw)] in the United States; the first collection of the lizard scale mite Hirstiella stamii (Jack) from any wild-caught animal [green iguana, Iguana iguana (L.)]; and the first collection of the lizard scale mite Geckobia hemidactyli (Lawrence) in the continental United States from a wild-caught tropical house gecko, Hemidactylus mabouia (Moreau de Jonnès). We also report the first collections of the Neotropical ticks Amblyomma rotundatum (Koch) and Amblyomma dissimile (Koch) from wild-caught Burmese pythons, Python molurus bivittatus (Kuhl); the first collections of A. dissimile from a wild-caught African savannah monitor, Varanus exanthematicus (Bosc); and from wild-caught green iguanas in the United States; and the first collections of the native chiggers Eutrombicula splendens (Ewing) and Eutrombicula cinnabaris (Ewing) from wild-caught Burmese pythons. These reports may only suggest the diversity of reptile ectoparasites introduced and established in Florida and the new host-parasite relationships that have developed among exotic and native ectoparasites and established exotic reptiles.

  12. Achieving Synergies through Generic Skills: A Strength of Online Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, Barnard; Brook, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Educators are often torn between impositions of the institution in which they work and the imperatives of their individual courses or units and the impact this tension might have on student satisfaction with the learning experience. It is common to hear that students must graduate with multiple generic attributes or skills, yet these skills may…

  13. From Cambodians to Bosnians: Interventions for Refugee Families Suffering from War Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Roger; Yuen, Francis K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Provides impressionistic reflection of how human service agencies in San Jose, California have helped refugee families from war-torn Cambodia and Bosnia. Summarizes some of the lessons learned from working with refugee families. Notes that the experiences have influenced the capacity- building, empowering, and mentoring aspects of a new…

  14. Active Learning Methods and Technology: Strategies for Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coorey, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The demands in higher education are on the rise. Charged with teaching more content, increased class sizes and engaging students, educators face numerous challenges. In design education, educators are often torn between the teaching of technology and the teaching of theory. Learning the formal concepts of hierarchy, contrast and space provide the…

  15. One-Shot Library Instruction and Cambourne's Theory of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masuchika, Glenn Norio; Boldt, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Librarians who teach one-shot library instruction classes (one-time, one- to three-hour classes to students who are assumed to be novice researchers) are often torn between two pedagogic approaches: a "critical mass" pedagogy emphasizing a minimum amount of databases that must be introduced with little time for student searching, and a…

  16. Prophetic Pragmatism? Post-Conflict Educational Development in Aceh and Mindanao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Jeffrey Ayala

    2009-01-01

    This essay critically examines the relevance of Cornel West's (1989) conception of "prophetic pragmatism" as a theoretical framework for educational development in post-conflict settings torn by religious, socioeconomic, and cultural tensions. It examines the concept through the conflict and post-conflict experiences of the Indonesian…

  17. Congo: Elections and the Battle for Mineral Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Twenty million voters cast ballots July 30, 2006, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo's first free election since 1960. A runoff election three months later, between transitional president Joseph Kabila and transitional vice president Jean-Pierre Bemba, gave Kabila a mandate to lead the war-torn nation for five more years. The elections, in…

  18. Pesticides detected in surface waters and fish of the Red River of the North drainage basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    Pesticide data have been collected in the Red River Basin by various Federal, State, and local agencies. Tornes and Brigham (1994) recently summarized many of these historical data. This paper summarizes selected data collected as part of the NAWQA program during 1992-93, and briefly compares these data to historical data and to pesticide usage.

  19. Looking at Racial Segregation: An Exploratory Case Study of a Predominately Somali Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, a group of concerned parents who had arrived in the United States as refugees from war-torn Somalia received approval from their local school district to establish the Iftin Charter School (ICS). The K-8 school continues to engender hope and intellectual strength in its students and parents. ICS finds itself uniquely equipped to meet the…

  20. Philosophical Anthropology and Educational Change: Wilhelm Von Humbolt and the Prussian Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Carla R.

    1973-01-01

    After the defeat by Napoleon, Prussia endeavored to rebuild its war torn country by instituting sweeping social and educational reforms. This effort marked one of the few instances in which philosophical anthropology formed the explicit basis of a successful program of social change. (Author/KM)

  1. Funny Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Presents a torn-paper and gadget-print activity for younger students, specifically pre-kindergarten to first grade, that can be done any time over the school year or at Halloween. Discusses how the students create their funny faces and lists the materials needed. (CMK)

  2. The Russian Federation Islamic Republic of Dagestan: Curricular Decentralization, Social Cohesion, and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Jana Sackman

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the curricular decentralization-sociopolitical stability nexus in the predominantly Muslim Russian Federation Republic of Dagestan, adjacent to war-torn Chechnya. Concomitant with the metamorphoses taking place in the economic and political sectors of society is the overhaul of institutionalized education. A major reform…

  3. The New Latin American Novel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Monegal, Emir

    1970-01-01

    Describes Latin American novelists as portraying the continent as torn by revolution and inflation, by anger and mounting expectations. Instead of denying the fictional qualities of this vision, the novelists transform this linguistic reality into the narrative itself. Only through fiction can the hidden realities of Latin American emerge. (DS)

  4. Conflicts between On-Task and Off-Task Behaviors in the Classroom: The Influences of Parental Monitoring, Peer Value Orientations, Students' Goals, and Their Value Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilian, Britta; Hofer, Manfred; Kuhnle, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Students in class are sometimes torn between following the lesson and engaging in off-task behavior. In this paper, instead of classifying it as a form of deviant behavior, off-task behavior is reconstructed as a manifestation of students multiple motivations in the classroom. The study examines whether parental monitoring, peer value…

  5. Black Bodies, White Rural Spaces: Disturbing Practices of Unbelonging for "Refugee" Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgeworth, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    In global times, when the forced migration of refugees from war-torn countries like Sudan impacts the demography of once ethnically homogenous schooling spaces, I consider the need to better understand the geographical making of racism. This article explores the lived experience of two newly arrived Sudanese students studying at a rural high…

  6. Preparing Pre-Service Teachers for Multicultural Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Premier, Jessica Aimee; Miller, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Cultural diversity is evident throughout schools in Victoria, Australia. Many students are new arrivals from war-torn countries including Sudan, Afghanistan and Iraq. To what extent do teacher training courses in Victoria prepare pre-service teachers to cater for the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students? This paper…

  7. Demanding Divestment from Sudan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asquith, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Bowing to student demands to "stop supporting genocide," the University of California regents voted earlier this year to divest millions of dollars from companies working in the war-torn African nation of Sudan, the first major public university in the nation to take such action. Since student protests on the subject began at Harvard…

  8. 40 CFR 63.1350 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... filter for air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition that may cause an increase in PM emissions; (ii) Sealing off defective bags or filter media; (iii) Replacing defective bags or filter media or otherwise repairing the control device; (iv) Sealing off a defective fabric...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1350 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... filter for air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition that may cause an increase in PM emissions; (ii) Sealing off defective bags or filter media; (iii) Replacing defective bags or filter media or otherwise repairing the control device; (iv) Sealing off a defective fabric...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1350 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Inspecting the fabric filter for air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition that may cause an increase in PM emissions; (ii) Sealing off defective bags or filter media; (iii) Replacing defective bags or filter media or otherwise repairing the control device; (iv) Sealing off...

  11. 18. View from East Rock, c. 1920 Photocopied from a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View from East Rock, c. 1920 Photocopied from a print from glass negative no. 6476 by Thomas S. Bronson, NHCHSL. An aerial view of the armory site evidently after the row of stone houses for married employees had been torn down. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  12. Falling into Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity that connects art, science, and nature in which elementary school students learn about deciduous trees. Explains that students create a torn-tissue collage, using fall colors for a background and drawing a silhouette of a tree without leaves on top of the background with black crayon. (CMK)

  13. Closure of cerebrospinal fluid leakage after transsphenoidal surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Freidberg, S R; Hybels, R L; Bohigian, R K

    1994-07-01

    It is necessary to pack the sella turcica to prevent the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid after transsphenoidal surgery if the arachnoid has been torn. The packing is usually supported by nasal cartilage. If this is not available, we recommend the Synthes minifragment plate to support the intradural pack.

  14. Life Situations and Lifestyles of Persons Who Attempt Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakinofsky, Isaac

    A Sample of 228 suicide attempters admitted in the emergency rooms of four general hospitals in an industrial city was studied as part of an ongoing follow-up investigation of the interaction of life situations and stresses and coping skills. Approximately 60% of the sample came from chaotic homes torn apart by family conflict. An assortative…

  15. An Overview of the History and Culture of Indochina. New Faces of Liberty Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, William

    Teachers who have classes with many Southeast Asian American students face the dual challenge of their own lack of knowledge about the cultural backgrounds of their students and of the students' often fragmentary understandings of their own war-torn cultures. This overview briefly describes the history and culture of Indochina to provide knowledge…

  16. Who Cares about One Blood in This Global Society? A Qualitative Study of South Korea's Reunification Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Yoo Jin

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examined South Korean teenagers' views on North Korea and possible reunification. In-depth interviews conducted with fourteen (14) South Korean high school students reported that these teenagers were torn about whether or not they should support reunification. While students acknowledged the lack of dialogue and discussion…

  17. Steal These Ideas! Winning Activities from Real Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several winning activities for students in the classroom. These activities include: (1) making Abraham Lincoln costumes; (2) creating frosty scenes from torn-paper collage for a grammar activity; (3) listening to Dr. Martin Luther King's "I have a Dream" speech; (4) hosting an architectural challenge for a kindergarten class;…

  18. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema

    Hubbard, Susan

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  19. A Role for English Language Teachers in Trauma Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medley, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Because English language teachers should take into account the social-psychological situation of the students they teach, they must be sensitive to the effects of traumatic stress among learners. Refugee and immigrant children are frequently survivors of trauma, along with their peers in crisis-torn English as a foreign language settings around…

  20. Humanizing the Data Processor and His Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Jim

    The modern educator works in a society threatened by several potential revolutions and torn by the conflict between the philosophies of materialism and humanism. In this situation the data processor has a unique opportunity to contribute to educational efficiency and to human harmony, provided he adopts certain premises and procedures. Regarding…

  1. Education in North Yemen: Problems and Hopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saif, Philip S.

    The background of the educational system in North Yemen is reviewed and some of the problems facing the system are described. The findings from examining documents and on-site visitations are summarized as follows: (1) the view is confirmed that developing countries with long history and cultural heritage are torn between keeping their traditions…

  2. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  3. Central American Refugees and U.S. High Schools. A Psychosocial Study of Motivation and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez-Orozco, Marcelo M.

    This ethnographic study documents and interprets key school, work, and family life issues in the lives and experiences of a sampling of recent immigrants from the war-torn Central American nations; and suggests a psychocultural theory of achievement motivation. Information was gathered from observation in two urban high schools, interviews with 50…

  4. A Developmental Model of Reading Acquisition Based upon Early Scaffolding Errors and Subsequent Vowel Inferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Robert; Stuart, Morag

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the processes that predict reading acquisition. Associations between (a) scaffolding errors (e.g., "torn" misread as "town" or "tarn"), other reading errors, and later reading and (b) vowel and rime inferences and later reading were explored. To assess both of these issues, 50 6-year-old children were shown a number of CVC…

  5. An American Montessori Teacher's Experience in Sri Lanka

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Irene

    2006-01-01

    What can Montessorians learn from teaching in a war-torn country, and what can they hope to share with others in the process? These questions were much on the author's mind when she went to Sri Lanka in the summer of 2003. This article contains excerpts from e-mails the author sent home, chronicling her experience teaching two high school English…

  6. Creative Expression Workshops for Immigrant and Refugee Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Cecile; Singh, Abha; Lacroix, Louise; Bagilishya, Deogratias; Measham, Toby

    2004-01-01

    The number of immigrant and refugee children coming from war-torn countries is increasing in North America. Over the past decades, creative expression activities have been increasingly recognized as a useful way to work with migrant and refugee children. These activities have been used to help them to construct meaning, to structure identity, and…

  7. Other Causes of Leg Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the same position for a long time Injuries caused by: A torn or overstretched muscle (strain) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon (tendinitis) Shin splints—pain in the front of your leg related to overuse or repetitive pounding Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , which occurs when ...

  8. Other Causes of Leg Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the same position for a long time Injuries caused by: A torn or overstretched muscle (strain) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon (tendinitis) Shin splints—pain in the front of your leg related to overuse or repetitive pounding Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , which occurs when ...

  9. Helping Immigrant and Refugee Students Succeed: It's Not Just What Happens in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugler, Eileen Gale; Price, Olga Acosta

    2009-01-01

    A child who seems disinterested may actually be depressed, living with parents who themselves are disengaged and depressed as they struggle to adjust. A student with violent outbursts, who might just appear undisciplined, can be reliving the emotion of a turbulent event in a war-torn country, experiencing a heightened "flight or fight" response.…

  10. Parents Can Guide Children through the World of Two Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasi, Mary Jane

    2005-01-01

    Many parents in the United States who speak and value a language other than English feel torn-between wanting their children to develop age-appropriate fluency and literacy in the language of their heritage, and wanting their children to acquire English as quickly and flawlessly as possible. When parents support communication in and acquisition of…

  11. 40 CFR 63.1350 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Inspecting the fabric filter for air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition that... Section 63.1350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National...

  12. [The induction of chondrogenesis after fracture repair].

    PubMed

    Coutelier, L; Delloye, C

    1983-01-01

    Various experimental models have been used in young rabbits to determine the conditions necessary to induce chondrogenesis in the inner layer of periosteum after injury. Chondrogenesis will always occur in the presence of a haematoma, torn periosteum and bone, but if one of these factors in missing such a response may not necessarily occur.

  13. 29 CFR 1910.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., shirts or blouses) not intended to function as protection against a hazard are not considered to be..., punctured, or when their ability to function as a barrier is compromised. (B) Disposable (single use) gloves..., peeling, torn, punctured, or exhibit other signs of deterioration or when their ability to function as...

  14. A Structuration Theory Analysis of the Refugee Action Support Program in Greater Western Sydney

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Loshini

    2009-01-01

    This article uses Gidden's structuration theory to analyse the Refugee Action Support program in Greater Western Sydney. The study shows that many refugee students in Australian high schools experience difficulty with academic transition in mainstream classrooms due to their previous experiences in war-torn countries. As a result of the trauma…

  15. Of people, particles and prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Penny; Greene, Anne; Mears, Matt; Spacecadet1; Green, Christian; Hunt, Devin J.; Berglyd Olsen, Veronica K.; Ilya, Komarov; Pierpont, Elaine; Gillman, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    In reply to Louise Mayor's feature article “Where people and particles collide”, about the experiences of researchers at CERN who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), efforts to make LGBT CERN an officially recognized club, and incidents where posters advertising the club have been torn down or defaced (March pp31-36, http://ow.ly/YVP2Z).

  16. Last Call

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    From the bleached blond hair with black tips to the intentionally torn clothes to the tattoo on her arm, Annie looked and acted like a rebel from the first day she set foot in the author's literature classroom. In this article, the author describes how the journal for literature class had been instrumental in finding out about Annie's life and how…

  17. Rotator Cuff Damage: Reexamining the Causes and Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1988-01-01

    Sports medicine specialists are beginning to reexamine the causes and treatments of rotator cuff problems, questioning the role of primary impingement in a deficient or torn cuff and trying new surgical procedures as alternatives to the traditional open acromioplasty. (Author/CB)

  18. Curls of My Dreams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art activity in which students draw ribbons (thin watercolor paper that, when torn, will stand up in a curling fashion). Explains in detail the assignment in which students used pencil rendering or charcoal pencil depending on the type of paper used for the assignment. (CMK)

  19. It's a Wrap! A Study of Installations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project for junior and senior high school students called the wrapped chair project where students wrapped chairs using torn sheets in the style of artists, Christo Javacheff and Jeanne-Claude de-Guillebon. Explains that students created thumbnail sketches and drew their finished drawing in either charcoal or chalk. (CMK)

  20. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  1. Neighborhood Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benin, Shirley

    1984-01-01

    Because of concern about the preservation of the historic character of Stamford (Connecticut), children in a pilot program at an elementary school learned about neighborhood history, sketched houses, researched houses which had been torn down and drew and constructed replicas of them, and learned about renovation and period interior design. (IS)

  2. A Community of Caring: Reaching Out to the Children of Kosovo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Reports on an educator's mission to examine the status of young children and early childhood education in war-torn Kosovo. Relates the story of a 10-year-old girl and her family during and after the hostilities. Describes relief efforts of Americans and American organizations, particularly Mercy Corps International, Children's Resources…

  3. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  4. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse

    SciTech Connect

    D. Egan

    2010-04-14

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  5. On Sensitivity Analysis within the 4DVAR Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    number of authors (e.g., Torn andHakim 2009; Zack et al. 2010) in application to the ensemble methods that keep the ensemble size fixed in the process of...Hydrological Applica- tions, S. K. Park and L. Xu, Eds., Vol. 2, Springer, 177–203. Zack , J., E. Natenberg, S. Young, G. V. Knowe, K. Waight

  6. 7 CFR 51.2657 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2657 Serious damage. Serious damage means any... healed; (d) Cracks which are not well healed; and, (e) Pulled stems with skin or flesh of cherry torn or which causes the cherry to leak. [36 FR 8502, May 5, 1971; 36 FR 9061, May 19, 1971. Redesignated at...

  7. The War in Man; Media and Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsen, Frederick D.; Bret, Jane

    The authors present a picture of contemporary man torn by conflicting forces, caught in a psychic house divided against itself, a victim of war between media and machines. Machines, they state, represent the rationalistic tradition which has brought man to the brink of psychic and social disaster. The media they see as offering hope--true…

  8. 40 CFR 63.1657 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... equipped with an alarm system that will sound when an increase in relative particulate loadings is detected... plan must include procedures used to determine the cause of an alarm or other indications of problems... baghouse for air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition that may cause...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1547 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alarm system that will sound when an increase in relative particulate loading is detected over a preset... be used to determine the cause of an alarm, as well as actions to be taken to minimize emissions..., torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition that may cause an increase in emissions....

  10. Children, Education and War: Reaching Education for All (EFA) Objectives in Countries Affected by Conflict. Conflict Prevention and Reconstruction Unit Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Marc

    Conflict's path of devastation and chaos has dramatically slowed the ability of war-torn countries to reach the Education for All (EFA) goals adopted in Dakar (April 2000). This paper describes the situation confronting children, their families, and governments in conflict countries and describes the challenges of reaching universal primary…

  11. Hand-Me-Down Dreams: Integrating Family Perspectives into Career Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Mary H.

    Exploring family influences is particularly helpful for career counseling clients who are stuck pursuing goals they know they want; clients who feel torn between practical or realistic paths and their individual passions; clients who express guilt or fear about defying their family's or society's expectations; clients who perceive the barriers…

  12. Who Better to Employ the CAP Concept than Reconnaissance Units?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-07

    they are the most qualified, best equipped, and best fitted. 8 Robert B. Cialdini , ph.D...CSC 1996, Strategic Issues, pp 9- 20. Cialdini , Robert . B. Ph.D. Influence. New York: Quill, 1993, pp 167-208. Danner, Matthew, Captain...awareness. Being able to speak the language would allow cultural barriers to be torn down. According to Robert

  13. Somalia: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on Conoco which completed its second well and prepared to drill a third on three blocks. Pecten and Mobil signed a joint venture agreement to explore a 14.9-million-ac block offshore. Most drilling plans were delayed following intensification of fighting in the civil war-torn country.

  14. Smashing Cosmopolitanism: The Neo-Liberal Destruction of Cosmopolitan Education in East-Central Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imre, Robert J.; Millei, Zsuzsa

    2009-01-01

    Critiques that seek to examine cosmopolitanism as a concept suffer from a severe popularity problem. Rather than engage in this pro/con debate, we are interested in demonstrating that cosmopolitanism can wax and wane, ebb and flow, and has appeared as a grounding ideology for educational programs before, only to be torn asunder by those seeking to…

  15. Balfour's Mission to Palestine: Science, Strategy, and the Inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macleod, Roy

    2008-01-01

    In 1925, A.J. Balfour, first Earl Balfour and author of the famous "Balfour Declaration", attended the inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. His education and experience of foreign policy equipped him to take a prominent role. However, the conditions of strife-torn Palestine weighed heavily upon him, and raised wider…

  16. Electrocardiogram, heart movement and heart rate in the awake gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia).

    PubMed

    Germer, Carina M; Tomaz, Juliana M; Carvalho, Ana F; Bassani, Rosana A; Bassani, José W M

    2015-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is the simplest and most effective non-invasive method to assess the electrical activity of the heart and to obtain information on the heart rate (HR) and rhythm. Because information on the HR of very small reptiles (body mass <10 g) is still scarce in the literature, in the present work we describe a procedure for recording the ECG in non-anesthetized geckos (Hemidactylus mabouia, Moreau de Jonnès, 1818) under different conditions, namely manual restraint (MR), spontaneous tonic immobility (TI), and in the non-restrained condition (NR). In the gecko ECG, the P, QRS and T waves were clearly distinguishable. The HR was 2.83 ± 0.02 Hz under MR, which was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than the HR under the TI (1.65 ± 0.09 Hz) and NR (1.60 ± 0.10 Hz) conditions. Spontaneously beating isolated gecko hearts contracted at 0.84 ± 0.03 Hz. The in vitro beating rate was affected in a concentration-dependent fashion by adrenoceptor stimulation with noradrenaline, as well as by the muscarinic cholinergic agonist carbachol, which produced significant positive and negative chronotropic effects, respectively (p < 0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first report on the ECG morphology and HR values in geckos, particularly under TI. The methodology and instrumentation developed here are useful for non-invasive in vivo physiological and pharmacological studies in small reptiles without the need of physical restraint or anesthesia.

  17. Anterior subluxation of the lateral tibial plateau. A new clinical test and the morbidity of this type of knee instability.

    PubMed

    Martens, M A; Mulier, J C

    1981-01-01

    A new clinical test is presented for the diagnosis of anterolateral knee instability. The advantages of the test are obviation of apprehension- and muscle spasm avoiding false negative results and also the recognition by the patient of his sensation of "collapsing at the knee". This allows for differentiation between "giving away" due to a torn meniscus alone and concomitant anterolateral knee instability. It implies important consequences for prognosis and treatment of the knee problem of the athlete. Underlying pathology consists of a torn anterior cruciate ligament and primary or secondary stretching of the soft tissues at the lateral and posterolateral capsule. These lesions and a positive test for anterolateral knee instability does not inevitably result in a disability for sports activity. The dynamic muscular control protects the knee in many instances from collapsing at cross over cutting.

  18. The potential for primary repair of the ACL

    PubMed Central

    Vavken, Patrick; Murray, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of successfully repairing the torn ACL. Two major motivators for developing a new treatment for ACL injuries are the recently reported high rates of osteoarthritis after conventional ACL reconstruction as well as the problem of how to safely treat skeletally immature patients. A key factor in developing such a technique was the identification of the main inhibitor of intrinsic ACL healing – the lack of clot formation between the two torn ends of the ligament. A bioactive and biocompatible scaffold which could be placed in the wound site to enhance cellular proliferation and biosynthesis was developed. This biomaterial has shown promising functional outcomes in several large animal models of primary repair of partial and complete ACL transection over 4 to 14 weeks, suggesting potential for a successful, future clinical application. PMID:21293237

  19. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  20. Reconstruction of recurrent diaphragmatic eventration with an elongated polytetrafluoroethylene sheet

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Masaki; Sonobe, Makoto; Bando, Toru; Date, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 31-year old woman with recurrence of left diaphragmatic eventration 3 years after a previous surgery for this condition. At the initial occurrence, she had experienced dyspnoea on exercise and subsequently underwent laparoscopic plication of the diaphragm with an endo-stapler at a local hospital. Immediately after the operation, the diaphragm was torn and the intestine entered the thorax. Therefore, plication involving sewing was performed. Then, 3 years later, the patient again experienced dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having recurrence of left diaphragmatic eventration. Observation under thoracoscopy revealed that the centre of the left diaphragm was thin but not torn. We reconstructed the left diaphragm with an elongated polytetrafluoroethylene sheet on the naïve diaphragm. The patient was discharged from our hospital 5 days after surgery. Her respiratory function improved and she has not experienced recurrence. PMID:23644727

  1. Pulmonary embolism caused by a carbon dioxide blower during off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Naoyuki; Kanaya, Noriaki; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Sonoda, Hajime; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2010-02-01

    We report a rare case of pulmonary embolism (PE) caused by a carbon dioxide (CO2) blower during off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). When the anastomosis of the right internal thoracic artery to left anterior descending artery was performed, the operator tore the right ventricle outflow track (RVOT) that was adjacent to the left anterior descending artery. Immediately after the anastomosis and repair of the torn RVOT with CO2 blower, the systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) increased from 28 to 64 mmHg, and end-tidal CO2 decreased from 32 to 12 mmHg. Because transesophageal echocardiograph (TEE) showed numerous gas bubbles in the main pulmonary artery, we diagnosed PE caused by invasion of CO2 gas bubbles via the torn RVOT. Although a CO2 blower is useful to enhance visualization of the anastomosis during OPCAB, it should not be used for the venous system because it may cause CO2 embolism.

  2. Reconstruction of recurrent diaphragmatic eventration with an elongated polytetrafluoroethylene sheet.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masaki; Sonobe, Makoto; Bando, Toru; Date, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    We report the case of a 31-year old woman with recurrence of left diaphragmatic eventration 3 years after a previous surgery for this condition. At the initial occurrence, she had experienced dyspnoea on exercise and subsequently underwent laparoscopic plication of the diaphragm with an endo-stapler at a local hospital. Immediately after the operation, the diaphragm was torn and the intestine entered the thorax. Therefore, plication involving sewing was performed. Then, 3 years later, the patient again experienced dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having recurrence of left diaphragmatic eventration. Observation under thoracoscopy revealed that the centre of the left diaphragm was thin but not torn. We reconstructed the left diaphragm with an elongated polytetrafluoroethylene sheet on the naïve diaphragm. The patient was discharged from our hospital 5 days after surgery. Her respiratory function improved and she has not experienced recurrence.

  3. The path of ambivalence: tracing the pull of opposing evaluations using mouse trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Iris K.; van Harreveld, Frenk; Rotteveel, Mark; Topolinski, Sascha; van der Pligt, Joop; Schwarz, Norbert; Koole, Sander L.

    2015-01-01

    Ambivalence refers to a psychological conflict between opposing evaluations, often experienced as being torn between alternatives. This dynamic aspect of ambivalence is hard to capture with outcome-focused measures, such as response times or self-report. To gain more insight into ambivalence as it unfolds, the current work uses an embodied measure of pull, drawing on research in dynamic systems. In three studies, using different materials, we tracked people’s mouse movements as they chose between negative and positive evaluations of attitude objects. When participants evaluated ambivalent attitude objects, their mouse trajectories showed more pull of the non-chosen evaluative option than when they evaluated univalent attitude objects, revealing that participants were literally torn between the two opposing evaluations. We address the relationship of this dynamic measure to response time and self-reports of ambivalence and discuss implications and avenues for future research. PMID:26236267

  4. Mitral valve plasty for mitral regurgitation after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, H; Hamanaka, Y; Hirai, S; Mitsui, N; Kobayashi, T

    2001-06-01

    A 21 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of chest and back pain after blunt chest trauma. On admission, consciousness was clear and a physical examination showed labored breathing. Her vital signs were stable, but her breathing gradually worsened, and artificial respiration was started. The chest roentgenogram and a subsequent chest computed tomographic scans revealed contusions, hemothorax of the left lung and multiple rib fractures. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed normal left ventricular wall motion and mild mitral regurgitation (MR). TTE was carried out repeatedly, and revealed gradually progressive MR and prolapse of the posterior medial leaflet, although there was no congestive heart failure. After her general condition had recovered, surgery was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed torn chordae at the posterior medial leaflet. The leaflet where the chorda was torn was cut and plicated, and posterior mitral annuloplasty was performed using a prosthetic ring. One month later following discharge, the MR had disappeared on TTE.

  5. Logistics in Motion: Supporting the March to the Rhine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    them across the Rhine to their occupation sector. (Photo courtesy of Alexander F. Barnes) July–August 2015 Army Sustainment54 It was cold. That...was nothing new, the corporal thought. It had been cold since late September, so this miserable weather was really just a continuation. What added...went. It didn’t help that the trucks and trac- tors from the Big Red One had torn up the roads while dragging their division artillery on this same

  6. Confusion about a little observatory: the history of the first high school observatory (German Title: Verwirrung um eine kleine Sternwarte: Die Geschichte der ersten Chemnitzer Schulsternwarte )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfitzner, Elvira

    By means of a small watercolor, painted by a musicologist, the existence of the highschool observatory of Chemnitz was rediscovered. The small observatory was build in 1893 by means of funds and a donation: after WW I it was also used for popular education. During Nazi times, the observatory fell into neglect, and the mechanical damage made it impossible to put it back into operation after WW II The building was torn down in 1964 and forgotten.

  7. Atlantic brant--human commensalism on eelgrass beds in New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, R.E.; Obrecht, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    Atlantic Brant Branta bernicla hrota in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey, have established a commensal feeding relationship with man. Small flocks feed 3-5 m from clam fishermen on Zostera torn from the sea bottom by the fishing activities. Background material on the availability and digestibility of different brant foods is presented. This commensalism gives the Brant an efficient food gathering opportunity and permits them to exploit Zostera which might otherwise be unavailable to them.

  8. Blowing DNA bubbles.

    PubMed

    Severin, N; Zhuang, W; Ecker, C; Kalachev, A A; Sokolov, I M; Rabe, J P

    2006-11-01

    We report here experimental observations which indicate that topologically or covalently formed polymer loops embedded in an ultrathin liquid film on a solid substrate can be "blown" into circular "bubbles" during scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging. In particular, supercoiled vector DNA has been unraveled, moved, stretched, and overstretched to two times its B-form length and then torn apart. We attribute the blowing of the DNA bubbles to the interaction of the tapping SFM tip with the ultrathin liquid film.

  9. Resistance of Coated and Uncoated IR Windows to Seawater Corrosion. Phase V. Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    competitive substrate materials, uncoated; single-layer AR coatings on germanium and zinc selenide; multiple-layer AR coatings on germanium; overcoatings on...testing) whose plastic coating has torn and peeled away from the substrate , leaving the substrate exposed to corrosion by seawater... 21 12. A coated...II examined two substrate materials (germanium and chalcogenide glass), and antifouling methods such as forced seawater circulation and electric

  10. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, Political Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-07

    disinformation has appeared in the West- ern press. Supposedly, the planetarium has been torn down, the building is abandoned, and the Orthodox...for Knowledge, must prepare a proposal to relocate the planetarium , the lecture hall, and the society’s other services. Do you already have an idea...how to do this? [Rubiks] Let us speak frankly, the problem that is posed is a difficult one. I think it may be possible to install the planetarium

  11. An emergency response team for membrane repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2005-01-01

    On demand, rapid Ca(2+)-triggered homotypic and exocytic membrane-fusion events are required to repair a torn plasma membrane, and we propose that this emergency-based fusion differs fundamentally from other rapid, triggered fusion reactions. Emergency fusion might use a specialized protein and organelle emergency response team that can simultaneously promote impromptu homotypic fusion events between organelles and exocytic fusion events along the vertices between these fusion products and the plasma membrane.

  12. Aortic insufficiency. A result of intermittent migration of aortic valve prosthesis poppet.

    PubMed

    Kunstadt, D; Adeyemo, A; Clauss, R H

    1976-06-28

    A bizarre mechanism of aortic valve incompetence was observed when the occluder of a Braunwald-Cutter aortic valve prosthesis decreased in diameter, volume, and weight, and from time to time fell into the left ventricle. The patient's symptoms were palpitation, coughing, chocking sensations, and fright. An operation disclosed a small, smooth ball with disrupted cloth on all the struts. The residual torn mesh was removed, and the ball was replaced.

  13. Isometric immersions, energy minimization and self-similar buckling in non-Euclidean elastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John; Sharon, Eran; Shearman, Toby; Venkataramani, Shankar C.

    2016-04-01

    The edges of torn plastic sheets and growing leaves often display hierarchical buckling patterns. We show that this complex morphology i) emerges even in zero strain configurations, and ii) is driven by a competition between the two principal curvatures, rather than between bending and stretching. We identify the key role of branch point (or “monkey saddle”) singularities in generating complex wrinkling patterns in isometric immersions, and show how they arise naturally from minimizing the elastic energy.

  14. Secrets of the Soil (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Eoin; Northen, Trent; Jansson, Janet; Torn, Margaret

    2011-11-07

    Four Berkeley Lab scientists unveil the "Secrets of the Soil"at this Nov. 7, 2011 Science at the Theater event. Eoin Brodie, Janet Jansson, Margaret Torn and Trent Northen talk about their research and how soil could hold the key to our climate and energy future.The discussion was moderated by John Harte, who holds a joint professorship in the Energy and Resources Group and the Ecosystem Sciences Division of UC Berkeley's College of Natural Resources

  15. Airman Scholar Journal. Volume 19, Fall 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    people think and act . The discus- sion that follows will consider how traditional Chinese culture, his- torical experiences, and national- ism have...and ethnic cleansing, if states in which those are occurring will not or cannot act .32 More impor- tantly, in late February of 2011, China voted...obstruction in the international community together with its emotional war-torn past may lead China to act irrationally. Japan has routinely expressed

  16. 2006 In Vitro Biology Meeting. Volume 42

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-25

    evaluations. Transcriptional activity of 13- transformations. Frequencies of soybean independent transgenic plant lipoxygenase (I 3LOX) a key regulatory enzyme...per explant from 41 production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide to 179% and the percentage of independent transgenic ... plant events per (HO.). Hydrogen peroxide generated in response to wounding can be de- explant from 28 to 94% in Lycopersicon esculentuor cv. MicroTorn

  17. An Empirical Study of Earth Covered Schools in Oklahoma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    Director, Defense Nuclear Agency Division of Biology and Medicine Attn: Mr. Torn Kenned- Atornic Energy Commission Washington, D. C. 20305 ^tt-: Mr...studies of underground structures in general and the Oklahoma schools in particular. Several were found. Limited measurement of the energy saving potential...suggests it is real, and significant; a sixty percent saving in energy was found to be likely without any specific effort at energy efficient design

  18. A User-Oriented Performance Index for Packet Switched Networks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    network type classification is [ Ref . 1] 1. Circuit-switched 2. Message-switched 3. Packet-switched 1. Circuit Switching In circuit switching, a "call" is...tech- niques used for over a century by telegraph and torn paper tape switching systems [ Ref . 2: p. 1307]. These techniques had traditionally used...was an eleven volume analysis written by Paul Baran of the RAND Corporation [ Ref . 3] in 1964. This report showed significant advantages in the use of

  19. China`s quest for security in the post cold war world. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.S.

    1996-07-29

    The author argues that despite all the estimates that the post-Tiananmen People`s Republic of China is about to take the stage as a world power, the reality is far different. He believes that China, in fact, is a weak nation torn by internal economic and environmental problems. The author asserts that its communist leadership is desperately trying to put the democracy genie back in its bottle even while supporting a Leninist-capitalist economic approach which, ultimately, cannot succeed.

  20. Precambrian crustal evolution in relation to geodynamics and supercontinents: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, Tamer S.; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    More than a century ago, Alfred Wegener explored the origin of continents in his work: "Die Entstehung der Kontinente" (Wegener, 1912, 1915) which provided the core idea of plate tectonics. However, significantly before this work, the idea of "continental drift" was hypothesized by Abraham Ortelius in 1596 with the suggestion that the Americas were torn away from Europe and Africa by earthquakes and floods, and that these continents were once united.

  1. White ring sign for uneventful lenticule separation in small-incision lenticule extraction.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Soosan; Nariani, Ashiyana; Figus, Michele; Agarwal, Amar; Agarwal, Athiya

    2016-09-01

    We describe the white ring sign, which differentiates the posterior and anterior lenticular planes in small-incision lenticule extraction. The sign identifies the plane of dissection by the anteroposterior relationship between the dissecting instrument and the circular white light reflected from the lenticular side cut. Differentiating the planes enables the surgeon to dissect the anterior plane before the posterior plane, which facilitates smooth lenticule extraction and prevents complications such as cap tears, partial lenticule dissection, and a torn lenticule.

  2. Models and Analogues for the Evaluation of Human Biodynamic Response, Performance and Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    the scapula or by hyper- abduction of the arm. From this review, it Is apparent that the severe upper extremity injuries were proximal involving the...anterior calcanel facet caused by external rotation of the foot. (2) Medial malleolar fracture caused by external rotation and eversion of the foot. (3 & 4...knee, a nebulous diagnosis but usually a torn meniscus, anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament or capsule, subsequently diagnosed as a

  3. Light-trails: an optical solution for IP transport [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumaste, Ashwin; Chlamtac, Imrich

    2004-05-01

    We present a solution for IP-centric communication at the optical layer through a combination of a hardware platform and algorithmic implementation. The presented approach, termed light-trails, is shown to yield a reconfigurable networking platform in which optical connections of arbitrary duration can be established and torn down flexibly in negligible time, accommodating the dynamic traffic requirements of the IP world. The hardware platform and protocol are evaluated with tractable mathematical models validated through detailed simulation.

  4. SU-E-T-462: Impact of the Radiochromic Film Energy Response On Dose Measurements of Low Energy Electronic Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, L; Bekerat, H; Tomic, N; DeBlois, F; Devic, S; Morcos, M; Popovic, M; Watson, P; Seuntjens, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We investigated the effect of the EBT3 GafChromicTM film model absorbed dose energy response when used for percent depth dose (PDD) measurements in low-energy photon beams. Methods: We measured PDDs in water from a Xoft 50 kVp source using EBT3 film, and compared them to PDD measurements acquired with a PTW-TN34013 parallel-plate ionization chamber. For the x-ray source, we simulated spectra using the EGSnrc (BEAMnrc) Monte Carlo code, and calculated Half Value Layer (HVL) at different distances from the source in water. Pieces of EBT3 film were irradiated in air and calibration curves were created in terms of air-kerma in air ((Kair)air) for different beam qualities. Pieces of EBT3 film were positioned at distances of 2–6 cm from the Xoft source in a water phantom using a custom-made holder, and irradiated at the same time. As scatter is incorporated in the measured film signal in water, measured (Kair)wat was subsequently converted into absorbed dose to water by the ratio of mass energy absorption coefficients following the AAPM TG-61 dosimetry protocol. Results: Our results show that film calibration curves obtained at beam qualities near the effective energy of the Xoft 50 kVp source in water lead to variation in absorbed dose energy dependence of the response of around 3%. However, if the calibration curve was established at MV beam quality, the error in absorbed dose could be as large as 15%. We observed agreement within 1% between PDD measurements using EBT3 film model (using a calibration curve obtained at 80 kVp, HVL=2.18 mm Al, Eeff=29.5 keV) and the parallel-plate ionization chamber. Conclusion: Accurate dose measurements using radiochromic films at low photon energies require that the radiochromic film dosimetry system be calibrated at corresponding low energies, as large absorbed dose errors are expected for calibrations performed at MV beam qualities.

  5. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke A.; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality. PMID:27113125

  6. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke A.; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  7. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke; Korhonen, Johanna; Yasuyuki Aono,

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  8. What's under the long line of heavy rocks? Waves can tell us. (Seismic tomography of the lithosphere below the Midcontinent Rift)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolin, E.

    2015-12-01

    A long long time ago, the middle of my home land started to tear. But it didn't tear all the way, and actually the torn part ended up getting pushed back together. This left a long line of heavy rocks in the top part of the ground. We don't know why the tearing stopped instead of forming a new big water place in the middle of the land. We also didn't know know if the deeper ground still looked like it was torn too, because we couldn't see it very well. We hoped by looking at the deep ground, we could figure out why the tearing stopped. I make pictures of the deep under ground places using waves that are made when the ground breaks quickly. I look at waves that go through the torn area and try to match them. I match the real waves by making my own pretend waves and changing how fast they move through the ground. After I match a lot of waves, I put them all together to make a picture that shows what's deep under ground.

  9. Grain refinement to improve impact toughness in 9Cr-1Mo steel through a double austenitization treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, T.; Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Moitra, A.; Sasikala, G.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation where an enhancement in Charpy impact toughness and decrease in DBTT was obtained through grain refinement in 9Cr-1Mo steel. The steel in the normalized and tempered condition (1323 K/air cool + 1023 K/2 h/air cool) had an average prior-austenite grain size of 26 μm. By designing a two-stage normalizing (1323 K/2 h/water quench + 1223 K/2 h/air cool) and tempering treatment (1023 K/2 h/air cool), a homogeneous tempered martensite microstructure with a lesser prior-austenite grain size of 12 μm could be obtained. An improvement trend in impact properties of standard sized Charpy specimens was obtained in fine-grained steel: upper shelf energy increased from 175 J to 210 J, and DBTT reduced from 243 K to 228 K. This heat treatment is unique since an attempt to carry out a single-stage low temperature normalizing treatment (1223 K/2 h/air cool) did not give a complete martensite structure, due to the incomplete dissolution of carbides during austenitization.

  10. Novel Functional Properties of Drosophila CNS Glutamate Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Dharkar, Poorva; Han, Tae-Hee; Serpe, Mihaela; Lee, Chi-Hon; Mayer, Mark L.

    2016-12-01

    Phylogenetic analysis reveals AMPA, kainate, and NMDA receptor families in insect genomes, suggesting conserved functional properties corresponding to their vertebrate counterparts. However, heterologous expression of the Drosophila kainate receptor DKaiR1D and the AMPA receptor DGluR1A revealed novel ligand selectivity at odds with the classification used for vertebrate glutamate receptor ion channels (iGluRs). DKaiR1D forms a rapidly activating and desensitizing receptor that is inhibited by both NMDA and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5; crystallization of the KaiR1D ligand-binding domain reveals that these ligands stabilize open cleft conformations, explaining their action as antagonists. Surprisingly, the AMPA receptor DGluR1A shows weak activation by its namesake agonist AMPA and also by quisqualate. Crystallization of the DGluR1A ligand-binding domain reveals amino acid exchanges that interfere with binding of these ligands. The unexpected ligand-binding profiles of insect iGluRs allows classical tools to be used in novel approaches for the study of synaptic regulation.

  11. Pen Rearing and Imprinting of Fall Chinook Salmon, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Jerry F.; Macy, Thomas L.; Gardenier, James T.; Beeman, John W.

    1986-12-01

    Pen rearing studies during 1986 completed the second of three years intended for rearing and releasing upriver bright fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from two study sites, a backwater and a pond, adjacent to the Columbia River; both areas are located in the Jonn Day Reservoir. Results of this study in 1984 and 1985 showed that fish could be successfully reared in net pens and that growth and physiological development of the off-station reared fish proceeded at a faster rate than in fish reared at a hatchery. Transfer of fish from the hatchery to off-station sites at Social Security Pond (pond) and Rock Creek (backwater) during early March increased the period of rearing in 1986 by about four weeks. The increased period of rearing allowed all treatments of fed fish to reach a minimum weight of YU fish/lb by release. Differences in growth of fed fish between regular density treatments and additional, high density treatments (double and triple the regular densities) were not significantly different (P > 0.05), but growth of all fed fish reared off-station was again significantly better than that of hatchery reared fish (P < 0.05), Mortalities in all groups of fed fish were low. Physiological development of fed fish was similar in all treatments. At release, development of fish at Social Security Pond appeared to be somewhat ahead of fish at Rock Creek on the same dates however, none of the groups of fed fish achieved a high state of smoltification by release. Unfed fish grew poorly over the redring period, and at release were significantly smaller than either fed groups at the off-station sites, or the control groups reared at the hatchery (P < 0.05). Development of unfed fish toward smoltification was much slower than of fed fish. Mortality of all groups of unfed fish, including the barrier net, was relatively low. Health of all fish reared off-station remained good over the rearing period, and no outbreaks of disease were noted. On-site marking and

  12. From the Underground to the High Ground: The Insurgent Use of Airpower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-16

    6 Brothers to the Rescue ( Hermanos al Rescate)………….………………………………….9 Hezbollah………………………….………………………………………………………12...war-torn country. Brothers to the Rescue ( Hermanos al Rescate) Many may contest the classification of Brothers to the Rescue (BTTR) as an

  13. Thermocouple tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A thermocouple which may be rolled as a tape until needed and a method of making it are described. Thermoelectrically different metals are applied to a strip of electrically nonconductive material in longitudinally overlapping relationship. Apertures may be provided along the tape in overlapping region at predetermined intervals. An adhesive material is applied to the side of the tape opposite the thermoelectric metals either before or after the thermoelectric metals are deposited. The tape may be cut or torn to form a thermocouple device which is ready for application to a body whose temperature is to be monitored or measured.

  14. Partial necrosis of the lunate after a translunate palmar perilunate fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Akane, Mao; Tatebe, Masahiro; Iyoda, Kazuhito; Ota, Kyotaro; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Michiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2014-02-01

    We present an extreme rare case of traumatic partial avascular necrosis of the lunate after palmar perilunate dislocation with lunate fracture. A 32-year-old female was injured by motorcycle accident with palmar perilunate fracture dislocation and lunate fracture. Scapholunate and lunotriquetrum dislocations were reduced and fixed temporarily. The torn dorsal ligament was repaired. Considering close observation with both arthroscopy and fluoroscopy, we decided not to conduct open reduction and internal fixation for the lunate. Partial avascular necrosis of the lunate appeared gradually in follow-up.

  15. PARTIAL NECROSIS OF THE LUNATE AFTER A TRANSLUNATE PALMAR PERILUNATE FRACTURE DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    AKANE, MAO; TATEBE, MASAHIRO; IYODA, KAZUHITO; OTA, KYOTARO; IWATSUKI, KATSUYUKI; YAMAMOTO, MICHIRO; HIRATA, HITOSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present an extreme rare case of traumatic partial avascular necrosis of the lunate after palmar perilunate dislocation with lunate fracture. A 32-year-old female was injured by motorcycle accident with palmar perilunate fracture dislocation and lunate fracture. Scapholunate and lunotriquetrum dislocations were reduced and fixed temporarily. The torn dorsal ligament was repaired. Considering close observation with both arthroscopy and fluoroscopy, we decided not to conduct open reduction and internal fixation for the lunate. Partial avascular necrosis of the lunate appeared gradually in follow-up. PMID:25130008

  16. An Information Processing Approach to the Study of Data Entry Skills: The Effects of Representation Rules and Coordination Requirements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    for a discussion of the general approach; and Karis, Fabiani , & Donchin, 1984, for an illustration of an empirical test of a prediction regarding an...1973. Kantowitz, B.H. & Knight, J.L. On experimenter limited processes. Psychological Review, 1976, 83, 502-507. S * 71 Karis, D., Fabiani , M., & Donchin...Proceedings of the 21st Arnual Meeting of the Human Factors Society, Santa Monica , CTiTornTa,19T;7. I • i ,. . . , ;i _ L jl i ~73 Wickens, C.D., & Kessel

  17. A new day: Challenger and space flight thereafter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonputtkamer, Jesco

    1986-01-01

    On January 28, 1986, at an altitude of 14 kilometers, the Space Shuttle Challenger was torn apart by an explosion of the external tank. The effects of the accident are undoubtedly far-reaching; they have broad repercussions that affect NASA's international partner organizations. The effects of the postponed shuttle flights on European space programs are discussed. A review of the German participation in the American space program is presented. The need to continue the future projects such as the space station is examined in light of its importance as a springboard for further exploration.

  18. Person-Locator System Based On Wristband Radio Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick W.; Blaes, Brent R.; Chandler, Charles W.

    1995-01-01

    Computerized system based on wristband radio frequency (RF), passive transponders is being developed for use in real-time tracking of individuals in custodial institutions like prisons and mental hospitals. Includes monitoring system that contains central computer connected to low-power, high-frequency central transceiver. Transceiver connected to miniature transceiver nodes mounted unobtrusively at known locations throughout the institution. Wristband transponders embedded in common hospital wristbands. Wristbands tamperproof: each contains embedded wire loop which, when broken or torn off and discarded, causes wristband to disappear from system, thus causing alarm. Individuals could be located in a timely fashion at relatively low cost.

  19. Lateral sided snapping elbow caused by a meniscus: two case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shin-Taek; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Lateral sided snapping elbow is an unusual condition, and it is apt to be misdiagnosed as lateral epicondylitis. The causes of lateral sided snapping elbow have been attributed to intraarticular loose bodies, instability, synovial plicae and torn annular ligament. We report our experiences for treating lateral sided snapping elbow caused by a meniscus in the radio-humeral joint. In the present cases, the cause of snapping was detected using double contrast arthrogram under fluoroscopic control, and histology revealed that it was a meniscus. Complete removal of the meniscus allowed immediate relief of the symptom, and there was no recurrence in both cases.

  20. Realtors granted exemption for nondisclosure of AIDS.

    PubMed

    1998-05-15

    Idaho enacted legislation protecting real estate agents in situations where they are asked to violate an HIV patient's privacy. Would-be buyers often ask for a psychological impact statement, including whether the home has been a crime site or whether the owners have HIV, about a property in which they are interested. Senate Bill 1313 has guidelines for realtors, who in the past were torn between disclosure and privacy. If buyers request the information in writing, the agent must ask for the owner's consent to release the information. The buyers must be told if the owner declines. The law shields realtors from legal liability once the requirements are met.

  1. The Tunguska comet or the great Siberian mystery explosion of 1908

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1986-01-01

    The boat disintegrates, hurling men and animals into the freezing river. The farmer's shirt is scorched off his back; the tramp is blown off his feet, his ports and pans scattering like shrapnel. One of the trappers standing in the doorway of the trading post is knocked unconscious, overcome by the searing heat; the tents of the nomads are torn loose, the men and dogs inside being rolled over the ground like leaves in a gale. All that remain of the reindeer are charred carcasses. The forest has been turning into a crackling inferno, and a black fireball rises into the air. 

  2. The Importance of the Intercondylar Notch in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Jaén, Tomás; López-Alcorocho, Juan Manuel; Rodriguez-Iñigo, Elena; Castellán, Fabián; Hernández, Juan Carlos; Guillén-García, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background The factors associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are not completely clear. Some studies have shown that patients with a narrow intercondylar notch have a predisposition for ACL tears. Purpose To determine the relationship between the α angle and intercondylar notch width measurements and ACL tears. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A total of 530 patients (308 with ACL rupture, 222 with healthy ACLs) were included in this study. The α angle and intercondylar width were measured from magnetic resonance images (MRIs). Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the influence of the variables on ACL status (normal or torn). Odds ratios (ORs) and their respective 95% CIs were also calculated. Results No significant differences in patient age and the affected knee were found between patients with normal or torn ACLs. The mean α angle was higher in patients with a torn ACL than in those with an intact one (57.5° ± 5.5° vs 56.2° ± 4.5°; P = .009). Intercondylar width was significantly lower in patients with a torn ACL than in those with an intact one (18.2 ± 3.1 vs 19.5 ± 3.6 mm; P < .001). A highly significant difference between men and women was found for mean intercondylar notch width (19.3 ± 3.3 vs 17.4 ± 3.1 mm; P < .001). In a logistic regression model, sex, intercondylar width, and α angle were statistically significant when adjusted for age. Conclusion Study results suggest that the ACL tears are associated with a narrow intercondylar notch and a high α angle, and that tears occur more frequently in men than in women. Clinical Relevance The model proposed in this study could be used by the physician in the medical office as a tool to identify the risk factors that may predispose a patient for a potential ACL tear. PMID:26535388

  3. Application of X-ray Refraction-Contrast to Medical Joint Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shimao, Daisuke; Mori, Koichi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Ando, Masami

    2004-05-12

    The refraction-contrast X-ray imaging technique using synchrotron X-ray has been applied to an 8 mm sliced distal end of a human femur involving ligament and articular cartilage at 15 keV. It was shown that this technique can clearly depict the fine structures of the ligament, its torn surface and substantial articular cartilage at near the just Bragg angular position. The entrance surface dose necessary for each image was approximately 4 mGy by using an imaging plate. This imaging technique may become a powerful tool for depicting abnormalities of the ligament and articular cartilage.

  4. Intra-abdominal bleeding in appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, C; Pasa-Arj, S

    1991-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman, gravida 6 with 10 weeks of gestation was admitted because of abdominal pain and fainting. On physical examination she had hypotension, was pale with abdominal tenderness and guarding. Culdocentesis yielded unclotted blood. Immediate laparotomy was performed, because a diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy was made. About 2,500 ml of fresh blood was found in the abdominal cavity. Appendicular artery tear caused active arterial bleeding. The torn appendicular artery was observed to be the consequence of perforated appendicitis, which, in turn, was caused by a faecalith. Appendectomy was performed and she made a good recovery.

  5. Fatigue 󈨛. Volume 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Figure 5 appears to be composed of fibrils or crazes which have been torn in the fracture process. There is little of this rough fibrous material on the...their work on the role of crazes in the fatigue of polycarbonate. They suggested that the smooth area evident at the edge of an untreated sample is a...remnant of a single craze which first formed during cyclic loading at a point of high local surface stress. Under cyclic loading, this craze grew, as

  6. The sliding stop: a technique of fielding in cricket with a potential for serious knee injury.

    PubMed

    Von Hagen, K; Roach, R; Summers, B

    2000-10-01

    The sliding stop method of fielding in cricket is gaining popularity in schools and club cricket through its frequent exposure on television. The case history is reported of a cricketer who suffered a torn medial meniscus in his knee, a rare cricketing injury, while performing this technique incorrectly in a club game. The correct method of performing the technique is described in coaching manuals but is not commonly instructed at club or school level. The sliding stop should be discouraged in school and for club cricketers unless appropriately coached.

  7. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx.

  8. Clinical implementation of a scrubless chlorhexidine/ethanol pre-operative surgical hand rub.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Richard; Theoret, Sylvie; Dion, Danielle; Pellerin, Michel

    2008-06-01

    The objective of surgical scrubbing is to reduce the bioburden on the hands of the surgical team in hope that if gloves are punctured or torn, the number of bacteria released at the operation site will be minimal and therefore reduce the risk of site infection. Long procedures with scrubbing and soaping can, however, be counterproductive because with repetition they tend to cause skin abrasions, damages and injuries without further reducing the risk of bacterial release. Within a general review of OR processes, it was decided to substitute to the standard surgical scrub a "new" scrubless pre-op surgical hand rub procedure. This article summarizes the results.

  9. Kurdistan Region, Asia as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Lake Urmia (Orumiyeh) in the high desert palteau of northwest Iran dominates the center of the northeast-looking view. The left edge of the view cuts Lake Van in eastern Turkey. The Caucasus mountains in war-torn Georgia appear just beyond. Mount Ararat is a major peak north of Lake Van. The Caspian Sea, an international body of water, stretches across the top right of the view. Countries bordering the Caspian are Iran in the south, Kazakhstan in the west, and Russia and Azerbaijan in the west. The shuttle stabilizer, OMS pods and open payload bay can also be seen just above the horizon.

  10. MMPI performance of central American refugees and Mexican immigrants.

    PubMed

    Clark, S; Callahan, W J; Lichtszajn, J; Velasquez, R J

    1996-12-01

    This study compared the MMPI scores of Central American refugees from Guatemala and El Salvador to those of Mexican immigrants. It was expected that subjects from Guatemala and El Salvador would obtain higher scores on the F, D, Pa, and Sc scales because these subjects came from "war-torn" countries. A multivariate analysis of variance yielded no significant differences between the three groups on any of the validity and clinical scales including F, D, Pa, and Sc. Recommendations for cross-national research are noted especially in light of the new version, or MMPI-2.

  11. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma for photons using a male adult voxel simulator in sitting and standing posture with geometry of irradiation antero-posterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Cavalcante, F. R.; Carvalho, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    The dose conversion coefficient (DCC) is important to quantify and assess effective doses associated with medical, professional and public exposures. The calculation of DCCs using anthropomorphic simulators and radiation transport codes is justified since in-vivo measurement of effective dose is extremely difficult and not practical for occupational dosimetry. DCCs have been published by the ICRP using simulators in a standing posture, which is not always applicable to all exposure scenarios, providing an inaccurate dose estimation. The aim of this work was to calculate DCCs for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H/Kair) using the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code and the VOXTISS8 adult male voxel simulator in sitting and standing postures. In both postures, the simulator was irradiated by a plane source of monoenergetic photons in antero-posterior (AP) geometry. The photon energy ranged from 15 keV to 2 MeV. The DCCs for both postures were compared and the DCCs for the standing simulator were higher. For certain organs, the difference of DCCs were more significant, as in gonads (48% higher), bladder (16% higher) and colon (11% higher). As these organs are positioned in the abdominal region, the posture of the anthropomorphic simulator modifies the form in which the radiation is transported and how the energy is deposited. It was also noted that the average percentage difference of conversion coefficients was 33% for the bone marrow, 11% for the skin, 13% for the bone surface and 31% for the muscle. For other organs, the percentage difference of the DCCs for both postures was not relevant (less than 5%) due to no anatomical changes in the organs of the head, chest and upper abdomen. We can conclude that is important to obtain DCCs using different postures from those present in the scientific literature.

  12. The effect of a compression paddle on energy response, calibration and measurement with mammographic dosimeters using ionization chambers and solid-state detectors.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, C J; Boziari, A; Koumbouli, E

    2009-02-21

    A compression paddle is always used in mammography x-ray examinations, in order to improve image quality and reduce patient doses. Although clinical dose measurements should be performed with the paddle to interfere with the x-ray beam, calibration of mammography dosimeters is performed free in air without the presence of the paddle. The paddle hardens the x-ray beam, which has an impact on a dosimeter performance, particularly on high-energy-dependent detectors. Due to the paddle, clinical mammography x-ray systems may exhibit beams with HVL values exceeding those of the IEC 61267 RQR-M series qualities at which dosimeters are usually calibrated. In this study, the influence of the paddle in mammography dosimetry is examined, in Mo/Mo anode/filter x-ray qualities. PMMA slabs of 1, 2 and 3 mm thickness and Al foils of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 mm thicknesses were used to simulate the paddles, producing beams with HVL values from 0.28 up to 0.43 mmAl. In these qualities, four solid-state (ST) detectors and three ionizations chambers (IC) were calibrated in terms of Kair and N(K) and k(Q) were deduced. The results showed that all IC and two modern-type ST dosimeters have a flat energy response in the above HVL range (less than 3%), so their calibration factor at RQR-M2 quality could be safely used for clinical measurements. Two other ST dosimeters exhibit up to 20% energy response, so differences up to 15% in dose measurement may be observed if the effect of paddle on their performance is ignored. Finally, the need of additional mammographic calibration qualities to the existing IEC 61267 RQR-M series is examined and discussed.

  13. Environmental toxicological fate prediction of diverse organic chemicals based on steady-state compartmental chemical mass ratio using quantitative structure-fate relationship (QSFR) models.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Subrata; Roy, Kunal

    2013-07-01

    Four quantitative prediction models for steady-state compartmental chemical mass concentrations (Wn,g) were obtained from structural information, physiochemical properties, degradation rate and transport coefficients of 455 diverse organic chemicals using chemometric tools in a quantitative structure-fate relationship (QSFR) study. The mass ratio assessment of environmentally prevalent organic chemicals may be helpful to predict their toxicological fate in the ecosystems. Four sets of mass ratios [(1) log(Wair) from water emissions (water to air compartment), (2) log(Wair) from air emissions (within different zones of the air compartment), (3) log(Wwater) from water emissions (within different zones of the water compartment) and (4) log(Wwater) from air emissions (air to water compartment)] have been used. The developed models using genetic function approximation followed by multiple linear regression (GFA-MLR) and subsequent partial least squares (PLS) treatment identify only four descriptors for log(Wair) from water emission, six descriptors for log(Wair) from air emission, five descriptors for log(Wwater) from water emission and seven descriptors for log(Wwater) from air emission for predicting efficiently a large number of test set chemicals (ntest=182). The conclusive models suggest that descriptors such as partition coefficients (Kaw, Kow and Ksw), degradation parameters (Ksoil,Kwater and Kair), vapor pressure (Pv), diffusivity (Dwater), spatial descriptors (Jurs-WNSA-1, Jurs-WNSA-2, Jurs-WPSA-3, Jurs-FNSA-3 and Density), thermodynamic descriptors (MolRef and AlogP98), electrotopological state indices (S_dsN, S_ssNH and S_dsCH) are important for predicting the chemical mass ratios. The developed models may be applicable in toxicological fate prediction of diverse chemicals in the ecosystems.

  14. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma using a sitting and standing female adult voxel simulators exposure to photons in antero-posterior irradiation geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. R.; Galeano, D. C.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Due to the difficulty in implementing invasive techniques for calculations of dose for some exposure scenarios, computational simulators have been created to represent as realistically as possible the structures of the human body and through radiation transport simulations to obtain conversion coefficients (CCs) to estimate dose. In most published papers simulators are implemented in the standing posture and this may not describe a real scenario of exposure. In this work we developed exposure scenarios in the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code using a female simulator in standing and sitting postures. The simulator was irradiated in the antero-posterior (AP) geometry by a plane source of monoenergetic photons with energy from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (HT/Kair) were calculated for both scenarios and compared. The results show that the percentage difference of CCs for the organs of the head and thorax was not significant (less than 5%) since the anatomic position of the organs is the same in both postures. The percentage difference is more significant to the ovaries (71% for photon energy of 20 keV), to the bladder (39% at 60 keV) and to the uterus (37% at 100 keV) due to different processes of radiation interactions in the legs of the simulator when its posture is changed. For organs and tissues that are distributed throughout the entire body, such as bone (21% at 100 keV) and muscle (30% at 80 keV) the percentage difference of CCs reflects a reduction of interaction of photons with the legs of the simulator. Therefore, the calculation of conversion coefficients using simulators in the sitting posture is relevant for a more accurate dose estimation in real exposures to radiation.

  15. The response of supraalveolar gingival collagen to orthodontic rotation movement in dogs.

    PubMed

    Redlich, M; Rahamim, E; Gaft, A; Shoshan, S

    1996-09-01

    An orthodontically rotated tooth relapses toward its pretreatment position. Explanations for this phenomenon have been given after light microscopic studies, according to which it had been assumed that stretched supraalveolar gingival fibers pulled back the tooth and brought about relaxation of the stretched fibers. The rotational relapse, however, can be prevented by supraalveolar fiberotomy of the gingiva around the tooth. This investigation was initiated to reevaluate the validity of the hitherto assumed causes for the relapse, by obtaining ultrastructural data on the response of collagen fibers after orthodontic intervention. Lateral maxillary incisors in the dog were rotated with bonded fixed appliances. The teeth were divided into groups according to different orthodontic procedures. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic analyses were performed on gingival samples after proper processing. Analyses of the untreated control samples showed well-organized, parallel, and densely packed thick bundles of collagen fibers, interconnected with thin fibers. After rotation-followed-by-retention, the gingival fibers were torn, ripped, disorganized, and laterally spaced and of increased diameter. Thus it was concluded that all these patterns are incompatible with stretching. Also, an increased number of elastic fibers were seen in proximity to the torn collagen fibers. After gingival fiberotomy, most fibers resumed the appearance of the organized pattern of large fiber bundles similar to those seen in the controls.

  16. Ditching Investigation of a 1/18-Scale Model of the North American B-45 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Thompson, William C.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation of a 1/18-scale dynamically similar model of the North American B-45 airplane was made to observe the ditching behavior and determine the proper landing technique to be used in an emergency water landing. Various conditions of damage were simulated to determine the behavior which probably would occur in a full-scale ditching. The behavior of the model was determined from high-speed motion-picture records, time-history acceleration records, and visual observations. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the maximum nose-high attitude with the landing flaps full down for minimum landing speed. During the ditching, the nose-wheel and bomb-bay doors probably will be torn away and the rear of the fuselage flooded. A violent dive will very likely occur. Longitudinal decelerations of approximately 5g and vertical accelerations of approximately -6g (including gravity) will be experienced near the pilots' compartment. Ditching braces installed in the bomb bay will tend to improve the behavior slightly but will be torn away along with the bomb-bay doors. A hydroflap installed ahead of the nose-wheel doors will eliminate the dive and failure of the nose-wheel doors, and substantially reduce the motions and accelerations.

  17. Effects of shoulder arthroplasty and exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mengshoel, Anne Marit; Slungaard, Bente

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine pain and shoulder function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before and after shoulder arthroplasty and postoperative exercise. Twenty-four patients (26 shoulders) were consecutively included in a multicentre study. Before surgery, at discharge from hospital and after 3 and 6 months, perceived shoulder function and shoulder pain were assessed by visual analogue scales, activities of daily living by the Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (M-HAQ) and shoulder range of motion (ROM) by a goniometer. All patients showed considerable pain reduction at discharge from hospital (p<0.001). In those with intact rotator cuff and biceps tendon (n=13) improvements were found after 6 months in active and passive abduction and flexion ROMs (p<0.01) and in M-HAQ (p<0.001). Such improvements were not found in those with torn soft tissue (n=12). Preoperatively, abduction and flexion motor deficits (passive ROM >active ROM) were found for the total group (p=0.001). Less flexion motor deficit was found in the intact soft tissue than in the torn soft tissue group after 3 (p=0.002) and 6 months (p<0.001). No group difference was found with respect to abduction motor deficit. In conclusion, pain relief was obtained by all patients. Improvements in ROMs and activities of daily living were influenced by the state of the soft tissue.

  18. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10–27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction. PMID:26229890

  19. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Stuart; Morgan, Mamdouh

    2002-01-01

    A prospective study of 238 patients was performed in a district general hospital to assess current diagnostic accuracy rates and to ascertain the use and the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning in reducing the number of negative arthroscopies. The pre-operative diagnosis of patients listed for knee arthroscopy was medial meniscus tear 94 (40%) and osteoarthritis 59 (25%). MRI scans were requested in 57 patients (24%) with medial meniscus tear representing 65% (37 patients). The correlation study was done between pre-operative diagnosis, MRI and arthroscopic diagnosis. Clinical diagnosis was as accurate as the MRI with 79% agreement between the preoperative diagnosis and arthroscopy compared to 77% agreement between MRI scan and arthroscopy. There was no evidence, in this study, that MRI scan can reduce the number of negative arthroscopies. Four normal MRI scans had positive arthroscopic diagnosis (two torn medial meniscus, one torn lateral meniscus and one chondromalacia patella). Out of 240 arthroscopies, there were only 10 normal knees (negative arthroscopy) representing 4% of the total number of knee arthroscopies; one patient of those 10 cases had MRI scan with ACL rupture diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12215031

  20. Comma Sign–Directed Repair of Anterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Dilisio, Matthew F.; Neyton, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    The comma sign was described as an arthroscopic landmark to identify the torn subscapularis stump to mobilize and repair the tendon in anterosuperior rotator cuff tears. It was hypothesized that it is composed of the humeral attachments of the superior glenohumeral and coracohumeral ligaments. This arthroscopic finding has since become accepted orthopaedic nomenclature pathognomonic for subscapularis tears and a key component of subscapularis tear classification. We propose an alternative theory of the pathoanatomy of the comma sign in anterosuperior rotator cuff tears and present the technique of comma sign–directed repairs of combined subscapularis and supraspinatus lesions. After appropriate releases, tendon-to-tendon repair of the distal-superior aspect of the comma sign to the upper border of the remnant subscapularis results in anatomic re-creation of the intra-articular portion of the torn subscapularis with concomitant reduction of the anterior leading edge of the supraspinatus and reconstitution of the rotator cable complex. A tension-free, single-anchor subscapularis repair is then performed to secure the tendon to the lesser tuberosity. After subscapularis repair, the supraspinatus that was previously retracted to the glenoid rim takes the appearance of a crescent-type tear that is easily approximated to its anatomic insertion. PMID:25685676

  1. The use of an intra-articular depth guide in the measurement of partial thickness rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael J; More, Kristie D; Sohmer, Stephen; Nelson, Atiba A; Sciore, Paul; Boorman, Richard; Hollinshead, Robert; Lo, Ian K Y

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of the conventional method for determining the percentage of partial thickness rotator cuff tears to a method using an intra-articular depth guide. The clinical utility of the intra-articular depth guide was also examined. Methods. Partial rotator cuff tears were created in cadaveric shoulders. Exposed footprint, total tendon thickness, and percentage of tendon thickness torn were determined using both techniques. The results from the conventional and intra-articular depth guide methods were correlated with the true anatomic measurements. Thirty-two patients were evaluated in the clinical study. Results. Estimates of total tendon thickness (r = 0.41, P = 0.31) or percentage of thickness tears (r = 0.67, P = 0.07) using the conventional method did not correlate well with true tendon thickness. Using the intra-articular depth guide, estimates of exposed footprint (r = 0.92, P = 0.001), total tendon thickness (r = 0.96, P = 0.0001), and percentage of tendon thickness torn (r = 0.88, P = 0.004) correlated with true anatomic measurements. Seven of 32 patients had their treatment plan altered based on the measurements made by the intra-articular depth guide. Conclusions. The intra-articular depth guide appeared to better correlate with true anatomic measurements. It may be useful during the evaluation and development of treatment plans for partial thickness articular surface rotator cuff tears.

  2. The role of arthroscopy in treating osteoarthritis of the knee in the older patient.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stephen M

    2010-09-07

    Arthroscopy of the osteoarthritic knee is a common and costly practice with limited and specific indications. The extent of osteoarthritis (OA) is determined by joint space narrowing, which is best measured on a weight-bearing radiograph of the knee in 30° or 45° of flexion. The patient older than 40 years with a normal joint space should have a magnetic resonance image taken to rule out focal cartilage wear and avascular necrosis before recommending arthroscopy. Randomized controlled trials of patients with joint space narrowing have shown that outcomes after arthroscopic lavage or debridement are no better than those after a sham procedure (placebo effect), and that arthroscopic surgery provides no additional benefit to physical and medical therapy. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons guideline on the Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee (2008) recommended against performing arthroscopy with a primary diagnosis of OA of the knee, with the caveat that partial meniscectomy or loose body removal is an option in patients with OA that have primary mechanical signs and symptoms of a torn meniscus and/or loose body. There is no evidence that removal of loose debris, cartilage flaps, torn meniscal fragments, and inflammatory enzymes have any pain relief or functional benefit in patients that have joint space narrowing on standing radiographs. Many patients with joint space narrowing are older with multiple medical comorbidities. Consider the complications and consequences when recommending arthroscopy to treat the painful osteoarthritic knee without mechanical symptoms, as there is no proven clinical benefit.

  3. Load limiting energy absorbing lightweight debris catcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the representative embodiment of the invention disclosed, a load limiting, energy absorbing net is arranged to overlay a normally-covered vent opening in the rear bulkhead of the space orbiter vehicle. Spatially-disposed flexible retainer straps are extended from the net and respectively secured to bulkhead brackets spaced around the vent opening. The intermediate portions of the straps are doubled over and stitched together in a pattern enabling the doubled-over portions to progressively separate at a predicable load designed to be well below the tensile capability of the straps as the stitches are successively torn apart by the forces imposed on the retainer members whenever the cover plate is explosively separated from the bulkhead and propelled into the net. By arranging these stitches to be successively torn away at a load below the strap strength in response to forces acting on the retainers that are less than the combined strength of the retainers, this tearing action serves as a predictable compact energy absorber for safely halting the cover plate as the retainers are extended as the net is deployed. The invention further includes a block of an energy-absorbing material positioned in the net for receiving loose debris produced by the explosive release of the cover plate.

  4. Document reconstruction by layout analysis of snippets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, Florian; Diem, Markus; Sablatnig, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Document analysis is done to analyze entire forms (e.g. intelligent form analysis, table detection) or to describe the layout/structure of a document. Also skew detection of scanned documents is performed to support OCR algorithms that are sensitive to skew. In this paper document analysis is applied to snippets of torn documents to calculate features for the reconstruction. Documents can either be destroyed by the intention to make the printed content unavailable (e.g. tax fraud investigation, business crime) or due to time induced degeneration of ancient documents (e.g. bad storage conditions). Current reconstruction methods for manually torn documents deal with the shape, inpainting and texture synthesis techniques. In this paper the possibility of document analysis techniques of snippets to support the matching algorithm by considering additional features are shown. This implies a rotational analysis, a color analysis and a line detection. As a future work it is planned to extend the feature set with the paper type (blank, checked, lined), the type of the writing (handwritten vs. machine printed) and the text layout of a snippet (text size, line spacing). Preliminary results show that these pre-processing steps can be performed reliably on a real dataset consisting of 690 snippets.

  5. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10-27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction.

  6. Reconstruction versus conservative treatment after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament: cost effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The decision whether to treat conservatively or reconstruct surgically a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an ongoing subject of debate. The high prevalence and associated public health burden of torn ACL has led to continuous efforts to determine the best therapeutic approach. A critical evaluation of benefits and expenditures of both treatment options as in a cost effectiveness analysis seems well-suited to provide valuable information for treating physicians and healthcare policymakers. Methods A literature review identified four of 7410 searched articles providing sufficient outcome probabilities for the two treatment options for modeling. A transformation key based on the expert opinions of 25 orthopedic surgeons was used to derive utilities from available evidence. The cost data for both treatment strategies were based on average figures compiled by Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist and reinforced by Swiss national statistics. A decision tree was constructed to derive the cost-effectiveness of each strategy, which was then tested for robustness using Monte Carlo simulation. Results Decision tree analysis revealed a cost effectiveness of 16,038 USD/0.78 QALY for ACL reconstruction and 15,466 USD/0.66 QALY for conservative treatment, implying an incremental cost effectiveness of 4,890 USD/QALY for ACL reconstruction. Sensitivity analysis of utilities did not change the trend. Conclusion ACL reconstruction for reestablishment of knee stability seems cost effective in the Swiss setting based on currently available evidence. This, however, should be reinforced with randomized controlled trials comparing the two treatment strategies. PMID:22098703

  7. Anatomical Knee Variants in Discoid Lateral Meniscal Tears

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu-Xu; Li, Jian; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Yang; Kang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Background: Discoid lateral meniscus was a common meniscal dysplasia and was predisposed to tear. There were some anatomical knee variants in patients with discoid lateral meniscus. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between anatomical knee variants and discoid lateral meniscal tears. Methods: There were totally 125 cases of discoid lateral meniscus enrolled in this study from February 2008 to December 2013. Eighty-seven patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for right torn discoid lateral meniscus were enrolled in the torn group. An additional 38 patients who were incidentally identified as having intact discoid lateral menisci on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were included in the control group. All patients were evaluated for anatomical knee variants on plain radiographs, including lateral joint space distance, height of the lateral tibial spine, height of the fibular head, obliquity of the lateral tibial plateau, squaring of the lateral femoral condyle, cupping of the lateral tibial plateau, lateral femoral condylar notch, and condylar cutoff sign. The relationship between anatomical variants and meniscal tear was evaluated. These anatomical variants in cases with complete discoid meniscus were also compared with those in cases with incomplete discoid meniscus. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in lateral joint space distance (P = 0.528), height of the lateral tibial spine (P = 0.927), height of the fibular head (P = 0.684), obliquity of the lateral tibial plateau (P = 0.672), and the positive rates of squaring of the lateral femoral condyle (P = 0.665), cupping of the lateral tibial plateau (P = 0.239), and lateral femoral condylar notch (P = 0.624). The condylar cutoff sign was significantly different between the two groups, with the prominence ratio in the torn group being smaller than that in the control group (0.74 ± 0.11 vs. 0.81 ± 0.04, P = 0.049). With the decision value of the

  8. The Bridge-Enhanced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair (BEAR) Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Martha M.; Flutie, Brett M.; Kalish, Leslie A.; Ecklund, Kirsten; Fleming, Braden C.; Proffen, Benedikt L.; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the safety of the newly developed bridge-enhanced anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair (BEAR), which involves suture repair of the ligament combined with a bioactive scaffold to bridge the gap between the torn ligament ends. As the intra-articular environment is complex in its response to implanted materials, this study was designed to determine whether there would be a significant rate of adverse reaction to the implanted scaffold. Hypothesis: The primary hypothesis was that the implanted scaffold would not result in a deep joint infection (arthrocentesis with positive culture) or significant inflammation (clinical symptoms justifying arthrocentesis but negative culture). The secondary hypotheses were that patients treated with BEAR would have early postoperative outcomes that were similar to patients treated with ACL reconstruction with an autologous hamstring graft. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 20 patients were enrolled in this nonrandomized, first-in-human study. Ten patients received BEAR treatment and 10 received a hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction. The BEAR procedure was performed by augmenting a suture repair with a proprietary scaffold, the BEAR scaffold, placed in between the torn ends of the ACL at the time of suture repair. The BEAR scaffold is to our knowledge the only device that fills the gap between the torn ligament ends to have current Investigational Device Exemption approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Ten milliliters of autologous whole blood were added to the scaffold prior to wound closure. Outcomes were assessed at 3 months postoperatively. The outcomes measures included postoperative pain, muscle atrophy, loss of joint range of motion, and implant failure (designated by an International Knee Documentation Committee grade C or D Lachman test and/or an absence of continuous ACL tissue on magnetic resonance images). Results: There were no joint

  9. KSC-04PD-1776

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lewis (left) and Damon Petty clean up hurricane debris inside the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). Much of the roof was torn off by Hurricane Frances as it passed over Central Florida during the Labor Day weekend. Undamaged equipment has been moved to the RLV hangar at KSC. The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof. The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5. It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore. The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph.

  10. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  11. Pathognomonic symptom associated with lightning strike: Lichtenberg figure.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Mehmet; Tanrikulu, Nazmiye; Turkdogan, Kenan Ahmet; Yigit, Eda

    2015-02-01

    Lightning strikes especially occur during spring and summer months in the afternoons when there is heavy rain. In deaths resulting from lightning strike, there may either be no evidence on the dead person's clothes or body, or there may be burnt or torn patches on their clothes and lichtenberg figures specific to lightning strikes on their bodies. In such cases that also have a comorbid of cognitive dysfunction, since there is generally amnesia, having these figures during the physical examination has a valuable place in early diagnosis and quick treatment. This paper presents a case of lightning strike that was found to have Lichtenberg figures on the back and right leg after secondary examination.

  12. Tularemia Outbreak Investigation in Kosovo: Case Control and Environmental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dedushaj, Isuf; Gjini, Ardiana; Jorgensen, Tine Rikke; Cotter, Benvon; Lieftucht, Alfons; D’Ancona, Fortunato; Dennis, David T.; Kosoy, Michael A.; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Grunow, Roland; Kalaveshi, Ariana; Gashi, Luljeta; Humolli, Isme

    2002-01-01

    A large outbreak of tularemia occurred in Kosovo in the early postwar period, 1999-2000. Epidemiologic and environmental investigations were conducted to identify sources of infection, modes of transmission, and household risk factors. Case and control status was verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, and microagglutination assay. A total of 327 serologically confirmed cases of tularemia pharyngitis and cervical lymphadenitis were identified in 21 of 29 Kosovo municipalities. Matched analysis of 46 case households and 76 control households suggested that infection was transmitted through contaminated food or water and that the source of infection was rodents. Environmental circumstances in war-torn Kosovo led to epizootic rodent tularemia and its spread to resettled rural populations living under circumstances of substandard housing, hygiene, and sanitation. PMID:11749751

  13. [Memisa in Afganistan: reconstruction of primary health care in a country during civil war and with restricted freedom of movement for women].

    PubMed

    Liem, L

    1999-01-30

    Afghanistan has the number five position in the world with regard to child mortality and ranks number two with regard to child mortality and ranks number two with regard to maternal death. Towards the end of 1994 Memisa agreed to assist IbnSina, an Afghan non-governmental organization which had been asked to rehabilitate basic health services in 4 regions via their existing immunization programme. After the withdrawal of the Russian army, the country is being torn apart by fighting bands of extremists. The rapid and successful rise of the Taliban, a movement of armed islamic fundamentalist students, puts severe restrictions on public life and on the rights of women, and makes it even more difficult to set up a health care system which is equally accessible to men and women. IbnSina-Memisa strives to revive health care in 4 regions and to cope with the logistic and cultural constraints which have to be faced.

  14. Pediatric canalicular tear repairs—revisiting the pigtail probe

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Brian J.; Katowitz, William R.; Binenbaum, Gil

    2008-01-01

    Repairing canalicular lacerations can be complicated by difficulty identifying and intubating the proximal injured system, retrieving stents in the nose, and repairing canalicular epithelium. We describe a hybrid method of repair that alleviates these challenges by using an eyelet-type pediatric pigtail probe and a self-threading monocanalicular stent. The pigtail probe is inserted through the intact punctum and canaliculus on the injured eyelid and rotated to identify the medial edge of the torn canaliculus. The stent is threaded through the injured punctum and pigtail probe, drawn back out the intact puncta, and cut flush. The eyelid is repaired without direct suturing of the canaliculus. Applying this technique to 10 children, the injured system was successfully intubated without complication, and all children had good anatomic and clinical results, with negative dye disappearance tests. PMID:18620879

  15. The First Air-Temperature Measurements for the Purposes of Battlefield Operations?.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgré, S.; Neumann, J.

    1986-03-01

    Close to the end of the severe winter 1808/09, a Russian force crossed the ice-bound Gulf of Bothnia from Finland to Sweden with the purpose of forcing Sweden to desist from taking sides with Great Britain against Napoléon. General major von Berg, one of the commanders of the force, took meteorological observations, including air-temperature measurements, during the crossing, a record of which he left behind in a journal. These air-temperature measurements appear to be the first of their kind in the history of land-based military forces.In the discussion of the meteorological conditions of the above-mentioned harsh winter, use is made of unpublished meteorological measurements at Umcaå, Sweden, and at Ylitomio (Över-Torneå), Finland. The latter were conducted by Johan Portin, a pioneer of meteorological observations near the Arctic Circle.

  16. Prioritizing Healthcare Delivery in a Conflict Zone Comment on "TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo".

    PubMed

    Wood, Robin; Richardson, Eugene T

    2013-09-01

    Nowhere are the barriers to a functional health infrastructure more clearly on display than in the Goma region of Democratic Republic of Congo. Kaboru et al. report poorly integrated services for HIV and TB in this war-torn region. Priorities in conflict zones include provision of security, shelter, food, clean water and prevention of sexual violence. In Goma, immediate health priorities include emergency treatment of cholera, malaria, respiratory illnesses, provision of maternal care, millions of measles vaccinations, and management of an ongoing rabies epidemic. It is a daunting task to determine an essential package of medical services in a setting where there are so many competing priorities, where opportunity costs are limited and epidemiologic information is scarce. Non-governmental agencies sometimes add to the challenge via an insidious reduction of state sovereignty and the creation of new levels of income inequality. Kaboru et al. have successfully highlighted many of the complexities of rebuilding and prioritizing healthcare in a conflict zone.

  17. Bridge-Enhanced ACL Repair: A Review of the Science and the Pathway through FDA Investigational Device Approval

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Perrone, Gabriel S.; Roberts, Gordon; Murray, Martha M.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are currently treated with replacement of the torn ligament with a graft of tendon harvested from elsewhere in the knee. This procedure, called "ACL reconstruction," is excellent for restoring gross stability to the knee; however, there are relatively high graft failure rates in adolescent patients,4, 12, 60 and the ACL reconstruction procedure does not prevent the premature osteoarthritis seen in patients after an ACL injury.1, 46, 52 Thus, new solutions are needed for ACL injuries. Researchers have been investigating the use of scaffolds, growth factors and cells to supplement a suture repair of the ACL (bio-enhanced repair). In this paper, we will review the varied approaches, which have been investigated for stimulating ACL healing and repair in preclinical models and how one of these technologies was able to move from promising preclinical results to FDA acceptance of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application for a first-in-human study. PMID:25631206

  18. Flow studies in a wet steam turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. H.; Pouchot, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    The design and test results of a four stage wet vapor turbine operating with slightly superheated inlet steam and expanding to 10% exit moisture are presented. High speed movies at 3000 frames per second of liquid movement on the pressure side and along the trailing edge of the last stator blade are discussed along with back lighted photographs of moisture drops as they were torn from the stator blade trailing edge. Movies at lower framing rates were also taken of the exit of the last rotating blade and the casing moisture removal slot located in line with the rotor blade shroud. Also moisture removal data are presented of casing slot removal at the exit of the third and fourth rotor blades and for slots located in the trailing edge of the last stator blade. Finally, the degradation of turbine thermodynamic performance due to condensation formation and movement is discussed.

  19. [The power of the notion of resistance in the mental health field: a case study on the life of rural communities whitin the Colombian armed conflict].

    PubMed

    Arias López, Beatriz Elena

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study is to identify individual, family and/or community responses of resistance within protracted armed conflict. We conducted a case study with members of rural communities in the municipality of San Francisco, in the eastern area of Antioquia, Colombia, combining biographical and ethnographical approaches. The primary results show that, along with the suffering generated by the experience of armed conflict, rural community members also display a repertoire of multiple and diverse resistance strategies. Resistance is for them an active response and a way to re-weave the fabric torn by the experience. As a type of affirmative opposition, resistance is a powerful category for the entire mental health field, in that it highlights the creativity and capacity for transformation of individuals. In this way, the category allows for overcoming the limits of the conventional biomedical view that tends to pathologize individual and social responses in scenarios of severe distress.

  20. Georg Friedrich Kordenbusch and astronomy in Nuremberg in the second half of the 18th century. (German Title: Georg Friedrich Kordenbusch und die Astronomie in Nürnberg in der zweiten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaab, Hans

    In the second half of the 18th century, Georg Friedrich Kordenbusch (1731 - 1802) was the best-known living mathematician and astronomer in Nuremberg. Being a physician by training, he obtained, in 1769, the post of lecturer in mathematics and physics at the Egidien secondary school. Subsequently, he tried in vain to re-erect the observatory, torn down in 1751. In the early 1770s, he became famous for preparing the second edition of Johann Leonhard Rost's Astronomisches Handbuch that was, in its first edition of 1718, the first compendium of astronomy written in German, and which had a wide circulation. In 1790, Kordenbusch was raised to the nobility for his achievements.

  1. The Ideological and Political Dimensions of the Anti-Smoking and Anti-Drinking Video Advertisements in the Republic of Moldova.

    PubMed

    Stanchevici, Dmitri

    2016-07-01

    Based on the critical approach in health communication, along with Habermas's theory of legitimation and Ellul's theory of propaganda, this qualitative study analyzes the political and ideological dimensions of the video advertisements used in the 2012 anti-smoking and 2014 anti-drinking campaigns in the Republic of Moldova. This analysis shows that these health videos support male domination and exclusion of the poor and legitimate the current political leadership with its declared pro-European orientation. This study uniquely contributes to the critical approach in health communication by focusing on the post-Soviet context in which statehood and national identity are unstable and societies are torn between the Russian and (post-)Soviet influences on one hand and European aspirations on the other. Drawing on critical scholarship in global health communication, this article calls for greater respect and recognition of Moldova's local culture and definition of health.

  2. 7. View of interior of Lock No. 2 on George ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of interior of Lock No. 2 on George washington 'Potowmack' Canal at Great Falls, Virginia. This lock is about 15 ft. in depth and possibly 70 or 60 ft. in length. Some 15 or 20 years ago, when a restoration was crudely attempted, the old oaken flooring, which was invariably placed at the bottom of canal locks, was roughly torn up and destroyed. The trunks and stumps of gigantic trees still remain from this restorative effort, and their girth indicates again the antiquity of this evidence of George Washington's work as an engineer. The stones are of the red Seneca type and were evidently ferried from the Maryland side above the dam and then brought by sled or rollers to this location. These stones were beautifully hand-cut and fitted with ... - Potowmack Company: Great Falls Canal, Lock No. 2, Great Falls, Fairfax County, VA

  3. First do no harm? Female hysteria, trauma, and the (bio)logic of violence in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    In Iraq, women are frequently rushed to the hospital in severe anxiety, diagnosed by medical professionals in local hospitals as "hysterical." The treatments proffered are often disturbingly violent in their own right, indicating the normalization of violence in the conflict zone and the rationalizing discourses of biomedicine to this end. Based on fieldwork in the northern Kurdish region, held to be a prosperous beacon of "postconflict" stability in an otherwise war-torn country, I consider the ways in which neoliberal interventionist agendas, medical technologies in the aftermath of war, and gendered narratives of the Kurdish nation coalesce to valorize particular forms of suffering while devaluing others as both inherently "feminine" and devoid of either agency or recuperative value. I argue that the violence of such biomedical beliefs forms a "natural" rationalized corollary of wider logics of violence in the war zone, and that both inscribe non-normative expressions of trauma in gendered terms.

  4. A Training Feedback System for Brigade Command Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    unlimited. ISoca UPLE enTARY NOTES I )AE Al01Exa endria, VAv2231, foradra Syte Devlopen Copoaio7 udr7ubotrc 146-3277TORN PrGENCo NtA ct ADAHCIfdffrntfo 1...Doc hki Ud Q UNAfNhu6c JUSTIFICATION ................................. BY .................. ., . ...... . 9WSTnIgUTIOl/AIAILABILITY SE Dist. AVAIL...93.0. 00 .0 -H r. 0i () Ha H O Q )j p$4 1 -J) 4-4 -H .0 $ 0 H Q.J E0 4.40 0 4 -i 4 0 1 00 w$40 0 4-0Q H- > 0 -H 0u 0 4-’ OHu 4-) 0 u 0 $4p""H 0 1 * r4 CU

  5. Dynamic forces on agglomerated particles caused by high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the acoustic forces on particles and agglomerates caused by high-intensity ultrasound in gaseous atmosphere are derived by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Sound induced forces cause an oscillating stress scenario where the primary particles of an agglomerate are alternatingly pressed together and torn apart with the frequency of the applied wave. A comparison of the calculated acoustic forces with respect to the inter particle adhesion forces from Van-der-Waals and liquid bridge interactions reveals that the separation forces may reach the same order of magnitude for 80 μm sized SiO2-particles. Hence, with finite probability acoustically agitated gases may de-agglomerate/disperse solid agglomerate structures. This effect is confirmed by dispersion experiments in an acoustic particle levitation setup.

  6. Nurses' work: balancing personal and professional caregiving careers.

    PubMed

    Ross, M M; Rideout, E; Carson, M

    1994-01-01

    Forty full-time nurses who were also responsible for providing care to individuals in their private lives volunteered for a qualitative study of combined caregiving careers. Each respondent kept a diary of caregiving activities during two representative 24-hour periods, and was interviewed prior to, and after diary-recording. Most nurses experienced high levels of stress associated with caregiving in both their professional and private lives. In general, they were relatively satisfied with their lives in both spheres, and felt a slightly greater sense of control in their work lives than in their home lives. Regarding the tensions/conflicts they alluded to, the following themes emerged: an ethic of high expectation, feeling torn between two worlds, a sense of working in isolation, and working in overdrive. The rewards/benefits included remuneration, recognition and self-esteem, opportunities for personal growth, and opportunities for family growth.

  7. [Caring for persons at the end of life in a curative care unit: privileges and heartbreaks].

    PubMed

    Fortin, Marie-Laurence; Bouchard, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the experience of caring for individuals at the end of life by five nurses working in curative care units. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gain a better understanding of the meaning nurses give to this experience. The analysis of results, based on Giorgi's phenomenological method (1997), highlighted a central meaning: it is a human experience fraught with paradoxes where the bedside nurse feels both privileged to be accompanying these individuals at the end of their lives and torn between the medical priority given to curative care and the lesser priority given to palliative care. This study offers relevant options for nurse managers wanting to improve these nurses' work environment and the quality of care for individuals at the end of life.

  8. Hymen care for unmarried Muslim females: role of the forensic consultant in gynaecology interventions.

    PubMed

    Abder-Rahman, H A

    2009-01-01

    This case series illustrates the role of the forensic consultant in hymen care for unmarried Muslim females exposed to gynaecology interventions. The age range of the 12 females attending University of Jordan Hospital in Amman was 35 days to 28 years. Gynaecology interventions included the use of a vaginoscope, circular resection of the hymen in cases of congenital imperforate hymen, evacuation of perineal abscess and evaluation of a torn hymen. The forensic consultant provides a valuable role in reassuring patients and parents about procedures used to avoid rupturing the hymen, and in protecting the gynaecologist's and patients' rights by providing reports of the status of the hymen before and after intervention in cases where damage is unavoidable.

  9. A possible relativistic jetted outburst from a massive black hole fed by a tidally disrupted star.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Joshua S; Giannios, Dimitrios; Metzger, Brian D; Cenko, S Bradley; Perley, Daniel A; Butler, Nathaniel R; Tanvir, Nial R; Levan, Andrew J; O'Brien, Paul T; Strubbe, Linda E; De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Lee, William H; Nayakshin, Sergei; Quataert, Eliot; King, Andrew R; Cucchiara, Antonino; Guillochon, James; Bower, Geoffrey C; Fruchter, Andrew S; Morgan, Adam N; van der Horst, Alexander J

    2011-07-08

    Gas accretion onto some massive black holes (MBHs) at the centers of galaxies actively powers luminous emission, but most MBHs are considered dormant. Occasionally, a star passing too near an MBH is torn apart by gravitational forces, leading to a bright tidal disruption flare (TDF). Although the high-energy transient Sw 1644+57 initially displayed none of the theoretically anticipated (nor previously observed) TDF characteristics, we show that observations suggest a sudden accretion event onto a central MBH of mass about 10(6) to 10(7) solar masses. There is evidence for a mildly relativistic outflow, jet collimation, and a spectrum characterized by synchrotron and inverse Compton processes; this leads to a natural analogy of Sw 1644+57 to a temporary smaller-scale blazar.

  10. Kidnapping and Mental Health in Iraqi Refugees: The Role of Resilience.

    PubMed

    Wright, A Michelle; Talia, Yousif R; Aldhalimi, Abir; Broadbridge, Carissa L; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A; Pole, Nnamdi; Arnetz, Bengt B; Arnetz, Judith E

    2017-02-01

    Although kidnapping is common in war-torn countries, there is little research examining its psychological effects. Iraqi refugees (N = 298) were assessed upon arrival to the U.S. and 1 year later. At arrival, refugees were asked about prior trauma exposure, including kidnapping. One year later refugees were assessed for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression disorder (MDD) using the SCID-I. Individual resilience and narratives of the kidnapping were also assessed. Twenty-six refugees (9 %) reported being kidnapped. Compared to those not kidnapped, those who were had a higher prevalence of PTSD, but not MDD, diagnoses. Analyses examining kidnapping victims revealed that higher resilience was associated with lower rates of PTSD. Narratives of the kidnapping were also discussed. This study suggests kidnapping is associated with PTSD, but not MDD. Additionally, kidnapping victims without PTSD reported higher individual resilience. Future studies should further elucidate risk and resilience mechanisms.

  11. Dragonfly: an implementation of the expand–maximize–compress algorithm for single-particle imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Ayyer, Kartik; Lan, Ti-Yen; Elser, Veit; Loh, N. Duane

    2016-01-01

    Single-particle imaging (SPI) with X-ray free-electron lasers has the potential to change fundamentally how biomacromolecules are imaged. The structure would be derived from millions of diffraction patterns, each from a different copy of the macromolecule before it is torn apart by radiation damage. The challenges posed by the resultant data stream are staggering: millions of incomplete, noisy and un-oriented patterns have to be computationally assembled into a three-dimensional intensity map and then phase reconstructed. In this paper, the Dragonfly software package is described, based on a parallel implementation of the expand–maximize–compress reconstruction algorithm that is well suited for this task. Auxiliary modules to simulate SPI data streams are also included to assess the feasibility of proposed SPI experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, California, USA. PMID:27504078

  12. Dragonfly: an implementation of the expand-maximize-compress algorithm for single-particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Ayyer, Kartik; Lan, Ti-Yen; Elser, Veit; Loh, N Duane

    2016-08-01

    Single-particle imaging (SPI) with X-ray free-electron lasers has the potential to change fundamentally how biomacromolecules are imaged. The structure would be derived from millions of diffraction patterns, each from a different copy of the macromolecule before it is torn apart by radiation damage. The challenges posed by the resultant data stream are staggering: millions of incomplete, noisy and un-oriented patterns have to be computationally assembled into a three-dimensional intensity map and then phase reconstructed. In this paper, the Dragonfly software package is described, based on a parallel implementation of the expand-maximize-compress reconstruction algorithm that is well suited for this task. Auxiliary modules to simulate SPI data streams are also included to assess the feasibility of proposed SPI experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, California, USA.

  13. [Injuries of the medial collateral ligament and anterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint and Lemaire surgical functional treatment. Long-term outcome].

    PubMed

    Schmid, F

    1996-06-01

    The present paper reports the results of 112 extraarticular ligamento-plasties performed on the knee with the procedure proposed by Lemaire. The series includes isolated tears of the anterior cruciate and medical collateral ligament as well as combined tears of both ligaments. The clinical and radiological results with a mean follow-up time of 11.5 years are compared with the results obtained in a first assessment 8 years ago. Good clinical results are in contrast with increasing osteoarthrosis in 1/3 of the knees radiologically assessed. The operation for a torn anterior cruciate ligament should be performed as soon as possible to avoid secondary meniscal lesions with subsequent severe osteoarthrosis. Presence or absence of arthrotic signs in the X-rays mainly determine the long-term result after ligamento-plasties of the knee. The Lemaire plasties are well tolerated even by elderly still active people and need little postoperative care.

  14. Accura balloon rupture during percutaneous trans-septal mitral commissurotomy: a rare and potentially fatal complication

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Vivek; Patra, Soumya; Patil, Shivanand; Ramalingam, Rangaraj

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous transseptal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC) is the treatment of choice in rheumatic mitral stenosis. The reuse of sterilised PTMC balloon catheters is widely practised to bring down the procedure cost and have proven safety and efficacy. The reused balloons may deform and are prone to rupture causing fatal complications like embolism either of the torn balloon material or air. We report a first case of Accura balloon rupture during PTMC to the best of our knowledge. Fortunately, there was no complication in our patient. Thus, during the balloon preparation it should be examined for any deformity or tear and air should be removed completely to prevent fatal outcome. The repeated use of the hardware should be limited and an informed consent regarding the possible complications of the reused hardware should be taken. PMID:23704459

  15. The coastal fishes and fisheries of the Socotra Archipelago, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Zajonz, Uwe; Lavergne, Edouard; Klaus, Rebecca; Krupp, Friedhelm; Aideed, Moteah Sheikh; Saeed, Fouad Naseeb

    2016-04-30

    The Socotra Archipelago is situated in the Gulf of Aden where tropical and "pseudo-temperate" conditions combine to create a unique marine ecosystem. The diversity, ecology, productivity and fisheries of the coastal fish assemblages are still relatively understudied and no update of the scientific knowledge existed. The islands support unique coastal and coral-associated fish assemblages in spite of the limited biogenic reef frameworks. Fish diversity is the highest among comparable Arabian eco-regions, and fish biomass productivity high too by Indian Ocean standards. The production of the once traditionally-managed small-scale fishery is severely declining and whether it is sustainable nowadays is extremely doubtful. At a time when Yemen is torn apart by a severe political and humanitarian crisis it is timely to review and update the current state of knowledge for scientists and managers, and thereby ease access to existing information, facilitating follow-on studies and evidence-based conservation and fisheries management.

  16. 37. GARRET, SOUTH HALF, LOOKING WEST. The trusses and joists ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. GARRET, SOUTH HALF, LOOKING WEST. The trusses and joists date from the 1755 Greater Meeting House. When this building was being torn down in 1812, these trusses were incorporated into the new Twelfth Street Meeting House. The trusses and joists were all pit sawn. The lower strut of the truss center posts were added in 1812 with iron strapping tieing them into the older members. Many of the joist tenons broke off in the transfer for reuse, so ledgers were provided to support the joists in 1812. At the Greater Meeting House the space between the queen posts was the Monthly Meeting Room. Evidence still exists for its plaster walls and ceiling. The suspended wood air duct dates from 1852. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Ultrahigh interlayer friction in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Niguès, A; Siria, A; Vincent, P; Poncharal, P; Bocquet, L

    2014-07-01

    Friction at the nanoscale has revealed a wealth of behaviours that depart strongly from the long-standing macroscopic laws of Amontons-Coulomb. Here, by using a 'Christmas cracker'-type of system in which a multiwalled nanotube is torn apart between a quartz-tuning-fork-based atomic force microscope (TF-AFM) and a nanomanipulator, we compare the mechanical response of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) during the fracture and telescopic sliding of the layers. We found that the interlayer friction for insulating BNNTs results in ultrahigh viscous-like dissipation that is proportional to the contact area, whereas for the semimetallic CNTs the sliding friction vanishes within experimental uncertainty. We ascribe this difference to the ionic character of the BN, which allows charge localization. The interlayer viscous friction of BNNTs suggests that BNNT membranes could serve as extremely efficient shock-absorbing surfaces.

  18. Gloves against mineral oils and mechanical hazards: composites of carboxylated acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber latex

    PubMed Central

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Rzymski, Władysław M.; Malesa, Monika; Borkowska, Urszula; Oleksy, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to permeation of noxious chemical substances should be accompanied by resistance to mechanical factors because the glove material may be torn, cut or punctured in the workplace. This study reports on glove materials, protecting against mineral oils and mechanical hazards, made of carboxylated acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The obtained materials were characterized by a very high resistance of the produced materials to oil permeation (breakthrough time > 480 min). The mechanical properties, and especially tear resistance, of the studied materials were improved after the addition of modified bentonite (nanofiller) to the XNBR latex mixture. The nanocomposite meets the requirements in terms of parameters characterizing tear, abrasion, cut and puncture resistance. Therefore, the developed material may be used for the production of multifunctional protective gloves. PMID:26757889

  19. Knee ligament injury during lateral impact.

    PubMed

    Hearon, B F; Brinkley, J W; Raddin, J H; Fleming, B W

    1985-01-01

    A volunteer woman subject incurred injury to her right knee consisting of a torn anterior cruciate ligament and stretched medial collateral ligament during a lateral (+Gy) impact test. Similar injury has not been reported in the English-language literature an accidental sideward automotive crashes or lateral impact experimentation involving humans. The primary mechanism which produced this injury was external tibial rotation on the femur with the knee flexed. The factors contributing to the injury included extraordinarily forceful leg bracing by the subject, her knee joint laxity or hypermobility, and the absence of side supports to limit lower extremity flailing during the impact response. In future lateral impact tests, women subjects should be used with caution and any subject with abnormal joint mobility should be excluded from participation.

  20. Ultrasound of ankle and foot: overuse and sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Viviane; Guillin, Raphaël; Dhanju, Jag; Cardinal, Etienne

    2007-06-01

    Sports and overuse injuries of the ankle and foot are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ultrasound (US) has been established as an excellent diagnostic modality for foot and ankle injuries, providing a rapid noninvasive, economical, and readily available tool that is well tolerated by the patient with acute or chronic pain. The opportunity for dynamic examination is another advantage of US in evaluating ankle and foot pathology, where maneuvers such as muscle contraction and stressing of the joint may be particularly helpful. In many cases, US can be used as a first-line and only imaging modality for diagnosis. This article focuses on ankle disorders related to sports or overuse that affect tendons, including tendinosis, tenosynovitis, paratendinitis, rupture, dislocation, and ligaments that are commonly torn. The sonographic features of certain common foot disorders related to physical activity and overuse are also discussed, including plantar fasciitis, Morton's neuroma, stress fractures, and plantar plate injury.

  1. THE THREAD OF DEPRESSION THROUGHOUT THE LIFE AND WORKS OF LEO TOLSTOY.

    PubMed

    Anargyros-Klinger, Annie

    2002-04-01

    Tolstoy, the author of two masterpieces, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, remains a writer of genius. Yet, after writing War and Peace, his existence had been torn apart by a serious depression. This depression, which was melancholic in character, almost destroyed him and, once he had finished Anna Karenina, led him to want to renounce not only sexuality but also literary creation and material possessions. Through examining Tolstoy's life and work, the author tries to uncover the underground paths of this depression, which emerged brutally in the middle of his life, and to understand why his creative genius dried up. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Tolstoy turned away from his artistic work, declaring that 'art is not only useless but even harmful', and thereafter devoted himself to philosophical, political and religious writings. These new sublimations would help him to recover his health.

  2. The thread of depression throughout the life and works of Leo Tolstoy.

    PubMed

    Anargyros-Klinger, Annie

    2002-04-01

    Tolstoy, the author of two masterpieces, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, remains a writer of genius. Yet, after writing War and Peace, his existence had been torn apart by a serious depression. This depression, which was melancholic in character, almost destroyed him and, once he had finished Anna Karenina, led him to want to renounce not only sexuality but also literary creation and material possessions. Through examining Tolstoy's life and work, the author tries to uncover the underground paths of this depression, which emerged brutally in the middle of his life, and to understand why his creative genius dried up. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Tolstoy turned away from his artistic work, declaring that 'art is not only useless but even harmful', and thereafter devoted himself to philosophical, political and religious writings. These new sublimations would help him to recover his health.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell applications to tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendons are often subject to age related degenerative changes that coincide with a diminished regenerative capacity. Torn tendons often heal by forming scar tissue that is structurally weaker than healthy native tendon tissue, predisposing to mechanical failure. There is increasing interest in providing biological stimuli to increase the tendon reparative response. Stem cells in particular are an exciting and promising prospect as they have the potential to provide appropriate cellular signals to encourage neotendon formation during repair rather than scar tissue. Currently, a number of issues need to be investigated further before it can be determined whether stem cells are an effective and safe therapeutic option for encouraging tendon repair. This review explores the in-vitro and invivo evidence assessing the effect of stem cells on tendon healing, as well as the potential clinical applications. PMID:23738300

  4. Modern management of patellar instability.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Shin-Jae; Pavlou, George; Oakley, Jeremy; Barlow, David; Haddad, Farres

    2012-12-01

    Recurrent patellofemoral instability is a disabling condition, attributed to a variety of anatomical aetiologies. Trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, an increased tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance of greater than 20 mm and soft tissue abnormalities such as a torn medial patellofemoral ligament and inadequate vastus medialis obliquus are all factors to be considered. Management of this condition remains difficult and controversial and knowledge of the functional anatomy and biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint, a detailed history and clinical examination, and an accurate patient assessment are all imperative to formulate an appropriate management plan. Surgical treatment is based on the underlying anatomical pathology with an aim to restore normal patellofemoral kinematics. We summarise aspects of assessment, treatment and outcome of patellofemoral instability and propose an algorithm of treatment.

  5. Payload bay doors and radiator panels familiarization handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godbold, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The structure and mechanisms associated with the Payload Bay Doors (PLBDs) and the radiator panels are detailed. The PLBDs allow the radiator panels to be exposed to space, protect payloads from contamination, and provide an aerodynamic fairing over the payload bay. The radiator panels dissipate heat from the orbiter and regulate hydraulic fluid temperature. Contamination in the payload bay can hinder the success of missions. Therefore, the contamination control barrier which the PLBDs provide must be efficient in keeping the bay free from contaminants. The aerodynamic fairing the PLBDs provide prevents the orbiter from being torn apart by aerodynamic forces. These facts make the PLBDs and radiator panels mission critical elements of the Space Shuttle.

  6. Benefits of an inclusive US education system.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Presented is a historical perspective of one scientist's journey from war-torn Europe to the opportunities presented by a flexible US educational system. It celebrates the opening of the science establishment that began in the 1950s and its fostering of basic research, and recognizes individuals who were instrumental in guiding the author's education as well as those with whom she later participated in collaborative algal plant research. The initial discovery and later elucidation of phycobilisome structure are elaborated, including the structural connection with photosystem II. Furthermore, she summarizes some of her laboratory's results on carotenoids and its exploration of the isoprenoid pathway in cyanobacteria. Finally, she comments on the gender gap and how her generation benefited when opportunities for women scientists were enlarged.

  7. Dynamic time and spectrum fragmentation-aware service provisioning in elastic optical networks with multi-path routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Zhao, Yongli; Yang, Hui; Yu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Jie; Yousefpour, Ashkan; Wang, Nannan; Jue, Jason P.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-path fragmentation-aware routing, modulation and spectrum assignment algorithm (RMSA) for advance reservation (AR) and immediate reservation (IR) requests in elastic optical networks. Immediate reservation requests should be provided with service immediately, while advance reservation requests have specific starting times and holding times. As lightpaths are set up and torn down, fragmentation may occur in both spectrum and time domains. To decrease the two-dimensional fragmentation and to solve the problem of resource scarcity, we propose splitting requests into different parts and transferring these parts along one or more paths utilizing sliceable bandwidth variable transponders. We first introduce a model to solve the problem and propose a two-dimensional fragmentation occurrence measurement in spectrum and time domains. Then we propose a multi-path fragmentation-aware RMSA algorithm (MPFA). Simulation results show that MPFA can achieve better performance than existing algorithms in terms of blocking probability and spectrum utilization.

  8. Uncommon indications for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Yoon Suk; Huri, Gazi; Garbis, Nickolas G; McFarland, Edward G

    2013-12-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty and shoulder hemiarthroplasty have been the traditional method for treating a variety of shoulder conditions, including arthritis, cuff tear arthropathy, and some fracture types. However, these procedures did not provide consistently good results for patients with torn rotator cuffs. The development of the reverse prosthesis by Grammont in the late 20th century revolutionized the treatment of the rotator-cuff-deficient shoulder with arthritis. The main indication for the reverse prosthesis remains the patient with cuff tear arthropathy who has pain and loss of motion. Because the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty produced such good results in these patients, the indications for the reverse prosthesis have expanded to include other shoulder conditions that have previously been difficult to treat successfully and predictably. This review discusses and critically reviews these newer indications for the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

  9. Uncommon Indications for Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Yoon Suk; Huri, Gazi; Garbis, Nickolas G.

    2013-01-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty and shoulder hemiarthroplasty have been the traditional method for treating a variety of shoulder conditions, including arthritis, cuff tear arthropathy, and some fracture types. However, these procedures did not provide consistently good results for patients with torn rotator cuffs. The development of the reverse prosthesis by Grammont in the late 20th century revolutionized the treatment of the rotator-cuff-deficient shoulder with arthritis. The main indication for the reverse prosthesis remains the patient with cuff tear arthropathy who has pain and loss of motion. Because the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty produced such good results in these patients, the indications for the reverse prosthesis have expanded to include other shoulder conditions that have previously been difficult to treat successfully and predictably. This review discusses and critically reviews these newer indications for the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:24340143

  10. Review: Modelling of meniscus of knee joint during soccer kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azrul Hisham Mohd Adib, Mohd; Firdaus Jaafar, Mohd

    2013-12-01

    Knee is a part of the body that located between thigh and shank is one of the most complicated and largest joints in the human body. The common injuries that occur are ligaments, meniscus or bone fracture. During soccer games, the knee is the most critical part that will easily injure due to the shock from an external impact. Torn meniscus is one of the effects. This study will investigate the effect towards the meniscus within the knee joint during soccer ball kicking. We conduct a literary review of 14 journals that discuss the general view of meniscus and also soccer kicking. The selected topics for this review paper are meniscal function, meniscal movement, meniscal tears and also instep kick. As a finding, statistics show that most meniscal tears (73%) occurred in athletes who were soccer players, basketball players or skiers. The tear is frequently happening at the medial side rather than lateral side with a percentage of 70%.

  11. ESO 255-IG 07, a compact group of interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergvall, N.; Ekman, A.; Lauberts, A.

    1981-03-01

    Photographic, photometric, and spectroscopic properties are studied for the galaxy system ESO 255-IG 07 = 0626-471. The system is composed of four main galaxies of normal sizes and luminosities in what looks like a common halo. It is suggested that the halo consists of stars being torn out from the individual galaxies as a consequence of the interaction. Although the galaxies morphologically seem to be of early Hubble types, ionized gas is found to extend over a significant part of all four galaxies and also in a bridge connecting the two northernmost galaxies. Indications of enhanced nuclear activity are found in the northernmost galaxy; it is suggested that cloud-cloud collisions are frequent and could trigger the star formation and enhanced nuclear activity observed.

  12. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surface Morphologies of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy at Liquid Nitrogen (Ln2) Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties and fracture surface morphologies were evaluated for a commercial epoxy resin toughened with two types of core-shell rubber (CSR) toughening agents (Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and MX960). The impact resistance (R) was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The resulting fracture surface morphologies were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fractographic observations of the CSR toughened epoxy tested at ambient temperature, showed a fracture as characterized by slender dendrite textures with large voids. The increasing number of dendrites and decreasing size of scale-like texture with more CSR particles corresponded with increased R. As the temperature decreased to Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2), the fracture surfaces showed a fracture characterized by a rough, torn texture containing many river markings and deep furrows.

  13. A case of Descemet’s membrane detachments and tears during phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Guan, Huaijin

    2015-01-01

    Descemet’s membrane detachment is an important reason for corneal endothelial decompensation after intraocular surgery. During cataract surgery, it is an unusual complication. We report a case of Descemet’s membrane detachment in which approximately 60% of Descemet’s membrane (DM) involving approximately the upper two-thirds of the cornea was torn out during a routine phacoemulsification. It caused diffuse corneal edema and blurred vision in the 2 months following the surgery. Topical prednisolone acetate (1%) and sodium chloride (5%) had been used for treatment, with slow improvement in the patient’s symptoms and vision. Interestingly, the cornea regained clarity 2 months after surgery without further surgical treatment. PMID:26640381

  14. Ultrasound of the pectoralis major muscle after reverse shoulder arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mascarinas, Angelie L; Newman, Joel S; Warner, Jon J P; Jain, Nitin B

    2014-12-01

    Only a few reports exist in the literature for sonographic assessment of the pectoralis major muscle. Presented is a case of pectoralis major muscle atrophy as a cause of persistent internal rotation weakness diagnosed via ultrasound in a patient with multiple previous surgeries and contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging because of a shoulder implant. This patient's physical examination suggested an abnormal contour of the pectoralis major muscle on contraction, so he was referred for diagnostic ultrasound. The ultrasound was key to guiding the management of this patient because surgical repair of a torn pectoralis major muscle was planned if this was found. No pectoralis major tear or rupture was seen on ultrasound, but there was evidence of pectoralis major muscle atrophy. Accordingly, surgery was avoided and the patient was able to continue with his physical therapy program.

  15. The struggle of giving up personal goals: affective, physiological, and cognitive consequences of an action crisis.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Veronika; Herrmann, Marcel; Schüler, Julia

    2013-12-01

    A critical phase in goal striving occurs when setbacks accumulate and goal disengagement becomes an issue. This critical phase is conceptualized as an action crisis and assumed to be characterized by an intrapsychic conflict in which the individual becomes torn between further goal pursuit and goal disengagement. Our theorizing converges with Klinger's conceptualization of goal disengagement as a process, rather than a discrete event. Two longitudinal field studies tested and found support for the hypothesis that an action crisis not only compromises an individual's psychological and physiological well-being, but also dampens the cognitive evaluation of the respective goal. In Study 3, marathon runners experiencing an action crisis in their goal of running marathons showed a stronger cortisol secretion and a lower performance in the race 2 weeks later. Results are interpreted in terms of action-phase-specific mindsets with a focus on self-regulatory processes in goal disengagement.

  16. Measuring Ejecta from Inspiralling Binary Neutron Stars using Smoothed-particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Monica; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Faber, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational waves, detectable perturbations in spacetime, can arise from astrophysical systems such as inspiralling binary neutron stars, the remnants of the core collapse of massive stars. In the inspiral process, neutron stars, composed of highly dense nuclear matter, are torn apart by each others gravity and eject matter. Using both gravitational waves and direct observations of ejected matter, we may gain valuable new information about the composition of neutron stars. Using several previously studied test cases, we seek to determine how the amount of ejected matter depends on the physical parameters of these systems. To do this, we use a particle-based hydrodynamics code which can accurately simulate binary neutron star systems with variable equation of state, spin, mass ratio, and eccentricity, and includes the lowest-order effects from gravitational wave emission. I would like to thank RIT's College of Science as well as the Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation for support and funding.

  17. [The DIALYSIS AMICA project].

    PubMed

    Marchionni, B

    2000-01-01

    The denominated Plan "DIALYSIS FRIEND" organized in the region March in the 1998, has seen involved almost all the centers of Dialysis of the region. He has the purpose of furnish the sanitary operators the tools for face the varied strife-torn situations in first person and emotional that they present themselves in an U.O. to "high tension" like result be the Dialysis and the "particularity" personality of whom affection from chronic uraemia comes subjected to dialysis. Besides through the identification of a "profile of fitness" furnishes data on the compliance of the person dialyzed or in pre-dialysis to the different techniques of dialysis. The share of the doctor, of a chief ward, and of any nurses of the U.O. of Nefro/Dialysis of Fano to such plan has resulted to be a very significance experience. The participants to the course tell their experience.

  18. Unusual injuries on the right hand and forearm caused by unidentified wild animals.

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Takayuki; Matoba, Kotaro; Terazawa, Koichi

    2008-11-01

    An old man was found dead in a rice paddy with his face down in the water. His right forearm and hand were severely injured and the shapes of injuries were unusual. It was initially suspected that the injuries had been caused by a cultivator placed at the site. However, they proved to be postmortem injuries because vital reactions were not observed. The skin was widely torn away. Some edges of the injuries looked like a bite mark and other parts looked like scratches. There were many parallel injuries on the right forearm and hand and footmark-like injuries on the right hand. They were probably caused by wild animals. Judging from the sizes and shapes of the footprint, bite marks and scratches, we estimated that the animal which caused the injuries was weasels.

  19. Centaur Standard Shroud (CSS) cryogenic unlatch tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Cryogenic tanking and partial jettison (unlatch) tests were performed on a full scale Centaur vehicle and Centaur Standard Shroud (CSS) to develop and qualify the CSS insulation system, the CSS and Centaur ground-hold purge systems, and the Centaur hydrogen tank flight vent system. Operation of the shroud/Centaur pyrotechnic systems, seals, and the shroud jettison springs, hinges, and other separation systems was demonstrated by a partial jettison of the shroud into catch nets. The Centaur tanks were filled with liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen. Prelaunch operations were performed, and data taken to establish system performances. Results from the initial tests showed a higher than expected heat transfer rate to the Centaur hydrogen tank. In addition, the release mechanism for the forward seal between the Centaur and the CSS did not function properly, and the seal was torn during jettison of the shroud.

  20. [A case of hemorrhagic cholecystitis associated with Churg-Strauss syndrome].

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Satomi; Kamisawa, Terumi; Kuruma, Sawako; Chiba, Kazuro; Tabata, Taku; Koizumi, Koichi; Kurata, Masanao; Horiguchi, Shinichiro; Hishima, Tsunekazu

    2016-01-01

    A woman in her 70s with Churg-Strauss syndrome presented with epigastric pain. She was being treated with steroids at the time of admission. Computed tomography showed swelling of the gallbladder, and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography revealed bloody secretion. On duodenoscopy, bleeding was observed from the orifice of the major duodenal papilla. Emergency cholecystectomy was performed under a diagnosis of hemorrhagic cholecystitis;intraoperatively, extensive hematoma was detected in the thickened wall of the gallbladder. Subsequent histopathological examination revealed mucosal ulceration with infiltration of inflammatory cells, torn small vessels, and extensive transmural bleeding and abscess formation in the thickened wall of the gallbladder. We considered that the hemorrhagic cholecystitis was induced by either vasculitis or corticosteroid therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of hemorrhagic cholecystitis associated with Churg-Strauss syndrome.

  1. Stranski, Krastanov, and Kaischew, and their influence on the founding of crystal growth theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassev, Vladimir L.; Bliss, David F.

    2008-08-01

    A reconsideration of the events and people associated with the birth of modern crystal growth theory is presented. The foundation of the new theory was enabled by validation of Gibbs and Volmer's thermodynamic theory with the new molecular-kinetic theory. For the first time it became possible to rigorously explain crystal growth at the atomic level. The new two-dimensional growth model opened the door to understanding the mechanisms of self-assembly, crystal defect formation, and nano-structures. Molecular-kinetic theory eventually embraced a second major tenet based on the model of spiral growth at dislocations. All of these initial discoveries occurred between 1927 and 1949, a time when the world was being torn apart by war. This article recounts some thoughts and actions of three of the most illustrious founders of crystal growth theory.

  2. The Thermodynamic and Kinetic Aspects of Power Ultrasound Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hao

    Most high intensity or power ultrasound applications involve a special transmission mode of sound waves in a medium that is composed of consecutive compressions and rarefactions. Since the propagation of such longitudinal waves is normally associated with a liquid medium, the use of power ultrasound is often termed as sonication. When the negative pressure in the rarefaction phase surpasses the tensile stress of the liquid, the liquid will be torn apart and cavities will be formed (Leighton, 1994). The inception of cavitation and the subsequent mechanical and chemical effects rising from the cavitation activity enable interactions between the acoustic energy and food and biological systems being processed. Such interactions take place at microscopic levels as the average diameters of cavitation bubbles are at 150-170 μm, for bubbles generated in water by 20 kHz ultrasound transducers (Awad, 1996; Vago, 1992).

  3. LIPOMA ARBORESCENS: RARE CASE OF ROTATOR CUFF TEAR ASSOCIATED WITH THE PRESENCE OF LIPOMA ARBORESCENS IN THE SUBACROMIAL-SUBDELTOID AND GLENOHUMERAL BURSA

    PubMed Central

    Benegas, Eduardo; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreiro; Teodoro, Daniel Sabatini; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius Muriano; de Oliveira, Augusto Medaglia; Filippi, Renée Zon; de Santis Prada, Flávia

    2015-01-01

    Lipoma arborescens is a rare intra-articular disease that is usually monoarticular and is characterized by extensive proliferation of the synovial villi and hyperplasia of the subsynovial fat. The synovial tissue is progressively replaced by mature fat cells in the synovial membrane. The present study reports a case of a rare condition of lipoma arborescens that was simultaneously intra-articular (glenohumeral joint) and in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, in association with a torn supraspinatus tendon. The clinical, histological and radiographic presentations and treatment are discussed here. The description of this case includes radiographic and magnetic resonance evaluations and pathological examination. Although lipoma arborescens is a rare condition, it should be taken into consideration in cases presenting synovial hyperproliferation and synovial fat replacement. PMID:27047861

  4. Virtual reality simulation of arthroscopy of the knee.

    PubMed

    Mabrey, Jay D; Gillogly, Scott D; Kasser, James R; Sweeney, Howard J; Zarins, Bertram; Mevis, Howard; Garrett, William E; Poss, Robert; Cannon, W Dilworth

    2002-01-01

    The virtual reality arthroscopic knee simulator (VR-AKS) consists of a computer platform, a video display, and two force-feedback (haptic) interfaces known as "PHANToMs" that also monitor the position of the instruments in the user's hands. The forces that the user would normally apply to the lower limb during arthroscopy are directed through an instrumented surrogate leg. Proprietary software provides the mathematical representation of the physical world and replicates the visual, mechanical, and behavioral aspects of the knee. This includes moderating the haptic interface and simultaneously executing a collision-detection algorithm that prevents the instruments from moving through "solid" surfaces. Modeling software interacts with this algorithm to send the appropriate images to the video display, including knee pathology such as meniscal tears and chondral defects as well as normal anatomy. Task-oriented programs monitor specific performance such as executing a proper examination of the knee or shaving a torn meniscus.

  5. New HI Features of the Magellanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, M. E.; Gibson, B. K.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    The first results from the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS) provide a new and spectacular view of the global HI distribution in the vicinity of the Magellanic Clouds and the southern Milky Way. A 2600 square degree mosaic of the South Celestial Pole (SCP) reveals the existence of a narrow, continuous counter-stream which "leads" the direction of motion of the Clouds, i.e. opposite in direction to the Stream. This strongly supports the gravitational model for the Stream in which the leading and trailing streams are tidally torn from the body of the Magellanic Clouds. We also reveal additional tidal features in the Bridge region which appear to emanate from the LMC, and a distinct spiral structure within the LMC itself.

  6. Evidence for the Magellanic Stream's Tidal Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, Mary E.; Gibson, Brad K.; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    The complete spatial coverage and unique blind nature of the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS) has allowed us to identify new HI features which have implications for the origin of the Magellanic Stream. The data presented here include a 2400 deg^2 mosaic of the HI distribution about the South Celestial Pole, revealing a counter-stream which leads the direction of motion of the Clouds, i.e. opposite in direction to the Stream. This strongly supports the gravitational model for the Stream in which the leading and trailing streams are tidally torn from the body of the Magellanic Clouds. This Leading Arm, as well as other recent results which support a tidal scenario, will be discussed.

  7. Performance of a 16.6 Meter Diameter Modified Ringsail Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, Charles H.; Henning, Allen B.; Coltrane, Lucille C.

    1968-01-01

    Inflation, drag, and stability characteristics of a 54.5 -foot nominal-diameter (16.6-meter) modified ringsail parachute deployed in the wake of a 15-foot-diameter (4.6-meter) spacecraft traveling at a Mach number of 1.6 and a dynamic pressure equal to 11.6 psf (555 N/m(exp 2)) were obtained from the third balloon-launched flight test of the Planetary Entry Parachute Program. After deployment, the parachute inflated rapidly to a full condition, partially collapsed, and reinflated to a stable configuration. After reinflation, an average drag coefficient near 0.6 based on nominal surface area was obtained. During descent, an aerodynamic trim angle was observed in a plane near several torn sails. Amplitude of the trim was approximately 15 degrees and oscillation about trim was less than 11 degrees.

  8. A Numerical Study on the Streams of Star Debris after Tidal Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho Olachea, Priscila; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Law-Smith, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Lurking at the centers of most galaxies are gigantic star and gas devouring monsters. These monsters are supermassive black holes (SMBHs), some of which are larger than our solar system and ten billion times as massive as our own Sun. The vast majority of stars in the universe live for tens of billions of years, eventually dying from old age as the nuclearreactions that power them become progressively less effective. But for every ten thousand stars that die peacefully, one star will be brutally torn apart by the extreme tidal forces present as it passes near a SMBH. My recent work has been to develop computational tools necessary to study the fates of stars disrupted by SMBHs. In this research project I presentthe results of my numerical study aimed at understanding the streams of star debris that result after disruption.

  9. Effect of security threats on primary care access in Logar province, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Masahiro J

    2008-01-01

    Security threats are a major concern for access to health care in many war-torn communities; however, there is little quantified data on actual access to care in rural communities during war. Kinderberg International e.V. provided primary care in rural Logar province, Afghanistan, for these three years in eight districts until they were integrated into the new health care structure led by the Ministry of Health in early 2005. We examined the number of patients visiting our clinic before and during the security threats related to the parliamentary election and subsequent national assembly in 2004. The number of patients declined in remote clinics while the number increased in central locations. This finding has an important practical implication: the monitoring of access to care should include remote clinics, otherwise it may potentially underestimate compromised access to health care due to security threats.

  10. Tartan Turf on trial. A comparison of intercollegiate football injuries occurring on natural grass and Tartan Turf.

    PubMed

    Keene, J S; Narechania, R G; Sachtjen, K M; Clancy, W G

    1980-01-01

    We retro- and prospectively compared collegiate football injuries that occurred on the grass and Tartan Turf (3M Company, St. Paul, Minnesota) fields at the University of Wisconsin. Retrospective injury data were obtained from questionnaires returned by 235 of 450 athletes that competed from 1960 to 1973. Prospective injury data were obtained by examination of athletes injured from 1975 through 1977. Although the number of injuries occurring on each playing surface were not significantly different, the type and severity of injuries were significantly different. We found that significantly more serious sprains and torn ligaments occurred on grass than occurred on Tartan Turf. There were significantly more scrapes (minor injuries) on the Tartan Turf than on the grass. We conclude that we may be prematurely returning to natural grass playing surfaces, and--to the detriment of the athlete--ending production of one synthetic turf that helped reduce major injuries.

  11. Land subsidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    In November 1966, sixty percent of Venice, Italy, is inundated by a storm surge that causes waters in the Venetian lagoon to rise more than 6 feet. On December 28, 1971, a janitor at the Washington Elementary School in Johnston City, Illinois, discovers sever cracking of the school. In January 1972, the school is abandoned and subsequently razed. In the 1970's, five homes in New Orleans, Louisiana, are destroyed by gas explosins. In May 198, a 350 feet diameter sink-hole forms in a business area in Winter Park, Florida, and swallows a home and parts of several businesses. In August 1983, Hurricane Alicia slams into the texas Gulf Coast near Houston, Texas, and devastates the 500 home Brownwood subdivision on the north end of Galveston Bay. Homes are torn from their foundations and reduced to rubble. 

  12. Thermal modeling of subducted plates: tear and hotspot at the Kamchatka corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaille, Anne; Lees, Jonathan M.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific plate subduction at the Aleutian-Kamchatka juncture, or corner, could be accommodated by either a large bend or a tear in the oceanic lithosphere. In this paper, we describe a number of observations which suggest that the Pacific plate terminates abruptly at the Bering transform zone (TZ). Seismicity shoals along the subduction zone from Southern Kamchatka (600 km) to relatively shallow depths near the Kamchatka-Bering Fault intersection (100-200 km). This seismicity shoaling is accompanied by an increase in the heat flow values measured on the Pacific plate. Moreover, unusual volcanic products related to adakites are erupted on Kamchatka peninsula at the juncture. Simple thermal modeling shows that a slab torn and thinner along the northern edge of the Pacific plate would be compatible with the observations. Delayed thickening of the lithosphere due to the Meiji-Hawaiian hotspot may be responsible for the required thinning.

  13. Conservative treatment of rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Bytomski, Jeffrey R; Black, Douglass

    2006-01-01

    Across all ages and activity levels, rotator cuff injuries are one of the most common causes of shoulder pain. The anatomy and biomechanics of the shoulder guide the history and physical exam toward the appropriate treatment of rotator cuff injuries. Rotator cuff tears are rare under the age of 40 unless accompanied by acute trauma. Throwing athletes are prone to rotator cuff injury from various causes of impingement (subacromial, internal, or secondary) and flexibility deficits, strength deficits, or both along the kinetic chain. Most rotator cuff injuries may be treated conservatively by using regimens of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroid injections, and functional rehabilitation therapy. Injury prevention programs are essential for the long-term care of patients with rotator cuff disease, for primary prevention, and for prevention of recurrent injuries, unless a traumatically torn rotator cuff is present. Surgical management is reserved for refractory cases that have exhausted conservative measures.

  14. Investigating the Pulse Mode Laser Joining of Overlapped Plastic and Metal Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauernhuber, Andor; Markovits, Tamás; Takács, János

    The growing utilization of plastic materials in our devices calls for joining them with traditional, often applied structural materials, like metals. Laser assisted metal plastic joining can be used to solve the problem mentioned above, however, relatively few materials have been investigated which could be used to create this special joint. In the course of this research, authors used pulse mode Nd:YAG laser source, structural steel and poly(methyl methacrylate) to create joining between rarely examined material pairs so far, and to explore the effects of technological settings like laser pulse shape, laser spot size, welding speed and joint strength. Material surfaces were also modified (sand blasting,) to enhance joint properties. In plastic material during joining and torn surfaces were investigated. Joints with good strength results were prepared to enable further research on transparent-absorbent metal plastic joining.

  15. Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Attansi, E.D.; DeYoung, J.H. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports that the outlook for exploration depends on the economic health of the mining industry and, in turn, general economic conditions. It is too early to determine the overall impact of the cessation of hostilities in the Persian Gulf War. Its conclusion would allow funds to be redirected to individual country's economies. The rebuilding of the war-damaged countries will probably translate into net increases in demand for the minerals industry. A return to stability in energy costs will also benefit the mining industry. Alternatively, the capital requirements to rebuild war-torn countries could put some strain on capital markets and affect the funds available for private commercial investment. Along with increasing the cost of capital to mining operations, a capital shortage could stall recovery of western industrialized economies that are currently in recession.

  16. Population stochastic modelling (PSM)--an R package for mixed-effects models based on stochastic differential equations.

    PubMed

    Klim, Søren; Mortensen, Stig Bousgaard; Kristensen, Niels Rode; Overgaard, Rune Viig; Madsen, Henrik

    2009-06-01

    The extension from ordinary to stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is an emerging field and has been motivated in a number of articles [N.R. Kristensen, H. Madsen, S.H. Ingwersen, Using stochastic differential equations for PK/PD model development, J. Pharmacokinet. Pharmacodyn. 32 (February(1)) (2005) 109-141; C.W. Tornøe, R.V. Overgaard, H. Agersø, H.A. Nielsen, H. Madsen, E.N. Jonsson, Stochastic differential equations in NONMEM: implementation, application, and comparison with ordinary differential equations, Pharm. Res. 22 (August(8)) (2005) 1247-1258; R.V. Overgaard, N. Jonsson, C.W. Tornøe, H. Madsen, Non-linear mixed-effects models with stochastic differential equations: implementation of an estimation algorithm, J. Pharmacokinet. Pharmacodyn. 32 (February(1)) (2005) 85-107; U. Picchini, S. Ditlevsen, A. De Gaetano, Maximum likelihood estimation of a time-inhomogeneous stochastic differential model of glucose dynamics, Math. Med. Biol. 25 (June(2)) (2008) 141-155]. PK/PD models are traditionally based ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with an observation link that incorporates noise. This state-space formulation only allows for observation noise and not for system noise. Extending to SDEs allows for a Wiener noise component in the system equations. This additional noise component enables handling of autocorrelated residuals originating from natural variation or systematic model error. Autocorrelated residuals are often partly ignored in PK/PD modelling although violating the hypothesis for many standard statistical tests. This article presents a package for the statistical program R that is able to handle SDEs in a mixed-effects setting. The estimation method implemented is the FOCE(1) approximation to the population likelihood which is generated from the individual likelihoods that are approximated using the Extended Kalman Filter's one-step predictions.

  17. Diary of an astronaut: examination of the remains of the late Israeli astronaut Colonel Ilan Ramon's Crew Notebook recovered after the loss of NASA's space shuttle Columbia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon; Sin-David, Laser

    2007-05-01

    Two months after the fatal re-entering into the Earth's atmosphere of Columbia flight STS-107, the remains of Israeli astronaut Colonel Ilan Ramon's Crew Notebook were found strewn in a field in San Augustine County, TX. The random pile of papers was found to have survived the calamity of the Shuttle's disintegration remarkably well. Most of the papers recovered were torn and/or washed out to varying degrees but only mildly charred around the edges. The sheets of paper could be categorized into four groups: Group I: eight sides of paper written while in space in black ink and in pencil--Ramon's personal diary; the writing on these eight sides of paper survived well and is only missing where the pages were torn. Small fragments found in the field were physically matched to holes in the pages thus locating their original positions in the text. Group II: six sides of technical preparation notes written by Ramon before the mission. The writing on these pages was washed out entirely, but much of it was visualized using infrared luminescence. Group III: eight sides of personal notes prepared by Ramon before the mission written in blue ink. The writing on these pages was barely visible to the naked eye and not visualized by infrared luminescence, but was made largely legible by digital enhancement imaging. Group IV: a few sides of printed technical information. These pages were mostly intact and were not examined at length as they contained standard printed material. After completion of examinations at the Questioned Document Laboratory of the Israel Police, the diary was transferred to the Paper Conservation Department of the Israel Museum for preservation and strengthening treatments.

  18. The potential of optical coherence tomography in meniscal tear characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hang-yin; Guo, Shuguang; Thieman, Kelley M.; Wise, Brent T.; Pozzi, Antonio; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2009-02-01

    Meniscal tear is one of the most common knee injuries leading to pain and discomfort. Partial and total meniscectomies have been widely used to treat the avascular meniscal injuries in which tears do not heal spontaneously. However, the meniscectomies would cause an alteration of the tibiofemoral contact mechanics resulting in progressive osteoarthritis (OA). To mitigate the progression of OA, maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is recommended. The clinical challenge is deciding which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and which part of damaged tissues should be removed. Current diagnosis techniques such as arthroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging can provide macrostructural information of menisci, but the microstructural changes that occur prior to the observable meniscal tears cannot be identified by these techniques. Serving as a nondestructive optical biopsy, optical coherence tomography (OCT), a newly developed imaging modality, can provide high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissues and has been shown its capabilty in arthroscopic evaulation of articular cartilage. Our research was to demonstrate the potential of using OCT for nondestructive characterization of the histopathology of different types of meniscal tears from clinical cases in dogs, providing a fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of meniscal tears. First, cross-sectional images of torn canine menisci obtained from the OCT and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were be compared. By studying the organization of collegan fibrils in torn menisci from the SEM images, the feasibility of using OCT to characterize the organization of collegan fibrils was elucidated. Moreover, the crack size of meniscal tears was quantatitively measured from the OCT images. Changes in the crack size of the tear may be useful for understanding the failure mechanism of meniscal tears.

  19. Warping and tearing of misaligned circumbinary disks around eccentric supermassive black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaki, K.; Sohn, B.W.; Jung, T.; Zhao, G.; Okazaki, A.T.; Naito, T. E-mail: bwsohn@kasi.re.kr E-mail: thjung@kasi.re.kr E-mail: tsuguya@ygu.ac.jp

    2015-07-01

    We study the warping and tearing of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on an eccentric orbit. The circumbinary disk is significantly misaligned with the binary orbital plane, and is subject to the time-dependent tidal torques. In principle, such a disk is warped and precesses, and is torn into mutually misaligned rings in the region, where the tidal precession torques are stronger than the local viscous torques. We derive the tidal-warp and tearing radii of the misaligned circumbinary disks around eccentric SMBH binaries. We find that in disks with the viscosity parameter α larger than a critical value depending on the disk aspect ratio, the disk warping appears outside the tearing radius. This condition is expressed for small amplitude warps as α > √H/(3r) for H/r∼<0.1, where H is the disk scale height. If α < √H/(3r), only the disk tearing occurs because the tidal warp radius is inside the tearing radius, where most of disk material is likely to rapidly accrete onto SMBHs. In warped and torn disks, both the tidal-warp and the tearing radii most strongly depend on the binary semi-major axis, although they also mildly depend on the other orbital and disk parameters. This strong dependence enables us to estimate the semi-major axis, once the tidal warp or tearing radius is determined observationally: for the tidal warp radius of 0.1 pc, the semi-major axis is estimated to be ∼10{sup −2} pc for 10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙} black hole with typical orbital and disk parameters. We also briefly discuss the possibility that central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are supermassive black hole binaries.

  20. Skeletal ligament healing using the recombinant human amelogenin protein.

    PubMed

    Hanhan, Salem; Ejzenberg, Ayala; Goren, Koby; Saba, Faris; Suki, Yarden; Sharon, Shay; Shilo, Dekel; Waxman, Jacob; Spitzer, Elad; Shahar, Ron; Atkins, Ayelet; Liebergall, Meir; Blumenfeld, Anat; Deutsch, Dan; Haze, Amir

    2016-05-01

    Injuries to ligaments are common, painful and debilitating, causing joint instability and impaired protective proprioception sensation around the joint. Healing of torn ligaments usually fails to take place, and surgical replacement or reconstruction is required. Previously, we showed that in vivo application of the recombinant human amelogenin protein (rHAM(+)) resulted in enhanced healing of the tooth-supporting tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether amelogenin might also enhance repair of skeletal ligaments. The rat knee medial collateral ligament (MCL) was chosen to prove the concept. Full thickness tear was created and various concentrations of rHAM(+), dissolved in propylene glycol alginate (PGA) carrier, were applied to the transected MCL. 12 weeks after transection, the mechanical properties, structure and composition of transected ligaments treated with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) were similar to the normal un-transected ligaments, and were much stronger, stiffer and organized than control ligaments, treated with PGA only. Furthermore, the proprioceptive free nerve endings, in the 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) treated group, were parallel to the collagen fibres similar to their arrangement in normal ligament, while in the control ligaments the free nerve endings were entrapped in the scar tissue at different directions, not parallel to the axis of the force. Four days after transection, treatment with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) increased the amount of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers at the injured site. In conclusion application of rHAM(+) dose dependently induced mechanical, structural and sensory healing of torn skeletal ligament. Initially the process involved recruitment and proliferation of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers.

  1. Mechanized and natural soil-to-air transfer of trifluralin and prometryn from a cotton field in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Holmén, Britt A; Kasumba, John; Hiscox, April; Wang, Junming; Miller, David

    2013-10-16

    Two pre-emergence herbicides (trifluralin and prometryn) were applied on a cotton field in Las Cruces, New Mexico, and their atmospheric particle and gas-phase concentrations were measured during mechanized soil preparation and natural wind erosion sampling events before and after herbicide application. Air sampling was conducted using samplers mounted at various heights from the ground and at various locations on the field. During mechanized soil management with a disk harrow, sampling occurred at two distances from the tractor ("near-source", 4 m downwind and "far-source", 20-100 m from the disking tractor). Natural background (no disking) sampling events occurred during daytime and at night. Both herbicides were quantifiable for all postapplication sampling events, including background sampling that occurred 8, 38, and 40 days after herbicide application. Average concentrations in both the gas and particle phases ranged from about 10 to 350 ng/m(3). Averaging by event type, mean total prometryn concentrations were 2 (night background) to 8 (near-source) times higher than the corresponding trifluralin concentrations. Prometryn/trifluralin ratios were higher in airborne samples than in soil, indicative of trifluralin losses during daytime sampling, possibly via atmospheric reactions. Prometryn particle phase mass fractions were generally higher than those for trifluralin for all sampling events, consistent with Kair/soil-oc partition coefficients, and particle-phase mass fractions were higher for near-source disking and daytime background sampling compared to far-source and nighttime. Daytime natural background prometryn concentrations could be as high as those measured during disking, and background samples showed significant relationships to meteorological parameters (air temperature, relative humidity, and dewpoint). Mechanical disturbance by tilling operations reduced the ability to predict airborne herbicide concentrations on the basis of meteorological

  2. Andic soils : mineralogical effect onto organic matter dynamics, organic matter effect onto mineral dynamics, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Amundson, Ronald; Balesdent, Jérome; Borschneck, Daniel; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Colin, Fabrice; de Junet, Alexis; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Legros, Samuel; Levard, Clément; Masion, Armand; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Rose, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    From a strictly mineralogical point of view, weathering of volcanic glass produces secondary phases that are short range ordered alumino-silicates (SRO-AlSi). These are imogolite tubes (2 to 3 nm of diameter) and allophane supposedly spheres (3.5 to 5 nm). Their local structure is composed of a curved gibbsite Al layer and Si tetrahedra in the vacancies (Q0). Proto-imogolites have the same local structure but are roof-shape nanoparticles likely representing the precursors of imogolite and allophanes (Levard et al. 2010). These structures and sizes give to the SRO-AlSi large specific surfaces and high reactivities. In some natural sites, imogolites and allophanes are formed in large quantities. Aging of these phases may lead to the formation of more stable minerals (halloysite, kaolinite and gibbsite) (Torn et al 1997). In natural environments, when the weathering of volcanic glass is associated with the establishment of vegetation, the soils formed are generally andosols. These soils are particularly rich in organic matter (OM), which is explained by the high ability of SRO-AlSi mineral phases to form bonds with organic compounds. In a first order "bulk" approach, it is considered that these bonds strongly stabilize the organic compounds as their mean age can reach more than 10 kyrs in some studied sites (Basile-Doelsch et al. 2005; Torn et al. 1997). However, the structure of the mineral phases present in andosols deserves more attention. Traditionally, the presence in the SRO-AlSi andosols was shown by selective dissolution approaches by oxalate and pyrophosphate. Using spectroscopic methods, mineralogical analysis of SRO-AlSi in andosols samples showed that these mineral phases were neither imogolites nor allophanes as originally supposed, but only less organized structures remained in a state of proto-imogolites (Basile-Doelsch al. 2005 ; Levard et al., 2012). The presence of OM would have an inhibitory effect on the formation of secondary mineral phases, by

  3. Human β-NGF gene transferred to cat corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen-Juan; Liu, Min; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Wang, Chuan-Fu; Hu, Li-Ting; Liu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM To transfect the cat corneal endothelial cells (CECs) with recombinant human β-nerve growth factor gene adeno-associated virus (AAV-β-NGF) and to observe the effect of the expressed β-NGF protein on the proliferation activity of cat CECs. METHODS The endothelium of cat cornea was torn under the microscope and rapidly cultivated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) to form single layer CECs and the passage 2 endothelial cells were used in this experiment. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was constructed. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was transferred into cat CECs directly. Three groups were as following: normal CEC control group, CEC-AAV control group and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group. Forty-eight hours after transfection, the total RNA was extracted from the CEC by Trizol. The expression of the β-NGF target gene detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction; proliferation activity of the transfected CEC detected at 48h by MTT assay; the percentage of G1 cells among CECs after transfect was detected by flow cytometry method (FCM); cell morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast microscope. RESULTS The torn endothelium culture technique rapidly cultivated single layer cat corneal endothelial cells. The self-designed primers for the target gene and reference gene were efficient and special confirmed through electrophoresis analysis and DNA sequencing. Forty-eight hours after transfect, the human β-NGF gene mRNA detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05); there was significant difference between two control groups and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group (P<0.05). MTT assay showed that transfect of recombinant AAV-β-NGF promoted the proliferation activity of cat CEC, while there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05). FCM result

  4. Assessing soil hydrological variability at the cm- to dm-scale using air permeameter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beerten, K.; Vandersmissen, N.; Rogiers, B.; Mallants, D.

    2012-04-01

    Soils and surficial sediments are crucial elements in the hydrological cycle since they are the medium through which infiltrating precipitation percolates to the aquifer. At the same time, soil horizons and shallow stratigraphy may act as hydraulic barriers that can promote runoff or interflow and hamper deep infiltration. For most catchments little is known about the small-scale horizontal and vertical variability of soil hydrological properties. Such information is however required to calculate detailed soil water flow paths and estimate small scale spatial variability in recharge and run-off. We present the results from field air permeameter measurements to assess the small-scale variability of saturated hydraulic conductivity in heterogeneous 2-D soil profiles. To this end, several outcrops in the unsaturated zone (sandy soils with podzolisation) of an interfluve in the Kleine Nete river catchment (Campine area, Northern Belgium) were investigated using a hand-held permeameter. Measurements were done each 10 cm on ~ 2 x 1 m or ~ 2 x 0.5 m grids. The initial results of the measurements (air permeability Kair; millidarcy) are recalculated to saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks; m/s) using specific transfer functions (Loll et al., 1999; Iversen et al., 2003). Validation of the results is done with independent lab-based constant head Ks measurements. The results show that field based Ks values generally range between 10-3 m/s and 10-7 m/s within one profile, but extremely high values (up to 10-1 m/s) have been measured as well. The lowest values are found in the organic- and silt-rich Bh horizon of podzol soils observed within the profiles (~ 10-6-10-7m/s), while the highest values are observed in overlying dune sands less than 40 cm deep (up to 10-3 m/s with outliers to 10-1 m/s). Comparison of field and laboratory based Ks data reveals there is fair agreement between both methods, apart from several outliers. Scatter plots indicate that almost all points

  5. Clinical analysis of the pivot shift tests: description of the pivot drawer test.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A F; Rennirt, G W; Standeffer, W C

    2000-01-01

    A clinical analysis of the pivot shift was performed by evaluating 100 patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency in an office setting. Each patient was examined in a random order using the Macintosh, Losee, Hughston, Slocum, pivot drawer, and flexion rotation drawer versions of the pivot shift test. Pathologic anterior tibial displacement was estimated with the Lachman test and quantitatively measured using the KT-1000 knee ligament arthrometer. Pivot shift was graded as 0 (absent), grade I (slight), grade II (definite subluxation), and grade III (subluxation and momentary locking). The presence or absence of any degree of pivot shift was correlated with the arthroscopic finding of a torn ACL. Results indicated the "drawer type" tests were significantly more sensitive than other versions of the pivot shift because they can be performed without causing significant pain and muscle spasm, and the limb position maximizes pathologic coupled motion. A correlation between increasing displacement estimated with the Lachman test and measured displacement with the KT-1000 arthrometer revealed that as pathologic displacement increases so does the grade of the Slocum, pivot drawer, and flexion rotation drawer tests. We recommend using the pivot drawer or flexion rotation drawer as a standard method for assessing the pivot shift phenomenon.

  6. Complete structure of the bacterial flagellar hook reveals extensive set of stabilizing interactions

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Hideyuki; Barker, Clive S.; Yoon, Young-Ho; Wolf, Matthias; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar hook is a tubular helical structure made by the polymerization of multiple copies of a protein, FlgE. Here we report the structure of the hook from Campylobacter jejuni by cryo-electron microscopy at a resolution of 3.5 Å. On the basis of this structure, we show that the hook is stabilized by intricate inter-molecular interactions between FlgE molecules. Extra domains in FlgE, found only in Campylobacter and in related bacteria, bring more stability and robustness to the hook. Functional experiments suggest that Campylobacter requires an unusually strong hook to swim without its flagella being torn off. This structure reveals details of the quaternary organization of the hook that consists of 11 protofilaments. Previous study of the flagellar filament of Campylobacter by electron microscopy showed its quaternary structure made of seven protofilaments. Therefore, this study puts in evidence the difference between the quaternary structures of a bacterial filament and its hook. PMID:27811912

  7. On the Symmetry of Ionospheric Polar Cap Patch Exits Around Magnetic Midnight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, J. I.; Hosokawa, K.; Gulbrandsen, N.; Clausen, L.

    2014-12-01

    We present continuous observations of polar cap patches exiting the polar cap ionosphere into the night time auoral oval. Satellite images of the auroral oval and all-sky camera observations of 630.0 nm airglow patches superimposed onto SuperDARN convection maps, reveals a detailed picture on how patches exiting the polar cap and return to the dayside at night, on both the dusk convection cell and the dawn convection cell. We also present eight years of statistics demonstrating that the MLT distribution of patch exits are marginally affected by the IMF BY polarity 3-4 hours around midnight. Synthesizing our observations with previous results there are two, possibly related, explanations to why patches populate both convection cells almost symmetrically. i) Intake of patch material occur on both convection cells for both IMF BY polarities. ii) According to the patch formation model by Lockwood and Carlson et al. [1992] the excitation of flow associated with transient dayside reconnection produces cigar-shaped patches stretching across both the morning and the evening convection cells. Applying the dynamic polar cap flow model by Cowley and Lockwood [1992], we suggest that dawn-dusk elongated patches may be torn apart at night when they are grabbed by transient tail reconnection. The associated twin cell flow disturbance expanding from the reconnection region will divert plasma towards dawn and dusk. This may explain the observed exits on both convection cells.

  8. Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion of Polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmanski, Jevan; Cady, Carl; Rae, Philip; Trujillo, Carl; Gray, G. T., III; Brown, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Polyurea was investigated under Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) loading where spherical projectiles were propelled at 440-509 m/s through an extrusion die with an area reduction of 87%. Momentum of the leading edge imposes a rapid tensile deformation on the extruding material. Polyurea is an elastomer with outstanding high-rate tensile performance of interest in the shock regime. Previous Dyn-Ten-Ext work on semi-crystalline polymers (PTFE, PCTFE) resulted in small-scale fragmentation of the polymer, and did not provide clear information on the evolution of tensile damage in those materials. The polyurea behaved very differently; the polymer first extruded a jet of apparently intact material, which then broke down via void formation and coalescence, followed by fibrillation and tearing of the material. Most of the material in the jet elastically retracted back into the die, and only a few fragments of torn material were liberated from the sample. The surface texture of all failed surfaces was rough indicating a considerable amount of energy was absorbed by sub-critical failure mechanisms. It is interesting to note that while damage nucleation appeared pervasive in the extruded jet, the samples were nevertheless recovered largely intact, with limited fragmentation.

  9. [Dynamic examination technique in meniscus sonography].

    PubMed

    Füsting, M; Casser, H R

    1991-03-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce an improved dynamic examination technique for sonographic assessment of the menisci, a technique that takes into account the special anatomy and function of the knee joint. The dynamic examination technique was used together with a 7.5 mhz sector transducer fitted with a water or PVC pad attachment when the area around the anterior horn and the pars intermedia was being scanned. Misinterpretation as a result of confusing reflections from a tear with the Hoffa fatty pad, popliteal tendon or popliteal groove can be largely avoided owing to the better sonoanatomic imaging and orientation. Diagnosing lesions of the meniscus from echogenic torn surfaces has also become easier thanks to dynamic examination. 60 patients with, for the most part, chronic knee-joint complaints were selected. A comparison of sonographic and arthroscopic findings demonstrated that large percentages of tears in the meniscus can be detected (76.7%) or ruled out (90.0%), and that recent longitudinal tears, flap and non-luxated bucket-handle tears can be considered to be "ideal" tear shapes. Because of its high specificity, sonography of the meniscus presents itself as a suitable method when lesions have to be ruled out, especially in recent knee injuries where clinical findings are unclear. On the other hand, if there are sure indications of a tear, sonography of the meniscus makes it possible to introduce therapeutic measures immediately and thereby to avoid any possible secondary damage.

  10. Rational rejection? The ethical complications of assessing organ transplant candidates in the United Kingdom and the United States.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Lisa

    2010-09-01

    The practice of allocating scarce organs in medicine is an ethical minefield. Due to the organ shortage, organ procurement agencies in both the United Kingdom and the United States are placed in the unenviable position of having to choose a limited number of patients to compete equally for life-saving treatment. They do this by composing multidisciplinary transplant teams, which must evaluate transplant candidates and their complex range of personal, medical, environmental, psychiatric and financial characteristics. During the candidate assessment process, such teams may often be torn between their moral duty to save those who are most in need, considerations of efficiency, and the battle against forming moral judgments about particular candidates. Several ethical approaches can be adopted by transplant teams during the decision-making process, but do these ideologies provide adequate justification for their sometimes controversial decisions? This article provides a detailed examination of the ethical principles available to transplant teams in the United Kingdom and the United States, and the effect that these principles have on assessment procedures, organ allocation protocols, transplant candidates and their prospects.

  11. Impact of a cylindrical rod on a concentrated particle suspension: dynamics, crack growth and relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myftiu, Eglind; Roche, Matthieu; Kim, Pilnam; Stone, Howard A.

    2010-11-01

    Many highly concentrated particle suspensions are shear thickening; the viscosity increases with shear rate. The physics underlying shear thickening is still under discussion. In recent years, it was pointed out that shear thickening may be connected with a liquid-to-solid phase transition of the suspension. We provide direct evidence of this transition by studying the behavior of aqueous cornstarch suspensions of various concentration and layer thicknesses after impact of a free-falling cylindrical rod, which induces high strain rates and stresses. We observe patterns of regularly distributed radial cracks growing outwards from the impact region. Just after impact, a wave propagates on the surface of the layer and in the neighborhood of the impact a cavity expands. During this expansion, the cavity boundary is torn, and cracks start to grow. These cracks have rough boundaries, as is seen in solids. Once the cracks have reached their maximal extension, the suspension relaxes. The solvent slowly fills the cracks, until the layer returns to its initial shape. We discuss the influence of the layer thickness, starch concentration and impact energy on the dynamics of these cracks. We also discuss some properties of the solid phase of these suspensions as well as their relaxation dynamics.

  12. [Chronic anterior and internal instabilities of the knee. Theoretical study. Clinical and radiological diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lemaire, M; Miremad, C

    1983-01-01

    Antero-medial instability of the knee comprises 96 p. 100 of all knee instabilities. In most instances, the instability is moderate and cannot be analyzed without an adequate understanding of the anatomy and mechanics of the joint. They usually occur after forced movement in medial rotation which ruptures the anterior cruciate ligament and may rupture the postero-medial ligament. Less frequently, they appear after a strain in abduction, flexion and lateral rotation. Some degree of hyper-extension may be added to the primary causal strain. Diagnosis is mainly based on the physical examination which determines the type of surgical procedure that should be made. An anterior draw sign and a click in medial rotation are present when the anterior cruciate ligament is torn. When these signs are very marked, it implies an associated tear of the postero-medial ligament. Standard X-rays and arthrography are most important. Arthroscopy is not of great value and only makes it possible to visualize the meniscus lesions which are important for prognosis. The author describes an original concept of the mechanics of rotation of the knee and the pathogenesis of lesions of the medial capsulo-ligamentous layer.

  13. [Results of a longitudinal study on the psychological acceptance of contraception with Multiload Cu 250].

    PubMed

    Rauchfleisch, U

    1982-01-01

    This article assesses the psychological aspects of 6 months' use of Multiload Cu 250 IUDs inserted in 51 patients aged 19-46 years at the sociomedical service of the university women's clinic at Basel. At the time of insertion the gynecologist completed a questionnaire designed by the author and the patients completed the Fribourg Personality Inventory and the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Test. At follow-up visits 6-8 weeks and 6 months later, patients were questioned on their complications, perceived changes in fear of becoming pregnant, sexual satisfaction, and their general impression of the IUD. The rate of complications at 6 months was 37%, primarily prolonged bleeding, breakthrough bleeding, and cramps. The statistical correlation between complications and different socioeconomic parameters was not established, but the highest rate of complications was in women who already had experienced complications with other methods of contraception. After 6 months, the fear of pregnancy had strongly diminished: the proportion fearing pregnancy declined from 35 to 4%. The proportion reporting satisfactory sexual relationships increased from 78% to 94%, and 94% of patients considered contraception with the Multiload Cu 250 to be satisfactory. The patients with the highest rates of complications were those torn between the desire for a pregnancy and the absolute desire not to conceive during the time of the study. The author proposes the hypothesis that complications are the somatic manifestation of repressed conflict.

  14. VARUN: discovering extensible motifs under saturation constraints.

    PubMed

    Apostolico, Alberto; Comin, Matteo; Parida, Laxmi

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of motifs in biosequences is frequently torn between the rigidity of the model on one hand and the abundance of candidates on the other hand. In particular, motifs that include wild cards or "don't cares" escalate exponentially with their number, and this gets only worse if a don't care is allowed to stretch up to some prescribed maximum length. In this paper, a notion of extensible motif in a sequence is introduced and studied, which tightly combines the structure of the motif pattern, as described by its syntactic specification, with the statistical measure of its occurrence count. It is shown that a combination of appropriate saturation conditions and the monotonicity of probabilistic scores over regions of constant frequency afford us significant parsimony in the generation and testing of candidate overrepresented motifs. A suite of software programs called Varun is described, implementing the discovery of extensible motifs of the type considered. The merits of the method are then documented by results obtained in a variety of experiments primarily targeting protein sequence families. Of equal importance seems the fact that the sets of all surprising motifs returned in each experiment are extracted faster and come in much more manageable sizes than would be obtained in the absence of saturation constraints.

  15. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1999-01-01

    We study our Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are now on top of a mountain may once have been at the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the Sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  16. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1993-01-01

    We study out Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are not on top of a mountain may once have been on the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of the Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  17. Senseless Violence Against Central American Unaccompanied Minors: Historical Background and Call for Help.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Cheryl B; Márquez, Judith

    2017-01-02

    The southwestern U.S. border has recently seen a significant increase in the number of unaccompanied children from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador illegally crossing the Mexican border into the United States. Many of these children leave home to flee violence, starvation, impoverished living conditions, or other life-threatening situations. The treatment of acute stress, anxiety, and depression associated with traumatic events is crucial in helping these children address these negative psychological events they have experienced so that they can move forward with their lives. Untreated, traumatic events experienced by this population can develop into Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, a potentially life-changing and physically threatening psychological and medical issue. The United States needs to effectively address the serious matter of responding to mental health issues facing refugees from war-torn or impoverished nations so as to help them to successfully adjust to American systems. There is a need for researchers in the mental health field to focus efforts in designing, implementing, and evaluating methodologies that can help these children develop healthy strategies for living with a very difficult and complex past.

  18. Microcystin release and Microcystis cell damage mechanism by alum treatment with long-term and large dose as in-lake treatment.

    PubMed

    Han, Jisun; Jeon, Bong-Seok; Park, Ho-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Most of our previous studies reported aluminum causes no cell damage or lysis, and no subsequent toxin release in conventional treatment of drinking water or in the laboratory, on the contrary, we investigated the effect of long-term and large-dose alum treatment, because the environmental conditions in lakes and treatment plants are widely different. The microcosm experiments were designed to simulate the effect of adding alum under the similar conditions of common lakes and reservoirs, and the bottle experiments were conducted to examine the budget or dynamics of microcystin after adding alum. In precipitate analyses, we also confirm the release and dynamics of microcystin and the damage mechanisms of Microcystis cells under alum treatment. In microcosms treated with alum alone, the extracellular microcystin-LR (MC-LR) concentration increased to approximately 82% in 7 days. Similar results were obtained in bottle experiments. By plotting the concentration of released microcystin over time, we inferred that the extracellular MC-LR concentration exponentially rose toward an asymptotic maximum. Moreover, in scanning electron microscope images, some cells exhibited torn membranes with miniscule traces of aluminum hydroxide coating. We conclude that alum treatment, particularly at maximum dosage administered over long periods, seriously damages Microcystis cells and induces microcystin release. Therefore, long-term application of large alum doses is not recommended as an in-lake treatment.

  19. Effects of change in slab geometry on the mantle flow and slab fabric in Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja; Wagner, Lara S.; Beck, Susan L.; Long, Maureen D.; Zandt, George; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-10-01

    The effects of complex slab geometries on the surrounding mantle flow field are still poorly understood. Here we combine shear wave velocity structure with Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy to examine these effects in southern Peru, where the slab changes its geometry from steep to flat. To the south, where the slab subducts steeply, we find trench-parallel anisotropy beneath the active volcanic arc that we attribute to the mantle wedge and/or upper portions of the subducting plate. Farther north, beneath the easternmost corner of the flat slab, we observe a pronounced low-velocity anomaly. This anomaly is caused either by the presence of volatiles and/or flux melting that could result from southward directed, volatile-rich subslab mantle flow or by increased temperature and/or decompression melting due to small-scale vertical flow. We also find evidence for mantle flow through the tear north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Finally, we observe anisotropy patterns associated with the fast velocity anomalies that reveal along strike variations in the slab's internal deformation. The change in slab geometry from steep to flat contorts the subducting plate south of the Nazca Ridge causing an alteration of the slab petrofabric. In contrast, the torn slab to the north still preserves the primary (fossilized) petrofabric first established shortly after plate formation.

  20. In Situ Growth of Highly Adhesive Surface Layer on Titanium Foil as Durable Counter Electrodes for Efficient Dye-sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wantao; Xu, Peng; Guo, Yanjun; Lin, Yuan; Yin, Xiong; Tang, Guangshi; He, Meng

    2016-10-03

    Counter electrodes (CEs) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are usually fabricated by depositing catalytic materials on substrates. The poor adhesion of the catalytic material to the substrate often results in the exfoliation of catalytic materials, and then the deterioration of cell performance or even the failure of DSCs. In this study, a highly adhesive surface layer is in situ grown on the titanium foil via a facile process and applied as CEs for DSCs. The DSCs applying such CEs demonstrate decent power conversion efficiencies, 6.26% and 4.37% for rigid and flexible devices, respectively. The adhesion of the surface layer to the metal substrate is so strong that the photovoltaic performance of the devices is well retained even after the CEs are bended for 20 cycles and torn twice with adhesive tape. The results reported here indicate that the in situ growth of highly adhesive surface layers on metal substrate is a promising way to prepare durable CEs for efficient DSCs.

  1. Irregular migration: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, S M

    1984-01-01

    Despite the heightened awareness of irregular migrations worldwide, a certain misappreciation or underestimation of the saliency of irregular migration issues persists. Conflict in the strife-torn Indian state of Assam, for example, has been widely publicized, but its roots in immigration issues linked to communal tensions are insufficiently understood. Conflict around the globe seems increasingly to involve, both as cause and effect, migrants in irregular status whose problematical or illegitimate presence itself is at issue. The global recession prompted governments in immigration-welcoming countries to adopt more restrictive stances vis-a-vis immigration at a time when global migratory pressures were expanding enormously. As if by a process of demonstration effect, 1 country after another began to view migratory flows with alarm--flows which previously had been regarded as benign or quantitatively unimportant. Part I of this special issue examines a variety of public responses to irregular migration. Part II looks at legalization issues in a number of national contexts. Part III contains 3 comparative reflections on immigration reform in industrial democracies. Part IV provides an overview and sampling of recent empirical and survey research findings on irregular status migrants, primarily in the US. This special issue is intended to encourage further research on irregular migration, foster better understanding of this complex phenomenon, and contribute to enlightened public policy-making.

  2. Biomechanical Effect of Margin Convergence Techniques: Quantitative Assessment of Supraspinatus Muscle Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sperling, John W.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Although the margin convergence (MC) technique has been recognized as an option for rotator cuff repair, little is known about the biomechanical effect on repaired rotator cuff muscle, especially after supplemented footprint repair. The purpose of this study was to assess the passive stiffness changes of the supraspinatus (SSP) muscle after MC techniques using shear wave elastography (SWE). A 30 × 40-mm U-shaped rotator cuff tear was created in 8 cadaveric shoulders. Each specimen was repaired with 6 types of MC technique (1-, 2-, 3-suture MC with/without footprint repair, in a random order) at 30° glenohumeral abduction. Passive stiffness of four anatomical regions in the SSP muscle was measured based on an established SWE method. Data were obtained from the SSP muscle at 0° abduction under 8 different conditions: intact (before making a tear), torn, and postoperative conditions with 6 techniques. MC techniques using 1-, or 2-suture combined with footprint repair showed significantly higher stiffness values than the intact condition. Passive stiffness of the SSP muscle was highest after a 1-suture MC with footprint repair for all regions when compared among all repair procedures. There was no significant difference between the intact condition and a 3-suture MC with footprint repair. MC techniques with single stitch and subsequent footprint repair may have adverse effects on muscle properties and tensile loading on repair, increasing the risk of retear of repairs. Adding more MC stitches could reverse these adverse effects. PMID:27583402

  3. Tunicate-Inspired Gallic Acid/Metal Ion Complex for Instant and Efficient Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Prajatelistia, Ekavianty; Ju, Sung-Won; Sanandiya, Naresh D; Jun, Sang Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-04-20

    Dentin hypersensitivity is sharp and unpleasant pains caused by exposed dentinal tubules when enamel outside of the tooth wears away. The occlusion of dentinal tubules via in situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite is the best method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity. Commercially available dental desensitizers are generally effective only on a specific area and are relatively toxic, and their performance usually depends on the skill of the clinician. Here, a facile and efficient dentin hypersensitivity treatment with remarkable aesthetic improvement inspired by the tunicate-self-healing process is reported. As pyrogallol groups in tunicate proteins conjugate with metal ions to heal the torn body armor of a tunicate, the ingenious mechanism by introducing gallic acid (GA) as a cheap, abundant, and edible alternative to the pyrogallol groups of the tunicate combined with a varied daily intake of metal ion sources is mimicked. In particular, the GA/Fe(3+) complex exhibits the most promising results, to the instant ≈52% blockage in tubules within 4 min and ≈87% after 7 d of immersion in artificial saliva. Overall, the GA/metal ion complex-mediated coating is facile, instant, and effective, and is suggested as an aesthetic solution for treating dentin hypersensitivity.

  4. Globalisation, complex humanitarian emergencies and health.

    PubMed

    O'Dempsey, T J D; Munslow, B

    2006-01-01

    A new political economy of conflict has emerged in the aftermath of colonialism and the Cold War. Complex political emergencies have been simmering in the post-colonial world for more than three decades. Intra-country armed conflict, often combined with natural disasters, at present contributes to the displacement of over 20 million people world-wide. The international community remains profoundly uncomfortable with the complex political emergencies of the new era, torn between the respect for national sovereignty upon which the international political system of the United Nations and other agencies is built, and the growth of concern with human rights and a burgeoning International Humanitarian Law. Globalisation may have brought many benefits to some but there are also many losers. The Word Bank and the International Monetary Fund imposed structural adjustment policies to ensure debt repayment and economic restructuring that have resulted in a net reduction in expenditure on health, education and development. A downward spiral has been created of debt, disease, malnutrition, missed education, economic entrapment, poverty, powerlessness, marginalization, migration and instability. Africa's complex political emergencies are particularly virulent and tenacious. Three examples that are among the most serious humanitarian emergencies to have faced the world in recent times--those in Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Sudan--are reviewed here in detail. The political evolution of these emergencies and their impact on the health of the affected populations are also explored.

  5. Efficient control-channel multifailure management mechanism in GMPLS-based optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Raül; Martínez, Ricardo; Junyent, Gabriel

    2006-12-01

    In generalized multiprotocol label switching (GMPLS) architecture, the control channels between each pair of optical nodes are not forced to use the same physical link as the data/transport channels. The problem arises when, due to the fact of allowing the control channels to be physically diverse from the associated data links, there may not be any active control channels available while data channels are still in use. Control-channel faults should not have a service impact on the existing connections; that is, a link that is carrying data traffic must not be torn down because the control channel is no longer available. But, due to the lack of the control channel, the active traffic that is using the data link may no longer be guaranteed with the same level of recovery service (protection or restoration). Under these circumstances the link must be considered to be in a degraded state. This means that routing and signaling should be notified that new connections are not accepted and the link is advertised with no unreserved resources. For this purpose, here we propose a control-channel multifailure management mechanism involving routing, signaling, and link management with extended GMPLS-based protocol extensions to keep the same level of service (in terms of provisioning and recovery) when a link is in the degraded state.

  6. Modeling Soft Tissue Damage and Failure Using a Combined Particle/Continuum Approach.

    PubMed

    Rausch, M K; Karniadakis, G E; Humphrey, J D

    2017-02-01

    Biological soft tissues experience damage and failure as a result of injury, disease, or simply age; examples include torn ligaments and arterial dissections. Given the complexity of tissue geometry and material behavior, computational models are often essential for studying both damage and failure. Yet, because of the need to account for discontinuous phenomena such as crazing, tearing, and rupturing, continuum methods are limited. Therefore, we model soft tissue damage and failure using a particle/continuum approach. Specifically, we combine continuum damage theory with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Because SPH is a meshless particle method, and particle connectivity is determined solely through a neighbor list, discontinuities can be readily modeled by modifying this list. We show, for the first time, that an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model commonly employed for modeling soft tissue can be conveniently implemented within a SPH framework and that SPH results show excellent agreement with analytical solutions for uniaxial and biaxial extension as well as finite element solutions for clamped uniaxial extension in 2D and 3D. We further develop a simple algorithm that automatically detects damaged particles and disconnects the spatial domain along rupture lines in 2D and rupture surfaces in 3D. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by simulating damage and failure under clamped uniaxial extension and in a peeling experiment of virtual soft tissue samples. In conclusion, SPH in combination with continuum damage theory may provide an accurate and efficient framework for modeling damage and failure in soft tissues.

  7. The Use of Remote Sensing Data for Advancing America's Energy Policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valinia, Azita; Seery, Bernard D.

    2010-01-01

    After briefly reviewing America's Energy Policy laid out by the Obama Administration, we outline how a Global Carbon Observing System designed to monitor Carbon from space can provide the necessary data and tools to equip decision makers with the knowledge necessary to formulate effective energy use and practices policy. To stabilize greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere in a manner that it does not interfere with the Earth's climate system (which is one of the goals of United Nations Framework for Convention on Climate Change) requires vastly improved prediction of the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. This in torn requires a robust understanding of the carbon exchange mechanisms between atmosphere, land, and oceans and a clear understanding of the sources and sinks (i.e. uptake and storage) of CO2. We discuss how the Carbon Observing System from space aids in better understanding of the connection between the carbon cycle and climate change and provides more accurate predictions of atmospheric CO2 concentration. It also enables implementation of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation policies such as cap and trade programs, international climate treaties, as well as formulation of effective energy use policies.

  8. Six decades of educational multilateralism in a globalising world: The history of the UNESCO Institute in Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfert, Maren

    2013-07-01

    Created in 1945 as a specialised agency of the United Nations (UN), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) was given, among other mandates, the task of reconstructing education systems devastated during the Second World War. UNESCO, in turn, and after some debate about an engagement in Germany, founded the UNESCO Institute for Education (UIE) in Hamburg in 1952. This paper traces the development of an institute which was founded to contribute to social renewal in war-torn Germany and Europe, functioned as a mediator between Western and Eastern countries during the Cold War and later shifted its geographical focus to developing countries. The institute was instrumental in conceptualising lifelong learning as a global educational paradigm, as well as in shaping the shift from education to learning and the concept of literacy as a "continuum". The author is particularly interested in the nature of the institute's niche which secured its survival in the uncertain domain of educational multilateralism in the past six decades.

  9. Polysulfones for conservation in the ethylene-polymer industry

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Meyer; Yoo, Hee Ju; Elling, David; Bernstein, Philip; Varker, Alan E.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation of ethylene-SO/sub 2/ polysulfone copolymers by cobalt-60 gamma irradiation, as well as by chemical catalysis, as a means of incorporating a polluting waste material such as SO/sub 2/ into useful ethylene polymers and also for the purpose of conserving ethylene feedstock is described. The physical properties of the copolymer were determined, and it was found that the copolymer is soluble in ethylene diamine and its homologues, hot concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and cold 45% KOH. Also found was that it had no glass transition temperature, Tg, and no crystalline melting temperature, Tm, but had a decomposition temperature near 350/sup 0/C. The copolymer was pressure molded into discs at elevated temperatures, 150 to 200/sup 0/C, which had a high degree of hardness but were brittle and inhomogeneous (partly clear and partly cloudy). Sheets of the copolymer were also prepared by mixing the powdered copolymer with 4 to 5% Teflon powder on a hot tow-roll mill. The sheets thus prepared had low strength and were easily torn, but were somewhat porous and oil-absorbent. The addition of small quantities of a third monomer resulted in products containing copolymers of the modifying monomer. These modified polymers appeared soluble in common solvents. A summary of accomplishments, conclusions, and suggestions for future work are presented.

  10. Nucleus-dependent sarcomere assembly is mediated by the LINC complex

    PubMed Central

    Auld, Alexander L.; Folker, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Two defining characteristics of muscle cells are the many precisely positioned nuclei and the linearly arranged sarcomeres, yet the relationship between these two features is not known. We show that nuclear positioning precedes sarcomere formation. Furthermore, ZASP-GFP, a Z-line protein, colocalizes with F-actin in puncta at the cytoplasmic face of nuclei before sarcomere assembly. In embryos with mispositioned nuclei, ZASP-GFP is still recruited to the nuclei before its incorporation into sarcomeres. Furthermore, the first sarcomeres appear in positions close to the nuclei, regardless of nuclear position. These data suggest that the interaction between sarcomere proteins and nuclei is not dependent on properly positioned nuclei. Mechanistically, ZASP-GFP localization to the cytoplasmic face of the nucleus did require the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Muscle-specific depletion of klarsicht (nesprin) or klariod (SUN) blocked the recruitment of ZASP-GFP to the nucleus during the early stages of sarcomere assembly. As a result, sarcomeres were poorly formed and the general myofibril network was less stable, incomplete, and/or torn. These data suggest that the nucleus, through the LINC complex, is crucial for the proper assembly and stability of the sarcomere network. PMID:27307582

  11. Performance of a 16.6 Meter Diameter Modified Ringsail Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Performance of a 16.6 Meter Diameter Modified Ringsail Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment. Inflation, drag, and stability characteristics of a 54.5 -foot nominal-diameter (16.6-meter) modified ringsail parachute deployed in the wake of a 15-foot-diameter (4.6-meter) spacecraft traveling at a Mach number of 1.6 and a dynamic pressure equal to 11.6 psf (555 N/m(exp 2)) were obtained from the third balloon-launched flight test of the Planetary Entry Parachute Program. After deployment, the parachute inflated rapidly to a full condition, partially collapsed, and reinflated to a stable configuration. After reinflation, an average drag coefficient near 0.6 based on nominal surface area was obtained. During descent, an aerodynamic trim angle was observed in a plane near several torn sails. Amplitude of the trim was approximately 15 degrees and oscillation about trim was less than 11 degrees. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030996. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  12. The Debris Streams from Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    When a star comes within a critical distance of a supermassive black hole, the tidal force exerted by the hole overcomes the stellar self-gravity. The star is subsequently torn apart, creating a stream of tidally-shredded debris that initially recedes from the hole, eventually returns to pericenter, forms an accretion disk and generates a highly luminous event that can sometimes be accompanied by the production of relativistic jets. This entire process is known as a tidal disruption event (TDE), and dozens of these events have already been observed. I will discuss my most recent work that has analyzed the tidal disruption process, and in particular I will focus on the results of numerical and analytical investigations that show that the streams of debris produced during TDEs can be gravitationally unstable. Specifically, I will describe how compressive motions augment the importance of self-gravity not long after the star is disrupted, resulting in the fragmentation of the debris stream into small-scale clumps. These findings will be discussed in the context of the observational signatures of tidal disruption events, and I will also relate these results to my past investigations concerning accretion disk formation and jet launching during TDEs.

  13. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  14. Reconstructed animation from four-phase grip MRI of the wrist with ulnar-sided pain.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Wada, T; Iba, K; Aoki, M; Tamakawa, M; Yamashita, T

    2013-09-01

    In order to visualize dynamic variations related to ulnar-sided wrist pain, animation was reconstructed from T2* coronal-sectioned magnetic resonance imaging in each of the four phases of grip motion for nine wrists in patients with ulnar pain. Eight of the nine wrists showed a positive ulnar variance of less than 2 mm. Ulnocarpal impaction and triangular fibrocartilage complex injury were assessed on the basis of animation and arthroscopy, respectively. Animation revealed ulnocarpal impaction in four wrists. In one of the four wrists, the torn portion of the articular disc was impinged between the ulnar head and ulnar proximal side of the lunate. In another wrist, the ulnar head impacted the lunate directly through the defect in the articular disc that had previously been excised. An ulnar shortening osteotomy successfully relieved ulnar wrist pain in all four cases with both ulnocarpal impaction and Palmer's Class II triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. This method demonstrated impairment of the articular disc and longitudinal instability of the distal radioulnar joint simultaneously and should be of value in investigating dynamic pathophysiology causing ulnar wrist pain.

  15. A model for liquid film in steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Amelie; Marcelet, Meryem; Herard, Jean-Marc; Dorey, Jean-Marc; Lance, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Wetness in steam turbines induces losses and erosion. Drops are created due to the fast expansion of the steam (homogeneous nucleation) and the impurities in the steam (heterogeneous nucleation). The droplets grow and some among them settle on the blade leading to a thin liquid film. This film may then be atomized into coarse water drops which crash on the following blades. The liquid film configuration is a thin film on a curved surface, created by the drop deposit and under high steam friction. In steam turbines, the liquid film is subject to high rotational effect (rotor) and/or to negative gravity. Moreover, due to interfacial instabilities, some drops are torn off from the film. The retained approach is an integral formulation of the Navier-Stokes equation (or shallow water equation) with specific terms. The derivation of these equations requires some closure laws for the convection contributions, the Coriolis terms and for terms related to the additional mass coming from the drops deposit. Once chosen, mathematical and mechanical analyses are performed (hyperbolicity, entropy, galilean and rotational invariance). A two-dimensional code has been developed based on finite volume method to simulate numerically this liquid film model for steam turbines.

  16. Plans for first oil production revived in two Sudanese fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-03

    A Vancouver, British Columbia, independent and its Sudanese partner have filed a development plan with the government of Sudan to produce an initial 40,000 b/d from Heglig and Unity oil fields in Sudan. Arakis Energy Corp., and the private Sudanese company State Petroleum Corp. (SPC) want to begin the first commercial hydrocarbon production in the destitute, war torn country. They are picking up where Chevron Corp. left off after years of grappling with an ambitious, costly - and ultimately futile - effort to export crude-oil from Sudan. After finding almost 300 million bbl of oil in Sudan during the early 1980s, Chevron scuttled a $2 billion project to export 50,000 b/d of Sudanese crude in 1986. It drilled 90 wells and sank more than $1 billion into the project. But it dropped the plan, citing the 1986 collapse of oil prices and concerns over security after repeated guerrilla attacks delayed work. The paper details the project.

  17. Study of nucleolar behavior during spermatogenesis in Martarega brasiliensis (Heteroptera, Notonectidae).

    PubMed

    Pereira, L L V; Alevi, K C C; Moreira, F F F; Barbosa, J F; Silistino-Souza, E R; Silva Júnior, F C; Souza-Firmino, T S; Banho, C A; Itoyama, M M

    2015-08-07

    Few cytogenetic studies have been undertaken using aquatic heteropterans and the nucleolar behavior of these insects has been described in only four species, Limnogonus aduncus, Brachymetra albinerva, Halobatopsis platensis, and Cylindrostethus palmaris. The nucleolus is a cellular structure related to biosynthetic activity and it exhibits a peculiar behavior in the heteropterans of the Triatominae subfamily; it persists during all stages of meiosis. Thus, this study aims to analyze spermatogenesis in Martarega brasiliensis, with an emphasis on nucleolar behavior. Twenty M. brasiliensis adult males were used and collected from the Municipal reservoir in the city of São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. The species were fixed in methanol:acetic acid (3:1), then dissected, and the testicles were extracted, torn apart, and impregnated with silver ions. During prophase, the nuclei of M. brasiliensis were composed of the nucleolus and nucleolar corpuscles, which varied in number from one to four, emphasizing that this insect has great synthetic activity during meiosis. The analysis of cells in metaphase I showed that M. brasiliensis presents a nucleolar organizing region in at least one autosome. Furthermore, the phenomenon of nucleolar persistence was not observed. All spermatids presented nucleolar markings that varied in number and position according to the stage of elongation. Moreover, it was also possible to highlight the presence of a vesicle in spermatids. Thus, this paper describes the nucleolar behavior of M. brasiliensis and highlights important characteristics during spermatogenesis, thus, increasing the knowledge about the biology of these aquatic heteropterans.

  18. Schistosoma mansoni: Antiparasitic effects of orally administered Nigella sativa oil and/or Chroococcus turgidus extract.

    PubMed

    Ali, Medhat; Eldahab, Marwa Abou; Mansour, Hoda Anwer; Nigm, Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is one of the parasites causing schistosomiasis, a disease which threatens millions of people all over the world. Traditional chemical drugs are not fully effective against schistosomaisis due to the evolving drug resistant worm strains, so exploring new remedies derived from natural products is a good way to fight schistosomiasis. In the present investigation two natural products, Nigella sativa oil and Chroococcus turgidus extract were used separately or in a combination to explore their effect on S. mansoni. The infected mice treated with Chroococcus turgidus extract or/and sativa seed oil showed a significant decrease in the total worm burden. The total number of deposited eggs by females of S. mansoni was significantly decreased in the liver of mice treated with Chroococcus turgidus extract or/and sativa seed oil. However, in the intestine, the number of eggs was significantly reduced in mice treated with algal extract and those treated with both algal extract and oil. Fecundity of female S. mansoni showed a significant decrease from mice treated with algal extract or/and sativa seed oil. According to SEM investigations the tegmental surface, oral and ventral suckers of worms also showed considerable changes; as the tubercles lost their spines, some are swollen and torn out. The suckers become edematous and enlarged while the tegmental surface is damaged due to the treatment with Chroococcus turgidus extract or/and sativa seed oil. In conclusion, the Nigella sativa oil and Chroococcus turgidus extract are promising natural compounds that can be used in fighting schistosomiasis.

  19. Preliminary Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1932-01-01

    Photomicrographs were taken of fuel sprays injected into air at various densities for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the stages in the atomization of the fuel. The photomicrographs were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. The results indicate that the theory advanced by Dr. R. A. Castleman, Jr., on the atomization of fuel in carburetors may also be applied to the atomization of fuel sprays of the solid-injection type. The fuel leaves the nozzle as a solid column, is ruffled and then torn into small, irregular ligaments by the action of the air. These ligaments are then quickly broken up into drops by the surface tension of the fuel. The photomicrographs also show that the dispersion of a fuel spray at a given distance from the nozzle increases with an increase in the jet velocity or an increase in the air density. The first portions of fuel sprays injected from an automatic injection valve into air at atmospheric density have a much greater dispersion than the later portions, but this difference decreases rapidly as the air density is increased.

  20. Negotiating candidacy: ethnic minority seniors' access to care.

    PubMed

    Koehn, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    The 'Barriers to Access to Care for Ethnic Minority Seniors ' (BACEMS) study in Vancouver, British Columbia, found that immigrant families torn between changing values and the economic realities that accompany immigration cannot always provide optimal care for their elders. Ethnic minority seniors further identified language barriers, immigration status, and limited awareness of the roles of the health authority and of specific service providers as barriers to health care. The configuration and delivery of health services, and health-care providers' limited knowledge of the seniors' needs and confounded these problems. To explore the barriers to access, the BACEMS study relied primarily on focus group data collected from ethnic minority seniors and their families and from health and multicultural service providers. The applicability of the recently developed model of 'candidacy', which emphasises the dynamic, multi-dimensional and contingent character of health-care access to ethnic minority seniors, was assessed. The candidacy framework increased sensitivity to ethnic minority seniors' issues and enabled organisation of the data into manageable conceptual units, which facilitated translation into recommendations for action, and revealed gaps that pose questions for future research. It has the potential to make Canadian research on the topic more co-ordinated.

  1. The effects of September 11 on traumatized refugees: reactivation of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Kinzie, J David; Boehnlein, Jame K; Riley, Crystal; Sparr, Landy

    2002-07-01

    Secondary traumatization from the tragic events of September 11, 2001 was studied among an ethnically diverse group of refugees who had been previously traumatized in their native war torn countries. A brief clinically oriented questionnaire was developed and administered to a clinic population of Vietnamese, Cambodian, Laotian, Bosnian and Somalian refugees in the Intercultural Psychiatric Program at Oregon Health & Science University. Traumatic symptoms and responses to the widely televised images from September 11 were assessed among the five ethnic groups, and the differential responses among patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and schizophrenia also were assessed. The strongest responses were among Bosnian and Somalian patients with PTSD, and the Somalis had the greatest deterioration in their subjective sense of safety and security. Regardless of ethnic group, PTSD patients reacted most intensely, and patients with schizophrenia the least. Although patients largely returned to their baseline clinical status after two to three months, this study shows that cross-cultural reactivation of trauma has a significant clinical impact. It is essential that clinicians anticipate PTSD symptom reactivation among refugees when they are reexposed to significant traumatic stimuli.

  2. Ligamentum teres tendinopathy and tears

    PubMed Central

    Kraeutler, Matthew J.; Garabekyan, Tigran; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The ligamentum teres (LT) consists of two bands that originate on the ischial and pubic sides of the acetabular notch and insert on the fovea capitis of the femoral head. Recent studies have established the LT as an important hip stabilizer in a squatting position, particularly in patients with osseous instability. Purpose This review aims to concisely present the literature on LT tendinopathy and tears in order to guide health care professionals in the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. Methods We reviewed the literature on the diagnosis and surgical management of ligamentum teres tendinopathy and tears. Conclusions The ligamentum teres is an important stabilizer to the hip joint, particularly with hip flexion and external rotation. Older age and acetabular bony pathomorphology are two of the known risk factors for LT tears. Symptoms of LT tendinopathy are largely non-specific, mimicking a wide range of other hip disorders including impingement and instability. Debridement of LT tears or reactive tissue has been reported with good outcomes, with more recent studies describing reconstruction of a completely torn, nonfunctional, or absent LT using various graft sources including synthetic grafts, autografts, and allografts. Level of evidence II. PMID:28066738

  3. Detection of the magnetar SGR J1745-2900 up to 291 GHz with evidence of polarized millimetre emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torne, P.; Desvignes, G.; Eatough, R. P.; Karuppusamy, R.; Paubert, G.; Kramer, M.; Cognard, I.; Champion, D. J.; Spitler, L. G.

    2017-02-01

    In 2015, Torne et al. reported detections of the magnetar SGR J1745-2900 up to 225 GHz (1.33 mm), which was the highest radio frequency detection of pulsar emission at that time. In this work, we present the results of new observations of the same magnetar with detections up to 291 GHz (1.03 mm), together with evidence of linear polarization in its millimetre emission. SGR J1745-2900 continues to show variability and is, on average, a factor ˜4 brighter in the millimetre band than in our observations of 2014 July. The new measured spectrum is slightly inverted, with <α> = +0.4 ± 0.2 (for Sν ∝ να). However, the spectrum does not seem to be well described by a single power law, which might be due to the intrinsic variability of the source, or perhaps a turn-up somewhere between 8.35 and 87 GHz. These results may help us to improve our still incomplete model of pulsar emission and, in addition, they further support the search for and study of pulsars located at the Galactic Centre using millimetre wavelengths.

  4. Imaging appearance of entrapped periosteum within a distal femoral Salter-Harris II fracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Johnathan; Abel, Mark F; Fox, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Salter Harris II fractures of the distal femur are associated with a high incidence of complications, especially premature physeal closure. Many risk factors for this high rate of premature physeal closure have been proposed. More recently, entrapment of periosteum within the physis has been suggested as an additional predisposing factor for premature physeal closure. The radiographic diagnosis of entrapped soft tissues, including periosteum, can be suggested in the setting of a Salter-Harris II fracture when the fracture does not reduce and physeal widening >3 mm remains. We report a patient who sustained a distal femoral Salter-Harris II fracture following a valgus injury. The patient had persistent distal medial physeal widening >5 mm following attempted reduction. A subsequent MRI revealed a torn periosteum entrapped within the distal femoral physis. Following removal of the periosteum, the patient developed a leg length discrepancy which required physiodesis of the contralateral distal femur. We present this case to raise awareness of the importance of having a high index of suspicion of periosteal entrapment in the setting of Salter-Harris II fractures since most consider entrapped periosteum an indication for surgery.

  5. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  6. The Economy of the Totalitarian Mind: the Case of the Immigrant Child(.)

    PubMed

    Kelley-Lainé, Kathleen

    2016-09-19

    Immigration in early childhood can be considered as a traumatic situation. It often goes unrecognized since children adapt to most conditions and conform to their environment with astonishing agility. Inspired by the sensitive work of Sándor Ferenczi, and Donald Winnicott, regarding the psychic economy of maturational processes, the author explores the concept of totalitarian functioning and its obstruction of the growing psyche. Before birth we are all totalitarian, one with the mother; this symbiotic, invincible state of survival mode is prolonged as the immature newborn child ignores the requirements of reality and enjoys omnipotent pleasure through hallucination. The loss of place in immigration often becomes the loss of identity-the question of "where am I?" becomes confused with "who am I?". Clinical practice exposes this fragility in adults torn from their home environment at an early age, forced into precocious maturity, never to grow up in reality. Through clinical examples, the author illustrates how totalitarian mental functioning of "all or nothing, right or wrong, black or white" is exposed in the transference and can be worked through within the psychoanalytical space.

  7. Modeling The Optical Emission Of Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodato, Giuseppe; Bonnerot, C.; Rossi, E.; Franchini, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this talk, i will present some new advances in the theory of Tidal Disruption Events (TDE). TDEs occur when a star approaches a SMBH close enough to be torn apart by the black hole tidal field. The rapid accretion of the stellar debris produce a luminous, possibly super-Eddington flare, lighting up an otherwise quiescent black hole. In this talk, I will present some recent results concerning the formation and early evolution of an accretion disc formed by the stellar debris. The structure of the disc is strongly dependent on the thermal state of the gas, with efficient or inefficient cooling giving rise to either a thin disc or an extended torus/envelope surrounding the black hole. I will present the results of numerical simulations confirming this picture and including relativistic effects, which are essential for the formation of the disc. Finally, I will discuss the possible development of quasi periodic signals arising from Lense-Thirring precession around a spinning black hole.

  8. [Ectopia cordis: multidisciplinary approach with successful result].

    PubMed

    Serrano Gómez, Servando Germán; Bermlúez Sosa, Marco Tulio; Palma Hernández, Emigdio; del Castillo Salceda, Luis Fernando; Pinzón Muslera, Otto; Hernández Cortés, Bernardino; Méndez Machado, Gustavo

    2006-08-01

    Ectopia cordis is a pathology in which the heart is complete or partially outside of the thoracic cavity. It represents a challenge for the diagnosis and handling because of its high perinatal mortality. We present the first case of thoracic ectopia cordis with prenatal diagnostic (27th week), its multidisciplinary handling at Hospital de Ginecopediatria núm. 71 of the Centro Medico Nacional Adolfo Ruiz Cortines, IMSS, in Veracruz, Mexico. We communicate the case of a 24 year-old woman referred by her correspondent medical unit with the diagnosis of 23.6 weeks pregnancy with suspicion of heart malformation by ultrasound. The pregnancy was followed-up until the 38th week, when it was programmed a caesarean section. The newborn had ectopia cordis, which was treated at the moment of birth. In this article, we present pictures of the heart defect as well as its evolution. The up-to-date bibliography is revised about the medical profile and treatment. The handling of the ectopia cordis includes an appropriate prenatal diagnosis through echocardiograph, a multidisciplinary perinatal team, to program the caesarean operation, aseptic handling of the newborn, immediate correction of the wall defect with skin torn piece without trying to correct the costal grill, specific hemodynamic cares, to reprogramme a correction of associated defects.

  9. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Koshi N.; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Kazuo; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  10. Effect of Dehydration on Leakage and Membrane Structure in Lotus corniculatus L. Seeds.

    PubMed

    McKersie, B D; Stinson, R H

    1980-08-01

    Membrane damage as a result of dehydration was studied in Lotus corniculatus L. cv. Carroll seeds which had been pregerminated for 0, 12, and 24 hours prior to dehydration. During reimbibition, desiccation-tolerant (0- and 12-hour) seeds leaked relatively low quantities of all solutes (total electrolytes, potassium, phosphate, sugar, amino acid, and protein). Desiccation-sensitive (24-hour) seeds leaked higher levels, but evidence of selective permeability remained. Membrane damage was not manifested as a complete removal of the diffusion barrier, although its permeability properties were dramatically altered. Consequently, the plasmalemma was not ruptured or torn by the dehydration treatment, but a more subtle structural alteration occurred.The possibility that seed membranes form a hexagonal rather than a lamellar phase at moisture contents below 20% was investigated by x-ray diffraction. Phospholipids were extracted from desiccation-tolerant (0-hour) and desiccation-sensitive (24-hour) seeds and hydrated to 5, 10, 20, and 40% water. This phospholipid-water system was examined using low-and wide-angle x-ray diffraction and was found to be exclusively lamellar, even at 5% water. Consequently, membrane damage and the leakage of cytoplasmic solutes from seeds cannot be explained by the formation of a hexagonal phase by membrane phospholipids.

  11. Warfare in biodiversity hotspots.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Thor; Brooks, Thomas M; Da Fonseca, Gustavo A B; Hoffmann, Michael; Lamoreux, John F; Machlis, Gary; Mittermeier, Cristina G; Mittermeier, Russell A; Pilgrim, John D

    2009-06-01

    Conservation efforts are only as sustainable as the social and political context within which they take place. The weakening or collapse of sociopolitical frameworks during wartime can lead to habitat destruction and the erosion of conservation policies, but in some cases, may also confer ecological benefits through altered settlement patterns and reduced resource exploitation. Over 90% of the major armed conflicts between 1950 and 2000 occurred within countries containing biodiversity hotspots, and more than 80% took place directly within hotspot areas. Less than one-third of the 34 recognized hotspots escaped significant conflict during this period, and most suffered repeated episodes of violence. This pattern was remarkably consistent over these 5 decades. Evidence from the war-torn Eastern Afromontane hotspot suggests that biodiversity conservation is improved when international nongovernmental organizations support local protected area staff and remain engaged throughout the conflict. With biodiversity hotspots concentrated in politically volatile regions, the conservation community must maintain continuous involvement during periods of war, and biodiversity conservation should be incorporated into military, reconstruction, and humanitarian programs in the world's conflict zones.

  12. New perspective on the transition from flat to steeper subduction in Oaxaca, Mexico, based on seismicity, nonvolcanic tremor, and slow slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasola, Shannon; Brudzinski, Michael R.; Ghouse, Noorulann; Solada, Katharine; Sit, Stefany; Cabral-Cano, Enrique; Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Kelly, Nicholas; Jensen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    We examine the along-strike transition from flat to steeper subduction in Oaxaca, Mexico, to provide a better understanding of what controls the slab morphology. Prior studies have suggested the slab tends to tear along the transitions in dip as the slab rolls back. We determine the slab geometry based on local seismicity, nonvolcanic tremor (NVT), and slow slip utilizing a deployment of broadband seismometers and continuous GPS receivers distributed in and around Oaxaca. We construct depth contours of the subducting slab surface down to 100 km, which illustrate that the transition from flat to steeper subduction occurs rapidly via a sharper flexure than previously recognized. The prior catalog of NVT in Oaxaca is extended using the same method and additional stations that extend further west. The band of NVT follows the new slab contours, widening toward the west with the downdip extent gradually moving inland. The amount of NVT also correlates with the strength of an ultraslow-velocity layer. There are no gaps in seismicity, NVT, or slow slip across the rapid transition in slab dip, further supporting the notion that the slab is not currently torn in the updip region. We propose that the sharp flexure is possible in this region due to bending moment saturation that leads to greater curvature in both the downdip and along-strike directions. A similar set of observations in southern Peru suggests this is a viable alternative to tearing that accommodates the large strains from variable rates of slab rollback.

  13. How Traumatic Violence Permanently Changes Shopping Behavior.

    PubMed

    Sigirci, Ozge; Rockmore, Marc; Wansink, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic experiences - such as combat, living in a conflict country or war-torn nation, or experiencing a violent crime or natural disaster - change social relationships and may also influence a life-time of consumer relationships with brands and shopping. Our focus on this previously overlooked area is centered on an analysis of the long-term shopping habits of 355 combat veterans. We show that those who experienced heavy trauma (e.g., heavy combat) exhibited similar disconnection from brands as others have experienced in social relationships. They became more transactional in that they were more open to switching brands, to trying new products, and buying the least expensive alternative (p < 0.01). In contrast, those who had experienced a light trauma were more influenced by ads and more open to buying brands even when they cost more (p < 0.00). Trauma, such as combat, may change one's decision horizon. Functionality and price become more important, which is consistent with the idea that they are more focused on the present moment than on building on the past or saving for the future.

  14. In Situ Growth of Highly Adhesive Surface Layer on Titanium Foil as Durable Counter Electrodes for Efficient Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wantao; Xu, Peng; Guo, Yanjun; Lin, Yuan; Yin, Xiong; Tang, Guangshi; He, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Counter electrodes (CEs) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are usually fabricated by depositing catalytic materials on substrates. The poor adhesion of the catalytic material to the substrate often results in the exfoliation of catalytic materials, and then the deterioration of cell performance or even the failure of DSCs. In this study, a highly adhesive surface layer is in situ grown on the titanium foil via a facile process and applied as CEs for DSCs. The DSCs applying such CEs demonstrate decent power conversion efficiencies, 6.26% and 4.37% for rigid and flexible devices, respectively. The adhesion of the surface layer to the metal substrate is so strong that the photovoltaic performance of the devices is well retained even after the CEs are bended for 20 cycles and torn twice with adhesive tape. The results reported here indicate that the in situ growth of highly adhesive surface layers on metal substrate is a promising way to prepare durable CEs for efficient DSCs. PMID:27694905

  15. Single cell wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Verboon, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is a common event in the life of many cell types, and the capacity of the cell to repair day-to-day wear-and-tear injuries, as well as traumatic ones, is fundamental for maintaining tissue integrity. Cell wounding is most frequent in tissues exposed to high levels of stress. Survival of such plasma membrane disruptions requires rapid resealing to prevent the loss of cytosolic components, to block Ca2+ influx and to avoid cell death. In addition to patching the torn membrane, plasma membrane and cortical cytoskeleton remodeling are required to restore cell function. Although a general understanding of the cell wound repair process is in place, the underlying mechanisms of each step of this response are not yet known. We have developed a model to study single cell wound repair using the early Drosophila embryo. Our system combines genetics and live imaging tools, allowing us to dissect in vivo the dynamics of the single cell wound response. We have shown that cell wound repair in Drosophila requires the coordinated activities of plasma membrane and cytoskeleton components. Furthermore, we identified an unexpected role for E-cadherin as a link between the contractile actomyosin ring and the newly formed plasma membrane plug. PMID:21922041

  16. Impressions of dinosaur skin from the Cretaceous Haman Formation in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, In Sung; Kim, Hyun Joo; Huh, Min

    2010-09-01

    The occurrences and features of two specimens of fossil dinosaur skin from Cretaceous Haman Formation in South Korea, including a new type of skin texture (development of micropolygons within scales) are described here for the first time, and several types of sedimentological aberrations of inorganic origin that are similar in appearance to fossil skin and therefore have the potential to be misidentified as fossil skin. The features and origins of fossil dinosaur skin found in South Korea with those of a diverse range of geological aberration structures resembling fossil skin are also compared. It is interpreted that dry climate, the presence of torn skin, and episodic sheetflood on an alluvial plain were related with the preservation of the Haman skin fossils. The preservation condition of the Haman skin fossils suggests that sheetflood deposits on a floodplain to mudflat environment under dry climatic condition are potential candidates for dinosaur skins to be found. The results of this study not only provide additional information that is helpful in understanding dinosaur skin, but also are useful in discriminating between true fossil skin and enigmatic sedimentological aberration structures resembling skin.

  17. The Effects of Rainfall on the Population Dynamics of an Endangered Aquatic Plant, Schoenoplectus gemmifer (Cyperaceae).

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Koshi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Tainaka, Kei-Ichi; Yoshimura, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The conservation of aquatic plants in river ecosystems should consider the wash-out (away) problem resulting from severe rainfall. The aquatic plant Schoenoplectus gemmifer is an endangered species endemic to Japan. Our previous study reported that the population size of S. gemmifer in Hamamatsu city, Japan, had decreased by one-tenth because many individuals had been washed out by a series of heavy rains in 2004. However, there is insufficient information on the ecological nature of this endangered aquatic plant for adequate conservation. In this paper, we report the population dynamics of one population in Hamamatsu city from 2004 to 2012 in relation to rainfall. We surveyed the number and growing location of all living individuals in the population 300 times during the study period. To examine the temporal changes of individual plants, we also counted the number of culms for 38 individuals in four observations among 300 records. Decreases and increases in the population size of this plant were associated with washing out and the settlement of gemmae (vegetative propagation), respectively. The major cause of the reduction in the population size was an increase in the number of washed-out individuals and not the decreased settlement of gemmae. The wash-out rates for small and large individuals were not significantly different. Small individuals having a stream form with linear leaves resisted flooding, and large individuals were often partially torn off by flooding events. Modification of river basins to reduce the flow velocity may be effective for the conservation of S. gemmifer.

  18. “8 Plate”: An Alternative Device to Fix Highly Recurrent Traumatic Anterior Gleno-Humeral Instability in Patients with Severe Impairment of the Anterior Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Tudisco, C; Bisicchia, S; Savarese, E; Ippolito, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is still debate about the best treatment option for highly recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in patients with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and/or recurrence after either arthroscopic or open capsulorrhaphy. Materials and Methods: The clinical and radiological findings of 7 patients treated with an open capsulorrhaphy stabilized with an “8 plate” for a highly recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and a large Bankart lesion were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up evaluation included VAS for pain, Constant-Murley, Simple Shoulder Test, ASES, UCLA, Quick DASH, Rowe, Walsch-Duplay scores, as well as X-rays of the operated shoulder. Results: At follow-up none of the patients reported subsequent dislocations. Range of motion of the shoulder was complete in all cases, but one. Results of the functional scoring systems were satisfactory. X-rays showed no osteolysis and good position of the plate. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature about an open capsular tensioning and Bankart lesion repair performed with an “8 plate”. We believe that this is a reliable and effective procedure to address traumatic anterior re-dislocation of the gleno-humeral joint when the capsule is extensively torn and frayed or in revision cases. Moreover the “8 plate” is ideal to be applied in such a narrow space on the slant surface of the scapular neck close to the glenoid rim. PMID:25621080

  19. On the tidal disruption of dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, K. S.; Lin, D. N. C.; Aarseth, S. J.

    1995-03-01

    The Milky Way induces a strong tidal perturbation on its satellite dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We present numerical simulations of tidal interactions between these low-density dwarf spheroidal galaxies and the Milky Way. Our results indicate that dwarf spheroidal galaxies with limiting radius much larger than the theoretical tidal radius are unstable and likely to be tidally disrupted on a Hubble-time. However, dwarf spheroidal galaxies can survive over a Hubble time if their limiting radii are less than twice their tidal radii at perigalacticon. In a galaxy which is undergoing tidal disruption, (1) the projected surface density is flattened in the galaxy's orbital plane and follows a power-law distribution from the galaxy's center, (2) the velocity dispersion is sustained at the current virial equilibrium value, and (3) the central density ofthe residual remnant is maintained even after most of the initial mass is lost. Beyond the tidal radius, the escapers have a radial velocity gradient along the azimuthal direction of the galaxy's motion. When compared with observational data, our theoretical results are consistent with the scenarios that (1) some dwarf spheroidal galaxies contain dark matter, and (2) some dwarf spheroidal galaxies may be part of the debris that was tidally torn from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the Galaxy.

  20. [Amputation in low-income countries: particularities in epidmiological features and management practices].

    PubMed

    Bisseriex, H; Rogez, D; Thomas, M; Truffaut, S; Compere, S; Mercier, H; Dochez, F; Lapeyre, E; Thefenne, L

    2011-12-01

    The epidemiological features and management practices associated with amputation in low-income countries, generally synonymous with the tropics, are different from those observed in Western countries. Unlike developed countries, amputation most frequently involves traumatic injury in young active people. However, Westernization of the lifestyle is leading to an increasing number of cases involving diabetes and atherosclerotic disease. In the developing world, leprosy and Buruli ulcer are still significant etiologic factors for amputation. In war-torn countries, use of antipersonnel landmines is another major cause of amputation with characteristic features. Management of amputees in the developing world is hindered by the lack of facilities for rehabilitation and prosthetic fitting. Many international organizations are supporting national programs to develop such facilities. In addition to being affordable, prosthetics and orthotics must be adapted to the living conditions of a mostly rural amputee population, i.e., heat, humidity, and farm work. The rehabilitation process must be part of a global handicap policy aimed at changing attitudes about disability and reintegrating amputees both socially and professionally.

  1. Multi-level partnerships to promote health services among internally displaced in eastern Burma.

    PubMed

    Mahn, M; Maung, C; Oo, E K Shwe; Smith, L; Lee, C I; Whichard, E; Neumann, C; Richards, A K; Mullany, L C; Kuiper, H; Lee, T J

    2008-01-01

    Ethnic populations in eastern Burma are the target of military policies that result in forced labour, destruction of food supplies, and massive forced displacement. Despite international assistance to Burmese refugees along the Thai-Burma border, traditional humanitarian models have failed to reach these internally displaced persons (IDPs) within Burma. Nevertheless, through the cultivation of a model (cross border local-global partnerships) 300,000 IDPs in eastern Burma now receive critical health services where, otherwise, there would be none. We describe key elements of the partnership model's genesis in eastern Burma. The role of the local partner, Backpack Health Worker Team (BPHWT), is highlighted for its indigenous access to the IDP populations and its maintenance of programmatic autonomy. These local elements are potentiated by international support for technical assistance, training, resources, and advocacy. International policy and investment should prioritize support of locally-driven health initiatives that utilize local-global partnerships to reach not only IDPs but also other war-torn or traditionally inaccessible populations worldwide.

  2. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-01-01

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair. PMID:25206505

  3. The Distress of Citizen-Children with Detained and Deported Parents

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Luis H.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Yoon, Hyunwoo; Rey, Guillermina Natera

    2015-01-01

    In immigration enforcement, many undocumented immigrants with children are often detained and deported. But it is their US-born citizen-children that have been overlooked in immigration debates and enforcement policies and practices. Citizen-children are at risk for negative psychological outcomes when families are fractured and destabilized by arrest, detention, and deportation. The children risk being torn from their parents and, often, their undocumented siblings. To add to the small but growing empirical base on the effects of living under the threat of deportation and actual deportation of parents, we compared the psychological status of three groups of citizen-children: (1) a group living in Mexico with their deported parents; (2) a group in the US with parents affected by detention or deportation; and (3) a comparison group of citizen-children whose undocumented parents were not affected by detention or deportation. We compared children on self-report and parent-report measures of behavioral adjustment, depression, anxiety, and self-concept. Across the three groups we found elevated levels of distress, and differences between children who had experienced a parent's detention or deportation and those who had not. We discuss findings in the context of children's clinical needs, future research, and implications for immigration enforcement policy and practices. PMID:26640358

  4. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McGehee, Ellen

    2016-07-12

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  5. The superluminous transient ASASSN-15lh as a tidal disruption event from a Kerr black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloudas, G.; Fraser, M.; Stone, N. C.; van Velzen, S.; Jonker, P. G.; Arcavi, I.; Fremling, C.; Maund, J. R.; Smartt, S. J.; Krìhler, T.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P. A.; De Cia, A.; Howell, D. A.; Inserra, C.; Patat, F.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Yaron, O.; Ashall, C.; Bar, I.; Campbell, H.; Chen, T.-W.; Childress, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Harmanen, J.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Johansson, J.; Kangas, T.; Kankare, E.; Kim, S.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Lyman, J.; Magee, M. R.; Maguire, K.; Malesani, D.; Mattila, S.; McCully, C. V.; Nicholl, M.; Prentice, S.; Romero-Cañizales, C.; Schulze, S.; Smith, K. W.; Sollerman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Tucker, B. E.; Valenti, S.; Wheeler, J. C.; Young, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    When a star passes within the tidal radius of a supermassive black hole, it will be torn apart1. For a star with the mass of the Sun (M ⊙) and a non-spinning black hole with a mass <108 M ⊙, the tidal radius lies outside the black hole event horizon2 and the disruption results in a luminous flare3-6. Here we report observations over a period of ten months of a transient, hitherto interpreted7 as a superluminous supernova8. Our data show that the transient rebrightened substantially in the ultraviolet and that the spectrum went through three different spectroscopic phases without ever becoming nebular. Our observations are more consistent with a tidal disruption event than a superluminous supernova because of the temperature evolution6, the presence of highly ionized CNO gas in the line of sight9 and our improved localization of the transient in the nucleus of a passive galaxy, where the presence of massive stars is highly unlikely10,11. While the supermassive black hole has a mass >108 M ⊙ 12,13, a star with the same mass as the Sun could be disrupted outside the event horizon if the black hole were spinning rapidly14. The rapid spin and high black hole mass can explain the high luminosity of this event.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Surgical Options for Medial Collateral Ligament Repair in Terrible Triad Injury of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Taku; Nobuta, Shingo; Aizawa, Toshitake; Sasajima, Koichi; Nakajima, Soichi; Honda, Masahito; Oki, Gosuke; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the clinical and radiologic outcomes in patients with terrible triad injury, who underwent surgical treatment with or without the medial collateral ligament (MCL) repair. Fourteen patients who underwent surgery with a minimum of 12-month follow-up (mean, 17 months) were reviewed. Based on the systematic treatment protocol, radial head fracture, lateral collateral ligament, and coracoid fracture were treated. Subsequently, torn MCL was repaired in 7 patients, whereas in the remaining 7 patients, the MCL was not treated. Range of motion, elbow function, and radiographs regarding the arthrosis and heterotopic ossification were assessed. At final follow-up, no significant differences were found in elbow motion or function between the groups with and without MCL repair; except the pronation and supination which had superior range in repair group. In contrast, radiologic findings such as the arthrosis were seen more frequently in patients without MCL repair than those with repair. Our results indicate the effect of MCL repair on elbow motion and function might be small, whereas osteoarthritic changes occurred more frequently in elbows without MCL repair. PMID:27761222

  7. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-02-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that qualitatively undergoes the same forces acting in whiplash and shows the same behavior is used to analyze the kinematics of both the head and the cervical spine and the resulting neck loads. The rapid acceleration during a whiplash event causes the extension and flexion of the cervical spine, which in turn can cause dislocated vertebrae, torn ligaments, intervertebral disc herniation, and other trauma that appear to be the likely causes of subsequent painful headache or neck pain symptoms. Thus, whiplash provides a connection between the dynamics of the human body and physics. Its treatment can enliven the usual teaching in kinematics, and both theoretical and experimental approaches provide an interesting biological context to teach introductory principles of mechanics.

  8. The attachment strategy of English ivy: a complex mechanism acting on several hierarchical levels

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Björn; Steinbrecher, Tina; Seidel, Robin; Kraft, Oliver; Schwaiger, Ruth; Speck, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    English ivy (Hedera helix L.) is able to grow on vertical substrates such as trees, rocks and house plaster, thereby attaching so firmly to the surface that when removed by force typically whole pieces of the climbing substrate are torn off. The structural details of the attachment process are not yet entirely understood. We studied the attachment process of English ivy in detail and suggest a four-phase process to describe the attachment strategy: (i) initial physical contact, (ii) form closure of the root with the substrate, (iii) chemical adhesion, and (iv) shape changes of the root hairs and form-closure with the substrate. These four phases and their variations play an important role in the attachment to differently structured surfaces. We demonstrate that, in English ivy, different mechanisms work together to allow the plant's attachment to various climbing substrates and reveal the importance of micro-fibril orientation in the root hairs for the attachment based on structural changes at the subcellular level. PMID:20462880

  9. An experimental study on Rosensweig instability of a ferrofluid droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Cheng, Z.-Y.

    2008-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the interfacial morphologies of Rosensweig instability on an extremely thin layer of ferrofluid droplets under a constant perpendicular magnetic field. Striking patterns consisting of numerous subscale droplets that developed from Rosensweig instability are observed. For a dry plate, on which surface tension dominates, the breaking pattern of subscale droplets can be characterized by a dimensionless magnetic Bond number Bom. In general, a more pronounced instability, which is evident by a greater number of breaking subscale droplets N, arises with a higher Bom. For a magnetic Bond number that is larger than a critical value, we identify a new mode of interfacial breakup pattern, where the central droplet is torn apart with major mass loss. In addition, we found that the volume fractions of breaking subscale droplets are strongly affected by the height variation of the initial fluid surface and appear unevenly distributed with dominance of a central droplet. On the other hand, for a prewetted plate, a nearly flat fluid surface is achieved due to a smaller contact angle, which then leads to virtually evenly distributed subscale droplets. A global size for all breaking subscale droplets is observed regardless of their initial diameters. The number of breaking subscale droplets (N) and the diameter of the initial droplet (D) can be approximated by a quadratic proportionality of N ˜D2.

  10. Experiments of Interfacial Instability on a Ferrofluid Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Cheng, Y.-Z.; Tsai, W.-K.; Miranda, Jose A.

    2008-11-01

    The interfacial morphologies of an extremely thin layer of ferrofluid droplet under a constant perpendicular magnetic field are investigated. Striking patterns consisting of numerous sub-scale droplets that develop from Rosensweig instability are observed. For a dry plate the breaking pattern of sub-scale droplets can be characterized by a dimensionless magnetic Bond number, Bom. In general, a more pronounced instability, which is evident by a greater number of breaking sub-scale droplets N, arises with a higher Bom. For a magnetic Bond number that is larger than a critical value, the central droplet is torn apart. For a prewetted plate, a nearly flat fluid surface is achieved due to a smaller contact angle, which then leads to virtually evenly distributed sub-scale droplets. A global size for all breaking sub-scale droplets is observed regardless of their initial diameters. On the other hand, when a ferrofluid droplet is immersed in a thin layer of a nonmagnetic fluid, a formation of intriguing interfacial structures is observed, and the development of a hybrid-type ferrohydrodynamic instability is verified, where peak and labyrinthine ferrofluid patterns coexist and share a coupled dynamic evolution.

  11. Securin degradation is mediated by fzy and fzr, and is required for complete chromatid separation but not for cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Zur, Amit; Brandeis, Michael

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the ubiquitination and degradation patterns of the human securin/PTTG protein. We show that, in contrast to budding yeast pds1, securin degradation is catalyzed by both fzy (fizzy/cdc20) and fzr (fizzy-related/cdh1/hct1). Both fzy and fzr also induce the APC/C to ubiquitinate securin in vitro. Securin degradation is mediated by an RXXL destruction box and a KEN box, and is inhibited only when both sequences are mutated. Interestingly, the non-degradable securin mutant is also partially ubiquitinated by fzy and fzr in vitro. Expressing the non-degradable securin mutant in cells frequently resulted in incomplete chromatid separation and gave rise to daughter cells connected by a thin chromatin fiber, presumably of chromosomes that failed to split completely. Strikingly, the mutant securin did not prevent the majority of sister chromatids from separating completely, nor did it prevent mitotic cyclin degradation and cytokinesis. This phenotype, reminiscent of the fission yeast cut (cells untimely torn) phenotype, is reported here for the first time in mammals. PMID:11179223

  12. Larynx Trauma and Hyoid Bone Fracture after Bite Injury in Dog: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Manchi, George; Brunnberg, Mathias M.; Shahid, Muhammad; Al Aiyan, Ahmad; Brunnberg, Leo; Stein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intraoperatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles, and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient’s severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea that underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome. PMID:27579303

  13. Corals from a dismembered late Paleozoic paleo-Pacific plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Calvin H.

    1983-10-01

    A coral belonging to the rare Late Mississippian Early Pennsylvanian Family Pseudopavonidae and a specimen of the Permian waagenophyllid coral genus Parawentzelella have been recovered from the Cache Creek assemblage in northern British Columbia and from a small limestone block in southern British Columbia, Canada, respectively. Both of these fossils are closely related to corals known from eastern Japan and western Sze-chuan, China; Parawentzelella also occurs in Indochina. These corals apparently occur in shallow-water carbonates that overlie pieces of oceanic volcanic ridges or plateaus. In both Asia and North America these corals now lie geographically close to coeval, but completely different, coral faunas that lived on shallow carbonate platforms built on continental shelves. This suggests that the circum-Pacific terranes bearing these unusual corals were displaced from a single, shallow-water oceanic region that in late Paleozoic time lay in the paleo-Pacific Ocean far from any continental margin. In Late Permian or early Mesozoic time the region colonized by these fossils was torn apart; the rock masses bearing these fossils were then carried on oceanic plates to subduction zones at continental margins on opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, where they became lodged.

  14. Biglycan (Bgn) and fibromodulin (Fmod) in ectopic ossification of tendon induced by exercise and in rotarod performance

    PubMed Central

    Kilts, T.; Ameye, L.; Syed-Picard, F.; Ono, M.; Berendsen, A. D.; Oldberg, A.; Heegaard, A-M.; Bi, Y.; Young, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the ectopic ossification (EO) found in tendons of biglycan (Bgn), fibromodulin (Fmod) single and double Bgn/Fmod deficient (DKO) mice with aging. At 3 months, Fmod KO, Bgn KO and DKO displayed torn cruciate ligaments and EO in their quadriceps tendon, menisci and cruciate and patellar ligaments. The phenotype was the least severe in the Fmod KO, intermediate in the Bgn KO and the most severe in the DKO. This condition progressed with age in all 3 mouse strains and resulted in the development of large supernumerary sesmoid bones. To determine the role of exercise on the extent of EO, we subjected normal and DKO mice to treadmill exercise for 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The EO in moderately exercised DKO was decreased compared to unexercised DKO mice. Finally, DKO and Bgn KO mice tested using a rotarod showed they had a reduced ability to maintain their grip on a rotating cylinder compared to WT controls. In summary, we show: 1) a detailed description of EO formed by Bgn, Fmod or combined depletion, 2) the role of exercise in modulating EO, and 3) that Bgn and Fmod are critical in controlling motor function. PMID:19422643

  15. The biopsychosocial model and its potential for a new theory of homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Josef M

    2012-04-01

    Since the nineteenth century the theory of conventional medicine has been developed in close alignment with the mechanistic paradigm of natural sciences. Only in the twentieth century occasional attempts were made to (re)introduce the 'subject' into medical theory, as by Thure von Uexküll (1908-2004) who elaborated the so-called biopsychosocial model of the human being, trying to understand the patient as a unit of organic, mental, and social dimensions of life. Although widely neglected by conventional medicine, it is one of the most coherent, significant, and up-to-date models of medicine at present. Being torn between strict adherence to Hahnemann's original conceptualization and alienation caused by contemporary scientific criticism, homeopathy today still lacks a generally accepted, consistent, and definitive theory which would explain in scientific terms its strength, peculiarity, and principles without relapsing into biomedical reductionism. The biopsychosocial model of the human being implies great potential for a new theory of homeopathy, as may be demonstrated with some typical examples.

  16. Sports cardiology: lessons from the past and perspectives for the future

    PubMed Central

    Leischik, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of myocardial damage as a result of endurance sport has been known about since ancient times. According to a leg­end, a soldier named Pheidippides (more likely Philippides) dropped dead after run­ning from war-torn Marathon to Athens with the news of victory. Millennia later, we do not know whether he was a soldier or a courier, or whether he really ran the entire 240 km from Athens to Sparta and then back from Marathon to Athens. What is clear however, is that his death went down in history as the first documented exercise-related death and provides a tangible starting-point for the discipline of sport cardiology. Sports cardiology today covers a broad range of areas; from patients with cardiomyopathies, coronary disease and metabolic syndrome through to fitness fans, high-performance athletes and those with physically demanding professions. The following editorial introduces the primary topics for discussion to be included in the F1000Research channel Sports cardiology with the hope that this will evoke open, controversial and broad discourse in the form of reviews and original research papers in this important field. PMID:26097692

  17. Mechanical injury and repair of cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To concisely review the field of cell plasma membrane disruption (torn cell surface) and repair. MAIN POINTS: Plasma membrane disruption is a common form of cell injury under physiologic conditions, after trauma, in certain muscular dystrophies, and during certain forms of clinical intervention. Rapid repair of a disruption is essential to cell survival and involves a complex and active cell response that includes membrane fusion and cytoskeletal activation. Tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, adapt to a disruption injury by hypertrophying. Cells adapt by increasing the efficiency of their resealing response. CONCLUSION: Plasma membrane disruption is an important cellular event in both health and disease. The disruption repair mechanism is now well understood at the cellular level, but much remains to be learned at the molecular level. Cell and tissue level adaptational responses to the disruption either prevent its further occurrence or facilitate future repairs. Therapeutically useful drugs might result if, using this accumulating knowledge, chemical agents can be developed that can enhance repair or adaptive responses.

  18. How Traumatic Violence Permanently Changes Shopping Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sigirci, Ozge; Rockmore, Marc; Wansink, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic experiences – such as combat, living in a conflict country or war-torn nation, or experiencing a violent crime or natural disaster – change social relationships and may also influence a life-time of consumer relationships with brands and shopping. Our focus on this previously overlooked area is centered on an analysis of the long-term shopping habits of 355 combat veterans. We show that those who experienced heavy trauma (e.g., heavy combat) exhibited similar disconnection from brands as others have experienced in social relationships. They became more transactional in that they were more open to switching brands, to trying new products, and buying the least expensive alternative (p < 0.01). In contrast, those who had experienced a light trauma were more influenced by ads and more open to buying brands even when they cost more (p < 0.00). Trauma, such as combat, may change one’s decision horizon. Functionality and price become more important, which is consistent with the idea that they are more focused on the present moment than on building on the past or saving for the future. PMID:27656152

  19. Abnormal seismological and magmatic processes controlled by the tearing South American flat slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiashun; Liu, Lijun

    2016-09-01

    The influence of flat slab subduction on the formation of intra-slab earthquakes, volcanic activities and mantle seismic velocity anomalies remains unclear. We attempt to better understand these processes by simulating the two flat slabs in Peru and Chile using data-orientated geodynamic models. Our results successfully reproduce the observed flat slabs as mainly due to two subducting aseismic ridges. In contrast to the traditional view of flat-slab subduction, we find that these slabs are internally torn, as is due to the 3D nature of the subducting buoyancy features. This broken slab configuration, confirmed by regional tomography, naturally explains the abnormal distribution of and stress regimes associated with the intermediate-depth earthquakes. We further show that the slab tearing process could also better explain the formation of adakitic and ore-forming magmatism, the evolution of the magmatic arc, and the enigmatic mantle seismic structures beneath these regions. We propose that slab tearing may represent a common result of buoyancy feature subduction and that the resulting mantle processes could affect the long-term geodynamic evolution of continents.

  20. [The rupture of the tibial anterior tendon in a world class veteran fencer].

    PubMed

    Kelm, J; Anagnostakos, K; Deubel, G; Schliessing, P; Schmitt, E

    2004-09-01

    The rupture of the tendon of the M. tibialis ant. is a rare sport injury and has not been yet described in fencing. The lunge, the most common offensive movement in fencing, displays a high stress on the spanned tendons and ligaments over the ankle joint and led to the rupture of the pre-damaged tendon of our patient. Pain over the inner side of the foot should be assessed as knells of this tendon injury. The exact patient's history and the precise clinical investigation are adequate for diagnosing the rupture. Hereby, an absence of the tendon shape over the ankle joint and a distinct active deficit of the extension are presented in comparison to the other side where a gap in the tendon course is palpable. An x-ray is obligate, a sonography and a MRI are helpful for the operative planning. The surgical treatment is necessary for athletes. If possible, a primary tendon suture should be aimed, in case of a distal torn an osseous reinsertion should occur. An early functional, postoperative treatment with an orthesis should be rather preferred for athletes than an immobilization.

  1. Nucleus-dependent sarcomere assembly is mediated by the LINC complex.

    PubMed

    Auld, Alexander L; Folker, Eric S

    2016-08-01

    Two defining characteristics of muscle cells are the many precisely positioned nuclei and the linearly arranged sarcomeres, yet the relationship between these two features is not known. We show that nuclear positioning precedes sarcomere formation. Furthermore, ZASP-GFP, a Z-line protein, colocalizes with F-actin in puncta at the cytoplasmic face of nuclei before sarcomere assembly. In embryos with mispositioned nuclei, ZASP-GFP is still recruited to the nuclei before its incorporation into sarcomeres. Furthermore, the first sarcomeres appear in positions close to the nuclei, regardless of nuclear position. These data suggest that the interaction between sarcomere proteins and nuclei is not dependent on properly positioned nuclei. Mechanistically, ZASP-GFP localization to the cytoplasmic face of the nucleus did require the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Muscle-specific depletion of klarsicht (nesprin) or klariod (SUN) blocked the recruitment of ZASP-GFP to the nucleus during the early stages of sarcomere assembly. As a result, sarcomeres were poorly formed and the general myofibril network was less stable, incomplete, and/or torn. These data suggest that the nucleus, through the LINC complex, is crucial for the proper assembly and stability of the sarcomere network.

  2. IL-17A mediates inflammatory and tissue remodelling events in early human tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Neal L.; Akbar, Moeed; Campbell, Abigail L.; Reilly, James H.; Kerr, Shauna C.; McLean, Michael; Frleta-Gilchrist, Marina; Fazzi, Umberto G.; Leach, William J.; Rooney, Brian P.; Crowe, Lindsay A. N.; Murrell, George A. C.; McInnes, Iain B.

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, inflammatory mediators are considered crucial to the onset and perpetuation of tendinopathy. We sought evidence of interleukin 17A (IL-17A) expression in early human tendinopathy and thereafter, explored mechanisms whereby IL-17A mediated inflammation and tissue remodeling in human tenocytes. Torn supraspinatus tendon (established pathology) and matched intact subscapularis tendon (representing ‘early pathology’) along with control biopsies were collected from patients undergoing shoulder surgery. Markers of inflammation and IL-17A were quantified by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Human tendon cells were derived from hamstring tendon obtained during ACL reconstruction. In vitro effects of IL-17A upon tenocytes were measured using RT-PCR, multiplex cytokine assays, apoptotic proteomic profiling, immunohistochemistry and annexin V FACS staining. Increased expression of IL-17A was detected in ‘early tendinopathy’ compared to both matched samples and non-matched control samples (p < 0.01) by RT-PCR and immunostaining. Double immunofluoresence staining revealed IL-17A expression in leukocyte subsets including mast cells, macrophages and T cells. IL-17A treated tenocytes exhibited increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (p < 0.001), altered matrix regulation (p < 0.01) with increased Collagen type III and increased expression of several apoptosis related factors. We propose IL-17A as an inflammatory mediator within the early tendinopathy processes thus providing novel therapeutic approaches in the management of tendon disorders. PMID:27263531

  3. Men and women--still far apart on HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Tim

    2003-11-01

    What could be more logical than a gay-feminist alliance to respond to the AIDS epidemic in Latin America? However, drawing on published articles and the author's experience in HIV/AIDS work in Chile, this paper argues that such an alliance is more rhetorical than real. Instead, both groups tend to stick to their respective niches and view the epidemic through the prism of the particular needs and concerns of their target constituencies, rather than learn from and support each other. Feminist rhetoric sometimes suggests that AIDS is a problem only because it affects women. The African paradigm of vulnerable women is inexactly applied, given the predominantly male and homosexual nature of the epidemic in most Latin American countries. Both women and homosexually active men are highly vulnerable to HIV infection, and little is gained by competing for the top slot on the "tragedy honour roll". Latin American gay men's groups, torn between AIDS and gay rights activism, often resist both protagonism by women and women's issues. Although the fight for access to antiretroviral treatment has obscured this conflict, it resurfaces in associations of HIV-positive people and may increase along with heterosexual transmission in the region. Discussion and exchanges should be encouraged to overcome these largely hidden divisions.

  4. Tearing of thin spherical shells adhered to equally curved rigid substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Connor; Lee, Anna; Marthelot, Joel; Reis, Pedro

    Lasik (Laser-Assisted in Situ Keratomileusis) eye surgery involves the tearing of the corneal epithelium to remodel the corneal stroma for corrections such as myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. One issue with this procedure is that during the tearing of the corneal epithelium, if the two propagating cracks coalesce, a flap detaches which could cause significant complications in the recovery of the patient. We seek to gain a predictive physical understanding of this process by performing precision desktop experiments on an analogue model system. First, thin spherical shells of nearly uniform thickness are fabricated by the coating of hemispherical molds with a polymer solution, which upon curing yields an elastic and brittle structure. We then create two notches near the equator of the shell and tear a flap by pulling tangentially to the spherical substrate, towards its pole. The resulting fracture paths are characterized by high-resolution 3D digital scanning. Our primary focus is on establishing how the positive Gaussian curvature of the system affects the path of the crack tip. Our results are directly contrasted against previous studies on systems with zero Gaussian curvature, where films were torn from planar and cylindrical substrates.

  5. Phantosmia as a meteorological forecaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, S. R.; Hirsch, A. R.

    2013-09-01

    In normosmics, olfactory ability has been found to vary with ambient humidity, barometric pressure, and season. While hallucinated sensations of phantom pain associated with changes in weather have been described, a linkage to chemosensory hallucinations has heretofore not been reported. A 64-year-old white male with Parkinson's disease presents with 5 years of phantosmia of a smoky burnt wood which changed to onion-gas and then to a noxious skunk-onion excrement odor. Absent upon waking it increases over the day and persists for hours. When severe, there appears a phantom taste with the same qualities as the odor. It is exacerbated by factors that manipulate intranasal pressure, such as coughing. When eating or sniffing, the actual flavors replace the phantosmia. Since onset, he noted the intensity and frequency of the phantosmia forecasted the weather. Two to 3 h before a storm, the phantosmia intensifies from a level 0 to a 7-10, which persists through the entire thunderstorm. Twenty years prior, he reported the ability to forecast the weather, based on pain in a torn meniscus, which vanished after surgical repair. Extensive olfactory testing demonstrates underlying hyposmia. Possible mechanisms for such chemosensory-meteorological linkage includes: air pressure induced synesthesia, disinhibition of spontaneous olfactory discharge, exacerbation of ectopic discharge, affect mediated somatic sensory amplification, and misattribution error with expectation and recall bias. This is the first reported case of weather-induced exacerbation of phantosmia. Further investigation of the connection between chemosensory complaints and ambient weather is warranted.

  6. Effect of tissue properties, shape and orientation of microcalcifications on vulnerable cap stability using different hyperelastic constitutive models.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Luis; Kelly-Arnold, Adreanne; Maldonado, Natalia; Laudier, Damien; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-03-03

    Approximately half of all cardiovascular deaths associated with acute coronary syndrome occur when the thin fibrous cap tissue overlying the necrotic core in a coronary vessel is torn, ripped or fissured under the action of high blood pressure. From a biomechanics point of view, the rupture of an atheroma is due to increased mechanical stresses in the lesion, in which the ultimate stress (i.e. peak circumferential stress (PCS) at failure) of the tissue is exceeded. Several factors including the cap thickness, morphology, residual stresses and tissue composition of the atheroma have been shown to affect the PCS. Also important, we recently demonstrated that microcalcifications (μCalcs>5 µm are a common feature in human atheroma caps, which behave as local stress concentrators, increasing the local tissue stress by at least a factor of two surpassing the ultimate stress threshold for cap tissue rupture. In the present study, we used both idealized µCalcs with spherical shape and actual µCalcs from human coronary atherosclerotic caps, to determine their effect on increasing the circumferential stress in the fibroatheroma cap using different hyperelastic constitutive models. We have found that the stress concentration factor (SCF) produced by μCalcs in the fibroatheroma cap is affected by the material tissue properties, μCalcs spacing, aspect ratio and their alignment relative to the tensile axis of the cap.

  7. Blue sensors : technology and cooperative monitoring in UN peacekeeping.

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, A. Walter Dr.

    2004-04-01

    For over a half-century, the soldiers and civilians deployed to conflict areas in UN peacekeeping operations have monitored ceasefires and peace agreements of many types with varying degrees of effectiveness. Though there has been a significant evolution of peacekeeping, especially in the 1990s, with many new monitoring functions, the UN has yet to incorporate monitoring technologies into its operations in a systematic fashion. Rather, the level of technology depends largely on the contributing nations and the individual field commanders. In most missions, sensor technology has not been used at all. So the UN has not been able to fully benefit from the sensor technology revolution that has seen effectiveness greatly amplified and costs plummet. This paper argues that monitoring technologies need not replace the human factor, which is essential for confidence building in conflict areas, but they can make peacekeepers more effective, more knowledgeable and safer. Airborne, ground and underground sensors can allow peacekeepers to do better monitoring over larger areas, in rugged terrain, at night (when most infractions occur) and in adverse weather conditions. Technology also allows new ways to share gathered information with the parties to create confidence and, hence, better pre-conditions for peace. In the future sensors should become 'tools of the trade' to help the UN keep the peace in war-torn areas.

  8. Geochemical evidence for the melting of subducting oceanic lithosphere at plate edges.

    PubMed

    Yogodzinski, G M; Lees, J M; Churikova, T G; Dorendorf, F; Wöerner, G; Volynets, O N

    2001-01-25

    Most island-arc magmatism appears to result from the lowering of the melting point of peridotite within the wedge of mantle above subducting slabs owing to the introduction of fluids from the dehydration of subducting oceanic crust. Volcanic rocks interpreted to contain a component of melt (not just a fluid) from the subducting slab itself are uncommon, but possible examples have been recognized in the Aleutian islands, Baja California, Patagonia and elsewhere. The geochemically distinctive rocks from these areas, termed 'adakites, are often associated with subducting plates that are young and warm, and therefore thought to be more prone to melting. But the subducting lithosphere in some adakite locations (such as the Aleutian islands) appears to be too old and hence too cold to melt. This implies either that our interpretation of adakite geochemistry is incorrect, or that our understanding of the tectonic context of adakites is incomplete. Here we present geochemical data from the Kamchatka peninsula and the Aleutian islands that reaffirms the slab-melt interpretation of adakites, but in the tectonic context of the exposure to mantle flow around the edge of a torn subducting plate. We conclude that adakites are likely to form whenever the edge of a subducting plate is warmed or ablated by mantle flow. The use of adakites as tracers for such plate geometry may improve our understanding of magma genesis and thermal structure in a variety of subduction-zone environments.

  9. High incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis after trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for basal joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Low, T H; Hales, P F

    2014-10-01

    We reviewed the incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis in 77 patients (81 thumbs) who had trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis. Eighteen patients, 20 wrists (25%) had flexor carpi radialis tendinitis. The onset was 2-10 months (mean 4.7) after surgery. Two cases had preceding trauma. Eight cases (40%) responded to splinting and steroid injection. Ten patients, 12 wrists (60%) underwent surgery after failing non-operative treatment. Eleven wrists had frayed or partially torn flexor carpi radialis tendon and one had a complete tendon rupture with pseudotendon formation. Flexor carpi radialis tenotomy and pseudotendon excision were performed. All operated patients obtained good pain relief initially post-operatively. However, the pain recurred in two patients after 8 months. One required a local steroid injection for localized tenderness at the site of the proximal tendon stump. The other patient required a revision operation for scaphotrapezoid impingement. Both obtained complete pain relief. Our study has shown a high incidence of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis following trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty. Patients should be warned about this potential complication.

  10. Biomechanical and biochemical properties of dog cartilage in experimentally induced osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Altman, R D; Tenenbaum, J; Latta, L; Riskin, W; Blanco, L N; Howell, D S

    1984-01-01

    The finding of other investigators that increased water content is often associated with signs of a torn collagen network in human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage led to this study. In the Pond-Nuki model of post-traumatic OA experimental but not control femoral condylar cartilage showed evidence of breakdown and stiffening of collagen network as assessed by measurement of swelling properties and indentation behaviour respectively. These changes in the unstable knees occurred despite lack of erosion of that surface cartilage ascertained from carbon black mapping and history. The stiffening rather than softening change was therefore attributed to cartilage oedema of the middle and deep certilagenous zones, wherein breakdown of collagen network has been postulated to occur. Because of insignificant reduction of total hexuronate in these cartilages, a proteoglycan (PG) profile of sedimentation coefficients for aggregate (PGA) and subunit species (PGS) was analysed to see if collagen network changes in the dog preceded PG alteration. Despite minimal histological changes our results confirmed previous findings in the tibial plateau cartilage in this model, that PGA was reduced in size and PGS increased in amount. Slight enzymatic breakdown of PGs, or altered synthesis due to cellular responses to either the injury directly or to synovial inflammation, seems necessary to explain such changes in the absence of cartilage erosion. PMID:6696526

  11. Measuring Regional Changes in Damaged Tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Catherine Kayt Vincent

    Mechanical properties of tendon predict tendon health and function, but measuring these properties in vivo is difficult. An ultrasound-based (US) analysis technique called acoustoelastography (AE) uses load-dependent changes in the reflected US signal to estimate tissue stiffness non-invasively. This thesis explores whether AE can provide information about stiffness alteration resulting from tendon tears both ex vivo and in vivo. An ex vivo ovine infraspinatus tendon model suggests that the relative load transmitted by the different tendon layers transmit different fractions of the load and that ultrasound echo intensity change during cyclic loading decreases, becoming less consistent once the tendon is torn. An in vivo human tibialis anterior tendon model using electrically stimulated twitch contractions investigated the feasibility of measuring the effect in vivo. Four of the five subjects showed the expected change and that the muscle contraction times calculated using the average grayscale echo intensity change compared favorably with the times calculated based on the force data. Finally an AE pilot study with patients who had rotator cuff tendon tears found that controlling the applied load and the US view of the system will be crucial to a successful in vivo study.

  12. A camerate-rich late carboniferous (Moscovian) crinoid fauna from volcanic conglomerate, Xinjiang, People's Republic of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, N.G.; Waters, J.A.; Maples, C.G.; Marcus, S.A.; Liao, Z.-T.

    1996-01-01

    A low-diversity camerate-rich crinoid fauna from the Qijiagou Formation, Taoshigo Valley near Turpan, Xinjiang-Uygar Autonomous Region, China was collected during field work in May, 1993. The crinoid fauna is dominated by species of Platycrinites. Other camerate crinoids include a species in the Paragaricocrinidae, Actinocrinites, a hexacrinitid, and an acrocrinoid. The only other non-North American occurrence of this latter family is Springeracrocrinus from the Moscovian of Russia. In addition to the camerates, there are several advanced cladid inadunates more typical of Upper Carboniferous crinoid faunas, including an erisocrinoid (possibly Sinocrinus), Graphiocrinus, ?Cromyocrinus, and an agassizocrinoid (Petschoracrinus) represented by partly fused infrabasal cones. A single radial plate with angustary facet may represent a cyathocrinoid, There also is a catillocrinoid, assigned here to Paracatillocrinus. The fauna, which resembles Moscovian crinoids described from Russia, is preserved in graded volcanic conglomeratic debris flows that overlie a carbonate mound and contain clasts up to 3 m in dimension. The crinoids are fragmentary, with many calyces seemingly torn into two or three pieces and dumped in with the pyroclastic debris. Camerates are represented by large thecal scraps consisting of numerous plates, or by large individual plates or circlets. Other fossils include rare solitary rugose corals, tabular bryozoans, Neospirifer, and other fragmentary brachiopods. We suspect that the crinoids may have been swept off of a nearby carbonate mound and deposited as debris-flow bedload.

  13. Communist coalmining union activists and postwar reconstruction, 1945-52: Germany, Poland, and Britain

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, N.; Prazmowska, A.J.; Heith, H.

    2006-01-15

    The demand for coal in war-torn Europe after VE Day gave coalmining trade unions unprecedented bargaining leverage. Miners' incomes had been depressed throughout the interwar period, and they were now anxious to recover their past high wages and improve their conditions. In several key European countries, Communists were prominent among the leadership of mining trade unions. Communist miners' leaders Willi Agatz, Edward Gierek and Arthur Horner each faced unprecedented opportunities and challenges at the onset of the Cold War in 1948, as they sought to fuse their parallel identities as committed and influential Communists and as conscientious trade union negotiators in these newly advantageous circumstances. Each of these three 'revolutionary' trade unionists pursued strategies that revived the position of miners, without undermining the potential for economic recovery in their respective countries - for which an uninterrupted supply of coal remained critical. A comparative study of the personal and political experiences of the three Communist miners' leaders enhances our understanding of the evolution of Communist trade unionism in the early postwar period.

  14. Hyporheic zone hydrologic science: A historical account of its emergence and a prospectus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2015-05-01

    The hyporheic zone, defined by shallow subsurface pathways through river beds and banks beginning and ending at the river, is an integral and unique component of fluvial systems. It hosts myriad hydrologically controlled processes that are potentially coupled in complex ways. Understanding these processes and the connections between them is critical since these processes are not only important locally but integrate to impact increasingly larger scale biogeochemical functioning of the river corridor up to the river network scale. Thus, the hyporheic zone continues to be a growing research focus for many hydrologists for more than half the history of Water Resources Research. This manuscript partly summarizes the historical development of hyporheic zone hydrologic science as gleaned from papers published in Water Resources Research, from the birth of the concept of the hyporheic zone as a hydrologic black box (sometimes referred to as transient storage zone), to its adolescent years of being torn between occasionally competing research perspectives of interrogating the hyporheic zone from a surface or subsurface view, to its mature emergence as an interdisciplinary research field that employs the wide array of state-of-the-art tools available to the modern hydrologist. The field is vibrant and moving in the right direction of addressing critical fundamental and applied questions with no clear end in sight in its growth. There are exciting opportunities for scientists that are able to tightly link the allied fields of geology, geomorphology, hydrology, geochemistry, and ecology to tackle the many open problems in hyporheic zone science.

  15. Using automatic particle counting to monitor aluminum cold mill coolant{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    A comprehensive program of testing and evaluation of aluminum cold rolling coolant conditions has been conducted using an automatic particle counting instrument. The project had three objectives. First, there was a need to know at what level of coolant particle contamination is surface cleanliness of an aluminum sheet affected during the rolling process. Secondly, is application of particle counting technology a reliable tool for troubleshooting coolant filtration systems and finally, what are the advantages of analyzing rolling coolants for contamination levels? A testing program was designed and performed over a two-year period. The test results revealed that mineral seal and synthetic-type coolants can begin to affect aluminum sheet surface cleanliness levels when particle sizes greater than five microns are in excess of 10,000 particles power 100 milliliters of rolling coolant. After performing over 3,000 separate tests, it was very clean that particle count levels are direct indicators of how well a filtration facility is performing. Through the application of particle counting, a number of conditions in coolant filtration facilities can be readily detected. Such items as defective filter valving, torn or fractured filter cloth, damaged filter parts, improper equipment operation and many other factors will directly impact the operation of aluminum cold rolling coolant filters. 11 figs.

  16. Critical components required to improve deployable laboratory biological hazards identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Debra M.

    2004-08-01

    An ever-expanding global military mission necessitates quick and accurate identification of biological hazards, whether naturally occurring or man-made. Coupled with an ever-present threat of biological attack, an expanded U.S. presence in worn-torn locations like Southwest Asia presents unique public health challenges. We must heed modern day "lessons learned" from Operation Desert Shield and the Soviet Afghanistan Campaign and guard against rapid incapacitation of troop strength from endemic disease and biological attack. To minimize readiness impacts, field hygiene is enforced, and research on better medical countermeasures such as antibiotics and vaccines continues. However, there are no preventions or remedies for all military-relevant infectious diseases or biological agents. A deployable, streamlined, self-contained diagnostic and public health surveillance laboratory capability with a reach-back communication is critical to meeting global readiness challenges. Current deployable laboratory packages comprise primarily diagnostic or environmental sample testing capabilities. Discussion will focus on critical components needed to improve existing laboratory assets, and to facilitate deployment of small, specialized packages far forward. The ideal laboratory model described will become an essential tool for the Combatant or Incident Commander to maintain force projection in the expeditionary environment.

  17. Messenger ribonucleic acid levels in disrupted human anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ian K Y; Marchuk, Linda; Hart, David A; Frank, Cyril B

    2003-02-01

    Thirty patients had anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction for ongoing instability. Two groups were defined according to gross morphologic features identified during reconstruction: anterior cruciate ligament disruptions with scars attached to a structure in the joint and disruptions without reattachments. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for a subset of extracellular matrix molecules, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors was done on samples of scarred anterior cruciate ligament tissue removed during reconstructive surgery. Results of the nonattached scar group showed significantly increased mRNA levels for Type I collagen, and an increased Type I to Type III collagen ratio compared with that for the attached scar group. In the first year after injury, decorin mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group also were significantly higher than in the attached scar group. Biglycan mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group correlated closely with Type I collagen mRNA levels. These results suggest differences in cellular expression in torn anterior cruciate ligaments that attach to structures in the joint versus those which do not. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences have not been delineated, different molecular signals may influence the gross morphologic features of anterior cruciate ligament disruptions or alternatively, differing gross morphologic features may be subject to different mechanical loads leading to altered molecular expression. However, the finding of endogenous cellular activity in injured anterior cruciate ligaments raises the possibility that this activity may be enhanced to improve outcomes.

  18. Electron Acceleration in a Dynamically Evolved Current Sheet Under Solar Coronal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Du, A. M.; Feng, Xueshang; Cao, Xin; Lu, Quanming; Yang, Liping; Chen, Gengxiong; Zhang, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Electron acceleration in a drastically evolved current sheet under solar coronal conditions is investigated via the combined 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and test-particle approaches. Having a high magnetic Reynolds number (105), the long, thin current sheet is torn into a chain of magnetic islands, which grow in size and coalesce with each other. The acceleration of electrons is explored in three typical evolution phases: when several large magnetic islands are formed (phase 1), two of these islands are approaching each other (phase 2), and almost merging into a "monster" magnetic island (phase 3). The results show that for all three phases electrons with an initial Maxwell distribution evolve into a heavy-tailed distribution and more than 20 % of the electrons can be accelerated higher than 200 keV within 0.1 second and some of them can even be energized up to MeV ranges. The lower-energy electrons are located away from the magnetic separatrices and the higher-energy electrons are inside the magnetic islands. The most energetic electrons have a tendency to be around the outer regions of the magnetic islands or to appear in the small secondary magnetic islands. It is the trapping effect of the magnetic islands and the distributions of E p that determine the acceleration and spatial distributions of the energetic electrons.

  19. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Ellen

    2014-05-22

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  20. Influence of meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane on the knee contact mechanics.

    PubMed

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Witkowski, Wojciech; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Zarzycki, Witold

    2015-06-01

    We present a three dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution and menisci deformation in the human knee joint. The study is based on the Open Knee model with the geometry of the lateral meniscus which shows some degenerative disorders. The nonlinear analysis of the knee joint under compressive axial load is performed. We present results for intact knee, knee with complete radial posterior meniscus root tear and knee with total meniscectomy of medial or lateral meniscus. We investigate how the meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane influences knee-joint mechanics by comparing the results for flat (degenerated) lateral and normal medial meniscus. Specifically, the deformation of the menisci in the coronal plane and the corresponding stress values in cartilages are studied. By analysing contact resultant force acting on the menisci in axial plane we have shown that restricted extrusion of the torn lateral meniscus can be attributed to small slope of its cross section in the coronal plane. Additionally, the change of the contact area and the resultant force acting on the menisci as the function of compressive load are investigated.

  1. Meteorologists from the University of Tokyo: Their Exodus to the United States Following World War II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, John M.

    1993-07-01

    The emigration of 11 young Japanese meteorologists to the United States following World War II is investigated. Their move is examined with the benefit of a historical backdrop that includes a study of the socioeconomic conditions in Japan and the education that they received at the University of Tokyo. Oral histories and letters of reminiscence from these scientists are used with standard source material to reconstruct the conditions of postwar Japan. The principal results of the study are that 1) these scientists were among the intellectual elite, because of the rigorous screening process in the Japanese educational system; 2) their scientific education was fundamentally grounded in traditional physics and a wide range of geophysical sciences; 3) they all experienced austere living conditions and poor job prospects in the war-torn Japanese economy; and 4) they made a strong scientific connection with U.S. researchers in the areas of numerical experimentation and numerical weather prediction, which facilitated their move to the United States.

  2. Sports cardiology: lessons from the past and perspectives for the future.

    PubMed

    Leischik, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of myocardial damage as a result of endurance sport has been known about since ancient times. According to a leg-end, a soldier named Pheidippides (more likely Philippides) dropped dead after run-ning from war-torn Marathon to Athens with the news of victory. Millennia later, we do not know whether he was a soldier or a courier, or whether he really ran the entire 240 km from Athens to Sparta and then back from Marathon to Athens. What is clear however, is that his death went down in history as the first documented exercise-related death and provides a tangible starting-point for the discipline of sport cardiology. Sports cardiology today covers a broad range of areas; from patients with cardiomyopathies, coronary disease and metabolic syndrome through to fitness fans, high-performance athletes and those with physically demanding professions. The following editorial introduces the primary topics for discussion to be included in the F1000Research channel Sports cardiology with the hope that this will evoke open, controversial and broad discourse in the form of reviews and original research papers in this important field.

  3. In Situ Growth of Highly Adhesive Surface Layer on Titanium Foil as Durable Counter Electrodes for Efficient Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wantao; Xu, Peng; Guo, Yanjun; Lin, Yuan; Yin, Xiong; Tang, Guangshi; He, Meng

    2016-10-01

    Counter electrodes (CEs) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are usually fabricated by depositing catalytic materials on substrates. The poor adhesion of the catalytic material to the substrate often results in the exfoliation of catalytic materials, and then the deterioration of cell performance or even the failure of DSCs. In this study, a highly adhesive surface layer is in situ grown on the titanium foil via a facile process and applied as CEs for DSCs. The DSCs applying such CEs demonstrate decent power conversion efficiencies, 6.26% and 4.37% for rigid and flexible devices, respectively. The adhesion of the surface layer to the metal substrate is so strong that the photovoltaic performance of the devices is well retained even after the CEs are bended for 20 cycles and torn twice with adhesive tape. The results reported here indicate that the in situ growth of highly adhesive surface layers on metal substrate is a promising way to prepare durable CEs for efficient DSCs.

  4. Retinal flat cells participate in the formation of fibers by retinal neuroblasts in vitro. Time lapse video studies.

    PubMed

    Li, H P; Sheffield, J B

    1986-03-01

    Freshly dissociated cells from embryonic chick neural retinas grow in characteristic patterns on flat cells or on chick embryo mesodermal cells. A striking difference between the two patterns is that the cells grown on flat cells are interconnected by a complex network of fibers, whereas those grown on mesodermal cells are aggregated into clusters that remain relatively isolated within the mesodermal monolayer. Analysis by time-lapse video microscopy indicates that two processes produce the fibers. (1) Fibers grow out by the extension of growth cones from cells within aggregates. (2) Neuronal cell aggregates that attach to two flat cells are pulled apart by the movement of the cells beneath them. As the aggregate is pulled apart, portions of the cells remain attached to the two halves, and their cytoplasm is drawn into thin fibers. The lack of fibers on a mesodermal substrate is due to two factors: (1) Aggregates are widely spaced on the substrate surface and do not come into contact often. (2) On those occasions when they do come into contact, the movement of the monolayer is so vigorous that emerging fibers are torn.

  5. Lost and found dark matter in elliptical galaxies.

    PubMed

    Dekel, A; Stoehr, F; Mamon, G A; Cox, T J; Novak, G S; Primack, J R

    2005-09-29

    There is strong evidence that the mass of the Universe is dominated by dark matter, which exerts gravitational attraction but whose exact nature is unknown. In particular, all galaxies are believed to be embedded in massive haloes of dark matter. This view has recently been challenged by the observation of surprisingly low random stellar velocities in the outskirts of ordinary elliptical galaxies, which has been interpreted as indicating a lack of dark matter. Here we show that the low velocities are in fact compatible with galaxy formation in dark-matter haloes. Using numerical simulations of disk-galaxy mergers, we find that the stellar orbits in the outer regions of the resulting ellipticals are very elongated. These stars were torn by tidal forces from their original galaxies during the first close passage and put on outgoing trajectories. The elongated orbits, combined with the steeply falling density profile of the observed tracers, explain the observed low velocities even in the presence of large amounts of dark matter. Projection effects when viewing a triaxial elliptical can lead to even lower observed velocities along certain lines of sight.

  6. Volcanism and Subduction: The Kamchatka Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John; Gordeev, Evgenii; Izbekov, Pavel; Kasahara, Minoru; Lees, Jonathan

    The Kamchatka Peninsula and contiguous North Pacific Rim is among the most active regions in the world. Kamchatka itself contains 29 active volcanoes, 4 now in a state of semi-continuous eruption, and I has experienced 14 magnitude 7 or greater earthquakes since accurate recording began in 1962. At its heart is the uniquely acute subduction cusp where the Kamchatka and Aleutian Arcs and Emperor Seamount Chain meet. Volcanism and Subduction covers coupled magmatism and tectonics in this spectacular region, where the torn North Pacific slab dives into hot mantle. Senior Russian and American authors grapple with the dynamics of the cusp with perspectives from the west and east of it, respectively, while careful tephrostratigraphy yields a remarkably precise record of behavior of storied volcanoes such as Kliuchevskoi and Shiveluch. Towards the south, Japanese researchers elucidate subduction earthquake processes with unprecedented geodetic resolution. Looking eastward, new insights on caldera formation, monitoring, and magma ascent are presented for the Aleutians. This is one of the first books of its kind printed in the English language. Students and scientists beginning research in the region will find in this book a useful context and introduction to the region's scientific leaders. Others who wish to apply lessons learned in the North Pacific to their areas of interest will find the volume a valuable reference.

  7. Repeating Fast Radio Bursts from Highly Magnetized Pulsars Traveling through Asteroid Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z. G.; Wang, J. S.; Wu, X. F.; Huang, Y. F.

    2016-09-01

    Very recently, Spitler et al. and Scholz et al. reported their detections of 16 additional bright bursts in the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is inconsistent with all of the catastrophic event models put forward previously for hypothetically non-repeating FRBs. Here, we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through the asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from such a pulsar encountering a large number of asteroids in the belt. During each pulsar-asteroid impact, an electric field induced outside of the asteroid has such a large component parallel to the stellar magnetic field that electrons are torn off the asteroidal surface and accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies instantaneously. The subsequent movement of these electrons along magnetic field lines will cause coherent curvature radiation, which can account for all of the properties of an FRB. In addition, this model can self-consistently explain the typical duration, luminosity, and repetitive rate of the 17 bursts of FRB 121102. The predicted occurrence rate of repeating FRB sources may imply that our model would be testable in the next few years.

  8. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-07-25

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair.

  9. In-place filter testing summary

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, J.P.; Garcia, E.D.; Ortega, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    The most common method of identifying particle penetration through a filter or adsorber system is through the performance of a periodic penetration test, i.e., in-place test or leak test using an aerosol or gas vapor to challenge the filter or adsorber system. The aerosol is usually formed by vaporization of a liquid, di-2(ethelhexyl sebacate) (DEHS), and allowed to condense to form liquid particles of a certain size and distribution. The gas vapor is formed by vaporization of Freon 11 liquid. The periodic penetration test, although conducted annually, can and has been demonstrated to show the beginning degradation of a filter or adsorber system. Other evidence of penetration can include detection of radiation downstream of the filter system or the existence of an unusually low pressure drop across the filter, i.e., torn filter, etc. However, these kinds of occurrences show up instantaneously and could release radioactive material to the atmosphere before the systems could be shut down. When a filter system fails the in--place test or is showing evidence of.filter or component degradation, corrective measures are put into place in order to return,the system back to its best operating condition. This report presents a summary of all filter tests.

  10. The experience of being a partner to a spinal cord injured person: A phenomenological-hermeneutic study

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative focuses on the personal experiences of partners to a spinal cord injured person. Using a Ricoeurian phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, we analysed seven partners’ narratives 1 and 2 years after their partner's injury. The study revealed how the injury was experienced from the partners’ perspective through the aftermath. In the acute phase after the injury, partners also felt harmed, and support was needed in relation to their own daily activities, eating, resting, and managing distress. During the institutionalized rehabilitation, partners felt torn between supporting the injured partner and the demanding tasks of everyday life outside the institution. After discharge, partners struggled for the injured partner to regain a well-functioning everyday life and for reestablishing life as a couple. The partner struggled to manage the overwhelming amount of everyday tasks. Some sought to reestablish their usual functions outside the family, whereas others focused on establishing a new life together. The partners experienced much distress and appreciated the support they got, but felt that they were mainly left to manage the difficult process on their own. PMID:22007262

  11. Effects of atopic dermatitis on the morphology and water content of scalp hair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Shin, Min Kyung; Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Mi Hyun; Haw, Choong-Rim; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2012-05-01

    The effects of atopic dermatitis (AD) on scalp hair properties, such as morphology and water content, were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thermogravimetric analyzer. Hairs from lesional and nonlesional scalp regions of eight patients with AD were investigated. The severity of the disease, which was evaluated using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis index, was 48.75 (range, 40-80). Hairs from 15 normal adults were also examined as controls. The surface images were taken in an area of 20 × 20 μm(2) with 512 × 512 pixels and a scan speed of 0.8 line/s. AD affected the cuticle structures and scales of scalp hair. The edges of cuticles were torn and collapsed, and the scales were very thick. The water contents of both types of AD hair were less than the control: 12% ± 0.7%, 11.7% ± 0.4%, and 13% ± 0.8% for lesional AD hair, nonlesional AD hair, and control hair, respectively. The scalp hair of patients with AD can be characterized by thick and globular scale patterns. The hair of patients with AD has less water content than normal hair showing a good agreement with the property of skin having AD.

  12. Methods used during gross necropsy to determine watercraft-related mortality in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Lightsey, Jessica D; Rommel, Sentiel A; Costidis, Alexander M; Pitchford, Thomas D

    2006-09-01

    Between 1993 and 2003, 713 (24%) of 2,940 dead Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) recovered from Florida waters and examined were killed by watercraft-induced trauma. It was determined that this mortality was the result of watercraft trauma because the external wound patterns and the internal lesions seen during gross necropsy are recognizable and diagnostic. This study documents the methods used in determining watercraft-related mortality during gross necropsy and explains why these findings are diagnostic. Watercraft can inflict sharp- and blunt-force trauma to manatees, and both types of trauma can lead to mortality. This mortality may be a direct result of the sharp and blunt forces or from the chronic effects resulting from either force. In cases in which death is caused by a chronic wound-related complication, the original incident is usually considered to be the cause of death. Once a cause of death is determined, it is recorded in an extensive database and is used by Federal and state managers in developing strategies for the conservation of the manatee. Common sequelae to watercraft-induced trauma include skin lesions, torn muscles, fractured and luxated bones, lacerated internal organs, hemothorax, pneumothorax, pyothorax, hydrothorax, abdominal hemorrhage and ascites, and pyoperitoneum.

  13. Flexural-slip generated bedding-parallel veins from central Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, T. J.

    1996-12-01

    Thin continuous laminated bedding-parallel quartz veins (BPVs) with slip-striated and fibred vein walls occur within slates, or at their contact with sandstones, on the limbs of chevron folds in the Bendigo-Castlemaine goldfields, southeastern Australia. Two microstructural Types of BPV (I and II) have been previously recognized, and are confirmed in this study. Both types are concluded to have formed during and/or after crenulation cleavage (the first tectonic axial planar structure) in the wallrock slates, and during flexural-slip folding. Type I BPVs consist of syntaxial phyllosilicate inclusion trails, parallel to bedding, enclosing inclined inclusion bands, the latter formed by detachment of wallrock phyllosilicate particles from the walls of pressure solution-segmented discordant tension veins. Type I BPVs are formed by bedding-parallel shear, and grow in width by propagation of the discordant veins into the BPV walls. Type II veins are composed of quartz bands separated by wallrock slate seams which have split away from the vein wall during dilatant shear opening. They incorporate numerous torn-apart fragments of crenulated wallrock slate. Type I BPV inclusion band average spacing of 0.5 mm probably represents the magnitude of slip increments during stick-slip flexural-slip folding activity.

  14. Tidal disruption of the Magellanic Clouds by the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, M. E.; Gibson, B. K.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Banks, G.; Barnes, D. G.; Bhatal, R.; Disney, M. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Haynes, R. F.; Henning, P.; Jerjen, H.; Kilborn, V.; Koribalski, B.; Knezek, P.; Malin, D. F.; Mould, J. R.; Oosterloo, T.; Price, R. M.; Ryder, S. D.; Sadler, E. M.; Stewart, I.; Stootman, F.; Vaile, R. A.; Webster, R. L.; Wright, A. E.

    1998-08-01

    Interactions between galaxies are common, and influence physical properties such as the global morphology and star-formation rate (Hubble type). Galaxies can interact in many different ways: they can merge together; they can pass through each other, with gas being stripped from the smaller of the two and compressed in the larger; and they can interact gravitationally (including, for example, tides in clusters). The relative importance of these mechanisms is often not clear, as the strength of each depends on poorly known parameters such as the density, extent and nature of the dark-matter haloes that surround galaxies. A nearby example of a galaxy interaction where the mechanism is controversial is that between our Galaxy and two of its neighbours, the Magellanic Clouds. Here we present the results of an atomic-hydrogen survey that help to elucidate this mechanism. Our data reveal a new stream of gas that lies in the opposite direction to the trailing Magellanic Stream and leads the motion of the Clouds. The existence of both leading and trailing streams supports a gravitational interaction whereby the streams are torn from the bodies of the Magellanic Clouds by tidal forces.

  15. The bulldozer and the ballet dancer: aspects of nurses' caring approaches in acute psychiatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Björkdahl, A; Palmstierna, T; Hansebo, G

    2010-08-01

    Demanding conditions in acute psychiatric wards inhibit provision of safe, therapeutic care and leave nurses torn between humanistic ideals and the harsh reality of their daily work. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' caring approaches within this context. Data were collected from interviews with nurses working in acute psychiatric intensive care. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis, based on interpretive description. Results revealed a caring-approach continuum on which two approaches formed the main themes: the bulldozer and the ballet dancer. The bulldozer approach functioned as a shield of power that protected the ward from chaos. The ballet dancer approach functioned as a means of initiating relationships with patients. When examining the data from a theoretical perspective of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing, the ballet dancer approach was consistent with a caring approach, while the bulldozer approach was more complex and somewhat aligned with uncaring approaches. Conclusions drawn from the study are that although the bulldozer approach involves a risk for uncaring and harming actions, it also brings a potential for caring. This potential needs to be further explored and nurses should be encouraged to reflect on how they integrate paternalistic nursing styles with person-centred care.

  16. Anatomy, Variants, and Pathologies of the Superior Glenohumeral Ligament: Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Three-Dimensional Volumetric Interpolated Breath-Hold Examination Sequence and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Arthrography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Karaca, Leyla; Can, Cahit Emre; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Topal, Murat; Okur, Aylin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL. PMID:25053912

  17. Anatomy, variants, and pathologies of the superior glenohumeral ligament: magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence and conventional magnetic resonance arthrography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Karaca, Leyla; Can, Cahit Emre; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Topal, Murat; Okur, Aylin; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL.

  18. Ugandan households: A Study of parenting practices in three districts.

    PubMed

    Boothby, Neil; Mugumya, Firminus; Ritterbusch, Amy E; Wanican, Joyce; Bangirana, Clare Ahabwe; Pizatella, Adrienne D; Busi, Sophie; Meyer, Sarah

    2017-03-05

    Ugandan households play a central role in child care and protection, and household-level practices influence the ways in which children are protected from adversities. This study was designed to identify community perceptions of protective and harmful parenting practices in three districts in Uganda. It employed free-listing interviews to determine priorities and practices deemed to be important in providing care and protection to children. Findings suggest that parenting practices can be grouped into seven basic themes, which are: Investing in children's future, Protection, Care, Enterprising, Relationship with neighbors, Intimate partner relationship, and Child Rearing. Investing in children's future, including educating children, was cited most often as a hallmark of positive parenting; while failure to care for children was most often cited as a hallmark of negative parenting. Concrete behaviors, such as walking a daughter to school; sewing a son's torn pants before going to church; and structuring study time at home were identified as concrete actions Ugandan parents undertake daily to promote their children's well-being. Conversely, specific contextual aspects of neglect and abuse were identified as central components of negative parenting, including lack of investment in children's education and not serving as a good role model. Building on community strengths is recommended as a principal means of enhancing household resilience and reducing childhood risk.

  19. The application of 3D image processing to studies of the musculoskeletal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Bruce Elliot; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Siegler, Sorin; Winkelstein, Beth A.

    2009-10-01

    Three dimensional renditions of anatomical structures are commonly used to improve visualization, surgical planning, and patient education. However, such 3D images also contain information which is not readily apparent, and which can be mined to elucidate, for example, such parameters as joint kinematics, spacial relationships, and distortions of those relationships with movement. Here we describe two series of experiments which demonstrate the functional application of 3D imaging. The first concerns the joints of the ankle complex, where the usual description of motions in the talocrural joint is shown to be incomplete, and where the roles of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments are clarified in ankle sprains. Also, the biomechanical effects of two common surgical procedures for repairing torn ligaments were examined. The second series of experiments explores changes in the anatomical relationships between nerve elements and the cervical vertebrae with changes in neck position. They provide preliminary evidence that morphological differences may exist between asymptomatic subjects and patients with radiculopathy in certain positions, even when conventional imaging shows no difference.

  20. Tectonic analysis of Baja California and Parras shear belt in Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Gawad, M. (Principal Investigator); Tubbesing, L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geological correlation of terrain across the Gulf of California using ERTS-1 imagery revealed significant similarities between Isla Tiburon, Isla Angel de la Guarda, and the San Carlos Range in mainland Mexico. ERTS-1 imagery was used to check the validity of the existence of major trans-Baja fault zones. ERTS-1 imagery also shows that high albedo sediments similar to known late Tertiary marine sediments are widespread in southern and middle Baja and extend in places to the eastern side of the Peninsula. Major faults in northern Mexico and across the border in the United States were mapped, and ample evidence was found that the Parras and parts of the Texas lineament are belts of major transverse shear faults in areas outside the supposed limit of the Texas and Parras lineaments. A fundamental concept which may help explain many complexities in the tectonic development is beginning to emerge: The southwestern part of North America was torn by massive left-lateral shear of transverse trend (east-west) during the compressive stage of the late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic. This tectonic style has changed into tensional rifting (Basin and Range) and right-lateral shear later in the Cenozoic and Quaternary.

  1. Beyond individual war trauma: domestic violence against children in Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Catani, Claudia; Schauer, Elisabeth; Neuner, Frank

    2008-04-01

    To date, research on the psychosocial consequences of mass trauma resulting from war and organized violence on children has primarily focused on the individual as the unit of treatment and analysis with particular focus on mental disorders caused by traumatic stress. This body of research has stimulated the development of promising individual-level treatment approaches for addressing psychological trauma. In contrast, there is virtually no literature addressing the effects of mass trauma on the family and community systems. Research conducted in Sri Lanka and Afghanistan, two long-standing war-torn societies, found that in addition to multiple exposure to war or disaster-related traumatic events children also indicated high levels of exposure to family violence. These findings point to the need for conjoint family- and community-based programs of prevention and intervention that are specifically tailored for the context of the affected society. In particular, programs should take issues such as poverty, child labor, and parental alcohol use into account in assessing and treating children in the aftermath of mass trauma.

  2. Leadership lessons from the Chilean mine rescue.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Faaiza; Edmondson, Amy C; Leonard, Herman B

    2013-01-01

    Three years ago, when a cave-in at the San José mine in Chile trapped 33 men under 700,000 metric tons of rock, experts estimated the probability of getting them out alive at less than 1%. Yet, after spending a record 69 days underground, all 33 were hoisted up to safety. The inspiring story of their rescue is a case study in how to lead in situations where the stakes, risk, and uncertainty are incredibly high and time pressure is intense. Today executives often find themselves in similar straits. When they do, many feel torn. Should they be directive, taking charge and commanding action? Or should they be empowering, enabling innovation and experimentation? As the successful example of André Sougarret, the chief of the mine rescue operation, shows, the answer is yes--to both. The choice is a false dichotomy. Implementing this dual approach involves three key tasks. Each has directive and enabling components. The first task is envisioning, which requires instilling both realism and hope. The second task is enrolling, which means setting clear boundaries for who is on and off the team, but inviting in helpful collaborators. The third task is engaging--leading disciplined execution while encouraging innovation and experimentation. The authors of this article describe how Sougarret ably juggled all of these tasks, orchestrating the efforts of hundreds of people from different organizations, areas of expertise, and countries in an extraordinary mission that overcame impossible odds.

  3. Linear and nonlinear evolution of the ion resonance instability in cylindrical traps: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2015-07-15

    Numerical experiments have been performed to investigate the linear and nonlinear dynamics, and energetics of the ion resonance instability in cylindrically confined nonneutral plasma. The instability is excited on a set of parametrically different unstable equilibria of a cylindrical nonneutral cloud, composed of electrons partially neutralized by a much heavier ion species of single ionization. A particle-in-cell code has been developed and employed to carry out these simulations. The results obtained from the initial exponential growth phase of the instability in these numerical experiments are in agreement with the linearised analytical model of the ion resonance instability. As the simulations delve much further in time beyond the exponential growth phase, very interesting nonlinear phenomena of the ion resonance instability are revealed, such as a process of simultaneous wave breaking of the excited poloidal mode on the ion cloud and pinching of the poloidal perturbations on the electron cloud. This simultaneous nonlinear dynamics of the two components is associated with an energy transfer process from the electrons to the ions. At later stages there is heating induced cross-field transport of the heavier ions and tearing across the pinches on the electron cloud followed by an inverse cascade of the torn sections.

  4. Fission yeast Pot1 and RecQ helicase are required for efficient chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsunori; Imano, Ryota; Kibe, Tatsuya; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Muramatsu, Yukiko; Kawabata, Naoki; Tanaka, Genki; Matsumoto, Yoshitake; Hiromoto, Taisuke; Koizumi, Yuka; Nakazawa, Norihiko; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko; Ueno, Masaru

    2011-02-01

    Pot1 is a single-stranded telomere-binding protein that is conserved from fission yeast to mammals. Deletion of Schizosaccharomyces pombe pot1(+) causes immediate telomere loss. S. pombe Rqh1 is a homolog of the human RecQ helicase WRN, which plays essential roles in the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we demonstrate that a pot1Δ rqh1-hd (helicase-dead) double mutant maintains telomeres that are dependent on Rad51-mediated homologous recombination. Interestingly, the pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant displays a "cut" (cell untimely torn) phenotype and is sensitive to the antimicrotubule drug thiabendazole (TBZ). Moreover, the chromosome ends of the double mutant do not enter the pulsed-field electrophoresis gel. These results suggest that the entangled chromosome ends in the pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant inhibit chromosome segregation, signifying that Pot1 and Rqh1 are required for efficient chromosome segregation. We also found that POT1 knockdown, WRN-deficient human cells are sensitive to the antimicrotubule drug vinblastine, implying that some of the functions of S. pombe Pot1 and Rqh1 may be conserved in their respective human counterparts POT1 and WRN.

  5. CSL protein regulates transcription of genes required to prevent catastrophic mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Převorovský, Martin; Oravcová, Martina; Zach, Róbert; Jordáková, Anna; Bähler, Jürg; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2016-11-16

    For every eukaryotic cell to grow and divide, intricately coordinated action of numerous proteins is required to ensure proper cell-cycle progression. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been instrumental in elucidating the fundamental principles of cell-cycle control. Mutations in S. pombe 'cut' (cell untimely torn) genes cause failed coordination between cell and nuclear division, resulting in catastrophic mitosis. Deletion of cbf11, a fission yeast CSL transcription factor gene, triggers a 'cut' phenotype, but the precise role of Cbf11 in promoting mitotic fidelity is not known. We report that Cbf11 directly activates the transcription of the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase gene cut6, and the biotin uptake/biosynthesis genes vht1 and bio2, with the former 2 implicated in mitotic fidelity. Cbf11 binds to a canonical, metazoan-like CSL response element (GTGGGAA) in the cut6 promoter. Expression of Cbf11 target genes shows apparent oscillations during the cell cycle using temperature-sensitive cdc25-22 and cdc10-M17 block-release experiments, but not with other synchronization methods. The penetrance of catastrophic mitosis in cbf11 and cut6 mutants is nutrient-dependent. We also show that drastic decrease in biotin availability arrests cell proliferation but does not cause mitotic defects. Taken together, our results raise the possibility that CSL proteins play conserved roles in regulating cell-cycle progression, and they could guide experiments into mitotic CSL functions in mammals.

  6. [The therapeutic promises of a building. Vijverdal Community Mental Hospital 1969-2004].

    PubMed

    Klijn, Annemieke

    2005-01-01

    In 1972 the psychiatric hospital 'Vijverdal' opened its doors in Maastricht. The building of this Community Mental Hospital was reported to be 'revolutionary'. Inspired by American architectural concepts about the construction of hospitals, Vijverdal arose as a huge complex with a nine storey radial block of flats: a unique building in Dutch psychiatry. The first reactions were very positive. The imposing flat expressed psychiatric optimism and therapeutic promises. However, confronted by the dynamic developments in psychiatry at the end of the seventies, the hospital more and more appeared to be a therapeutic monstrum: the flat became a symbol of alienation and medical detachment. Adapting it to the new ideas about differentiation and de-concentration appeared difficult, however. Only in 2000 Vijverdal started a fundamental renovation. The flat will be torn down in 2006. This changing evaluation of Vijverdal makes us wonder about the biography of this psychiatric hospital. Which intentions and which psychiatric concepts inspired Vijverdal to be built? How functioned the building environment of Vijverdal in practice? Could the hospital be accommodated to the new notions and wishes about psychiatric care? Moreover, in what way did the architecture determine the history of Vijverdal? And eventually, how are new conceptions about psychiatric care translated in the present renovation and reconstruction of Vijverdal? Do therapeutic promises play a role again? The adventures of Vijverdal tell us about the risks of visionary architecture, but also that a building matters: the psychiatric patients appreciate the new houses and the privacy of a room for their own.

  7. Semitendinosus and gracilis free muscle-tendon graft for repair of massive rotator cuff tears: surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    GIGANTE, ANTONIO; BOTTEGONI, CARLO; MILANO, GIUSEPPE; RICCIO, MICHELE; DEI GIUDICI, LUCA

    2016-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears are difficult to treat surgically due to retraction, degeneration and fraying of the ends of torn tendons, severe fatty infiltration and atrophy of the respective muscles. Procedures developed to close the gap between the rotator cuff and the greater tuberosity of the humerus, such as soft tissue release may be inadequate for large tears. Human or porcine dermal allografts still have uncertain benefits, and tendon transfers seem to be associated with poor outcomes, donor site morbidity and altered mechanics. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has limited durability and is not indicated in young patients with high functional demands. We developed a new technique for repairing massive rotator cuff tears by semitendinosus and gracilis myotendinous grafting. This novel therapeutic option allows massive rotator cuff tears to be repaired using autologous material that is adequate and adaptable, making it possible to cover any width of defect. The technique is low-invasive and not technically demanding, with minimal donor site morbidity. PMID:27900313

  8. The Economy of the Totalitarian Mind: the Case of the Immigrant Child().

    PubMed

    Kelley-Lainé, Kathleen

    2016-12-01

    Immigration in early childhood can be considered as a traumatic situation. It often goes unrecognized since children adapt to most conditions and conform to their environment with astonishing agility. Inspired by the sensitive work of Sándor Ferenczi, and Donald Winnicott, regarding the psychic economy of maturational processes, the author explores the concept of totalitarian functioning and its obstruction of the growing psyche. Before birth we are all totalitarian, one with the mother; this symbiotic, invincible state of survival mode is prolonged as the immature newborn child ignores the requirements of reality and enjoys omnipotent pleasure through hallucination. The loss of place in immigration often becomes the loss of identity-the question of "where am I?" becomes confused with "who am I?". Clinical practice exposes this fragility in adults torn from their home environment at an early age, forced into precocious maturity, never to grow up in reality. Through clinical examples, the author illustrates how totalitarian mental functioning of "all or nothing, right or wrong, black or white" is exposed in the transference and can be worked through within the psychoanalytical space.

  9. Heliconia phenotypic diversity based on qualitative descriptors.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, W N R; Martins, L S S; Castro, C E F; Carvalho Filho, J L S; Loges, V

    2014-04-17

    The aim of this study was to characterize Heliconia genotypes phenotypically using 26 qualitative descriptors. The evaluations were conducted in five flowering stems per clump in three replicates of 22 Heliconia genotypes. Data were subjected to multivariate analysis, the Mahalanobis dissimilarity measure was estimated, and the dendrogram was generated using the nearest neighbor method. From the values generated by the dissimilarity matrix and the clusters formed among the Heliconia genotypes studied, the phenotypic characterizations that best differentiated the genotypes were: pseudostem and wax green tone (light or dark green), leaf-wax petiole, the petiole hair, cleft margin at the base of the petiole, midrib underside shade of green, wax midrib underside, color sheet (light or dark green), unequal lamina base, torn limb, inflorescence-wax, position of inflorescence, bract leaf in apex, twisting of the rachis, and type of bloom. These results will be applied in the preparation of a catalog for Heliconia descriptors, in the selection of different genotypes with most promising characteristics for crosses, and for the characterization of new genotypes to be introduced in germplasm collections.

  10. Articular cartilage friction increases in hip joints after the removal of acetabular labrum.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongnam; Ito, Hiroshi; Kourtis, Lampros; Safran, Marc R; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2012-02-02

    The acetabular labrum is believed to have a sealing function. However, a torn labrum may not effectively prevent joint fluid from escaping a compressed joint, resulting in impaired lubrication. We aimed to understand the role of the acetabular labrum in maintaining a low friction environment in the hip joint. We did this by measuring the resistance to rotation (RTR) of the hip, which reflects the friction of the articular cartilage surface, following focal and complete labrectomy. Five cadaveric hips without evidence of osteoarthritis and impingement were tested. We measured resistance to rotation of the hip joint during 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 times body weight (BW) cyclic loading in the intact hip, and after focal and complete labrectomy. Resistance to rotation, which reflects articular cartilage friction in an intact hip was significantly increased following focal labrectomy at 1-3 BW loading, and following complete labrectomy at all load levels. The acetabular labrum appears to maintain a low friction environment, possibly by sealing the joint from fluid exudation. Even focal labrectomy may result in increased joint friction, a condition that may be detrimental to articular cartilage and lead to osteoarthritis.

  11. Human and robotic repair of a solar array wing during ISS assembly mission 10A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghenekevwe, Viano; Redmond, Scott; Hiltz, Michael; Rembala, Richard

    2009-12-01

    With the installation of a new module and the relocation of three other modules, including multiple hand-offs from the station arm (SSRMS) to the shuttle arm (SRMS), International Space Station (ISS) assembly mission 10A/STS-120 was anticipated to be one of the most complicated ISS assembly missions ever attempted. The assembly operations became even more complex when a solar array wing (SAW) on the relocated Port-6 (P6) truss segment ripped while being extended. Repairing the torn SAW became the single most important objective for the remainder of STS-120, with future ISS assembly missions threatened by reduced power generation capacity if the SAW could not be repaired. Precise coordination between the space shuttle and ISS robotics teams led to an operational concept that combined the capabilities of the SRMS and SSRMS robotic systems in ways far beyond their original design capacities. Benefits of consistent standards for ISS robotic interfaces have been previously identified, but the advantages of having two such versatile and compatible robotic systems have never been quite so spectacular. This paper describes the role of robotics in the emergency SAW repair and highlights how versatility within space robotics systems can allow operations far beyond the intended design scenarios.

  12. Facial injuries following hyena attack in rural eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Fell, M J; Ayalew, Y; McClenaghan, F C; McGurk, M

    2014-12-01

    Hyenas are effective hunters and will consider humans as potential prey if the need and opportunity arise. This study describes the circumstances of hyena attacks, the patterns of injuries sustained, and reconstruction in a resource-poor setting. As part of a charitable surgical mission to Ethiopia in 2012, 45 patients with facial deformities were reviewed, of whom four were victims of hyena attacks. A semi-structured interview was performed to ascertain the circumstances of the attack and the subsequent consequences. The age of the victims at the time of attack varied from 5 to 50 years. The attacks occurred when the victims were alone and vulnerable and took place in outdoor open spaces, during the evening or at night. The initial lunge was made to the facial area; if the jaws closed on the facial bones they were crushed, but in all cases the soft tissues were grasped and torn from the underlying bone. Reconstruction was dictated by the extent of soft tissue loss but could normally be obtained by use of local or regional flaps. Hyenas have been shown to attack humans in a predictable way and cause injuries that typically involve the soft tissues of the face.

  13. Massive Black Hole Implicated in Stellar Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Magellan telescopes suggest that a dense stellar remnant has been ripped apart by a black hole a thousand times as massive as the Sun. If confirmed, this discovery would be a cosmic double play: it would be strong evidence for an intermediate mass black hole, which has been a hotly debated topic, and would mark the first time such a black hole has been caught tearing a star apart. This scenario is based on Chandra observations, which revealed an unusually luminous source of X-rays in a dense cluster of old stars, and optical observations that showed a peculiar mix of elements associated with the X-ray emission. Taken together, a case can be made that the X-ray emission is produced by debris from a disrupted white dwarf star that is heated as it falls towards a massive black hole. The optical emission comes from debris further out that is illuminated by these X-rays. The intensity of the X-ray emission places the source in the "ultraluminous X-ray source" or ULX category, meaning that it is more luminous than any known stellar X-ray source, but less luminous than the bright X-ray sources (active galactic nuclei) associated with supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. The nature of ULXs is a mystery, but one suggestion is that some ULXs are black holes with masses between about a hundred and several thousand times that of the Sun, a range intermediate between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes located in the nuclei of galaxies. This ULX is in a globular cluster, a very old and crowded conglomeration of stars. Astronomers have suspected that globular clusters could contain intermediate-mass black holes, but conclusive evidence for this has been elusive. "Astronomers have made cases for stars being torn apart by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies before, but this is the first good evidence for such an event in a globular cluster," said Jimmy Irwin of the University

  14. Comet 'Bites the Dust' Around Dead Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared Spectrometer Graph

    This artist's concept illustrates a comet being torn to shreds around a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29-38. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope observed a cloud of dust around this white dwarf that may have been generated from this type of comet disruption. The findings suggest that a host of other comet survivors may still orbit in this long-dead solar system.

    The white dwarf G29-38 began life as a star that was about three times as massive as our sun. Its death involved the same steps that the sun will ultimately undergo billions of years from now. According to theory, the G29-38 star became brighter and brighter as it aged, until it bloated up into a dying star called a red giant. This red giant was large enough to engulf and evaporate any terrestrial planets like Earth that happened to be in its way. Later, the red giant shed its outer atmosphere, leaving behind a shrunken skeleton of star, called a white dwarf. If the star did host a planetary system, outer planets akin to Jupiter and Neptune and a remote ring of icy comets would remain.

    The Spitzer observations provide observational evidence for this orbiting outpost of comet survivors. Astronomers speculate that one such comet was knocked into the inner regions of G29-38, possibly by an outer planet. As the comet approached very close to the white dwarf, it may have been torn apart by the star's tidal forces. Eventually, all that would be left of the comet is a disk of dust.

    This illustration shows a comet in the process of being pulverized: part of it still exists as a chain of small clumps, while the rest has already spread out into a dusty disk. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 broke apart in a similar fashion when it plunged into Jupiter in 1994. Evidence for Comets Found in Dead Star's Dust The graph of data, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope indicates that a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29

  15. Sea spray production by bag breakup mode of fragmentation of the air-water interface at strong and hurricane wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kozlov, Dmitry; Sergeev, Daniil; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-04-01

    Sea sprays is a typical element of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) of large importance for marine meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and climate studies. They are considered as a crucial factor in the development of hurricanes and severe extratropical storms, since they can significantly enhance exchange of mass, heat and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere. This exchange is directly provided by spume droplets with the sizes from 10 microns to a few millimeters mechanically torn off the crests of a breaking waves and fall down to the ocean due to gravity. The fluxes associated with the spray are determined by the rate of droplet production at the surface quantified by the sea spray generation function (SSGF), defined as the number of spray particles of radius r produced from the unit area of water surface in unit time. However, the mechanism of spume droplets' formation is unknown and empirical estimates of SSGF varied over six orders of magnitude; therefore, the production rate of large sea spray droplets is not adequately described and there are significant uncertainties in estimations of exchange processes in hurricanes. Experimental core of our work comprise laboratory experiments employing high-speed video-filming, which have made it possible to disclose how water surface looks like at extremely strong winds and how exactly droplets are torn off wave crests. We classified events responsible for spume droplet, including bursting of submerged bubbles, generation and breakup of "projections" or liquid filaments (Koa, 1981) and "bag breakup", namely, inflating and consequent blowing of short-lived, sail-like pieces of the water-surface film, "bags". The process is similar to "bag-breakup" mode of fragmentation of liquid droplets and jets in gaseous flows. Basing on statistical analysis of results of these experiments we show that the main mechanism of spray-generation is attributed to "bag-breakup mechanism On the base of general principles

  16. An explanation for the chotic structure of the poles based on a new concept concerning the formation of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguignes, M.

    Observations made by Moon probes, and in particular the topological cartography of the surface of the Moon carried out by the probe CLEMENTINE, showed highly chaotic structures with a high density of craters concentrated around a vast central depression. The Sun's light only falls on the summits of the craters and thus the bottom may always be in darkness. This has led to the assumption that water could be trapped in the deepest areas, an idea which has suddenly inspired a certain amount of research into the presence of water at the poles (STANKEVICH et al. 2001,. HUBBARD et al 2002) Based on the hypothesis that the Moon was formed from matter torn from the Earth by the force of the tides of Jupiter (SEGUIGNES, 2002), we suggest a plausible hypothesis for the formation of the polar regions of the Moon. The circumference of the Moon is - that of the circumference of the Earth. The matter out of which it was formed had the same dimension. This matter, which was torn from the Earth and then became its satellite, was subjected to the forces of gravity of the newly-formed Moon. During the process whereby the Moon's crust closed over under the force of its own gravity, parts of the crust at the polar regions were subjected to a dual effect : A central collapse due to the fact there was not enough magmatic material to support them ; A topological shrinking due to the fact that the crust was being transformed from a surface spread out over thousand km to an area covering only a few hundred km. Although the North pole experienced only the mechanism of shrinkage, at the South pole a dual phenomenon occurred : a shrinking of the same kind as that seen at the North pole and an inadequate supply of magma from the Earth due to the Moon's rotation while it was becoming a satellite. Conclusion Understanding the chaotic nature of the polar regions of the Moon provides much precious information on : the structure of the proto-Earth's crust, which was violently broken up in these

  17. A Preferred Home for Disrupted Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Observed burps from the shredding of stars by supermassive black holes suggest that this behavior is more common in an unusual type of galaxy. A new study has examined NGC 3156, an example from this galaxy type, to better understand what causes this preference.Stellar BetrayalAn artists illustration of a tidal disruption event, in which a star is sent on a plunging orbit near a supermassive black hole and is subsequently torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. [NASA/CXC/M.Weiss]Tidal disruption events (TDEs) are events where a star plunges too close to a supermassive black hole and is torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. Weve observed roughly a dozen of these violent events in the last five years, and we expect to finds hundreds to thousands more with future surveys.TDEs are triggered when a star is sent on a plunging orbit close to a supermassive black hole. But what sends the star into harms way? One possible culprit is a dynamical mechanism known as two-body relaxation. In this process, stars orbiting a black hole undergo individual starstar interactions that, with a close enough encounter, can send them on plunging orbits.Choosing an Unusual HostOne puzzle with TDEs is that they tend to be preferentially found in rather unusual galaxies: galaxies that recently exhibited a lot of star formation but are now quiescent. In particular, several of the TDEs have been discovered in what are known as E+A galaxies, a rare subtype of elliptical galaxy that has recently undergone a major starburst.Since this subtype makes up only ~0.1% of all galaxies, its surprising that weve found so many TDEs in E+A galaxies so far. So why the preference?In an effort to answer this question, two scientists, Nicholas Stone (Einstein Fellow at Columbia University) and Sjoert van Velzen (Hubble Fellow at Johns Hopkins University), have teamed up to examine a nearby E+A galaxy, NGC 3156.Tidal disruption rates as a function of central supermassive-black-hole mass. The blue curve

  18. Building Halos by Digesting Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    We think galactic halos are built through the addition of material from the smaller subhalos of satellites digested by their hosts. Though most of the stars in Milky-Way-mass halos were probably formed in situ, many were instead accumulated over time, as orbiting dwarf galaxies were torn apart and their stars flung throughout the host galaxy. A recent set of simulations has examined this brutal formation process.In the authors simulations, a subhalo first falls into the host halo. At this point, it can either survive to present day as a satellite galaxy, or it can be destroyed, its stars scattering throughout the host halo. [Deason et al. 2016]Subhalo FateThere are many open questions about the growth of Milky-Way-mass halos from the accretion of subhalos. Which subhalos are torn apart and accreted, and which ones survive intact? Are more small or large subhalos accreted? Does subhalo accretion affect the host galaxys metallicity? And what can we learn from all of this about the Milky Ways formation history?In a recently published study, a team of scientists from Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory set out to answer these questions using a suite of 45 zoom-in simulations of Milky-Way-mass halos. Led by Alis Deason, the team tracked the accretion history of these 45 test galaxies to determine how their halos were built.Piecing Together HistoryDeason and collaborators reach several new and interesting conclusions based on the outcomes of their simulations.Average accreted stellar mass from destroyed dwarfs for each host halo, as a function of the time of the last major accretion event. More stellar mass is accreted in more recent accretion events. [Deason et al. 2016]Most of the stellar mass accreted by the Milky-Way-mass halos typically comes from only one or two destroyed dwarfs. The accreted dwarfs are usually low-mass if they were accreted early on in the simulation (i.e., in the early universe), and high-mass if they were accreted

  19. Temporal headaches and associated symptoms relating to the styloid process and its attachments.

    PubMed

    Wong, E; Lee, G; Mason, D T

    1995-01-01

    The styloid process is a slender spike-like bony process that is attached to the base of the skull that has been of interest to physicians for centuries. From this process is the attachment for five structures--three muscles and two ligaments are attached to it. Any of these soft tissues of the styloid process are prone to be torn due to trauma by way of detachment of the periosteum from the bone. These lesions may occur from auto accidents, falls, sports injuries, to prolonged medical or dental procedures requiring excessive mouth opening. The detachment of Sharpey's fibres results in the release of noxious chemicals such as kinins, histamines, prostaglandins, etc, which can produce a withdrawal reflex, causing muscle tension, ischaemia, spasm and pain. Pain transmission via C fibres may induce a host of autonomic responses as well. We have observed 11 common pains and symptoms that are associated with soft tissue lesions of the styloid process and stylomandibular ligament. They are (1) headaches localised in the anterior temporal fossa, (2) sore throat and difficulty swallowing in the absence of inflammation, (3) pain radiating to the temporomandibular joint and ear, (4) voice alteration, (5) dry, non-productive cough, (6) pain in the masseter muscle, (7) restricted mandibular opening or the "closed lock", (8) development of the "open lock", (9) sinusitis, congested stuffy nose or post nasal drip, (10) tinnitus, and (11) excessive lacrimation and bloodshot eyes. A few drops of local anesthetic into the styloid process and stylomandibular ligament attachment can temporarily relieve the pain and symptoms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Thermal history and origin of the IVB iron meteorites and their parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jijin; Goldstein, Joseph I.; Michael, Joseph R.; Kotula, Paul G.; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2010-08-01

    We have determined metallographic cooling rates of 9 IVB irons by measuring Ni gradients 3 μm or less in length at kamacite-taenite boundaries with the analytical transmission electron microscope and by comparing these Ni gradients with those derived by modeling kamacite growth. Cooling rates at 600-400 °C vary from 475 K/Myr at the low-Ni end of group IVB to 5000 K/Myr at the high-Ni end. Sizes of high-Ni particles in the cloudy zone microstructure in taenite and the widths of the tetrataenite rims, which both increase with decreasing cooling rate, are inversely correlated with the bulk Ni concentrations of the IVB irons confirming the correlation between cooling rate and bulk Ni. Since samples of a core that cooled inside a thermally insulating silicate mantle should have uniform cooling rates, the IVB core must have cooled through 500 °C without a silicate mantle. The correlation between cooling rate and bulk Ni suggests that the core crystallized concentrically outwards. Our thermal and fractional crystallization models suggest that in this case the radius of the core was 65 ± 15 km when it cooled without a mantle. The mantle was probably removed when the IVB body was torn apart in a glancing impact with a larger body. Clean separation of the mantle from the solid core during this impact could have been aided by a thin layer of residual metallic melt at the core-mantle boundary. Thus the IVB irons may have crystallized in a well-mantled core that was 70 ± 15 km in radius while it was inside a body of radius 140 ± 30 km.

  1. DEMOLISHING A COLD WARE ERA FULE STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD ER; STEVENS JM; DAGAN EB; ORGILL TK; GREEN MA; LARSON CH; ZINSLI LC

    2009-01-12

    asbestos) demonstrates that contaminated structures can be torn down successfully using similar open-air demolition techniques.

  2. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section

  3. PHYSICS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER CLOUD G2, ON ITS WAY TOWARD THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, A.; Schartmann, M.; Alig, C.; Gillessen, S.; Genzel, R.; Fritz, T. K.; Eisenhauer, F.

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the origin, structure, and evolution of the small gas cloud G2, which is on an orbit almost straight into the Galactic central supermassive black hole (SMBH). G2 is a sensitive probe of the hot accretion zone of Sgr A*, requiring gas temperatures and densities that agree well with models of captured shock-heated stellar winds. Its mass is equal to the critical mass below which cold clumps would be destroyed quickly by evaporation. Its mass is also constrained by the fact that at apocenter its sound crossing timescale was equal to its infall timescale. Our numerical simulations show that the observed structure and evolution of G2 can be well reproduced if it forms in pressure equilibrium with its surroundings in 1995 at a distance from the SMBH of 7.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm. If the cloud had formed at apocenter in the 'clockwise' stellar disk as expected from its orbit, it would be torn into a very elongated spaghetti-like filament by 2011, which is not observed. This problem can be solved if G2 is the head of a larger, shell-like structure that formed at apocenter. Our numerical simulations show that this scenario explains not only G2's observed kinematical and geometrical properties but also the Br{gamma} observations of a low surface brightness gas tail that trails the cloud. In 2013, while passing the SMBH, G2 will break up into a string of droplets that within the next 30 years will mix with the surrounding hot gas and trigger cycles of active galactic nucleus activity.

  4. Political Activity at Harvard College Observatory in the Shapley ERA (1921-1952): Controversy and Consequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, Barbara L.

    1993-12-01

    Soon after Harlow Shapley became director of HCO in 1921, he established himself as a scientist who would speak out and take action on national and international issues. Recognizing the importance of international cooperation in astronomy, he frequently traveled abroad and in turn invited foreign scientists to visit and work at HCO. By the mid-1930s, Shapley was actively rescuing refugee scientists in war-torn Europe and placing them in American universities. Both Harvard and the FBI took note of his activities. Shapley feared intervention of any kind from either academia or the government. Desperate for funding, however, he finally went to Washington and lobbied Congress to set up the NSF. Through 1945, when Truman succeeded Roosevelt, Shapley pursued his political activities freely. That year he travelled to Moscow to represent Harvard at the 220th anniversary celebration of the Academy of Sciences. In Moscow he advocated international cooperation between Soviet and American scientists. Consequently, Shapley was subpoenaed for interrogation in 1946 by John Rankin, who served during the Truman administration as a one-man committee to investigate un-American activities. The ordeal infuriated Shapley. Headlines about it infuriated some Harvard alumni who urged the university to fire him. Although Shapley was nearing retirement, President Conant stood by his right to keep his job. By 1950, when Senator Joseph McCarthy was compiling a list of Communist sympathizers in the State Department, the FBI had a dossier on Shapley. McCarthy subpoenaed Shapley, but could not intimidate him. The Senator continued the witch hunt with Shapley's associates. First he harassed Martha Betz Shapley, then Donald Menzel. Both cleared themselves. Other associates, such as Bart Bok, were spared. Ultimately, the interrogation worked in Menzel's favor. It disassociated him from Shapley's ideology and political activities. When the Harvard Corporation sought the next director of HCO, Menzel

  5. Environmental reporters: prisoners of gullibility

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbison, J.

    1984-03-01

    Mr. Sibbison, formerly a press officer for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), says EPA's problems are far from over even though it is now directed by a nice guy and competent administrator, William Ruckelshaus. He wonders how industry can take seriously an agency so visibly torn between its shrinking resources and its sweeping mandate to rid the air, water, and land of contamination. He points out the wide discrepancy between the countless mundane tasks necessary to achieve a clean environment and the situation as conveyed by the media. He puts much of the blame on the gullibility of the reporters in their dependence on official sources - and says they should understand there is more to covering an agency than keeping abreast of press releases and office politics at the upper levels. Sibbison cites several examples from his past experience to show how EPA press officers get the media to tell the story EPA's way. Even Ruckelshaus' brown bag luncheons with different groups of reporters every two weeks - selected from the nation's leading news outlets - are suspect as another means to manage any obvious embarrassments out of the news. But, even granting that Ruckelshaus remains as committed as ever to EPA's goals, Sibbison notes that isn't the same as succeeding. The real problem is getting the bureaucracy to follow through on the day-to-day drudgery of monitoring and enforcement - and it is here the press should take a much harder look, rather than feeding on releases from EPA officials or from other executive officials.

  6. [The physician between the ideal and reality: medical profession and popular attitude towards health and medicine in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Zeleznik, Urska

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the attitude of the society towards the medical profession, which was torn between high social expectations and ideals and medical practice confronted with real-life obstacles. In the 19th century, the physician's position was still precarious and called for a renegotiation in the community. Physician's work was faced with people's distrust and resistance, superstitions and prejudices, folk medicine and religion. Even such ideal qualities as dignity, conscientiousness, and courage, would quickly be called into question by events such as epidemics. Particularly in 19th century rural areas, the physician's position was far from acknowledged and official medicine had yet to win people's trust. This paper explores the polyvalent attitude of people towards medicine and health. It investigates the discourse used to describe health and medicine in daily press, professional and popular literature, as well as in official medical documents of the time. It shows a long struggle of public health care to gain people's approval. During cholera epidemics, which apart from presenting serious threat to human life were an opportunity for medicine to win people's trust and obedience, the attitude towards health gradually began to change. To some extent this was a result of medical advances, new scientific discoveries, and increasing success in abating the epidemics. At the same time, as the society became more secular, medicine slowly gained people's trust and gradually replaced the healing methods of folk medicine. Health was less and less understood as a result of God's will and mercy, and the attitude towards disease began to evolve from passive resignation to an active battle for health.

  7. In Vitro Repair of Meniscal Radial Tear Using Aligned Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Bean, Allison C.; Lin, Hang; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2015-01-01

    Radial tears of the meniscus represent one of the most common injuries of the knee, and result in loss of biomechanical meniscal function. However, there have been no established, effective treatments for radial meniscal tears. Nanofibrous materials produced by electrospinning have shown high promise in the engineering of soft musculoskeletal tissues. The goal of our study is to apply these technologies to develop a functional cell-seeded scaffold as a potential, new surgical method to enhance meniscal radial repair. Cylinder-shaped explants were excised from the inner avascular region of bovine meniscus and a radial tear was created in the center of the explant. The torn site was wrapped with either nanofibrous scaffold alone or scaffold seeded with meniscal fibrochondrocytes (MFC). A control group was prepared as explants without scaffolds or cells. The composite constructs in each group were cultured in vitro for 4 and 8 weeks, and these were then assessed histologically and mechanically. Histological analysis showed partial repair of the radial tear was observed with adherence between scaffold and native meniscal tissue in either the scaffold alone or cell-seeded scaffold group. Only the cell-seeded scaffold exhibited significant positive Picrosirius red staining and Safranin O staining. Mechanical testing of the repaired meniscus showed that the load-to-failure and stiffness values were significantly improved in the cell-seeded group. These results demonstrated the applicability of the MFC-seeded nanofibrous scaffold for meniscal radial tear repair based on both histological and mechanical analyses. In particular, the highly adhesive property of the cell-seeded scaffold to the meniscal tissue should be beneficial in helping to preserve the meniscal function by stabilizing meniscal fibers. PMID:25813386

  8. Partial ACL tears: anatomic reconstruction versus nonanatomic augmentation surgery.

    PubMed

    Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Parma, Alessandro; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Luciani, Deianira; Ramponi, Laura; Castagnini, Francesco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears requires ACL remnant preservation. The goal of this study was to compare the outcome of anatomic reconstruction of the torn bundle with nonanatomic augmentation using the over-the-top femoral route. Fifty-two athletes (mean age, 23.3 years) with partial ACL lesions underwent anatomic reconstruction (n=26) or nonanatomic augmentation (n=26). Intraoperative damage of the healthy bundle that required a standard ACL reconstruction occurred in 2 patients in the anatomic reconstruction group. International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Tegner score, and arthrometer evaluation were used pre-operatively and at follow-up for up to 5 years postoperatively. One failure occurred in the anatomic reconstruction group. Mean IKDC subjective score at follow-up was 88.2 ± 5.7 in the anatomic reconstruction group and 90.2 ± 4.7 in the nonanatomic augmentation group. According to the IKDC objective score at final follow-up, 96% of knees in the nonanatomic augmentation group were normal vs 87.5% in the anatomic reconstruction group. No significative differences were observed between the 2 groups at final follow-up. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction showed significantly lower IKDC subjective and objective scores and higher residual instability values as evaluated with the arthrometer compared with posterolateral bundle reconstruction (P=.017). The surgical treatment of ACL partial tears is demanding. Adapted portals, perfect control of the tunnel drilling process, and intercondylar space management are required in anatomic reconstruction. The nonanatomic augmentation technique is simpler, providing excellent durable results over time with a lower complication rate. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction is associated with a poorer outcome, especially when performed with anatomic reconstruction.

  9. Comparison of the clinical performance of the Acuvue disposable contact lens and CSI lens in patients with giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Bucci, F A; Lopatynsky, M O; Jenkins, P L; Mackay, A T; Rickert, D G; Gold, R M

    1993-04-15

    Anecdotal reports have suggested that the use of disposable contact lenses is an effective treatment for giant papillary conjunctivitis. In a prospective randomized double-masked study, we compared the clinical performance of the Acuvue (Vistakon, Jacksonville, Florida) disposable contact lens to the traditional daily-wear lens of choice, CSI (Pilkington Barnes Hind, Sunnyvale, California), in 37 patients with previously diagnosed giant papillary conjunctivitis who were examined at one-month intervals for six months. A survey questionnaire for grading symptoms disclosed significant improvement in itching, discharge, and blurred vision in both groups early in the study. Evaluation of patient preference showed that the CSI lens was strongly preferred with regard to lens handling (76% vs 8%). In contrast, the Acuvue lens was strongly preferred with regard to lens comfort (62% vs 11%). For the variable of overall lens preference, there was no significant difference between the two lenses (CSI, 43% and Acuvue, 41%). Multiple regression analysis disclosed that both lens comfort (P < .002) and lens handling (P = .05) contributed significantly to the choices made regarding the dependent variable of overall lens preference. Lens comfort (beta = .71) was observed to be approximately 50% more powerful than lens handling (beta = .48). There was no significant difference in the rate or cost of torn lenses between groups, suggesting that the Acuvue lens can withstand the physical manipulation associated with daily-wear use for up to one month. The results of this study suggest that the use of disposable contact lenses for the treatment of giant papillary conjunctivitis is at least as effective as the traditional daily-wear lens of choice.

  10. Subduction of the Indian slab into the mantle transition zone revealed by receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yaohui; Tian, Xiaobo; Liang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wei; Wu, Chenglong; Zhou, Beibei; Iqbal, Javed

    2017-04-01

    A large volume of continental lithosphere should have been emplaced beneath the Tibetan Plateau during the convergence between the Indian and Asian plates. However, geophysical studies have imaged an obviously thickened crust and a normal to slightly thickened mantle lithosphere beneath the plateau. Most of the additional mantle lithosphere is proposed to have detached and descended into the deep mantle to the mantle transition zone (MTZ). Recent studies suggest that the Indian lithospheric slab has torn into sections with different subduction angles. However, the locations of these slab sections, especially the high-angle one, require further structural constraints. Here, we used newly collected data from the broadband seismic network SANDWICH in central Tibet to study the thickness of the MTZ using the receiver function method. Our results show that there are two MTZ regions that are approximately 15 km thicker than the average one. One region is beneath the Lhasa terrane centered at 90°E, 31°N, and the other one is beneath the Qiangtang terrane centered at 88°E, 33°N. Because the upper and lower boundaries of the MTZ are both rock phase transition discontinuities that are sensitive to temperature. We interpret the thickened MTZ beneath the plateau as evidence of the presence of cold Indian slab and mantle lithosphere. The high-angle Indian lithospheric slab between the Yadong-Gulu Rift and the Pumqu-Xianza Rift is subducting deep into the MTZ, producing a decrease in temperature and thickening the MTZ beneath Lhasa terrane. In contrast, the Qiangtang anomaly corresponds to a piece of delaminated thickened Tibetan lithosphere. Based on the extensive distributions of Eocene to Oligocene potassic rocks and Mid-Miocene to Quaternary potassic rocks, we suggest that the thickened mantle lithosphere beneath the northern Qiangtang terrane and Songpan-Ganzi terrane detached in a piecewise manner, resulting in subsequent plateau uplift and recent potassic volcanism.

  11. [Practical Use Evaluation of Aluminum Packaging for Medicinal Products Based on Universal Design].

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kazuya; Hidaka, Takashi; Marubashi, Koichi; Takagi, Hirokazu; Kamimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Many pharmacists have requested optimization of aluminum packaging of medicinal products in terms of usability. To improve operational efficiency of aluminum packaging, we used Universal Design (UD)-based approach, which enables products to be used properly and consistently regardless of users. The UD-pack used in this research is composed of a film that can be easily opened and torn linear. Here, we compared the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging by evaluating the practical use of each under the cooperation of 24 pharmacists. Following opening and removal of contents of one sample for both types of packaging, monitors were asked which type was easier to use in each case. Also, monitors were to repeat the opening and removal of contents of five samples in a row, and were asked the same question. Monitors were recorded by digital camera to measure the time required to finish the procedure for five samples in a row. After opening one sample, approximately 83% of monitors preferred the UD-pack, and after opening five samples, all (100%) preferred the UD-pack. Regarding the time required for opening five samples and removing the contents measured by analyzing the recorded video, the UD-pack significantly reduced the time required for all monitors. The average time ratio of the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging was approximately 59%, and no significant difference was observed between male and female pharmacists. Our results indicate the UD-pack improves ease of opening and removal of contents and increases efficiency of dispensing in a clinical setting compared with conventional aluminum packaging.

  12. Effect of magnetic and thermal properties of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Hun Tiar; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Boondamnoen, O.; Tai, Mun Foong

    2015-12-01

    Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves are one of the most important personal protective equipments but they are possible to tear off and contaminate food or pharmaceutical and healthcare products during manufacturing and packaging process. High tendency of torn glove remaining in food or products due to white or light flesh-coloured glove is not easy to be detected by naked eyes. In this paper, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) selected as additive for NBR to improve its detectability by mean of magnetic properties. IONs synthesized via precipitation method and compounded with NBR latex before casting on petri dish. The properties of IONs were investigated by X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Raman Spectroscopy and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Meanwhile NBR/IONs composites were studied by Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). It observed that, synthesized IONs shows of 25.28 nm crystallite with 25.86 nm semipherical (changed as) shape. Meanwhile, Magnetite and maghemite phase are found in range of 670 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 respectively, which it contributes magnetization saturation of 73.96 emu/g at 10,000 G by VSM. Thermal stability and magnetic properties were increased with incorporating IONs into NBR latex up to 20 phr. NBR/IONs 5 phr has the optimum thermal stability, lowest glass transition temperature (-14.83 °C) and acceptable range of magnetization saturation (3.83 emu/g at 10,000 G) to form NBR gloves with magnetic detectability.

  13. Friction and wear of iron and nickel in sodium hydroxide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    A loaded spherical aluminum oxider rider was made to slide, while in various solutions, on a flat iron or nickel surface reciprocate a distance of 1 cm. Time of experiments was 1 hr during which the rider passed over the rider passed over the center section of the track 540 times. Coefficients of friction were measured throughout the experiments. Wear was measured by scanning the track with a profilometer. Analysis of some of the wear tracks included use of the SEM (scanning electron microscrope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Investigated were the effect of various concentractions of NaOH and of water. On iron, increasing NaOH concentration above 0.01 N caused the friction and wear to decrease. This decrease is accompanied by a decrease in surface concentration of ferric oxide (Fe2O3) while more complex iron-oxygen compounds, not clearly identified, also form. At low concentrations of NaOH, such as 0.01 N, where the friction is high, the wear track is badely torn up and the surface is broken. At high concentration, such as 10 N, where the friction is low, the wear track is smooth. The general conclusion is that NaOH forms a protective, low friction film on iron which is destroyed by wear at low concentrations but remains intact at high concentrations of NaOH. Nickel behaves differently than iron in that only a little NaOH gives a low coefficient of friction and a surface which, although roughened in the wear track, remains intact.

  14. Uranium and minor-element partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon from partially melted granodiorite, Crater Lake, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    La Tourrette, T.Z.; Burnett, D.S. ); Bacon C.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Crystal-liquid partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon was studied in partially melted granodiorite blocks ejected during the climactic eruption of Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake), Oregon. The blocks, which contain up to 33% rhyolite glass (75 wt% SiO{sub 2}), are interpreted to be portions of the magma chamber walls that were torn off during eruption. The glass is clear and well homogenized for all measured elements except Zr. Results for Fe-Ti oxides give D{sub U}{sup oxide/liq} {approx} 0.1. Partitioning of Mg, Mn, Al, Si, V, and Cr in Fe-Ti oxides indicates that grains surrounded by glass are modestly well equilibrated with the melt for many of the minor elements, while those that are inclusions in relict plagioclase are not. Uranium and ytterbium inhomogeneities in zircons indicate that the zircons have only partially equilibrated with the melt and that uranium appears to have been diffusing out of the zircons have only partially equilibrated with the melt and that uranium appears to have been diffusing out of the zircons faster that the zircons were dissolving. Based on the authors measurements and given their low abundances in most rocks, Fe-Ti oxides probably do not play a major role in U-Th fractional during partial melting. The partial melts were undersaturated with zircon and apatite, but both phases are present in the authors samples. This demonstrates an actual case of nonequilibrium source retention of accessory phases, which in general could be an important trace element fractionation mechanism. Their results do not support the hypothesis that liquid structure is the dominant factor controlling trace-element partitioning in high-silica rhyolites.

  15. Phantosmia as a meteorological forecaster.

    PubMed

    Aiello, S R; Hirsch, A R

    2013-09-01

    In normosmics, olfactory ability has been found to vary with ambient humidity, barometric pressure, and season. While hallucinated sensations of phantom pain associated with changes in weather have been described, a linkage to chemosensory hallucinations has heretofore not been reported. A 64-year-old white male with Parkinson's disease presents with 5 years of phantosmia of a smoky burnt wood which changed to onion-gas and then to a noxious skunk-onion excrement odor. Absent upon waking it increases over the day and persists for hours. When severe, there appears a phantom taste with the same qualities as the odor. It is exacerbated by factors that manipulate intranasal pressure, such as coughing. When eating or sniffing, the actual flavors replace the phantosmia. Since onset, he noted the intensity and frequency of the phantosmia forecasted the weather. Two to 3 h before a storm, the phantosmia intensifies from a level 0 to a 7-10, which persists through the entire thunderstorm. Twenty years prior, he reported the ability to forecast the weather, based on pain in a torn meniscus, which vanished after surgical repair. Extensive olfactory testing demonstrates underlying hyposmia. Possible mechanisms for such chemosensory-meteorological linkage includes: air pressure induced synesthesia, disinhibition of spontaneous olfactory discharge, exacerbation of ectopic discharge, affect mediated somatic sensory amplification, and misattribution error with expectation and recall bias. This is the first reported case of weather-induced exacerbation of phantosmia. Further investigation of the connection between chemosensory complaints and ambient weather is warranted.

  16. Evaluation of an intact, an ACL-deficient, and a reconstructed human knee joint finite element model.

    PubMed

    Vairis, Achilles; Stefanoudakis, George; Petousis, Markos; Vidakis, Nectarios; Tsainis, Andreas-Marios; Kandyla, Betina

    2016-02-01

    The human knee joint has a three-dimensional geometry with multiple body articulations that produce complex mechanical responses under loads that occur in everyday life and sports activities. Understanding the complex mechanical interactions of these load-bearing structures is of use when the treatment of relevant diseases is evaluated and assisting devices are designed. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee is one of four main ligaments that connects the femur to the tibia and is often torn during sudden twisting motions, resulting in knee instability. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical behavior of the human knee joint and evaluate the differences in its response for three different states, i.e., intact, ACL-deficient, and surgically treated (reconstructed) knee. The finite element models corresponding to these states were developed. For the reconstructed model, a novel repair device was developed and patented by the author in previous work. Static load cases were applied, as have already been presented in a previous work, in order to compare the calculated results produced by the two models the ACL-deficient and the surgically reconstructed knee joint, under the exact same loading conditions. Displacements were calculated in different directions for the load cases studied and were found to be very close to those from previous modeling work and were in good agreement with experimental data presented in literature. The developed finite element model for both the intact and the ACL-deficient human knee joint is a reliable tool to study the kinematics of the human knee, as results of this study show. In addition, the reconstructed human knee joint model had kinematic behavior similar to the intact knee joint, showing that such reconstruction devices can restore human knee stability to an adequate extent.

  17. A new biogeochemical model to simulate regional scale carbon emission from lakes, ponds and wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Tina; Brakebusch, Matthias; Gustafsson, Erik; Beer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Small aquatic systems are receiving increasing attention for their role in global carbon cycling. For instance, lakes and ponds in permafrost are net emitters of carbon to the atmosphere, and their capacity to process and emit carbon is significant on a landscape scale, with a global flux of 8-103 Tg methane per year which amounts to 5%-30% of all natural methane emissions (Bastviken et al 2011). However, due to the spatial and temporal highly localised character of freshwater methane emissions, fluxes remain poorly qualified and are difficult to upscale based on field data alone. While many models exist to model carbon cycling in individual lakes and ponds, we perceived a lack of models that can work on a larger scale, over a range of latitudes, and simulate regional carbon emission from a large number of lakes, ponds and wetlands. Therefore our objective was to develop a model that can simulate carbon dioxide and methane emission from freshwaters on a regional scale. Our resulting model provides an additional tool to assess current aquatic carbon emissions as well as project future responses to changes in climatic drivers. To this effect, we have combined an existing large-scale hydrological model (the Variable Infiltration Capacity Macroscale Hydrologic Model (VIC), Liang & Lettenmaier 1994), an aquatic biogeochemical model (BALTSEM, Savchuk et al., 2012; Gustafsson et al., 2014) and developed a new methane module for lakes. The resulting new process-based biogeochemical model is designed to model aquatic carbon emission on a regional scale, and to perform well in high-latitude environments. Our model includes carbon, oxygen and nutrient cycling in lake water and sediments, primary production and methanogenesis. Results of calibration and validation of the model in two catchments (Torne-Kalix in Northern Sweden and of a large arctic river catchment) will be presented.

  18. Quantitative assessment of rotator cuff muscle elasticity: Reliability and feasibility of shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Uehara, Kosuke; Okamoto, Seiji; Chen, Shigao; Sperling, John W; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-11-05

    Ultrasound imaging has been used to evaluate various shoulder pathologies, whereas, quantification of the rotator cuff muscle stiffness using shear wave elastography (SWE) has not been verified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of SWE measurements for the quantification of supraspinatus (SSP) muscle elasticity. Thirty cadaveric shoulders (18 intact and 12 with torn rotator cuff) were used. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated on an established SWE technique for measuring the SSP muscle elasticity. To assess the effect of overlying soft tissues above the SSP muscle, SWE values were measured with the transducer placed on the skin, on the subcutaneous fat after removing the skin, on the trapezius muscle after removing the subcutaneous fat, and directly on the SSP muscle. In addition, SWE measurements on 4 shoulder positions (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° abduction) were compared in those with/without rotator cuff tears. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of SWE measurements were excellent for all regions in SSP muscle. Also, removing the overlying soft tissue showed no significant difference on SWE values measured in the SSP muscle. The SSP muscle with 0° abduction showed large SWE values, whereas, shoulders with large-massive tear showed smaller variation throughout the adduction-abduction positions. SWE is a reliable and feasible tool for quantitatively assessing the SSP muscle elasticity. This study also presented SWE measurements on the SSP muscle under various shoulder abduction positions which might help characterize patterns in accordance to the size of rotator cuff tears.

  19. Deep India meets deep Asia: a seismological view of lithospheric slab interactions under Hindu Kush and Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, Bernd; Kufner, Sofia; Sippl, Christian; Schneider, Felix; Yuan, Xiaohui; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Mechie, James

    2016-04-01

    It is part of the plate-tectonic paradigm that buoyant continental lithosphere subducts only in tow of a sinking oceanic plate after continent collision and that large deep (> 100 km) earthquakes occur exclusively in subducted oceanic lithosphere. Yet under the Pamir in Central Asia, far away from any (paleo-)ocean basins, continental lithosphere appears to subduct by itself and the Pamir-Hindu Kush seismic zone is one of the most active intermediate (100-300 km) depth earthquake zones globally. We show that large-scale indentation of cratonic Asia by a promontory of the Indian plate is causing subduction of continental lithosphere under the Pamir and that the Hindu Kush earthquakes are due to detachment of a narrow plate sliver. New precise earthquake hypocenters, a large number of source mechanisms and detailed receiver function sections and tomographic images allow us to distinguish an arcuate, stretched and partly torn slab of Asian lithosphere beneath the Pamir and a piece of Indian lithosphere beneath the deepest Hindu Kush earthquakes. This peculiar double subduction zone arises by contrasting modes of convergence under Pamir and Hindu Kush imposed by the different mechanical properties of the three types of lithosphere involved: We suggest that the buoyant northwestern salient of (1) Cratonic India bulldozes into (2) Cratonic Asia forcing delamination and rollback of its lithosphere. At the same time (3) India's thinned margin tears off from Cratonic India and subducts under Asia. The narrow swath of the subducted Indian continental margin forms a prominent high-velocity anomaly down to the mantle transition zone. Its uppermost section is thinned or already severed and intermediate depth earthquakes cluster at the final neck connecting it to the deeper slab. These images provide a rare glimpse of the ephemeral process of slab break-off.

  20. Ice-Free Greenland during the Mid-Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, J. M.; Finkel, R. C.; Caffee, M. W.; Alley, R. B.; Balco, G.; Zimmerman, S. R. H.; Briner, J. P.; Young, N. E.; Schwartz, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the face of accelerated ice sheet contribution to sea level rise, in part fueled by rapid thinning and retreat of marine terminating outlet glaciers, it remains uncertain how the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) will adjust to a warming Arctic, declining sea ice and related changing precipitation patterns. This is concerning, given that future sea level rise is strongly dependent on the GrIS's response to Arctic change. The scientific community is currently torn between a model of a dynamic GrIS that becomes greatly reduced during interglacials and a model where the GrIS is relatively stable, even through interglacials that were warmer than today. We review the paleo-stability of the GrIS and discuss the implications for GrIS predictions. Based on new cosmogenic data from the bedrock core drilled underneath the GISP2 ice core, we present the case that Greenland might have been free of ice at least once during the Pleistocene, highlighting its vulnerability. An immediate climate driver for the GrIS collapse is not evident from the existing paleo-climate database, motivating re-intensified research of physical mechanisms to melt the GrIS. We discuss a few preliminary climate scenarios that might have contributed to this dramatic ice-sheet collapse. On the shorter time-scale, we present tentative strategies how to investigate the stability of the GrIS during the Holocene Climate Optimum, a period of arguable-warmer-than today temperatures. Finally, we summarize the value of the paleo-data for predictions of the GrIS stability.

  1. The Effect of Pyriproxyfen as a “Population Growth Regulator” against Aedes albopictus under Semi-Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Shin-ya; Ohashi, Kazunori; Pujiyati, Endang; Higa, Yukiko; Kawada, Hitoshi; Mito, Nobuaki; Takagi, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    An insect growth regulator, pyriproxyfen, has been used for the control of a range of pest insects, including mosquitoes. Pyriproxyfen is effective in inhibiting adult emergence and sterilizing adult females. The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse), is an important vector of dengue and chikungunya, and is expanding its distribution throughout Europe and the Americas. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of pyriproxyfen-treated bed nets on population growth of Ae. albopictus under semi-field conditions, using 6 small microcosms. We created microcosms containing breeding sites to simulate the natural ecosystem of vector mosquito and installing miniature bed net treated with 350 mg/m2 pyriproxyfen in Experiment I and 35 mg/m2 in Experiment II. For each experiment, we also established microcosms installing untreated polyethylene net (untreated control). The installing nets were provided with artificially torn holes, to simulate damage and allow mosquitoes to penetrate. We released 100 pairs of Ae. albopictus into each microcosm, and allowed them to feed on a mouse under the bed nets at approximately 1-week intervals. In comparison with the untreated control microcosms, the number of eggs laid by the released adults in the pyriproxyfen-treated microcosms was significantly lower in both Experiment I and II. Moreover, egg hatchability was significantly suppressed and pupal mortality was increased. Our results indicate that tarsal contact with pyriproxyfen has been shown to suppress egg production and hatchability in adult females and the auto-dissemination of pyriproxyfen into larval breeding sites by adult mosquitoes, through contact with pyriproxyfen-treated polyethylene bed nets, may suppress the mosquito population density. PMID:23843982

  2. Effect of irrigation water salinity and sodicity and water table position on water table chemistry beneath Atriplex lentiformis and Hordeum marinum

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, L.S.; Bauder, J.W.; Phelps, S.D.

    2006-04-15

    Coal bed methane (CBM) extraction in Montana and Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) produces large quantities of modestly saline-sodic water. This study assessed effects of irrigation water quality and water table position on water chemistry of closed columns, simulating a perched or a shallow water table. The experiment assessed the potential salt loading in areas where shallow or perched water tables prevent leaching or where artificial drainage is not possible. Water tables were established in sand filled PVC columns at 0.38, 0.76, and1.14 m below the surface, after which columns were planted to one of three species, two halophytic Atriplex spp. and Hordeum marinum Huds. (maritime barley), a glycophyte. As results for the two Atriplex ssp. did not differ much, only results from Atriplex lentiformis (Torn) S. Wats. (big saltbush) and H. marinum are presented. Irrigation water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) (electrolytic conductivity (EC) = 0.19 Sm{sup -1}, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) = 3.5) or CBM water (EC = 0.35 Sm-1, SAR = 10.5). Continuous irrigation with CBM and PR water led to salt loading over time, the extent being proportional to the salinity and sodicity of applied water. Water in columns planted to A. lentiformis with water tables maintained at 0.38 m depth had greater EC and SAR values than those with 0.76 and 1.14 m water table positions. Elevated EC and SAR values most likely reflect the shallow rooted nature of A. lentiformis, which resulted in enhanced ET with the water table close to the soil surface.

  3. Project KEWL: Kinect Engineering With Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeff; Goza, Sharon; Shores, David

    2011-01-01

    Project KEWL is a joint project between NASA/JPL and NASA/JSC to stimulate interest of children in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) and bring the NASA space exploration experience to the classroom, museum and ultimately the living room. Using the Kinect game controller KEWL allows children to engage in NASA s missions in a fundamentally new way. KEWL allows children to experiment with gravity on Mars and the Moon; navigate through the International Space Station; fix a torn solar array on the ISS; drive a robot on Mars; visit an Asteroid; learn about the differences in gravity on different planets and control Robonaut 2 using their body as the input device. Project KEWL complements NASA s outreach investments in television, mobile platforms and the web by engaging the public through the rapidly expanding medium of console gaming. In 2008, 97% of teenagers played video games and 86% played on a home gaming console. (source: http://pewresearch.org/pubs/953/) As of March 2011, there have been more than 10 million Kinects sold. (source: http://www.itproportal.com/2011/03/10/kinect-record-breaking-sales-figures-top-10-million/) Project KEWL interacts with children on a platform on which they spend much of their time and teaches them information about NASA while they are having fun. Project KEWL progressed from completely custom C++ code written in house to using a commercial game engine. The art work and 3D geometry models come from existing engineering work or are created by the KEWL development team. Six different KEWL applications have been demonstrated at nine different venues including schools, museums, conferences, and NASA outreach events. These demonstrations have allowed the developers the chance to interact with players and observe the gameplay mechanics in action. The lessons learned were then incorporated into the subsequent versions of the applications.

  4. Open air demolition of facilities highly contaminated with plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, E.R.; Lackey, M.B.; Stevens, J.M.; Zinsli, L.C.

    2007-07-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than 'hands on' techniques. (authors)

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament- and hamstring tendon-derived cells: in vitro differential properties of cells involved in ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ghebes, Corina Adriana; Kelder, Cindy; Schot, Thomas; Renard, Auke J; Pakvis, Dean F M; Fernandes, Hugo; Saris, Daniel B

    2015-03-11

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction involves the replacement of the torn ligament with a new graft, often a hamstring tendon (HT). Described as similar, the ACL and HT have intrinsic differences related to their distinct anatomical locations. From a cellular perspective, identifying these differences represents a step forward in the search for new cues that enhance recovery after the reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to characterize the phenotype and multilineage potential of ACL- and HT-derived cells. ACL- and HT-derived cells were isolated from tissue harvest from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or ACL reconstruction. In total, three ACL and three HT donors were investigated. Cell morphology, self-renewal potential (CFU-F), surface marker profiling, expression of tendon/ligament-related markers (PCR) and multilineage potential were analysed for both cell types; both had fibroblast-like morphology and low self-renewal potential. No differences in the expression of tendon/ligament-related genes or a selected set of surface markers were observed between the two cell types. However, differences in their multilineage potential were observed: while ACL-derived cells showed a high potential to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes, but not osteoblasts, HT-derived cells showed poor potential to form adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrated that HT-derived cells have low multilineage potential compared to ACL-derived cells, further highlighting the need for extrinsic signals to fully restore the function of the ACL upon reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. New Perspective on the Transition from Flat to Steeper Subduction in Oaxaca, Mexico Based on Seismicity, Nonvolcanic Tremor, and Slow Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasola, S.; Brudzinski, M.; Ghouse, N.; Solada, K.; Sit, S. M.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Kelly, N.; DeMets, C.; Jensen, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Mexico subduction zone has a complex geometry involving along-strike variations in dip of the Cocos plate. What is interesting about the slab dip is that under central Mexico it becomes horizontal for 250 km before it descends steeply beneath the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Numerous studies have examined the geometry of the flat slab, however, few studies have focused on the along-strike transitions from flat to steeper subduction. Some of those studies have suggested the slab tends to tear along the sharp transitions in slab dip as the slab rolls back. In this study, the eastern transition from flat to steeper subduction in Oaxaca, Mexico is examined in greater detail using high resolution seismic data to provide a better understanding of how the slab morphology changes during slab rollback. We determine the geometry based on local seismicity, nonvolcanic tremor (NVT), and slow slip utilizing a deployment of broadband seismometers and continuous GPS receivers distributed in and around Oaxaca. Seismic data are processed with Antelope to detect and locate earthquakes. We construct depth contours of the subducting slab surface down to 100 km to illustrate that the transition from flat to steeper subduction in Oaxaca occurs rapidly via a stronger flexure than what is shown in previous studies. We find no gaps in seismicity to suggest a tear occurs above 100 km depth. A recently determined catalog of NVT in Oaxaca is extended using the same method and additional data that now extends further west. In the east, NVT epicenters are similar to earlier studies and form a continuous trench-parallel band that gradually moves inland. In the west, the distribution of NVT widens, closely following the shape of the newly determined slab contours. There are no gaps in NVT or slow slip across the rapid transition in slab dip, further supporting the notion that the slab is not currently torn in the updip region of the transition from flat to steeper subduction as it rolls back.

  7. Tectonic evolution of the Perth Abyssal Plain's Quiet Zone, Southeast Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Zohar Louis; Granot, Roi; Williams, Simon E.

    2013-04-01

    During the Late Jurassic period, the Greater-Indian plate was torn away from Australia, dissociating East Gondwanaland. The Perth Abyssal Plain (PAP) is the southernmost rift segment along the western Australian margin, and has an onset age of ~136 Ma. New marine magnetic and swath bathymetry data, crossing the entire PAP, were acquired recently on geophysical cruise ss2011v06 aboard the R/V Southern Surveyor. These have lead to the outline of conjugate Indian and Australian M-series isochrons in the east and west PAP, respectively [1]. Yet, most of the PAP was created during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS, 121-83 Ma), a period of no geomagnetic field reversals, hence no comprehensive tectonic model for the PAP exists . Here we present preliminary findings of an analytic bathymetric and magnetic investigation aimed at elucidating the PAP's quiet zone. Recent discoveries regarding the evolution of the geomagnetic field during the CNS [2] provide new time markers that can be utilized to date the oceanic crust. The magnetic anomaly data exhibit the Q2 anomaly marker (~108 Ma), further constraining the spreading history of the PAP. Together with the ridgelet transform method [3] for automated abyssal hill delineation, we present new constraints on the development of crustal construction processes (spreading location, direction and rates) that took place along the PAP spreading center. References: [1] S.E. Williams, J.M. Whittaker, R. Granot, R.D. Muller (in preparation), New constraints on the seafloor spreading history in the Perth Abyssal Plain. [2] Granot, R., J. Dyment, and Y. Gallet (2012), Geomagnetic field variability during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron, Nature Geoscience, 5(3), 220-223. [3] Downey, N. J. and R. W. Clayton (2007), A ridgelet transform method for constraining tectonic models via abyssal-hill morphology, Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 8, Q03004, doi: 10.1029/2006GC001440.

  8. Knee Extension Range of Motion at 4 Weeks Is Related to Knee Extension Loss at 12 Weeks After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Sarah; Garrison, J. Craig; Bothwell, James; Conway, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is commonly torn, and surgical reconstruction is often required to allow a patient to return to their prior level of activity. Avoiding range of motion (ROM) loss is a common goal, but little research has been done to identify when ROM loss becomes detrimental to a patient’s future function. Purpose: To determine whether there is a relationship between early knee side-to-side extension difference after ACL reconstruction and knee side-to-side extension difference at 12 weeks. The hypothesis was that early (within the first 8 weeks) knee side-to-side extension difference will be predictive of knee side-to-side extension difference seen at 12 weeks. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Knee side-to-side extension difference measures were taken on 74 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction rehabilitation at the initial visit and 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Visual analog scores (VAS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were also recorded at these time frames. Results: There was a strong relationship between knee extension ROM at 4 and 12 weeks (r = 0.639, P < .001) and 8 and 12 weeks (r = 0.742, P < .001). When the variables of knee extension ROM at initial visit and 4 and 8 weeks were entered into a regression analysis, the predictor variable explained 61% (R2 = 0.611) of variance for knee extension ROM at 12 weeks, with 4 weeks (R2 = 0.259) explaining the majority of this variance. Conclusion: This study found that a patient’s knee extension at 4 weeks was strongly correlated with knee extension at 12 weeks. Clinical Relevance: This information may be useful for clinicians treating athletic patients who are anxious for return to sport by providing them an initial goal to work toward in hopes of ensuring successful rehabilitation of their knee. PMID:26675061

  9. Riverland ERA maintenance pad site diesel contamination risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Valcich, P.J.

    1993-12-02

    The maintenance pad site consists of a concrete pad and underlying soils, approximately 15 by 46 m in area, and a drainage ditch with dimensions of 2.4 by 91 m. The ditch is located approximately 60 m from the concrete pad and is oriented parallel to the pads long axis. The facility was built in 1943, at which time the concrete pad was the floor of a maintenance shed for railroad activities. In 1955, use of the facility as a maintenance shed was discontinued. Between 1955 and 1957, the facility was used as a radioactivity decontamination area for railroad cars; acetone-soaked rags were used to remove surface contamination from the cars. The concrete pad was washed down with a mixture of water and diesel fuel, which was then flushed via clay pipe to the drainage ditch. In 1963, the maintenance shed was torn down and the concrete pad covered with approximately one-half meter of fill. The concrete pad was re-exposed in 1993. The site was sampled for Toxicity Characteristic Leachate Procedure (TCLP) metals, volatile, and semi-volatile compounds, as well as for extractable fuel hydrocarbons. A total of 17 samples were collected from surface concrete, soil beneath surface concrete, and ditch soil. One concrete sample and one ditch soil sample were split. The ditch soil sample was also duplicated. The relative percent difference (RPD) in extractable hydrocarbons of the two split samples, one from concrete and one from ditch soil are, respectively, 52% and 186%. The RPD for the duplicate sample, taken from the same ditch soil sample from which one of the splits was taken, is 39%.

  10. Kinematics and strain rates of the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis from new GPS campaigns in Northeast India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Tanay Dutta; Riguzzi, Federica; Dasgupta, Sujit; Mukhopadhyay, Basab; Roy, Sujit; Sharma, Somnath

    2015-08-01

    Newly acquired GPS data along transects across Himalaya in Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis (EHS) reveal a clockwise rotation of rigid micro-plate comprising part of Brahmaputra valley, NE Himalaya and Northern Myanmar that rotates about a pole located at 14.5°N, 100.8°E at an angular rate of 1.75 ± 0.12°/Myr. The EHS is being torn-off from the main Indian Plate as a rigid block around which the kinematic clockwise rotation of Tibetan GPS sites toward the Sichuan-Yunnan region occurs in the Eurasia fixed frame. The residual velocity field of the newly acquired data estimated after removing the rotation that minimizes the GPS rates around EHS show a clear NE motion of the EHS sites, indentation of the rigid Indian plate into a less rigid area of the Eurasian plate. The most extensive EHS zones of compression and shortening are in the direction of indenter convergence, with average values ranging between ~ 50-100 nanostrain/year. Along the frontal segment of EHS, from NW to SE, the shortening rate is reduced from the local maximum value of 160 to ~ 80 nanostrain/year, thus indicating a possibly locked fault patch of Mishmi or Lohit thrusts, the southernmost part of segment activated during the large 1950 Assam earthquake, Mw 8.6. An elastic block-model was invoked to infer the average slip rates of sections around EHS and to estimate an average locking depth of ~ 15 km. The slip rate perpendicular to the locked sector of EHS reaches 32.4 mm/year and permits to roughly infer a recurrence time of ~ 200 year for an earthquake as energetic as the 1950 Assam event.

  11. Queer Quit: Gay smokers’ perspectives on a culturally specific smoking cessation service

    PubMed Central

    Schwappach, David L.B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background  The prevalence of smoking is high among gay males. The need for culturally specific support has been acknowledged, but little is known about gay men’s perspectives on such adapted interventions. Objective  To investigate smoking and intention to quit in gay smokers and to explore their attitudes towards a gay‐specific smoking cessation programme. Design  Quantitative survey and focus groups. Setting and participants  A total of 325 gay smokers living in Zurich (Switzerland) completed an anonymous survey. Thirteen males participated in two focus groups, theoretically sampled to reflect heterogeneity in terms of age, HIV serostatus and smoking histories. Participants were personally recruited at a variety of events and through advertisements. Results  Responders reported high consumption of cigarettes, and every second man stated that more than half of his gay friends smoke regularly. The majority planned their quit within the next 6 months. Idealizing attitudes towards smoking were very common. Men stated strong preferences towards a culturally adapted cessation programme for gay men. Higher age, high nicotine dependence, intention to quit, smoking stereotypes and fears for weight gain were significant predictors for interest in participation in the programme. Qualitative results indicate that men felt torn between their wish for support, bonding, and community alternatives to the ‘smoking gay’ environment and fears for failure and loss of reputation. Conclusions  Gay men reported likely use of a gay‐specific intervention. Such interventions may offer support in abstaining from smoking, without abstaining from gay social life. Health‐care providers play an important role in communicating the serious threats caused by smoking to gay men. PMID:19682099

  12. BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS FOR MULTIMODAL TREATMENT OF COLORECTAL LIVER METASTASES. MODULE 3: CONTROVERSIES AND UNRESECTABLE METASTASES.

    PubMed

    Torres, Orlando Jorge Martins; Marques, Márcio Carmona; Santos, Fabio Nasser; Farias, Igor Correia de; Coutinho, Anelisa Kruschewsky; Oliveira, Cássio Virgílio Cavalcante de; Kalil, Antonio Nocchi; Mello, Celso Abdon Lopes de; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirola; Fernandes, Gustavo Dos Santos; Quireze, Claudemiro; Murad, André M; Silva, Milton José de Barros E; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Freitas, Helano Carioca; Cruz, Marcelo Rocha; Weschenfelder, Rui; Linhares, Marcelo Moura; Castro, Leonaldson Dos Santos; Vollmer, Charles; Dixon, Elijah; Ribeiro, Héber Salvador de Castro; Coimbra, Felipe José Fernandez

    2016-01-01

    In the last module of this consensus, controversial topics were discussed. Management of the disease after progression during first line chemotherapy was the first discussion. Next, the benefits of liver resection in the presence of extra-hepatic disease were debated, as soon as, the best sequence of treatment. Conversion chemotherapy in the presence of unresectable liver disease was also discussed in this module. Lastly, the approach to the unresectable disease was also discussed, focusing in the best chemotherapy regimens and hole of chemo-embolization. RESUMO Neste último módulo do consenso, abordou-se alguns temas controversos. O primeiro tópico discutido foi o manejo da doença após progressão na primeira linha de quimioterapia, com foco em se ainda haveria indicação cirúrgica neste cenário. A seguir, o painel debruçou-se sobre as situações de ressecção da doença hepática na presença de doença extra-hepática, assim como, qual a melhor sequência de tratamento. O tratamento de conversão para doença inicialmente irressecável também foi abordado neste módulo, incluindo as importantes definições de quando se pode esperar que a doença se torne ressecável e quais esquemas terapêuticos seriam mais efetivos à luz dos conhecimentos atuais sobre a biologia tumoral e taxas de resposta objetiva. Por último, o tratamento da doença não passível de ressecção foi discutida, focando-se nos melhores esquemas a serem empregados e seu sequenciamento, bem como o papel da quimioembolização no manejo destes pacientes.

  13. Health care seeking and financial behaviours of the elderly during wartime in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Kwalya, Timothée M.; Kasagila, Eric K.; Watongoka, L. Hubert; Mupenda, Bavon W.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Health and social services utilisation is seen to be more closely related to age than to other socio-demographic characteristics. Many health problems are known to increase with age and this demographic trend may lead to an increase in the absolute number of health conditions in this population. However, questions are still emerging as to how the elderly seek care in response to their needs in the context of a war-torn region. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the behaviour of the elderly in seeking care during a time of conflict. Method A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in the health district Goma, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), using a multistage sampling of 500 senior citizens. Eight trained field-workers were deployed in the field where they administered a structured questionnaire. Results The public health sector was well known and preferred by 186 participants (37.2%), but only used by 16 (3.2%) participants. Financial support received by the elderly came from their own relatives and fellow believers in 33.5% and 20.2% of cases, respectively. Almost 71% of monetary support is the result of begging and unknown sources – there is no government involvement whatsoever. Much of the external support that the elderly receive involves support in the form of food. Disease expenses remain a main concern of the elderly themselves. Conclusion Government support for the elderly in the DRC is non-existent. There is an overuse of private sector and traditional medicine, despite the preference indicated for the public health sector. As a recommendation, a general increase in income-related activities could contribute to alleviating the health state of the elderly in a war situation. Further studies might explore in future the contribution of those results on the health of elders.

  14. The Effects of Rainfall on the Population Dynamics of an Endangered Aquatic Plant, Schoenoplectus gemmifer (Cyperaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Koshi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Yoshimura, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The conservation of aquatic plants in river ecosystems should consider the wash-out (away) problem resulting from severe rainfall. The aquatic plant Schoenoplectus gemmifer is an endangered species endemic to Japan. Our previous study reported that the population size of S. gemmifer in Hamamatsu city, Japan, had decreased by one-tenth because many individuals had been washed out by a series of heavy rains in 2004. However, there is insufficient information on the ecological nature of this endangered aquatic plant for adequate conservation. In this paper, we report the population dynamics of one population in Hamamatsu city from 2004 to 2012 in relation to rainfall. We surveyed the number and growing location of all living individuals in the population 300 times during the study period. To examine the temporal changes of individual plants, we also counted the number of culms for 38 individuals in four observations among 300 records. Decreases and increases in the population size of this plant were associated with washing out and the settlement of gemmae (vegetative propagation), respectively. The major cause of the reduction in the population size was an increase in the number of washed-out individuals and not the decreased settlement of gemmae. The wash-out rates for small and large individuals were not significantly different. Small individuals having a stream form with linear leaves resisted flooding, and large individuals were often partially torn off by flooding events. Modification of river basins to reduce the flow velocity may be effective for the conservation of S. gemmifer. PMID:27327439

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Injured Meniscus Reveals a Distinct Phenotype of Meniscus Degeneration with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Muhammad Farooq; Patra, Debabrata; Sandell, Linda J.; Brophy, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Meniscus tears are associated with a heightened risk for osteoarthritis. We aimed to advance our understanding of the metabolic state of human injured meniscus at the time of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy through transcriptome-wide analysis of gene expression in relation to patient age and degree of cartilage chondrosis. Methods The degree of chondrosis of knee cartilage was recorded at the time of meniscectomy in symptomatic patients without radiographic osteoarthritis. RNA preparations from resected menisci (N=12) were subjected to transcriptome-wide microarray and QuantiGene Plex analyses. The relative changes in gene expression variation with age and chondrosis were analyzed and integrated biological processes were investigated computationally. Results We identified a set of genes in torn meniscus that were differentially expressed with age and chondrosis. There were 866 genes differentially regulated (≥1.5-fold; P<0.05) with age and 49 with chondrosis. In older patients, genes associated with cartilage and skeletal development and extracellular matrix synthesis were repressed while those involved in immune response, inflammation, cell cycle, and cellular proliferation were stimulated. With chondrosis, genes representing cell catabolism (cAMP catabolic process) and tissue and endothelial cell development were repressed and those involved in T cell differentiation and apoptosis were elevated. Conclusion Differences in age-related gene expression suggest that in older adults, meniscal cells might de-differentiate and initiate a proliferative phenotype. Conversely, meniscal cells in younger patients appear to respond to injury, but maintain the differentiated phenotype. Definitive molecular signatures identified in damaged meniscus could be segregated largely with age and, to a lesser extent, with chondrosis. PMID:23658108

  16. Surgical retrieval, isolation and in vitro expansion of human anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashim; Sharif, Kevin; Walters, Megan; Woods, Mia D; Potty, Anish; Main, Benjamin J; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2014-04-30

    Injury to the ACL is a commonly encountered problem in active individuals. Even partial tears of this intra-articular knee ligament lead to biomechanical deficiencies that impair function and stability. Current options for the treatment of partial ACL tears range from nonoperative, conservative management to multiple surgical options, such as: thermal modification, single-bundle repair, complete reconstruction, and reconstruction of the damaged portion of the native ligament. Few studies, if any, have demonstrated any single method for management to be consistently superior, and in many cases patients continue to demonstrate persistent instability and other comorbidities. The goal of this study is to identify a potential cell source for utilization in the development of a tissue engineered patch that could be implemented in the repair of a partially torn ACL. A novel protocol was developed for the expansion of cells derived from patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. To isolate the cells, minced hACL tissue obtained during ACL reconstruction was digested in a Collagenase solution. Expansion was performed using DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 1% penicillin/streptomycin (P/S). The cells were then stored at -80 ºC or in liquid nitrogen in a freezing medium consisting of DMSO, FBS and the expansion medium. After thawing, the hACL derived cells were then seeded onto a tissue engineered scaffold, PLAGA (Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid) and control Tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). After 7 days, SEM was performed to compare cellular adhesion to the PLAGA versus the control TCPS. Cellular morphology was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining. SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) micrographs demonstrated that cells grew and adhered on both PLAGA and TCPS surfaces and were confluent over the entire surfaces by day 7. Immunofluorescence staining showed normal, non-stressed morphological patterns on both surfaces. This technique is

  17. Tornadoes Strike Northern Wisconsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A series of tornadoes ripped through the Upper Midwest region of the United States in the evening of June 7, 2007. At least five different tornadoes touched down in Wisconsin, according to the Associated Press, one of which tore through the Bear Paw Resort in northern Wisconsin. Despite dropping as much as fifteen centimeters (six inches) of rain in some places and baseball-size hail in others, authorities were reporting no deaths attributable to the storm system, and only a smattering of injuries, but considerable property damage in some areas. When the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite observed the area on June 9, 2007, the track torn through the woods by one of the tornadoes stands out quite clearly. This photo-like image uses data collected by MODIS in the normal human vision range to give a familiar natural-looking appearance. The landscape is largely a checkerboard of farms, towns, roads, and cities. The pale land is predominantly farmland where crops have not fully grown in yet. Dark blue shows the winding path of rivers and lakes dotting the landscape. The large blue lake on the east (right) side of the image is Lake Michigan. Towns and cities, including the city of Green Bay, are gray. To the north side, farmland gives way to dark green as land use shifts from agriculture to the Menominee Indian Reservation and Nicolet National Forest. The diagonal slash through the dark green forested land shows the tornado track. Bare land was revealed where the tornado tore down trees or stripped vegetation off the branches. The high-resolution image provided above is at MODIS' full spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response System provides this image at additional resolutions.

  18. Auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia and post-traumatic stress disorder: common phenomenology, common cause, common interventions?

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy-Jones, Simon; Longden, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH: ‘hearing voices’) are found in both schizophrenia and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this paper we first demonstrate that AVH in these two diagnoses share a qualitatively similar phenomenology. We then show that the presence of AVH in schizophrenia is often associated with earlier exposure to traumatic/emotionally overwhelming events, as it is by definition in PTSD. We next argue that the content of AVH relates to earlier traumatic events in a similar way in both PTSD and schizophrenia, most commonly having direct or indirect thematic links to emotionally overwhelming events, rather than being direct re-experiencing. We then propose, following cognitive models of PTSD, that the reconstructive nature of memory may be able to account for the nature of these associations between trauma and AVH content, as may threat-hypervigilance and the individual’s personal goals. We conclude that a notable subset of people diagnosed with schizophrenia with AVH are having phenomenologically and aetiologically identical experiences to PTSD patients who hear voices. As such we propose that the iron curtain between AVH in PTSD (often termed ‘dissociative AVH’) and AVH in schizophrenia (so-called ‘psychotic AVH’) needs to be torn down, as these are often the same experience. One implication of this is that these trauma-related AVH require a common trans-diagnostic treatment strategy. Whilst antipsychotics are already increasingly being used to treat AVH in PTSD, we argue for the centrality of trauma-based interventions for trauma-based AVH in both PTSD and in people diagnosed with schizophrenia. PMID:26283997

  19. Mineralogical Controls over Carbon Storage and Residence Times in Grassland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, D.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.; Spycher, N.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains approximately three times more carbon than the atmosphere and terrestrial vegetation contain combined. However, it is not well understood why some SOM persists for a long time while other SOM decomposes quickly. For future climate predictions, representing soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics accurately in Earth system models is essential. Soil minerals stabilize organic carbon in soil; however, there are gaps in our understanding of how soil mineralogy controls the quantity and turnover of long-residence-time organic carbon. To investigate the impact of soil mineralogy on SOM dynamics, we used a new model (Biotic and Abiotic Model of SOM—BAMS1 [Riley et al., 2014]) integrated with a three-dimensional, multiphase reactive transport solver (TOUGHREACT). The model represents bacterial and fungal activity, archetypal polymer and monomer carbon substrate groups, aqueous chemistry, gaseous diffusion, aqueous advection and diffusion, and adsorption and desorption processes. BAMS1 can predict bulk SOM and radiocarbon signatures without resorting to an arbitrary depth-dependent decline in SOM turnover rates. Results show a reasonable match between observed and simulated depth-resolved SOM and ∆14C in grassland ecosystems (soils formed on terraces south of Eureka, California, and the Central Chernozem Region of Russia) and were consistent with expectations of depth-resolved profiles of lignin content and fungi:aerobic bacteria ratios. Results also suggest that clay-mineral surface area and soil sorption coefficients constitute dominant controls over organic carbon stocks and residence times, respectively. Bibliography: Riley, W.J., F.M. Maggi, M. Kleber, M.S. Torn, J.Y. Tang, D. Dwivedi, and N. Guerry (2014), Long residence times of rapidly decomposable soil organic matter: application of a multi-phase, multi-component, and vertically resolved model (BAMS1) to soil carbon dynamics, Geoscientific Model Development, vol. 7, 1335

  20. Hydroclast and Peperite generation: Experimental Results produced using the Silicate Melt Injection Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, W. S.; Mastin, L. G.; Spieler, O.; Kunzmann, T.; Shaw, C. S.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The Silicate Melt Injection Laboratory Experiment (SMILE) allows for the effusive and explosive injection of molten glass into a variety of media - air, water, water spray, and wet sediments. Experiments have been preformed using the SMILE apparatus to evaluate the mechanisms of "turbulent shedding" during shallow submarine volcanic eruptions and magma/wet-sediment interactions. In these experiments, approximately 0.5 kg of basaltic melt with 5 wt.% Spectromelt (dilithium tetraborate) is produced in an internally heated autoclave at 1150° C and ambient pressure. The molten charge is ejected via the bursting of a rupture disc at 3.5 MPa into the reaction media, situated within the low pressure tank (atmospheric conditions). Preliminary experiments ejecting melt into a standing water column have yielded hydroclasts of basalt. SEM images of the clasts show ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in strips. Adhering to the clast surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material, up to 10 μm in size. The presence of partially detached rinds and rind debris likely reflects repeated bending, scraping, impact, and other disruption through turbulent velocity fluctuations. These textures are comparable to littoral explosive deposits at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where lava tubes are torn apart by wave action, the lava is quenched, and thrown back on the beach as loose fragments (hyaloclastite). Preliminary experiments injecting melt into wet sediments show evidence of sediment ingestion and fluidal textures. These results support the interpretation that peperite generation can be driven by hydrodynamic mixing of a fuel and a coolant.

  1. Workarounds to barcode medication administration systems: their occurrences, causes, and threats to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Ross; Wetterneck, Tosha; Telles, Joel Leon; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2008-01-01

    The authors develop a typology of clinicians' workarounds when using barcoded medication administration (BCMA) systems. Authors then identify the causes and possible consequences of each workaround. The BCMAs usually consist of handheld devices for scanning machine-readable barcodes on patients and medications. They also interface with electronic medication administration records. Ideally, BCMAs help confirm the five "rights" of medication administration: right patient, drug, dose, route, and time. While BCMAs are reported to reduce medication administration errors--the least likely medication error to be intercepted--these claims have not been clearly demonstrated. The authors studied BCMA use at five hospitals by: (1) observing and shadowing nurses using BCMAs at two hospitals, (2) interviewing staff and hospital leaders at five hospitals, (3) participating in BCMA staff meetings, (4) participating in one hospital's failure-mode-and-effects analyses, (5) analyzing BCMA override log data. The authors identified 15 types of workarounds, including, for example, affixing patient identification barcodes to computer carts, scanners, doorjambs, or nurses' belt rings; carrying several patients' prescanned medications on carts. The authors identified 31 types of causes of workarounds, such as unreadable medication barcodes (crinkled, smudged, torn, missing, covered by another label); malfunctioning scanners; unreadable or missing patient identification wristbands (chewed, soaked, missing); nonbarcoded medications; failing batteries; uncertain wireless connectivity; emergencies. The authors found nurses overrode BCMA alerts for 4.2% of patients charted and for 10.3% of medications charted. Possible consequences of the workarounds include wrong administration of medications, wrong doses, wrong times, and wrong formulations. Shortcomings in BCMAs' design, implementation, and workflow integration encourage workarounds. Integrating BCMAs within real-world clinical workflows

  2. Three-Dimensional Visualization and Imaging of the Entry Tear and Intimal Flap of Aortic Dissection Using CT Virtual Intravascular Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ma, Xiangxing; Wang, Qing; Yu, Dexin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Conventional computed tomography (CT) approaches provides limited visualization of the entire endoluminal changes of aortic dissection (AD), which is essential for its treatment. As an important supplement, three-dimensional CT virtual intravascular endoscopy (VIE) can show relevant details. This study aims to determine the value of VIE in displaying the entry tear and intimal flap of AD. Methods and Results Among 127 consecutive symptomatic patients with suspected AD who underwent CT angiography (CTA), 84 subjects were confirmed to have AD and were included in the study. Conventional CT and VIE images were observed and evaluated. From the 92 entry tears revealed via conventional CT, 88 (95.7%) tears appeared on VIE with round (n = 26), slit-shaped (n = 9), or irregular (n = 53) shapes, whereas the intimal flaps were sheetlike (n = 34), tubular (n = 34), wavelike (n = 13), or irregular (n = 7) in shape. The VIE also showed the spatial relationship between the torn flap and adjacent structures. Among 58 entry tears with multiple-line type flap shown on conventional CT, 41 (70.7%) appeared with an irregular shape on VIE, whereas among 30 tears with single-line type flap, 17 (56.7%) appeared as round or slit-shaped on VIE. These results demonstrated a significant difference (P < 0.05). The poor display of tears on VIE was related to the low CT attenuation values in lumen or in neighboring artifacts (P < 0.01). Conclusion CT VIE presents the complete configurations and details of the intimal tears and flaps of AD better than conventional CT approaches. Accordingly, it should be recommended as a necessary assessment tool for endovascular therapy and as part of strategy planning in pre-surgical patients. PMID:27760170

  3. Succession and failure.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, Frank V; Galford, Robert M

    2004-06-01

    Norman Windom, the chairman of Tiverton Media, may not know much about the world of popular music, but he does fancy himself a careful planner and a superb judge of managerial talent. That's why he's been grooming COO Sean Kinnane, a Wharton-minted numbers man, to take over an important division, Aleph Records, and one day Tiverton itself. But Derek Solomon, Aleph's 68-year-old CEO and founder, remains a creative force and a father figure to the label's artists. What's more, he's touchy about anything that might slow down Aleph's responses to the market's ever-shifting preferences--or that might call into question his indispensability. Though Sean dutifully participates in Tiverton's broad-based and elaborate executive development plan, he senses that Aleph's future leadership structure is uncertain. As impatient as he is ambitious, he announces that he's leaving Tiverton for more suitable pastures. Several of his associates, also unsure about their fate within Aleph, are following him out the door. In one fell swoop, they've torn Norman's proud succession plan apart. What kind of plan should the board adopt going forward? Commenting on this fictional case study are Francis N. Bonsignore, a senior vice president at Marsh & McLennan; Michelle L. Buck, a clinical associate professor of management and organizations at Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management; Jon Younger, who heads leadership development at National City Corporation, a financial holding company in Cleveland; and Thomas Leppert, the chairman and CEO of the Turner Corporation, a large construction company in Dallas.

  4. High-resolution US and MR imaging of peroneal tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Alcala, Jennifer N; Gimber, Lana H; Rieke, Joshua D; Chilvers, Margaret M; Latt, L Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the peroneal tendon complex are common and should be considered in every patient who presents with chronic lateral ankle pain. These injuries occur as a result of trauma (including ankle sprains), in tendons with preexisting tendonopathy, and with repetitive microtrauma due to instability. The peroneus brevis and peroneus longus tendons are rarely torn simultaneously. Several anatomic variants, including a flat or convex fibular retromalleolar groove, hypertrophy of the peroneal tubercle at the lateral aspect of the calcaneus, an accessory peroneus quartus muscle, a low-lying peroneus brevis muscle belly, and an os peroneum, may predispose to peroneal tendon injuries. High-resolution 1.5-T and 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with use of dedicated extremity coils and high-resolution ultrasonography (US) with high-frequency linear transducers and dynamic imaging are proved to adequately depict the peroneal tendons for evaluation and can aid the orthopedic surgeon in injury management. An understanding of current treatment approaches for partial- and full-thickness peroneal tendon tears, subluxation and dislocation of these tendons with superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR) injuries, intrasheath subluxations, and peroneal tendonopathy and tenosynovitis can help physicians achieve a favorable outcome. Patients with low functional demands do well with conservative treatment, while those with high functional demands may benefit from surgery if nonsurgical treatment is unsuccessful. Radiologists should recognize the normal anatomy and specific pathologic conditions of the peroneal tendons at US and MR imaging and understand the various treatment options for peroneal tendon and SPR superior peroneal retinaculum injuries. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  5. Evaluation of Community Land Model Hydrologic Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. Y.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Bohn, T.; Delire, C.

    2005-12-01

    Confidence in representation and parameterization of land surface processes in coupled land-atmosphere models is strongly dependent on a diversity of opportunities for model testing, since such coupled models are usually intended for application in a wide range of conditions (regional models) or globally. Land surface models have been increasing in complexity over the past decade, which has increased the demands on data sets appropriate for model testing and evaluation. In this study, we compare the performance of two commonly used land surface schemes - the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) and Community Land Model (CLM) with respect to their ability to reproduce observed water and energy fluxes in off-line tests for two large river basins with contrasting hydroclimatic conditions spanning the range from temperate continental to arctic, and for five point (column flux) sites spanning the range from tropical to arctic. The two large river basins are the Arkansas-Red in U.S. southern Great Plains, and the Torne-Kalix in northern Scandinavia. The column flux evaluations are for a tropical forest site at Reserva Jaru (ABRACOS) in Brazil, a prairie site (FIFE) near Manhattan, Kansas in the central U.S., a soybean site at Caumont (HAPEX-Monbilhy) in France, a meadow site at Cabauw in the Netherlands, and a small grassland catchment at Valday, Russia. The results indicate that VIC can reasonably well capture the land surface biophysical processes, while CLM is somewhat less successful. We suggest changes to the CLM parameterizations that would improve its general performance with respect to its representation of land surface hydrologic processes.

  6. A perfect storm? Welfare, care, gender and generations in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Filgueira, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Magdalena; Papadópulos, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article claims that welfare states modelled on a contributory basis and with a system of entitlements that assumes stable two-parent families, a traditional breadwinner model, full formal employment and a relatively young age structure are profoundly flawed in the context of present-day challenges. While this is true for affluent countries modelled on the Bismarckian type of welfare system, the costs of the status quo are even more devastating in middle-income economies with high levels of inequality. A gendered approach to welfare reform that introduces the political economy and the economy of care and unpaid work is becoming critical to confront what may very well become a perfect storm for the welfare of these nations and their peoples. Through an in-depth study of the Uruguayan case, the authors show how the decoupling of risk and protection has torn asunder the efficacy of welfare devices in the country. An ageing society that has seen a radical transformation of its family and labour market landscapes, Uruguay maintained during the 1980s and 1990s a welfare state that was essentially contributory, elderly and male-oriented, and centred on cash entitlements. This contributed to the infantilization of poverty, increased the vulnerability of women and exacerbated fiscal stress for the system as a whole. Furthermore, because of high levels of income and asset inequality, the redistribution of risk between upper- and lower-income groups presented a deeply regressive pattern. The political economy of care and welfare has begun to change in the last decade or so, bringing about mild reforms in the right direction; but these might prove to be too little and too late.

  7. Optical Measurement Center Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, H.; Abercromby, K.; Mulrooney, M.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, an optical measurement center (OMC) was created to measure the photometric signatures of debris pieces. Initially, the OMC was equipped with a 300 W xenon arc lamp, a SBIG 512 x 512 ST8X MEI CCD camera with standard Johnson filters, and a Lynx 6 robotic arm with five degrees of freedom. As research progressed, modifications were made to the equipment. A customized rotary table was built to overcome the robot s limitation of 180 degree wrist rotation and provide complete 360 degree rotation with little human interaction. This change allowed an initial phase angle (source-object-camera angle) of roughly 5 degrees to be adjusted to 7, 10, 15, 18, 20, 25, or 28 degrees. Additionally, the Johnson R and I CCD filters were replaced with the standard astronomical filters suite (Bessell R,I). In an effort to reduce object saturation, the two generic aperture stops were replaced with neutral density filters. Initially data were taken with aluminum debris pieces from the European Space Operations Centre ESOC2 ground test and more recently with samples from a thermal multi-layered insulation (MLI) commonly used on rocket bodies and satellites. The ESOC2 data provided light curve analysis for one type of material but many different shapes, including flat, bent, curled, folded, and torn. The MLI samples are roughly the same size and shape, but have different surfaces that give rise to interesting photometric light curves. In addition, filter photometry was conducted on the MLI pieces, a process that also will be used on the ESOC2 samples. While obtaining light curve data an anomalous drop in intensity was observed when the table revolved through the second 180 degree rotation. Investigation revealed that the robot s wrist rotation is not reliable past 80 degrees, thus the object may be at slightly different angles at the 180 degree transition. To limit this effect, the initial rotation position begins with the object s minimal surface area facing the camera.

  8. Images of American sexuality in debates over nonprescription access to emergency contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Wynn, L L; Trussell, James

    2006-11-01

    The debate over emergency contraceptive pill access in the United States revolves around speculations about Americans' sexual lives. The recently released internal U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) memo that expresses fears that adolescents will form "sex-based cults" around emergency contraceptive pills echoes arguments made against the nonprescription switch at the 2003 FDA hearings. In these hearings, opponents argued that nonprescription access would lead to adolescent promiscuity and disease transmission and that adult predators would use the drug to facilitate the sexual abuse of young women. In contrast, proponents of expanded access to emergency contraceptive pills overwhelmingly portrayed their model user as a responsible adult who experiences a torn condom during consensual sex. These imaginations of American sexuality are tied to competing models of the role of medical providers in women's sexual decision making. Opponents of the nonprescription switch argued that women need a learned intermediary, not only to determine their need for emergency contraception, but also to educate them about proper sexual behavior and protect them from abuse. Proponents advocated putting more responsibility for sexual health decision making in the hands of women, not doctors, and complained about the moralizing scrutiny of medical providers. In the absence of nonprescription access to emergency contraception, advance prescription of emergency contraceptive pills can ensure that contraceptive education is not tied to a specific sexual act and therefore not perceived as a judgment about women's sexual decisions. However, advance prescription does not help women who lack access to health care or women who make sexual and contraceptive decisions without consulting physicians.

  9. Traffic-Based Reconfiguration for Logical Topologies in Large-Scale WDM Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbing; Murata, Masaki; Takagi, Hideaki; Ji, Yusheng

    2005-10-01

    Wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) technology has emerged as a promising technology for backbone networks. The optical layer based on WDM technology provides optical routing services to the upper layers such as the packet-switching layer and the time-division multiplexing (TDM) layer over the generalized multiprotocol label-switching (GMPLS) paradigm. The set of all-optical communication channels (lightpaths) in the optical layer defines the logical topology for the upper layer applications. Since the traffic demand of upper layer applications fluctuates from time to time, it is required to reconfigure the underlying logical topology in the optical layer accordingly. However, the reconfiguration for the logical topology is reluctantly disruptive to the network since some lightpaths should be torn down and some traffic has to be buffered or rerouted during the reconfiguration process. Therefore, it needs to have an efficient transition method to shift the current logical topology to the new one so as to minimize the effect of the reconfiguration on the upper layer traffic. This paper proposes several heuristic algorithms that move the current logical topology efficiently to the given target logical topology in large-scale wavelength-routed optical networks. In the proposed algorithms, the performance improvement/degradation of data transmission [transmission delay or distance between a source-destination (s-d) pair] caused by a new lightpath is considered as benefit for establishing the new lightpath. The proposed algorithms construct the new logical topology starting from a lightpath with the largest benefit to the user traffic. Simulation experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed algorithms in comparison with existing algorithms in a National Science Foundation Network (NSFNET)-like network model with 16 nodes and 25 links. The results show that the proposed algorithms yield much better performance (shorter average packet hot distance) than

  10. The effects of knee injury on skeletal muscle function, Na+, K+-ATPase content, and isoform abundance

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Ben D; Levinger, Pazit; Morris, Hayden G; Petersen, Aaron C; Garnham, Andrew P; Levinger, Itamar; McKenna, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    While training upregulates skeletal muscle Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA), the effects of knee injury and associated disuse on muscle NKA remain unknown. This was therefore investigated in six healthy young adults with a torn anterior cruciate ligament, (KI; four females, two males; age 25.0 ± 4.9 years; injury duration 15 ± 17 weeks; mean ± SD) and seven age- and BMI-matched asymptomatic controls (CON; five females, two males). Each participant underwent a vastus lateralis muscle biopsy, on both legs in KI and one leg in CON. Muscle was analyzed for muscle fiber type and cross-sectional area (CSA), NKA content ([3H]ouabain binding), and α1–3 and β1–2 isoform abundance. Participants also completed physical activity and knee function questionnaires (KI only); and underwent quadriceps peak isometric strength, thigh CSA and postural sway assessments in both injured and noninjured legs. NKA content was 20.1% lower in the knee-injured leg than the noninjured leg and 22.5% lower than CON. NKA α2 abundance was 63.0% lower in the knee-injured leg than the noninjured leg, with no differences in other NKA isoforms. Isometric strength and thigh CSA were 21.7% and 7.1% lower in the injured leg than the noninjured leg, respectively. In KI, postural sway did not differ between legs, but for two-legged standing was 43% higher than CON. Hence, muscle NKA content and α2 abundance were reduced in severe knee injury, which may contribute to impaired muscle function. Restoration of muscle NKA may be important in rehabilitation of muscle function after knee and other lower limb injury. PMID:25677549

  11. [Mathematics - astronomy - astrology special library].

    PubMed

    Gluch, Sibylle

    2011-01-01

    About 1560 Elector August of Saxony created an unusual library--one distinguished within its period by both its specialization and location. Situated within the Kunstkammer this library was mostly dedicated to the mathematical sciences and related disciplines. It contained works by the most important authors on mathematics, astronomy, and astrology from the classical, medieval, and early modern periods. This essay traces the formation and composition of August's library, and examines its function: What kind of relationship existed between the library and the Kunstkammer? In what way did the library mirror the interests of the Elector, and to what extend does it permit inferences regarding the Elector's knowledge of mathematics? From the analysis August emerges not as a specialist with a deep understanding of mathematics, but as a particular aficionado of mathematical applications. As a practitioner and general follower of the mathematical arts he took part in a far-reaching intellectual network the center of which lay in the University of Wittenberg. Here, Melanchthon had effectively strengthened the importance of the mathematical disciplines within the university curriculum. He regarded mathematics as the foremost science, arguing that before all other disciplines its method enabled man to recognize the harmonic order of the world, and to discern divine providence. Thus, mathematics offered consoling stability and support in an often seemingly chaotic world torn by religious controversies. This kind of esteem for the mathematical sciences did not presuppose expert knowledge. Hence, the fact that August does not appear to have read the mathematical books he collected does not come as a contradiction. On the contrary, for August it sufficed to recognize the potential of the mathematical sciences, which he brought into life through the creation of a specialized library that developed a rhetoric of its own. The collection of his Kunstkammer library spoke of a

  12. Psyche=singularity: A comparison of Carl Jung's transpersonal psychology and Leonard Susskind's holographic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmond, Timothy

    In this dissertation I discern what Carl Jung calls the mandala image of the ultimate archetype of unity underlying and structuring cosmos and psyche by pointing out parallels between his transpersonal psychology and Stanford physicist Leonard Susskind's string theory. Despite his atheistic, materialistically reductionist interpretation of it, I demonstrate how Susskind's string theory of holographic information conservation at the event horizons of black holes, and the cosmic horizon of the universe, corroborates the following four topics about which Jung wrote: (1) his near-death experience of the cosmic horizon after a heart attack in 1944; ( 2) his equation relating psychic energy to mass, "Psyche=highest intensity in the smallest space" (1997, 162), which I translate into the equation, Psyche=Singularity; (3) his theory that the mandala, a circle or sphere with a central point, is the symbolic image of the ultimate archetype of unity through the union of opposites, which structures both cosmos and psyche, and which rises spontaneously from the collective unconscious to compensate a conscious mind torn by irreconcilable demands (1989, 334-335, 396-397); and (4) his theory of synchronicity. I argue that Susskind's inside-out black hole model of our Big Bang universe forms a geometrically perfect mandala: a central Singularity encompassed by a two-dimensional sphere which serves as a universal memory bank. Moreover, in precise fulfillment of Jung's theory, Susskind used that mandala to reconcile the notoriously incommensurable paradigms of general relativity and quantum mechanics, providing in the process a mathematically plausible explanation for Jung's near-death experience of his past, present, and future life simultaneously at the cosmic horizon. Finally, Susskind's theory also provides a plausible cosmological model to explain Jung's theory of synchronicity--meaningful coincidences may be tied together by strings at the cosmic horizon, from which they

  13. 3D Hydrodynamical Calculations on the Fragmentation of Pancakes and Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemura, Masayuki

    1992-05-01

    The fragmentation of pancakes is numerically investigated by 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics combined with N-body scheme, where the thermal processes by the cooling and heating are explicitly included and the self-gravity is calculated by the direct summation for all particle pairs. We consider baryon-dominated and hot dark matter-dominated pancakes. We find that the fragmentation is triggered in a central cooled dense layer of a pancake, and it obeys a two-step scenario: first the pancake exhibits some filamentary structures after collapse, and then they are torn to numerous fragments, eventually forming chain-like structures. The galaxy formation efficiency in pancake fragmentation is considerably small as fGF ~ exp [-2(M_pan/10(14}M_sun)({1/5)) ]. This is suggestive when compared with the recent observations on X-ray clusters. It is also found that the typical sizes of fragments are proportional to the pancake mass, M_pan. The mass of fragment is determined as M_b ~ 0.3-2times 10(12) M_sun (M_pan/10(15) M_sun) in baryonic component. Moreover the rotation curve of each fragment is asymptotically flat in the outer envelope. Other characteristic quantities as the total mass to baryon mass ratios, the line-of-sight relative peculiar velocity dispersion of fragments, the neutral hydrogen column density of each fragment at the high-redshift epoch, and the intergalactic gas heating and X-ray luminosity are also presented. The fragmentation processes are strongly dependent upon small-scale fluctuations. Unless there is any small-scale seed fluctuations, the pancakes cannot be fragmented. Therefore, a pure neutrino-dominated universe where small-scale fluctuations are thoroughly erased may be unsuccessful in galaxy formation. We require just a small amount of fluctuations of smaller scales than a neutrino collisionless damping scale for the formation of galaxies in the fragmentation scenario.

  14. Infected shoulder joint with loose Suture Anchor in the joint after Bankart’s Repair- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Thilak, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The glenoid labrum is frequently torn in traumatic glenohumeral dislocation; arthroscopic repair is the standard method of treatment. The complications associated with this repair are pulling out of metal suture anchors, chondrolysis and joint infection. The infection of joint after arthroscopy is less than 1%. Staphylococcus is most common organism and rarely followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We report a case of infected shoulder with chondrolysis of the joint and pulled out metal suture anchor lying inside the joint after Bankart’s repair. Case Report: A 22-year-old gentleman came to us with complaints of shoulder joint pain & gross restriction of movements for one year, with history of intermittent fever and treatment in nearby hospital. He also gives past history of recurrent dislocation of shoulder with last episode 18 months back, which was diagnosed as Bankart’s lesion and arthroscopic Bankart’s repair was done 15 months back. He was evaluated at our institute and suspected to have infection of shoulder joint with pulled out metal suture anchor inside the joint. Arthroscopic removal of suture anchor and debridement of shoulder joint was done, Culture was obtained and culture specific antibiotics were given for six weeks, and significant improvement was observed with this line of treatment. At lyear follow up, the patient was able to perform his daily activities with terminal restriction of range of motion. Conclusions: Shoulder joint infection is rare after Bankart’s repair and required a high degree of suspicion. Any foreign materials inside the joint should be taken out & followed with aggressive treatment by debridement, irrigation and culture specific antibiotics. Suppression of joint infection with antibiotics should be avoided specially when there is foreign body inside the joint. PMID:27703928

  15. Northeast Regional Planetary Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Saunders, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    In 1980, the Northeast Planetary Data Center (NEPDC) was established with Tim Mutch as its Director. The Center was originally located in the Sciences Library due to space limitations but moved to the Lincoln Field Building in 1983 where it could serve the Planetary Group and outside visitors more effectively. In 1984 Dr. Peter Schultz moved to Brown University and became its Director after serving in a similar capacity at the Lunar and Planetary Institute since 1976. Debbie Glavin has served as the Data Center Coordinator since 1982. Initially the NEPDC was build around Tim Mutch's research collection of Lunar Orbiter and Mariner 9 images with only partial sets of Apollo and Viking materials. Its collection was broadened and deepened as the Director (PHS) searched for materials to fill in gaps. Two important acquisitions included the transfer of a Viking collection from a previous PI in Tucson and the donation of surplused lunar materials (Apollo) from the USGS/Menlo Park prior to its building being torn down. Later additions included the pipeline of distributed materials such as the Viking photomosaic series and certain Magellan products. Not all materials sent to Brown, however, found their way to the Data Center, e.g., Voyager prints and negatives. In addition to the NEPDC, the planetary research collection is separately maintained in conjunction with past and ongoing mission activities. These materials (e.g., Viking, Magellan, Galileo, MGS mission products) are housed elsewhere and maintained independently from the NEPDC. They are unavailable to other researchers, educators, and general public. Consequently, the NEPDC represents the only generally accessible reference collection for use by researchers, students, faculty, educators, and general public in the Northeast corridor.

  16. Caught between intending and doing: older people ideating on a self-chosen death

    PubMed Central

    van Wijngaarden, Els; Leget, Carlo; Goossensen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper is to provide insight into what it means to live with the intention to end life at a self-chosen moment from an insider perspective. Setting Participants who lived independent or semidependent throughout the Netherlands. Participants 25 Dutch older citizens (mean age of 82 years) participated. They were ideating on a self-chosen death because they considered their lives to be no longer worth living. Inclusion criteria were that they: (1) considered their lives to be ‘completed’; (2) suffered from the prospect of living on; (3) currently wished to die; (4) were 70 years of age or older; (5) were not terminally ill; (6) considered themselves to be mentally competent; (7) considered their death wish reasonable. Design In this qualitative study, in-depth interviews were carried out in the participants’ everyday home environment (median lasting 1.56 h). Verbatim transcripts were analysed based on the principles of phenomenological thematic analysis. Results The liminality or ‘in-betweenness’ of intending and actually performing self-directed death (or not) is characterised as a constant feeling of being torn explicated by the following pairs of themes: (1) detachment and attachment; (2) rational and non-rational considerations; (3) taking control and lingering uncertainty; (4) resisting interference and longing for support; (5) legitimacy and illegitimacy. Conclusions Our findings show that the in-between period emerges as a considerable, existential challenge with both rational and non-rational concerns and thoughts, rather than a calculative, coherent sum of rational considerations. Our study highlights the need to take due consideration of all ambiguities and ambivalences present after a putatively rational decision has been made in order to develop careful policy and support for this particular group of older people. PMID:26781505

  17. Amazing and portentous summer of 1783

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1984-04-01

    The summer of the year 1783 was an amazing and portentous one, and full of horrible phenomena; for besides the alarming meteors and tremendous thunder-storms that affrighted and distressed the different counties of this kingdom, the peculiar haze, or smokey fog, that prevailed for many weeks in this island, and in every part of Europe, and even beyond its limits, was a most extraordinary appearance, unlike anything known within the memory of man. By my journal I find that I has notice this strange occurrence from June 23 to July 20 inclusive, during which period the wind varied to every quarter without making any alteration in the air. The sun, at noon, looked as blank as a clouded moon, and shed a rust-coloured ferruginous light on the ground, and floors of rooms; but was particularly lurid and blood-coloured at rising and setting. All the time the heat was so intense that butchers' meat could hardly be eaten on the day after it was killed; and the flies swarmed so in the lanes and hedges that they rendered the horses half frantic, and riding irksome. The country people began to look with a superstitious awe at the red, louring aspect of the sun; and indeed there was reason for the most enlightened person to be apprehensive; for all the while, Calabria and part of the isle of Sicily, were torn and convulsed with earthquakes; and about that juncture a volcano sprung out of the sea on the coast of Norway. On this occasion Milton's noble simile of the sun, in his first book of Paradise Lost, frequently occurred to my mind; and it is indeed particularly applicable, because, towards the end, it alludes to a superstitious kind of dread, with which the minds of men are always impressed by such strange and unusual phenomena.

  18. Spontaneous release of epiretinal membrane in a young weight-lifting athlete by presumed central rupture and centrifugal pull

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Mansour, Hana A; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This patient presented for surgery at the age of 32 years, 14 months after his initial complaint of metamorphopsia and visual loss in the right eye. Past tests demonstrated a whitish epiretinal membrane (ERM) with translucent stress lines over a thickened macula. Visual acuity was found on last presentation to be normal with minimal alteration on Amsler grid testing. A torn ERM was found in the center with left-over ERM temporally and rolled-over ERM nasally at the site of the epicenter with no posterior vitreous detachment. Visual recovery occurred gradually over several days 2 months prior to presentation apparently following heavy weight-lifting with a sensation of severe eye pressure. Sequential funduscopy and optical coherence tomography scans demonstrated the peeling of an ERM accompanied by normalization of foveal thickness. Valsalva maneuver had put excessive tension on ERM which tore in its center at the weakest line with gradual contraction of the ERM away from the fovea towards the peripapillary area. This is a new mechanism of self-separation of ERM induced by Valsalva. ERM in young subjects is subject to rupture and subsequent separation by tangential traction. There are three mechanisms for spontaneous separation of ERM: 1) posterior vitreous detachment with pulling of ERM by detaching vitreous (most common in adults); 2) the contracting forces of the immature ERM become stronger than its adhesions to the retina resulting in slow tangential traction on the edges of the ERM and gradual separation from the edges towards the center (remodeling common in youngsters); and 3) acute tearing of ERM at its weakest central point and retraction of part of the membrane towards the epicenter (current case report). PMID:25484573

  19. Exploring halo substructure with giant stars. XIV. The nature of the Triangulum-Andromeda stellar features

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Allyson A.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Majewski, Steven R.; Damke, Guillermo; Richardson, Whitney; Beaton, Rachael; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J. E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.edu E-mail: gjd3r@virginia.edu E-mail: rlb9n@virginia.edu

    2014-09-20

    As large-scale stellar surveys have become available over the past decade, the ability to detect and characterize substructures in the Galaxy has increased dramatically. These surveys have revealed the Triangulum-Andromeda (TriAnd) region to be rich with substructures in the distance range 20-30 kpc, and the relation of these features to each other, if any, remains unclear. An exploration using Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry reveals not only the faint sequence in M giants detected by Rocha-Pinto et al. spanning the range 100° < l < 160° and –50° < b < –15°, but, in addition, a second, brighter and more densely populated sequence. These sequences are likely associated with the distinct main sequences (MSs) discovered (and labeled TriAnd1 and TriAnd2) by Martin et al. in an optical survey in the direction of M31, where TriAnd2 is the optical counterpart of the fainter red giant branch (RGB)/asymptotic giant branch sequence of Rocha-Pinto et al. Here, the age, distance, and metallicity ranges for TriAnd1 and TriAnd2 are estimated by simultaneously fitting isochrones to the 2MASS RGB tracks and the optical MS/MS turn-off features. The two populations are clearly distinct in age and distance: the brighter sequence (TriAnd1) is younger (6-10 Gyr) and closer (distance of ∼15-21 kpc), whereas the fainter sequence (TriAnd2) is older (10-12 Gyr) and at an estimated distance of ∼24-32 kpc. A comparison with simulations demonstrates that the differences and similarities between TriAnd1 and TriAnd2 can simultaneously be explained if they represent debris originating from the disruption of the same dwarf galaxy, but torn off during two distinct pericentric passages.

  20. Physics of the Galactic Center Cloud G2, on Its Way toward the Supermassive Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Schartmann, M.; Alig, C.; Gillessen, S.; Genzel, R.; Fritz, T. K.; Eisenhauer, F.

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the origin, structure, and evolution of the small gas cloud G2, which is on an orbit almost straight into the Galactic central supermassive black hole (SMBH). G2 is a sensitive probe of the hot accretion zone of Sgr A*, requiring gas temperatures and densities that agree well with models of captured shock-heated stellar winds. Its mass is equal to the critical mass below which cold clumps would be destroyed quickly by evaporation. Its mass is also constrained by the fact that at apocenter its sound crossing timescale was equal to its infall timescale. Our numerical simulations show that the observed structure and evolution of G2 can be well reproduced if it forms in pressure equilibrium with its surroundings in 1995 at a distance from the SMBH of 7.6 × 1016 cm. If the cloud had formed at apocenter in the "clockwise" stellar disk as expected from its orbit, it would be torn into a very elongated spaghetti-like filament by 2011, which is not observed. This problem can be solved if G2 is the head of a larger, shell-like structure that formed at apocenter. Our numerical simulations show that this scenario explains not only G2's observed kinematical and geometrical properties but also the Brγ observations of a low surface brightness gas tail that trails the cloud. In 2013, while passing the SMBH, G2 will break up into a string of droplets that within the next 30 years will mix with the surrounding hot gas and trigger cycles of active galactic nucleus activity.