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  1. Meet EPA Scientist Diana Bless

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA chemical engineer Diana Bless works on sustainable materials management research for rare earth elements in consumer electronics and approaches related to characterization, source control and treatment of mining-influenced waters.

  2. Diana Leonard and Materialist Feminism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Stevi

    2013-01-01

    This tribute to Diana Leonard focuses on her contribution to materialist feminism, both through bringing the work of key French theorists to the attention of an Anglophone audience and through her own sociological work on the family, marriage and childhood. In so doing it draws attention to the importance of her work as editor and…

  3. Making a Way for Diana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shima, Kate; Gsovski, Barbara K.

    1996-01-01

    Although many parents and educators hesitate to involve children in a regular course of drug therapy, Ritalin often proves beneficial to Attention Deficit Disorder sufferers. Diana, an intelligent, easily distracted middle schooler, was helped by a team approach using evaluation, remediation, behavioral therapy, medication, and a supportive…

  4. Making a Way for Diana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shima, Kate; Gsovski, Barbara K.

    1996-01-01

    Although many parents and educators hesitate to involve children in a regular course of drug therapy, Ritalin often proves beneficial to Attention Deficit Disorder sufferers. Diana, an intelligent, easily distracted middle schooler, was helped by a team approach using evaluation, remediation, behavioral therapy, medication, and a supportive…

  5. Diana Leonard and Materialist Feminism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Stevi

    2013-01-01

    This tribute to Diana Leonard focuses on her contribution to materialist feminism, both through bringing the work of key French theorists to the attention of an Anglophone audience and through her own sociological work on the family, marriage and childhood. In so doing it draws attention to the importance of her work as editor and…

  6. Social familiarity affects Diana monkey (Cercopithecus diana diana) alarm call responses in habitat-specific ways

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Claudia; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Male Diana monkeys produce loud and acoustically distinct alarm calls to leopards and eagles that propagate over long distances, much beyond the immediate group. Calling is often contagious, with neighbouring males responding to each other’s calls, indicating that harem males communicate both to local group members and distant competitors. Here, we tested whether male Diana monkeys responding to each other’s alarm calls discriminated familiar from unfamiliar callers in two populations in Taï Forest (Ivory Coast) and on Tiwai Island (Sierra Leone). At both sites, we found specific acoustic markers in male alarm call responses that discriminated familiar from unfamiliar callers, but response patterns were site-specific. On Tiwai Island, males responded to familiar males’ eagle alarms with ‘standard’ eagle alarm calls, whereas unfamiliar males triggered acoustically atypical eagle alarms. The opposite was found in Taï Forest where males responded to unfamiliar males’ eagle alarm calls with ‘standard’ eagle alarms, and with atypical eagle alarms to familiar males’ calls. Moreover, only Taï, but not Tiwai, males also marked familiarity with the caller in their leopard-induced alarms. We concluded that male Diana monkeys encode not only predator type but also signaller familiarity in their alarm calls, although in population-specific ways. We explain these inter-site differences in vocal behaviour in terms of differences in predation pressure and population density. We discuss the adaptive function and implications of this behaviour for the origins of acoustic flexibility in primate communication. PMID:26998336

  7. Diana Al-Hadid: Identity and Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungerberg, Tom; Smith, Anna; Borsh, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Diana Al-Hadid's sculptures reflect the many locations, cultures, histories, and mythologies that have shaped her as an artist. In large-scale works which have the appearance of architectural ruins, Al-Hadid employs imagery drawn from many diverse interests including science and technology, history, and literature. She also incorporates images and…

  8. Diana Al-Hadid: Identity and Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungerberg, Tom; Smith, Anna; Borsh, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Diana Al-Hadid's sculptures reflect the many locations, cultures, histories, and mythologies that have shaped her as an artist. In large-scale works which have the appearance of architectural ruins, Al-Hadid employs imagery drawn from many diverse interests including science and technology, history, and literature. She also incorporates images and…

  9. Observations of Speyeria diana (Diana Fritillary) utilizing forested areas in North Carolina that have been Mechanically thinned and burned

    Treesearch

    John W. Campbell; James L. Hanula; Thomas A. Waldrop

    2007-01-01

    Speyeria diana (Diana fritillary) is a forest dwelling butterfly that has been eradicated from portions of its native habitat in North Carolina. This loss has been attributed to habitat destruction and pesticide use, resulting in its status as a species of special concern. During the spring and summer of 2003 and 2004, we conducted butterfly surveys...

  10. The Diana fritillary (Speyeria diana) and great spangled fritillary (S. cybele): dependence on fire in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas

    Treesearch

    D. Craig Rudolph; Charles A. Ely; Richard R. Schaefer; J. Howard Williamson; Ronald E. Thill

    2006-01-01

    The Diana fritillary (Speyerio diana), a species of conservation concern throughout its range, and the great spangled fritillary (S. cybele) both occur in the Ouachita Mountains of west-central Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma. Both species depend on abundant, high quality nectar resources to support populations. Decades of intense...

  11. Pulse register phonation in Diana monkey alarm calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riede, Tobias; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    The adult male Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) produce predator-specific alarm calls in response to two of their predators, the crowned eagles and the leopards. The acoustic structure of these alarm calls is remarkable for a number of theoretical and empirical reasons. First, although pulsed phonation has been described in a variety of mammalian vocalizations, very little is known about the underlying production mechanism. Second, Diana monkey alarm calls are based almost exclusively on this vocal production mechanism to an extent that has never been documented in mammalian vocal behavior. Finally, the Diana monkeys' pulsed phonation strongly resembles the pulse register in human speech, where fundamental frequency is mainly controlled by subglottal pressure. Here, we report the results of a detailed acoustic analysis to investigate the production mechanism of Diana monkey alarm calls. Within calls, we found a positive correlation between the fundamental frequency and the pulse amplitude, suggesting that both humans and monkeys control fundamental frequency by subglottal pressure. While in humans pulsed phonation is usually considered pathological or artificial, male Diana monkeys rely exclusively on pulsed phonation, suggesting a functional adaptation. Moreover, we were unable to document any nonlinear phenomena, despite the fact that they occur frequently in the vocal repertoire of humans and nonhumans, further suggesting that the very robust Diana monkey pulse production mechanism has evolved for a particular functional purpose. We discuss the implications of these findings for the structural evolution of Diana monkey alarm calls and suggest that the restricted variability in fundamental frequency and robustness of the source signal gave rise to the formant patterns observed in Diana monkey alarm calls, used to convey predator information.

  12. DIANA - A deep underground accelerator for nuclear astrophysics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Winklehner, Daniel; Leitner, Daniela; Lemut, Alberto; Hodgkinson, Adrian; Couder, Manoel; Wiescher, Michael

    2013-04-19

    DIANA (Dakota Ion Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a proposed facility designed to be operated deep underground. The DIANA collaboration includes nuclear astrophysics groups from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, Colorado School of Mines, and the University of North Carolina, and is led by the University of Notre Dame. The scientific goals of the facility are measurements of low energy nuclear cross-sections associated with sun and pre-supernova stars in a laboratory setup at energies that are close to those in stars. Because of the low stellar temperatures associated with these environments, and the high Coulomb barrier, the reaction cross-sections are extremely low. Therefore these measurements are hampered by small signal to background ratios. By going underground the background due to cosmic rays can be reduced by several orders of magnitude. We report on the design status of the DIANA facility with focus on the 3 MV electrostatic accelerator.

  13. A Diana-Driven Pretty-Printer for ADA,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-22

    be laid out on the page: the second aspect Involves making all decisions concerning page layout and then carrying them out. Although this distinction...formatting decisions on questionable Input, we have chosen to Ignore comments while making formatting decisions . 3.2.5. Solving WhiteSpace and Page Layout...pass to make formatting decisions about indentation and where to break lines. This chapter begins with the definition of the refinement of DIANA that

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM GENAVENSE IN A DIANA MONKEY (CERCOPITHECUS DIANA) BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kathleen M; Wack, Allison N; Bradway, Dan; Simons, Brian W; Bronson, Ellen; Osterhout, Gerard; Parrish, Nicole M; Montali, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    A 25-yr-old Diana monkey (Cercopithecus diana) with a 1.5-yr history of chronic colitis and diarrhea was found to have disseminated granulomatous disease with intralesional acid fast bacilli. Bacilli were identified as Mycobacterium genavense by polymerase chain reaction, sequencing of the 16S-23S ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer (ITS) gene, and mycolic acid analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mycobacterium genavense is a common cause of mycobacteriosis in free-ranging and captive birds. In addition, recognition of opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients is increasing. Disease manifestations of M. genavense are similar to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and include fever, wasting, and diarrhea with disseminated disease. Similar clinical signs and lesions were observed in this monkey. Mycobacterium genavense should be considered as a differential for disseminated mycobacterial disease in nonhuman primates as this agent can mimic MAC and related mycobacteria.

  15. Tamarugite from Diana Cave (SW Romania) -first true karst occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pušcaš, C. M.; Onac, B. P.; Effenberger, H. S.; Povarǎ, I.

    2012-04-01

    Diana Cave is located within the town limits of Baile Herculane (SW Romania) and develops as a 14 m long, westward oriented, unique passage guided by the Diana fault [1]. At the far end of the cave, the thermo-mineral Diana Spring wells forth. In the early 1970s a mine gallery that intersected the cave was created to drain the water into a pumping station and the original cave passage was somewhat altered and reinforced with concrete. Today the concrete and the silty limestone cave walls are heavily corroded by H2SO4 outgassing from the hot water (ca. 50°C) and display abundant gypsum crusts, soggy aggregates of native S, and a variety of more exotic sulfates. Among them, a mineral that has been previously identified in caves only in connection to volcanic activity, either as thermal springs or fumaroles [2]: tamarugite [NaAl(SO4)26H2O]. It was [3] that first mentioned the occurrence of this Na and Al sulfate in Diana Cave, our research aiming to give a detailed description of this mineral, its paragenesis, and mechanisms of precipitation. Recently, tamarugite has also been identified in a sulfuric acid cave from Greece [4]. Along with powder X-ray diffractions coupled with Rietveld refinement, scanning electron microscope, and electron probe micro-analysis, δ18O and δ34S compositions of the sulfate mineral as well as precipitates from the water were analyzed to identify and better constrain the genesis of this rare sulfate. Regrettably, the crystal size of our specimens is inappropriate for identification by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction. Physical and chemical parameters of Diana Spring were as well measured on several occasions. Geochemical analysis suggests that the minute, white tamarugite flakes precipitated in Diana Cave as a result of the interactions between the thermo-mineral water or water vapor and the original limestone bedrock and concrete that blankets the mine gallery. [1] Povara, I., Diaconu, G., Goran, C. (1972). Observations pr

  16. Geologic Map of the Diana Chasma Quadrangle (V-37), Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, V.L.; DeShon, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    Diana Chasma quadrangle hosts some of the steepest topography on Venus. Altimetry measurements range from -2.5 to 4.7 km (0.0 = mean planetary radius), with a surface mean of 0.6 km. Fractures and faults within the central fracture/rift zone create large blocks of down-dropped material, especially along the east-central edge of the map area. The Dali and Diana chasmata display slopes of >30°, the steepest and deepest trenches on Venus. Both chasmata host landslide deposits presumably sourced from the steep chasmata walls. The tessera inlier, coronae, and ridge belts sit topographically above Rusalka and Zhibek planitiae. Rusalka Planitia topography describes broad undulations having northwest-trending ridges spaced ~200 km apart. The most distinctive ridge, Vetsorgo Dorsum, centered at 6.5° S., 163° E., is a Class I ridge belt owing to its simple arch morphology. The central interior of Markham crater sits topographically lower than the surrounding region, which slopes downward to the east.

  17. Functional Analysis of miRNAs Using the DIANA Tools Online Suite.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Ioannis S; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are central regulators of gene expression. They are actively studied for their involvement in numerous physiological and pathological conditions but also as diagnostic biomarkers or promising therapeutic targets. The increased complexity of the miRNA interactomes hinders straightforward interpretation of miRNA expression differences between states and conditions. To this end, functional analysis web servers process and combine experimental and in silico data, enabling researchers to uncover targeted pathways and transcriptional mechanisms that are hidden within numerous interactions and vast expression datasets. DIANA-tools ( www.microrna.gr ) is a web server hosting state-of-the-art utilities and databases for miRNA functional investigation. Available utilities cover a wide scope of different needs and research scenarios, rendering DIANA website a one-stop-shop for miRNA analyses. The most commonly utilized databases and algorithms include DIANA-microT-CDS, DIANA-TarBase v7.0, DIANA-lncBase v2.0, DIANA-miRGen v3.0, DIANA-miRPath v3.0, and DIANA-mirExTra v2.0.In the presented protocol, we will utilize different online tools in order to explore miRNA functions and to identify probable targets of interest for downstream analyses and wet lab experiments. The combined use of different applications from the DIANA suite can shed light to numerous different aspects of miRNA regulation and regulatory function, without the necessity for extensive bioinformatics expertise or computational infrastructure.

  18. DNA-linked Inhibitor Antibody Assay (DIANA) for sensitive and selective enzyme detection and inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Navrátil, Václav; Schimer, Jiří; Tykvart, Jan; Knedlík, Tomáš; Vik, Viktor; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2017-01-25

    Human diseases are often diagnosed by determining levels of relevant enzymes and treated by enzyme inhibitors. We describe an assay suitable for both ultrasensitive enzyme quantification and quantitative inhibitor screening with unpurified enzymes. In the DNA-linked Inhibitor ANtibody Assay (DIANA), the target enzyme is captured by an immobilized antibody, probed with a small-molecule inhibitor attached to a reporter DNA and detected by quantitative PCR. We validate the approach using the putative cancer markers prostate-specific membrane antigen and carbonic anhydrase IX. We show that DIANA has a linear range of up to six logs and it selectively detects zeptomoles of targets in complex biological samples. DIANA's wide dynamic range permits determination of target enzyme inhibition constants using a single inhibitor concentration. DIANA also enables quantitative screening of small-molecule enzyme inhibitors using microliters of human blood serum containing picograms of target enzyme. DIANA's performance characteristics make it a superior tool for disease detection and drug discovery. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. DIANA-microT web server: elucidating microRNA functions through target prediction.

    PubMed

    Maragkakis, M; Reczko, M; Simossis, V A; Alexiou, P; Papadopoulos, G L; Dalamagas, T; Giannopoulos, G; Goumas, G; Koukis, E; Kourtis, K; Vergoulis, T; Koziris, N; Sellis, T; Tsanakas, P; Hatzigeorgiou, A G

    2009-07-01

    Computational microRNA (miRNA) target prediction is one of the key means for deciphering the role of miRNAs in development and disease. Here, we present the DIANA-microT web server as the user interface to the DIANA-microT 3.0 miRNA target prediction algorithm. The web server provides extensive information for predicted miRNA:target gene interactions with a user-friendly interface, providing extensive connectivity to online biological resources. Target gene and miRNA functions may be elucidated through automated bibliographic searches and functional information is accessible through Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The web server offers links to nomenclature, sequence and protein databases, and users are facilitated by being able to search for targeted genes using different nomenclatures or functional features, such as the genes possible involvement in biological pathways. The target prediction algorithm supports parameters calculated individually for each miRNA:target gene interaction and provides a signal-to-noise ratio and a precision score that helps in the evaluation of the significance of the predicted results. Using a set of miRNA targets recently identified through the pSILAC method, the performance of several computational target prediction programs was assessed. DIANA-microT 3.0 achieved there with 66% the highest ratio of correctly predicted targets over all predicted targets. The DIANA-microT web server is freely available at www.microrna.gr/microT.

  20. Condolence Books: Language and Meaning in the Mourning for Hillsborough and Diana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article reports empirical research into public books of condolence signed following two key mourning events within British culture: the 1989 Hillsborough soccer stadium disaster and the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997. The author suggests that not only do condolence books provide valuable historical record of the way contemporary…

  1. 78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen... Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and Richard Kosiba (Petitioners...

  2. Kudoa dianae sp. n. (Myxosporea: Multivalvulida), a new parasite of bullseye puffer, Sphoeroides annulatus (Tetraodontiformes: Tetraodontidae).

    PubMed

    Dyková, Iva; Fajer Avila, Emma Josefina; Fiala, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A new multivalvulid myxosporean species, Kudoa dianae sp. n., is described from bullseye puffer, Sphoeroides annulatus (Jenyns) (Tetraodontiformes: Tetraodontidae). Plasmodia develop in extramuscular sites, in the wall of oesophagus and less frequently on mesenteries. Mature spores can reach lumen of the digestive tract directly by disruption of plasmodial wall or via macrophage transport to the oesophageal epithelium. New species is characterised by morphology of spores and by the complete sequence of SSU rRNA gene that differs from all hitherto known sequences of Kudoa species. Spore morphology (moderate-sized, simple non-ornate spores, quadrate in apical view) clusters with that of Kudoa scienae, K. cerebralis, K. chilkaensis, K. leiostomi, K. finduli, K. cascasia and K. ovivora. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships (using SSU rRNA gene sequences) among five Kudoa species, the molecular data of which are available thus far, revealed that K. dianae is distinguishable from these five species and that its closest relation is with K. miniauiriculata.

  3. U-Pb age of the Diana Complex and Adirondack granulite petrogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basu, A.R.; Premo, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    U-Pb isotopic analyses of eight single and multi-grain zircon fractions separated from a syenite of the Diana Complex of the Adirondack Mountains do not define a single linear array, but a scatter along a chord that intersects the Concordia curve at 1145 ?? 29 and 285 ?? 204 Ma. For the most concordant analyses, the 207Pb/206Pb ages range between 1115 and 1150 Ma. Detailed petrographic studies revealed that most grains contained at least two phases of zircon growth, either primary magmatic cores enclosed by variable thickness of metamorphic overgrowths or magmatic portions enclosing presumably older xenocrystic zircon cores. The magmatic portions are characterized by typical dipyramidal prismatic zoning and numerous black inclusions that make them quite distinct from adjacent overgrowths or cores when observed in polarizing light microscopy and in back-scattered electron micrographs. Careful handpicking and analysis of the "best" magmatic grains, devoid of visible overgrowth of core material, produced two nearly concordant points that along with two of the multi-grain analyses yielded an upper-intercept age of 1118 ?? 2.8 Ma and a lower-intercept age of 251 ?? 13 Ma. The older age is interpreted as the crystallization age of the syenite and the younger one is consistent with late stage uplift of the Appalachian region. The 1118 Ma age for the Diana Complex, some 35 Ma younger than previously believed, is now approximately synchronous with the main Adirondack anorthosite intrusion, implying a cogenetic relationship among the various meta-igneous rocks of the Adirondacks. The retention of a high-temperature contact metamorphic aureole around Diana convincingly places the timing of Adirondack regional metamorphism as early as 1118 Ma. This result also implies that the sources of anomalous high-temperature during granulite metamorphism are the syn-metamorphic intrusions, such as the Diana Complex.

  4. Tamarugite in the Steam-Condensate Alteration Paragenesis in Diana Cave (SW Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puscas, C. M.; Onac, B. P.; Effenberger, H. S.; Povară, I.

    2012-12-01

    The double-salt hydrate tamarugite [NaAl(SO4)2 6H2O] is an uncommon mineral in the cave environment, forming as a result of chemical reactions between water and bedrock only under very specific conditions. The Diana Cave hosts a unique tamarugite occurrence, the first one to be reported from a typical karst environment. The cave is located within the limits of Băile Herculane township in the Cerna Mountains, SW Romania. It consists of a 14 m long, westward-oriented single passage, developed along the Diana Fault. In 1974 a concrete-clad mine gallery was created to channel the thermal water (Diana 1+2 Spring) flowing through the cave to a pumping station. The spring's chemical and physical parameters fluctuated through time, averaging 51.98° C, discharge of 0.96 Ls-1, pH of 7.46, 5768.66 ppm TDS, 9303 μScm-1 conductivity, 5.02 salinity. The major chemical components of the thermo-mineral water in Diana Cave are, Na+ (1392.57 ppm), K+ (58.55 ppm), Ca2+ (725.16 ppm), Mg2+ (10.78 ppm), Cl- (3376.83 ppm), and SO42- (92.27 ppm), and H2S (24.05 ppm), with traces of Si, Fe2+, Br+, I-, and Li+. The general air circulation pattern within the cave is fairly simple: cold air from the outside sweeps into the cave along the floor, heats up at the contact with the thermo-mineral water, ascends, and exists the cave along the ceiling. At the contact with the cold walls of the Diana Cave, the hot steam condenses and gives rise to a rich and exotic sulfate-mineral paragenesis (including halotrichite-series minerals, gypsum, bassanite, anhydrite, epsomite, alunite, halite, native sulfur, etc.). The most exotic minerals precipitate at or below the contact between the Tithonic - Neocomian limestone and the overlaying Cretaceous shaly limestone, as a result of steam-condensate alteration. Minerogenetic mechanisms responsible for the peculiar sulfate mineral assemblage in Diana Cave are evaporation, oxidation, hydrolysis, double exchange reactions, and deposition from vapours or

  5. Application of hybrid clustering using parallel k-means algorithm and DIANA algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umam, Khoirul; Bustamam, Alhadi; Lestari, Dian

    2017-03-01

    DNA is one of the carrier of genetic information of living organisms. Encoding, sequencing, and clustering DNA sequences has become the key jobs and routine in the world of molecular biology, in particular on bioinformatics application. There are two type of clustering, hierarchical clustering and partitioning clustering. In this paper, we combined two type clustering i.e. K-Means (partitioning clustering) and DIANA (hierarchical clustering), therefore it called Hybrid clustering. Application of hybrid clustering using Parallel K-Means algorithm and DIANA algorithm used to clustering DNA sequences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV). The clustering process is started with Collecting DNA sequences of HPV are obtained from NCBI (National Centre for Biotechnology Information), then performing characteristics extraction of DNA sequences. The characteristics extraction result is store in a matrix form, then normalize this matrix using Min-Max normalization and calculate genetic distance using Euclidian Distance. Furthermore, the hybrid clustering is applied by using implementation of Parallel K-Means algorithm and DIANA algorithm. The aim of using Hybrid Clustering is to obtain better clusters result. For validating the resulted clusters, to get optimum number of clusters, we use Davies-Bouldin Index (DBI). In this study, the result of implementation of Parallel K-Means clustering is data clustered become 5 clusters with minimal IDB value is 0.8741, and Hybrid Clustering clustered data become 13 sub-clusters with minimal IDB values = 0.8216, 0.6845, 0.3331, 0.1994 and 0.3952. The IDB value of hybrid clustering less than IBD value of Parallel K-Means clustering only that perform at 1ts stage. Its means clustering using Hybrid Clustering have the better result to clustered DNA sequence of HPV than perform parallel K-Means Clustering only.

  6. The hidden impact of conspiracy theories: perceived and actual influence of theories surrounding the death of Princess Diana.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Karen M; Sutton, Robbie M

    2008-04-01

    The authors examined the perceived and actual impact of exposure to conspiracy theories surrounding the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997. One group of undergraduate students rated their agreement and their classmates' perceived agreement with several statements about Diana's death. A second group of students from the same undergraduate population read material containing popular conspiracy theories about Diana's death before rating their own and others' agreement with the same statements and perceived retrospective attitudes (i.e., what they thought their own and others' attitudes were before reading the material). Results revealed that whereas participants in the second group accurately estimated others' attitude changes, they underestimated the extent to which their own attitudes were influenced.

  7. Mate-locating behavior of the butterfly Lethe diana (Lepidoptera: Satyridae): do males diurnally or seasonally change their mating strategy?

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Tsuyoshi

    2010-10-01

    The mate-locating behavior of male butterflies has been classified into two major types, territorial and patrolling. Territorial males defend a specific site, whereas patrolling males fly around a wider area without having to defend a site. In this study, I investigated the use of these tactics by males of the satyrine butterfly, Lethe diana. A previous study suggested that the males of L. diana change their mate-locating behavior during the day (they patrol in the morning and defend territories in the afternoon) and that patrolling is the primary mating strategy, whereas defending territories is a supplementary one. In the present study, I found that the daily activity pattern of the males of L. diana was similar to that described in the previous study: males often flew around in the morning and competed for territories in the afternoon. However, contrary to the previous study, all courtships and copulations were performed within male territories during their territorial activity. Closer observations revealed that copulations found in male territories were achieved by the owner of the territory. Males tended to feed in the morning, suggesting that the males flying in the morning searched for food rather than females. I conclude that territory holding is the primary male matelocating tactic in L. diana. I further found that, in summer, males exhibited territorial behavior later than in spring or autumn, which may be a strategy for preventing heat stress.

  8. DIANA-microT web server v5.0: service integration into miRNA functional analysis workflows.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kostoulas, Nikos; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Reczko, Martin; Filippidis, Christos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, A G

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous RNA molecules that regulate gene expression through mRNA degradation and/or translation repression, affecting many biological processes. DIANA-microT web server (http://www.microrna.gr/webServer) is dedicated to miRNA target prediction/functional analysis, and it is being widely used from the scientific community, since its initial launch in 2009. DIANA-microT v5.0, the new version of the microT server, has been significantly enhanced with an improved target prediction algorithm, DIANA-microT-CDS. It has been updated to incorporate miRBase version 18 and Ensembl version 69. The in silico-predicted miRNA-gene interactions in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans exceed 11 million in total. The web server was completely redesigned, to host a series of sophisticated workflows, which can be used directly from the on-line web interface, enabling users without the necessary bioinformatics infrastructure to perform advanced multi-step functional miRNA analyses. For instance, one available pipeline performs miRNA target prediction using different thresholds and meta-analysis statistics, followed by pathway enrichment analysis. DIANA-microT web server v5.0 also supports a complete integration with the Taverna Workflow Management System (WMS), using the in-house developed DIANA-Taverna Plug-in. This plug-in provides ready-to-use modules for miRNA target prediction and functional analysis, which can be used to form advanced high-throughput analysis pipelines.

  9. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-04

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D.; Vlachos, Ioannis S.; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G.

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads. PMID:26612864

  11. 3DIANA: 3D Domain Interaction Analysis: A Toolbox for Quaternary Structure Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joan; Sanchez-Garcia, Ruben; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Cuenca-Alba, Jesus; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S.; Carazo, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is experiencing a revolution with the advent of a new generation of Direct Electron Detectors, enabling a broad range of large and flexible structures to be resolved well below 1 nm resolution. Although EM techniques are evolving to the point of directly obtaining structural data at near-atomic resolution, for many molecules the attainable resolution might not be enough to propose high-resolution structural models. However, accessing information on atomic coordinates is a necessary step toward a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow proteins to perform specific tasks. For that reason, methods for the integration of EM three-dimensional maps with x-ray and NMR structural data are being developed, a modeling task that is normally referred to as fitting, resulting in the so called hybrid models. In this work, we present a novel application—3DIANA—specially targeted to those cases in which the EM map resolution is medium or low and additional experimental structural information is scarce or even lacking. In this way, 3DIANA statistically evaluates proposed/potential contacts between protein domains, presents a complete catalog of both structurally resolved and predicted interacting regions involving these domains and, finally, suggests structural templates to model the interaction between them. The evaluation of the proposed interactions is computed with DIMERO, a new method that scores physical binding sites based on the topology of protein interaction networks, which has recently shown the capability to increase by 200% the number of domain-domain interactions predicted in interactomes as compared to previous approaches. The new application displays the information at a sequence and structural level and is accessible through a web browser or as a Chimera plugin at http://3diana.cnb.csic.es. PMID:26772592

  12. Cephenemyia stimulator and Hypoderma diana infection of roe deer in the Czech Republic over an 8-year period.

    PubMed

    Salaba, Ondrej; Vadlejch, Jaroslav; Petrtyl, Miloslav; Valek, Petr; Kudrnacova, Marie; Jankovska, Ivana; Bartak, Miroslav; Sulakova, Hana; Langrova, Iva

    2013-04-01

    A survey of naso-pharyngeal and subcutaneous myiasis affecting roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) was conducted in the Czech Republic over an 8-year period (1999-2006). A total of 503 bucks and 264 does from six hunting localities were examined. The sampling area comprised predominantly agricultural lowlands and a mountain range primarily covered by forest. Since 1997, the deer have been treated each winter across the board with ivermectin (150 mg/kg, CERMIX® pulvis, Biopharm, CZ). Parasites found were the larvae of Hypoderma diana and Cephenemyia stimulator. There were no significant differences in warble fly infection among captured animals in the individual hunting localities. Overall, 146 (28.8%) of 503 animals (bucks) were infected with Cephenemyia stimulator larvae; body size of the second instar larva reached 13-18 mm. The prevalence ranged from 16.1 to 42.9% per year, and the mean intensity from 6 to 11 larvae per animal. Additionally, a total of 264 roe deer (does) were examined for H. diana larvae, and 77 (29.1%) were found to be positive; body size of the second instar larva reached 17 mm. The prevalence ranged from 18.8 to 50.0% per year, and the mean intensity from 13 to 22 larvae per animal. The results showed that the bot flies, Cephenemyia stimulator as well as H. diana, are common parasites in roe deer in the Czech Republic, and that through the help of treatment (ivermectin), it is possible to keep parasite levels low. The body weights of infected and non-infected H. diana deer did not differ significantly.

  13. The Role of “Vortical” Hot Towers in the Formation of Tropical Cyclone Diana (1984).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Eric A.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Davis, Christopher A.

    2004-06-01

    A high-resolution (3-km horizontal grid spacing) near-cloud-resolving numerical simulation of the formation of Hurricane Diana (1984) is used to examine the contribution of deep convective processes to tropical cyclone formation. This study is focused on the 3-km horizontal grid spacing simulation because this simulation was previously found to furnish an accurate forecast of the later stages of the observed storm life cycle. The numerical simulation reveals the presence of vortical hot towers, or cores of deep cumulonimbus convection possessing strong vertical vorticity, that arise from buoyancy-induced stretching of local absolute vertical vorticity in a vorticity-rich prehurricane environment.At near-cloud-resolving scales, these vortical hot towers are the preferred mode of convection. They are demonstrated to be the most important influence to the formation of the tropical storm via a two-stage evolutionary process: (i) preconditioning of the local environment via diabatic production of multiple small-scale lower-tropospheric cyclonic potential vorticity (PV) anomalies, and (ii) multiple mergers and axisymmetrization of these low-level PV anomalies. The local warm-core formation and tangential momentum spinup are shown to be dominated by the organizational process of the diabatically generated PV anomalies; the former process being accomplished by the strong vertical vorticity in the hot tower cores, which effectively traps the latent heat from moist convection. In addition to the organizational process of the PV anomalies, the cyclogenesis is enhanced by the aggregate diabatic heating associated with the vortical hot towers, which produces a net influx of low-level mean angular momentum throughout the genesis.Simpler models are examined to elucidate the underlying dynamics of tropical cyclogenesis in this case study. Using the Sawyer Eliassen balanced vortex model to diagnose the macroscale evolution, the cyclogenesis of Diana is demonstrated to proceed in

  14. Broadcasting the royal role: constructing culturally situated identities in the Princess Diana Panorama interview.

    PubMed

    Abell, J; Stokoe, E H

    2001-09-01

    We examine critically the two traditions of work that have informed discursive approaches to identity: social constructionism and conversation analysis. Within both strands, identity is theorized as a flexible phenomenon that is situated in conversations. But although constructionists locate identity within the social, such work remains at a theoretical and rather abstract level and often fails to interrogate the discursive practices through which identity is constituted. Conversely, this attention to the occasioning of identity in everyday talk is precisely the focus of the second, conversation analytic strand of work. Whereas constructionists attend to the wider cultural positioning of identities, conversation analysts resist commenting upon the social significance of what is constructed in interaction. Conversation analysis is therefore limited by its restricted notion of culture in the study of the situated social self. Despite the apparent conflict between these approaches, we suggest that a synthesis of the two provides a comprehensive framework for analysing identity. Drawing upon the BBC Panorama interview between Martin Bashir and Princess Diana, we explore how culturally situated identities are located in this conversational context. We conclude that analysts must not only attend to the micro-level organization of identities but also engage in a wider understanding of the cultural framework within which they are located.

  15. Condolence books: language and meaning in the mourning for Hillsborough and Diana.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article reports empirical research into public books of condolence signed following two key mourning events within British culture: the 1989 Hillsborough soccer stadium disaster and the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997. The author suggests that not only do condolence books provide valuable historical record of the way contemporary society mourns, but also that they reflect attempts to language loss in ways that can be used to evaluate the extent of society's engagement with death. In so doing, he points to ways in which condolence messages signed following these events oscillate between "conservative structures of meaning" (Marris, 1974) and contemporary "structures of feeling" (Williams, 1971). In turn he suggests that such distinctions--between public and private, modernity and tradition--are destabilized by the postmodern cultural forms that these events appeared to inaugurate. In addition, and in the purported absence of expressivist mourning rituals (Gorer, 1965), the author suggests that condolence books may provide a useful social platform for the social expression of grief.

  16. Diversity and morphological structure of bacterial communities inhabiting the Diana-Hygieia Thermal Spring (Budapest, Hungary).

    PubMed

    Anda, Dóra; Büki, Gabriella; Krett, Gergely; Makk, Judit; Márialigeti, Károly; Erőss, Anita; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    The Buda Thermal Karst System is an active hypogenic karst area that offers possibility for the analysis of biogenic cave formation. The aim of the present study was to gain information about morphological structure and genetic diversity of bacterial communities inhabiting the Diana-Hygieia Thermal Spring (DHTS). Using scanning electron microscopy, metal accumulating and unusual reticulated filaments were detected in large numbers in the DHTS biofilm samples. The phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were represented by both bacterial strains and molecular clones but phyla Acidobacteria, Chlorobi, Chlorofexi, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae and Thermotogae only by molecular clones which showed the highest similarity to uncultured clone sequences originating from different environmental sources. The biofilm bacterial community proved to be somewhat more diverse than that of the water sample and the distribution of the dominant bacterial clones was different between biofilm and water samples. The majority of biofilm clones was affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria and Nitrospirae while the largest group of water clones was related to Betaproteobacteria. Considering the metabolic properties of known species related to the strains and molecular clones from DHTS, it can be assumed that these bacterial communities may participate in the local sulphur and iron cycles, and contribute to biogenic cave formation.

  17. An account of the life and achievements of Miss Diana Beck, neurosurgeon (1902-1956).

    PubMed

    Gilkes, Catherine E

    2008-03-01

    DIANA BECK (1902-1956) WAS probably the first female neurosurgeon in the world and played a large part in establishing neurosurgery in the United Kingdom. She served as the consultant advisor in neurosurgery for the Emergency Medical Service in the southwest region during the Second World War and subsequently set up the neurosurgical unit at Frenchay Hospital in Bristol before becoming a consultant at The Middlesex Hospital in London in 1947. There, she was the first woman to be given charge of men in a consultant capacity in a major London teaching hospital. During her 31-year career, she was the only female neurosurgeon in Western Europe and the United States. Miss Beck came to the attention of the general public when she operated on Alan Alexander Milne in 1952. However, she was better known in neurosurgical circles for her interest in intracranial hemorrhage. In this article, some of her original research, case reports, and her seminal paper on the surgical treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage are presented. They are a stark reminder of the limited investigations available at that time. In addition to her neurosurgical achievements, Miss Beck was a remarkable character and teacher. Her Saturday ward rounds proved so popular that they competed successfully with the students' weekend plans. In a specialty in which women continue to represent a disproportionately small percentage of the workforce, Miss Beck was one of our earliest role models.

  18. Ancient parasites from endemic deer from "CUEVA PARQUE DIANA" archeological site, Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, María Ornela; Tietze, Eleonor; Pérez, Alberto Enrique; Bellusci, Agustín; Sardella, Norma Haydée

    2017-03-24

    The narrow Andean-Patagonian temperate rainforest strip in the west of southern South America is inhabited by two endemic species of cervids, the southern pudu (Pudu puda) and the huemul (Hippocamelus bisulcus), both cataloged as near threatened and threatened species, respectively. One of the possible causes of their declined number is the susceptibility to livestock diseases. Significant zooarchaeological records of both deer have been found throughout the Holocene from Patagonia. The present contribution reports the first paleoparasitological results obtained from coprolites of endemic deer from the archeological site "Cueva Parque Diana," Neuquén Province, Argentina, and discusses the possible diseases found in ancient times. Thirty-four coprolites were fully processed, rehydrated, homogenized, sieved, subjected to spontaneous sedimentation, and examined by light microscopy. Thirty samples contained parasite remains. The presence of diverse parasitic diseases such as trematodioses, metastrongylosis, trichuriosis, strongylida gastroenteritis, dioctophymosis, and coccidiosis which could cause diseases in deer previous to the arrival of European livestock and the presence of zoonotic diseases in the hunters-gatherers and fishermen are discussed.

  19. Habitat use analysis of Dian's tarsier (Tarsius dianae) in a mixed-species plantation in Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Merker, Stefan; Yustian, Indra

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the importance of mixed-species plantations as a potential habitat for small arboreal primates, we radio-tracked six Dian's tarsiers (Tarsius dianae) in such an area in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, and explored their selectivity for certain vegetation types. The animals strongly favored sporadic dense shrubbery over more open structures, yet they also utilized cash-crop cultivations for hunting insects. This paper documents the first habitat use analysis of tarsiers on agricultural land and exemplifies the vital role of mixed-species plantations in conserving wildlife when nearby forest is logged.

  20. DIANA: A multi-phase, multi-component hydrodynamic model for the analysis of severe accidents in heavy water reactors with multiple-tube assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A.M.

    1994-03-01

    A detailed hydrodynamic fuel relocation model has been developed for the analysis of severe accidents in Heavy Water Reactors with multiple-tube Assemblies. This model describes the Fuel Disruption and Relocation inside a nuclear fuel assembly and is designated by the acronym DIANA. DIANA solves the transient hydrodynamic equations for all the moving materials in the core and treats all the relevant flow regimes. The numerical solution techniques and some of the physical models included in DIANA have been developed taking advantage of the extensive experience accumulated in the development and validation of the LEVITATE (1) fuel relocation model of SAS4A [2, 3]. The model is designed to handle the fuel and cladding relocation in both voided and partially voided channels. It is able to treat a wide range of thermal/ hydraulic/neutronic conditions and the presence of various flow regimes at different axial locations within the same hydrodynamic channel.

  1. DIANA-TarBase v7.0: indexing more than half a million experimentally supported miRNA:mRNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Ioannis S; Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Kanellos, Ilias; Anastasopoulos, Ioannis-Laertis; Maniou, Sofia; Karathanou, Konstantina; Kalfakakou, Despina; Fevgas, Athanasios; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA species, which act as potent gene expression regulators. Accurate identification of miRNA targets is crucial to understanding their function. Currently, hundreds of thousands of miRNA:gene interactions have been experimentally identified. However, this wealth of information is fragmented and hidden in thousands of manuscripts and raw next-generation sequencing data sets. DIANA-TarBase was initially released in 2006 and it was the first database aiming to catalog published experimentally validated miRNA:gene interactions. DIANA-TarBase v7.0 (http://www.microrna.gr/tarbase) aims to provide for the first time hundreds of thousands of high-quality manually curated experimentally validated miRNA:gene interactions, enhanced with detailed meta-data. DIANA-TarBase v7.0 enables users to easily identify positive or negative experimental results, the utilized experimental methodology, experimental conditions including cell/tissue type and treatment. The new interface provides also advanced information ranging from the binding site location, as identified experimentally as well as in silico, to the primer sequences used for cloning experiments. More than half a million miRNA:gene interactions have been curated from published experiments on 356 different cell types from 24 species, corresponding to 9- to 250-fold more entries than any other relevant database. DIANA-TarBase v7.0 is freely available. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Community-based participatory research to improve life quality and clinical outcomes of patients with breast cancer (DianaWeb in Umbria pilot study)

    PubMed Central

    Villarini, Milena; Lanari, Chiara; Nucci, Daniele; Gianfredi, Vincenza; Marzulli, Tiziana; Berrino, Franco; Borgo, Alessandra; Bruno, Eleonora; Gargano, Giuliana; Moretti, Massimo; Villarini, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent cancer in Europe and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has estimated over 460 000 incident cases per year. Survival among patients with BC has increased in the past decades and EUROCARE-5 has estimated a 5-year relative survival rate of 82% for patients diagnosed in 2000–2007. There is growing evidence that lifestyle (such as a diet based on Mediterranean principles associated with moderate physical activity) may influence prognosis of BC; however, this information is not currently available to patients and is not considered in oncology protocols. Only a few epidemiological studies have investigated the role of diet in BC recurrence and metastasis. Methods and analysis DianaWeb is a community-based participatory research dedicated to patients with BC and represents a collaborative effort between participants and research institutions to determine if specified changes in lifestyle would result in improved outcomes in terms of quality of life or survival. The aim of the study is to recruit a large number of participants, to monitor their lifestyle and health status over time, to provide them tips to encourage sustainable lifestyle changes, to analyse clinical outcomes as a function of baseline risk factors and subsequent changes, and to share with patients methodologies and results. DianaWeb uses a specific interactive website (http://www.dianaweb.org/) and, with very few exceptions, all communications will be made through the web. In this paper we describe the pilot study, namely DianaWeb in Umbria. Ethics and dissemination DianaWeb does not interfere with prescribed oncological treatments; rather, it recommends that participants should follow the received prescriptions. The results will be used to plan guidelines for nutrition and physical activity for patients with BC. The pilot study was approved by the ethics committee of the University of Perugia (reference number 2015-002), and is

  3. DIANA-mirExTra v2.0: Uncovering microRNAs and transcription factors with crucial roles in NGS expression data

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Ioannis S.; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Paraskevopoulou, Maria D.; Lykokanellos, Filopoimin; Georgakilas, Georgios; Georgiou, Penny; Chatzopoulos, Serafeim; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Christodoulou, Foteini; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G.

    2016-01-01

    Differential expression analysis (DEA) is one of the main instruments utilized for revealing molecular mechanisms in pathological and physiological conditions. DIANA-mirExTra v2.0 (http://www.microrna.gr/mirextrav2) performs a combined DEA of mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) to uncover miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs) playing important regulatory roles between two investigated states. The web server uses as input miRNA/RNA-Seq read count data sets that can be uploaded for analysis. Users can combine their data with 350 small-RNA-Seq and 65 RNA-Seq in-house analyzed libraries which are provided by DIANA-mirExTra v2.0. The web server utilizes miRNA:mRNA, TF:mRNA and TF:miRNA interactions derived from extensive experimental data sets. More than 450 000 miRNA interactions and 2 000 000 TF binding sites from specific or high-throughput techniques have been incorporated, while accurate miRNA TSS annotation is obtained from microTSS experimental/in silico framework. These comprehensive data sets enable users to perform analyses based solely on experimentally supported information and to uncover central regulators within sequencing data: miRNAs controlling mRNAs and TFs regulating mRNA or miRNA expression. The server also supports predicted miRNA:gene interactions from DIANA-microT-CDS for 4 species (human, mouse, nematode and fruit fly). DIANA-mirExTra v2.0 has an intuitive user interface and is freely available to all users without any login requirement. PMID:27207881

  4. First paleoparasitological record of digenean eggs from a native deer from Patagonia Argentina (Cueva Parque Diana archaeological site).

    PubMed

    María Ornela, Beltrame; Eleonor, Tietze; Alberto Enrique, Pérez; Norma Haydeé, Sardella

    2017-02-15

    Eggs representative of a digenean species were found in coprolites belonged to an endemic deer from Patagonia. Samples were collected from the archaeological site named "Cueva Parque Diana". This site is a cave located at the Lanín National Park, Neuquén Province, Argentina. The coprolites were dated from 2370±70 to 580±60 years B.P. The eggs were ellipsoidal, operculated, yellowish and thin-shelled. Measurements (n=65) ranged from 120.0 to 142.5 (133.2±6.53) μm long and 62.5 to 87.5 (72.6±6.15) μm wide. Eggs were well-preserved and were identified as belonged to Class Trematoda, Subclass Digenea, similar to those of Fasciola hepatica or with another species not identified at present from Patagonia. This is the first report of digenean eggs from ancient deer worldwide. The present study confirms the presence of representatives of digenean species in endemic deer from Patagonia in ancient times and the presence of a trematode disease prior to the arrival of European cattle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The MADS domain protein DIANA acts together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to specify the central cell in Arabidopsis ovules.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C

    2008-08-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein-beta-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt.

  6. DianaHealth.com, an On-Line Database Containing Appraisals of the Clinical Value and Appropriateness of Healthcare Interventions: Database Development and Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bonfill, Xavier; Osorio, Dimelza; Solà, Ivan; Pijoan, Jose Ignacio; Balasso, Valentina; Quintana, Maria Jesús; Puig, Teresa; Bolibar, Ignasi; Urrútia, Gerard; Zamora, Javier; Emparanza, José Ignacio; Gómez de la Cámara, Agustín; Ferreira-González, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of a novel on-line database aimed to serve as a source of information concerning healthcare interventions appraised for their clinical value and appropriateness by several initiatives worldwide, and to present a retrospective analysis of the appraisals already included in the database. Methods and Findings Database development and a retrospective analysis. The database DianaHealth.com is already on-line and it is regularly updated, independent, open access and available in English and Spanish. Initiatives are identified in medical news, in article references, and by contacting experts in the field. We include appraisals in the form of clinical recommendations, expert analyses, conclusions from systematic reviews, and original research that label any health care intervention as low-value or inappropriate. We obtain the information necessary to classify the appraisals according to type of intervention, specialties involved, publication year, authoring initiative, and key words. The database is accessible through a search engine which retrieves a list of appraisals and a link to the website where they were published. DianaHealth.com also provides a brief description of the initiatives and a section where users can report new appraisals or suggest new initiatives. From January 2014 to July 2015, the on-line database included 2940 appraisals from 22 initiatives: eleven campaigns gathering clinical recommendations from scientific societies, five sets of conclusions from literature review, three sets of recommendations from guidelines, two collections of articles on low clinical value in medical journals, and an initiative of our own. Conclusions We have developed an open access on-line database of appraisals about healthcare interventions considered of low clinical value or inappropriate. DianaHealth.com could help physicians and other stakeholders make better decisions concerning patient care and healthcare systems sustainability

  7. DianaHealth.com, an On-Line Database Containing Appraisals of the Clinical Value and Appropriateness of Healthcare Interventions: Database Development and Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonfill, Xavier; Osorio, Dimelza; Solà, Ivan; Pijoan, Jose Ignacio; Balasso, Valentina; Quintana, Maria Jesús; Puig, Teresa; Bolibar, Ignasi; Urrútia, Gerard; Zamora, Javier; Emparanza, José Ignacio; Gómez de la Cámara, Agustín; Ferreira-González, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    To describe the development of a novel on-line database aimed to serve as a source of information concerning healthcare interventions appraised for their clinical value and appropriateness by several initiatives worldwide, and to present a retrospective analysis of the appraisals already included in the database. Database development and a retrospective analysis. The database DianaHealth.com is already on-line and it is regularly updated, independent, open access and available in English and Spanish. Initiatives are identified in medical news, in article references, and by contacting experts in the field. We include appraisals in the form of clinical recommendations, expert analyses, conclusions from systematic reviews, and original research that label any health care intervention as low-value or inappropriate. We obtain the information necessary to classify the appraisals according to type of intervention, specialties involved, publication year, authoring initiative, and key words. The database is accessible through a search engine which retrieves a list of appraisals and a link to the website where they were published. DianaHealth.com also provides a brief description of the initiatives and a section where users can report new appraisals or suggest new initiatives. From January 2014 to July 2015, the on-line database included 2940 appraisals from 22 initiatives: eleven campaigns gathering clinical recommendations from scientific societies, five sets of conclusions from literature review, three sets of recommendations from guidelines, two collections of articles on low clinical value in medical journals, and an initiative of our own. We have developed an open access on-line database of appraisals about healthcare interventions considered of low clinical value or inappropriate. DianaHealth.com could help physicians and other stakeholders make better decisions concerning patient care and healthcare systems sustainability. Future efforts should be focused on

  8. Exercise training improves cardiopulmonary and endothelial function in women with breast cancer: findings from the Diana-5 dietary intervention study.

    PubMed

    Giallauria, Francesco; Vitelli, Alessandra; Maresca, Luigi; Santucci De Magistris, Maria; Chiodini, Paolo; Mattiello, Amalia; Gentile, Marco; Mancini, Maria; Grieco, Alessandra; Russo, Angelo; Lucci, Rosa; Torella, Giorgio; Berrino, Franco; Panico, Salvatore; Vigorito, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether exercise training (ET) improves cardiopulmonary and endothelial function in women with breast cancer (BC). Fifty-one female patients (aged between 39 and 72 years) with a history of primary invasive BC within the previous 5 years and enrolled in the Mediterranean diet-based DIANA (diet and androgens)-5 Trial were subdivided into 2 groups: an ET group (n = 25) followed a formal ET program of moderate intensity (3 session/week on a bicycle at 60-70 % VO2peak for 3 months, followed by one session/week until 1-year follow-up), while a control group (n = 26) did not perform any formal ET. At baseline and at 1-year follow-up, all patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise stress test (CPET) and measurements of vascular endothelial function by peripheral artery tonometry (Reactive Hyperemia Index, RHI). There were no significant differences between the groups in baseline anthropometrical, BC characteristics, and metabolic profile. No differences in baseline CPET and RHI parameters were found. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) significantly increased in ET group (from 12.4 ± 2.9 to 14.3 ± 3.3 mL/kg/min, p < 0.001) compared to the control group (from 12.8 ± 2.5 to 12.6 ± 2.8 mL/kg/min, p = 0.55; p < 0.001 between groups). Compared to the control group (from 2.0 ± 0.4 to 1.9 ± 0.4, p = 0.62), the ET group showed a significant improvement of RHI after 1 year (from 2.1 ± 0.7 to 2.5 ± 0.8, p < 0.001). Changes in VO2peak were correlated with changes in RHI (ΔVO2peak vs. ΔRHI: r = 0.47, p = 0.017). In BC survivors, ET program improves cardiopulmonary functional capacity and vascular endothelial function after 12 months. Whether these changes may favorably modulate some of the pathophysiological mechanisms implied in cancer evolution should be investigated.

  9. Operational use of environmental satellite remote sensing and satellite communications technology for global food security and locust control by FAO: The ARTEMIS and DIANA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielkema, J. U.; Snijders, F. L.

    implementing during 1989-1992 a dedicated satellite communications system, DIANA (Direct Information Access Network for Africa), which allows real-time transmission of high volume ARTEMIS digital products to user terminals in Nairobi, Kenya: Accra, Ghana and Harare, Zimbabwe. The DIANA system, which operates through the Intelsat satellite over the Indian Ocean and the italian Intelsat groundstation of Telespazio in Fucino, is currently being tested and demonstrated for a wide variety of applications of an operational, technical and administrative nature.

  10. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics in the southern part of the Rancho Diana Natural Area, northern Bexar County, Texas, 2008-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Morris, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    The area designated by the city of San Antonio as the Rancho Diana Natural Area is in northern Bexar County, near San Antonio, Texas. During 2008-10, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of San Antonio, documented the geologic framework and mapped the hydrogeologic characteristics for the southern part of the Rancho Diana Natural Area. The geologic framework of the study area and its hydrogeologic characteristics were documented using field observations and information from previously published reports. Many of the geologic and hydrogeologic features were found by making field observations through the dense vegetation along gridlines spaced approximately 25 feet apart and documenting the features as they were located. Surface geologic features were identified and hydrogeologic features such as caves, sinkholes, and areas of solutionally enlarged porosity were located using hand-held Global Positioning System units. The location data were used to create a map of the hydrogeologic subdivisions and the location of karst features. The outcrops of the Edwards and Trinity aquifer recharge zones were mapped by using hydrogeologic subdivisions modified from previous reports. All rocks exposed within the study area are of sedimentary origin and Lower Cretaceous in age. The valley floor is formed in the cavernous member of the upper Glen Rose Limestone of the Trinity Group. The hills are composed of the basal nodular member, dolomitic member, Kirschberg evaporite member, and grainstone member of the Kainer Formation of the Edwards Group. Field observations made during this study of the exposed formations and members indicate that the formations and members typically are composed of mudstones, wackestones, packstones, grainstones, and argillaceous limestones, along with marls. The upper Glen Rose Limestone is approximately 410 to 450 feet thick but only the upper 70 feet is exposed in the study area. The Kainer Formation is approximately 255 feet thick in

  11. The MADS Domain Protein DIANA Acts Together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to Specify the Central Cell in Arabidopsis Ovules[W

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2008-01-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein–β-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt. PMID:18713950

  12. [Opinion from physicians on the need for dyslipidemia screening in cardiovascular risk. Similarities and differences between primary care and other specialties. The DIANA study].

    PubMed

    Serrano, Adalberto; Pascual, Vicente

    2016-08-16

    The clinical inertia in the screening and treatment of patients at high or very high cardiovascular risk leads to the failure to achieve LDLc targets in this population. The aim of the DIANA study was to determine the opinion of doctors about the screening for dyslipidaemia, the usual practice, and the differences between Primary Care physicians and other specialties. A questionnaire, using the modified Delphi method, included four blocks on dyslipidemic patients with impaired glucose metabolism. Of the 497 participating experts, 58% were Primary Care physicians. There was agreement on the need for dyslipidemia screening in patients with diabetes, ischaemic heart disease or hypertension, although to a lesser extent among Primary Care physicians. Greater significant differences were found in situations such as pre-diabetes or family history of premature cardiovascular disease (86.2% and 88.6% in Primary Care physicians versus 96.1% and 97.6% in other specialties, respectively). There was no agreement on the need for screening in the presence of xanthomas, xanthelasmas or corneal arcus in people under the age of 45 years, with statistically significant differences in the latter. Dyslipidaemia screening is mainly performed on patients with cardiovascular disease or any major cardiovascular risk factor, and cutaneous lesions of familial hypercholesterolaemia are underestimated. The need for accurate screening and treatment of dyslipidemia in subjects at high cardiovascular risk must be stressed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of environmental parameters in the biocolonization of the Mithraeum in the roman masonry of casa di Diana (Ostia Antica, Italy).

    PubMed

    Scatigno, C; Moricca, C; Tortolini, C; Favero, G

    2016-07-01

    The microclimatic parameters (Ta, RH, E, and CO2) reflect the indoor quality of the environment. Their relationship, connected with the design of the building, can facilitate the growth of photo/heterotrophic organisms and therefore facilitate the increase of the relative CO2 production. Taking this into account, the impact of biological proliferation in a historical building is discussed for the Mithraeum of "Casa di Diana" in the archaeological site of Ostia Antica, which is subjected to guided tours. In this work, for the first time, we propose a study on biological monitoring to evaluate the contribution of bioactivity to air quality, with the objective to increase the comfort of visitors and to open the site for more than one day per week, suggesting possible tools providing a good compromise between building conservation and human comfort. In the sense, it has been possible to distinguish the contribution of the plants from the one deriving from humans: high values of carbon dioxide have been recorded during the night and its scarce removal during the day (air flow). The window present is not sufficient to eliminate the CO2, involving concentrations of CO2 relatively high in comparison to the proposed limits and guidelines defined by law. The obtained results strongly encouraged the elimination of flora in order to increase the comfort of visitors and to open the house for more than one day per week. Although, this process involves an important economic effort, the present study allows making an objective decision which has an important value in a cultural heritage management. Graphical Abstract CO2 contribute by bioactivity as damage to human health.

  14. First detection of Echinococcus multilocularis infection in two species of nonhuman primates raised in a zoo: a fatal case in Cercopithecus diana and a strongly suspected case of spontaneous recovery in Macaca nigra.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Kimiaki; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Uraguchi, Kohji; Mukai, Takeshi; Shibata, Chikako; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Takaesu, Noboru; Ito, Masaki; Makino, Yoshinori; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi; Yagi, Kinpei

    2014-08-01

    The causative parasite of alveolar echinococcosis, Echinococcus multilocularis, maintains its life cycle between red foxes (Vulpes vulples, the definitive hosts) and voles (the intermediate hosts) in Hokkaido, Japan. Primates, including humans, and some other mammal species can be infected by the accidental ingestion of eggs in the feces of red foxes. In August 2011, a 6-year-old zoo-raised female Diana monkey (Cercopithecus diana) died from alveolar echinococcosis. E. multilocularis infection was confirmed by histopathological examination and detection of the E. multilocularis DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A field survey in the zoo showed that fox intrusion was common, and serodiagnosis of various nonhuman primates using western blotting detected a case of a 14-year-old female Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra) that was weakly positive for E. multilocularis. Computed tomography revealed only one small calcified lesion (approximately 8mm) in the macaque's liver, and both western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed a gradual decline of antibody titer. These findings strongly suggest that the animal had recovered spontaneously. Until this study, spontaneous recovery from E. multilocularis infection in a nonhuman primate had never been reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diana Reference Manual. Revision 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-28

    Lterale - yno 2.3 - not of Interest for Diane 10 :.a OEF-10I I USMD....D OP : : x OEP..OP I USMDOP; DEI 3NATOR : :z 10 1 Or; OEPOCCJRRENC :: EP_ID I... Ideferred constant; -deterred constant~declaraton (7.4) DCI pragma; -pregmea lowe as declaration ADA Section 2. 3 Page 34 / teCtIOfl 2 otAIA Rteference...osat -see rationale Section 3.5.2.14 csao fdeerdcosat const-id I X -Srcpoe : ort..positiofl. Ix...commelnfts comments. Ix-sym rep :symbol rep; cosstd

  16. Diana's Eulogy: Breaking New Ground in Epideictic Rhetoric?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, David K.

    A speech in response to an individual's death is by nature a recurring form of rhetoric. Based on audience expectations and needs, certain generic aspects have emerged to characterize eulogies. The funeral oration has generally been recognized as a form of epideictic rhetoric. Modern scholars have generally broadly defined epideictic rhetoric to…

  17. [Significance and progress of DIAN/A4/API].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    The DIAN observational study compared the pathophysiological markers between mutation carriers and non-carriers for autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease. It has revealed the biomarker changes in the mutation carrier's brain started as early as 20, even 25 years prior to symptoms. The researchers of DIAN started the prevention trial(DIAN-TU) with two monoclonal antibodies. The API study is the clinical trial of the anti-amyloid monoclonal antibody therapy to the kindred of early onset familial AD (EOAD) who carry the PSEN1 E280A mutation. This study has also shown the same biomarker changes that were reported in the DIAN study. Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic AD (A4) is a prevention trial aimed at treating cognitive normal older individuals at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease dementia on the basis of having biomarker evidence of amyloid (pre-clinical AD). Solanezumab was selected for the anti-amyloid treatment for A4.

  18. [Delphi consensus on management of dyslipidaemia in patients with impaired glucose metabolism: Diana study].

    PubMed

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Barrios, Vivencio; Pascual, Vicente; Ascaso, Juan F; Cases, Aleix; Millán, Jesús; Serrano, Adalberto; Pintó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a multidisciplinary consensus based on the Delphi system to establish clinical recommendations for the management of dyslipidaemia when hyperglycaemia is present, and the relevant factors that should be taken into consideration when prescribing and monitoring treatment with statins. The questionnaire developed by the scientific committee included four blocks of questions about dyslipidaemia in patients with impaired glucose metabolism. The results of the first two blocks are presented here: a) management of dyslipidaemia; b) relevant factors that should be taken into consideration when prescribing and monitoring treatment with statins. Among the 497 experts who participated in the study, an agreement of over 90% was attained for recommending screening for dyslipidaemia in patients with diabetes or pre-diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease or a family history and/or abdominal obesity and/or hypertension. There was a high degree of agreement that a statin is the lipid-lowering treatment of choice, and that it should be switched when side effects develop. Also, the choice of statin and dose should be made according to baseline LDL cholesterol levels, the target to achieve, and the possible drug-drug interactions. The screening of dyslipidaemia is primarily conducted in patients with cardiovascular disease, or any major cardiovascular risk factor. When prescribing a statin, physicians mainly focus on the ability to reduce LDL cholesterol and the risk of drug interactions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Seeking a "Mexicana/Mestiza" Critical Feminist Ethic of Care: Diana's "Revolución" of Body and Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa-Provencio, Mia Angélica

    2016-01-01

    This Chicana Critical Feminist Testimonio reveals a Mexican/Mexican-American Ethic of Care and Testimonios of struggle and survival informing curriculum and pedagogy of one Mexican/Mexican-American female educator of predominantly Mexican/Mexican-American students. This work is part of a larger ethnographic study conducted through multiple…

  20. Seeking a "Mexicana/Mestiza" Critical Feminist Ethic of Care: Diana's "Revolución" of Body and Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa-Provencio, Mia Angélica

    2016-01-01

    This Chicana Critical Feminist Testimonio reveals a Mexican/Mexican-American Ethic of Care and Testimonios of struggle and survival informing curriculum and pedagogy of one Mexican/Mexican-American female educator of predominantly Mexican/Mexican-American students. This work is part of a larger ethnographic study conducted through multiple…

  1. An Investigation of School Psychology Training Pertaining to Bilingual Psycho-Educational Assessment of Primarily Hispanic Students: Twenty-five Years after Diana v. California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochoa, Salvador Hector; Rivera, Bernadette; Ford, Laurie

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 1,507 school psychologists found that those who conduct bilingual psycho-educational assessment do not believe that they have received adequate training. Respondents identified only one program as having provided adequate training in all competencies identified. Indicates that the amount of training provided by the programs does not…

  2. Operations MANDREL and GROMMET Events MINUTE STEAK, DIESEL TRAIN, DIANA MIST, MINT LEAF, HUDSON MOON, DIAGONAL LINE, and MISTY NORTH, 12 September 1969 to 2 May 1972

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-30

    remainder were United States Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)*, other government agency, and other contractor personnel. The average gamma radiation ...exposure per entry for all par- ticipants was 20 mR. The average gamma radiation exposure per entry for DOD-affiliated participants was 27 mR. The...implemented. Radsafe survey teams, when released by the Test Controller, were to survey the test area in sufficient detail to plot gamma radiation

  3. Operations CROSSTIE and BOWLINE Events DOOR MIST, DORSAL FIN, MILK SHAKE, DIANA MOON, HUDSON SEAL, and MING VASE, 31 August 1967 - 20 November 1968

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-15

    radiation exposure per entry for all par- ticipants was 16 mR. The average gamma radiation exposure per entry for DOD-affiliated participants was 33 mR... gamma radiation at contact vity. Vehicles and equipment normally 59 were decontaminated by vacuuming and steam cleaning with water or detergent...RAMS was the RAMP-4. The RAMP-4 was a multi-channel, hardwire- linked, remote area gamma radiation monitoring (tele- metry) system, designed and

  4. Delphi consensus on the diagnosis and management of dyslipidaemia in chronic kidney disease patients: A post hoc analysis of the DIANA study.

    PubMed

    Cases Amenós, Aleix; Pedro-Botet Montoya, Juan; Pascual Fuster, Vicente; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Pintó Sala, Xavier; Ascaso Gimilio, Juan F; Millán Nuñez-Cortés, Jesús; Serrano Cumplido, Adalberto

    This post hoc study analysed the perception of the relevance of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dyslipidaemia screening and the choice of statin among primary care physicians (PCPs) and other specialists through a Delphi questionnaire. The questionnaire included 4blocks of questions concerning dyslipidaemic patients with impaired carbohydrate metabolism. This study presents the results of the impact of CKD on screening and the choice of statin. Of the 497 experts included, 58% were PCPs and 42% were specialists (35, 7% were nephrologists). There was consensus by both PCPs and specialists, with no difference between PCPs and specialists, that CKD patients should undergo a dyslipidaemia screening and that the screening should be part of routine clinical practice. However, there was no consensus in considering the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (although there was consensus among PCPs and nephrologists), or considering albuminuria when selecting a statin, or in determining albuminuria during follow-up after having initiated treatment with statins (although there was consensus among the nephrologists). The consensus to analyse the lipid profile in CKD patients suggests acknowledgment of the high cardiovascular risk of this condition. However, the lack of consensus in considering renal function or albuminuria, both when selecting a statin and during follow-up, suggests a limited knowledge of the differences between statins in relation to CKD. Thus, it would be advisable to develop a guideline/consensus document on the use of statins in CKD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrological processes controlling ground and surface water flow from a hypermaritime forest-peatland complex, Diana Lake Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emili, Lisa A.; Price, Jonathan S.

    2006-08-01

    The proposed harvesting of previously undeveloped forests in north coastal British Columbia requires an understanding of hydrological responses. Hydrometric and isotopic techniques were used to examine the hydrological linkages between meteoric inputs to the surface-groundwater system and runoff response patterns of a forest-peatland complex. Quickflow accounted for 72-91% of peak storm discharge. The runoff ratio was lowest for open peatland areas with thick organic horizons (0.02-0.05) due to low topographic gradients and many surface depressions capable of retaining surface water. Runoff ratio increased comparatively for ephemeral surface seep flows (0.06-0.40) and was greatest in steeply sloping forest communities with more permeable soils (0.33-0.69). The dominant mechanism for runoff generation was saturated shallow subsurface flow. Groundwater fluxes from the organic horizon of seeps (1.70-1.72 m3 day-1 m-1) were an important component of quickflow. The homogeneous 2H18O composition of groundwater indicated attenuation of the seasonal rainfall signal by mixing during recharge. The positive correlation (r2 = 0.64 and 0.38, α = 0.05) between slope index and δ18O values in groundwater suggests that the spatial pattern in the δ18O composition along the forest-peatland complex is influenced by topography and provides evidence that topographic indices may be used to predict groundwater residence time.

  6. 77 FR 36994 - Questa Ranger District, Carson National Forest; Taos County, NM; Taos Ski Valley's 2010 Master...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... Supervisor Diana Trujillo, Carson National Forest. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Carson National Forest... can be reached at 575-758-6200. Dated: June 13, 2012. Diana M. Trujillo, Acting Carson National...

  7. [Botfly larva skin infestation in a donkey].

    PubMed

    Schumann, H; Schuster, R; Ruscher, H J

    1988-11-01

    In January 1987 7 larvae of Hypoderma diana were found in a donkey. The infection probably took place on a horse pasture in Fürstenwalde, Frankfurt (O.) region, grazed also by roes, the main hosts of H. diana.

  8. 76 FR 60836 - Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ..., Officers: Diana Espinal Acevedo, Vice President/ Secretary (Qualifying Individual), Aleido J. Cabrera..., President (Qualifying Individual), Daniel Freire, Controller, Application Type: New NVO & OFF License...

  9. Air and Space Museum Apollo 40th Celebration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Jazz pianist and singer Diana Krall performs at the Apollo 40th anniversary celebration held at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. Diana Krall talked about her love of space flight and showed off her temporary tattoo that honors Canadian Astronaut Bob Thirsk who is currently onboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  10. Air and Space Museum Apollo 40th Celebration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Jazz pianist and singer Diana Krall performs at the Apollo 40th anniversary celebration held at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. Diana Krall talked about her love of space flight and showed off her temporary tattoo that honors Canadian Astronaut Bob Thirsk who is currently onboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Helmet-Mounted Displays: Sensation, Perception and Cognition Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Command Wilton, UK Diana C. Emanuel, Professor Department of Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology and Deaf Studies Towson University 8000 York...230 Part Three: The Human Visual and Auditory Sensory Systems Chapter 6 Basic Anatomy and Physiology of the...Chapter 8 Basic Anatomy of the Hearing System .................................................................. 279 Sumalai Maroonroge, Diana C

  12. Approaches to Research Priorities for Policy: A Comparative Study. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Diana Wilkinson, Chief Social Researcher with the Scottish Government, assisted National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) to facilitate a forum to discuss the development of national research priorities for the vocational education and training sector. This paper summarises Diana Wilkinson's impression of the forum and uses two…

  13. Cheek pouch use in relation to interspecific competition and predator risk for three guenon monkeys (Cercopithecus spp.).

    PubMed

    Buzzard, Paul J

    2006-10-01

    Forest guenons (Cercopithecus spp.) are often found in polyspecific associations that may decrease predator risk while increasing interspecific competition for food. Cheek pouch use may mitigate interspecific competition and predator risk by reducing the time spent in areas of high competition/predator risk. I investigated these ideas in three forest guenons: Campbell's monkey (Cercopithecus campbelli), spot-nosed monkey (C. petaurista), and Diana monkey (C. diana). I present 13 months of scan sample data from Taï Forest, Côte d'Ivoire, including 3,675, 3,330, and 5,689 records of cheek pouch distention, to quantify cheek pouch use, for Campbell's, spot-nosed, and Diana monkeys, respectively. Cheek pouches are often used to hold fruit, so I first predicted that the most frugivorous species, Diana monkeys, would have the most cheek pouch distension. Spot-nosed monkeys ate the least amount of fruit over the study period and had the least distended cheek pouches, suggesting the importance of frugivory in relation to cheek pouch distension for this species. This was not a sufficient explanation for Campbell's monkeys; Campbell's ate fruit less than Diana monkeys, but had more distended cheek pouches, suggesting that cheek pouch use was not simply a reflection of high frugivory. From the interspecific competition hypothesis, I predicted that Campbell's monkeys would have more distended cheek pouches than Diana and spot-nosed monkeys, and more distended cheek pouches when associated with Diana because Campbell's monkeys have the highest potential for interspecific competition with dominant Diana monkeys. From the predator risk hypothesis, I predicted that Campbell's would have more distended cheek pouches when not associated with highly vigilant Diana monkeys. Campbell's monkeys had the most distended cheek pouches overall, but had more distended cheek pouches when not in association with Diana, suggesting the greater importance of predator risk rather than

  14. Interactive energy atlas for Colorado and New Mexico: an online resource for decisionmakers and the public

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, N.B.; Babel, N.; Diffendorfer, J.; Ignizio, D.; Hawkins, S.; Latysh, N.; Leib, K.; Linard, J.; Matherne, A.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the western United States, increased demand for energy is driving the rapid development of oil, gas (including shale gas and coal-bed methane), and uranium, as well as renewable energy resources such as geothermal, solar, and wind. Much of the development in the West is occurring on public lands, including those under Federal and State jurisdictions. In Colorado and New Mexico, these public lands make up about 40 percent of the land area. Both states benefit from the revenue generated by energy production, but resource managers and other decisionmakers must balance the benefits of energy development with the potential consequences for ecosystems, recreation, and other resources. Although a substantial amount of geospatial data on existing energy development and energy potential is available, much of this information is not readily accessible to natural resource decisionmakers, policymakers, or the public. Furthermore, the data often exist in varied formats, requiring considerable processing before these datasets can be used to evaluate tradeoffs among resources, compare development alternatives, or quantify cumulative impacts. To allow for a comprehensive evaluation among different energy types, an interdisciplinary team of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists has developed an online Interactive Energy Atlas for Colorado and New Mexico. The Energy and Environment in the Rocky Mountain Area (EERMA) interdisciplinary team includes investigators from several USGS science centers1. The purpose of the EERMA Interactive Energy Atlas is to facilitate access to geospatial data related to energy resources, energy infrastructure, and natural resources that may be affected by energy development. The Atlas is designed to meet the needs of various users, including GIS analysts, resource managers, policymakers, and the public, who seek information about energy in the western United States. Currently, the Atlas has two primary capabilities, a GIS data viewer and an

  15. Health Tip: Know Your Risk for Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... 166114.html Health Tip: Know Your Risk for Obesity Here's what makes it more likely To use ... Diana Kohnle Wednesday, May 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is linked to an increased risk for heart ...

  16. 78 FR 70088 - Advisory Committee on Veterans Business Affairs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... regarding our veterans' resources and partners, please visit our Web site at www.sba.gov/vets . FOR FURTHER... at www.sba.gov/vets . Dated: November 14, 2013 Diana Doukas, SBA Committee Management Officer...

  17. Investigating the Causes of Chronic Itch: New Advances Could Bring Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... of chili peppers that produces the burning sensation. Credit: Diana Bautista, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. ... cells in mouse skin, triggers the itch sensation. Credit: Zhou-Feng Chen, Ph.D., Washington University in ...

  18. Reliability of Multiple Component Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-15

    Armament Command Rock Island, Illinois 61201 William S. Agee White Sands Missile Range White Sands, New Mexico 88002 Dr. Roger Brauer ...Diana L. Frederich Frankford Arsenal Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19137 Dr. Fred Frishman USA Research Office Duiham, North Carolina 27706

  19. 76 FR 24030 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Funding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... for More Information: Diana Bartlett, M.P.H., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop D-72, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, Telephone: (404) 639-4938. The Director, Management Analysis...

  20. Region 3: Virginia Adequate VA Letter (2/22/2013)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter from Diana Esher, Director, Air Protection Division, U.S. EPA to David K. Director, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, regarding adequacy findings for the motor vehicle emissions budgets contingency plan for the metropolitan Washignton DC

  1. Region 3: Maryland Adequate MD Letter (2/22/2013)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter from Diana Esher, Director, Air Protection Division, U.S. EPA to Robert Summers, Secretary Maryland Department of the Environment regarding adequacy findings for the motor vehicle emissions budgets contingency plan for the metropolitan Washignton,DC

  2. Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis from Volunteer Observatory December 2006 to April 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleenor, Michael L.

    2007-09-01

    Lightcurve period and amplitude results for eight asteroids observed at Volunteer Observatory during December 2006 to April 2007 are reported: 78 Diana, 623 Chimaera, 888 Parysatis, 1502 Arenda, 1602 Indiana, 3497 Innanen, 4374 Tadamori, and (34777) 2001RH.

  3. Van Gogh and lithium. Creativity and bipolar disorder: perspective of a writer/photographer.

    PubMed

    Dennison, D

    1999-12-01

    Diana Dennison has suffered from manic depression since her teenage years in the 1960s but only realised that she had the condition when, in her 30s, she learnt that her uncle was manic depressive. Diana endured her low states with either no medication or with what was for her the unsatisfactory effect of tricyclic antidepressants. Her untreated hypomanic states cut a swathe through her life. She has never been hospitalised for her condition. Her marriage did not survive but her daughters did and she is now a proud and doting grandmother who skis and scuba dives. Only in the last 4 years did Diana seek help for the treatment of her condition. Diana is a free-lance writer, researcher and photographer.

  4. Reducing Insecurity in Africa: Roles and Responsibilities of the U.S. Military, U.S. Government and Non-Governmental Communities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Participants and Objectives In this panel Diana B. Putman , United States Africa Command, presented on implementing quasi-developmental programs in...was Diana Putman , a senior USAID official who had headed the Humanitarian Assistance branch at AFRICOM for several years (following her assignment at...AFRICOM, Putman became the head of USAID in the DRC). Putman argued that while many of AFRICOM’s programs have been successful, there remain many

  5. The USAF Manufacturing Technology: Program Status Report. Spring 1997.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    modernization, also sat on the Technical Track Highlights panel. More than 70 government and industry exhib- Diana Carlin moderated a session on Composites...MT’s For more information or to register, contact IBP programs have made major strides in Tracy Tapia at Universal Technology Corporation, transitioning...Corporation Diana Carlin Preferred Spares (MATCOPS) El Segundo, CA (937) 255-7277 F33615-91-C-5717 March 1997 Design and Manufacture of Low Cost Boeing Company

  6. [The height target prediction by the Tanner method infra evaluates the final height in youths from the rural area of South East Spain].

    PubMed

    Ríos, Rafael; Bosch, Vicente; Santonja, Fernando; López, José Manuel; Garaulet, Marta

    2014-10-16

    Introducción: Conocer la talla final de un individuo antes de finalizar el crecimiento presenta utilidad clínica para el seguimiento de la salud infantil. Objetivo: Calcular la talla diana de una población rural del sudeste de España y comparar con la talla final alcanzada. Métodos: Fueron incluidos 50 jóvenes de 18 a 22 años (44% hombres) y 100 progenitores. La selección de los jóvenes se realizó en 2 fases: 1. Estudio retrospectivo a partir de historias clínicas. 2. Estudio prospectivo: reclutamiento y determinaciones antropométricas. Se calculó talla diana y el desvío de talla. Resultados: La talla final de los chicos fue de 4,44 cm superior a la talla diana (p.

  7. Sofia Ionescu, the first woman neurosurgeon in the world.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Alexandru-Vlad; Moisa, Horatiu Alexandru; Mohan, Dumitru

    2013-11-01

    The authors present the activity of Mrs. Sofia Ionescu, the one female surgeon who was nominated as the first woman neurosurgeon in the world. Sofia Ionescu worked in the field of neurosurgery for 47 years, performing all the known neurosurgical procedures of the time. She made herself known through her incredible surgical skill and her enormous work power. Due to her incredible modesty and workload, she never participated at international congresses or manifestations. The nomination as first woman neurosurgery took place in Marrakech, Morocco, during the 2005 WFNS Congress. Although some claim that Diana Beck was the first woman neurosurgeon in the world, our theory suggests otherwise. The first documented surgical intervention performed by Diana Beck dates to 1952. Sofia Ionescu operated for the first time on a human brain as early as 1944. Furthermore, Diana Beck's actions surfaced in the year 1947, long after the war had ended and Sofia Ionescu had become a neurosurgeon. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. "The black and white of it": Barbara Grier editing and publishing women of color.

    PubMed

    Enszer, Julie R

    2014-01-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s, lesbian-feminist writing and publishing expressed new theoretical insights about race and envisioned new, intersectional identities. Using texts published and edited by Grier in The Ladder and subsequent Ladder anthologies published by Diana Press, archival documents from Diana Press, and the Grier-Naiad Press papers, this article explores Grier's editorial practices and compares Grier's work to other lesbian-feminist editors and publishers to illuminate different generational understandings of racial-ethnic and class formations within lesbianism and feminism and highlight some of the strategies that White publishers like Grier utilized to realize a vision of multicultural publishing.

  9. A Literature Survey of Reverberation Modeling: With Emphasis on Bellhop Compatibility for Operational Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    necessarily have the approval or endorsement of Defence R&D Canada. Contract Project Manager: Diana McCammon, 902-538-3003 Contract number: W7707...McCammon Acoustical Consulting 475 Baseline Road Waterville, NS B0P 1V0 Contract Project Manager: Diana McCammon, 902-538-3003 Contract Number...in some cases, the scattering area. Some of the older models of reverberation are the Generic Sonar Model (GSM), Cass/Grab, BiRasp, and ASTRAL . A

  10. Evaluation Strategies and Techniques for Public Library Children's Services: A Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Jane; And Others

    The 28 papers in this sourcebook relate to the evaluation of children's services in public libraries: (1) "Introduction to Evaluation" (Jane Robbins and Douglas Zweizig); (2) "Research and Measurement in Library Services to Children" (Adele Fasick); (3) "Evaluating Children's Services" (Diana Young); (4) "What Is Good about Children's Library…

  11. Where Are All the Black Teachers? Discrimination in the Teacher Labor Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'amico, Diana; Pawlewicz, Robert J.; Earley, Penelope M.; McGeehan, Adam P.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Diana D'Amico, Robert J. Pawlewicz, Penelope M. Earley, and Adam P. McGeehan examine the racial composition of one public school district's teacher labor market through teacher application data and subsequent hiring decisions. Researchers and policy makers have long noted the lack of racial diversity among the nation's public…

  12. 76 FR 9578 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Conducting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... for More Information: Diana Bartlett, M.P.H., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E...:30 p.m.-3 p.m., April 13, 2011 (Closed). Place: Teleconference. Status: The meeting will be closed to... Services Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  13. Working with Staff Using Baumrind's Parenting Styles Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldhuis, Hollace Anne

    2012-01-01

    The author's presentation at the staff meeting centered on Diana Baumrind's parenting styles framework (Baumrind, 1967). Baumrind believed that there were four requirements for effective guidance: nurturing, communication, maturity demands, and control. She rated parents on these four dimensions and identified the pattern of parenting that…

  14. Parents as Leaders: The Role of Control and Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahraes, Herbert

    This paper reviews Diana Baumrind's studies of the effect of various types of parental control on children's behavior and concludes that a child is more likely to develop a sense of competence, responsibility, and independence if he or she is given firm and reasonable guidelines. A brief survey of Baumrind's first two studies of preschool children…

  15. Should Teachers Help Students Develop Partisan Identities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Diana E.; McAvoy, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Five years ago, Diana Hess was teaching a graduate seminar called "Democratic Education." The purpose of the seminar was to critically analyze two seemingly simple, but actually very complex, questions: What is democracy? What is democratic education? Both are contested concepts, and the seminar was designed to help students understand…

  16. Rethinking "Harmonious Parenting" Using a Three-Factor Discipline Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenspan, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Diana Baumrind's typology of parenting is based on a two-factor model of "control" and "warmth". Her recommended discipline style, labeled "authoritative parenting", was constructed by taking high scores on these two factors. A problem with authoritative parenting is that it does not allow for flexible and differentiated responses to discipline…

  17. Should Teachers Help Students Develop Partisan Identities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Diana E.; McAvoy, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Five years ago, Diana Hess was teaching a graduate seminar called "Democratic Education." The purpose of the seminar was to critically analyze two seemingly simple, but actually very complex, questions: What is democracy? What is democratic education? Both are contested concepts, and the seminar was designed to help students understand…

  18. Mussolini's Marriage and a Game in the Playground: Using Analogy to Help Pupils Understand the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laffin, Diana; Wilson, Maggie

    2005-01-01

    Diana Laffin and Maggie Wilson want their pupils to connect with people in the past and to experience some of their emotions. The emotional factor is a difficult one in history, both for pupils and professional historians. When studying Eden's actions at Suez, for example, what we lack is a proper insight into the immediate pressures he faced and…

  19. 77 FR 52315 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... held September 17-18, 2012 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the..., AK 99501-2252. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Diana Evans, Council staff, telephone: (907) 271-2809...-2809 at least 7 working days prior to the meeting date. Dated: August 24, 2012. William D. Chappell...

  20. Recent Litigation in the Placement of Minority Group Children in the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra, Viola

    Reviewed are some of the legal challenges aimed against the misplacement of minority group children in low ability groups in southwestern states. Court cases covered include Ruiz vs. State Board of Education, Spangles vs. Board of Education, Diana vs. Board of Education, Arreola vs. Board of Education, Covarrubias vs. San Diego, Larry P. vs.…

  1. AAHE Bulletin, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchese, Theodore J., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The 10 issues of this bulletin present reports, reviews and essays on issues concerning the advancement of higher education. Major articles include: "Learning, Teaching Technology"--an interview with Diana Laurillard of Britain's Open University; "Learning, Technology, and the Way We Work" (Russ Edgerton and Barbara Leigh…

  2. On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Diana, Ed.

    This publication presents interviews with 11 prominent women, representing different backgrounds, philosophies, and life experiences, in which they speak about their own experiences with work and family issues. The introduction, "On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family" (Diana Zuckerman), provides an overview. The 11 interviews…

  3. Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Materials Guidebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American College Personnel Association's (ACPA's) Sustainability Task Force partnered with the Commission on Assessment and Evaluation with the goal of creating assessment tools to help ACPA members effectively measure student learning around sustainability. Towards these ends, Kimberly Yousey-Elsener (StudentVoice), Diana Richter Keith…

  4. One-Stop Shopping: A Library-Based Corporate Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handman, Pamela L.; Ziegler, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Cetus Corporation library's online information system, called ISCLine (Information Services Center Line). Menu options are explained, system maintenance is described, the use of the system by employees and staff is examined, and future possibilities are considered. A sidebar by Diana L. Ziegler describes programing procedures for…

  5. Masculinities in Dialogue: A Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knights, Ben

    2011-01-01

    This response to the articles by Diana Wallace and Samantha Pinto seeks to locate the negotiation of gendered identities in the classroom within the larger study of the dialogic relations between texts, teachers, and students. Teaching, it proposes, is not a second-order derivative of scholarship, but a cultural form in its own right. The article…

  6. Using Group-Based Learning in Higher Education. Teaching and Learning in Higher Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorley, Lin, Ed.; Gregory, Roy, Ed.

    The 26 papers in this collection from a British conference first provide an overview of group-based learning in higher education, offer a range of examples, and identify issues and trends. Chapters include: (1) "Introduction" (Roy Gregory and Lin Thorley); (2) "An Overview from Higher Education" (Diana M. R. Tribe); (3)…

  7. The Teacher Trainer, A Practical Journal Mainly for Modern Language Teacher Trainers, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The three issues of the journal on second language teacher education include these articles: "Monitoring and Evaluating the Production of Materials on a Large Scale Trainer Training Workshop" (R. Williams, Choong Kam Foong, Diana Lubelska); Sensory Channels in ESL Instruction" (Michael E. Rudder); "Using the In-Service Feedback…

  8. Development Programs and the Maoist Insurgency in Andhra Pradesh and Chhattisgarh: A Comparative Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    ANALYSIS Diana M. Beckett-Hile Civilian, Department of the Navy B.A., Brown University , 2005 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the...Staniland 13 David Kilcullen, Counterinsurgency (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010), 1–2. 14...Manual No. 3–24 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007); Kilcullen, Counterinsurgency; Lalwani, “India’s Approach to Counterinsurgency and the

  9. International Workshop on Discrete Time Domain Modelling of Electromagnetic Fields and Networks (2nd) Held in Berlin, Germany on October 28 and 29, 1993. Program and Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Program 0 Berlin, Germany, October 1993 Diana Lawton, Piano 0 W.A. Mozart Sonate d-dur, KV. 311 Allegro con spirito Andante con espressione Rondo II C...exhibiting a cause-to- effect (causality) relationship. The latter in turn gives rise to computational rules that exhibit the sequential nature needed for

  10. Language and Music as Communication: A Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Roger Brown, Diana Deutsch, Warren Benson, and Ruth Day comment on the similarities and differences between verbal language and music as forms of communication. This discussion occurred at the first session of the National Symposium on the Applications of Psychology to the Teaching and Learning of Music, Ann Arbor. (SJL)

  11. Now, voyager.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    Diana Athill, now 90, has spent a life in books. As a writer, editor and publisher she has, as expected, a way with words, employed to great effect in A Final Farewell to Sex, published in The Guardian Weekend magazine ( http://tinyurl.com/2gg20y ).

  12. 77 FR 66957 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... to the United States Transportation Command, Command Change Management, ATTN: Diana Roach, 508 Scott.... Mail: Federal Docket Management System Office, 4800 Mark Center Drive, East Tower, Suite 02G09... http://www.regulations.gov as they are received without change, including any personal identifiers...

  13. 77 FR 66956 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... to the United States Transportation Command, Command Change Management, ATTN: Diana Roach, 508 Scott.... Mail: Federal Docket Management System Office, 4800 Mark Center Drive, East Tower, Suite 02G09... http://www.regulations.gov as they are received without change, including any personal identifiers...

  14. Making Matter Making Us: Thinking with Grosz to Find Freedom in New Feminist Materialisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Alecia Youngblood

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I offer a very close reading of Grosz [2010. "Feminism, Materialism, and Freedom." In "New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics," edited by Diana Coole and Samantha Frost, 139-157. Durham, NC: Duke University Press] thinking with Bergson in order to re-conceptualise freedom, matter, and the subject in new…

  15. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Media Ethics Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The Media Ethics division of the proceedings contains the following 6 papers: "A Masochist's Teapot: Where to Put the Handle in Media Ethics" (Thomas W. Hickey); "Stalker-razzi and Sump-pump Hoses: The Role of the Media in the Death of Princess Diana" (Elizabeth Blanks Hindman); "The Promise and Peril of Anecdotes in News…

  16. The Spanish-Language Roundtable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criticas: An English Speaker's Guide to the Latest Spanish Language Titles, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a meeting with a group of experts including Leylha Ahuile, Rene Alegria, Rueben Martinez, Diana Martinez Calice, Silvia Matute, Anne Messitte, and Teresa Mlawer from the Spanish language market for books. Topics include publishing; school and library markets; bookstores; the role of the Latino press and Latino authors; coverage in…

  17. How Schools Can Support Children Who Experience Loss and Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, John

    2008-01-01

    Scenes of public grieving such as followed the death of Princess Diana bear little resemblance to the "taboo" status of death and bereavement at an individual level. For schools and the support services with whom they work, responding to pupils' experiences of loss and death, especially of parents, is challenging. This paper draws on…

  18. Edith Wharton: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Irving, Ed.

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Irving Howe, Edmund Wilson, Louis Auchincloss, Percy Lubbock, E. K. Brown, Q. D. Lewis, Alfred Kazin, Diana Trilling, Blake Nevius, Lionel Trilling, Vernon L. Parrington, and Louis O. Coxe--all dealing with the biography…

  19. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 5: Practical Issues in Parenting. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with practical aspects of meeting children's needs, this volume, the fifth of five on parenting, describes the nuts and bolts of parenting as well as the promotion of positive parenting practices. The volume consists of the following 19 chapters: (1) "The Ethics of Parenting" (Diana Baumrind and Ross A. Thompson; (2) "Parenting and…

  20. 77 FR 63314 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... Pearl Street, Dallas, Texas 75201-2272: 1. James Leon Bradley, Sr., individually and as Trustee of the Bradley 2012 Irrevocable Trust; The Bradley 2012 Irrevocable Trust; Diana McBay Bradley, James Leon... B. Flood, Jr., and Susan J. Flood- Dziubinski, co-trustees; James Flood, Medford, Wisconsin;...

  1. DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    Marek H. Zaluski1,3, Brian T. Park1, Diana R. Bless2

    1 MSE Technology Applications; 200 Technology Way, Butte, Montana 59701, USA
    2 U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinna...

  2. 76 FR 69241 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ..., as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. DATES: Written comments must be submitted on or before January 9, 2012. ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to Diana Hynek, Departmental Paperwork... creation of a National Marine Sanctuary in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Since that time, the area...

  3. Aglaopheniid hydroids (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Aglaopheniidae) from bathyal waters of the Flemish Cap, Flemish Pass, and Grand Banks of Newfoundland (NW Atlantic) .

    PubMed

    Altuna, Alvaro; Murillo, Francisco J; Calder, Dale R

    2013-11-22

    Five species of aglaopheniid hydroids (Aglaophenopsis cornuta, Cladocarpus diana, C. formosus, C. integer, and Nematocarpus ramuliferus) were collected from the Flemish Cap, Flemish Pass, and Grand Banks of Newfoundland during surveys with bottom trawls, rock dredges, and scallop gear. All are infrequently reported species, with C. diana being discovered for the first time since its original description from Iceland. We document here the southernmost collections of C. diana and N. ramuliferus, both previously unknown in the western Atlantic. Each of the five species is described and illustrated based on fertile material, a key is provided for their identification, and bathymetric distributions are noted. Known depth ranges are extended for A. cornuta, C. diana, and C. integer. Aglaophenopsis and Nematocarpus are recognized as genera distinct from the polyphyletic Cladocarpus, based on the unique structure of the phylactocarp in the former, and the existence of appendages with nematothecae (ramuli) on almost all thecate internodes of hydrocladia in the latter. These appendages occur even in the absence of gonothecae, and are here considered defensive structures that protect the hydranths. In differing from typical phylactocarps, we accept the contention that they are characters of generic value.

  4. Technology, Education, and the Changing Nature of Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Wendy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses information technology in higher education. Includes comments from Educom Medal Awards winners honored for contributions made to improving undergraduate education through information technology: Paul Velleman, Cornell; Diana Eck, Harvard; Richard Larson, Stony Brook; David Fulker, University Corporation; and Stephen Ressler, Military…

  5. JiaZhang Dui ErTong FaZhan TongBan GuanXi De ZuoYong (The Role of Parents in the Development of Peer Group Competence). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Shirley G.

    Among studies that have examined the relationship between parenting styles and children's development of social skills, the research of Diana Baumrind is noteworthy. In several studies, she has identified authoritarian, permissive, and authoritative parenting styles, which differ on the dimensions of nurturance and parental control. Authoritarian…

  6. Parents as Leaders: The Role of Control and Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahraes, Herbert

    This paper reviews Diana Baumrind's studies of the effect of various types of parental control on children's behavior and concludes that a child is more likely to develop a sense of competence, responsibility, and independence if he or she is given firm and reasonable guidelines. A brief survey of Baumrind's first two studies of preschool children…

  7. The Role of Parents in the Development of Peer Group Competence. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Shirley G.

    Among studies that have examined the relationship between parenting styles and children's development of social skills, the research of Diana Baumrind is noteworthy. In several studies, she has identified authoritarian, permissive, and authoritative parenting styles, which differ on the dimensions of nurturance and parental control. Authoritarian…

  8. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 5: Practical Issues in Parenting. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with practical aspects of meeting children's needs, this volume, the fifth of five on parenting, describes the nuts and bolts of parenting as well as the promotion of positive parenting practices. The volume consists of the following 19 chapters: (1) "The Ethics of Parenting" (Diana Baumrind and Ross A. Thompson; (2) "Parenting and…

  9. Rethinking "Harmonious Parenting" Using a Three-Factor Discipline Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenspan, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Diana Baumrind's typology of parenting is based on a two-factor model of "control" and "warmth". Her recommended discipline style, labeled "authoritative parenting", was constructed by taking high scores on these two factors. A problem with authoritative parenting is that it does not allow for flexible and differentiated responses to discipline…

  10. Working with Staff Using Baumrind's Parenting Styles Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldhuis, Hollace Anne

    2012-01-01

    The author's presentation at the staff meeting centered on Diana Baumrind's parenting styles framework (Baumrind, 1967). Baumrind believed that there were four requirements for effective guidance: nurturing, communication, maturity demands, and control. She rated parents on these four dimensions and identified the pattern of parenting that…

  11. Sex Differences in the Development of Moral Reasoning: A Rejoinder to Baumrind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the criticisms of Diana Baumrind's review of his research on sex differences in moral reasoning development. Discusses issues such as the nature of moral development, the focus on adulthood, the choice of statistics, the effect of differing sample sizes and scoring systems, and the role of sexual experiences in explaining variability in…

  12. Teaching Creative Writing: That Is, Teaching Something Other Than the Craft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichmann, Sandra Gail

    Recent articles by August Kleinzahler, Joseph Epstein, and Diana Gioia question the value of contemporary poetry, particularly that which comes from graduate and undergraduate creative writing programs. Ron McFarland, in a recent issue of "College English," argues against these articles and advocates teaching craft as the only essential…

  13. Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Materials Guidebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American College Personnel Association's (ACPA's) Sustainability Task Force partnered with the Commission on Assessment and Evaluation with the goal of creating assessment tools to help ACPA members effectively measure student learning around sustainability. Towards these ends, Kimberly Yousey-Elsener (StudentVoice), Diana Richter Keith…

  14. Los biocombustibles y el futuro

    NASA Image and Video Library

    ¿Cómo podremos utilizar los biocombustibles en el futuro? La ingeniera aeroespacial de la NASA, Diana Centeno Gómez nos explica el futuro de los biocombustibles y cómo un día podrías trabajar con d...

  15. A Sacrificial Lam: A Divided School Board, a Beleaguered Superintendent, and an Urgent Need to Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossey, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This case describes the confrontational relationship between four trustees on the San Antonio School Board and the San Antonio School District's superintendent Diana Lam, a nationally recognized school reformer, who came to San Antonio in 1994. The case includes a dramatic board meeting where a closely divided board meets to buy out Lam's…

  16. Missouri Assessment Program (MAP), Spring 2000: Intermediate Communication Arts, Released Items, Grade 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    This document deals with testing in intermediate communication arts for seventh graders in Missouri public schools. The document contains the following items from the Session 1 Test Booklet: "Swimming in Snow" (Diana C. Conway) (Items 1, 2, and 5); "Discovery" (Marion Dane Bauer) (Item 13); writing prompt; and a writer's…

  17. The Puerto Ricans: Their History, Culture, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Adalberto, Ed.

    Articles in this book cover Puerto Rican history from the Spanish colonization to the present day experience of Puerto Ricans in the United States. Political, social, economic, cultural, and historical issues are addresed by the following authors: Edna Acosta-Belen, Frank Bonilla, Juan Manuel Carrion, Diana Christopulos, Sandra Messinger Cypess,…

  18. Introduction to "Multicultural Voices: Peer Tutoring and Critical Reflection in the Writing Center"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Nancy Maloney

    2010-01-01

    In 1991 when Diana George, Ed Lotto, and the author were publishing their first issue as "WCJ" editors, this multivoiced essay struck her as a prime example of their editorial belief that writing centers could be "agents of change in the academy." As Gail Okawa and Tom Fox observe, "Most universities are inhospitable to more democratic definitions…

  19. Impeccable Advice: Supporting Women Academics through Supervision and Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Suki; Coate, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    At the time when Diana was writing " A Woman's Guide to Doctoral Studies" (2001), she was supervising a number of female doctoral students. She drew on some of their experiences in the writing of the book, and they in return benefited from the extensive insights she had about the politics of academic life that she portrays in her…

  20. One-Stop Shopping: A Library-Based Corporate Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handman, Pamela L.; Ziegler, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Cetus Corporation library's online information system, called ISCLine (Information Services Center Line). Menu options are explained, system maintenance is described, the use of the system by employees and staff is examined, and future possibilities are considered. A sidebar by Diana L. Ziegler describes programing procedures for…

  1. Introduction to "Multicultural Voices: Peer Tutoring and Critical Reflection in the Writing Center"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Nancy Maloney

    2010-01-01

    In 1991 when Diana George, Ed Lotto, and the author were publishing their first issue as "WCJ" editors, this multivoiced essay struck her as a prime example of their editorial belief that writing centers could be "agents of change in the academy." As Gail Okawa and Tom Fox observe, "Most universities are inhospitable to more democratic definitions…

  2. Adult Education and Social Transformation: On Gramsci, Freire, and the Challenge of Comparing Comparisons. Essay Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schugurensky, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Reviews three books that critique and compare the ideas of Gramsci and Freire: "Revolutionary Social Transformation: Democratic Hopes, Political Possibilities and Critical Education" (Paula Allman); "Radical Heroes: Gramsci, Freire and the Politics of Adult Education" (Diana Coben); and "Gramsci, Freire and Adult…

  3. Marr: Magpie or Marsh Harrier? The Quest for the Common Characteristics of the Genus "Historian" with 16- to 19-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laffin, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Diana Laffin writes about historical language and explores how understanding different historians' use of language can help sixth form students refine and deepen both their understanding of the discipline of history and their abilities to practise the discipline in their own writing. What does close study of the textual habits and practices of…

  4. Connecting the Private and the Public: Pregnancy, Exclusion, and the Expansion of Schooling in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unterhalter, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    In a number of countries in Africa, young women who become pregnant are excluded from school. This article presents a critique of policy and practice in this area drawing partly on Diana Leonard's scholarship concerning the relational dynamic of gender, generation, social division, and household forms. Much of the policy prescription of large…

  5. Sharing Educational Resources Worldwide: An Interview with Shimizu Yasutaka

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2006-01-01

    Shimizu Yasutaka is President of the National Institute of Multimedia Education (NIME) and Professor Emeritus at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. After meeting with Shimizu in December 2005 in Washington, D.C., and in January 2006 in Tokyo, Japan, EDUCAUSE Vice President Diana G. Oblinger asked him some questions about NIME, about IT in Japanese…

  6. Mini-Portfolio on Math and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching PreK-8, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Presents six articles dealing with math and science education: "Sneaker Geometry" (Jack George), "Fairs with a Flair" (Diane McCarty), "Generating Excitement with Math Projects" (Jeffrey Kostecky and Louis Roe), "Playing with Numbers" (Diana Smith), "When Student Teachers Want to Do Hands-On Science" (Betsy Feldkamp-Price), and "Science ala Carte"…

  7. Precious Knowledge: Teaching Solidarity with Tucson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carberry, Devin

    2013-01-01

    The author's class has been invited to speak on NPR's "Call-In-Radio" and two of her students, Omar and Diana, were elected to be their spokespeople regarding HB 2281, Arizona's controversial ethnic studies ban. Omar stressed that he and his classmates are engaged by this topic because they see what's happening in Arizona is wrong--that…

  8. Marr: Magpie or Marsh Harrier? The Quest for the Common Characteristics of the Genus "Historian" with 16- to 19-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laffin, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Diana Laffin writes about historical language and explores how understanding different historians' use of language can help sixth form students refine and deepen both their understanding of the discipline of history and their abilities to practise the discipline in their own writing. What does close study of the textual habits and practices of…

  9. Citizenship Education Research in Varied Contexts: Reflections and Future Possibilities. A Review Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudball, Libby

    2015-01-01

    Three books are the subject of this review essay: (1) Avril Keating's (2014) publication, "Education for Citizenship in Europe: European Policies, National Adaptations and Young People's Attitudes"; (2) "The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education", Diana Hess and Paula McAvoy (2015); and (3) "We…

  10. Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senechal, Diana

    2011-01-01

    In "Republic of Noise," Diana Senechal confronts a culture that has come to depend on instant updates and communication at the expense of solitude. Where once it was common wisdom that the chatter of the present, about the present, could not always grasp the present, today we treat "real time" as though it were the only real time. Schools…

  11. The Puerto Ricans: Their History, Culture, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Adalberto, Ed.

    Articles in this book cover Puerto Rican history from the Spanish colonization to the present day experience of Puerto Ricans in the United States. Political, social, economic, cultural, and historical issues are addresed by the following authors: Edna Acosta-Belen, Frank Bonilla, Juan Manuel Carrion, Diana Christopulos, Sandra Messinger Cypess,…

  12. Assessing Individuals with Disabilities in Educational, Employment, and Counseling Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, Ruth B., Ed.; Smith, Douglas K., Ed.

    This book is designed to assist testing professionals as they face the challenge of how best to assess and test people with disabilities. Chapters include: (1) "Testing Individuals with Disabilities: Reconciling Social Science and Social Policy" (Diana Pullin); (2) "The Psychometrics of Testing Individuals with Disabilities"…

  13. Good/Bad Girls Read Together: Pre-Adolescent Girls' Co-Authorship of Feminine Subject Positions during a Shared Reading Event.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso, Patricia E.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses reading with pre-teens Francine Pascal's "Sweet Valley Twins: Best Friends," one of a series of pre-romance novels featuring identical twin sisters. Interviews six girls using the Symbolic Representation Interview (SRI) about the good girl/bad girl dichotomy in novels and other media. Provides comments by Tom Romano and Diana Mitchell.…

  14. The Spanish-Language Roundtable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criticas: An English Speaker's Guide to the Latest Spanish Language Titles, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a meeting with a group of experts including Leylha Ahuile, Rene Alegria, Rueben Martinez, Diana Martinez Calice, Silvia Matute, Anne Messitte, and Teresa Mlawer from the Spanish language market for books. Topics include publishing; school and library markets; bookstores; the role of the Latino press and Latino authors; coverage in…

  15. Perspectives on Adults Learning Mathematics: Research and Practice. Mathematics Education Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coben, Diana, Ed.; O'Donoghue, John, Ed.; FitzSimons, Gail E., Ed.

    This book contains 22 papers that are designed to situate research and practice in adults learning mathematics within the wider field of lifelong learning and lifelong education. The following papers are included: "Introduction" (Diana Coben, Gail E. FitzSimons, John O'Donoghue); "Review of Research on Adults Learning…

  16. El Papel de los Padres en el Desarrollo de la Competencia Social (The Role of Parents in the Development of Peer Group Competence). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Shirley G.

    Among studies that have examined the relationship between parenting styles and children's development of social skills, the research of Diana Baumrind is noteworthy. In several studies, she has identified authoritarian, permissive, and authoritative parenting styles, which differ on the dimensions of nurturance and parental control. Authoritarian…

  17. Precious Knowledge: Teaching Solidarity with Tucson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carberry, Devin

    2013-01-01

    The author's class has been invited to speak on NPR's "Call-In-Radio" and two of her students, Omar and Diana, were elected to be their spokespeople regarding HB 2281, Arizona's controversial ethnic studies ban. Omar stressed that he and his classmates are engaged by this topic because they see what's happening in Arizona is wrong--that…

  18. Adult Education and Social Transformation: On Gramsci, Freire, and the Challenge of Comparing Comparisons. Essay Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schugurensky, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Reviews three books that critique and compare the ideas of Gramsci and Freire: "Revolutionary Social Transformation: Democratic Hopes, Political Possibilities and Critical Education" (Paula Allman); "Radical Heroes: Gramsci, Freire and the Politics of Adult Education" (Diana Coben); and "Gramsci, Freire and Adult…

  19. Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senechal, Diana

    2011-01-01

    In "Republic of Noise," Diana Senechal confronts a culture that has come to depend on instant updates and communication at the expense of solitude. Where once it was common wisdom that the chatter of the present, about the present, could not always grasp the present, today we treat "real time" as though it were the only real time. Schools…

  20. DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    Marek H. Zaluski1,3, Brian T. Park1, Diana R. Bless2

    1 MSE Technology Applications; 200 Technology Way, Butte, Montana 59701, USA
    2 U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinna...

  1. Alaska Inclusion Training Modules: Building Inclusive Classrooms and Schools. Modules 1-3. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Susan, Ed.; Kurka, Diana, Ed.

    This document presents three inservice training modules which focus on the inclusion of students with disabilities in regular education settings in Alaska schools. Module 1, "Setting our Sights on Inclusion," by Diana Kurka, is a three-hour inservice program which provides an introduction to inclusion via sections on: legal and…

  2. Making Matter Making Us: Thinking with Grosz to Find Freedom in New Feminist Materialisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Alecia Youngblood

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I offer a very close reading of Grosz [2010. "Feminism, Materialism, and Freedom." In "New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics," edited by Diana Coole and Samantha Frost, 139-157. Durham, NC: Duke University Press] thinking with Bergson in order to re-conceptualise freedom, matter, and the subject in new…

  3. Armstrong Memorial Service

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-13

    Musician Diana Krall sings ""Fly Me to the Moon" during a memorial service celebrating the life of Neil Armstrong at the Washington National Cathedral, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  4. Armstrong Memorial Service

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-13

    Former U.S. Sen. John Glenn, left, and musician Diana Krall bow there heads in prayer during a memorial service celebrating the life of Neil Armstrong, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at the Washington National Cathedral. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Connecting the Private and the Public: Pregnancy, Exclusion, and the Expansion of Schooling in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unterhalter, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    In a number of countries in Africa, young women who become pregnant are excluded from school. This article presents a critique of policy and practice in this area drawing partly on Diana Leonard's scholarship concerning the relational dynamic of gender, generation, social division, and household forms. Much of the policy prescription of large…

  6. Education, Diversity, and Inclusion in Burmese Refugee Camps in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Su-Ann; van der Stouwe, Marc

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the "two faces" model of education through which Kenneth Bush and Diana Saltarelli (2000) describe the positive and negative roles that education can play in situations of ethnic conflict. The authors apply it more narrowly to analyze the effect of inclusion and diversity in education in a conflict situation. In…

  7. Transaction Cost Economics (TCE) and Cost Estimation Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-15

    TRANSACTION COST ECONOMICS (TCE) – MAKE OR BUY , AND ASSOCIATED DIFFICULTIES • OUR VIEW OF TCE AND COST ...1 Transaction Cost Economics (TCE) and Cost Estimation Methodology Diana Angelis, Francois Melese (DRMI) John Dillard, Chip Franck (GSBPP) NAVAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Transaction Cost Economics (TCE) and Cost Estimation Methodology 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  8. Citizenship Education Research in Varied Contexts: Reflections and Future Possibilities. A Review Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudball, Libby

    2015-01-01

    Three books are the subject of this review essay: (1) Avril Keating's (2014) publication, "Education for Citizenship in Europe: European Policies, National Adaptations and Young People's Attitudes"; (2) "The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education", Diana Hess and Paula McAvoy (2015); and (3) "We…

  9. Using Group-Based Learning in Higher Education. Teaching and Learning in Higher Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorley, Lin, Ed.; Gregory, Roy, Ed.

    The 26 papers in this collection from a British conference first provide an overview of group-based learning in higher education, offer a range of examples, and identify issues and trends. Chapters include: (1) "Introduction" (Roy Gregory and Lin Thorley); (2) "An Overview from Higher Education" (Diana M. R. Tribe); (3)…

  10. Perceived Advantages and Disadvantages of Being a Female Graduate Student in the US and the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Clare Marie; Keener, Emily; Shrier, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We build on Diana Leonard's work on gender and graduate education by qualitatively investigating the perceived advantages and disadvantages of being a female graduate student in the USA and the UK. We interviewed six female students (ages 22-30) pursuing master's degrees in psychology or social sciences in the USA and the UK. Students from both…

  11. Suffixation influences receivers' behaviour in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Coye, Camille; Ouattara, Karim; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lemasson, Alban

    2015-01-01

    Compared to humans, non-human primates have very little control over their vocal production. Nonetheless, some primates produce various call combinations, which may partially offset their lack of acoustic flexibility. A relevant example is male Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli), which give one call type (‘Krak’) to leopards, while the suffixed version of the same call stem (‘Krak-oo’) is given to unspecific danger. To test whether recipients attend to this suffixation pattern, we carried out a playback experiment in which we broadcast naturally and artificially modified suffixed and unsuffixed ‘Krak’ calls of male Campbell's monkeys to 42 wild groups of Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana diana). The two species form mixed-species groups and respond to each other's vocalizations. We analysed the vocal response of male and female Diana monkeys and overall found significantly stronger vocal responses to unsuffixed (leopard) than suffixed (unspecific danger) calls. Although the acoustic structure of the ‘Krak’ stem of the calls has some additional effects, subject responses were mainly determined by the presence or the absence of the suffix. This study indicates that suffixation is an evolved function in primate communication in contexts where adaptive responses are particularly important. PMID:25925101

  12. Rachel's Challenge: A Moral Compass for Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingshead, Barbara; Crump, Christi; Eddy, Rochelle; Rowe, Dina

    2009-01-01

    Though American life in 1923 was significantly different than the present day, authors John Dewey and Diana Brannon share similar concerns about character. Historically, educators as far back as the 1800s have felt an obligation to the community to transcend the primary purpose for schooling by including character education in their curricula.…

  13. REVIEW OF REFLECTIONS IN BULLOUGH'S POND: ECONOMY AND ECOSYSTEM IN NEW ENGLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reflections in Bullough's Pond is a fascinating and eye opening chronicle of New England from pre-European settlement to present times. Author Diana Muir uses the history of the pond in her backyard to individualize the story she tells. It's a powerful device that makes her arg...

  14. Penn Working Papers in Educational Linguistics, Volume 5, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Kathryn, Ed.

    The working papers contained in this volume include the following: "Research on Language Learning; How Can It Respond to Classroom Concerns?" (Teresa Pica); "Building Rapport Through Indirect Complaints: Implications for Language Learning" (Diana Boxer); "(Bi)literacy and Empowerment: Education for Indigenous Groups in…

  15. 75 FR 81211 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides educators an opportunity to gain first-hand experience with field... writing Diana Hynek, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0266, Department of Commerce....gov ). Written comments and recommendations for the proposed ] information collection should be...

  16. Flexible Learning Strategies in Higher and Further Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Diana, Ed.

    This book contains 15 papers written by contributors from all areas of Great Britain in further and higher education. The following papers are included: "Learning to Be Flexible" (Diana Thomas); "Managing Change: Towards a New Paradigm?" (Mac Stephenson, Timothy Lehmann); "Open Learning: Educational Opportunity or…

  17. Otherness through Elves: Into Elfland and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamazaki, Akiko

    2008-01-01

    This article examines three novels which use stories of elves--especially the ballad "Tam Lin"--as pre-texts, and contemplates how they explore the issue of Otherness. The three novels are "The Sterkarm Handshake" by Susan Price, "Cold Tom" by Sally Prue, and "Fire and Hemlock" by Diana Wynne Jones. Although the novels seem to be about elves as…

  18. Assessing Individuals with Disabilities in Educational, Employment, and Counseling Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, Ruth B., Ed.; Smith, Douglas K., Ed.

    This book is designed to assist testing professionals as they face the challenge of how best to assess and test people with disabilities. Chapters include: (1) "Testing Individuals with Disabilities: Reconciling Social Science and Social Policy" (Diana Pullin); (2) "The Psychometrics of Testing Individuals with Disabilities"…

  19. Key and Essential Elements of a U.S. Government Interagency Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-15

    trust and appreciation for the skills and expertise each can provide. Diana Putman , a career civil servant with U.S. Agency for International...at all like what the military is wearing. But if we complain, we’re cowards and weak.” Both Smyth and Putman pointed out the DoS has conducted R/S

  20. Air and Space Museum Apollo 40th Celebration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Jazz pianist and singer Diana Krall gives an introduction prior to her performance at the Apollo 40th anniversary celebration held at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. Ms. Krall's piano was staged right next to the Apollo 11 Command Capsule. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Working Papers in Educational Linguistics, Volume 11, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabors, Leslie K., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Five papers on applied linguistics in educational contexts are presented. "What Can Second Language Learners Learn from Each Other? Only Their Researcher Knows for Sure" (Teresa Pica, Felicia Lincoln-Porter, Diana Paninos, Julian Linnell) presents further research on interaction and negotiation among language learners.…

  2. The Rules of the Game: Women and the Leaderist Turn in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Louise

    2013-01-01

    This paper engages with Diana Leonard's writing on how gender is constituted in the academy. It offers an international review of feminist knowledge on how gender and power interact with leadership in higher education. It interrogates the "leaderist turn" or how leadership has developed into a popular descriptor and a dominant social and…

  3. Perceived Advantages and Disadvantages of Being a Female Graduate Student in the US and the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Clare Marie; Keener, Emily; Shrier, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We build on Diana Leonard's work on gender and graduate education by qualitatively investigating the perceived advantages and disadvantages of being a female graduate student in the USA and the UK. We interviewed six female students (ages 22-30) pursuing master's degrees in psychology or social sciences in the USA and the UK. Students from both…

  4. 78 FR 76886 - National Small Business Development Center Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... will be held on the following dates: Tuesday, January 21, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. EST Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. EST Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. EST ADDRESSES: This meeting will be held via.... Diana Doukas, Committee Management Officer. BILLING CODE 8025-01-M...

  5. Language and Music as Communication: A Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Roger Brown, Diana Deutsch, Warren Benson, and Ruth Day comment on the similarities and differences between verbal language and music as forms of communication. This discussion occurred at the first session of the National Symposium on the Applications of Psychology to the Teaching and Learning of Music, Ann Arbor. (SJL)

  6. Impeccable Advice: Supporting Women Academics through Supervision and Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Suki; Coate, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    At the time when Diana was writing " A Woman's Guide to Doctoral Studies" (2001), she was supervising a number of female doctoral students. She drew on some of their experiences in the writing of the book, and they in return benefited from the extensive insights she had about the politics of academic life that she portrays in her…

  7. Legal Aspects: Civilians/Contractors in the War Zone And Disaster Relief Support Joint Center for Operational Analysis Journal, Volume 10, Issue 2, June 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    this mission and help those in need. I will remember them for the rest of my life.” -Diana Hardin , a volunteer with international health charity...www.uscg.mil Commandant (G-OPF) 2100 2nd St. S.W. Washington, D.C. 20593-0001 Offi ce of Command, Control, and Preparedness user name phone# CAPT Brian

  8. Mussolini's Marriage and a Game in the Playground: Using Analogy to Help Pupils Understand the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laffin, Diana; Wilson, Maggie

    2005-01-01

    Diana Laffin and Maggie Wilson want their pupils to connect with people in the past and to experience some of their emotions. The emotional factor is a difficult one in history, both for pupils and professional historians. When studying Eden's actions at Suez, for example, what we lack is a proper insight into the immediate pressures he faced and…

  9. Women and Technical Professions. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles programs for women in technical professions that are offered through the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program. The following programs are profiled: (1) Artemis and Diana (vocational guidance programs to help direct girls toward technology-related careers); (2) CEEWIT (an Internet-based information and…

  10. REVIEW OF REFLECTIONS IN BULLOUGH'S POND: ECONOMY AND ECOSYSTEM IN NEW ENGLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reflections in Bullough's Pond is a fascinating and eye opening chronicle of New England from pre-European settlement to present times. Author Diana Muir uses the history of the pond in her backyard to individualize the story she tells. It's a powerful device that makes her arg...

  11. Teacher Preparation: Assessing Teacher Quality, Administrative Support, Standards-Based Teacher Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakoff, Anne Rogers, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This collection of papers focuses on the preparation of teachers by university-based education programs. The papers are: "The STEPS That Support P-12 Learning and Achievement" (Diana Rigden), which describes the Standards-based Teacher Education Project (STEP) for improving student learning; "The Responsibility for Assessing Beginning Teachers"…

  12. You Are Embarked: How a Philosophy Curriculum Took Shape and Took Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senechal, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Diana Senechal teaches philosophy at Columbia Secondary School for Math, Science, and Engineering in New York City; in addition, she serves on the faculty of the Sue Rose Summer Institute for Teachers at the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture. In this article she states that if someone had told her five years ago that she would be a high…

  13. Rachel's Challenge: A Moral Compass for Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingshead, Barbara; Crump, Christi; Eddy, Rochelle; Rowe, Dina

    2009-01-01

    Though American life in 1923 was significantly different than the present day, authors John Dewey and Diana Brannon share similar concerns about character. Historically, educators as far back as the 1800s have felt an obligation to the community to transcend the primary purpose for schooling by including character education in their curricula.…

  14. Television Ceremonial Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayan, Daniel; Katz, Elihu

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the impact of televised ceremonies (such as the marriage of Prince Charles and Lady Diana) as "media events" which allow viewers to vicariously enter into the ceremony. Compares them with cult movies that, over repeated viewing, encourage audience "participation." Focuses on the narrator's/commentator's role in shaping…

  15. Analysis of Parental Involvement and Self-Esteem on Secondary School Students in Kieni West Sub-County, Nyeri County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wairimu, Mburu Josephine; Macharia, Susan M.; Muiru, Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental involvement and the self-esteem among adolescents in secondary school students in Kieni West District in Nyeri County. It was guided by Self Determination Theory (SDT) by James William and Baumrind Theory of Parenting Styles by Diana Blumberg Baumrind. Some of the gaps identified in the…

  16. Good/Bad Girls Read Together: Pre-Adolescent Girls' Co-Authorship of Feminine Subject Positions during a Shared Reading Event.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso, Patricia E.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses reading with pre-teens Francine Pascal's "Sweet Valley Twins: Best Friends," one of a series of pre-romance novels featuring identical twin sisters. Interviews six girls using the Symbolic Representation Interview (SRI) about the good girl/bad girl dichotomy in novels and other media. Provides comments by Tom Romano and Diana Mitchell.…

  17. An Analysis of Factors that Influence Air Force Civil Engineer Company Grade Officer Turnover Intentions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    signed// u 16 Mar 2010uu Alfred E. Thal, Jr. (Member) Date //signed...the research regarding military members has investigated the effects of operations tempo on turnover decisions (Huffman, Adler , Dolan, & Castro, 2005...or focus on Army members (e.g., Adler , Castro, & Bartone, 1997; Giacalone, 2000; Sticha, Sadacca, DiFazio, Knerr, Hogan, & Diana, 1999; Huffman et al

  18. Education, Diversity, and Inclusion in Burmese Refugee Camps in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Su-Ann; van der Stouwe, Marc

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the "two faces" model of education through which Kenneth Bush and Diana Saltarelli (2000) describe the positive and negative roles that education can play in situations of ethnic conflict. The authors apply it more narrowly to analyze the effect of inclusion and diversity in education in a conflict situation. In…

  19. Abraham Lincoln and the Pillars of Liberty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaub, Diana J.

    2002-01-01

    In this essay, Diana Schaub, associate professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at Loyola College in Maryland, asserts that the 9/11 attack on America showed students the fallacy not of relativism, but of toleration. They are now aware that there are limits to toleration. By giving such a vivid display of the horrors of…

  20. The deaf child--challenges in management: a parent's perspective.

    PubMed

    Glover, Diana M

    2003-12-01

    Diana Glover lives in Buckinghamshire, UK with her husband, Ray, and their three sons, William (21), Robin (19) and Benjamin (10). Robin and Benjamin are profoundly deaf. Ray also has a hearing loss, which is unconnected with the children's deafness. Diana is a trustee of the National Deaf Children's Society. Diana will compare Robin's experiences with those of Benjamin. She will show how difficult it was to obtain a diagnosis of Robin's deafness, in spite of her early anxieties about his hearing, and that this had a marked impact on Robin's speech and language acquisition. She will speak about the struggle she and Ray had to convince their Local Education Authority that Robin should move from mainstream schooling to a boarding school for the deaf at the age of 9. She will also express her current anxieties as Robin, who has only deaf friends, moves from Mary Hare Grammar School for the Deaf to mainstream Higher Education. Robin's experiences will be contrasted with Benjamin's diagnosis at 7 weeks and progress in mainstream education. Diana will also highlight some of the issues that she and Ray had to consider when they agreed that Benjamin should have a cochlear implant at the age of 2. It will be demonstrated that having one hearing and two deaf sons has a profound effect on relationships within the family and with professionals. Diana will show how she and Ray have learned that one can easily overlook the needs of a hearing sibling, and that it is equally important for deaf children to come to terms with their disability. She will summarise the difficult choices they have had to make over implantation, communication methods and schooling and demonstrate that, even within one family, the needs of deaf children are never the same.

  1. [Anesthesiological systems "Polinarkon-Vita" with microprocessor for artificial lung ventilation apparatuses and monitoring].

    PubMed

    Trushin, A I; Uliakov, G I; Reĭderman, E N

    2005-01-01

    The anesthesiological systems Polinarkon-Vita for adults and children are described. These systems were developed at VNIIMP-VITA, Ltd. on the basis of basic model of the anesthesiological system Polinarkon-E-Vita. The following new important units of the fifth generation apparatuses for inhalation anesthesia (IA) are described: Anestezist-4 monocomponent evaporator for liquid anesthetics (enfluran and isofluran); Diana, Diana-Det, and Elan-NR apparatuses for mechanical lung ventilation (MLV); dosimeters of medical gases, etc. These systems implement monitoring of vitally important functions of patient and parameters of IN and MLV. The anesthesiological systems Polinarkon-Vita are recommended for medical practice and commercially available from VNIIMP-VITA, Ltd. as small lots.

  2. Application of PIXE to the study of Renaissance style enamelled gold jewelry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldon, M.; Carlson, J.; Reedy, S.; Swann, C. P.

    1996-04-01

    This study examines and compares three pieces of Renaissance style gold and enamelled jewelry owned by the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, MD, USA. These are a 16th century Hat Badge of Adam and Eve, a 19th century Fortitude Pendant and a Diana Pendant presumed to be of the 16th century (The Walters Art Gallery, Jewelry, Ancient to Modern (Viking, New York, 1979)), Ref. [1]. PIXE spectroscopy was applied to examine the elemental composition of the gold and of the enamels. Compositional differences, including the use of post-Renaissance colorants, were found between the enamels in separate regions of each of the three pieces. The modern colorant, chromium, was, in fact, found in all of the pieces and uranium was found in only the Diana Pendant. There are some differences in the gold purity of the three objects; there are significant differences in the solders used even within one object, the Fortitude Pendant.

  3. PREFACE: Conference Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    ORGANISING COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov - Chairman, Kiril Blagoev - Vice-Chairman, Margarita Grozeva - Scientific secretary, Kostadinka Gesheva, Anna Szekeres, Hassan Chamati, Diana Nesheva, Peter Rafailov, Yordan Marinov, Emilia Dimova, Tatyana Ivanova, Radostina Kamburova, Ekaterina Iordanova, Julia Genova, Alexander Donkov, Emilia Vlaikova SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov, Bulgaria; Nikola Sabotinov, Bulgaria; Kiril Blagoev, Bulgaria; Nicholay Tonchev, Bulgaria; Hassan Chamati, Bulgaria; Marin Gospodinov, Bulgaria; Peter Rafailov, Bulgaria; Emil Vlakhov, Bulgaria; Kostadinka Gesheva, Bulgaria; Anna Szekeres, Bulgaria; Diana Nesheva, Bulgaria; Albena Paskaleva, Bulgaria; Tatyana Ivanova, Bulgaria; Alexander Dreischuh, Bulgaria; Evgenia Valcheva, Bulgaria; Miglena Nikolaeva-Dimitrova, Bulgaria; Sanka Gateva, Bulgaria; Frank Hamelmann, Germany; Nicola Scaramuzza, Italy; G.M.W. Kroesen, Netherlands; Jan van Dijk Netherlands; Andrzej Szewczyk, Poland; Henryk Szymczak, Poland; Krzistof Rogacki, Poland; Ion Mihailescu, Romania; Claes-Goran Granqvist, Sweden; Mikael Jonsson, Sweden; Andrew Livingston, UK; Ludmila Peeva, UK

  4. Historic Royal events and the male to female ratio at birth in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Grech, Victor

    2015-08-01

    The male to female ratio of live births is expressed as the ratio of male live births divided by total live births (M/T). Factors which reduce M/T include toxins, stress and privation. Britain remains enamoured of the Monarchy. This study was carried out in order to ascertain whether Royal events influenced M/T in the UK. Live births were analysed in relation to the birth of Prince Charles (1948), the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II (1952), the Silver Jubilee (1977), the wedding of Diana Spencer to Charles, Prince of Wales (July 1981), the birth of Prince William (1982), the death of Lady Diana (August 1997), the wedding of Kate Middleton to Prince William (2011) and the Golden Jubilee (2002). This study analysed 29,293,240 live births. There was a significant dip in M/T in the Coronation year (p=0.03). M/T dipped significantly in relation to the Royal Wedding, commencing a year before (p<0.0001). There were no significant M/T changes in relation to the Silver and Golden Jubilees. The birth of Prince William in 1982 resulted in a rise in M/T in the following year only (p=0.016). Analysis by quarter in relation to Lady Diana's death showed a decline in M/T 4-5 months later in the first quarter of 1998 (p=0.046). The anticipation and stress leading to the Coronation and Royal Wedding may have depressed M/T. Increased coital rates associated with exuberance in relation to Prince William's birth may have raised M/T. Lady Diana's death was temporally associated with a decline in M/T. Royalty events may affect M/T ratios in Britain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. What All Teachers Hope for

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Ken

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how he had touched the life of one of his troubled students. He relates how he had helped Diana, his student, make her life a little smoother after her mother's suicide. He relates that this is the very reason why he had loved teaching for most of his 40-year career as an educator. The author states that the…

  6. Engineer: The Professional Bulletin of Army Engineers, Jan-Apr 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    do not necessarily reflect of- ficial U.S. Army positions and do not change or supersede information in other U.S. Army publications. Use of news ...Diana M. Holland 18 Engineers Build Capacity in Stability Operations By Colonel Jeffrey R. Eckstein 21 Army Training Support Enterprise: A New Paradigm...turnout of enlisted engineer leaders at ENFORCE 2010. It’s a great opportunity to rekindle old friendships and create new ones. Our experiences over

  7. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-02

    through the use of a single intermediate language. However, certain evolutionary paths, i.e., translators and funtional interfaces, must be established...Systems Ada compiler beginning in December 1984 and was presented at an Arcadia consortium meeting held in December 1984. Iris concepts and a grammar ...Page 11 2 November 1990 STARS-RC-01430/001/00 o An LALR parser generator and an Ada grammar , used to produce the parse phase of the Ada-to-DIANA

  8. Spring Research Festival and NICBR Collaboration Winners Announced | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer The winners of the 2014 Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 7 and 8, were recognized on July 2, and included 20 NCI at Frederick researchers: Matthew Anderson, Victor Ayala, Matt Bess, Cristina Bergamaschi, Charlotte Choi, Rami Doueiri, Laura Guasch Pamies, Diana Haines, Saadia Iftikhar, Maria Kaltcheva, Wojciech Kasprzak, Balamurugan Kuppusamy, James Lautenberger, George Lountos, Megan Mounts, Uma Mudunuri, Martha Sklavos, Gloriana Shelton, Alex Sorum, and Shea Wright.

  9. Defense Acquisitions: Assessments of Selected Weapon Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Julia M. Kennon, C. James Madar, Jean L. McSween, Diana L. Moldafsky, Kenneth E. Patton, Scott Purdy, Rae Ann H. Sapp , Roxanna T. Sun, and Bruce H...Rae Ann H. Sapp Global Positioning System (GPS) III Laura T. Holliday GPS III OCX Ground Control Segment Arturo Holguin, Jr. Gray Eagle Unmanned...Teakoe S. Coleman, Jerry W. Clark Reaper Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Rae Ann H. Sapp , Laura Jezewski Ship to Shore Connector (SSC) Meghan Hardy

  10. Pro: Licensure necessary in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mass, Diana

    2006-01-31

    The myths surrounding the licensure of clinical laboratory personnel are numerous, but many licensure detractors skew the facts in an attempt to convince both laboratorians and the general public that licensure of lab personnel is unnecessary. In her argument in favor of national licensure, longtime laboratory manager Diana Mass presents her case that debunks many of the so-called truths surrounding the negative impact of licensure.

  11. Borohydride Catalysis of Nitramine Thermal Decomposition and Combustion. 3. Literature Review and Wrap-Up Discussion of Possible Chemical Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    O and to a gradual conversion of the tetrahydroborate ion into alkali metal borates and B2 03 . The thermal decomposition of the hydrogen analogs_2 y...95151-9028 Boulder Engineering Center Universal Propulsion Company ATTN: JL Daily ATTN: HJ. McSpadden Campus Box 427 Black Canyon Stage I Boulder, CO...ATTN: E. Freedman 2411 Diana Road Baltimore , MD 21209-1525 25 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK. 26 USER EVALUATION SHEET/CHANGE OF ADDRESS This Laboratory

  12. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)/IMVAMUNE (registered trademark) Against Aerosolized Rabbitpox Virus in a Rabbit Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    rabbitpox virus in a rabbit model icole L. Garzaa, Josh M. Hatkina, Virginia Livingstona, Donald K. Nicholsb, aul J. Chaplind, Ariane Volkmannd, Diana...eywords: abbitpox virus a b s t r a c t Infection of rabbitswith aerosolized rabbitpox virus (RPXV) produces a disease similar tomonkeypox and smallpox...irus, amember of the genusOrthopoxvirus in the family Poxviridae. ther orthopoxviruses that can infect humans include monkeypox irus, cowpox virus , and

  13. Governing Geoengineering Research: A Political and Technical Vulnerability Analysis of Potential Near-Term Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    weather events, or the spread of tropical diseases into North America. The net A Vulnerability-and-Response-Option Analysis Framework for a Risk...Avoidable Surprises, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Doney, Scott C., Victoria J. Fabry , Richard A. Feely, and Joan A. Kleypas, “Ocean...Falkenmark, Louise Karlberg, Robert W. Corell, Victoria J. Fabry , James Hansen, Brian Walker, Diana Liverman, Katherine Richardson, Paul Crutzen, and

  14. A Model for Understanding the Relationship Between Transaction Costs and Acquisition Cost Breaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-30

    John Dillard, Chip Franck , and Francois Melese. 2007. Applying Insights from Transaction Cost Economics (TCE) to Improve DoD Cost Estimation. NPS...GSBPP-07-008. Monterey, CA: Naval Postgraduate School. Angelis, Diana, John Dillard, Chip Franck , and Francois Melese. 2008. Measuring Transaction...Jeffrey A. Drezner, James Dryden, Kenneth Horn, James G. Kallimani, Martin C. Libicki, Megan McKernan, Roger C. Molander, Charles Nemfakos, Chad J.R

  15. Air and Space Museum Apollo 40th Celebration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Jazz pianist and singer Diana Krall holds a montage given to her by the STS-125 space shuttle crew along with Apollo 11 Astronaut Neil Armstrong at the Apollo 40th anniversary celebration held at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. From left, Michael J. Massimino, Michael T. Good, Gregory C. Johnson, Andrew J. Feustel, Krall, Scott D. Altman, Neil Armstrong, John M. Grunsfeld and Megan McArthur. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Report on the Domestic Natural Disaster Health Workforce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-30

    PPHD) Maj Joseph Langevin (USTRANSCOM/SG [CF]) COL Gregory Limberis (ASD/RA) Diana Luan, PhD (USUHS/CDHAM) Elisabeth (Betsey) Lyman (CDPH) Sheila...Pangelinan, (CA NG/JFHQCA) CDR Paul Reed, MD (HHS/USPHS) Malcholm Reese (NGB/JSG) Tamara Richardson (Community Hospital of Long Beach) Col Lawrence...collection, and transfusion capability is limited. (Maj J. Langevin , DoD [U.S. Transportation Command {on behalf of U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command

  17. Measuring Transaction Costs in DoD Acquisition Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-29

    consider both the cost of production and the cost of transactions in evaluating “ make -or- buy ” decisions. The internal costs include the production costs ...Measuring Transaction Costs in DoD Acquisition Programs 29 September 2008 by Dr. Diana Angelis, Associate Professor John Dillard, Senior...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measuring Transaction Costs in DoD Acquisition Programs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  18. Exploring the Implications of Transaction Cost Economics on Joint and System-of-Systems Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-23

    Exploring the Implications of Transaction Cost Economics on Joint and System-of-Systems Programs 23 September 2008 Dr. Diana Angelis...SEP 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Exploring the Implications of Transaction Cost Economics...needs to be overcome for the DoD to achieve the promises of joint service and SoS programs involves the challenge of “ transaction costs .” These are the

  19. Archaeological Data Recovery in the Abiquiu Reservoir Multiple Resource Area, New Mexico,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    reservations in southern Colorado, and in 1681, the Apache were moved to the Jicarilla Reservation near Dulce , New Mexico (Schaafsma 1977). Ute sites...AD-A127 143 ARCHAEOLOGICAL DATA RECOVERY IN THE AR QUIJU RESERVOI R is MULTIPLE RESOURCE AREA NEW MEXICO (U NICKENS AND ASSOCIATES MONTROSE CO A D...MULTIPLE RESOURCE AREA, NEW MEXICO by 44 Alan D. Reed Susan M. Chandler Kim Kreut.zer and~ Diana Christensen N IC NICKENS ASSOCIATESn < 1 L..PO Box

  20. [Fleas from the Neuguén Province (Argentina); description of 4 new taxa (Insecta, Siphonaptera)].

    PubMed

    Beaucournu, J C; Alcover, J A

    1989-01-01

    The collect of 973 Fleas on various small terrestrial mammals, from December 1987 till May 1988, in the Neuquén Province (Argentina), has given 20 taxa. Hectopsylla pascuali n. sp., Plocopsylla consobrina n. sp., Agastopsylla boxi gibbosa n. ssp., Chiliopsylla allophyla tonnii n. ssp. are described. Plocopsylla diana Beaucournu, Gallardo and Launay, 1986, Ctenoparia inopinata Rothschild, 1909, Neotyphloceras crassispina chilensis Jordan, 1936, Tetrapsyllus satyrus Beaucournu and Torrés-Mura, 1986, Ectinorus martini Lewis, 1976, are new from Argentina.

  1. Spring Research Festival and NICBR Collaboration Winners Announced | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer The winners of the 2014 Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 7 and 8, were recognized on July 2, and included 20 NCI at Frederick researchers: Matthew Anderson, Victor Ayala, Matt Bess, Cristina Bergamaschi, Charlotte Choi, Rami Doueiri, Laura Guasch Pamies, Diana Haines, Saadia Iftikhar, Maria Kaltcheva, Wojciech Kasprzak, Balamurugan Kuppusamy, James Lautenberger, George Lountos, Megan Mounts, Uma Mudunuri, Martha Sklavos, Gloriana Shelton, Alex Sorum, and Shea Wright.

  2. AFRICOM: Reconstruction and Stability through the Provisional Reconstruction Team-Enhanced, Enabled by Unity of Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-12

    Colonial governments established within Africa did very little to establish African governance and 108 to develop civil societies ( Putman 2008, 6...for its future ( Putman 2008, 16). PRT-Es must have a clear, unified chain of command in order to achieve unity of effort. They must have access to...Library of Congress. Putman , Diana. 2008. Combating African questions about the legitimacy of AFRICOM. Strategy Research Project, Carlisle: U.S

  3. Democracy Assistance in the Gulf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply...Assistance in the Gulf 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Colonel Diana M. Holland Colon 5d...democratic community.14 George W. Bush continued his predecessors’ interest in encouraging democracy, and even justified regime change in certain cases

  4. The Collaborative Capacity of the NYPD, FDNY, and EMS in New York City: A Focus on the First Line Officer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    to my two wonderful daughters, Diana and Nicole, who inspire me every day to make our community a great place in which to live. This paper is...collaborative capacity is also influenced by cultural factors such as a unique language of terms, codes, and acronyms that facilitates communication ...within a particular agency; however, since communication is agency specific, it makes it difficult for different agencies to communicate together

  5. Proceedings of a Conference on a Comprehensive Technical Review of Human Factors Technology in the Design-for-Maintainers Held at Pensacola Beach, Florida on 9-11 March 1982,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-11

    impact), one wag observed that had it not been for Thomas Alva Edison , all of A us would have to resign ourselves to watching television by candlelight...Variel Avenue Ms. Diana Barry Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Rowland & Co. Commercial (213) 884-7470 6961 Hanging Moss Rd. Orlando, FL 32807 LT Thomas N...4970 "Commercial (202) 692-2164 ’.Commercial (202) 694-4970 199 CAPT Derr, USN CAPT. Thomas Gallagher l Chief Naval Operations Code 703 OP 514, Room

  6. Two decision-support tools for assessing the potential effects of energy development on hydrologic resources as part of the Energy and Environment in the Rocky Mountain Area interactive energy atlas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linard, Joshua I.; Matherne, Anne Marie; Leib, Kenneth J.; Carr, Natasha B.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Latysh, Natalie; Ignizio, Drew A.; Babel, Nils C.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey project—Energy and Environment in the Rocky Mountain Area (EERMA)—has developed a set of virtual tools in the form of an online interactive energy atlas for Colorado and New Mexico to facilitate access to geospatial data related to energy resources, energy infrastructure, and natural resources that may be affected by energy development. The interactive energy atlas currently (2014) consists of three components: (1) a series of interactive maps; (2) downloadable geospatial datasets; and (3) decison-support tools, including two maps related to hydrologic resources discussed in this report. The hydrologic-resource maps can be used to examine the potential effects of energy development on hydrologic resources with respect to (1) groundwater vulnerability, by using the depth to water, recharge, aquifer media, soil media, topography, impact of the vadose zone, and hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer (DRASTIC) model, and (2) landscape erosion potential, by using the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE). The DRASTIC aquifer vulnerability index value for the two-State area ranges from 48 to 199. Higher values, indicating greater relative aquifer vulnerability, are centered in south-central Colorado, areas in southeastern New Mexico, and along riparian corridors in both States—all areas where the water table is relatively close to the land surface and the aquifer is more susceptible to surface influences. As calculated by the RUSLE model, potential mean annual erosion, as soil loss in units of tons per acre per year, ranges from 0 to 12,576 over the two-State area. The RUSLE model calculated low erosion potential over most of Colorado and New Mexico, with predictions of highest erosion potential largely confined to areas of mountains or escarpments. An example is presented of how a fully interactive RUSLE model could be further used as a decision-support tool to evaluate the potential hydrologic effects of energy development on a

  7. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in Colorado, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Natasha B.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Fancher, Tammy; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Latysh, Natalie; Leib, Kenneth J.; Matherne, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This dataset represents an update to U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 597. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in Colorado, 2009 (available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/597/). This updated Colorado wind turbine Data Series provides geospatial data for all 1,204 wind turbines established within the State of Colorado as of September 2011, an increase of 297 wind turbines from 2009. Attributes specific to each turbine include: turbine location, manufacturer and model, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, potential megawatt output, land ownership, county, and development status of the wind turbine. Wind energy facility data for each turbine include: facility name, facility power capacity, number of turbines associated with each facility to date, facility developer, facility ownership, and year the facility went online. The locations of turbines are derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters. Locations of turbines constructed during or prior to August 2009 are based on August 2009 NAIP imagery and turbine locations constructed after August 2009 were based on September 2011 NAIP imagery. The location of turbines under construction during September 2011 likely will be less accurate than the location of existing turbines. This data series contributes to an Online Interactive Energy Atlas developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (http://my.usgs.gov/eerma/). The Energy Atlas synthesizes data on existing and potential energy development in Colorado and New Mexico and includes additional natural resource data layers. This information may be used by decisionmakers to evaluate and compare the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with different energy development strategies or scenarios. Interactive maps, downloadable data layers, comprehensive metadata, and decision-support tools also are included in the Energy Atlas. The format of

  8. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in New Mexico, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Natasha B.; Diffendorfer, James B.; Fancher, Tammy; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Latysh, Natalie; Leib, Kenneth J.; Matherne, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This dataset represents an update to U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 596. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in New Mexico, 2009 (available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/596/).This updated New Mexico wind turbine Data Series provides geospatial data for all 562 wind turbines established within the State of New Mexico as of June 2011, an increase of 155 wind turbines from 2009. Attributes specific to each turbine include: turbine location, manufacturer and model, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, potential megawatt output, land ownership, county, and development status of wind turbine. Wind energy facility data for each turbine include: facility name, facility power capacity, number of turbines associated with each facility to date, facility developer, facility ownership, and year the facility went online. The locations of turbines are derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters. The locations of turbines constructed during or prior to August 2009 are based on August 2009 NAIP imagery and turbine locations constructed after August 2009 were based June 2011 NAIP imagery. The location of turbines under construction during June 2011 likely will be less accurate than the location of existing turbines. This data series contributes to an Online Interactive Energy Atlas developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (http://my.usgs.gov/eerma/). The Energy Atlas synthesizes data on existing and potential energy development in Colorado and New Mexico and includes additional natural resource data layers. This information may be used by decisionmakers to evaluate and compare the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with different energy development strategies or scenarios. Interactive maps, downloadable data layers, comprehensive metadata, and decision-support tools also are included in the Energy Atlas. The format of the Energy

  9. A transgenic mutant of Lactuca sativa (lettuce) with a T-DNA tightly linked to loss of downy mildew resistance.

    PubMed

    Okubara, P A; Arroyo-Garcia, R; Shen, K A; Mazier, M; Meyers, B C; Ochoa, O E; Kim, S; Yang, C H; Michelmore, R W

    1997-11-01

    One hundred and ninety-two independent primary transformants of lettuce cv. Diana were obtained by co-cultivation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying constructs containing maize Ac transposase and Ds. R2 families were screened for mutations at four genes (Dm) for resistance to downy mildew. One family, designated dm3t524, had lost resistance to an isolate of Bremia lactucae expressing the avirulence gene Avr3. Loss of resistance segregated as a single recessive allele of Dm3. The mutation was not due to a large deletion as all molecular markers flanking Dm3 were present. Loss of Dm3 activity co-segregated with a T-DNA from which Ds had excised. Genomic DNA flanking the right border of this T-DNA was isolated by inverse polymerase chain reaction. This genomic sequence was present in four to five copies in wild-type cv. Diana. One copy was missing in all eight deletion mutants of Dm3 and altered in dm3t524, indicating tight physical linkage to Dm3. Three open reading frames (ORFs) occurred in a 6.6-kb region flanking the insertion site; however, expression of these ORFs was not detected. No similarities were detected between these ORFs and resistance genes cloned from other species. Transgenic complementation with 11-to 27-kb genomic fragments of Diana spanning the insertion site failed to restore Dm3 function to two ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-induced mutants of Dm3 or to cv. Cobham Green, which naturally lacks Dm3 activity. Therefore, either the T-DNA inserted extremely close to, but not within, Dm3 and the mutation may have been caused by secondary movement of Ds, or Dm3 activity is encoded by a gene extending beyond the fragments used for complementation.

  10. Implementation of hybrid clustering based on partitioning around medoids algorithm and divisive analysis on human Papillomavirus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimbi, Mentari Dian; Bustamam, Alhadi; Lestari, Dian

    2017-03-01

    Data clustering can be executed through partition or hierarchical method for many types of data including DNA sequences. Both clustering methods can be combined by processing partition algorithm in the first level and hierarchical in the second level, called hybrid clustering. In the partition phase some popular methods such as PAM, K-means, or Fuzzy c-means methods could be applied. In this study we selected partitioning around medoids (PAM) in our partition stage. Furthermore, following the partition algorithm, in hierarchical stage we applied divisive analysis algorithm (DIANA) in order to have more specific clusters and sub clusters structures. The number of main clusters is determined using Davies Bouldin Index (DBI) value. We choose the optimal number of clusters if the results minimize the DBI value. In this work, we conduct the clustering on 1252 HPV DNA sequences data from GenBank. The characteristic extraction is initially performed, followed by normalizing and genetic distance calculation using Euclidean distance. In our implementation, we used the hybrid PAM and DIANA using the R open source programming tool. In our results, we obtained 3 main clusters with average DBI value is 0.979, using PAM in the first stage. After executing DIANA in the second stage, we obtained 4 sub clusters for Cluster-1, 9 sub clusters for Cluster-2 and 2 sub clusters in Cluster-3, with the BDI value 0.972, 0.771, and 0.768 for each main cluster respectively. Since the second stage produce lower DBI value compare to the DBI value in the first stage, we conclude that this hybrid approach can improve the accuracy of our clustering results.

  11. Impact of preanalytical factors on fecal immunochemical tests: need for new strategies in comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Rubeca, Tiziana; Cellai, Filippo; Confortini, Massimo; Fraser, Callum G; Rapi, Stefano

    2015-07-22

    Harmonization of fecal immunochemical tests for hemoglobin (FIT-Hb) is crucial to compare clinical outcomes in screening programs. The lack of reference materials and standard procedures does not allow the use of usual protocols to compare methods. We propose 2 protocols, based on artificial biological samples (ABS), to discriminate preanalytical and analytical variation and investigate clinical performances. The protocols were used to compare 2 FIT systems available on European markets: the OC-Sensor Diana (Eiken, Tokyo, Japan) and HM-JACKarc (Kyowa-Medex, Tokyo, Japan). ABS were obtained adding Hb to Hb-free feces. In the first procedure, 35 ABS were collected for each collection device and analyzed on both systems. In the second, 188 ABS (106 positive and 82 negative) were -collected and tested on the specific systems. Passing-Bablock (PB), Pearson's correlation coefficients (R) and Bland-Altman difference analysis were used to compare data. PB, R and mean standard errors for Bland-Altman analysis (Diana vs. Arc) results were 0.93x-0.56: R = 0.97 and 19%; and 1.09x + 5.60: R = 0.96 and -18%; for Diana and Arc devices, respectively. No correlations and no difference in positive/negative assessment were observed with the second protocol. A good correlation was observed in comparing data generated using collection devices on the 2 systems. Manufacturers have developed different sample collection procedures for feces: therefore, data from different systems cannot easily be compared. Adoption of protocols to discriminate preanalytical and analytical variation would be a significant contribution to harmonization of FIT, facilitating data comparison and information acquisition for sample collection strategy and effect of buffers on systems.

  12. Shimoda 1854: Historical Consequences of a Natural Disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, A.

    2012-04-01

    At the end of 1854 - beginning of 1855 Japan was struck by a series of powerful earthquakes known as the Ansei Great Earthquakes. The first one, Ansei-Tōkai Quake, occurred on 23 December, 1854. It had a magnitude of 8.4; the epicenter ranged from the centre of Suruga Bay to the south-east into the ocean. It was followed by the Ansei-Nankai Quake on 24 December. The earthquakes with the following tsunami caused a huge damage in several regions of Japan: more than 20,000 buildings were destroyed, about 30,000 casualties caused. This natural disaster was witnessed by a Russian diplomatic mission led by admiral Yevfimy Putyatin. His flagship, frigate Diana, stayed at Shimoda, and Putyatin was conducting long and difficult negotiations trying to convince Japan of signing a commercial treaty with Russia, when Shimoda was hit by the tsunami. Several members of the mission described their impressions in their memoirs. The city was almost completely destroyed (only 16 houses survived the disaster). Diana was also badly damaged and sank in a storm while sailing to Heda for repairs. It was decided to build a new ship for the Russian mission. Works were carried out in Heda with the help of plans salvaged from the Diana, and required a cooperation of Russian sailors and Japanese carpenters. In about two months a two-masted schooner was built, which was christened Heda in honour of the city that helped with its construction. The Heda was the first western-style ship built in Japan, and thus can be called a "grandfather" of a Japanese oceanic navy. On 26 January, 1855 the Russian-Japanese negotiations were successfully concluded, and the Treaty of Shimoda was signed, marking the start of official relations between Russia and Japan. Thus a terrible natural disaster framed one of the most vivid pages in history of the Japanese-Russian relationship.

  13. Interpretation of the Theta+ as an isotensor pentaquark with weakly decaying partners

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Capstick; Philip R. Page; Winston Roberts

    2003-09-25

    The {Theta}{sup +}(1540), recently observed at LEPS, DIANA and CLAS, is hypothesized to be an isotensor resonance. This implies the existence of a multiplet where the {Theta}{sup ++}, {Theta}{sup +} and {Theta}{sup 0} have isospin-violating strong decays, and the {Theta}{sup +++} and {Theta}{sup -} have weak decays and so are long-lived. Production mechanisms for these states are discussed. The J{sup P} assignment of the {Theta} is most likely 1/2{sup -} or 3/2{sup -} or 5/2{sup -}.

  14. An Integrated Science-based methodology

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The data is secondary in nature. Meaning that no data was generated as part of this review effort. Rather, data that was available in the peer-reviewed literature was used.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Tolaymat , T., A. El Badawy, R. Sequeira, and A. Genaidy. An integrated science-based methodology to assess potential risks and implications of engineered nanomaterials. Diana Aga, Wonyong Choi, Andrew Daugulis, Gianluca Li Puma, Gerasimos Lyberatos, and Joo Hwa Tay JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 298: 270-281, (2015).

  15. Water Quality Changes Caused by Extension of the Winter Navigation Season on the Detroit - St. Clair River System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    I..1Fli F c P, Special ReDort 88-10 M US Army CorpsJuly 1988 of Engineers AD-A200 535 Cold RegisResearch & Engineering Laboratory Water quality...readable. Field and laboratory work by Carl Diener and Patricia Weyrick, both of CRREL, and data analysis by Diana Seely, formerly of CRREL, also...tation of brand names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. F Slot) For NTIS CRA&I ",?, U

  16. Electrical, Optical and Structural Studies of INAS/INGASB VLWIR Superlattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    FOR PUBLICATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASSIGNED DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. //SIGNED// //SIGNED// GAIL J. BROWN, Program Manager DIANA M ...using the 3x3 envelope-function approximation (EFA). However, the electron and hole masses, || m , in the in-plane direction are found from the full...in GaAs1-xPx alloys,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 7(10), 261-263 (1965). 3 P-Y Delaunay, B.- M . Nguyen, D. Hoffman, and M . Razeghi, “320x256 infrared focal

  17. Temperature Measurements of ET Plasmas Using Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    BEYER :t.CEIll: ALEXANDER E. ZIELINSKI C T I C 1, * &FE B2 61991, - FEBRUARY 1991 I APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. U.S. ARMY...Company 3 SRI International ATTN: H. J. McSpadden ATTN: G. Smith Black Canyon Stage 1 D. Crosley Box 1140 D. Golden Phoenix, AZ 85029 333 Ravenswood...Associates Princton, NJ 08540 ATTN: E. Freedman 2411 Diana Road Purdue University Baltimore , MD 21209-1525 School of Aeronautics and Astronautics ATN: J. R

  18. [Femicides: concepts, types and scenarios].

    PubMed

    Meneghel, Stela Nazareth; Portella, Ana Paula

    2017-09-01

    This text is a theoretical essay that discusses the concepts, types and scenarios of feminicides, and presents some proposals for the prevention of these premature, unjust and avoidable deaths. The text revisits the original concept of femicide proposed by Diana Russell and Jane Caputti and shows new and old scenarios where these crimes occur. It points to patriarchy, understood as being a hierarchical system of power between men and women, as one of the main determinants of these deaths. It ends by presenting actions and proposals to prevent and combat these gender crimes.

  19. Venus - Volcanism and rift formation in Beta Regio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. B.; Harmon, J. K.; Hine, A. A.; Head, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A new high-resolution radar image of Beta Regio, a Venus highland area, confirms the presence of a major tectonic rift system and associated volcanic activity. The lack of identifiable impact craters, together with the apparent superposition of the Theia Mons volcanic structure on the rift system, suggest that at least some of the volcanic activity occurred in relatively recent geologic time. The presence of topographically similar highland areas elsewhere on Venus (Aphrodite Terra, Dali Chasma, and Diana Chasma) suggests that rifting and volcanism are significant processes on Venus.

  20. Measurements of a Separating Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    operational. Diana Cantu, Judy Whirley, and Yolanda Contreras put the figures, tables, and manuscript into the present form. I I ~I ’I m_ I TABLE OF...high overheat ratio was used since Wood (1975) I showed that the range of flat frequency response is improved with a higher m overheat ratio. Standard...67, pp. 125-143. I Wood , N. B. 1975 "A Method for Determination and Control of the Frequency Response of the Constant-Temperature Hot-Wire Anemometer

  1. The Perseids Aug 11-12, 1996 in Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojurova, E.; Trukchev, I.

    As every year Astroclub "Canopus" organized an extended Perseid observing campaign. Members of the club took part in expedition to Avren village near Varna, at the National Astronomical Observatory (Rojen) and at the National Yought Astronomical Camp in Belite Brezi (South Bulgaria). Here we present some results derived on the basis of data obtained by Biliana Ognianova, Diana Tisheva, Diliana Antonova, Eva Bojurova, Elena Surbinska, Irena Stavreva, Katia Koleva, Lilia Porojanova, Anton Antonov, Denis Mechmedov, Doichin Docinski, Galin Genchev, Ivan Trukhchev, Valentin Velkov. More than 2000 Perseids were recorded. Some other showers were also observed.

  2. Aluminum Alloys Reinforced by Nano-Particles Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Perez Bustamante (M. Sc. Student) GRADUATED 2. Diana Crisel Mendoza Ruiz (M. Sc. Student) GRADUATED 3. Caleb Carrefio Gallardo (Ph. D. Student) 4. 6...280-283. 7. C. Carrefio- Gallardo , I. Estrada-Guel, M.A. Neri, E. Rocha-Rangel, M. Romero- Romo, C. L6pez-Melendez, and R.Martinez-Sanchez. Carbon...Estrada-Guel, C. Carefio- Gallardo , D.C. Mendoza-Ruiz, M. Miki-Yoshida, E. Rocha- Rangel and R. Martinez-Sanchez. Graphite Nanoparticle Dispersion in

  3. The gifts of silence and solitude.

    PubMed

    Schmidt Bunkers, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    In this column the author describes the importance of finding silence and solitude amid the noise and technology present today in the teaching-learning academy. Three gifts of silence and solitude are identified: the gift of comforting aloneness, the gift of vision for new horizons, and the gift of a sense of freedom. A humanbecoming perspective is used to explore the implications of these gifts. This column introduces a column by Diana Vander Woude describing her teaching-learning experience in leadership focusing on silence and solitude.

  4. Classification of Murine Pulmonary Tumors —

    Cancer.gov

    This WEB site contains a digital atlas of virtual histological slides with representative mouse and human pulmonary proliferative lesions. It complements the paper "Classification of Proliferative Pulmonary Lesions of the Mouse: Recommendations of the Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium" by Alexander Yu. Nikitin, Ana Alcaraz, Miriam R. Anver, Roderick T. Bronson, Robert D. Cardiff, Darlene Dixon, Armando E. Fraire, Edward W. Gabrielson, William T. Gunning, Diana C. Haines, Matthew H. Kaufman, R. Ilona Linnoila, Robert R. Maronpot, Alan S. Rabson, Robert L. Reddick, Sabine Rehm, Nora Rozengurt, Hildegard M. Schuller, Elena N. Shmidt, William D. Travis, Jerrold M. Ward and Tyler Jacks published in Cancer Research 64: 2307-2316, 2004

  5. A computer graphics based model for scattering from objects of arbitrary shapes in the optical region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Narendra S.; Rozehnal, Ivan; Thompson, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    A computer-graphics-based model, named DIANA, is presented for generation of objects of arbitrary shape and for calculating bidirectional reflectances and scattering from them, in the visible and infrared region. The computer generation is based on a modified Lindenmayer system approach which makes it possible to generate objects of arbitrary shapes and to simulate their growth, dynamics, and movement. Rendering techniques are used to display an object on a computer screen with appropriate shading and shadowing and to calculate the scattering and reflectance from the object. The technique is illustrated with scattering from canopies of simulated corn plants.

  6. A Electronic Voting Scheme Achieved by Using Quantum Proxy Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Ding, Li-Yuan; Yu, Yao-Feng; Li, Peng-Fei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new electronic voting scheme using Bell entangled states as quantum channels. This scheme is based on quantum proxy signature. The voter Alice, vote management center Bob, teller Charlie and scrutineer Diana only perform single particle measurement to realize the electronic voting process. So the scheme reduces the technical difficulty and increases operation efficiency. It can be easily realized. We use quantum key distribution and one-time pad to guarantee its unconditional security. The scheme uses the physical characteristics of quantum mechanics to guarantee its anonymity, verifiability, unforgetability and undeniability.

  7. Initial Implementation of an Active Prediction Capability in Bellhop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Defence R&D Canada. Contract Project Manager : Diana McCammon, 902-538-3003 Contract number: W7707-098272 Scientific Authority: Dr. WA Roger, 902-426... Manager : Dr. D. McCammon, 902-538-3003 Contract Number: W7707-098272 CSA: Dr. WA Roger, 902-426-3100 ext.292 The scientific or...of the transmission loss of sound in the ocean, and is a key component of the tactical oceanography system called the Environment Modeling Manager

  8. Malagasyprinus, a new genus of the Saprininae from Madagascar with description of two new species (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Saprininae) (First contribution to the knowledge of the Histeridae of Madagascar).

    PubMed

    Lackner, Tomáš; Gomy, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Based on the results of recent phylogenetic analysis of the higher taxa of the Saprininae as well as external morphological characters, especially the presence of deep and large prosternal foveae, and the shape and position of the sensory organs of the antennal club, the species Saprinus (s.str.) caeruleatus Lewis, 1905 is excluded from the genus Saprinus and a new genus Malagasyprinus, exclusive to Madagascar, is established for it. The new genus shows mainly characters that are apomorphic for the subfamily and contains another two, highly similar allopatric species Malagasyprinus perrieri sp. n., and Malagasyprinus diana sp. n., described herein. The three species are best separated from each other by the structure of the prosternum and male terminalia, especially the shape of the aedeagus. We re-describe Malagasyprinus caeruleatus comb. n. and provide Malagasyprinus perrieri and Malagasyprinus diana with brief differential diagnoses. All taxon descriptions are accompanied with color habitat photographs, SEM micrographs and drawings of their male genitalia. A key to the species of Malagasyprinus is given. Sensory structures of the antenna of Malagasyprinus caeruleatus comb. n. are likewise depicted herein. The systematic position of the newly erected genus is discussed. A lectotype of Saprinus caeruleatus Lewis, 1905 is designated.

  9. Collaboration on SEP Missions to the Moon and Small Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    In response to the Discovery announcement of opportunity a team consisting of TRW Lewis Research Center, JPL and UCLA with scientific co-investigators from government and University laboratories have proposed to fly the first planetary solar electric propulsion (SEP) mission. Diana is designed to carry an X-ray and gamma ray spectrometer, and imaging spectrometer, a framing camera, a laser altimer an ion spectrometer and a magnetometer. In order to obtain lunar gravity data from the far side of the moon a relay satellite is placed into high polar orbit about the moon to relay the Doppler-shifted telemetry to Earth. Diana will spend two months in a 700 km polar orbit obtaining mineralogical data from a full spectral map of the lunar surface, and then spend a year in a 100 km (or below) polar orbit mapping the lunar elemental composition, its topography, gravity field, ions from its atmosphere and its permanent and induced magnetic fields. After the low altitude mapping phase the ion thrusters propel the spacecraft out of the lunar sphere of influence and onto a heloioscentric trajectory to rendezvous with dormant comet Wilson-Harrington. The ground truth provided by the returned lunar samples to validate the remote sensing instruments for lunar studies will also serve to validate the Wilson-Harrington observations since the same instruments will be used at both bodies.

  10. Profile: Manhiça Health Research Centre (Manhiça HDSS).

    PubMed

    Sacoor, Charfudin; Nhacolo, Ariel; Nhalungo, Delino; Aponte, John J; Bassat, Quique; Augusto, Orvalho; Mandomando, Inácio; Sacarlal, Jahit; Lauchande, Natu; Sigaúque, Betuel; Alonso, Pedro; Macete, Eusébio; Munguambe, Khátia; Guinovart, Caterina; Aide, Pedro; Menendez, Clara; Acácio, Sozinho; Quelhas, Diana; Sevene, Esperança; Nhampossa, Tacilta

    2013-10-01

    The Manhiça Health Research Centre, established in 1996 in a rural area of southern Mozambique, currently follows around 92 000 individuals living in approximately 20 000 enumerated and geo-positioned households. Its main strength is the possibility of linking demographic data and clinical data to promote and conduct biomedical research in priority health areas. Socio-demographic data are updated twice a year and clinical data are collected on a daily basis. The data collected in Manhiça HDSS comprises household and individual characteristics, household socio-economic assets, vital data, migration, individual health history and cause of death, among others. Studies conducted in this HDSS contributed to guide the health authorities and decision-making bodies to define or adjust health policies such as the introduction of Mozambique's expanded programme of immunization with different vaccines (Haemophilus influenzae type b, Pneumococcus) or the development of the concept of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Infants (IPTi) that led to the World Health Organization recommendation of this method as best practice for the control of malaria among infants. Manhiça's data can be accessed through a formal request to Diana Quelhas (diana.quelhas@manhica.net) accompanied by a proposal that will be analysed by the Manhiça HDSS internal scientific and ethics committees.

  11. Genetically engineered Mengo virus vaccination of multiple captive wildlife species.

    PubMed

    Backues, K A; Hill, M; Palmenberg, A C; Miller, C; Soike, K F; Aguilar, R

    1999-04-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), has caused the deaths of many species of animals in zoological parks and research institutions. The Audubon Park Zoo, (New Orleans, Louisiana, USA) attempted vaccination of several species with a killed EMCV vaccine with mixed results. This paper reports an attempt at vaccination against EMCV using a genetically engineered, live attenuated Mengo virus (vMC0) at the Audubon Park Zoo and Miami Metro Zoo, (Miami, Florida, USA) from December 1996 to June 1997. Several species of animals were vaccinated with vMC0, which is serologically indistinguishable from the field strain of EMCV. Serum samples were taken at the time of vaccination and again 21 days later, then submitted for serum neutralization titers against EMCV. The vaccinate species included red capped mangebey (Cercocebus torquatus), colobus (Colobus guereza), angolan colobus (Colobus angolensis), ruffed lemur (Lemur variegatus ruber and Lemur variegatus variegatus), back lemur (Lemur macaco), ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), siamang (Hylobates syndactylus), diana guenon (Cercopithicus diana), spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi), common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), talapoin monkey (Cercopithecus talapoin), Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris), Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii), Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius), bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), gerenuk (Litocranius walleri), guanaco (Lama glama guanicoe), black duiker (Cephalophus niger), Vietnamese potbellied pig (Sus scrofa), babirusa (Babyrousa babyrussa), collard peccary (Tayass tajacu), and African crested porcupine (Hystrix africaeaustralis). The vaccine response was variable, with high virus neutralizing antibody titer responses in some primate species and mixed to poor responses for other species. No ill effects were seen with vaccination.

  12. Diversity and prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in seven non-human primates of the Taï National Park, Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Kouassi, Roland Yao Wa; McGraw, Scott William; Yao, Patrick Kouassi; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Brunet, Julie; Pesson, Bernard; Bonfoh, Bassirou; N’goran, Eliezer Kouakou; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2015-01-01

    Parasites and infectious diseases are well-known threats to primate populations. The main objective of this study was to provide baseline data on fecal parasites in the cercopithecid monkeys inhabiting Côte d’Ivoire’s Taï National Park. Seven of eight cercopithecid species present in the park were sampled: Cercopithecus diana, Cercopithecus campbelli, Cercopithecus petaurista, Procolobus badius, Procolobus verus, Colobus polykomos, and Cercocebus atys. We collected 3142 monkey stool samples between November 2009 and December 2010. Stool samples were processed by direct wet mount examination, formalin-ethyl acetate concentration, and MIF (merthiolate, iodine, formalin) concentration methods. Slides were examined under microscope and parasite identification was based on the morphology of cysts, eggs, and adult worms. A total of 23 species of parasites was recovered including 9 protozoa (Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Entamoeba hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba butschlii, Chilomastix mesnili, Giardia sp., Balantidium coli, and Blastocystis sp.), 13 nematodes (Oesophagostomum sp., Ancylostoma sp., Anatrichosoma sp., Capillariidae Gen. sp. 1, Capillariidae Gen. sp. 2, Chitwoodspirura sp., Subulura sp., spirurids [cf Protospirura muricola], Ternidens sp., Strongyloides sp., Trichostrongylus sp., and Trichuris sp.), and 1 trematode (Dicrocoelium sp.). Diversity indices and parasite richness were high for all monkey taxa, but C. diana, C. petaurista, C. atys, and C. campbelli exhibited a greater diversity of parasite species and a more equitable distribution. The parasitological data reported are the first available for these cercopithecid species within Taï National Park. PMID:25619957

  13. Tensiometer-Based Irrigation Management of Subirrigated Soilless Tomato: Effects of Substrate Matric Potential Control on Crop Performance.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Francesco F; Serio, Francesco; Mininni, Carlo; Signore, Angelo; Parente, Angelo; Santamaria, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Automatic irrigation scheduling based on real-time measurement of soilless substrate water status has been recognized as a promising approach for efficient greenhouse irrigation management. Identification of proper irrigation set points is crucial for optimal crop performance, both in terms of yield and quality, and optimal use of water resources. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of irrigation management based on matric potential control on growth, plant-water relations, yield, fruit quality traits, and water-use efficiency of subirrigated (through bench system) soilless tomato. Tensiometers were used for automatic irrigation control. Two cultivars, "Kabiria" (cocktail type) and "Diana" (intermediate type), and substrate water potential set-points (-30 and -60 hPa, for "Diana," and -30, -60, and -90 hPa for "Kabiria"), were compared. Compared with -30 hPa, water stress (corresponding to a -60 hPa irrigation set-point) reduced water consumption (14%), leaf area (18%), specific leaf area (19%), total yield (10%), and mean fruit weight (13%), irrespective of the cultivars. At -60 hPa, leaf-water status of plants, irrespective of the cultivars, showed an osmotic adjustment corresponding to a 9% average osmotic potential decrease. Total yield, mean fruit weight, plant water, and osmotic potential decreased linearly when -30, -60, and -90 hPa irrigation set-points were used in "Kabiria." Unmarketable yield in "Diana" increased when water stress was imposed (187 vs. 349 g·plant(-1), respectively, at -30 and -60 hPa), whereas the opposite effect was observed in "Kabiria," where marketable yield loss decreased linearly [by 1.05 g·plant(-1) per unit of substrate water potential (in the tested range from -30 to -90 hPa)]. In the second cluster, total soluble solids of the fruit and dry matter increased irrespective of the cultivars. In the seventh cluster, in "Diana," only a slight increase was observed from -30 vs. -60 hPa (3.3 and 1

  14. Cassiopeia A: Supernova explosion and expansion simulations under strong asymmetry conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yakhin, R. A. Rozanov, V. B.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Stepanov, R. V.

    2016-09-15

    We propose a model for the explosion of a supernova and the expansion of its ejecta in the presence of a strong initial asymmetry (at the explosion time) in the central part of the star (core) and a possible smallscale asymmetry in the peripheral regions. The Chandra and NuSTAR observations of ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant are analyzed. Based on our 1D and 2D numerical simulations performed using the DIANA and NUTCY codes, we propose a model for the explosion and expansion of ejecta that explains the observed experimental data where the materials initially located in the central region of the star end up on the periphery of the cloud of ejecta.

  15. Comparison of satellite IR rain estimates with radar rain observations in hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, K. Robert; Negri, Andrew J.; Adler, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Radar-observed rainrates and rain areas obtained for the Hurricanes Frederic (1979), Alicia (1983), and Diana (1984) were used in conjunction with GOES IR data to examine the validity of three satellite IR rain estimation techniques: the Arkin (1983) method, the Negri-Adler-Wetzel (1984) technique, and the convective-stratiform technique of Adler and Negri (1987). The Alicia hurricane was also monitored using the subjective manual technique of Spayd and Scofield (1984). It is shown that the success of IR techniques in identifying areas of rainfall depends on the hurricane feature being addressed. Thus, the three objective IR techniques were unable to identify the locations of radar-observed eyewall and inner band precipitation areas because of strong vertical wind shear in the eyewall and the lack of the vertical extent of stratiform precipitation beneath the central dense overcast.

  16. Linear Combination Fitting (LCF)-XANES analysis of As speciation in selected mine-impacted materials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This table provides sample identification labels and classification of sample type (tailings, calcinated, grey slime). For each sample, total arsenic and iron concentrations determined by acid digestion and ICP analysis are provided along with arsenic in-vitro bioaccessibility (As IVBA) values to estimate arsenic risk. Lastly, the table provides linear combination fitting results from synchrotron XANES analysis showing the distribution of arsenic speciation phases present in each sample along with fitting error (R-factor).This dataset is associated with the following publication:Ollson, C., E. Smith, K. Scheckel, A. Betts, and A. Juhasz. Assessment of arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in mine-impacted materials. Diana Aga, Wonyong Choi, Andrew Daugulis, Gianluca Li Puma, Gerasimos Lyberatos, and Joo Hwa Tay JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 313: 130-137, (2016).

  17. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals MicroRNAs Regulating Biological Pathways in Exercise-Induced Cardiac Physiological Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiahong; Liu, Yang; Xie, Yuan; Zhao, Cuimei; Wang, Hongbao

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy is generally considered to be a type of adaptive change after exercise training and is beneficial for cardiovascular diseases. This study aims at investigating exercise-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and their potential biological pathways. Here, we collected 23 miRNAs from 8 published studies. MirPath v.3 from the DIANA tools website was used to execute the analysis, and TargetScan was used to predict the target genes. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Various miRNA targets and molecular pathways, such as Fatty acid elongation, Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and ECM-receptor interaction, were identified. This study could prompt the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy.

  18. Formation of a narrow baryon resonance with positive strangeness in K{sup +} collisions with Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.

    2010-07-15

    The data on the charge-exchange reaction K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}pXe', obtained with the bubble chamber DIANA, are reanalyzed using increased statistics and updated selections. Our previous evidence for formation of a narrow pK{sup 0} resonance with mass near 1538 MeV is confirmed. The statistical significance of the signal reaches some 8{sigma} (6{sigma}) standard deviations when estimated as S/{radical}B (S/{radical}B + S. The mass and intrinsic width of the {Theta}{sup +} baryon are measured as m = 1538 {+-} 2 MeV and {Gamma} = 0.39 {+-} 0.10 MeV.

  19. Use of multiple cluster analysis methods to explore the validity of a community outcomes concept map.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Concept mapping is now a commonly-used technique for articulating and evaluating programmatic outcomes. However, research regarding validity of knowledge and outcomes produced with concept mapping is sparse. The current study describes quantitative validity analyses using a concept mapping dataset. We sought to increase the validity of concept mapping evaluation results by running multiple cluster analysis methods and then using several metrics to choose from among solutions. We present four different clustering methods based on analyses using the R statistical software package: partitioning around medoids (PAM), fuzzy analysis (FANNY), agglomerative nesting (AGNES) and divisive analysis (DIANA). We then used the Dunn and Davies-Bouldin indices to assist in choosing a valid cluster solution for a concept mapping outcomes evaluation. We conclude that the validity of the outcomes map is high, based on the analyses described. Finally, we discuss areas for further concept mapping methods research.

  20. Comparison of satellite IR rain estimates with radar rain observations in hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, K. Robert; Negri, Andrew J.; Adler, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Radar-observed rainrates and rain areas obtained for the Hurricanes Frederic (1979), Alicia (1983), and Diana (1984) were used in conjunction with GOES IR data to examine the validity of three satellite IR rain estimation techniques: the Arkin (1983) method, the Negri-Adler-Wetzel (1984) technique, and the convective-stratiform technique of Adler and Negri (1987). The Alicia hurricane was also monitored using the subjective manual technique of Spayd and Scofield (1984). It is shown that the success of IR techniques in identifying areas of rainfall depends on the hurricane feature being addressed. Thus, the three objective IR techniques were unable to identify the locations of radar-observed eyewall and inner band precipitation areas because of strong vertical wind shear in the eyewall and the lack of the vertical extent of stratiform precipitation beneath the central dense overcast.

  1. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals MicroRNAs Regulating Biological Pathways in Exercise-Induced Cardiac Physiological Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiahong; Liu, Yang; Xie, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy is generally considered to be a type of adaptive change after exercise training and is beneficial for cardiovascular diseases. This study aims at investigating exercise-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and their potential biological pathways. Here, we collected 23 miRNAs from 8 published studies. MirPath v.3 from the DIANA tools website was used to execute the analysis, and TargetScan was used to predict the target genes. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Various miRNA targets and molecular pathways, such as Fatty acid elongation, Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and ECM-receptor interaction, were identified. This study could prompt the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:28286759

  2. KSC-2013-3953

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-15

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – During a Spanish language news conference at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, agency officials discussed preparations for the launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission. Participating in the briefing, from the left, are Andres Adorno of NASA Public Affairs, Jared Espley, project scientist at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., Sandra Cauffman, deputy project manager at Goddard and Diana Calero, launch integration engineer in NASA's Launch Services Program at Kennedy. MAVEN is being prepared for its scheduled launch on Nov 18, 2013 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Positioned in an orbit above the Red Planet, MAVEN will study the upper atmosphere of Mars in unprecedented detail. For information on the MAVEN mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/maven/main/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  3. Mutations Allow JC Polyomaviruses to Elude Antibody Recognition | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) infects the urinary tract of most adults. In healthy individuals, JCV infection does not cause noticeable symptoms. However, in those with compromised immune systems, JCV can cause a lethal brain disease called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Data from a recently approved assay to detect serum antibodies specific for the JCV protein VP1 revealed that patients with antibodies are at increased risk of developing PML. At the same time, sequencing studies of JCV in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) identified a number of mutations in VP1. Christopher Buck, Ph.D., and Diana Pastrana, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, and their colleagues hypothesized that the VP1 mutations could allow the virus to evade antibody-mediated elimination.

  4. KSC-2013-3951

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-15

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – During a Spanish language news conference at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, agency officials discussed preparations for the launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission. Participating in the briefing is Diana Calero, launch integration engineer in NASA's Launch Services Program at Kennedy. MAVEN is being prepared for its scheduled launch on Nov 18, 2013 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Positioned in an orbit above the Red Planet, MAVEN will study the upper atmosphere of Mars in unprecedented detail. For information on the MAVEN mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/maven/main/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  5. Physician involvement enhances coding accuracy to ensure national standards: an initiative to improve awareness among new junior trainees.

    PubMed

    Nallasivan, S; Gillott, T; Kamath, S; Blow, L; Goddard, V

    2011-06-01

    Record Keeping Standards is a development led by the Royal College of Physicians of London (RCP) Health Informatics Unit and funded by the National Health Service (NHS) Connecting for Health. A supplementary report produced by the RCP makes a number of recommendations based on a study held at an acute hospital trust. We audited the medical notes and coding to assess the accuracy, documentation by the junior doctors and also to correlate our findings with the RCP audit. Northern Lincolnshire & Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has 114,000 'finished consultant episodes' per year. A total of 100 consecutive medical (50) and rheumatology (50) discharges from Diana Princess of Wales Hospital from August-October 2009 were reviewed. The results showed an improvement in coding accuracy (10% errors), comparable to the RCP audit but with 5% documentation errors. Physician involvement needs enhancing to improve the effectiveness and to ensure clinical safety.

  6. Evidence for retrograde lithospheric subduction on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Annular moats and outer rises around large Venus coronas such as Artemis, Latona, and Eithinoha are similar in arcuate planform and topography to the trenches and outer rises of terrestrial subduction zones. On earth, trenches and outer rises are modeled as the flexural response of a thin elastic lithosphere to the bending moment of the subducted slab; this lithospheric flexure model also accounts for the trenches and outer rises outboard of the major coronas on Venus. Accordingly, it is proposed that retrograde lithospheric subduction may be occurring on the margins of the large Venus coronas while compensating back-arc extension is occurring in the expanding coronas interiors. Similar processes may be taking place at other deep arcuate trenches or chasmata on Venus such as those in the Dali-Diana chasmata area of aestern Aphrodite Terra.

  7. Cassiopeia A: Supernova explosion and expansion simulations under strong asymmetry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhin, R. A.; Rozanov, V. B.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Stepanov, R. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a model for the explosion of a supernova and the expansion of its ejecta in the presence of a strong initial asymmetry (at the explosion time) in the central part of the star (core) and a possible smallscale asymmetry in the peripheral regions. The Chandra and NuSTAR observations of ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant are analyzed. Based on our 1D and 2D numerical simulations performed using the DIANA and NUTCY codes, we propose a model for the explosion and expansion of ejecta that explains the observed experimental data where the materials initially located in the central region of the star end up on the periphery of the cloud of ejecta.

  8. A new genus of huntsman spiders (Araneae, Sparassidae, Sparianthinae) from the Neotropical region.

    PubMed

    Rheims, Cristina A

    2013-11-06

    Uaiuara gen. nov. is described to include Sparianthis amazonica Simon from Brazil, Sparianthis barroana Chamberlin from Panama, and five new species, namely: Uaiuara quyguaba sp. nov. from the states of Amazonas, Pará and Amapá; Uaiuara ope sp. nov. from Acre and Uaiuara jirau sp. nov. from Rondônia, all in northern Brazil, Uaiuara palenque sp. nov. from Ecuador and Uaiuara dianae sp. nov. from Peru. The genus is easily distinguished from the remaining Neotropical Sparianthinae by the very recurved anterior eye row, the large number of ventral spines on tibiae of legs I-II, the retrolateral grove on the male palpal cymbium and the convoluted duct system of the female vulva. In addition, the female of S. barroana and the male of S. amazonica are described for the first time. The latter species is newly recorded from Colombia, Suriname, Ecuador and Bolivia.

  9. The Unappreciated Ramifications of the "Triple Obstetric Tragedy".

    PubMed

    Quigley, James

    2015-06-01

    The untimely death of a young Princess of Wales reverberated around the world in August 1997. Diana, Princess of Wales, was not, however, the first holder of that title to suffer an early demise. Princess Charlotte of Wales was fifteen years younger and died exactly one hundred and eighty years earlier. A national feeling of grief and desolation consumed the nation in the same way as it did following the death of the "People's Princess" in the twentieth century. Her death during childbirth led to a change in the practice of obstetrics and a succession crisis in the British monarchy. But were the consequences of the fateful night of 6th November 1817 to be even more profound, indirectly contributing to war in Europe a century later?

  10. Resistance to hurricane disturbance of an epifaunal community on the continental shelf off North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby-Smith, William W.; Ustach, Joseph

    1986-10-01

    Hurricane Diana was stalled over the continental shelf of central North Carolina on 11-13 September 1984 in the vicinity of a previously studied epifaunal community (30 m depth). Two research cruises following the hurricane used still camera and TV transects to obtain data which allowed an evaluation of stormrelated effects on taxa of algae, sponges, corals, echinoderms and fish. Analysis of 35-mm slides suggested no effects attributable to the hurricane except observations of damaged coral heads and dead mussels. Analysis of television transects indicated no storm related changes from the previous study in frequency of occurrence of large epibenthic taxa. Hurricane damage was much less than anticipated and it is hypothesized that these coral reef-type communities are adapted to or structured by strong bottom currents generated by the frequent passage of gales and that the passage of hurricanes causes little additional stress.

  11. Optimal lunar trajectories for a combined chemical-electric propulsion spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kluever, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    Spacecraft which utilize electric propulsion (EP) systems are capable of delivering a greater payload fraction compared to spacecraft using conventional chemical propulsion systems. Several researchers have investigated numerous applications of low-thrust EP including a manned Mars mission, scientific missions to the outer planets, and lunar missions. In contrast, the study of optimal combined high and low-thrust spacecraft trajectories has been limited. In response to the release of NASA's 1994 Announcement of Opportunity (AO) for Discovery class interplanetary exploration missions, a preliminary investigation of a lunar comet rendezvous mission using a solar electric propulsion (SEP) spacecraft was performed. The Discovery mission (eventually named Diana) was envisioned to be a two-phase scientific exploration mission: the first phase involved exploration of the moon and second phase involved rendezvous with a comet. The initial phase began with a chemical propulsion translunar injection and chemical insertion into a lunar orbit, followed by a low-thrust SEP transfer to a circular, polar, low-lunar orbit (LLO). After scientific data was collected at the moon, the SEP spacecraft performed a spiral lunar escape maneuver to begin the interplanetary leg of the mission. After escape from the Earth-moon system, the SEP spacecraft maneuvered in interplanetary space and performed a rendezvous with a short period comet. An initial study that demonstrated the feasibility of using EP for the lunar and comet orbit transfer was performed under the grant NAG3-1581. This final report is a continuation of the initial research efforts in support of the Discovery mission proposal that was submitted to NASA Headquarters in October 1994. Section 2 discusses the lunar orbit transfer phase of the Diana mission which involves both chemical and electric propulsion stages. Section 3 discusses the chemical lunar orbit insertion (LOI) burn optimization. Finally, section 4 presents the

  12. [Central online quality assurance in radiology: an IT solution exemplified by the German Breast Cancer Screening Program].

    PubMed

    Czwoydzinski, J; Girnus, R; Sommer, A; Heindel, W; Lenzen, H

    2011-09-01

    Physical-technical quality assurance is one of the essential tasks of the National Reference Centers in the German Breast Cancer Screening Program. For this purpose the mammography units are required to transfer the measured values of the constancy tests on a daily basis and all phantom images created for this purpose on a weekly basis to the reference centers. This is a serious logistical challenge. To meet these requirements, we developed an innovative software tool. By the end of 2005, we had already developed web-based software (MammoControl) allowing the transmission of constancy test results via entry forms. For automatic analysis and transmission of the phantom images, we then introduced an extension (MammoControl DIANA). This was based on Java, Java Web Start, the NetBeans Rich Client Platform, the Pixelmed Java DICOM Toolkit and the ImageJ library. MammoControl DIANA was designed to run locally in the mammography units. This allows automated on-site image analysis. Both results and compressed images can then be transmitted to the reference center. We developed analysis modules for the daily and monthly consistency tests and additionally for a homogeneity test. The software we developed facilitates the immediate availability of measurement results, phantom images, and DICOM header data in all reference centers. This allows both targeted guidance and short response time in the case of errors. We achieved a consistent IT-based evaluation with standardized tools for the entire screening program in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. A microclimate study on hypogea environments of ancient roman building.

    PubMed

    Scatigno, C; Gaudenzi, S; Sammartino, M P; Visco, G

    2016-10-01

    Roman hypogea, vernacular settlements or crypts, are underground places characterised by specific and unique challenges (RH<90% and almost constant temperature throughout the whole year) related to their relative isolation from the outdoor environment. These sites often require adequate monitoring tools providing complete environmental information in order to carry out appropriate strategies for scheduling routine maintenance and designing suitable layouts for their preservation. In this work we present the results of a carefully planned thermo-hygrometric monitoring campaign conducted in a peculiar Roman building (130CE), the "Casa di Diana" Mithraeum, sited in Ostia Antica (archaeological site, Rome-Italy), with the aim of characterising the indoor environment as the structure suffers of several conservation problems (biocolonisation, efflorescences, evaporating and condensing cycle for wall-building materials). The campaign involving multipoint continuous measurement was carefully planned to better describe this micro-clime. In addition to underground environmental data available in literature, we have also performed, as a checkpoint control, a thermo-hygrometric monitoring campaign in the "Terme di Mitra" Hypogeum, a few meters from the "Casa di Diana". The recorded data was analysed by multivariate statistical and chemometric analyses. The results brought to light the presence of different microclimates (three areas) within a single Mithraeum: a room (pre-Mithraeum) and an area (Mithraeum: 2-4m) present a thermo-hygrometric environmental behaviour in accordance with a semi-confined environment, another area (Mithraeum: 1-2m) behaves accordingly with underground environments (although it cannot be described as such), and the last area (Mithraeum: 0-1m) where was recording RH values close to saturation (96-99%), associated with non-ventilated areas where the rising damp is "held" and not dispersed, describing an own micro-clime, comparable to a "small greenhouse

  14. MicroRNAs associated with tumour migration, invasion and angiogenic properties in A549 and SK-Lu1 human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chai San; Yap, Seow Hui; Phuah, Neoh Hun; In, Lionel L A; Hasima, Noor

    2014-02-01

    Dysregulation in miRNA expression contributes towards the initiation and progression of metastasis by regulating multiple target genes. In this study, variations in miRNA expression profiles were investigated between high and low invasive NSCLC cell lines followed by identification of miRNAs with targets governing NSCLC's metastatic potential. Two NSCLC sub-cell lines possessing opposing migration and invasion properties were established using serial transwell invasion assays. Global miRNA expression profiles were obtained using microarray followed by RT-qPCR validation. Target prediction and pathway enrichment analyses were conducted on dysregulated miRNAs using DIANA-mirPath, DIANA-microT 4.0 and TargetScan 5.2 softwares. Metastatic effects of dysregulated miRNAs were evaluated using wound healing assay, invasion assay and HUVEC angiogenesis assay following transfection with mimics and inhibitors. A total of eleven differentially expressed miRNAs were revealed from microarray analyses, with four miRNAs validated through RT-qPCR. Three of these miRNAs were further selected for biological function validations, with only two modulating metastasis. A pathway model describing interactions between miRNAs and metastasis highlighted four major pathways: non-canonical Wnt/PCP, TGF-β, MAPK and integrin-FAK-Src signalling cascade. These results provide a list of potential candidate metastatic markers during the classification of NSCLCs and a platform for the development of bio-therapeutics targeting these miRNA control elements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Permanent Habitats in Earth-Sol/Mars-Sol Orbit Positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspon, J.

    Project Outpost is a manned Earth-Sol/Mars-Sol platform that enables permanent occupation in deep space. In order to develop the program elements for this complex mission, Project Outpost will rely primarily on existing/nearterm technology and hardware for the construction of its components. For the purposes of this study, four mission requirements are considered: 1. Outpost - Man's 1st purpose-produced effort of space engineering, in which astructure is developed/constructed in an environment completely alien to currentpractices for EVA guidelines. 2. Newton - a concept study developed at StarGate Research, for the development ofa modified Hohmann personnel orbital transport operating between Earth andMars. Newton would serve as the primary crew delivery apparatus throughrepeatable transfer scheduling for all Earth-Lpoint-Mars activities. Thispermanent "transit system" would establish the foundations for Solar systemcolonization. 3. Cruis - a concept study developed at StarGate Research, for the development of amodified Hohmann cargo orbital transport operating between Earth and Mars.Cruis would serve as the primary equipment delivery apparatus throughrepeatable transfer scheduling for all Earth-Lpoint-Mars activities. Thispermanent "transit system" would establish the foundations for Solar systemcolonization, and 4. Ares/Diana - a more conventional space platform configuration for Lunar andMars orbit is included as a construction baseline. The operations of these assetsare supported, and used for the support, of the outpost. Outpost would be constructed over a 27-year period of launch opportunities into Earth-Sol or Mars-Sol Lagrange orbit (E-S/M-S L1, 4 or 5). The outpost consists of an operations core with a self-contained power generation ability, a docking and maintenance structure, a Scientific Research complex and a Habitation Section. After achieving initial activation, the core will provide the support and energy required to operate the outpost in a 365

  16. Tensiometer-Based Irrigation Management of Subirrigated Soilless Tomato: Effects of Substrate Matric Potential Control on Crop Performance

    PubMed Central

    Montesano, Francesco F.; Serio, Francesco; Mininni, Carlo; Signore, Angelo; Parente, Angelo; Santamaria, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Automatic irrigation scheduling based on real-time measurement of soilless substrate water status has been recognized as a promising approach for efficient greenhouse irrigation management. Identification of proper irrigation set points is crucial for optimal crop performance, both in terms of yield and quality, and optimal use of water resources. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of irrigation management based on matric potential control on growth, plant–water relations, yield, fruit quality traits, and water-use efficiency of subirrigated (through bench system) soilless tomato. Tensiometers were used for automatic irrigation control. Two cultivars, “Kabiria” (cocktail type) and “Diana” (intermediate type), and substrate water potential set-points (−30 and −60 hPa, for “Diana,” and −30, −60, and −90 hPa for “Kabiria”), were compared. Compared with −30 hPa, water stress (corresponding to a −60 hPa irrigation set-point) reduced water consumption (14%), leaf area (18%), specific leaf area (19%), total yield (10%), and mean fruit weight (13%), irrespective of the cultivars. At −60 hPa, leaf-water status of plants, irrespective of the cultivars, showed an osmotic adjustment corresponding to a 9% average osmotic potential decrease. Total yield, mean fruit weight, plant water, and osmotic potential decreased linearly when −30, −60, and −90 hPa irrigation set-points were used in “Kabiria.” Unmarketable yield in “Diana” increased when water stress was imposed (187 vs. 349 g·plant−1, respectively, at −30 and −60 hPa), whereas the opposite effect was observed in “Kabiria,” where marketable yield loss decreased linearly [by 1.05 g·plant−1 per unit of substrate water potential (in the tested range from −30 to −90 hPa)]. In the second cluster, total soluble solids of the fruit and dry matter increased irrespective of the cultivars. In the seventh cluster, in “Diana,” only a

  17. Meaning and emotion in animal vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Seyfarth, Robert M; Cheney, Dorothy L

    2003-12-01

    Historically, a dichotomy has been drawn between the semantic communication of human language and the apparently emotional calls of animals. Current research paints a more complicated picture. Just as scientists have identified elements of human speech that reflect a speaker's emotions, field experiments have shown that the calls of many animals provide listeners with information about objects and events in the environment. Like human speech, therefore, animal vocalizations simultaneously provide others with information that is both semantic and emotional. In support of this conclusion, we review the results of field experiments on the natural vocalizations of African vervet monkeys, diana monkeys, baboons, and suricates (a South African mongoose). Vervet and diana monkeys give acoustically distinct alarm calls in response to the presence of leopards, eagles, and snakes. Each alarm call type elicits a different, adaptive response from others nearby. Field experiments demonstrate that listeners compare these vocalizations not just according to their acoustic properties but also according to the information they convey. Like monkeys, suricates give acoustically distinct alarm calls in response to different predators. Within each predator class, the calls also differ acoustically according to the signaler's perception of urgency. Like speech, therefore, suricate alarm calls convey both semantic and emotional information. The vocalizations of baboons, like those of many birds and mammals, are individually distinctive. As a result, when one baboon hears a sequence of calls exchanged between two or more individuals, the listener acquires information about social events in its group. Baboons, moreover, are skilled "eavesdroppers:" their response to different call sequences provides evidence of the sophisticated information they acquire from other individuals' vocalizations. Baboon males give loud "wahoo" calls during competitive displays. Like other vocalizations, these

  18. miR-155 in the progression of lung fibrosis in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Christmann, Romy B; Wooten, Alicia; Sampaio-Barros, Percival; Borges, Claudia L; Carvalho, Carlos R R; Kairalla, Ronaldo A; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Ziemek, Jessica; Mei, Yu; Goummih, Salma; Tan, Jiangning; Alvarez, Diana; Kass, Daniel J; Rojas, Mauricio; de Mattos, Thiago Lemos; Parra, Edwin; Stifano, Giuseppina; Capelozzi, Vera L; Simms, Robert W; Lafyatis, Robert

    2016-07-05

    MicroRNA (miRNA) control key elements of mRNA stability and likely contribute to the dysregulated lung gene expression observed in systemic sclerosis associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD). We analyzed the miRNA gene expression of tissue and cells from patients with SSc-ILD. A chronic lung fibrotic murine model was used. RNA was isolated from lung tissue of 12 patients with SSc-ILD and 5 controls. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was performed at baseline and 2-3 years after treatment. Lung fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from healthy controls and patients with SSc-ILD. miRNA and mRNA were analyzed by microarray, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and/or Nanostring; pathway analysis was performed by DNA Intelligent Analysis (DIANA)-miRPath v2.0 software. Wild-type and miR-155 deficient (miR-155ko) mice were exposed to bleomycin. Lung miRNA microarray data distinguished patients with SSc-ILD from healthy controls with 185 miRNA differentially expressed (q < 0.25). DIANA-miRPath revealed 57 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways related to the most dysregulated miRNA. miR-155 and miR-143 were strongly correlated with progression of the HRCT score. Lung fibroblasts only mildly expressed miR-155/miR-21 after several stimuli. miR-155 PBMC expression strongly correlated with lung function tests in SSc-ILD. miR-155ko mice developed milder lung fibrosis, survived longer, and weaker lung induction of several genes after bleomycin exposure compared to wild-type mice. miRNA are dysregulated in the lungs and PBMC of patients with SSc-ILD. Based on mRNA-miRNA interaction analysis and pathway tools, miRNA may play a role in the progression of the disease. Our findings suggest that targeting miR-155 might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for SSc-ILD.

  19. [Reintervention with percutaneous balloon angioplasty in patients with congenital heart disease with left-sided obstructions].

    PubMed

    Márquez-González, Horacio; López-Gallegos, Diana; Pérez-Velázquez, Nataly Alejandra; Yáñez-Gutiérrez, Lucelli

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: las obstrucciones izquierdas representan 15% de las cardiopatías congénitas (CC). El tratamiento en la edad adulta es quirúrgico; no obstante, la dilatación con balón puede paliar los síntomas en edad pediátrica para permitir que alcancen la talla diana. El objetivo fue determinar la sobrevida y los factores asociados a la reintervención en enfermos con CC con obstrucción izquierda tratados con plastía con balón. Métodos: se realizó un estudio de cohorte en pacientes entre 4 y 17 años con cardiopatías de obstrucción izquierda (estenosis valvular, supravalvular y coartación aórtica) tratados con angioplastía con balón exitosa. El seguimiento fue de 10 años y la variable de desenlace fue la reestenosis con criterios para reintervención. Se consideraron variables pronósticas la etapa pediátrica al momento del procedimiento, el estado nutricional, el gradiente residual y la presencia de síndromes genéticos. Se usaron medidas de tendencia central y dispersión. Se usó chi cuadrada en variables cualitativas y Kruskal-Wallis en variables cuantitativas. Resultados: fueron 110 pacientes; 40% presentó coartación aórtica, 35% estenosis valvular y 25% estenosis supravalvular aórtica. El 39% requirió reintervención y la frecuencia fue la siguiente: 80% en estenosis supravalvular, 35% en coartación aórtica y 14% en estenosis valvular aórtica. Conclusión: la intervención con balón es una medida paliativa que permite a los enfermos con obstrucciones izquierdas alcanzar la talla diana.

  20. Investigation of key miRNAs and target genes in bladder cancer using miRNA profiling and bioinformatic tools.

    PubMed

    Canturk, Kemal Murat; Ozdemir, Muhsin; Can, Cavit; Öner, Setenay; Emre, Ramazan; Aslan, Huseyin; Cilingir, Oguz; Ciftci, Evrim; Celayir, Fatih Mehmet; Aldemir, Ozgur; Özen, Mustafa; Artan, Sevilhan

    2014-12-01

    Despite the association of several miRNAs with bladder cancer, little is known about the miRNAs' regulatory networks. In this study, we aimed to construct potential networks of bladder-cancer-related miRNAs and their known target genes using miRNA expression profiling and bioinformatics tools and to investigate potential key molecules that might play roles in bladder cancer regulatory networks. Global miRNA expression profiles were obtained using microarray followed by RT-qPCR validation using two randomly selected miRNAs. Known targets of deregulated miRNAs were utilized using DIANA-TarBase database v6.0. The incorporation of deregulated miRNAs and target genes into KEGG pathways were utilized using DIANA-mirPath software. To construct potential miRNA regulatory networks, the overlapping parts of three selected KEGG pathways were visualized by Cytoscape software. We finally gained 19 deregulated miRNAs, including 5 ups- and 14 down regulated in 27 bladder-cancer tissue samples and 8 normal urothelial tissue samples. The enrichment results of deregulated miRNAs and known target genes showed that most pathways were related to cancer or cell signaling pathways. We determined the hub CDK6, BCL2, E2F3, PTEN, MYC, RB, and ERBB3 target genes and hub hsa-let-7c, hsa-miR-195-5p, hsa-miR-141-3p, hsa-miR-26a-5p, hsa-miR-23b-3p, and hsa-miR-125b-5p miRNAs of the constructed networks. These findings provide new insights into the bladder cancer regulatory networks and give us a hypothesis that hsa-let-7c, hsa-miR-195-5p, and hsa-miR-125b-5p, along with CDK4 and CDK6 genes might exist in the same bladder cancer pathway. Particularly, hub miRNAs and genes might be potential biomarkers for bladder cancer clinics.

  1. Venus - 3D Perspective View of Latona Corona and Dali Chasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This computer-generated perspective view of Latona Corona and Dali Chasma on Venus shows Magellan radar data superimposed on topography. The view is from the northeast and vertical exaggeration is 10 times. Exaggeration of relief is a common tool scientists use to detect relationships between structure (i.e. faults and fractures) and topography. Latona Corona, a circular feature approximately 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) in diameter whose eastern half is shown at the left of the image, has a relatively smooth, radar-bright raised rim. Bright lines or fractures within the corona appear to radiate away from its center toward the rim. The rest of the bright fractures in the area are associated with the relatively deep (approximately 3 kilometers or 1.9 miles) troughs of Dali Chasma. The Dali and Diana Chasma system consist of deep troughs that extend for 7,400 kilometers (4,588 miles) and are very distinct features on Venus. Those chasma connect the Ovda and Thetis highlands with the large volcanoes at Atla Regio and thus are considered to be the 'Scorpion Tail' of Aphrodite Terra. The broad, curving scarp resembles some of Earth's subduction zones where crustal plates are pushed over each other. The radar-bright surface at the highest elevation along the scarp is similar to surfaces in other elevated regions where some metallic mineral such as pyrite (fool's gold) may occur on the surface.

  2. Cloning and expression of sesquiterpene synthase genes from lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Mark H; Mansfield, John W; Lewis, Mervyn J; Beale, Michael H

    2002-06-01

    Sesquiterpenoid lactones (SLs) from lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) include constitutive components of latex such as lactucin and the induced phytoalexin, lettucenin A. A redundant primer strategy was used to recover two full length cDNA clones (LTC1 and LTC2) encoding sesquiterpene synthases from a cDNA library derived from seedlings with the red spot disorder, which accumulate phytoalexins. Recombinant enzymes produced from LTC1 and LTC2 in Escherichia coli catalysed the cyclisation of farnesyl diphosphate to germacrene A, potentially an early step in the biosynthesis of SLs. RT-PCR analysis showed LTC1 and LTC2 were expressed constitutively in roots, hypocotyls and true leaves but not in cotyledons. Expression in cotyledons was induced by challenge with the downy mildew pathogen Bremia lactucae in the disease resistant cultivar Diana. Southern hybridisation experiments showed that LTC1 and LTC2 were not part of a multigene family. The germacrene A synthases provide targets for modified expression to generate beneficial modifications to the SL profile in lettuce.

  3. Aneurysm miRNA Signature Differs, Depending on Disease Localization and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Albert; Busch, Martin; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Kellersmann, Richard; Otto, Christoph; Chernogubova, Ekaterina; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zernecke, Alma; Lorenz, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Limited comprehension of aneurysm pathology has led to inconclusive results from clinical trials. miRNAs are key regulators of post-translational gene modification and are useful tools in elucidating key features of aneurysm pathogenesis in distinct entities of abdominal and popliteal aneurysms. Here, surgically harvested specimens from 19 abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 8 popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) patients were analyzed for miRNA expression and histologically classified regarding extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and inflammation. DIANA-based computational target prediction and pathway enrichment analysis verified our results, as well as previous ones. miRNA-362, -19b-1, -194, -769, -21 and -550 were significantly down-regulated in AAA samples depending on degree of inflammation. Similar or inverse regulation was found for miR-769, 19b-1 and miR-550, -21, whereas miR-194 and -362 were unaltered in PAA. In situ hybridization verified higher expression of miR-550 and -21 in PAA compared to AAA and computational analysis for target genes and pathway enrichment affirmed signal transduction, cell-cell-interaction and cell degradation pathways, in line with previous results. Despite the vague role of miRNAs for potential diagnostic and treatment purposes, the number of candidates from tissue signature studies is increasing. Tissue morphology influences subsequent research, yet comparison of distinct entities of aneurysm disease can unravel core pathways. PMID:26771601

  4. The role of the district nurse when involved in the coronial process.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2008-02-01

    The inquisition into the death of Diana, Princess of Wales has highlighted the role of the coroner in the investigation of the cause of death in England and Wales. The coroner provides an important safeguard to an administrative system for the registration of deaths in the United Kingdom that relies heavily on a doctor to confirm the cause of death. Coroners are required to hold an inquest where the person has died a violent or unnatural death, has died suddenly from an unknown cause or has died in custody or at the hands of the police or where an inquest is required by statute. District nurses will encounter death in such circumstances during the course of their duties and the coroner's court is the most likely court where a district nurse will be called to give evidence. It is essential you know the duties of the coroner and what is expected when giving evidence at an inquest. Following the inquiry into the case of Dr Harold Shipman the government is proposing changes to the coroner's role that will have an impact on district nurse practice (The Shipman inquiry, 2004). In a series of articles Richard Griffith and Cassam Tengnah review the role of the coroner and consider the impact of reform on district nurse practice.

  5. Remote Semi-State Preparation as SuperDense Quantum Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Herbert J.

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in experimental technique make SuperDense Teleportation (SDT) possible. The effect uses remote state preparation to send more state-specifying parameters per bit than ordinary quantum teleportation (QT) can transmit. SDT uses a maximal entanglement to teleport the relative phases of an {n}-dimensional equimodular state. This means that one can send only {n}-1 of the total (2 n - 2) parameters -- comprising the relative phases and amplitudes -- of a general state. Nevertheless, for {n} >= 3 , SDT sends more of these state-specifying parameters than QT for a given number of classical bits. In the limit of large {n} the ratio is 2 to 1, hence the nomenclature Bennett suggested, SDT, by analogy with Super Dense Coding. Alice's measurements and Bob's transformations are simpler than in QT. The roles of Charles the state chooser, and Diana who deploys it, are different than in QT. I briefly review possible experimental realizations, including two that are under consideration at the present time by an experimental group leading in higher-dimension entanglement work. Supported in part by NSF grants PHY97-22614 & 07-58149 & KITP, UCSB, including an ITP Scholar-ship.

  6. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-11-10

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein (APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls.

  7. Pharmaceuticals, alkylphenols and pesticides in Mediterranean coastal waters: Results from a pilot survey using passive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaron, Dominique; Tapie, Nathalie; Budzinski, Hélène; Andral, Bruno; Gonzalez, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-01

    21 pharmaceuticals, 6 alkylphenols and 27 hydrophilic pesticides and biocides were investigated using polar organic contaminant integrative samplers (POCIS) during a large-scale study of contamination of French Mediterranean coastal waters. Marine and transitional water-bodies, defined under the EU Water Framework Directive were monitored. Our results show that the French Mediterranean coastal waters were contaminated with a large range of emerging contaminants, detected at low concentrations during the summer season. Caffeine, carbamazepine, theophilline and terbutaline were detected with a detection frequency higher than 83% in the coastal waters sampled, 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-OP) and 4-nonylphenol diethoxylate (NP2EO) were detected in all coastal waters sampled, and diuron, terbuthylazine, atrazine, irgarol and simazine were detected in more than 77% of samples. For pharmaceuticals, highest time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations were measured for caffeine and carbamazepine (32 and 12 ng L-1, respectively). For alkylphenols, highest TWA concentrations were measured for 4-nonylphenol mono-ethoxylate and 4-nonylphenol (41 and 33 ng L-1, respectively), and for herbicides and biocides, they were measured for diuron and irgarol (33 and 2.5 ng L-1, respectively). Except for Diana lagoon, lagoons and semi-enclosed bays were the most contaminated areas for herbicides and pharmaceuticals, whilst, for alkylphenols, levels of contamination were similar in lagoons and coastal waters. This study demonstrates the relevance and utility of POCIS as quantitative tool for measuring low concentrations of emerging contaminants in marine waters.

  8. Meeting report of the first conference of the International Placenta Stem Cell Society (IPLASS)

    PubMed Central

    Parolini, O.; Alviano, F.; Betz, A.G.; Bianchi, D.W.; Götherström, C.; Manuelpillai, U.; Mellor, A.L.; Ofir, R.; Ponsaerts, P.; Scherjon, S.A.; Weiss, M.L.; Wolbank, S.; Wood, K.J.; Borlongan, C.V.

    2012-01-01

    The International Placenta Stem Cell Society (IPLASS) was founded in June 2010. Its goal is to serve as a network for advancing research and clinical applications of stem/progenitor cells isolated from human term placental tissues, including the amnio-chorionic fetal membranes and Wharton's jelly. The commitment of the Society to champion placenta as a stem cell source was realized with the inaugural meeting of IPLASS held in Brescia, Italy, in October 2010. Officially designated as an EMBO-endorsed scientific activity, international experts in the field gathered for a 3-day meeting, which commenced with “Meet with the experts” sessions, IPLASS member and board meetings, and welcome remarks by Dr. Ornella Parolini, President of IPLASS. The evening's highlight was a keynote plenary lecture by Dr. Diana Bianchi. The subsequent scientific program consisted of morning and afternoon oral and poster presentations, followed by social events. Both provided many opportunities for intellectual exchange among the 120 multi-national participants. This allowed a methodical and deliberate evaluation of the status of placental cells in research in regenerative and reparative medicine. The meeting concluded with Dr. Parolini summarizing the meeting's highlights. This further prepared the fertile ground on which to build the promising potential of placental cell research. The second IPLASS meeting will take place in September 2012 in Vienna, Austria. This meeting report summarizes the thought-provoking lectures delivered at the first meeting of IPLASS. PMID:21575989

  9. The social consequences of conspiracism: Exposure to conspiracy theories decreases intentions to engage in politics and to reduce one's carbon footprint.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Daniel; Douglas, Karen M

    2014-02-01

    The current studies explored the social consequences of exposure to conspiracy theories. In Study 1, participants were exposed to a range of conspiracy theories concerning government involvement in significant events such as the death of Diana, Princess of Wales. Results revealed that exposure to information supporting conspiracy theories reduced participants' intentions to engage in politics, relative to participants who were given information refuting conspiracy theories. This effect was mediated by feelings of political powerlessness. In Study 2, participants were exposed to conspiracy theories concerning the issue of climate change. Results revealed that exposure to information supporting the conspiracy theories reduced participants' intentions to reduce their carbon footprint, relative to participants who were given refuting information, or those in a control condition. This effect was mediated by powerlessness with respect to climate change, uncertainty, and disillusionment. Exposure to climate change conspiracy theories also influenced political intentions, an effect mediated by political powerlessness. The current findings suggest that conspiracy theories may have potentially significant social consequences, and highlight the need for further research on the social psychology of conspiracism.

  10. Using unsteady-state water level data to estimate channel roughness and discharge hydrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Nasello, Carmelo; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    2009-08-01

    A novel methodology for simultaneous discharge and channel roughness estimation is developed and applied to data sets available at three experimental sites. The methodology is based on the synchronous measurement of water level data in two river sections far some kilometers from each other, as well as on the use of a diffusive flow routing solver and does not require any direct velocity measurement. The methodology is first analyzed for the simplest case of a channel with a large slope, where the kinematic assumption holds. A sensitivity and a model error analysis are carried out in this hypothesis in order to show the stability of the results with respect to the error in the input parameters in the case of homogeneous roughness and to analyze the effect of unknown roughness heterogeneity on the estimated discharges. The methodology is then extended to the more general case of channels with mild slope and validated using field data previously collected in three Italian rivers: the Arno (in Tuscany), the Tiber (in Latium) and the Vallo di Diana, a small tributary of the Tanagro river (in Southern Italy). The performance of the proposed algorithm has been investigated according to three performance criteria estimating the quality of the match between the measured and the computed stage and discharge hydrographs. Results of the field tests can be considered good, despite the uncertainties of the field data and of the measured values.

  11. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein, APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament, light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls. PMID:26497684

  12. Bond-slip behavior of CFRP plate-concrete interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, D. Y.; Park, S. K.; Hong, S. N.

    2011-11-01

    The paper deals with evaluation of the bond performance between a CFRP plate and concrete with respect to various compressive strengths of concrete and bond lengths of the CFRP plate as parameters. To consider stress conditions in the tensile zone of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, double-lap axial tension tests were conducted for eight specimens with CFRP plates bonded to concrete prisms. In addition, a simple linear bond-slip model for the CFRP plate/concrete joints, developed from the bond tests, was used. To verify the model proposed, a total of seven RC beams were strengthened with CFRP plates and tested in flexure employing various bond lengths, strengthening methods, and numbers of CFRP plates. A nonlinear finite-element analysis, with the bond-slip model incorporated in the DIANA program, was performed for the strengthened RC beams. Also, the results of flexural test and analytical predictions are found to be in close agreement in terms of yield and ultimate loads and ductility.

  13. Fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria innocua on minimally-processed peaches under different storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Isabel; Abadias, Maribel; Anguera, Marina; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada

    2010-10-01

    Consumption of fresh-cut produce has sharply increased recently causing an increase of foodborne illnesses associated with these products. As generally, acidic fruits are considered 'safe' from a microbiological point of view, the aim of this work was to study the growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria innocua on minimally-processed peaches. The three foodborne pathogens population increased more than 2 log(10)units on fresh-cut peach when stored at 20 and 25 degrees C after 48 h. At 10 degrees C only L. innocua grew more than 1 log(10)unit and it was the only pathogen able to grow at 5 degrees C. Differences in growth occurred between different peach varieties tested, with higher population increases in those varieties with higher pH ('Royal Glory' 4.73+/-0.25 and 'Diana' 4.12+/-0.18). The use of common strategies on extending shelf life of fresh-cut produce, as modified atmosphere packaging and the use of the antioxidant substance, ascorbic acid (2%w/v), did not affect pathogens' growth at any of the temperatures tested (5 and 25 degrees C). Minimally-processed peaches have shown to be a good substrate for foodborne pathogens' growth regardless use of modified atmosphere and ascorbic acid. Therefore, maintaining cold chain and avoiding contamination is highly necessary.

  14. In Situ Boundary Layer Coral Metabolism in the Atlantic Ocean Acidification Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillis, Wade

    2013-04-01

    and Chris Langdon, Brice Loose, Dwight Gledhill, Diana Hsueh, Derek Manzello, Ian Enochs, Ryan Moyer We present net ecosystem productivity (nep) and net ecosystem calcification (nec) in coral and seagrass ecosystems using the boundary layer gradient flux technique (CROSS). Coastal anthropogenic inputs and changes in global ocean chemistry in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide has emerged in recent years as a topic of considerable concern. Coral reefs are particularly vulnerable from eroded environmental conditions including ocean acidification and water pollution. The Atlantic Ocean Acidification Testbed (AOAT) project monitors metabolism to ascertain the continuing health of coral reef ecosystems. The CROSS boundary layer nep/nec approach is one component of this diagnostic program. Certification of CROSS as an operational monitoring tool is underway in the AOAT. CROSS inspects a benthic community and measures productivity/respiration and calcification/dissolution over an area of 10 square meters. Being a boundary layer tool, advection and complex mesoscale flows are not a factor or concern and CROSS is autonomous and can be used at deep benthic sites. The interrogation area is not enclosed therefore exposed to ambient light, flow, and nutrient levels. CROSS is easy to deploy, unambiguous, and affordable. Repeated measurements have been made from 2011-2012 in reefal systems in La Parguera Puerto Rico and the Florida Keys, USA. Diurnal, seasonal and regional metabolism will be compared and discussed. The ability to accurately probe benthic ecosystems provides a powerful management and research tool to policy makers and researchers.

  15. Assessment of damage localization based on spatial filters using numerical crack propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraemaeker, Arnaud

    2011-07-01

    This paper is concerned with vibration based structural health monitoring with a focus on non-model based damage localization. The type of damage investigated is cracking of concrete structures due to the loss of prestress. In previous works, an automated method based on spatial filtering techniques applied to large dynamic strain sensor networks has been proposed and tested using data from numerical simulations. In the simulations, simplified representations of cracks (such as a reduced Young's modulus) have been used. While this gives the general trend for global properties such as eigen frequencies, the change of more local features, such as strains, is not adequately represented. Instead, crack propagation models should be used. In this study, a first attempt is made in this direction for concrete structures (quasi brittle material with softening laws) using crack-band models implemented in the commercial software DIANA. The strategy consists in performing a non-linear computation which leads to cracking of the concrete, followed by a dynamic analysis. The dynamic response is then used as the input to the previously designed damage localization system in order to assess its performances. The approach is illustrated on a simply supported beam modeled with 2D plane stress elements.

  16. Picasso Paintings, Moon Rocks, and Hand-Written Beatles Lyrics: Adults’ Evaluations of Authentic Objects

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Brandy N.; Gelman, Susan A.; Wilson, Alice; Hood, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Authentic objects are those that have an historical link to a person, event, time, or place of some significance (e.g., original Picasso painting; gown worn by Princess Diana; your favorite baby blanket). The current study examines everyday beliefs about authentic objects, with three primary goals: to determine the scope of adults’ evaluation of authentic objects, to examine such evaluation in two distinct cultural settings, and to determine whether a person’s attachment history (i.e., whether or not they owned an attachment object as a child) predicts evaluation of authentic objects. We found that college students in the U.K. (N = 125) and U.S. (N = 119) consistently evaluate a broad range of authentic items as more valuable than matched control (inauthentic) objects, more desirable to keep, and more desirable to touch, though only non-personal authentic items were judged to be more appropriate for display in a museum. These patterns were remarkably similar across the two cultural contexts. Additionally, those who had an attachment object as a child evaluated objects more favorably, and in particular judged authentic objects to be more valuable. Altogether, these results demonstrate broad endorsement of "positive contagion" among college-educated adults. PMID:20631919

  17. Molecular diversity of Cotton leaf curl Gezira virus isolates and their satellite DNAs associated with okra leaf curl disease in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Okra leaf curl disease (OLCD) is a major constraint on okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) production and is widespread in Africa. Using a large number of samples representative of the major growing regions in Burkina Faso (BF), we show that the disease is associated with a monopartite begomovirus and satellite DNA complexes. Twenty-three complete genomic sequences of Cotton leaf curl Gezira virus (CLCuGV) isolates associated with OLCD, sharing 95 to 99% nucleotide identity, were cloned and sequenced. Six betasatellite and four alphasatellite (DNA-1) molecules were also characterized. The six isolates of betasatellite associated with CLCuGV isolates correspond to Cotton leaf curl Gezira betasatellite (CLCuGB) (88 to 98% nucleotide identity). One isolate of alphasatellite is a variant of Cotton leaf curl Gezira alphasatellite (CLCuGA) (89% nucleotide identity), whereas the three others isolates appear to correspond to a new species of alphasatellite (CLCuGA most similar sequence present 52 to 60% nucleotide identity), provisionally named Okra leaf curl Burkina Faso alphasatellite (OLCBFA). Recombination analysis of the viruses demonstrated the interspecies recombinant origin of all CLCuGV isolates, with parents being close to Hollyhock leaf crumple virus (AY036009) and Tomato leaf curl Diana virus (AM701765). Combined with the presence of satellites DNA, these results highlight the complexity of begomoviruses associated with OLCD. PMID:20178575

  18. Acoustic Sensor Planning for Gunshot Location in National Parks: A Pareto Front Approach

    PubMed Central

    González-Castaño, Francisco Javier; Alonso, Javier Vales; Costa-Montenegro, Enrique; López-Matencio, Pablo; Vicente-Carrasco, Francisco; Parrado-García, Francisco J.; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Costas-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a solution for gunshot location in national parks. In Spain there are agencies such as SEPRONA that fight against poaching with considerable success. The DiANa project, which is endorsed by Cabaneros National Park and the SEPRONA service, proposes a system to automatically detect and locate gunshots. This work presents its technical aspects related to network design and planning. The system consists of a network of acoustic sensors that locate gunshots by hyperbolic multi-lateration estimation. The differences in sound time arrivals allow the computation of a low error estimator of gunshot location. The accuracy of this method depends on tight sensor clock synchronization, which an ad-hoc time synchronization protocol provides. On the other hand, since the areas under surveillance are wide, and electric power is scarce, it is necessary to maximize detection coverage and minimize system cost at the same time. Therefore, sensor network planning has two targets, i.e., coverage and cost. We model planning as an unconstrained problem with two objective functions. We determine a set of candidate solutions of interest by combining a derivative-free descent method we have recently proposed with a Pareto front approach. The results are clearly superior to random seeding in a realistic simulation scenario. PMID:22303135

  19. Acoustic sensor planning for gunshot location in national parks: a pareto front approach.

    PubMed

    González-Castaño, Francisco Javier; Alonso, Javier Vales; Costa-Montenegro, Enrique; López-Matencio, Pablo; Vicente-Carrasco, Francisco; Parrado-García, Francisco J; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Costas-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a solution for gunshot location in national parks. In Spain there are agencies such as SEPRONA that fight against poaching with considerable success. The DiANa project, which is endorsed by Cabaneros National Park and the SEPRONA service, proposes a system to automatically detect and locate gunshots. This work presents its technical aspects related to network design and planning. The system consists of a network of acoustic sensors that locate gunshots by hyperbolic multi-lateration estimation. The differences in sound time arrivals allow the computation of a low error estimator of gunshot location. The accuracy of this method depends on tight sensor clock synchronization, which an ad-hoc time synchronization protocol provides. On the other hand, since the areas under surveillance are wide, and electric power is scarce, it is necessary to maximize detection coverage and minimize system cost at the same time. Therefore, sensor network planning has two targets, i.e., coverage and cost. We model planning as an unconstrained problem with two objective functions. We determine a set of candidate solutions of interest by combining a derivative-free descent method we have recently proposed with a Pareto front approach. The results are clearly superior to random seeding in a realistic simulation scenario.

  20. Raman microspectrometry as a powerful tool for a quick screening of thiotrophy: an application on mangrove swamp meiofauna of Guadeloupe (F.W.I.).

    PubMed

    Maurin, Leslie C; Himmel, David; Mansot, Jean-Louis; Gros, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    The mangrove swamp environment constitutes a sulphide rich habitat harbouring some thioautotrophic organisms. The ciliate Zoothamnium niveum and the nematode Eubostrichus dianae, both known to live associated with bacterial sulphide-oxidizing ectosymbionts, were analysed as positive controls by Raman microspectrometry. The detection of the 3 Raman bands characteristic of elemental sulphur (S(8)) allows us to define a positive model of sulphide-oxidizing symbiotic invertebrates and by extrapolation, of thioautotrophic organisms. A fast screening using this tool was carried out on eukaryotic organisms such as hydrozoan, nematodes, annelids, copepods, and ciliate (Pseudovorticella sp.) and on free-living filamentous bacteria found on decomposing leaves in order to detect thioautotrophic organisms. The Raman microspectrometry permits us: (i) to reveal thioautotrophic metabolism of free-living bacteria (Beggiatoa sp.) and even for Archaea and (ii) to detect sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiotic and ectosymbiotic bacteria associated with the Bivalve Lucina pectinata and Pseudovorticella sp., respectively. Raman microspectrometry represents a fast, easy and non destructive technique which can be used on living organisms without constraints of sample size. The Raman analysis can also be completed by ultrastructural analysis (SEM, TEM) on the same sample.

  1. [Twins in myth (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    de Rachewiltz, B; Parisi, P; Castellani, V

    1976-01-01

    Twins have an important place in mythology and a sacred character appears to be attached to them since the most ancient times. In ancient Egypt, the royal placenta was worshipped, being considered as the Pharao's twin (a conception that is still alive among certain African populations), and actually everyone was considered to possess a spiritual twin, the Ka or astral body, through whom it was supposed to be possible to operate with magic rituals and hit enemies. Twin gods were worshipped by Babylonians and Assyrians (who even introduced them among astronomic constellations), and may be also found in the Persian and Veda religions. In the classic, Greco-Roman world, the examples of twin gods and heroes are innumerable: from the twin sons of Zeus, the Dioscuri, to the opposite-sexed twin gods Apollo and Diana, to Rome's founders, Romulus and Remus, etc. Since the most ancient times, a magic conception is connected to the twins, either in a positive or a negative sense, but often with some kind of a "fatidic" aspect. Such a two-faced approach to the phenomenon of twinning, that variously characterizes near-east, protomediterranean, classic, and other ancient civilizations, may still be found in contemporary primitive societies.

  2. Contribution to the understanding of the cycle of the protozoan parasite Marteilia refringens.

    PubMed

    Arzul, I; Chollet, B; Boyer, S; Bonnet, D; Gaillard, J; Baldi, Y; Robert, M; Joly, J P; Garcia, C; Bouchoucha, M

    2014-02-01

    The paramyxean parasite Marteilia refringens infects several bivalve species including European flat oysters Ostrea edulis and Mediterranean mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. Sequence polymorphism allowed definition of three parasite types 'M', 'O' and 'C' preferably detected in oysters, mussels and cockles respectively. Transmission of the infection from infected bivalves to copepods Paracartia grani could be experimentally achieved but assays from copepods to bivalves failed. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the M. refringens life cycle, the dynamics of the infection was investigated in O. edulis, M. galloprovincialis and zooplankton over one year in Diana lagoon, Corsica (France). Flat oysters appeared non-infected while mussels were infected part of the year, showing highest prevalence in summertime. The parasite was detected by PCR in zooplankton particularly after the peak of prevalence in mussels. Several zooplanktonic groups including copepods, Cladocera, Appendicularia, Chaetognatha and Polychaeta appeared PCR positive. However, only the copepod species Paracartia latisetosa showed positive signal by in situ hybridization. Small parasite cells were observed in gonadal tissues of female copepods demonstrating for the first time that a copepod species other than P. grani can be infected with M. refringens. Molecular characterization of the parasite infecting mussels and zooplankton allowed the distinguishing of three Marteilia types in the lagoon.

  3. Stardial -- an autonomous astronomical camera on the WWW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, P. R.; Thakkar, U.

    1997-05-01

    The use of an autonomous electronic camera, called ``Stardial,'' for undergraduate instruction is described. Stardial delivers images of the night sky nearly in real-time to the world wide web (www.astro.uiuc.edu/stardial/). The remote instrumentation of Stardial is robust, inexpensive, and accomodates many students asynchronously with respect to the instructor(s). The guiding philosophy of the curriculum is to provide students with authentic astronomical data so that they may learn about science by doing it themselves on the internet. Students respond favorably to the opportunity to learn from their own experiences with genuine data, complete with its irregularities and its surprises. Perhaps surprisingly, 9 of 10 self-selected student volunteers in our pilot project were female. Stardial's instrumentation is similar to that of Gaustad et al., and to that of Richmond, Droege, et al. (both at this same meeting). Stardial has benefitted from contributions from students, especially Lawrence Tan, Troy Klyber, Jim Pulokas, Jim Waldemer, and Diana Lopez, and from a number of professionals, especially G.T. Becker, Mike Newberry, John Dolby, Tom Droege, Bob Mutel, Mike Richmond, John Thorstensen, and Rick White. Stardial is funded by the University of Illinois, primarily from the office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. We welcome participation from amateur astronomers and other educators.

  4. Venus - 3D Perspective View of Latona Corona and Dali Chasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This computer-generated perspective view of Latona Corona and Dali Chasma on Venus shows Magellan radar data superimposed on topography. The view is from the northeast and vertical exaggeration is 10 times. Exaggeration of relief is a common tool scientists use to detect relationships between structure (i.e. faults and fractures) and topography. Latona Corona, a circular feature approximately 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) in diameter whose eastern half is shown at the left of the image, has a relatively smooth, radar-bright raised rim. Bright lines or fractures within the corona appear to radiate away from its center toward the rim. The rest of the bright fractures in the area are associated with the relatively deep (approximately 3 kilometers or 1.9 miles) troughs of Dali Chasma. The Dali and Diana Chasma system consist of deep troughs that extend for 7,400 kilometers (4,588 miles) and are very distinct features on Venus. Those chasma connect the Ovda and Thetis highlands with the large volcanoes at Atla Regio and thus are considered to be the 'Scorpion Tail' of Aphrodite Terra. The broad, curving scarp resembles some of Earth's subduction zones where crustal plates are pushed over each other. The radar-bright surface at the highest elevation along the scarp is similar to surfaces in other elevated regions where some metallic mineral such as pyrite (fool's gold) may occur on the surface.

  5. Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamzina, Diana

    Diana Gamzina March 2016 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices Abstract A methodology for performing thermo-mechanical design and analysis of high frequency and high average power vacuum electron devices is presented. This methodology results in a "first-pass" engineering design directly ready for manufacturing. The methodology includes establishment of thermal and mechanical boundary conditions, evaluation of convective film heat transfer coefficients, identification of material options, evaluation of temperature and stress field distributions, assessment of microscale effects on the stress state of the material, and fatigue analysis. The feature size of vacuum electron devices operating in the high frequency regime of 100 GHz to 1 THz is comparable to the microstructure of the materials employed for their fabrication. As a result, the thermo-mechanical performance of a device is affected by the local material microstructure. Such multiscale effects on the stress state are considered in the range of scales from about 10 microns up to a few millimeters. The design and analysis methodology is demonstrated on three separate microwave devices: a 95 GHz 10 kW cw sheet beam klystron, a 263 GHz 50 W long pulse wide-bandwidth sheet beam travelling wave tube, and a 346 GHz 1 W cw backward wave oscillator.

  6. [Gynecology and obstetrics in Ancient Rome].

    PubMed

    Dumont, M

    1992-10-01

    Gods and Goddesses were invoked by the Romans for the termination of a good delivery. Diana, Juno, Lucina and Cybele were the preferred ones. Sterility was sometimes treated by the whip of the Lupercali of ministers of Pan. The first doctors in Rome were coming from Greece. Celsus, Pliny the Elder were encyclopedists, Rufus an anatomist, Dioscorides a pharmacologist. Archigenes, Aretaeus and Antyllus surgeons. Soranus from Ephesus, was the first to recommend podalic version. His works was a long time buried in a profound oblivion and discovered by scholars during the nineteenth century. Galen was looked as the most famous medical man after Hippocrates. During the Roman Empire of Occident (Byzantine Empire), Oribasius, Aurelianus Caelius, Moschion and above all Aetius and Paul of Aegina wrote many works which were many times plagiarized. Roman laws concerning public health were severe. Midwives took an important action in the care of pregnant women. Roman poets as Plautus, Terence, Lucilius, Catullus, Virgil, Tibullus, Ovid and Martial were many times concerned in their writings with gynecologic or obstetric subjects. Children were easily forsaken. Three Emperors, Trajan, Marcus-Aurelius and Alexander Severius, a writer, Aulu-Gelles, and a rhetor, Quintilian, took protection of them.

  7. Revisiting play elements and self-handicapping in play: a comparative ethogram of five Old World monkey species.

    PubMed

    Petrů, Milada; Spinka, Marek; Charvátová, Veronika; Lhota, Stanislav

    2009-08-01

    Play behavior has been viewed as a mixture of elements drawn from "serious" behavior, interspersed by ritualized play signals. Two other types of play behaviors have been overlooked: patterns that are dissimilar from any serious behavior and patterns with self-handicapping character, that is, those that put the animal into unnecessary disadvantageous positions or situations. Here the authors show that these 2 types of patterns can constitute a major part of play repertoire. From our own videorecordings and observations, we constructed play ethograms of 5 monkey species (Semnopithecus entellus, Erythrocebus patas, Chlorocebus pygerythrus, Cercopithecus neglectus, and Cercopithecus diana). The authors evaluated the self-handicapping character of each pattern and in Hanuman langurs also the (dis)similarity to serious behavior. Of the 74 patterns in the 5 species, 33 (45%) were judged to have a self-handicapping character. Of 48 patterns observed in langurs, 16 (33%) were totally dissimilar to any serious langur behavior known to us. The authors discuss the possibility that the different types of play elements may have different functions in play.

  8. COMMITTEES COMMITTEES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    ORGANISING COMMITTEE Chairman: Alexander G Petrov Director, Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria Chairman Emeritus: Nikolay Kirov Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria Local Organising Committee: Chairman: Alexander G Petrov Members: Diana Nesheva, Doriana Dimova-Malinovska, Eleonora Popova, Lyubomila Dedinska, Christo Popov, Vasil Lovchinov, Marina Primatarowa, Emilia Vlaikova, Irina Velkova, Hassan Chamati PROGRAMME COMMITTEE Chairman: A G Petrov Members: D Alexandrov (Thunder Bay), V Celebonovic (Belgrade), D Dimova-Malinovska (Sofia), B Dulmet (Besancon), A Grechnikov (Moscow), M Gunes (Mugla), C Main (Dundee), D Nesheva (Sofia), M C Petty (Durham), M Popescu (Bucharest), S Reynolds (Dundee), K Shimakawa (Gifu), J Singh (Darwin), N Starbov (Sofia), M Tomilin (St Petersburg), Ph Vanderbemden (Liege), A Vaseashta (Washington) LOCAL SCIENTIFIC COUNCIL Chairman: A G Petrov Members: Bulgarian Academy of Sciences N Sabotinov (President) I Nedkov (Scientific Secretary, Physics) Institute of Solid State Physics N Kirov, D Nesheva, V Lovchinov, St Andreev, M Primatarowa Institute of Electronics R Enikov (Director) Central Lab. of Solar Energy and New Energy Sources D Dimova-Malinovska Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies V Saynov, N Starbov Central Lab. of Applied Physics R Kakanakov (Director) Sofia University - Faculty of Physics A Andreeva, S Russev (Heads of Departments)

  9. KSC-02pd0616

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Honorable Diana Morgan speaks to attendees at the opening ceremony kicking off a new program known as SABRE, Space Agricultural Biotechnology Research and Education. In the foreground are Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. (left) and U.S. Representative Dave Weldon (right). The SABRE program is a combined effort of the University of Florida and NASA. Morgan is vice chair on the UF Board of Trustees. SABRE will focus on the discovery, development and application of the biological aspects of advanced life support strategies. The program will include faculty from UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, who will be located at both KSC - in the state-owned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory (SERPL) being built there - and UF in Gainesville. SABRE will be directed by Robert Ferl, professor in the horticultural sciences department and assistant director of UF's Biotechnology Program. He will be responsible for coordinating the research and education efforts of UF and NASA

  10. The Sacred Mountain of Varallo in Italy: Seismic Risk Assessment by Acoustic Emission and Structural Numerical Models

    PubMed Central

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Invernizzi, Stefano; Accornero, Federico

    2013-01-01

    We examine an application of Acoustic Emission (AE) technique for a probabilistic analysis in time and space of earthquakes, in order to preserve the valuable Italian Renaissance Architectural Complex named “The Sacred Mountain of Varallo.” Among the forty-five chapels of the Renaissance Complex, the structure of the Chapel XVII is of particular concern due to its uncertain structural condition and due to the level of stress caused by the regional seismicity. Therefore, lifetime assessment, taking into account the evolution of damage phenomena, is necessary to preserve the reliability and safety of this masterpiece of cultural heritage. A continuous AE monitoring was performed to assess the structural behavior of the Chapel. During the monitoring period, a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of the “Sacred Mountain of Varallo” and regional seismicity was found. Although the two phenomena take place on very different scales, the AE in materials and the earthquakes in Earth's crust, belong to the same class of invariance. In addition, an accurate finite element model, performed with DIANA finite element code, is presented to describe the dynamic behavior of Chapel XVII structure, confirming visual and instrumental inspections of regional seismic effects. PMID:24381511

  11. Temporal changes of microRNA gga-let-7b and gga-let-7i expression in chickens challenged with subgroup J avian leukosis virus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jun; Shang, Huiqin; Zhang, Huanmin; Li, Hongxin; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2017-02-11

    Two important microRNAs, gga-let-7b and gga-let-7i were examined for the relative expression in liver and bone marrow tissues from specific pathogen free chickens that were challenged either with GD1109 or NX0101 strain of subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J). The GD1109 strain of ALV-J reportedly causes hemangioma (HE) and NX0101 reportedly causes myeloma (ML) in susceptible chickens. Temporal changes of both gga-let-7b and gga-let-7i expression in ALV-J infected chickens were observed in contrast to its counterpart of a non-infected negative control group of chickens (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) during the first 120 days post infection. Use of the web-based computational DIANA-mirPath software (available at http://microrna.gr/mirpath ), it was predicted that both gga-let-7b and gga-let-7i were involved in multiple pathways including signaling pathways, such as MAPK, TGF-beta, Notch, Wnt, mTOR, Cell cycle, P53 and Jak-STAT. Combining our experimental data with reports on the microRNAs, we suggest that both gga-let-7i and gga-let-7b may also act as tumor suppressors in chicken, especially play a critical role in tumorigenesis induced by ALV-J.

  12. To Boldly Go: America's Next Era in Space. Sustaining Life on the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. France Cordova, NASA's Chief Scientist, opened this, the sixth seminar in the Administrator's Seminar Series, by introducing NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin. Mr Goldin welcomed the attendees and set the stage for Dr. Cordova's introduction of the first speaker, Dr. Robert Kates of Brown University. Dr. Kates primary concerns are global environmental changes, world hunger, and the size of the population. Human changes, he said, rival the changes of nature. Changes in the size of world population affect the need for more agricultural products, therefore more land for growing food, which leads to deforestation, which affects rainfall, and therefore the water supply which is in increased demand. Human ingenuity can reduce some shortages but generally doesn't keep up with increased demand for life-sustaining essentials. These problems require the concern of intergovernmental organizations, treaties and activities, as well as transnational corporations, and non-governmental and private, volunteer organizations. Next Dr. Diana Liverman of Pennsylvania State University spoke on human interactions regarding climate and society. She considered the effect of changes in land use on climate, using Mexico as an example. Mexicans changed from raising much wheat to raising more fruits and vegetables. This was in response to the demands of the market. The results were more industry, population growth, greater income, drought (because the new crops required more water), and conflicts over water supplies. Dr. Charles Kennel of the Office of Mission to Planet Earth joined Dr.s Cordova, Kates, and Liverman for the question and answer session that followed.

  13. Bio-informatic trends for the determination of miRNA-target interactions in mammals.

    PubMed

    Doran, Jonathon; Strauss, William M

    2007-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate mRNAs through a sequence-specific mechanism. By virtue of their structure and mechanism of action, computational methods have been devised to investigate the encoding of miRNA genes and the targets of miRNA action. A variety of assumptions have predicated the implementation of these various computational solutions. Evolutionary sequence conservation, secondary structure, and folding energetics are some of the assumptions that have been used. The success of these different computational solutions has been evaluated for both elucidation of new miRNAs and deducing targets of miRNA action. While the focus is on search techniques for new miRNAs, we have compared the programs miRseeker, miRScan, PalGrade, ProMiR, and miRAlign as examples of implementation of these techniques. For these programs, a benchmark comparison between theoretical estimation and actual identification is possible. We have also compared the target prediction programs TargetScanS, PicTar, DIANA-microT, miRanda, and RNAhybrid. However, it is difficult to rigorously assess the benchmark performance of these programs due to the difficulty in confirming their theoretical predictions.

  14. PREFACE: Processes in Isotopes and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Diana; Tosa, Valer

    2009-07-01

    These Proceedings present some of the Invited Lectures and Contributed Papers of the International Conference 'Processes in Isotopes and Molecules' (PIM), held in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, 24-26 September 2009. The PIM conference, started in 1999 as a local event, is now an international conference organized every two years by the National Institute for R&D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies in Cluj-Napoca, the capital city of Transylvania, Romania. The meetings are attended by researchers in the field of atomic and molecular physics as well as those developing new materials and technologies. The scientific subjects are at the cross-roads of three fundamental research areas: physics, chemistry, and biology. The papers here are grouped according to the five conference topics: T1 - Molecular and biomolecular systems T2 - Modern techniques and technologies T3 - Environmental molecular processes T4 - Hydrogen and renewable sources of energy T5 - Nanostructured materials and nanocomposites We gratefully acknowledge the contribution of our colleagues from the Scientific Committee and Program Committee who contributed their time, energy and expertise to the refereeing process. Finally, we would like to thank people from IOP Publishing for their friendly advice and prompt help during the editing process, as well as for their efforts making the Journal of Physics: Conference Series available to the scientific community. Diana Bogdan and Valer Tosa National Institute for R&D Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca

  15. A study on family communication pattern and parenting styles with quality of life in adolescent.

    PubMed

    Sanavi, Fariba Shahhraki; Baghbanian, Abdolvahab; Shovey, Mehdi Faraji; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between parenting styles and family communication patterns with adolescent's quality of life. The cross-sectional study was carried out on 439 randomly selected adolescents in the city of Zahedan, Iran, from January to July 2011.The subjects were asked to complete the KIDSCREEN-52 health-related quality of life questionnaire, while their parents were asked to complete the Diana Brinder's Test to show their parenting styles. SPSS 15 was used to analyse data. Most parents had 'authoritative' parenting style (n = 380; 86.6%). Pluralistic (n = 170; 38.7%) and consensual (n = 152; 34.6%) patterns were the most frequent styles of communication in families. Data suggested a significant relationship between parenting style and some dimensions of quality of life, including physical well-being, psychological well-being, social support and peers, and autonomy (p < 0.05). There was also a significant relationship between family communication patterns and parent relation and home life (p < 0.001) as well as autonomy (p < 0.006). Families play a critical role in increasing adolescents' health-related quality-of-life. Effort should be made to address problems facing parents while raising their children.

  16. New 1π sr acceptance angle display-type ellipsoidal mesh analyzer for electron energy and two-dimensional angular distribution as well as imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, László; Goto, Kentaro; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Fumihiko; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    We propose a Display-type Ellipsoidal Mesh Analyzer (DELMA) using a newly developed 1π sr wide acceptance angle electrostatic lens (WAAEL), energy aperture and some other electrostatic lenses [1-5]. It can display two-dimensional angular distributions of charged particles within the acceptance angle of ±60°, which is much larger than the largest acceptance angle range so far and comparable to the display-type spherical mirror analyzer (DIANA) developed by Daimon et al. [6,8-11]. It also has a focusing capability with 5 times magnification and ˜30 μm lateral resolution. The relative energy resolution is typically from 2 to 5×10-3 depending on the emission area of the sample, as well as on the diameter of energy aperture.Because this new analyzer has a function of low-magnification photoemission electron microscope, this instrument will be extended and applied as a new type Stereo-PEEM [7] in near future.

  17. Observations of lightning in convective supercells within tropical storms and hurricanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.A.; Keen, C.S. |

    1994-08-01

    Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning observations from land-based lightning detection networks now allow monitoring this component of the electrical structure of tropical storms and hurricanes within a few hundred kilometers of the United States coastline. Several case studies confirm the long-held opinion that lightning is rather common within the outer rainbands. The general absence of CG lightning within the interior of mature tropical cyclones is also apparent. On the other hand, bursts of CG lightning near the circulation center of developing storms appear to precede periods of further deepening. The CG events are associated with convective supercells, whose anvil canopies can often obscure much of the underlying storm. Near-eyewall CG bursts preceding periods of intensification were noted in Hurricanes Diana (1984) and Florence (1988). A detailed case study of the 1987 unnamed tropical storm that struck the Texas-Louisiana coastline reveals that lightning was associated with two large supercells. These supercells appeared to be the trigger for the development of a closed circulation that formed several hours after the apparent low pressure center made landfall. Further studies of lightning may provide additional insight into the role of convective supercells in tropical storm intensification. It may also provide a useful diagnostic of impending deepening.

  18. Adherence to WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations and metabolic syndrome in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Eleonora; Gargano, Giuliana; Villarini, Anna; Traina, Adele; Johansson, Harriet; Mano, Maria Piera; Santucci De Magistris, Maria; Simeoni, Milena; Consolaro, Elena; Mercandino, Angelica; Barbero, Maggiorino; Galasso, Rocco; Bassi, Maria Chiara; Zarcone, Maurizio; Zagallo, Emanuela; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Bellegotti, Manuela; Berrino, Franco; Pasanisi, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), conventionally defined by the presence of at least three out of five dismetabolic traits (abdominal obesity, hypertension, low plasma HDL-cholesterol and high plasma glucose and triglycerides), has been associated with both breast cancer (BC) incidence and prognosis. We investigated the association between the prevalence of MetS and a score of adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) recommendations for the prevention of cancer in a cross-sectional study of BC patients. The DIet and ANdrogen-5 study (DIANA-5) for the prevention of BC recurrences recruited 2092 early stage BC survivors aged 35-70. At recruitment, all women completed a 24-hour food frequency and physical activity diary on their consumption and activity of the previous day. Using these diaries we created a score of adherence to five relevant WCRF/AICR recommendations. The prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of MetS associated with the number of recommendations met were estimated using a binomial regression model. The adjusted PRs of MetS decreased with increasing number of recommendations met (p < 0.001). Meeting all the five recommendations versus meeting none or only one was significantly associated with a 57% lower MetS prevalence (95% CI 0.35-0.73). Our results suggest that adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations is a major determinant of MetS and may have a clinical impact. © 2015 UICC.

  19. MicroRNA regulation in heart and skeletal muscle over the freeze-thaw cycle in the freeze tolerant wood frog.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Saumya; Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-02-01

    The North American wood frog, Rana sylvatica, is one of just a few anuran species that tolerates whole body freezing during the winter and has been intensely studied to identify the biochemical adaptations that support freeze tolerance. Among these adaptations is the altered expression of many genes, making freeze-responsive changes to gene regulatory mechanisms a topic of interest. The present study focuses on the potential involvement of microRNAs as one such regulatory mechanism and aims to better understand freeze/thaw stress-induced microRNA responses in the freeze-tolerant wood frog. Using quantitative PCR, relative levels of 53 microRNAs were measured in heart and skeletal muscle of control, 24 h frozen, and 8 h thawed frogs. MicroRNAs showed tissue specific expression patterns: 21 microRNAs decreased in the heart during thawing, whereas 16 microRNAs increased during freezing stress in skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that select genes may be activated and suppressed in heart and skeletal muscle, respectively, in response to freezing. Bioinformatics analysis using the DIANA miRPath program (v.2.0) predicted that the differentially expressed microRNAs may collectively regulate tissue-specific cellular pathways to promote survival of wood frogs undergoing freezing and thawing.

  20. The Sacred Mountain of Varallo in Italy: seismic risk assessment by acoustic emission and structural numerical models.

    PubMed

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Invernizzi, Stefano; Accornero, Federico

    2013-01-01

    We examine an application of Acoustic Emission (AE) technique for a probabilistic analysis in time and space of earthquakes, in order to preserve the valuable Italian Renaissance Architectural Complex named "The Sacred Mountain of Varallo." Among the forty-five chapels of the Renaissance Complex, the structure of the Chapel XVII is of particular concern due to its uncertain structural condition and due to the level of stress caused by the regional seismicity. Therefore, lifetime assessment, taking into account the evolution of damage phenomena, is necessary to preserve the reliability and safety of this masterpiece of cultural heritage. A continuous AE monitoring was performed to assess the structural behavior of the Chapel. During the monitoring period, a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of the "Sacred Mountain of Varallo" and regional seismicity was found. Although the two phenomena take place on very different scales, the AE in materials and the earthquakes in Earth's crust, belong to the same class of invariance. In addition, an accurate finite element model, performed with DIANA finite element code, is presented to describe the dynamic behavior of Chapel XVII structure, confirming visual and instrumental inspections of regional seismic effects.

  1. Picasso Paintings, Moon Rocks, and Hand-Written Beatles Lyrics: Adults' Evaluations of Authentic Objects.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Brandy N; Gelman, Susan A; Wilson, Alice; Hood, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Authentic objects are those that have an historical link to a person, event, time, or place of some significance (e.g., original Picasso painting; gown worn by Princess Diana; your favorite baby blanket). The current study examines everyday beliefs about authentic objects, with three primary goals: to determine the scope of adults' evaluation of authentic objects, to examine such evaluation in two distinct cultural settings, and to determine whether a person's attachment history (i.e., whether or not they owned an attachment object as a child) predicts evaluation of authentic objects. We found that college students in the U.K. (N = 125) and U.S. (N = 119) consistently evaluate a broad range of authentic items as more valuable than matched control (inauthentic) objects, more desirable to keep, and more desirable to touch, though only non-personal authentic items were judged to be more appropriate for display in a museum. These patterns were remarkably similar across the two cultural contexts. Additionally, those who had an attachment object as a child evaluated objects more favorably, and in particular judged authentic objects to be more valuable. Altogether, these results demonstrate broad endorsement of "positive contagion" among college-educated adults.

  2. Two-dimensional 1H-NMR study of the spatial structure of neurotoxin II from Naja naja oxiana.

    PubMed

    Golovanov, A P; Lomize, A L; Arseniev, A S; Utkin, Y N; Tsetlin, V I

    1993-05-01

    The spatial structure of neurotoxin II from the venom of the central Asian cobra Naja naja oxiana was determined by two-dimensional 1H-NMR techniques and computational analysis. Nearly complete proton resonance assignments for 61 amino acid residues have been made using two-dimensional (2D) homonuclear total correlated spectroscopy, 2D homonuclear double-quantum-filtered correlated spectroscopy and 2D homonuclear NOE spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. The cross-peak volumes in NOESY spectra spin-spin coupling constants of vicinal protons NH-C alpha H and C alpha H-C beta H and the observation of slow deuterium exchange of amide protons were used to define local structure and a set of constraints for distance geometry program DIANA. The average root-mean-square deviations are 53 pm for backbone heavy atoms and 118 pm for all heavy atoms of 19 final neurotoxin II conformations. The spatial structure is characterized by a short double-stranded (residues 1-5 and 13-17) and a triple-stranded (residues 22-30, 33-41 and 50-54) antiparallel beta-sheets.

  3. [Neurological disorders and the blood-brain barrier. Strategies and limitations for drug delivery to the brain].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alazne; Álvarez, Antonia; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe

    2014-03-01

    Introduccion. La incidencia de enfermedades del sistema nervioso central (SNC) aumenta a causa del envejecimiento de la sociedad. Desgraciadamente, los tratamientos clasicos para tratarlas no resultan efectivos debido a la presencia de la barrera hematoencefalica. Objetivo. Abordar las propiedades de la barrera hematoencefalica que impiden el transporte de los farmacos al cerebro y las principales estrategias para tratar las afecciones neurologicas. Desarrollo. La barrera hematoencefalica esta compuesta principalmente por un endotelio vascular especializado y las celulas de la glia. Esta constituye una herramienta a disposicion del organismo para aislar al SNC del resto del cuerpo. Sin embargo, tambien supone un impedimento para que muchos farmacos alcancen su diana en el cerebro. Conclusiones. Para poder tratar las afecciones neurologicas, los farmacos deben ser capaces de alcanzar el cerebro. Los agentes terapeuticos pueden diseñarse para que sean capaces de atravesar esta barrera, o bien facilitar su entrada mediante el uso de sistemas de liberacion. Para evaluar la efectividad de los tratamientos dirigidos a enfermedades del SNC, se emplean los modelos animales de enfermedades neurologicas asi como modelos in vitro de barrera hematoencefalica.

  4. To Boldly Go: America's Next Era in Space. Sustaining Life on the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. France Cordova, NASA's Chief Scientist, opened this, the sixth seminar in the Administrator's Seminar Series, by introducing NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin. Mr Goldin welcomed the attendees and set the stage for Dr. Cordova's introduction of the first speaker, Dr. Robert Kates of Brown University. Dr. Kates primary concerns are global environmental changes, world hunger, and the size of the population. Human changes, he said, rival the changes of nature. Changes in the size of world population affect the need for more agricultural products, therefore more land for growing food, which leads to deforestation, which affects rainfall, and therefore the water supply which is in increased demand. Human ingenuity can reduce some shortages but generally doesn't keep up with increased demand for life-sustaining essentials. These problems require the concern of intergovernmental organizations, treaties and activities, as well as transnational corporations, and non-governmental and private, volunteer organizations. Next Dr. Diana Liverman of Pennsylvania State University spoke on human interactions regarding climate and society. She considered the effect of changes in land use on climate, using Mexico as an example. Mexicans changed from raising much wheat to raising more fruits and vegetables. This was in response to the demands of the market. The results were more industry, population growth, greater income, drought (because the new crops required more water), and conflicts over water supplies. Dr. Charles Kennel of the Office of Mission to Planet Earth joined Dr.s Cordova, Kates, and Liverman for the question and answer session that followed.

  5. PREFACE 16 ISCMP: Progress in Solid State and Molecular Electronics, Ionics and Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Nesheva, Diana; Petrov, Alexander G.; Primatarowa, Marina T.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to introduce the Proceedings of the 16 ISCMP, organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The Chairman of the School was Professor Alexander G Petrov. The School was dedicated to the late Professor Joe Marshall, who served for a long time as Chairman and Honorary Chairman and left us just after having completed the proceedings of the previous School. Like previous events, the School took place in the beautiful Black Sea resort of Saint Constantine and Elena near Varna, going back to the renewed facilities of the Panorama hotel. Participants from 19 different countries delivered 34 invited lecturers and 75 posters, contributing to three sessions of poster presentations. Papers submitted to the Proceedings were refereed according to the high standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series and the articles published in this volume illustrate the diversity and the high level of the contributions. Not the least significant factor in the success of the 16 ISCMP was the social program, both the organized events (Welcome and Farewell Parties) and the variety of pleasant local restaurants and beaches. These Proceedings are published for the first time in Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are grateful to the Journal's staff for encouraging this idea. The Scientific Committee of the ISCMP dedicates this volume of the Proceedings to the living memory of Professor Joe Marshall, Honorary Chairman of the ISCMP. The Committee decided that the next event will take place again in Saint Constantine and Elena, in September 2012. It will be entitled: Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications. Doriana Dimova-Malinovska, Diana Nesheva, Alexander G Petrov and Marina T Primatarowa

  6. Beyond offshoring: assess your company's global potential.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Diana

    2004-12-01

    In the past few years, companies have become aware that they can slash costs by offshoring: moving jobs to lower-wage locations. But this practice is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of how globalization can transform industries, according to research by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI). The institute's yearlong study suggests that by streamlining their production processes and supply chains globally, rather than just nationally or regionally, companies can lower their costs-as we've seen in the consumer-electronics and PC industries. Companies can save as much as 70% of their total costs through globalization--50% from offshoring, 5% from training and business-task redesign, and 15% from process improvements. But they don't have to stop there. The cost reductions make it possible to lower prices and expand into new markets, attracting whole new classes of customers. To date, however, few businesses have recognized the full scope of performance improvements that globalization makes possible, much less developed sound strategies for capturing those opportunities. In this article, Diana Farrell, director of MGI, offers a step-by-step approach to doing both things. Among her suggestions: Assess where your industry falls along the globalization spectrum, because not all sectors of the economy face the same challenges and opportunities at the same time. Also, pay attention to production, regulatory, and organizational barriers to globalization. If any of these can be changed, size up the cost-saving (and revenue-generating) opportunities that will emerge for your company as a result of those changes. Farrell also defines the five stages of globalization-market entry, product specialization, value chain disaggregation, value chain reengineering, and the creation of new markets-and notes the different levers for cutting costs and creating value that companies can use in each phase.

  7. The major resistance gene cluster in lettuce is highly duplicated and spans several megabases.

    PubMed

    Meyers, B C; Chin, D B; Shen, K A; Sivaramakrishnan, S; Lavelle, D O; Zhang, Z; Michelmore, R W

    1998-11-01

    At least 10 Dm genes conferring resistance to the oomycete downy mildew fungus Bremia lactucae map to the major resistance cluster in lettuce. We investigated the structure of this cluster in the lettuce cultivar Diana, which contains Dm3. A deletion breakpoint map of the chromosomal region flanking Dm3 was saturated with a variety of molecular markers. Several of these markers are components of a family of resistance gene candidates (RGC2) that encode a nucleotide binding site and a leucine-rich repeat region. These motifs are characteristic of plant disease resistance genes. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones were identified by using duplicated restriction fragment length polymorphism markers from the region, including the nucleotide binding site-encoding region of RGC2. Twenty-two distinct members of the RGC2 family were characterized from the bacterial artificial chromosomes; at least two additional family members exist. The RGC2 family is highly divergent; the nucleotide identity was as low as 53% between the most distantly related copies. These RGC2 genes span at least 3.5 Mb. Eighteen members were mapped on the deletion breakpoint map. A comparison between the phylogenetic and physical relationships of these sequences demonstrated that closely related copies are physically separated from one another and indicated that complex rearrangements have shaped this region. Analysis of low-copy genomic sequences detected no genes, including RGC2, in the Dm3 region, other than sequences related to retrotransposons and transposable elements. The related but divergent family of RGC2 genes may act as a resource for the generation of new resistance phenotypes through infrequent recombination or unequal crossing over.

  8. Silencing of the major family of NBS-LRR-encoding genes in lettuce results in the loss of multiple resistance specificities.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Tomczak, Anna; Ochoa, Oswaldo; Michelmore, Richard W

    2007-09-01

    The RGC2 gene cluster in lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is one of the largest known families of genes encoding nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins. One of its members, RGC2B, encodes Dm3 which determines resistance to downy mildew caused by the oomycete Bremia lactucae carrying the cognate avirulence gene, Avr3. We developed an efficient strategy for analysis of this large family of low expressed genes using post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). We transformed lettuce cv. Diana (carrying Dm3) using chimeric gene constructs designed to simultaneously silence RGC2B and the GUS reporter gene via the production of interfering hairpin RNA (ihpRNA). Transient assays of GUS expression in leaves accurately predicted silencing of both genes and were subsequently used to assay silencing in transgenic T(1) plants and their offspring. Levels of mRNA were reduced not only for RGC2B but also for all seven diverse RGC2 family members tested. We then used the same strategy to show that the resistance specificity encoded by the genetically defined Dm18 locus in lettuce cv. Mariska is the result of two resistance specificities, only one of which was silenced by ihpRNA derived from RGC2B. Analysis of progeny from crosses between transgenic, silenced tester stocks and lettuce accessions carrying other resistance genes previously mapped to the RGC2 locus indicated that two additional resistance specificities to B. lactucae, Dm14 and Dm16, as well as resistance to lettuce root aphid (Pemphigus bursarius L.), Ra, are encoded by RGC2 family members.

  9. Synanthropy of sarcophagidae (Diptera) in La Pintada, Antioquia-Colombia.

    PubMed

    Yepes-Gaurisas, Daniela; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Juan David; de Mello-Patiu, Cátia Antunes; Wolff Echeverri, Marta

    2013-09-01

    Recently, populations of flies have increased in numbers given the elevated levels of organic matter waste produced by anthropic activities and domestication of animals. Such increase represents a worldwide health concern, since flies can be vectors of human diseases. The great variety of feeding and developmental habits of flies of the family Sarcophagidae taking place on animal corpses, feces and decomposed organic matter make them potential vectors of pathogens. Herein, we evaluated the synanthropic index (SI), as well as other ecological aspects of this family, through simultaneous monthly samplings in three areas with different degrees of human disturbance (urban, rural and forest). Each area had four van Someren Rydon traps, each one with a different bait (i.e., human feces, chicken viscera, fish and decomposing onion). Traps were active during 48 hours each month, and specimen collection was made every 12 hours. A total of 7 446 Sarcophagidae individuals were collected (1275 males and 6171 females), belonging to 27 species and nine genera. Tricharaea (Sarcophagula) canuta (Sl = +96.67), Oxysarcodexia taitensis (SI = +93.85), Peckia (Peckia) chrysostoma (SI = +90.00) and Tricharaea (Sarcophagula) occidua (SI = +88.76) exhibited the highest values of synanthropy index, revealing a strong preference for human settlements. The most abundant species were Oxysarcodexia conclausa (21.80%), Ravinia effrenata (18.67%), Oxysarcodexia bakeri (11.45%) and Oxysarcodexia taitensis (10.20%), all of which exhibited preference for urban environments. Additionally, we are reporting seven new records of Sarcophagid flies for Colombia: Oxysarcodexia angrensis, Oxysarcodexia bakeri, Oxysarcodexia diana, Oxysarcodexia similata, Oxysarcodexia timida, Peckia (Peckia) pexata and Titanogrypa (Cucullomyia) placida.

  10. Culturally relevant science: An approach to math science education for Hispanics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Montellano, B.

    1996-11-14

    As planned a letter was sent out to 17 teachers who had participated in a Summer 1994 workshop on ``Culturally Relevant Science for Hispanics`` at Michigan State. These teachers were supposed to have spent the intervening time developing lesson plans and curricula. The letter requested a report of any activities undertaken and copies of lesson plans and materials developed by February 1996 with a stipend of $400 for satisfactory reports. It was a disappointment to only get 9 responses and not all of them demonstrating a satisfactory level of activity. Diana Marinez, Dean of Science at Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi, who is the other developer of this curriculum and the author reviewed the submitted materials and chose those showing the most promise to be invited to participate in the Summer Writing Workshop. Spring of 1996 and particularly in May--June, the author wrote a partial first draft of a companion volume for the teacher`s manual which would provide a rationale for doing culturally relevant science, present the cultural and the scientific background that teachers would need in order to be able to teach. One of the goals of this curriculum is that it should be off-the-shelf ready to teach and that teachers would not have to do extra research to encourage its adoption. The outline of the book is appendix 1. The Writing Workshop was held at Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi from July 14 to July 27, 1996. Participating teachers chose topics that they were interested in developing and wrote first drafts. These were distributed to all participants and critiqued by the workshop directors before being rewritten. Some teachers were more productive than others depending on their science background. In total an impressive number of lesson plans were written. These lesson plans are listed in Appendix 3. Appendix 4 is a sample lesson. Work still needs to be done on both the source book and the teachers` manual.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha, which is linked to the development of cutaneous SCC, modulates differential epidermal microRNAs expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashok; Willems, Estelle; Singh, Anupama; Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Ong, Irene M; Mehta, Suresh L; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2016-04-05

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is linked to the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a non-melanoma form of skin cancer that can metastasize. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is linked to UVR-induced development of SCC. To find clues about the mechanisms by which TNFα may promote UVR-induced development of SCC, we investigated changes in the expression profiling of microRNAs (miRNA), a novel class of short noncoding RNAs, which affects translation and stability of mRNAs. In this experiment, TNFα knockout (TNFα KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates were exposed to acute UVR (2.0 kJ/m2) and the expression profiling of epidermal miRNA was determined 4hr post UVR exposure. TNFα deletion in untreated WT mice resulted in differential expression (log fold change>1) of seventeen miRNA. UVR exposure in WT mice induced differential expression of 22 miRNA. However, UVR exposure in TNFα KO mice altered only two miRNAs. Four miRNA, were differentially expressed between WT+UVR and TNFα KO+UVR groups. Differentially expressed selected miRNAs were further validated using real time PCR. Few of the differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-31-5p, miR-196a-5p, miR-127-3p, miR-206-3p, miR-411-5p, miR-709, and miR-322-5p) were also observed in UVR-induced SCC. Finally, bio-informatics analysis using DIANA, MIRANDA, Target Scan, and miRDB algorithms revealed a link with major UVR-induced pathways (MAPK, PI3K-Akt, transcriptional mis-regulation, Wnt, and TGF-beta).

  12. Hsa-miR-146a-5p modulates androgen-independent prostate cancer cells apoptosis by targeting ROCK1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Huang, Yeqing; Niu, Xiaobing; Tao, Tao; Jiang, Liang; Tong, Na; Chen, Shuqiu; Liu, Ning; Zhu, Weidong; Chen, Ming

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been demonstrated playing important roles in the procession of prostate cancer cells transformation from androgen-dependence to androgen-independence. We conducted the miRNA microarray and realtime PCR analyses in both androgen-dependent (ADPC) and androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) tissues. We also explored the role of hsa-miR-146a-5p (miR-146a) in MSKCC prostate cancer clinical database. Moreover, the impact of miR-146a on prostate cancer cells apoptosis were detected by Hoechst staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Its target is predicted by DIANA LAB online database and the result was assumed by western blotting and luciferase assay. We demonstrated that miR-146a was down-regulated in AIPC tissues and cell lines compared to that in the ADPC tissues. In MSKCC data re-analyses, we found that miR-146a was underexpressed in metastatic prostate cancer tissues and those with Gleason score >8, moreover, low level of miR-146a represented a high biochemical relapse rate after radical prostatectomy. In the functional analyses, we transfected miR-146a mimics into CPRC cell lines and found miR-146a induced cells apoptosis. In mechanic analyses, we found that miR-146a inhibited the basal level of Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) expression by targeting its 3'UTR and an inverse correlation of expression between miR-146a and ROCK1 was observed. Moreover, caspase 3 activity was stimulated by miR-146a overexpression. miR-146a has a critical role in the process of AIPC prostate cancer cells apoptosis through regulation of ROCK/Caspase 3 pathway. Targeting this pathway may be a promising therapeutic strategy for future personalized anti-cancer treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of metal contamination in situ on osmoregulation and oxygen consumption in the mudflat fiddler crab Uca rapax (Ocypodidae, Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Capparelli, Mariana V; Abessa, Denis M; McNamara, John C

    2016-01-01

    The contamination of estuaries by metals can impose additional stresses on estuarine species, which may exhibit a limited capability to adjust their regulatory processes and maintain physiological homeostasis. The mudflat fiddler crab Uca rapax is a typical estuarine crab, abundant in both pristine and contaminated areas along the Atlantic coast of Brazil. This study evaluates osmotic and ionic regulatory ability and gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in different salinities (<0.5, 25 and 60‰ S) and oxygen consumption rates at different temperatures (15, 25 and 35°C) in U. rapax collected from localities along the coast of São Paulo State showing different histories of metal contamination (most contaminated Ilha Diana, Santos>Rio Itapanhaú, Bertioga>Picinguaba, Ubatuba [pristine reference site]). Our findings show that the contamination of U. rapax by metals in situ leads to bioaccumulation and induces biochemical and physiological changes compared to crabs from the pristine locality. U. rapax from the contaminated sites exhibit stronger hyper- and hypo-osmotic regulatory abilities and show greater gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities than crabs from the pristine site, revealing that the underlying biochemical machinery can maintain systemic physiological processes functioning well. However, oxygen consumption, particularly at elevated temperatures, decreases in crabs showing high bioaccumulation titers but increases in crabs with low/moderate bioaccumulation levels. These data show that U. rapax chronically contaminated in situ exhibits compensatory biochemical and physiological adjustments, and reveal the importance of studies on organisms exposed to metals in situ, particularly estuarine invertebrates subject to frequent changes in natural environmental parameters like salinity and temperature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Recent Progress in GW-based Methods for Excited-State Calculations of Reduced Dimensional Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Jornada, Felipe H.

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio calculations of excited-state phenomena within the GW and GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) approaches allow one to accurately study the electronic and optical properties of various materials, including systems with reduced dimensionality. However, several challenges arise when dealing with complicated nanostructures where the electronic screening is strongly spatially and directionally dependent. In this talk, we discuss some recent developments to address these issues. First, we turn to the slow convergence of quasiparticle energies and exciton binding energies with respect to k-point sampling. This is very effectively dealt with using a new hybrid sampling scheme, which results in savings of several orders of magnitude in computation time. A new ab initio method is also developed to incorporate substrate screening into GW and GW-BSE calculations. These two methods have been applied to mono- and few-layer MoSe2, and yielded strong environmental dependent behaviors in good agreement with experiment. Other issues that arise in confined systems and materials with reduced dimensionality, such as the effect of the Tamm-Dancoff approximation to GW-BSE, and the calculation of non-radiative exciton lifetime, are also addressed. These developments have been efficiently implemented and successfully applied to real systems in an ab initio framework using the BerkeleyGW package. I would like to acknowledge collaborations with Diana Y. Qiu, Steven G. Louie, Meiyue Shao, Chao Yang, and the experimental groups of M. Crommie and F. Wang. This work was supported by Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR10-1006184.

  15. Effect of spatial nonuniformity of heating on compression and burning of a thermonuclear target under direct multibeam irradiation by a megajoule laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'kov, S. A.; Bondarenko, S. V.; Vergunova, G. A.; Garanin, S. G.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Doskoch, I. Ya.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    Direct-drive fusion targets are considered at present as an alternative to targets of indirect compression at a laser energy level of about 2 MJ. In this approach, the symmetry of compression and ignition of thermonuclear fuel play the major role. We report on the results of theoretical investigation of compression and burning of spherical direct-drive targets in the conditions of spatial nonuniformity of heating associated with a shift of the target from the beam center of focusing and possible laser radiation energy disbalance in the beams. The investigation involves numerous calculations based on a complex of 1D and 2D codes RAPID, SEND (for determining the target illumination and the dynamics of absorption), DIANA, and NUT (1D and multidimensional hydrodynamics of compression and burning of targets). The target under investigation had the form of a two-layer shell (ablator made of inertial material CH and DT ice) filled with DT gas. We have determined the range of admissible variation of compression and combustion parameters of the target depending on the variation of the spatial nonuniformity of its heating by a multibeam laser system. It has been shown that low-mode (long-wavelength) perturbations deteriorate the characteristics of the central region due to less effective conversion of the kinetic energy of the target shell into the internal energy of the center. Local initiation of burning is also observed in off-center regions of the target in the case of substantial asymmetry of irradiation. In this case, burning is not spread over the entire volume of the DT fuel as a rule, which considerably reduces the thermonuclear yield as compared to that in the case of spherical symmetry and central ignition.

  16. MiR-578 and miR-573 as potential players in BRCA-related breast cancer angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Danza, Katia; De Summa, Simona; Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Merla, Giuseppe; Simone, Gianni; Tommasi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of microRNA (miRNAs), a new class of small RNA molecules, in governing angiogenesis has been well described. Our aim was to investigate miRNA-mediated regulation of angiogenesis in a series of familial breast cancers stratified by BRCA1/2 mutational status in BRCA carriers and BRCA non-carriers (BRCAX). Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays were used to perform miRNA expression analysis on 43 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour tissue familial breast cancers (22 BRCA 1/2-related and 21 BRCAX). Pathway enrichment analysis was carried out with the DIANA miRPath v2.0 web-based computational tool, and the miRWalk database was used to identify target genes of deregulated miRNAs. An independent set of 8 BRCA 1/2-related and 11 BRCAX breast tumors was used for validation by Real-Time PCR. In vitro analysis on HEK293, MCF-7 and SUM149PT cells were performed to best-clarify miR-573 and miR-578 role. A set of 16 miRNAs differentially expressed between BRCA 1/2-related and BRCAX breast tumors emerged from the profile analysis. Among these, miR-578 and miR-573 were found to be down-regulated in BRCA 1/2-related breast cancer and associated to the Focal adhesion, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling pathways. Our data highlight the role of miR-578 and miR-573 in controlling BRCA 1/2-related angiogenesis by targeting key regulators of Focal adhesion, VEGF and HIF-1 signaling pathways.

  17. MiR-578 and miR-573 as potential players in BRCA-related breast cancer angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Danza, Katia; Summa, Simona De; Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Merla, Giuseppe; Simone, Gianni; Tommasi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of microRNA (miRNAs), a new class of small RNA molecules, in governing angiogenesis has been well described. Our aim was to investigate miRNA-mediated regulation of angiogenesis in a series of familial breast cancers stratified by BRCA1/2 mutational status in BRCA carriers and BRCA non-carriers (BRCAX). Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays were used to perform miRNA expression analysis on 43 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour tissue familial breast cancers (22 BRCA 1/2-related and 21 BRCAX). Pathway enrichment analysis was carried out with the DIANA miRPath v2.0 web-based computational tool, and the miRWalk database was used to identify target genes of deregulated miRNAs. An independent set of 8 BRCA 1/2-related and 11 BRCAX breast tumors was used for validation by Real-Time PCR. In vitro analysis on HEK293, MCF-7 and SUM149PT cells were performed to best-clarify miR-573 and miR-578 role. A set of 16 miRNAs differentially expressed between BRCA 1/2-related and BRCAX breast tumors emerged from the profile analysis. Among these, miR-578 and miR-573 were found to be down-regulated in BRCA 1/2-related breast cancer and associated to the Focal adhesion, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling pathways. Our data highlight the role of miR-578 and miR-573 in controlling BRCA 1/2-related angiogenesis by targeting key regulators of Focal adhesion, VEGF and HIF-1 signaling pathways. PMID:25333258

  18. TGFbeta and miRNA regulation in familial and sporadic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Popescu, Ondina; Digennaro, Maria; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Tommasi, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    The term ‘BRCAness’ was introduced to identify sporadic malignant tumors sharing characteristics similar to those germline BRCA-related. Among all mechanisms attributable to BRCA1 expression silencing, a major role has been assigned to microRNAs. MicroRNAs role in familial and sporadic breast cancer has been explored but few data are available about microRNAs involvement in homologous recombination repair control in these breast cancer subgroups. Our aim was to seek microRNAs associated to pathways underlying DNA repair dysfunction in breast cancer according to a family history of the disease. Affymetrix GeneChip microRNA Arrays were used to perform microRNA expression analysis in familial and sporadic breast cancer. Pathway enrichment analysis and microRNA target prediction was carried out using DIANA miRPath v.3 web-based computational tool and miRWalk v.2 database. We analyzed an external gene expression dataset (E-GEOD-49481), including both familial and sporadic breast cancers. For microRNA validation, an independent set of 19 familial and 10 sporadic breast cancers was used. Microarray analysis identified a signature of 28 deregulated miRNAs. For our validation analyses by real time PCR, we focused on miR-92a-1*, miR-1184 and miR-943 because associated to TGF-β signalling pathway, ATM and BRCA1 genes expression. Our results highlighted alterations in miR-92a-1*, miR-1184 and miR-943 expression levels suggesting their involvement in repair of DNA double-strand breaks through TGF-beta pathway control. PMID:28881597

  19. TGFbeta and miRNA regulation in familial and sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Danza, Katia; Summa, Simona De; Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Popescu, Ondina; Digennaro, Maria; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Tommasi, Stefania

    2017-08-01

    The term 'BRCAness' was introduced to identify sporadic malignant tumors sharing characteristics similar to those germline BRCA-related. Among all mechanisms attributable to BRCA1 expression silencing, a major role has been assigned to microRNAs. MicroRNAs role in familial and sporadic breast cancer has been explored but few data are available about microRNAs involvement in homologous recombination repair control in these breast cancer subgroups. Our aim was to seek microRNAs associated to pathways underlying DNA repair dysfunction in breast cancer according to a family history of the disease. Affymetrix GeneChip microRNA Arrays were used to perform microRNA expression analysis in familial and sporadic breast cancer. Pathway enrichment analysis and microRNA target prediction was carried out using DIANA miRPath v.3 web-based computational tool and miRWalk v.2 database. We analyzed an external gene expression dataset (E-GEOD-49481), including both familial and sporadic breast cancers. For microRNA validation, an independent set of 19 familial and 10 sporadic breast cancers was used. Microarray analysis identified a signature of 28 deregulated miRNAs. For our validation analyses by real time PCR, we focused on miR-92a-1*, miR-1184 and miR-943 because associated to TGF-β signalling pathway, ATM and BRCA1 genes expression. Our results highlighted alterations in miR-92a-1*, miR-1184 and miR-943 expression levels suggesting their involvement in repair of DNA double-strand breaks through TGF-beta pathway control.

  20. Spatial variation in mandibular bone elastic modulus and its effect on structural bending stiffness: A test case using the Taï Forest monkeys.

    PubMed

    Le, Kim N; Marsik, Matthew; Daegling, David J; Duque, Ana; McGraw, William Scott

    2017-03-01

    We investigated how heterogeneity in material stiffness affects structural stiffness in the cercopithecid mandibular cortical bone. We assessed (1) whether this effect changes the interpretation of interspecific structural stiffness variation across four primate species, (2) whether the heterogeneity is random, and (3) whether heterogeneity mitigates bending stress in the jaw associated with food processing. The sample consisted of Taï Forest, Cote d'Ivoire, monkeys: Cercocebus atys, Piliocolobus badius, Colobus polykomos, and Cercopithecus diana. Vickers indentation hardness samples estimated elastic moduli throughout the cortical bone area of each coronal section of postcanine corpus. For each section, we calculated maximum area moment of inertia, Imax (structural mechanical property), under three models of material heterogeneity, as well as spatial autocorrelation statistics (Moran's I, IMORAN ). When the model considered material stiffness variation and spatial patterning, Imax decreased and individual ranks based on structural stiffness changed. Rank changes were not significant across models. All specimens showed positive (nonrandom) spatial autocorrelation. Differences in IMORAN were not significant among species, and there were no discernable patterns of autocorrelation within species. Across species, significant local IMORAN was often attributed to proximity of low moduli in the alveolar process and high moduli in the basal process. While our sample did not demonstrate species differences in the degree of spatial autocorrelation of elastic moduli, there may be mechanical effects of heterogeneity (relative strength and rigidity) that do distinguish at the species or subfamilial level (i.e., colobines vs. cercopithecines). The potential connections of heterogeneity to diet and/or taxonomy remain to be discovered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis).

    PubMed

    Brown, L R; Wüthrich, K

    1992-10-20

    The three-dimensional structure in solution of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A high quality structure for this 60-residue protein was obtained from 656 NOE distance constraints and 143 dihedral angle constraints, using the distance geometry program DIANA for the structure calculation and AMBER for restrained energy minimization. For a group of 20 conformers used to represent the solution structure, the average root-mean-square deviation value calculated for the polypeptide backbone heavy atoms relative to the mean structure was 0.45 A. The protein consists of a core region from which three finger-like loops extend outwards. It includes a short, two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet of residues 1-5 and 13-17, a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet involving residues 23-31, 34-42 and 51-55, and four disulfide bridges in the core region. There is also extensive non-regular hydrogen bonding between the carboxy-terminal tail of the polypeptide chain and the rest of the core region. Comparison with the crystal structure of erabutoxin-b indicates that the structure of alpha-neurotoxin is quite similar to other neurotoxin structures, but that local structural differences are seen in regions thought to be important for binding of neurotoxins to the acetylcholine receptor. For two regions of the alpha-neurotoxin structure there is evidence for an equilibrium between multiple conformations, which might be related to conformational rearrangements upon binding to the receptor. Overall, the alpha-neurotoxin presents itself as a protein with a stable core and flexible surface areas that interact with the acetylcholine receptor in such a way that high affinity binding is achieved by conformational rearrangements of the deformable regions of the neurotoxin structure.

  2. Science Planning for the TROPIX Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the study grant was to undertake the planning needed to execute meaningful solar electric propulsion missions in the magnetosphere and beyond. The first mission examined was the Transfer Orbit Plasma Investigation Experiment (TROPIX) mission to spiral outward through the magnetosphere. The next mission examined was to the moon and an asteroid. Entitled Diana, it was proposed to NASA in October 1994. Two similar missions were conceived in 1996 entitled CNR for Comet Nucleus Rendezvous and MBAR for Main Belt Asteroid Rendezvous. The latter mission was again proposed in 1998. All four of these missions were unsuccessfully proposed to the NASA Discovery program. Nevertheless we were partially successful in that the Deep Space 1 (DS1) mission was eventually carried out nearly duplicating our CNR mission. Returning to the magnetosphere we studied and proposed to the Medium Class Explorer (MIDEX) program a MidEx mission called TEMPEST, in 1995. This mission included two solar electric spacecraft that spiraled outward in the magnetosphere: one at near 900 inclination and one in the equatorial plane. This mission was not selected for flight. Next we proposed a single SEP vehicle to carry Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers and inside observations to complement the IMAGE mission providing needed data to properly interpret the IMAGE data. This mission called SESAME was submitted unsuccessfully in 1997. One proposal was successful. A study grant was awarded to examine a four spacecraft solar electric mission, named Global Magnetospheric Dynamics. This study was completed and a report on this mission is attached but events overtook this design and a separate study team was selected to design a classical chemical mission as a Solar Terrestrial Probe. Competing proposals such as through the MIDEX opportunity were expressly forbidden. A bibliography is attached.

  3. Active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: the German discussion.

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, Manfred; Meissner, Christoph

    2003-03-01

    The debate on legalization of active euthanasia in the Netherlands and Belgium and the refused legal right to choose the circumstances of Diana Pretty's own death are the last actual reasons for reconsidering the situation in Germany. Around the world heated debates have broken out on the topic of active euthanasia. Specialists in the field of 'forensic medicine' have taken full part in these discussions. The present survey from the point of view of forensic medicine begins with a look at current terminology and at the laws pertaining to euthanasia in Germany. These laws are then contrasted with actual practice, including a description of the increasing acceptance of active euthanasia by the German population. The main argument against legalization of active euthanasia is that its formal acceptance in law would cause the dam of restraint to burst, culminating in widespread misuse, as already seen in recent serial killings by nurses in hospitals and homes for the elderly around the world. Contrasted with this are the arguments for taking active steps at the end of life, including emotional considerations such as the revulsion against mechanized medicine and the fear of pain and rational arguments such as the necessity to end a 'life unworthy of life', to save medical costs, and obtaining prior consent in 'living wills'. Such considerations have put in jeopardy the moral integrity of the medical profession - and thus the layperson's trust in physicians--around the world. In Germany especially the history of mass killing during the Nazi era constitutes a fundamental argument against active euthanasia. As a consequence, in Germany active euthanasia will not receive legal sanction, although recommendations on rendering dying more bearable are permitted.

  4. The real new economy.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Diana

    2003-10-01

    During the soar-and-swoon days of the late 1990s, many people believed that information technology, and the Internet in particular, were "changing everything" in business. A fundamental change did happen in the 1990s, but it was less about technology than about competition. Under director Diana Farrell, the McKinsey Global Institute has conducted an extensive study of productivity and its connection to corporate IT spending and use during that period. The study revealed that information technology is important--but not central--to the fate of industries and individual companies. So if information technology was not the primary factor in the productivity surge, what was? The study points to competition and innovation. In those industries that saw increases in competitive intensity, managers were forced to innovate aggressively to protect their revenues and profits. Those innovations--in products, business practices, and technology--led to the gains in productivity. In fact, a critical dynamic of the new economy--the real new economy--is the virtuous cycle of competition, innovation, and productivity growth. Managers can innovate in many ways, but during the 1990s, information technology was a particularly powerful tool, for three reasons: First, IT enabled the development of attractive new products and efficient new business processes. Second, it facilitated the rapid industrywide diffusion of innovations. And third, it exhibited strong scale economies--its benefits multiplied rapidly as its use expanded. This article reveals surprising data on how various industries in the United States and Europe were affected by competition, innovation, and information technology in the 1990s and offers insights about how managers can get more from their IT investments.

  5. Pricing products: juxtaposing affordability with quality appeal.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Choosing appropriate product prices is 1 of the most crucial steps in creating an effective contraceptive social marketing (CSM) sales campaign. The Social Marketing Forum conducted an informal survey of social marketing project managers, international contractors, and marketing consultants to determine how CSM programs cope with pricing problems and ways to circumvent some obstacles. According to Diana Altman, a family planning consultant, low prices that make products available to needy individuals are more important than the program's self sufficiency, yet if prices are too low, consumers think the products were unusable in the US and thus were dumped on local markets. Other key factors include commercial competition, spiraling inflation rates, and problems with rising prices and retailer/distributor margins. A sampling of per capita gross national products indicates the poverty level of most CSM projects' target market. Consequently, CSM projects must set low pices, regardless of program operating costs. The goal often is to increase the demand and availability for contraceptives. The fact that social marketing products must pass through retail networks to reach consumers complicates the pricing equation. To deal with the problem, India's Nirodh program gives a 25% margin to distributors/wholesalers, compared to 6% offered on most other goods. Retailers also receive a 25% margin, more than double the commercial rate. Once prices are set, increases pose hazards. Local government approval often is a prerequisite and can require lengthy negotiations. Market studies remain a valuable approach to effective pricing, according to PNA's Mallamad and other research consultants. They cite such effective research strategies as test marketing products and asking consumers how prices affect buying habits. Further, CSM projects can jump over some pricing hurdles through creative marketing. An effective pricing strategy alone cannot produce a successful CSM program. Pricing

  6. Computational identification of microRNAs associated to both epithelial to mesenchymal transition and NGAL/MMP-9 pathways in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Falzone, Luca; Candido, Saverio; Salemi, Rossella; Basile, Maria S.; Scalisi, Aurora; McCubrey, James A.; Torino, Francesco; Signorelli, Salvatore S.; Montella, Maurizio; Libra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the leading cancer of the urinary tract. It is often diagnosed at advanced stage of the disease. To date, no specific and effective early detection biomarkers are available. Cancer development and progression are associated with the involvement of both epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and tumor microenvironment of which NGAL/MMP-9 complex represents the main player in bladder cancer. It is known that change in microRNAs (miRNAs) expression may result in gene modulation. Therefore, the identification of specific miRNAs associated with EMT pathway and NGAL/MMP-9 complex may be useful to detect the development of bladder cancer at early stages. On this ground, the expression levels of miRNAs in public available datasets of bladder cancer containing data of non-coding RNA profiling was evaluated. This analysis revealed a group of 16 miRNAs differentially expressed between bladder cancer patients and related healthy controls. By miRNA prediction tool (mirDIP), the relationship between the identified miRNAs and the EMT genes was established. Using the DIANA-mirPath (v.2) software, miRNAs, able to modulate the expression of NGAL and MMP-9 genes, were recognized. The results of this study provide evidence that the downregulated hsa-miR-145-5p and hsa-miR-214-3p may modulate the expression of both EMT and NGAL/MMP-9 pathways. Therefore, further validation analyses may confirm the usefulness of these selected miRNAs for predicting the development of bladder cancer at the early stage of the disease. PMID:27602581

  7. MiRImpact, a new bioinformatic method using complete microRNA expression profiles to assess their overall influence on the activity of intracellular molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Artcibasova, Alina V.; Korzinkin, Mikhail B.; Sorokin, Maksim I.; Shegay, Peter V.; Zhavoronkov, Alex A.; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Alekseev, Boris Y.; Vorobyev, Nikolay V.; Kuzmin, Denis V.; Kaprin, Аndrey D.; Borisov, Nikolay M.; Buzdin, Anton A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRs) are short noncoding RNA molecules that regulate expression of target mRNAs. Many published sources provide information about miRs and their targets. However, bioinformatic tools elucidating higher level impact of the established total miR profiles, are still largely missing. Recently, we developed a method termed OncoFinder enabling quantification of the activities of intracellular molecular pathways basing on gene expression data. Here we propose a new technique, MiRImpact, which enables to link miR expression data with its estimated outcome on the regulation of molecular pathways, like signaling, metabolic, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and DNA repair pathways. MiRImpact uses OncoFinder rationale for pathway activity calculations, with the major distinctions that (i) it deals with the concentrations of miRs - known regulators of gene products participating in molecular pathways, and (ii) miRs are considered as negative regulators of target molecules, if other is not specified. MiRImpact operates with 2 types of databases: for molecular targets of miRs and for gene products participating in molecular pathways. We applied MiRImpact to compare regulation of human bladder cancer-specific signaling pathways at the levels of mRNA and miR expression. We took 2 most complete alternative databases of experimentally validated miR targets – miRTarBase and DianaTarBase, and an OncoFinder database featuring 2725 gene products and 271 signaling pathways. We showed that the impact of miRs is orthogonal to pathway regulation at the mRNA level, which stresses the importance of studying posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. We also report characteristic set of miR and mRNA regulation features linked with bladder cancer. PMID:27027999

  8. In Silico Prediction and Validation of Gfap as an miR-3099 Target in Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Abidin, Shahidee Zainal; Leong, Jia-Wen; Mahmoudi, Marzieh; Nordin, Norshariza; Abdullah, Syahril; Cheah, Pike-See; Ling, King-Hwa

    2017-08-01

    MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression and protein synthesis during brain development. MiR-3099 is highly expressed throughout embryogenesis, especially in the developing central nervous system. Moreover, miR-3099 is also expressed at a higher level in differentiating neurons in vitro, suggesting that it is a potential regulator during neuronal cell development. This study aimed to predict the target genes of miR-3099 via in-silico analysis using four independent prediction algorithms (miRDB, miRanda, TargetScan, and DIANA-micro-T-CDS) with emphasis on target genes related to brain development and function. Based on the analysis, a total of 3,174 miR-3099 target genes were predicted. Those predicted by at least three algorithms (324 genes) were subjected to DAVID bioinformatics analysis to understand their overall functional themes and representation. The analysis revealed that nearly 70% of the target genes were expressed in the nervous system and a significant proportion were associated with transcriptional regulation and protein ubiquitination mechanisms. Comparison of in situ hybridization (ISH) expression patterns of miR-3099 in both published and in-house-generated ISH sections with the ISH sections of target genes from the Allen Brain Atlas identified 7 target genes (Dnmt3a, Gabpa, Gfap, Itga4, Lxn, Smad7, and Tbx18) having expression patterns complementary to miR-3099 in the developing and adult mouse brain samples. Of these, we validated Gfap as a direct downstream target of miR-3099 using the luciferase reporter gene system. In conclusion, we report the successful prediction and validation of Gfap as an miR-3099 target gene using a combination of bioinformatics resources with enrichment of annotations based on functional ontologies and a spatio-temporal expression dataset.

  9. Original Research: miR-194 inhibits proliferation and invasion and promotes apoptosis by targeting KDM5B in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guanghui; Liu, Donglei; Li, Weihao; Li, Yuhang; Liang, Youguang; Shi, Wensong; Zhao, Song

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that miR-194 is down-regulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma tumor tissue. However, the role and underlying mechanism of miR-194 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma have not been well defined. We used DIANA, TargetScan and miRanda to perform target prediction analysis and found KDM5B is a potential target of miR-194. Based on these findings, we speculated that miR-194 might play a role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma development and progression by regulation the expression of KDM5B. We detected the expression of miR-194 and KDM5B by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot assays, respectively, and found down-regulation of miR-194 and up-regulation of KDM5B existed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. By detecting proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of TE6 and TE14 cells transfected with miR-194 mimics or mimic control, miR-194 was found to inhibit proliferation and invasion and promote apoptosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells. miR-194 was further verified to regulate proliferation, apoptosis and invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells by directly targeting KDM5B. Furthermore, animal studies were performed and showed that overexpression of miR-194 inhibited the growth of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma tumors in vivo. These results confirmed our speculation that miR-194 targets KDM5B to inhibit esophageal squamous cell carcinoma development and progression. These findings offer new clues for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma development and progression and novel potential therapeutic targets for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  10. Common features of microRNA target prediction tools.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Sarah M; Thompson, Jeffrey A; Ufkin, Melanie L; Sathyanarayana, Pradeep; Liaw, Lucy; Congdon, Clare Bates

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes for over 1800 microRNAs (miRNAs), which are short non-coding RNA molecules that function to regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Due to the potential for one miRNA to target multiple gene transcripts, miRNAs are recognized as a major mechanism to regulate gene expression and mRNA translation. Computational prediction of miRNA targets is a critical initial step in identifying miRNA:mRNA target interactions for experimental validation. The available tools for miRNA target prediction encompass a range of different computational approaches, from the modeling of physical interactions to the incorporation of machine learning. This review provides an overview of the major computational approaches to miRNA target prediction. Our discussion highlights three tools for their ease of use, reliance on relatively updated versions of miRBase, and range of capabilities, and these are DIANA-microT-CDS, miRanda-mirSVR, and TargetScan. In comparison across all miRNA target prediction tools, four main aspects of the miRNA:mRNA target interaction emerge as common features on which most target prediction is based: seed match, conservation, free energy, and site accessibility. This review explains these features and identifies how they are incorporated into currently available target prediction tools. MiRNA target prediction is a dynamic field with increasing attention on development of new analysis tools. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive assessment of these tools in a manner that is accessible across disciplines. Understanding the basis of these prediction methodologies will aid in user selection of the appropriate tools and interpretation of the tool output.

  11. PREFACE: 17th International School on Condensed Matter Physics (ISCMP): Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Nesheva, Diana; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Alexander G.; Primatarowa, Marina T.

    2012-12-01

    We are pleased to introduce the Proceedings of the 17th International School on Condensed Matter Physics: Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications, organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The Chairman of the School was Professor Alexander G Petrov. Like prior events, the School took place in the beautiful Black Sea resort of Saints Constantine and Helena near Varna, going back to the refurbished facilities of the Panorama hotel. Participants from 17 different countries delivered 31 invited lecturers and 78 posters, contributing through three sessions of poster presentations. Papers submitted to the Proceedings were refereed according to the high standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series and the accepted papers illustrate the diversity and the high level of the contributions. Not least significant factor for the success of the 17 ISCMP was the social program, both the organized events (Welcome and Farewell Parties) and the variety of pleasant local restaurants and beaches. Visits to the Archaeological Museum (rich in valuable gold treasures of the ancient Thracian culture) and to the famous rock monastery Aladja were organized for the participants from the Varna Municipality. These Proceedings are published for the second time by the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are grateful to the Journal's staff for supporting this idea. The Committee decided that the next event will take place again in Saints Constantine and Helena, 1-5 September 2014. It will be entitled: Challenges of the Nanoscale Science: Theory, Materials and Applications. Doriana Dimova-Malinovska, Diana Nesheva, Emilia Pecheva, Alexander G Petrov and Marina T Primatarowa Editors

  12. Experimental search for radiative decays of the pentaquark baryon {Theta}{sup +}(1540)

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.

    2010-07-15

    The data on the reactions K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup 0{gamma}}X and K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup +{gamma}}X, obtained with the bubble chamber DIANA, have been analyzed for possible radiative decays of the {Theta}{sup +}(1540) baryon: {Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma} and {Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}. No signals have been observed, and we derive the upper limits {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma})/{Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p) < 0.032 and {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma})/{Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}) < 0.041 which, using our previous measurement of {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}KN) = 0.39 {+-} 0.10 MeV, translate to {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma}) < 8 keV and {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}) < 11 keV at 90% confidence level. We have also measured the cross sections of K{sup +}-induced reactions involving emission of a neutral pion: {sigma}(K{sup +}n {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{pi}{sup 0}) = 68 {+-} 18 {mu}b and {sigma}(K{sup +}N {sup {yields}}K{sup +}N{pi}{sup 0}) = 30 {+-} 8 {mu}b for incident K{sup +} momentum of 640 MeV.

  13. Further evidence for formation of a narrow baryon resonance with positive strangeness in K{sup +} collisions with Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G. Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.

    2007-01-15

    We have continued our investigation of the charge-exchange reaction K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}} K{sup 0}pXe' in the bubble chamber DIANA. In agreement with our previous results based on part of the present statistics, formation of a narrow pK{sup 0} resonance with mass of 1537 {+-} 2 MeV/c{sup 2} is observed in the elementary transition K{sup +}n {sup {yields}} K{sup 0}p on a neutron bound in the xenon nucleus. The visible width of the peak is consistent with being entirely due to instrumental resolution and allows one to place an upper limit on its intrinsic width: {gamma} < 9 MeV/c{sup 2}. A more precise estimate of the resonance intrinsic width, {gamma} = 0.36 {+-} 0.11 MeV/c{sup 2}, is obtained from the ratio between the numbers of resonant and nonresonant charge-exchange events. The signal is observed in a restricted interval of incident K{sup +} momentum that is consistent with smearing of a narrow pK{sup 0} resonance by Fermi motion of the target neutron. The statistical significance of the signal is some 7.3, 5.3, and 4.3 standard deviations for the estimators S/{radical}B,S/{radical}(S+B) and S/{radical}(S+2B), respectively. This observation confirms and reinforces our earlier results, and offers strong evidence for formation of a pentaquark baryon with positive strangeness in the charge-exchange reaction K{sup +}n {sup {yields}} K{sup 0}p on a bound neutron.

  14. Effect of Surface Alloying by Silicon on the Corrosion Resistance and Biocompatibility of the Binary NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psakhie, S. G.; Meisner, S. N.; Lotkov, A. I.; Meisner, L. L.; Tverdokhlebova, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the study on changes in element and phase compositions in the near-surface layer and on surface topography of the NiTi specimens after the silicon ion-beam treatment. The effect of these parameters of the near-surface layer on corrosion properties in biochemical solutions and biocompatibility with mesenchymal stem cells of rat marrow is studied. Ion-beam surface modification of the specimens was performed by a DIANA-3 implanter (Tomsk, Russia), using single-ion-beam pulses under oil-free pumping and high vacuum (10-4 Pa) conditions in a high-dose ion implantation regime. The fluence made 2 × 1017 cm-2, at an average accelerating voltage of 60 kV, and pulse repetition frequency of 50 Hz. The silicon ion-beam treatment of specimen surfaces is shown to bring about a nearly twofold improvement in the corrosion resistance of the material to attack by aqueous solutions of NaCl (artificial body fluid) and human plasma and a drastic decrease in the nickel concentration after immersion of the specimens into the solutions for ~3400 and ~6000 h, respectively (for the artificial plasma solution, a nearly 20-fold decrease in the Ni concentration is observed). It is shown that improvement of NiTi corrosion resistance after treatment by Si ions occurs mainly due to the formation of two-layer composite coating based on Ti oxides (outer layer) on the NiTi surface and adjacent inner layer of oxides, carbides, and silicides of the NiTi alloy components. Inner layer with high silicon concentration serves as a barrier layer preventing nickel penetration into biomedium. This, in our opinion, is the main reason why the NiTi alloy exhibits no cytotoxic properties after ion modification of its surface and leads to the biocompatibility improvement at the cellular level, respectively.

  15. CrossHub: a tool for multi-way analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) in the context of gene expression regulation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Krasnov, George S.; Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Zaretsky, Andrew R.; Nasedkina, Tatiana V.; Zasedatelev, Alexander S.; Senchenko, Vera N.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of different mechanisms to the regulation of gene expression varies for different tissues and tumors. Complementation of predicted mRNA–miRNA and gene–transcription factor (TF) relationships with the results of expression correlation analyses derived for specific tumor types outlines the interactions with functional impact in the current biomaterial. We developed CrossHub software, which enables two-way identification of most possible TF–gene interactions: on the basis of ENCODE ChIP-Seq binding evidence or Jaspar prediction and co-expression according to the data of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, the largest cancer omics resource. Similarly, CrossHub identifies mRNA–miRNA pairs with predicted or validated binding sites (TargetScan, mirSVR, PicTar, DIANA microT, miRTarBase) and strong negative expression correlations. We observed partial consistency between ChIP-Seq or miRNA target predictions and gene–TF/miRNA co-expression, demonstrating a link between these indicators. Additionally, CrossHub expression-methylation correlation analysis can be used to identify hypermethylated CpG sites or regions with the greatest potential impact on gene expression. Thus, CrossHub is capable of outlining molecular portraits of a specific gene and determining the three most common sources of expression regulation: promoter/enhancer methylation, miRNA interference and TF-mediated activation or repression. CrossHub generates formatted Excel workbooks with the detailed results. CrossHub is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/crosshub/. PMID:26773058

  16. 2010 John H. Gibbon Lecture. Just say yes!

    PubMed

    DeBois, William J

    2010-12-01

    Advancing anything requires change and a new method. It can be a challenge to bring about the change that you believe in. This change however requires you to plan and say no to the old way of doing things. Fortunately there is a positive way to say no whereby important needs are met. As Ury suggests, we need to focus on how the two opposing forces need to be addressed. There is your internal focus of what's important to you and the opposing external focus of others--what's important to them. We can't lose sight of this because when we do, we risk disrespecting others. As technicians we are in a unique position as perfusionists whereby we work closely with physicians and on occasion will direct them to perform tasks. Additionally, many other non-physicians are not familiar with our responsibilities. We need to make others knowledgeable of the education, skill, and passion we possess. I really enjoy what I do as a perfusionist and I am proud to be recognized for my team's contribution and of having received the Gibbon award. Bob Parsons, the CEO and founder of The Go Daddy Group, Inc., said "We're not here for a long time, we're here for a good time!" This all has been a real good time. Thank you. My Perfusion Team is currently: Barbara Elmer, Marie Kilcullen, Jim McVey, Marie Zanichelli, Junli Liu, Anthony Lamonica, Karen Hussey, Lilia Voevidko, Haleh Ebrahimi, Sergey Savy, Akilah Richards, Diana Froehlich.

  17. miRNAs and other non-coding RNAs in posttraumatic stress disorder: A systematic review of clinical and animal studies.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrike; Keck, Martin E; Buell, Dominik R

    2015-06-01

    In the last couple of years, non-coding (nc) RNAs like micro-RNAs (miRNAs), small interference RNAs (siRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as promising candidates for biomarkers and drug-targets in a variety of psychiatric disorders. In contrast to reports on ncRNAs in affective disorders, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, manuscripts on ncRNAs in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and associated animal models are scarce. Aiming to stimulate ncRNA research in PTSD and to identify the hitherto most promising ncRNA candidates and associated pathways for psychotrauma research, we conducted the first review on ncRNAs in PTSD. We aimed to identify studies reporting on the expression, function and regulation of ncRNAs in PTSD patients and in animals exhibiting a PTSD-like syndrome. Following the PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews, we systematically screened the PubMed database for clinical and animal studies on ncRNAs in PTSD, animal models for PTSD and animal models employing a classical fear conditioning paradigm. Using 112 different combinations of search terms, we retrieved 523 articles of which we finally included and evaluated three clinical and 12 animal studies. In addition, using the web-based tool DIANA miRPath v2.0, we searched for molecular pathways shared by the predicted targets of the here-evaluated miRNA candidates. Our findings suggest that mir-132, which has been found to be regulated in three of the here included studies, as well as miRNAs with an already established role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) seem to be particularly promising candidates for future miRNA studies in PTSD. These results are limited by the low number of human trials and by the heterogeneity of included animal studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlates of objectively measured physical activity in adolescents with Down syndrome: the UP & DOWN study.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Gomez, Rocío; Veiga, Óscar L; Sanz, Alberto; Fernhall, Bo; Díaz-Cueto, Mario; Villagra, Ariel

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: los correlatos de actividad física (AF) no han sido estudiados en adolescentes con síndrome de Down (SD). Entendiendo los correlatos de AF se podría aportar información para desarrollar estrategias para incrementar los niveles de AF en esta población diana. Objetivo: el objetivo de este estudio fue identificar correlatos de AF en adolescentes con SD. Métodos: la información de los niveles de AF y sus potenciales correlatos fue recogida en 98 adolescentes con SD (63 hombres, con edades comprendidas entre 11-20 años), usando acelerómetros y cuestionarios proxy-reportados. Se utilizó análisis de covarianza y análisis de regresión lineal múltiple para examinar los correlatos de AF. Resultados: nuestros resultados muestran que la edad y el estatus socioeconómico de los participantes fue asociado con niveles de AF como correlatos no modificables. Además, el apoyo de los padres, la AF del padre y el tiempo dedicado a ver la televisión con hermanos y amigos fueron asociados con niveles de AF como correlatos modificables. Discusión y conclusión: ambos factores modificables y no modificables se asocian con niveles de AF en adolescentes con SD. Por lo tanto, una mejor comprensión de los correlatos de AF podría contribuir a desarrollar estrategias de promoción de la AF en adolescentes con SD.

  19. The relationship between caves minerals and hypogene speleogenesis along the Cerna Valley (SW Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onac, B. P.; Sumrall, J.; Tamas, T.; Povara, I.; Veres, D.; Darmiceanu, V.; Lascu, C.

    2009-04-01

    Over 100 caves are known to develop in the Jurassic and Cretaceous limestone that outcrops on both sides of the Cerna Valley in southwestern Romania. High temperature anomalies are rather uncommon in the cave environment; however, in certain caves in the lower part of Cerna Valley one can measure air temperatures as high as 40°C. This situation is due to the presence of thermal water pooling or flowing through the caves or to the hot steam that rises along fractures from deeper thermal water pools. During the long evolution of the thermo-mineral activity along the Cerna Valley interaction has occurred on a wide scale between the cave host rock or/and cave sediments and the ascending hot steam or/and thermal solutions of all types (mainly sulfide-rich). The present work documents the products of these processes and record the occurrence of twenty-four secondary cave minerals (both of primarily or replacement origin) precipitated under particular cave environments. Among these, glauberite, apjonite, halotrichite, pickeringite, rapidcreekite, tamarugite, and darapskite are the most interesting. The mineral samples were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscope analyses with the scope of linking the cave minerals with possible hypogene speleogenetic processes. The isotopic measurements (δ34S) performed on sulfate speleothems contribute valuable information on both minerals and caves origin. Apart from two minerals (i.e., calcite and gypsum), which were identified in every cave investigated so far, all the others fall into three distinct associations that have resulted from specific reactions under highly particular settings in Diana (sulfate-dominated association), Adam (phosphate-dominated), and Great Sălitrari (sulfate/phosphate/nitrate-rich association) caves. These three remarkable cave occurrences are presented along with morphological features that confirm the

  20. An atlas of type I MADS box gene expression during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C

    2010-09-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and beta-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis.

  1. An Atlas of Type I MADS Box Gene Expression during Female Gametophyte and Seed Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:20631316

  2. Synthesis and NMR solution structure of an alpha-helical hairpin stapled with two disulfide bridges.

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, P.; Rochette, S.; Vita, C.; Roumestand, C.

    2000-01-01

    Helical coiled-coils and bundles are some of the most common structural motifs found in proteins. Design and synthesis of alpha-helical motifs may provide interesting scaffolds that can be useful as host structures to display functional sites, thus allowing the engineering of novel functional miniproteins. We have synthesized a 38-amino acid peptide, alpha2p8, encompassing the alpha-helical hairpin present in the structure of p8MTCP1, as an alpha-helical scaffold particularly promising for its stability and permissiveness of sequence mutations. The three-dimensional structure of this peptide has been solved using homonuclear two-dimensional NMR techniques at 600 MHz. After sequence specific assignment, a total of 285 distance and 29 dihedral restraints were collected. The solution structure of alpha2p8 is presented as a set of 30 DIANA structures, further refined by restrained molecular dynamics, using simulated annealing protocol with the AMBER force field. The RMSD values for the backbone and all heavy atoms are 0.65+/-0.25 and 1.51+/-0.21 A, respectively. Excised from its protein context, the alpha-hairpin keeps its native structure: an alpha-helical coiled-coil, similar to that found in superhelical structures, with two helices spanning residues 4-16 and 25-36, and linked by a short loop. This motif is stabilized by two interhelical disulfide bridges and several hydrophobic interactions at the helix interface, leaving most of its solvent-exposed surface available for mutation. This alpha-helical hairpin, easily amenable to synthetic chemistry and biological expression system, may represent a stable and versatile scaffold to display new functional sites and peptide libraries. PMID:10850804

  3. Distinct microRNA expression signatures in human right atrial and ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Xiaowei; Xu, Xiaohan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yijiang

    2012-12-01

    Human atrial and ventricular myocardium has distinct structure and physiology. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the central players in the regulation of gene expression, participating in many physiological processes. A comprehensive knowledge of miRNA expression in the human heart is essential for the understanding of myocardial function. The aim of this study was to compare the miRNA signature in human right atrial and ventricular myocardium. Agilent human miRNA arrays were used to indicate the miRNA expression signatures of the right atrial (n = 8) and ventricular (n = 9) myocardium of healthy individuals. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCRs) were used to validate the array results. DIANA-mirPath was used to incorporate the miRNAs into pathways. MiRNA arrays showed that 169 miRNAs were expressed at different levels in human right atrial and ventricular myocardium. The unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis based on the 169 dysregulated miRNAs showed that miRNA expression categorized two well-defined clusters that corresponded to human right atrial and ventricular myocardium. The qRT-PCR results correlated well with the microarray data. Bioinformatic analysis indicated the potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways. This study indicates that distinct miRNA expression signatures in human right atrial and ventricular myocardium. The findings provide a novel understanding of the molecular differences between human atrial and ventricular myocardium and may establish a framework for an anatomically detailed evaluation of cardiac function regulation.

  4. Ultraviolet radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha, which is linked to the development of cutaneous SCC, modulates differential epidermal microRNAs expression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashok; Willems, Estelle; Singh, Anupama; Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Ong, Irene M.; Mehta, Suresh L.; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is linked to the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a non-melanoma form of skin cancer that can metastasize. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is linked to UVR-induced development of SCC. To find clues about the mechanisms by which TNFα may promote UVR-induced development of SCC, we investigated changes in the expression profiling of microRNAs (miRNA), a novel class of short noncoding RNAs, which affects translation and stability of mRNAs. In this experiment, TNFα knockout (TNFα KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates were exposed to acute UVR (2.0 kJ/m2) and the expression profiling of epidermal miRNA was determined 4hr post UVR exposure. TNFα deletion in untreated WT mice resulted in differential expression (log fold change>1) of seventeen miRNA. UVR exposure in WT mice induced differential expression of 22 miRNA. However, UVR exposure in TNFα KO mice altered only two miRNAs. Four miRNA, were differentially expressed between WT+UVR and TNFα KO+UVR groups. Differentially expressed selected miRNAs were further validated using real time PCR. Few of the differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-31-5p, miR-196a-5p, miR-127-3p, miR-206-3p, miR-411-5p, miR-709, and miR-322-5p) were also observed in UVR-induced SCC. Finally, bio-informatics analysis using DIANA, MIRANDA, Target Scan, and miRDB algorithms revealed a link with major UVR-induced pathways (MAPK, PI3K-Akt, transcriptional mis-regulation, Wnt, and TGF-beta). PMID:26918454

  5. TGFbeta and miRNA regulation in familial and sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Danza, Katia; De Summa, Simona; Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Popescu, Ondina; Digennaro, Maria; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Tommasi, Stefania

    2017-01-30

    The term 'BRCAness' was introduced to identify sporadic malignant tumors sharing characteristics similar to those germline BRCA-related. Among all mechanisms attributable to BRCA1 expression silencing, a major role has been assigned to microRNAs. MicroRNAs role in familial and sporadic breast cancer has been explored but few data are available about microRNAs involvement in homologous recombination repair control in these breast cancer subgroups. Our aim was to seek microRNAs associated to pathways underlying DNA repair dysfunction in breast cancer according to a family history of the disease. Affymetrix GeneChip microRNA Arrays were used to perform microRNA expression analysis in familial and sporadic breast cancer. Pathway enrichment analysis and microRNA target prediction was carried out using DIANA miRPath v.3 web-based computational tool and miRWalk v.2 database. We analyzed an external gene expression dataset (E-GEOD-49481), including both familial and sporadic breast cancers. For microRNA validation, an independent set of 19 familial and 10 sporadic breast cancers was used. Microarray analysis identified a signature of 28 deregulated miRNAs. For our validation analyses by real time PCR, we focused on miR-92a-1*, miR-1184 and miR-943 because associated to TGF-β signalling pathway, ATM and BRCA1 genes expression. Our results highlighted alterations in miR-92a-1*, miR-1184 and miR-943 expression levels suggesting their involvement in repair of DNA double-strand breaks through TGF-beta pathway control.

  6. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II. Relationship to receptor and binding protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Torres, A M; Forbes, B E; Aplin, S E; Wallace, J C; Francis, G L; Norton, R S

    1995-04-28

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II in aqueous solution at pH 3.1 and 300 K has been determined from nuclear magnetic resonance data and restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Structural constraints consisting of 502 NOE-derived distance constraints, 11 dihedral angle restraints, and three disulfide bridges were used as input for distance geometry calculations in DIANA and X-PLOR, followed by simulated annealing refinement and energy minimization in X-PLOR. The resulting family of 20 structures was well defined in the regions of residues 5 to 28 and 41 to 62, with an average pairwise root-mean-square deviation of 1.24 A for the backbone heavy-atoms (N, C2, C) and 1.90 A for all heavy atoms. The poorly defined regions consist of the N and C termini, part of the B-domain, and the C-domain loop. Resonances from these regions of the protein gave stronger cross peaks in two dimensional NMR spectra, consistent with significant motional averaging. The main secondary structure elements in IGF-II are alpha-helices encompassing residues 11 to 21, 42 to 49 and 53 to 59. A small anti-parallel beta-sheet is formed by residues 59 to 61 and 25 to 27, while residues 26 to 28 appear to participate in intermolecular beta-sheet formation. The structure of IGF-II in the well-defined regions is very similar to those of the corresponding regions of insulin and IGF-I. Significant differences between IGF-II and IGF-I occur near the start of the third helix, in a region known to modulate affinity for the type 2 IGF receptor, and at the C terminus. The IGF II structure is discussed in relation to its binding sites for the insulin and IGF receptors and the IGF binding proteins.

  7. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ručevskis, Sandris

    2015-11-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies (IMST 2015) took place in Riga, Latvia from 30th September - 2nd October, 2015. The first event of the conference series, dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the Faculty of Civil Engineering of Riga Technical University, was held in 2013. Following the established tradition, the aim of the conference was to promote and discuss the latest results of industrial and academic research carried out in the following engineering fields: analysis and design of advanced structures and buildings; innovative, ecological and energy efficient building materials; maintenance, inspection and monitoring methods; construction technologies; structural management; sustainable and safe transport infrastructure; and geomatics and geotechnics. The conference provided an excellent opportunity for leading researchers, representatives of the industrial community, engineers, managers and students to share the latest achievements, discuss recent advances and highlight the current challenges. IMST 2015 attracted over 120 scientists from 24 countries. After rigorous reviewing, over 80 technical papers were accepted for publication in the conference proceedings. On behalf of the organizing committee I would like to thank all the speakers, authors, session chairs and reviewers for their efficient and timely effort. The 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies was organized by the Faculty of Civil Engineering of Riga Technical University with the support of the Latvia State Research Programme under the grant agreement "INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND SMART TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, IMATEH". I would like to express sincere gratitude to Juris Smirnovs, Dean of the Faculty of Civil Engineering, and Andris Chate, manager of the Latvia State Research Programme. Finally, I would like to thank all those who helped to make this event happen. Special thanks go to Diana

  8. Dehydration triggers differential microRNA expression in Xenopus laevis brain.

    PubMed

    Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-11-15

    African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis, although primarily aquatic, have a high tolerance for dehydration, being capable of withstanding the loss of up to 32-35% of total water body water. Recent studies have shown that microRNAs play a role in the response to dehydration by the liver, kidney and ventral skin of X. laevis. MicroRNAs act by modulating the expression of mRNA transcripts, thereby affecting diverse biochemical pathways. In this study, 43 microRNAs were assessed in frog brains comparing control and dehydrated (31.2±0.83% of total body water lost) conditions. MicroRNAs of interest were measured using a modified protocol which employs polyadenylation of microRNAs prior to reverse transcription and qPCR. Twelve microRNAs that showed a significant decrease in expression (to 41-77% of control levels) in brains from dehydrated frogs (xla-miR-15a, -150, -181a, -191, -211, -218, -219b, -30c, -30e, -31, -34a, and -34b) were identified. Genomic analysis showed that the sequences of these dehydration-responsive microRNAs were highly conserved as compared with the comparable microRNAs of mice (91-100%). Suppression of these microRNAs implies that translation of the mRNA transcripts under their control could be enhanced in response to dehydration. Bioinformatic analysis using the DIANA miRPath program (v.2.0) predicted the top two KEGG pathways that these microRNAs collectively regulate: 1. Axon guidance, and 2. Long-term potentiation. Previous studies indicated that suppression of these microRNAs promotes neuroprotective pathways by increasing the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and activating anti-apoptotic pathways. This suggests that similar actions may be triggered in X. laevis brains as a protective response to dehydration.

  9. Long noncoding RNA FTX is upregulated in gliomas and promotes proliferation and invasion of glioma cells by negatively regulating miR-342-3p.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguang; Bi, Yunke; Li, Jianhua; Peng, Fei; Li, Hui; Li, Chenguang; Wang, Laizang; Ren, Fubin; Xie, Chen; Wang, Pengwei; Liang, Weiwei; Wang, Zhi; Zhu, Dan

    2017-04-01

    Gliomas remain a major public health challenge, posing a high risk for brain tumor-related morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms that drive the development of gliomas remain largely unknown. Emerging evidence has shown that long noncoding RNAs are key factors in glioma pathogenesis. qRT-PCR analysis was used to assess the expression of FTX and miR-342-3p in the different stages of gliomas in tissues. Bioinformatics tool DIANA and TargetSCan were used to predict the targets of FTX and miR-342-3p, respectively. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to test the correlation between the expression levels of FTX, miR-342-3p, and astrocyte-elevated gene-1 (AEG-1). To examine the role of FTX in regulating proliferation and invasion of glioma cells, specific siRNA was used to knockdown FTX, and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and transwell assays were performed. Furthermore, rescue experiments were performed to further confirm the regulation of miR-342-3p by FTX. We then found that the expression of FTX and miR-342-3p was associated with progression of gliomas. FTX directly inhibited the expression of miR-342-3p, which subsequently regulates the expression of AEG-1. Collectively, FTX is critical for proliferation and invasion of glioma cells by regulating miR-342-3p and AEG-1. Our findings indicate that FTX and miR-342-3p may serve as a biomarker of glioma diagnosis, and offer potential novel therapeutic targets of treatment of gliomas.

  10. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 miRNA profile expression after BIK interference: BIK involvement in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Torres-Márquez, María Eugenia; Viedma-Rodríguez, Rubí; Velázquez-Wong, Ana Claudia; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio; Rosas-Vargas, Haydeé; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel Ángel

    2016-05-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-interacting killer (apoptosis inducing) (BIK) has been proposed as a tumor suppressor in diverse types of cancers. However, BIK's overexpression in breast cancer (BC) and in non-small lung cancer cells (NSCLCs), associated with a poor prognosis, suggests its participation in tumor progression. In this study, we evaluated the global expression pattern of microRNAs (miRNAs), messenger RNA (mRNA) expression changes in autophagy, and autophagic flux after BIK interference. BIK gene expression was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in BC cell MDA-MB-231, and BIK interference efficiency was tested by real-time PCR and by Western blotting. BIK expression levels decreased by 75 ± 18 % in the presence of 600 nM siRNA, resulting in the abolishment of BIK expression by 94 ± 30 %. BIK interference resulted in the overexpression of 17 miRNAs that, according to the DIANA-miRPath v3.0 database, are mainly implied in the control of cell signaling, gene expression, and autophagy. The autophagy array revealed downregulation of transcripts which participate in autophagy, and their interactome revealed a complex network, where hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (HGS), α-synuclein (SNCA), unc-51-like autophagy activating kinase 1/2 (ULK1/2), and mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPK3) were shown to be signaling hubs. LC3-II expression-an autophagy marker-was increased by 169 ± 25 % after BIK interference, which indicates the involvement of BIK in autophagy. Altogether, our results indicate-for the first time-that BIK controls the expression of miRNAs, as well as the autophagic flux in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  11. Computational identification of microRNAs associated to both epithelial to mesenchymal transition and NGAL/MMP-9 pathways in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Luca; Candido, Saverio; Salemi, Rossella; Basile, Maria S; Scalisi, Aurora; McCubrey, James A; Torino, Francesco; Signorelli, Salvatore S; Montella, Maurizio; Libra, Massimo

    2016-11-08

    Bladder cancer is one of the leading cancer of the urinary tract. It is often diagnosed at advanced stage of the disease. To date, no specific and effective early detection biomarkers are available. Cancer development and progression are associated with the involvement of both epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and tumor microenvironment of which NGAL/MMP-9 complex represents the main player in bladder cancer. It is known that change in microRNAs (miRNAs) expression may result in gene modulation. Therefore, the identification of specific miRNAs associated with EMT pathway and NGAL/MMP-9 complex may be useful to detect the development of bladder cancer at early stages.On this ground, the expression levels of miRNAs in public available datasets of bladder cancer containing data of non-coding RNA profiling was evaluated. This analysis revealed a group of 16 miRNAs differentially expressed between bladder cancer patients and related healthy controls. By miRNA prediction tool (mirDIP), the relationship between the identified miRNAs and the EMT genes was established. Using the DIANA-mirPath (v.2) software, miRNAs, able to modulate the expression of NGAL and MMP-9 genes, were recognized.The results of this study provide evidence that the downregulated hsa-miR-145-5p and hsa-miR-214-3p may modulate the expression of both EMT and NGAL/MMP-9 pathways. Therefore, further validation analyses may confirm the usefulness of these selected miRNAs for predicting the development of bladder cancer at the early stage of the disease.

  12. U-Pb garnet, sphene, monazite, and rutile ages: Implications for the duration of high-grade metamorphism and cooling histories, Adirondack Mts. , New York

    SciTech Connect

    Mezger, K.; Rawnsley, C.M.; Hanson, G.N. ); Bohlen, S.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Garnet ages for the Lowlands range from 1,168-1,127 Ma, those from the central and southern Highlands from 1,154-1,013 Ma. Metamorphism in the Highlands may not have occurred as a single event but rather in several discrete thermal pulses. An age of 1,153 {plus minus} 3 Ma was determined for garnets in the syn-regional metamorphic contact aureole of the Diana syenite, consistent with that of the syenite intrusion, 1 155 {plus minus} 4 Ma. Garnets just outside the contact aureole give an age of 1,168 {plus minus} 6 Ma. In the Lowlands, monazite yielded an age of 1,161 {plus minus} 1 Ma, rutiles yielded ages of 1,005 {plus minus} 2 Ma and 953 {plus minus} 4 Ma, and sphene ages range from 1,156 to 1,103 Ma. In the Highlands, monazite yielded an age of 1,033 {plus minus} 1 Ma, rutiles yielded ages of 911 {plus minus} 2 Ma and 885 {plus minus} 2 and sphenes from 1,033 Ma to 991 Ma. The rutile and monazite ages indicate that both terranes cooled at time-integrated rates of ca. 1.5C/Ma for at least 150 Ma following the last phase of high-grade metamorphism. The Lowlands cooled to ca. 400C by ca. 1,000 Ma and the Highlands by ca. 900 Ma. The mineral ages indicate that metamorphic pressures and temperatures recorded by thermobarometry correspond to conditions attained polychronically over 150 Ma or more. Mineral ages combined with temperature estimates for peak metamorphism indicate that the closure temperature for the U-Pb system is >800C in garnet, 640-730C in monazite, and 500-670C in sphene.

  13. On the seismic behavior of the main tower of the San Felice sul Panaro (Italy) fortress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellazzi, Giovanni; D'Altri, Antonio Maria; de Miranda, Stefano; Magagnini, Stefano; Tralli, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    The medieval fortresses are a very common and distinctive type among the Emilian historical constructions and the earthquakes of May 20th and 29th, 2012 underlined their high vulnerability. Among those heavily damaged, there is the fortress of San Felice sul Panaro located between the two epicenters. This study presents some FE results regarding the behavior under seismic actions of the main tower (Mastio tower). The Mastio has peculiar geometric features and represents a typical example of non-isolated tower. In fact, it is constrained in very different ways by the surrounding parts of the fortress along two of its sides: on the north side it is constrained by the perimeter wall until one third of his high, while a stiffer building constrains it on the west side. In order to remodel the entire fortress, a multidisciplinary project involving the Municipality of San Felice sul Panaro and four Universities of the Emilia- Romagna (Bologna, Ferrara, Parma and Modena) together with the University of Genoa is going on. The study, oriented to the structural restoration, produced an accurate survey of the entire building including a fine definition of architectural peculiarities, historical stages and materials evolution. Based on such geometrical data, we developed a detailed 3D realistic mesh, with a point-by-point characterization of each single geometric element. We performed both pushover and nonlinear dynamic analyses using accelerograms data measured near the fortress on May 29th. A damage-plasticity material model exhibiting softening in both tension and compression, already available in the commercial code Abaqus, has been used for masonry in nonlinear dynamic analyses. On the other hand, pushover analyses have been performed utilizing similar constitutive equations available on code DIANA. The effects of higher modes of vibration have been taken into account by means of the modal pushover analysis technique. For the sake of conciseness, only some preliminary

  14. The major resistance gene cluster in lettuce is highly duplicated and spans several megabases.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, B C; Chin, D B; Shen, K A; Sivaramakrishnan, S; Lavelle, D O; Zhang, Z; Michelmore, R W

    1998-01-01

    At least 10 Dm genes conferring resistance to the oomycete downy mildew fungus Bremia lactucae map to the major resistance cluster in lettuce. We investigated the structure of this cluster in the lettuce cultivar Diana, which contains Dm3. A deletion breakpoint map of the chromosomal region flanking Dm3 was saturated with a variety of molecular markers. Several of these markers are components of a family of resistance gene candidates (RGC2) that encode a nucleotide binding site and a leucine-rich repeat region. These motifs are characteristic of plant disease resistance genes. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones were identified by using duplicated restriction fragment length polymorphism markers from the region, including the nucleotide binding site-encoding region of RGC2. Twenty-two distinct members of the RGC2 family were characterized from the bacterial artificial chromosomes; at least two additional family members exist. The RGC2 family is highly divergent; the nucleotide identity was as low as 53% between the most distantly related copies. These RGC2 genes span at least 3.5 Mb. Eighteen members were mapped on the deletion breakpoint map. A comparison between the phylogenetic and physical relationships of these sequences demonstrated that closely related copies are physically separated from one another and indicated that complex rearrangements have shaped this region. Analysis of low-copy genomic sequences detected no genes, including RGC2, in the Dm3 region, other than sequences related to retrotransposons and transposable elements. The related but divergent family of RGC2 genes may act as a resource for the generation of new resistance phenotypes through infrequent recombination or unequal crossing over. PMID:9811791

  15. Camões e a cosmogonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, J. M.

    2003-08-01

    Os Lusíadas, escrito por Luis de Camões em 1572, é um poema épico renascentista e a visão Cosmogônica do autor é apresentada, principalmente, no último canto do poema, quando Tétis mostra ao Gama a Máquina do Mundo. A Cosmogonia de Camões neste poema reflete uma visão de uma época de transição, que ainda não incorporou os elementos da revolução Copernicana. É uma visão Grego- Ptolomaica e também medieval. O poeta guia-se pela tradução e notas feita por Pedro Nunes, inventor do Nonio, do Tratado da Esfera "De Sphaera" do Astrônomo Inglês John Holywood, mais conhecido pelo nome latinizado de Johannes Sacrobosco. Outra provável fonte de Camões, de acordo com Luciano Antonio Pereira da Silva em Astronomia de os Lusíadas, é o "Theoricae novae Planetarum" (1460) do astrólogo Alemão Jorge Purbáquio (1423 - 1461). A Astronomia de Os Lusíadas representa a ciência do tempo de Camões. Camões nunca emprega a palavra constelação e seu catálogo é bastante completo. A Máquina do Mundo tem a Terra no centro. Em redor, em círculos concêntricos, a lua (Diana), Mercúrio, Vênus, o Sol (Febo), Marte, Júpiter e Saturno. Envolvendo estes astros tem o firmamento seguido pelo "Céu Áqueo" ou cristalino, depois o 1o Móbil, esfera que arrasta todas as outras consigo. Este trabalho, multidisciplinar, serve tanto para ensinar aos alunos da Física como das Ciências Humanas, a concepção de mundo do renascimento de uma forma belamente poética em versos decassílabos Este trabalho também ajuda na apreciação do maior clássico da língua portuguesa e mostra como as Ciências e as artes, em geral, estão correlacionadas e refletem a visão de mundo da época em que foi produzida.

  16. Interplay between microRNA-17-5p, insulin-like growth factor-II through binding protein-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Habashy, Danira Ashraf; El Tayebi, Hend Mohamed; Fawzy, Injie Omar; Hosny, Karim Adel; Esmat, Gamal; Abdelaziz, Ahmed Ihab

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of microRNA on insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and hence on insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) bioavailability in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS Bioinformatic analysis was performed using microrna.org, DIANA lab and Segal lab softwares. Total RNA was extracted from 23 HCC and 10 healthy liver tissues using mirVana miRNA Isolation Kit. microRNA-17-5p (miR-17-5p) expression was mimicked and antagonized in HuH-7 cell lines using HiPerFect Transfection Reagent, then total RNA was extracted using Biozol reagent then reverse transcribed into cDNA followed by quantification of miR-17-5p and IGFBP-3 expression using TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR. Luciferase reporter assay was performed to validate the binding of miR-17-5p to the 3’UTR of IGFBP-3. Free IGF-II protein was measured in transfected HuH-7 cells using IGF-II ELISA kit. RESULTS Bioinformatic analysis revealed IGFBP-3 as a potential target for miR-17-5p. Screening of miR-17-5p and IGFBP-3 revealed a moderate negative correlation in HCC patients, where miR-17-5p was extensively underexpressed in HCC tissues (P = 0.0012), while IGFBP-3 showed significant upregulation in the same set of patients (P = 0.0041) compared to healthy donors. Forcing miR-17-5p expression in HuH-7 cell lines showed a significant downregulation of IGFBP-3 mRNA expression (P = 0.0267) and a significant increase in free IGF-II protein (P = 0.0339) compared to mock untransfected cells using unpaired t-test. Luciferase assay validated IGFBP-3 as a direct target of miR-17-5p; luciferase activity was inhibited by 27.5% in cells co-transfected with miR-17-5p mimics and the construct harboring the wild-type binding region 2 of IGFBP-3 compared to cells transfected with this construct alone (P = 0.0474). CONCLUSION These data suggest that regulating IGF-II bioavailability and hence HCC progression can be achieved through targeting IGFBP-3 via manipulating the expression of mi

  17. Faunal assemblages of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in and around Alsancak Harbour (Izmir Bay, eastern Mediterranean) with special emphasis on alien species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çinar, Melih Ertan; Katağan, Tuncer; Koçak, Ferah; Öztürk, Bilal; Ergen, Zeki; Kocatas, Ahmet; Önen, Mesut; Kirkim, Fevzi; Bakir, Kerem; Kurt, Güley; Dağli, Ertan; Açik, Sermin; Doğan, Alper; Özcan, Tahir

    gallensis, Paradella dianae, Anadara demiri and Celleporaria brunnea. These species comprised 31% of the total number of individuals found during this study. H. elegans was the most dominant species among aliens, reaching a maximum density of 110,700 ind m - 2 (spring, at station 3, 63% of the total population) in the area. The total abundance of aliens was positively correlated with that of natives, but the total biomass value of aliens was negatively correlated with that of natives.

  18. PowerPoint in the classroom.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Points of View (POV) addresses issues faced within life science education. Cell Biology Education has launched the POV feature to present two or more opinions published in tandem on a common topic. We consider POVs to be "Op-Ed" pieces designed to stimulate thought and dialog on significant educational issues. Each author has the opportunity to revise a POV after reading drafts of the other POVs. In this issue, we ask the question, "Is PowerPoint the best instructional medium to use in your class?" Everyone seems to have an opinion on Microsoft, but the intellectual merits of using PowerPoint (or similar software) is a growing question as states and institutions put more and more money into information technology and distance learning. Four POVs are presented: 1) David Keefe and James Willett provide their case why PowerPoint is an ideal teaching software. Keefe is an educational researcher at the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International. Willett is a professor at George Mason University in the Departments of Microbial and Molecular Bioscience; as well as Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. 2) Kim McDonald highlights the causes of PowerPointlessness, a term which indicates the frequent use of PowerPoint as a crutch rather than a tool. She is a Bioscience Educator at the Shodor Education Foundation, Inc. 3) Diana Voss asks readers if PowerPoint is really necessary to present the material effectively or not. Voss is a Instructional Computing Support Specialist at SUNY Stony Brook. 4) Cynthia Lanius takes a light-hearted approach to ask whether PowerPoint is a technological improvement or just a change of pace for teacher and student presentations. Lanius is a Technology Integration Specialist in the Sinton (Texas) Independent School District. The authors span the range of teaching experiences and settings from which they bring different points of view to the debate. Readers are encouraged to participate in the online discussion forum hosted by CBE

  19. Obituary: Preston F. Gott, 1919-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Charles Wesley

    2003-12-01

    Scholarship Award in Physics and also endowed a scholarship in the Women's Studies Program, in memory of his first wife, long time TTU Economics Professor Edna Gott. He was a true gentleman and a friend to all who knew him. He will be sorely missed. He is survived by his wife, Orene, and his children, Eugene and Suzanne. His stepchildren are Ruth, Benita, and Diana (who pre-deceased him).

  20. Nutritive quality of romanian hemp varieties (Cannabis sativa L.) with special focus on oil and metal contents of seeds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The study aims to determine the nutritional value of hemp seed expressed by the oil content and by the concentration of metals (Ca, Mg, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cd), for five varieties of monoecious and dioecious hemp seeds approved in Romania, comparative with the concentration of these metals in the soil. Results The content of oil in hempseed registers a slight decrease in the production records of 2011, losses due to drought and low levels of precipitation during the growth period. The greatest loss is found in Diana monoecious variety (26.54-20.82%) followed by Zenit varieties (27.37-22.97%), Armanca (29.27-25.32%), Silvana (28.89-25.04%) and Denise (26.96-25.30%). Siccative hemp oil has a yellowish green color and an iodine index of 140–156 g I2/100 g oil. Hemp seed are rich in mineral based Ca (144–955 mg/100 g seed), Mg (237–694 mg/100 g seed), K (463–2821 mg/100 g seed), Fe (1133-2400 mg.kg-1), Mn (63–110 mg.kg-1) and Zn (42-94 mg.kg-1). For the soil the following macroelements concentrations were determined: Ca (2100–2520 mg.kg-1), Mg (320–376 mg.kg-1) and K (232–257 mg.kg-1). Mn (156–197 mg.kg-1) and Zn (54–67 mg.kg-1) remain within normal limits for Romania. The soils in the experience area contain large amounts of Fe (19000–20430 mg.kg-1). The presence of K in large quantities determines the accumulation of large quantities of Fe in the soil. Conclusion Hempseed belonging to the five Romanian varieties are rich source of nutrients (Ca, Mg, K) and unsaturated oil easily digestible by the body, but the presence of Cd concentrations above the upper limit puts a question mark over the use of seeds in various food products. Hemp extracts easily certain metals from the soil. Significant amounts of Fe (1133–2400 mg.kg-1), Mn (63–110 mg.kg-1), Zn (42–94 mg.kg-1) and Cd (1.3-4.0 mg.kg-1) are found in hemp seeds. Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is included among plants suitable for phytoremediation of soil contaminated with cadmium

  1. The Response of microRNAs to Solar UVR in Skin-Resident Melanocytes Differs between Melanoma Patients and Healthy Persons

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Jingfeng; Gastman, Brian R.; Morris, Nathan; Mesinkovska, Natasha A.; Baron, Elma D.; Cooper, Kevin D.; McCormick, Thomas; Arbesman, Joshua; Harter, Marian L.

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of melanocytes into cutaneous melanoma is largely dictated by the effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Yet to be described, however, is exactly how these cells are affected by intense solar UVR while residing in their natural microenvironment, and whether their response differs in persons with a history of melanoma when compared to that of healthy individuals. By using laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate a pure population of melanocytes from a small area of skin that had been intermittingly exposed or un-exposed to physiological doses of solar UVR, we can now report for the first time that the majority of UV-responsive microRNAs (miRNAs) in the melanocytes of a group of women with a history of melanoma are down-regulated when compared to those in the melanocytes of healthy controls. Among the miRNAs that were commonly and significantly down-regulated in each of these women were miR-193b (P<0.003), miR-342-3p (P<0.003), miR186 (P<0.007), miR-130a (P<0.007), and miR-146a (P<0.007). To identify genes potentially released from inhibition by these repressed UV-miRNAs, we analyzed databases (e.g., DIANA-TarBase) containing experimentally validated microRNA-gene interactions. In the end, this enabled us to construct UV-miRNA-gene regulatory networks consisting of individual genes with a probable gain-of-function being intersected not by one, but by several down-regulated UV-miRNAs. Most striking, however, was that these networks typified well-known regulatory modules involved in controlling the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and processes associated with the regulation of immune-evasion. We speculate that these pathways become activated by UVR resulting in miRNA down regulation only in melanocytes susceptible to melanoma, and that these changes could be partially responsible for empowering these cells toward tumor progression. PMID:27149382

  2. [Probiotics: from the lab to the consumer].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J M

    2015-02-07

    Introducción: En los últimos años, el campo de los probióticos ha experimentado un gran auge. Sin embargo, de los miles de cepas aisladas cada año por su potencial probiótico en los laboratorios de todo el mundo, muy pocas pasan a una fase de desarrollo industrial y menos aún son las que consiguen una vida comercial. Objetivo: En este artículo, se revisan los principales aspectos que se deben tener en cuenta en el, habitualmente, largo y tortuoso camino que debe seguir una cepa desde su aislamiento inicial hasta su comercialización. Resultados y conclusiones: Cualquier microorganismo probiótico debe estar correctamente identificado a nivel de especie y cepa. La secuencia del genoma es la mejor identificación posible, además de proporcionar información muy valiosa sobre su seguridad, funcionalidad y propiedades de interés tecnológico. Los casos en los que se ha podido establecer una relación entre un probiótico y un efecto adverso son muy escasos y han afectado a personas con patologías subyacentes. Globalmente, aunque las distintas pruebas in vitro, ex vivo y en modelos animales proporcionan información útil durante el proceso de selección de cepas, los únicos datos que permiten evaluar la seguridad y eficacia de un probiótico de una forma directa son los que se obtienen en el curso de ensayos clínicos correctamente diseñados y dirigidos específicamente a la población diana. Por otra parte, las empresas que comercializan probióticos tienen la necesidad de obtener una biomasa muy elevada de forma económicamente rentable y de que la concentración de bacterias viables necesaria para ejercer el efecto beneficioso se mantenga hasta el final de la vida útil del producto. Finalmente, los aspectos comerciales son determinantes en la decisión de afrontar el desarrollo industrial y la puesta en el mercado de un probiótico.

  3. Adding new pieces to the Azadinium (Dinophyceae) diversity and biogeography puzzle: Non-toxigenic Azadinium zhuanum sp. nov. from China, toxigenic A. poporum from the Mediterranean, and a non-toxigenic A. dalianense from the French Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhaohe; Krock, Bernd; Mertens, Kenneth Neil; Nézan, Elisabeth; Chomérat, Nicolas; Bilien, Gwenael; Tillmann, Urban; Gu, Haifeng

    2017-06-01

    The marine planktonic dinophyceaen genus Azadinium is a primary source of azaspiracids, but due to their small size its diversity may be underestimated and information on its biogeography is still limited. A new Azadinium species, A. zhuanum was obtained from the East China Sea and Yellow Sea of China by incubating surface sediments. Five strains were established by isolating single germinated cells and their morphology was examined with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Azadinium zhuanum was characterized by a plate pattern of Po, cp, X, 4', 2a, 6'', 6C, 5S, 6''', 2'''', by a distinct ventral pore at the junction of Po, the first and fourth apical plates, and a conspicuous antapical spine. Moreover, Azadinium poporum was obtained for the first time from the Mediterranean by incubating surface sediment collected from Diana Lagoon (Corsica) and a new strain of Azadinium dalianense was isolated from the French Atlantic. The morphology of both strains was examined. Small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA), large subunit ribosomal DNA (LSU rDNA) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were obtained from cultured strains. In addition, LSU sequences were obtained by single cell sequencing of two presumable A. poporum cells collected from the French Atlantic. Molecular phylogeny based on concatenated SSU, LSU and ITS sequences revealed that A. zhuanum was closest to A. polongum. French A. poporum from Corsica (Mediterranean) and from the Atlantic showed some genetic differences but were nested within one of the A. poporum ribotypes together with other European strains. Azadinium dalianense from France together with the type strain of the species from China comprised a well resolved clade now consisting of two ribotypes. Azaspiracid profiles were analyzed for the cultured Azadinium strains using LC-MS/MS and demonstrate that the Mediterranean A. poporum strain produced AZA-2 and AZA-2 phosphate with an amount of 0.44fgcell(-1). Azadinium zhuanum and

  4. Revision of the Malagasy ponerine ants of the genus Leptogenys Roger (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Rakotonirina, Jean Claude; Fisher, Brian L

    2014-07-15

    Leptogenys is the most diverse ponerine ant genus in the world; it is widespread throughout tropical and subtropical regions and there are over 200 extant species described. Most species have ergatoid queens, and many have falcate, bowed mandibles and are specialists on isopod prey. Here, the Malagasy Leptogenys are revised with 60 species recognized, of which 40 are newly described, 18 redescribed, and two subspecies raised to species rank and redescribed. Included in the revision are a key to species based on the worker caste, geographic distributions, descriptions of intraspecific variation, and notes on natural history. The following species are redescribed: L. acutirostris Santschi, L. alluaudi Emery, L. angusta (Forel), L. antongilensis Emery, L. arcirostris Santschi, L. coerulescens Emery, L. falcigera Roger, L. gracilis Emery, L. grandidieri Forel, L. incisa Forel, L. maxillosa (F. Smith), L. oswaldi Forel, L. pavesii Emery, L. ridens Forel, L. saussurei (Forel), L. stuhlmanni Mayr, L. truncatirostris Forel, and L. voeltzkowi Forel. The following are raised to species and redescribed: L. imerinensis Forel stat. rev., stat. n.; and L. suarensis Emery stat. rev., stat. n. The following are described as new: L. alamando sp. n., L. alatapia sp. n., L. ambo sp. n., L. andritantely sp. n., L. anjara sp. n., L. avaratra sp. n., L. avo sp. n., L. barimaso sp. n., L. bezanozano sp. n., L. borivava sp. n., L. chrislaini sp. n., L. comajojo sp. n., L. diana sp. n., L. edsoni sp. n., L. fasika sp. n., L. fiandry sp. n., L. fotsivava sp. n., L. johary sp. n., L. lavavava sp. n., L. lohahela sp. n., L. lucida sp. n., L. malama sp. n., L. mangabe sp. n., L. manja sp. n., L. manongarivo sp. n., L. mayotte sp. n., L. namana sp. n., L. namoroka sp. n., L. pilaka sp. n., L. rabebe sp. n., L. rabesoni sp. n., L. ralipra sp. n., L. sahamalaza sp. n., L. tatsimo sp. n., L. toeraniva sp. n., L. tsingy sp. n., L. variabilis sp. n., L.vatovavy sp. n., L. vitsy sp. n., and L. zohy

  5. Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

    2001-02-16

    Energy-performance improvements in consumer products are an essential element in any government's portfolio of energy-efficiency and climate change mitigation programs. Governments need to develop balanced programs, both voluntary and regulatory, that remove cost-ineffective, energy-wasting products from the marketplace and stimulate the development of cost-effective, energy-efficient technology. Energy-efficiency labels and standards for appliances, equipment, and lighting products deserve to be among the first policy tools considered by a country's energy policy makers. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Foundation (UNF) recognize the need to support policy makers in their efforts to implement energy-efficiency standards and labeling programs and have developed this guidebook, together with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), as a primary reference. This guidebook was prepared over the course of the past year with significant contribution from the authors and reviewers mentioned previously. Their diligent participation has made this the international guidance tool it was intended to be. The lead authors would also like to thank the following individuals for their support in the development, production, and distribution of the guidebook: Marcy Beck, Elisa Derby, Diana Dhunke, Ted Gartner, and Julie Osborn of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as well as Anthony Ma of Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. This guidebook is designed as a manual for government officials and others around the world responsible for developing, implementing, enforcing, monitoring, and maintaining labeling and standards-setting programs. It discusses the pros and cons of adopting energy-efficiency labels and standards and describes the data, facilities, and institutional and human resources needed for these programs. It provides guidance on the design, development, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of the programs

  6. [Analisis of the budget impact of adalimumab and etanercept in rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathies].

    PubMed

    González Álvarez, A; Gómez Barrera, M; Borrás Blasco, J; Giner Serret, E J

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar el impacto económico derivado de la ampliación de los intervalos de administración de adalimumab (ADA) y etanercept (ETN), en el tratamiento de la artritis reumatoide (AR) y espondiloartropatias (EAP) en nuestro ámbito de trabajo. Material y método: Se desarrolló un modelo de impacto presupuestario (MIP) para estimar la repercusión económica que tendría la ampliación en los intervalos habituales de administración de ADA 40 mg cada dos semanas y ETN 50 mg semanal (escenario A), por ADA 40 mg cada tres semanas y ETN 50 mg cada dos semanas (escenario B) de acuerdo a las guías y recomendaciones que se aplican a estos estudios, especificando la población diana, la perspectiva del estudio, el horizonte temporal y analizando la robustez del estudio a través de un análisis de sensibilidad univariante de tipo umbral. Resultados: Se incluyeron un total de 71 pacientes en el estudio. La aplicación del MIP mostró unos ahorros anuales para ADA y ETN de 19.784??y 38.271 ??respectivamente. El coste neto, es decir, el ahorro que esto supuso en el horizonte temporal considerado (dos años) ascendió a 116.110 ?. El análisis de sensibilidad realizado mostró que el MIP estimado para el periodo de estudio fue muy robusto ya que el resultado neto en diferentes escenarios apenas variaba, manteniéndose negativo en los nuevos escenarios. Conclusiones: La ampliación de los intervalos de administración de ADA y ETN cada tres semanas y dos semanas respectivamente, sería una estrategia que permitiría generar ahorros en el presupuesto hospitalario cercanos a los 116.110 ??en el horizonte temporal considerado, consiguiendo así una optimización del tratamiento con estos fármacos.

  7. Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Image Cubes of Mars during the 1999 Opposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillman, John J.; Glenar, D.; Espenak, F.; Chanover, N.; Murphy, J.; Young, L.; Blass, W.

    1999-01-01

    and Fred Espenak from GSFC, Nancy Chanover, Jim Murphy and A. S. MurTell from NMSU, Leslie Young from BU, Diana Blaney from JPL and Dick Joyce from KPNO.

  8. Near-Infrared hyperspectral image cubes of Mars during the 1999 opposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, J.; Glenar, D.; Espenak, F.; Chanover, N.; Murphy, J.; Young, L.; Blass, W.

    1999-09-01

    Fred Espenak from GSFC, Nancy Chanover, Jim Murphy and A. S. Murrell from NMSU, Leslie Young from BU, Diana Blaney from JPL and Dick Joyce from KPNO.

  9. Effect of fire-induced damage on the uniaxial strength characteristics of solid timber: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkin, D. J.; El-Rimawi, J.; Lennon, T.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    The advent of the structural Eurocodes has allowed civil engineers to be more creative in the design of structures exposed to fire. Rather than rely upon regulatory guidance and prescriptive methods engineers are now able to use such codes to design buildings on the basis of credible design fires rather than accepted unrealistic standard-fire time-temperature curves. Through this process safer and more efficient structural designs are achievable. The key development in enabling performance-based fire design is the emergence of validated numerical models capable of predicting the mechanical response of a whole building or sub-assemblies at elevated temperature. In such a way, efficiency savings have been achieved in the design of steel, concrete and composite structures. However, at present, due to a combination of limited fundamental research and restrictions in the UK National Annex to the timber Eurocode, the design of fire-exposed timber structures using numerical modelling techniques is not generally undertaken. The 'fire design' of timber structures is covered in Eurocode 5 part 1.2 (EN 1995-1-2). In this code there is an advanced calculation annex (Annex B) intended to facilitate the implementation of numerical models in the design of fire-exposed timber structures. The properties contained in the code can, at present, only be applied to standard-fire exposure conditions. This is due to existing limitations related to the available thermal properties which are only valid for standard fire exposure. In an attempt to overcome this barrier the authors have proposed a 'modified conductivity model' (MCM) for determining the temperature of timber structural elements during the heating phase of non-standard fires. This is briefly outlined in this paper. In addition, in a further study, the MCM has been implemented in a coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of uniaxially loaded timber elements exposed to non-standard fires. The finite element package DIANA was adopted

  10. MicroRNA profiling in kidney disease: Plasma versus plasma-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jeffrey X; Fan, Xiaoming; Drummond, Christopher A; Majumder, Reetam; Xie, Yanmei; Chen, Tian; Liu, Lijun; Haller, Steven T; Brewster, Pamela S; Dworkin, Lance D; Cooper, Christopher J; Tian, Jiang

    2017-09-05

    Liquid biopsies have advanced rapidly in recent years for use in diagnostic and prognostic applications. One important aspect of this advancement is the growth in our understanding of microRNA (miRNA) biology. The measurement of miRNAs packaged within exosomes, which are constantly released into the blood stream, may reflect pathological changes within the body. The current study performed miRNA profiling using plasma and plasma-derived exosome samples from two animal models of kidney disease, the 5/6th partial nephrectomy (PNx) and two-kidney-one-clip (2K1C) models. The RT-qPCR-based profiling results revealed that the overall miRNA expression level was much higher in plasma than in plasma-derived exosomes. With 200μl of either plasma or exosomes derived from the same volume of plasma, 629 out of 665 total miRNAs analyzed were detectable in plasma samples from sham-operated rats, while only 403 were detectable in exosomes with a cutoff value set at 35cycles. Moreover, the average miRNA expression level in plasma was about 16-fold higher than that in exosomes. We also found a select subset of miRNAs that were enriched within exosomes. The number of detectable miRNAs from plasma-derived exosomes was increased in rats subjected to PNx or 2K1C surgery compared to sham-operated animals. Importantly, we found that the changes of individual miRNAs measured in plasma had very poor concordance with that measured in plasma-derived exosomes in both animal models, suggesting that miRNAs in plasma and plasma-derived exosomes are differentially regulated in these disease conditions. Interestingly, PNx and 2K1C surgeries induced similar changes in miRNA expression, implying that common pathways were activated in these two disease models. Pathway analyses using DIANA-miRPath v3.0 showed that significantly changed exosomal miRNAs were associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor interaction and mucin type-O-glycan synthesis pathways, which are related with tissue fibrosis

  11. [A short-term training program reduced acute phase proteins in premenopausal women with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rosety-Rodríguez, Manuel; Fornieles, Gabriel; Camacho-Molina, Alejandra; Rosety, Ignacio; Díaz, Antonio J; Rosety, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Pareja, Antonia; Ordonez, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Fundamento y objetivo: Actualmente se acepta la importancia del estatus proinflamatorio en la fisiopatología del síndrome metabólico. De hecho, ha sido propuesto como diana terapéutica en el manejo clínico de estos pacientes. Por consiguiente este estudio pretende reducir los niveles plasmáticos de reactantes de fase aguda en mujeres con síndrome metabólico mediante un corto programa de entrenamiento. Material y método: Un total de 135 mujeres jóvenes adultas (38,4 ± 3,3 años) con diagnóstico de síndrome metabólico participaron voluntariamente en este estudio. El grupo de intervención se sometió a un programa de entrenamiento aeróbico de 12 semanas, con 3 sesiones/ semana en el que duración e intensidad de la parte principal se incrementaron progresivamente. Los niveles plasmáticos de proteína C-reactiva (PCR) y fibrinógeno se determinaron mediante nefelometría y HPLC respectivamente. También se evaluaron el fitness cardiovascular mediante prueba de esfuerzo máxima e índices de distribución de masa grasa. Este protocolo fue aprobado por un Comité de Ética Institucional. Resultados: Tras completar el programa, se observo una mejora significativa del fitness cardiovascular además de una reducción también significativa de los niveles de fibrinógeno y PCR. Asimismo, se encontraron correlaciones entre niveles de reactantes e índices de distribución de masa grasa, siendo la de mayor fuerza de asociación la establecida entre PCR y perímetro cintura. Conclusión: Un programa de 12 semanas consiguió reducir los niveles de reactantes de fase aguda en mujeres con síndrome metabólico. Futuros estudios longitudinales son necesarios para conocer el impacto del efecto anti-inflamatorio del ejercicio en el manejo de estos pacientes a medio/largo plazo.

  12. PREFACE: FAIRNESS 2012: FAIR NExt Generation of ScientistS 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcones, Almudena; Bleicher, Marcus; Fritsch, Miriam; Galatyuk, Tetyana; Nicmorus, Diana; Petersen, Hannah; Ratti, Claudia; Tolos, Laura

    2013-03-01

    forefront of research that is dedicated to the physics of FAIR. February 2013, Organizers of FAIRNESS 2012: Almudena Arcones, Marcus Bleicher, Miriam Fritsch, Tetyana Galatyuk, Diana Nicmorus, Hannah Petersen, Claudia Ratti and Laura Tolos Support for holding the conference was provided by: logos

  13. PREFACE: FAIRNESS 2013: FAIR NExt generation of ScientistS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Hannah; Destefanis, Marco; Galatyuk, Tetyana; Montes, Fernando; Nicmorus, Diana; Ratti, Claudia; Tolos, Laura; Vogel, Sascha

    2014-04-01

    research that is dedicated to the physics of FAIR. February 2014. Organizers of FAIRNESS 2013: Marco Destefanis, Tetyana Galatyuk, Fernando Montes, Diana Nicmorus, Hannah Petersen, Claudia Ratti, Laura Tolos, and Sascha Vogel. Support for holding the conference was provided by: Logos

  14. PREFACE: FAIRNESS 2014: FAIR Next Generation ScientistS 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    is dedicated to the physics at FAIR. February 2015, Organizers of FAIRNESS 2014: Marco Destefanis, Tetyana Galatyuk, Fernando Montes, Diana Nicmorus, Hannah Petersen, Claudia Ratti, Laura Tolos, and Sascha Vogel. Support for holding the conference was provided by: Conference photograph

  15. MiRNATIP: a SOM-based miRNA-target interactions predictor.

    PubMed

    Fiannaca, Antonino; Rosa, Massimo La; Paglia, Laura La; Rizzo, Riccardo; Urso, Alfonso

    2016-09-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA sequences with regulatory functions to post-transcriptional level for several biological processes, such as cell disease progression and metastasis. MiRNAs interact with target messenger RNA (mRNA) genes by base pairing. Experimental identification of miRNA target is one of the major challenges in cancer biology because miRNAs can act as tumour suppressors or oncogenes by targeting different type of targets. The use of machine learning methods for the prediction of the target genes is considered a valid support to investigate miRNA functions and to guide related wet-lab experiments. In this paper we propose the miRNA Target Interaction Predictor (miRNATIP) algorithm, a Self-Organizing Map (SOM) based method for the miRNA target prediction. SOM is trained with the seed region of the miRNA sequences and then the mRNA sequences are projected into the SOM lattice in order to find putative interactions with miRNAs. These interactions will be filtered considering the remaining part of the miRNA sequences and estimating the free-energy necessary for duplex stability. We tested the proposed method by predicting the miRNA target interactions of both the Homo sapiens and the Caenorhbditis elegans species; then, taking into account validated target (positive) and non-target (negative) interactions, we compared our results with other target predictors, namely miRanda, PITA, PicTar, mirSOM, TargetScan and DIANA-microT, in terms of the most used statistical measures. We demonstrate that our method produces the greatest number of predictions with respect to the other ones, exhibiting good results for both species, reaching the for example the highest percentage of sensitivity of 31 and 30.5 %, respectively for Homo sapiens and for C. elegans. All the predicted interaction are freely available at the following url: http://tblab.pa.icar.cnr.it/public/miRNATIP/ . Results state miRNATIP outperforms or is comparable to the other six state

  16. MicroRNA profile in very young women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is rarely diagnosed in very young women (35years old or younger), and it often presents with distinct clinical-pathological features related to a more aggressive phenotype and worse prognosis when diagnosed at this early age. A pending question is whether breast cancer in very young women arises from the deregulation of different underlying mechanisms, something that will make this disease an entity differentiated from breast cancer diagnosed in older patients. Methods We performed a comprehensive study of miRNA expression using miRNA Affymetrix2.0 array on paraffin-embedded tumour tissue of 42 breast cancer patients 35 years old or younger, 17 patients between 45 and 65 years old and 29 older than 65 years. Data were statistically analyzed by t-test and a hierarchical clustering via average linkage method was conducted. Results were validated by qRT-PCR. Putative targeted pathways were obtained using DIANA miRPath online software. Results The results show a differential and unique miRNA expression profile of 121 miRNAs (p-value <0.05), 96 of those with a FDR-value <0.05. Hierarchical clustering grouped the samples according to their age, but not by subtype nor by tumour characteristics. We were able to validate by qRT-PCR differences in the expression of 6 miRNAs: miR-1228*, miR-3196, miR-1275, miR-92b, miR-139 and miR-1207. Moreover, all of the miRNAs maintained the expression trend. The validated miRNAs pointed out pathways related to cell motility, invasion and proliferation. Conclusions The study suggests that breast cancer in very young women appears as a distinct molecular signature. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a validated microRNA profile, distinctive to breast cancer in very young women, has been presented. The miRNA signature may be relevant to open an important field of research in order to elucidate the underlying mechanism in this particular disease, which in a more clinical setting, could potentially help to

  17. Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Image Cubes of Mars during the 1999 Opposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillman, John J.; Glenar, D.; Espenak, F.; Chanover, N.; Murphy, J.; Young, L.; Blass, W.

    1999-01-01

    and Fred Espenak from GSFC, Nancy Chanover, Jim Murphy and A. S. MurTell from NMSU, Leslie Young from BU, Diana Blaney from JPL and Dick Joyce from KPNO.

  18. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzera, M. R.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Lazzati, D.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2003-02-01

    We present the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue (BMW-HRI) derived from all ROSAT HRI pointed observations with exposure times longer than 100 s available in the ROSAT public archives. The data were analyzed automatically using a wavelet detection algorithm suited to the detection and characterization of both point-like and extended sources. This algorithm is able to detect and disentangle sources in very crowded fields and/or in the presence of extended or bright sources. Images have been also visually inspected after the analysis to ensure verification. The final catalogue, derived from 4303 observations, consists of 29 089 sources detected with a detection probability of >=4.2 sigma . For each source, the primary catalogue entries provide name, position, count rate, flux and extension along with the relative errors. In addition, results of cross-correlations with existing catalogues at different wavelengths (FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS and GSC2) are also reported. Some information is available on the web via the DIANA Interface. As an external check, we compared our catalogue with the previously available ROSHRICAT catalogue (both in its short and long versions) and we were able to recover, for the short version, ~ 90% of the entries. We computed the sky coverage of the entire HRI data set by means of simulations. The complete BMW-HRI catalogue provides a sky coverage of 732 deg2 down to a limiting flux of ~ 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 and of 10 deg2 down to ~ 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2. We were able to compute the cosmological log(N)-log(S) distribution down to a flux of =~ 1.2 x 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2. The catalogue is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/399/351

  19. Every Student Counts: Broadening Participation in the Geosciences through a Multiyear Internship Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, V.

    2010-12-01

    , every student counts. Diana Prado Garzon at work in summer of 2010.

  20. Geologic Mapping of Isabella Quadrangle (V-50) and Helen Planitia, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleamaster, Leslie F., III

    2008-01-01

    (25-50 S, 180-210 E) is host to numerous coronae and small volcanic centers (paterae and shield fields), focused (Aditi and Sirona Dorsa) and distributed (penetrative north-south trending wrinkle ridges) contractional deformation, and radial and linear extensional structures, all of which contribute materials to and/or deform the expansive surrounding plains (Nsomeka and Wawalag Planitiae). Regional plains, which are a northern extension of regional plains mapped in the Barrymore Quadrangle V-59 [1], dominate the V-50 quadrangle. Previous mapping divided the regional plains into two members: regional plains, members a and b [2]. A re-evaluation of these members has determined that a continuous and consistent unit contact does not exist; however, the majority of this radar unit or surficial unit will still be displayed on the final map as a stipple pattern as it is a prevalent feature of the quadrangle. With minimal tessera or highland material, much of the quadrangle s oldest materials are plains units (the regional plains). Much of these plains are covered with small shield edifices that exhibit a variety of material contributions (or flows). In the northwest, several flows emerge and flow to the southeast from Diana-Dali Chasmata. Local corona- and mons-fed flows superpose the regional plains; however, earlier stages of volcano-tectonic centers marked by arcuate and radial structural elements, including terrain so heavily deformed that it takes on a new appearance, may have developed prior to or concurrently with the region plains. Northtrending deformation belts disrupt the central portion of the map area and wrinkle ridges parallel these larger belts. Isabella crater, in the northeastern quadrant, is highly asymmetric and displays two prominent ejecta blanket morphologies, which generally correlate with distance from the impact structure suggesting that ejecta block size or ejecta blanket thickness may be the cause. The crater floor is very dark and shows no

  1. Nutritive quality of romanian hemp varieties (Cannabis sativa L.) with special focus on oil and metal contents of seeds.

    PubMed

    Mihoc, Marcela; Pop, Georgeta; Alexa, Ersilia; Radulov, Isidora

    2012-10-23

    The study aims to determine the nutritional value of hemp seed expressed by the oil content and by the concentration of metals (Ca, Mg, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cd), for five varieties of monoecious and dioecious hemp seeds approved in Romania, comparative with the concentration of these metals in the soil. The content of oil in hempseed registers a slight decrease in the production records of 2011, losses due to drought and low levels of precipitation during the growth period. The greatest loss is found in Diana monoecious variety (26.54-20.82%) followed by Zenit varieties (27.37-22.97%), Armanca (29.27-25.32%), Silvana (28.89-25.04%) and Denise (26.96-25.30%). Siccative hemp oil has a yellowish green color and an iodine index of 140-156 g I2/100 g oil. Hemp seed are rich in mineral based Ca (144-955 mg/100 g seed), Mg (237-694 mg/100 g seed), K (463-2821 mg/100 g seed), Fe (1133-2400 mg.kg-1), Mn (63-110 mg.kg-1) and Zn (42-94 mg.kg-1). For the soil the following macroelements concentrations were determined: Ca (2100-2520 mg.kg-1), Mg (320-376 mg.kg-1) and K (232-257 mg.kg-1). Mn (156-197 mg.kg-1) and Zn (54-67 mg.kg-1) remain within normal limits for Romania. The soils in the experience area contain large amounts of Fe (19000-20430 mg.kg-1). The presence of K in large quantities determines the accumulation of large quantities of Fe in the soil. Hempseed belonging to the five Romanian varieties are rich source of nutrients (Ca, Mg, K) and unsaturated oil easily digestible by the body, but the presence of Cd concentrations above the upper limit puts a question mark over the use of seeds in various food products. Hemp extracts easily certain metals from the soil. Significant amounts of Fe (1133-2400 mg.kg-1), Mn (63-110 mg.kg-1), Zn (42-94 mg.kg-1) and Cd (1.3-4.0 mg.kg-1) are found in hemp seeds. Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is included among plants suitable for phytoremediation of soil contaminated with cadmium, zinc and iron.

  2. PROKARYOTIC EXPRESSION AND BIOACTIVITY EVALUATION OF THE CHIMERIC GENE DERIVED FROM THE GROUP 1 ALLERGENS OF DUST MITES.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaodong; Li, Chaopin; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Yuxin

    2015-12-01

    Antecedentes: se reconstituyó con éxito el gen del grupo 1 alérgenos de los ácaros del polvo, y obtuvo un conjunto de genes barajadas. Con el fin de verificar la predicción en el gen quimérico, hemos clonado tentativamente R8 en el vector que se expresó prokaryoticly, purificó y se evaluó por sus actividades-bio. Métodos: el producto expresado se detectó por SDS-PAGE y la proteína diana se purificó. La proteína purificada R8 se detectó por ELISA. Setenta y cinco ratones BALB/ c se dividieron en 5 grupos, a saber: PBS, rDer f1, rDer p1, R8 y el grupo de asma. Los ratones fueron tratados con alérgenos de ácaros del polvo a los 0, 7, 14 días mediante inyección intraperitoneal y inhaladas desafío como aerosol en día 21 durante 7 días. La inmunoterapia específica para el alérgeno se realizó utilizando rDer f1, rDer p1 y alérgenos R8, respectivamente. El nivel de IFN e IL-4 en BALF se detectó por ELISA. Resultados: el gen quimérico R8 se expresó con una banda de aproximadamente Mr 35000. En comparación con los grupos de rDer f 1 y rDer p 1 [(80,44 ± 15,50) y (90,79 ± 10,38) μg/ml, respectivamente], la capacidad de unión a IgE de la proteína R8 (37,03 ± 12,46) μg/ml fue estadísticamente inferior (P.

  3. Identification of miRNAs during mouse postnatal ovarian development and superovulation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Hamid Ali; Zhao, Yi; Wang, Li; Li, Qian; Du, Yu-Ai; Dan, Yi; Huo, Li-Jun

    2015-07-08

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that play critical roles in regulation of gene expression in wide array of tissues including the ovary through sequence complementarity at post-transcriptional level. Tight regulation of multitude of genes involved in ovarian development and folliculogenesis could be regulated at transcription level by these miRNAs. Therefore, tissue specific miRNAs identification is considered a key step towards understanding the role of miRNAs in biological processes. To investigate the role of microRNAs during ovarian development and folliculogenesis we sequenced eight different libraries using Illumina deep sequencing technology. Different developmental stages were selected to explore miRNAs expression pattern at different stages of gonadal maturation with/without treatment of PMSG/hCG for superovulation. From massive sequencing reads, clean reads of 16-26 bp were selected for further analysis of differential expression analysis and novel microRNA annotation. Expression analysis of all miRNAs at different developmental stages showed that some miRNAs were present ubiquitously while others were differentially expressed at different stages. Among differentially expressed miRNAs we reported 61 miRNAs with a fold change of more than 2 at different developmental stages among all libraries. Among the up-regulated miRNAs, mmu-mir-1298 had the highest fold change with 4.025 while mmu-mir-150 was down-regulated more than 3 fold. Furthermore, we found 2659 target genes for 20 differentially expressed microRNAs using seven different target predictions programs (DIANA-mT, miRanda, miRDB, miRWalk, RNAhybrid, PICTAR5, TargetScan). Analysis of the predicted targets showed certain ovary specific genes targeted by single or multiple microRNAs. Furthermore, pathway annotation and Gene ontology showed involvement of these microRNAs in basic cellular process. These results suggest the presence of different miRNAs at different stages of ovarian development and

  4. Developing a Carbon Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, B., III

    2015-12-01

    There is a clear need to better understand and predict future climate change, so that science can more confidently inform climate policy, including adaptation planning and future mitigation strategies. Understanding carbon cycle feedbacks, and the relationship between emissions (fossil and land use) and the resulting atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations in a changing climate has been recognized as an important goal by the IPCC. The existing surface greenhouse gas observing networks provide accurate and precise measurements of background values, but they are not configured to target the extended, complex and dynamic regions of the carbon budget. Space Agencies around the globe are committed to CO2 and CH4 observations: GOSAT-1/2, OCO-2/3, MERLin, TanSat, and CarbonSat. In addition to these Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions, a new mission in Geostationary Orbit (GEO), geoCARB, which would provide mapping-like measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide concentrations over major land areas, has been recently proposed to the NASA Venture Program. These pioneering missions do not provide the spatial/temporal coverage to answer the key carbon-climate questions at process relevant scales nor do they address the distribution and quantification of anthropogenic sources at urban scales. They do demonstrate, however, that a well-planned future system of system integrating space-based LEO and GEO missions with extensive in situ observations could provide the accuracy, spatial resolution, and coverage needed to address critical open issues in the carbon-climate system. Dr. Diana Wickland devoted enormous energy in developing a comprehensive apprioach to understand the global carbon cycle; she understood well that an integrated, coordinated, international approach is needed. This shines through in her recent contribution in co-chairing the team that produced the "CEOS Strategy for Carbon Observations from Space." A NASA-funded community

  5. Seafloor distribution and last glacial to postglacial activity of mud volcanoes on the Calabrian accretionary prism, Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceramicola, Silvia; Praeg, Daniel; Cova, Andrea; Accettella, Daniela; Zecchin, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mud volcanoes (MVs) are abundant along the eastern Mediterranean subduction zones, recording mud breccia extrusion over long timescales (106 years), but to date relatively few have been recognised in the northern Ionian Sea on the Calabrian accretionary prism (CAP). In the present study, the seafloor distribution and recent activity of MVs is investigated across a 35,600 km2 sector of the CAP using a regional acoustic dataset (multibeam bathymetric and backscatter imagery, integrated with subbottom profiles) locally ground-truthed by sediment cores. A total of 54 MVs are identified across water depths of 150-2,750 m using up to four geophysical criteria: distinctive morphology, high backscatter, unstratified subbottom facies and, in one case, a hydroacoustic flare. Fourteen MVs are identified from 3-4 criteria, of which five have been previously proven by cores containing mud breccia beneath up to 1.6 m of hemipelagic sediments (Madonna dello Ionio MVs 1-3, Pythagoras MV and the newly named Sartori MV), while nine others are identified for the first time (Athena, Catanzaro, Cerere, Diana, Giunone, Minerva, `right foot', Venere 1 and 2). Forty other as yet unnamed MVs are inferred from 1-2 geophysical criteria (three from distinctive morphology alone). All but one possible MV lie on the inner plateau of the CAP, landwards of the Calabrian Escarpment in a zone up to 120 km wide that includes the inner pre-Messinian wedge and the fore-arc basins, where they are interpreted to record the ascent from depth of overpressured fluids that interacted with tectonic structures and with evaporitic or shale seals within the fore-arc basins. The rise of fluids may have been triggered by post-Messinian out-of-sequence tectonism that affected the entire pre-Messinian prism, but Plio-Quaternary sedimentation rates and depositional styles support the inference that significant mud volcanism has taken place only on the inner plateau. Sedimentation rates across the CAP applied to a 12

  6. miRNome landscape analysis reveals a 30 miRNA core in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Castro-Magdonel, Blanca Elena; Orjuela, Manuela; Camacho, Javier; García-Chéquer, Adda Jeanette; Cabrera-Muñoz, Lourdes; Sadowinski-Pine, Stanislaw; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Orozco-Romero, María de Jesús; Velázquez-Wong, Ana Claudia; Hernández-Ángeles, Adriana; Hernández-Galván, Claudia; Lara-Molina, Citlali; Ponce-Castañeda, M Verónica

    2017-07-01

    miRNAs exert their effect through a negative regulatory mechanism silencing expression upon hybridizing to their target mRNA, and have a prominent position in the control of many cellular processes including carcinogenesis. Previous miRNA studies on retinoblastoma (Rb) have been limited to specific miRNAs reported in other tumors or to medium density arrays. Here we report expression analysis of the whole miRNome on 12 retinoblastoma tumor samples using a high throughput microarray platform including 2578 mature miRNAs. Twelve retinoblastoma tumor samples were analyzed using an Affymetrix platform including 2578 mature miRNAs. We applied RMA analysis to normalize raw data, obtained categorical data from detection call values, and also used signal intensity derived expression data. We used Diana-Tools-microT-CDS to find miRNA targets and ChromDraw to map miRNAs in chromosomes. We discovered a core-cluster of 30 miRNAs that were highly expressed in all the cases and a cluster of 993 miRNAs that were uniformly absent in all cases. Another 1022 miRNA were variably present in the samples reflecting heterogeneity between tumors. We explored mRNA targets, pathways and biological processes affected by some of these miRNAs. We propose that the core-cluster of 30 miRs represent miRNA machinery common to all Rb, and affecting most pathways considered hallmarks of cancer. In this core, we identified miR-3613 as a potential and critical down regulatory hub, because it is highly expressed in all the samples and its potential mRNA targets include at least 36 tumor suppressor genes, including RB1. In the variably expressed miRNA, 36 were differentially expressed between males and females. Some of the potential pathways targeted by these 36 miRNAs were associated with hormonal production. These findings indicate that Rb tumor samples share a common miRNA expression profile regardless of tumor heterogeneity, and shed light on potential novel therapeutic targets such as mir-3613 This

  7. Perturbed microRNA Expression by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Promotes Macrophage Polarization Leading to Pro-survival Foam Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Pankaj Kumar; Pandey, Rajan Kumar; Sehajpal, Prabodh Kumar; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the prevalent causes of death worldwide, with 95% of these deaths occurring in developing countries, like India. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) has the tenacious ability to circumvent the host’s immune system for its own advantage. Macrophages are one of the phagocytic cells that are central to immunity against MTb. These are highly plastic cells dependent on the milieu and can showcase M1/M2 polarization. M1 macrophages are bactericidal in action, but M2 macrophages are anti-inflammatory in their immune response. This computational study is an effort to elucidate the role of miRNAs that influences the survival of MTb in the macrophage. To identify the miRNAs against critical transcription factors, we selected only conserved hits from TargetScan database. Further, validation of these miRNAs was achieved using four databases viz. DIANA-microT, miRDB, miRanda-mirSVR, and miRNAMap. All miRNAs were identified through a conserved seed sequence against the 3′-UTR of transcription factors. This bioinformatics study found that miR-27a and miR-27b has a putative binding site at 3′-UTR of IRF4, and miR-302c against IRF5. miR-155, miR-132, and miR-455-5p are predicted microRNAs against suppressor of cytokine signaling transcription factors. Several other microRNAs, which have an affinity for critical transcription factors, are also predicted in this study. This MTb-associated modulation of microRNAs to modify the expression of the target gene(s) plays a critical role in TB pathogenesis. Other than M1/M2 plasticity, MTb has the ability to convert macrophage into foam cells that are rich in lipids and cholesterol. We have highlighted few microRNAs which overlap between M2/foam cell continuums. miR-155, miR-33, miR-27a, and miR-27b plays a dual role in deciding macrophage polarity and its conversion to foam cells. This study shows a glimpse of microRNAs which can be modulated by MTb not only to prevent its elimination but

  8. The role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in neuroprotection: Professor Illana Gozes is interviewed by Emma Quigley.

    PubMed

    Gozes, Illana

    2007-06-01

    Professor Illana Gozes was interviewed by Emma Quigley (Senior Editor, Expert Opinion) on 17(th) April 2007. Professor Illana Gozes BSc, PhD holds the titles of Professor of Clinical Biochemistry; The Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors; Director of Adams Super Center for Brain Studies and Levi-Edersheim-Gitter fMRI Institute; Head of the Dr Diana and Zelman Elton (Elbaum) Laboratory for Molecular Neuroendocrinology, Tel Aviv University and Chief Scientific Officer, Allon Therapeutics, Inc., Vancouver BC, Canada. Professor Gozes has served as a member (or chair) of several faculty, university or national and international committees and she currently serves on the Board of Directors of Allon Therapeutics, the Scientific Review Board of the ISOA, and is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Molecular Neuroscience. Professor Gozes has received a number of scientific awards for her work including the Landau Award for an excellent PhD dissertation, the Juludan Prize and the Teva Founders Prize for exceptional scientific studies that may lead to biotechnology developments as well as the Bergmann Prize and the Neufeld award for outstanding/leading US-Israel BSF grant proposals, and has published extensively in the fields of molecular neuroscience and neuroprotection (> 200 scientific manuscripts). She is co-inventor of > 15 patents and applications, including the composition of matter patent on AL-108 and AL-208, Allon's lead compounds. Professor Gozes received a BSc from Tel Aviv University, a PhD from The Weizmann Institute of Science and was a Weizmann Postdoctoral Fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Associate/Visiting Scientist at the Salk Institute and the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, a Senior Scientist/Associate Professor at the Weizmann Institute and a Fogarty-Scholar-in-Residence at the National Institutes of Health (USA). Professor Gozes directs a very active research laboratory at Tel Aviv

  9. Circulating MicroRNAs and Aerobic Fitness – The HUNT-Study

    PubMed Central

    Bye, Anja; Røsjø, Helge; Aspenes, Stian T.; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Omland, Torbjørn; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic fitness, measured as maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), is a good indicator of cardiovascular health, and a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality. Biomarkers associated with low VO2max may therefore represent potential early markers of future cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to assess whether circulating microRNAs (miRs) are associated with VO2max-level in healthy individuals. In a screening study, 720 miRs were measured in serum samples from healthy individuals (40–45 yrs) with high (n = 12) or low (n = 12) VO2max matched for gender, age and physical activity. Candiate miRs were validated in a second cohort of subjects with high (n = 38) or low (n = 38) VO2max. miR-210 and miR-222 were found to be higher in the low VO2max-group (p<0.05). In addition, miR-21 was increased in male participants with low VO2max (p<0.05). There were no correlations between traditional risk factors for CVD (blood pressure, cholesterol, smoking habit, or obesity) and miR-21, miR-210 and miR-222. DIANA-mirPath identified 611 potential gene-targets of miR-21, miR-210 and miR-222, and pathway analysis indicated alterations in several important signaling systems in subjects with low VO2max. Potential bias involve that blood was collected from non-fasting individuals, and that 8 performed exercise within 24 h before sampling. In conclusion, we found that miR-210, miR-21, and miR-222 were increased in healthy subjects with low VO2max. The lack of association between these three miRs, and other fitness related variables as well as traditional CVD risk factors, suggests that these miRs may have a potential as new independent biomarkers of fitness level and future CVD. PMID:23469005

  10. MicroRNA profile in very young women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Peña-Chilet, Maria; Martínez, Maria T; Pérez-Fidalgo, Jose A; Peiró-Chova, Lorena; Oltra, Sara S; Tormo, Eduardo; Alonso-Yuste, Elisa; Martinez-Delgado, Beatriz; Eroles, Pilar; Climent, Joan; Burgués, Octavio; Ferrer-Lozano, Jaime; Bosch, Ana; Lluch, Ana; Ribas, Gloria

    2014-07-21

    Breast cancer is rarely diagnosed in very young women (35 years old or younger), and it often presents with distinct clinical-pathological features related to a more aggressive phenotype and worse prognosis when diagnosed at this early age. A pending question is whether breast cancer in very young women arises from the deregulation of different underlying mechanisms, something that will make this disease an entity differentiated from breast cancer diagnosed in older patients. We performed a comprehensive study of miRNA expression using miRNA Affymetrix2.0 array on paraffin-embedded tumour tissue of 42 breast cancer patients 35 years old or younger, 17 patients between 45 and 65 years old and 29 older than 65 years. Data were statistically analyzed by t-test and a hierarchical clustering via average linkage method was conducted. Results were validated by qRT-PCR. Putative targeted pathways were obtained using DIANA miRPath online software. The results show a differential and unique miRNA expression profile of 121 miRNAs (p-value <0.05), 96 of those with a FDR-value <0.05. Hierarchical clustering grouped the samples according to their age, but not by subtype nor by tumour characteristics. We were able to validate by qRT-PCR differences in the expression of 6 miRNAs: miR-1228*, miR-3196, miR-1275, miR-92b, miR-139 and miR-1207. Moreover, all of the miRNAs maintained the expression trend. The validated miRNAs pointed out pathways related to cell motility, invasion and proliferation. The study suggests that breast cancer in very young women appears as a distinct molecular signature. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a validated microRNA profile, distinctive to breast cancer in very young women, has been presented. The miRNA signature may be relevant to open an important field of research in order to elucidate the underlying mechanism in this particular disease, which in a more clinical setting, could potentially help to identify therapeutic targets in this

  11. Conference Comments by the Editors

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    acknowledge our corporate supporters: Caen Nuclear, Eljen Technology, Hilger Crystals and GE Global Research. Finally, we thank the members of the local organizing committee: Diana Attila, Thomas Budinger, Joe Chew, Daniel Chivers, Rob Johnson, Laurie O'Brien, Donna Raziano, Emily Sause, and Brian Wirth for doing all the work that actually made this conference happen.

  12. PubMed

    De Abajo Larriba, Ana Beatriz; Méndez Rodríguez, Enrique; González-Gallego, Javier; Capón Álvarez, Jessica; Díaz Rodríguez, Ángel; Peleteiro Cobo, Beatriz; Mahmoud Atoui, Omar; De Abajo Olea, Serafín; Lumbreras González, Víctor; Martínez de Mandojana Hernández, Juan

    2017-02-01

    Objetivo: estimar la prevalencia de los fenotipos de enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica (EPOC) en la provincia de León.Métodos: estudio epidemiológico, transversal, multicéntrico (30 centros de salud de la provincia de León). Incluyó pacientes mayores de 35 años diagnosticados y tratados de EPOC. Variables a estudio: edad, sexo, hábitat, datos antropométricos, tabaquismo, espirometría posbroncodilatadora, disnea (mMRC), reagudizaciones, gravedad (índice Bodex), hospitalizaciones, tratamiento, seguimiento y caracterización del fenotipo (GesEOPC 2014). Los resultados se expresan con sus IC al 95,5%.Resultados: se incluyeron 833 pacientes, el 85,8% varones, edad media: 64,69 (53,66-75,61) años y 20,65 (4,47-36,8) años de evolución de la EPOC. El 86,67% (80,30-93,30) habían fumado. Prevalencia de fenotipos: 58,8% (55,2-61,9) no agudizador, 13,6% (11,3-16,3) FMEA, 10,8% (8,8-13,3) agudizador con enfisema y 16,7% (14,2-19,3) agudizador con bronquitis crónica, p < 0,05. En el fenotipo no reagudizador predominan las formas leves y son controlados por médicos de familia. En los agudizadores predominan las formas graves y el seguimiento es compartido por médicos de familia y neumólogos. Las reagudizaciones son más frecuentes en los fenotipos agudizadores con bronquitis crónica (40%), con enfisema (27%) y FMEA (23%), p = 0,004. Los fenotipos agudizadores con bronquitis crónica tienen una media de 6 reagudizaciones, 4 ingresos y 4 fármacos prescritos/año. Los fenotipos agudizadores con enfisema 5,7 reagudizaciones, 2,8 ingresos y 3,1 fármacos prescritos/año. Los FMEA 5 reagudizaciones, 1 ingreso y 2,6 fármacos prescritos/año, p < 0,001.Conclusiones: los fenotipos clínicos se postulan como dianas terapéuticas y pronósticas. Conocer su prevalencia permitirá una planificación terapéutica personalizada y mejor reasignación de recursos para el control y seguimiento de la EPOC.

  13. Economic evaluation in collaborative hospital drug evaluation reports.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ana; Fraga, María Dolores; Marín-Gil, Roberto; Lopez-Briz, Eduardo; Puigventós, Francesc; Dranitsaris, George

    2015-09-01

    Objetivo: la evaluación económica es un criterio fundamental en el posicionamiento de medicamentos. El método MADRE (Método de Ayuda para la toma de Decisiones y la Realización de Evaluaciones de medicamentos) es ampliamente utilizado en la evaluación de medicamentos. Fue desarrollado por el grupo GENESIS de la Sociedad Española de Farmacia Hospitalaria (SEFH), e incluye una evaluación económica. Con objeto de mejorar los aspectos económicos de este método, analizaremos la experiencia previa con esta metodología y propondremos mejoras. Método: revisión retrospectiva de las evaluaciones económicas en los informes de evaluación de medicamentos realizados de forma colaborativa (como SEFH) con el método MADRE. Resultados: se revisaron 32 informes, el 87,5% incluían una evaluación económica realizada por los autores y un 65,6% una publicada. El 90,6% incluían un análisis de impacto presupuestario. 14 informes incluían el coste por año de vida o por año de vida ganado ajustado por calidad. 23 informes recibieron alegaciones relacionadas con la evaluación económica. Las principales dificultades fueron: baja calidad de la evidencia en la población diana, falta de estudios comparativos con el comparador relevante, resultados finales no evaluados, falta de datos de calidad de vida, precio del medicamento no fijado, incertidumbre en la dosis y diferentes precios del medicamento. Conclusiones: mejoras propuestas: incorporar ayudas para inclusión de costes no farmacológicos, estimación de la supervivencia y adaptación de evaluaciones económicas publicadas; establecer criterios para: selección de precios, toma de decisiones en condiciones de incertidumbre o evidencia pobre, cálculo de dosis y umbrales de coste-efectividad en diferentes situaciones.

  14. The Response of microRNAs to Solar UVR in Skin-Resident Melanocytes Differs between Melanoma Patients and Healthy Persons.

    PubMed

    Sha, Jingfeng; Gastman, Brian R; Morris, Nathan; Mesinkovska, Natasha A; Baron, Elma D; Cooper, Kevin D; McCormick, Thomas; Arbesman, Joshua; Harter, Marian L

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of melanocytes into cutaneous melanoma is largely dictated by the effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Yet to be described, however, is exactly how these cells are affected by intense solar UVR while residing in their natural microenvironment, and whether their response differs in persons with a history of melanoma when compared to that of healthy individuals. By using laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate a pure population of melanocytes from a small area of skin that had been intermittingly exposed or un-exposed to physiological doses of solar UVR, we can now report for the first time that the majority of UV-responsive microRNAs (miRNAs) in the melanocytes of a group of women with a history of melanoma are down-regulated when compared to those in the melanocytes of healthy controls. Among the miRNAs that were commonly and significantly down-regulated in each of these women were miR-193b (P<0.003), miR-342-3p (P<0.003), miR186 (P<0.007), miR-130a (P<0.007), and miR-146a (P<0.007). To identify genes potentially released from inhibition by these repressed UV-miRNAs, we analyzed databases (e.g., DIANA-TarBase) containing experimentally validated microRNA-gene interactions. In the end, this enabled us to construct UV-miRNA-gene regulatory networks consisting of individual genes with a probable gain-of-function being intersected not by one, but by several down-regulated UV-miRNAs. Most striking, however, was that these networks typified well-known regulatory modules involved in controlling the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and processes associated with the regulation of immune-evasion. We speculate that these pathways become activated by UVR resulting in miRNA down regulation only in melanocytes susceptible to melanoma, and that these changes could be partially responsible for empowering these cells toward tumor progression.

  15. PowerPoint in the Classroom

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Note from the Editors Points of View (POV) addresses issues faced within life science education. Cell Biology Education has launched the POV feature to present two or more opinions published in tandem on a common topic. We consider POVs to be “Op-Ed” pieces designed to stimulate thought and dialog on significant educational issues. Each author has the opportunity to revise a POV after reading drafts of the other POVs. In this issue, we ask the question, “Is PowerPoint the best instructional medium to use in your class?” Everyone seems to have an opinion on Microsoft, but the intellectual merits of using PowerPoint (or similar software) is a growing question as states and institutions put more and more money into information technology and distance learning. Four POVs are presented: 1) David Keefe and James Willett provide their case why PowerPoint is an ideal teaching software. Keefe is an educational researcher at the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International. Willett is a professor at George Mason University in the Departments of Microbial and Molecular Bioscience; as well as Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. 2) Kim McDonald highlights the causes of PowerPointlessness, a term which indicates the frequent use of PowerPoint as a crutch rather than a tool. She is a Bioscience Educator at the Shodor Education Foundation, Inc. 3) Diana Voss asks readers if PowerPoint is really necessary to present the material effectively or not. Voss is a Instructional Computing Support Specialist at SUNY Stony Brook. 4) Cynthia Lanius takes a light-hearted approach to ask whether PowerPoint is a technological improvement or just a change of pace for teacher and student presentations. Lanius is a Technology Integration Specialist in the Sinton (Texas) Independent School District. The authors span the range of teaching experiences and settings from which they bring different points of view to the debate. Readers are encouraged to participate in the online

  16. Using Dust Lines to Learn About Planetary Birthplaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    Observations of the protoplanetary disks that surround young stars provide crucial information about the initial conditions for planet formation. In a recent study, a team of scientists has proposed a novel new approach for determining disk properties from observations.Limitations to Direct MeasurementArtists impression of a protoplanetary disk surrounding a young star. [ESO/L. Calada]The surface density of protoplanetary disks (i.e., how much mass is there and where is it concentrated?) cant be measured directly, since most of the disk mass is in molecular hydrogen gas, which doesnt readily emit.Instead, disk surface densities are inferred by measuring other components of the disk, like dust or molecules like CO or HD, and then making assumptions about the molecular abundances or the dust-to-gas ratio in the disk. Disk surface density estimatesare therefore heavily dependent upon the assumptions that went into them.Now, a team of scientists led by Diana Powell (University of California Santa Cruz) has proposed a new technique in which observations of adisk in different wavelengths can be used to determine itssurface density profile without the need for such assumptions.Schematic showing disk dust lines for three different particle sizes, s1 s2 s3. Particles of size s1 exist in the yellow region, so in observations at wavelength obs=s1, a disk the size of the yellow region will be seen. Particles of size s2 exist in the yellow and red region, so a disk will extend to the end of the red region for obs=s2. Particles of size s3 exist throughout the disk, so the full disk size will be seen for obs=s3. [Powell et al. 2017]How Does It Work?Particles in a protoplanetary disk collide and stick together, thereby growing over time. But particles are also removed from the outskirts of the disk by a process called drift. More massive particles are removed from closer in to the star, so average particle sizes get smaller the further from the star you move out in a disk. For

  17. Human impact and Holocene climatic change in the archaeological site 'Piani della Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelle, Teresa; Scarciglia, Fabio; La Russa, Mauro F.; Natali, Elena; Tinè, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    A pedoarchaeological study was carried out in the archaeological site "Piani della Corona", located on a wide terrace at 500 m a.s.l. along the southwestern coast of Calabria, in southern Italy. The archaeological excavations exhumed an extensive settlement related to old to medium Bronze Age phases and traces of late Neolithic human colonization. On the basis of archaeological finds the pedostratigraphic succession can be partly dated. It consists of soils with variable features and andic properties, which include yellowish-brown (in places more reddish), deep argillic (Bt) horizons with variable amounts of clay coatings in pores and dark brown infillings of soil material rich in organic matter, in places overlaid by thin, severely truncated, brown to dark brown, organic-mineral (A) horizons. These layers include late Neolithic ceramic artefacts (Diana style facies) and typical incineration burials found in biconical vases, that can be referred to 6500-5000 years BP. The prehistoric layers are widely overlaid and strongly superimposed by a paleosurface of the early to medium Bronze age. This surface is affected by many pole holes left by large rectangular, apsidal wooden huts (not preserved), ploughed furrows, excavated cisterns, ditches and trenches, often filled by organic-rich dark brown material. Also hearths with charcoal remains, burials, vases and other diagnostic ceramic fragments occur. The upper portion of the pedostratigraphic succession consists of thicker brown A horizons, that appear cyclically ploughed during historical times (archaeologically not well dated as a consequence of their reworking for agricultural practices), with abrupt irregular boundaries often entering the underlying horizons. Micromorphological observations confirmed the presence of clay coatings within pores of Bt horizons, showing that they represent relict features (i.e. related to inactive illuvial processes, at present), as often fragmented and with smooth-banded to grainy

  18. Hsa-microRNA-181a is a regulator of a number of cancer genes and a biomarker for endometrial carcinoma in patients: a bioinformatic and clinical study and the therapeutic implication

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuming; Zeng, Shumei; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The aberrant expression of human microRNA-181a-1 (hsa-miR-181a) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cancers, serving as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor. However, the role of hsa-miR-181a in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma (EC) and its clinical significance are unclear. This study aimed to search for the molecular targets of hsa-miR-181a using bioinformatic tools and then determine the expression levels of hsa-miR-181a in normal, hyperplasia, and EC samples from humans. To predict the targets of hsa-miR-181a, ten different algorithms were used, including miRanda-mirSVR, DIANA microT v5.0, miRDB, RNA22 v2, TargetMiner, TargetScan 6.2, PicTar, MicroCosm Targets v5, and miRWALK. Two algorithms, TarBase 6.0 and miRTarBase, were used to identify the validated targets of hsa-miR-181a-5p (a mature product of hsa-miR-181a), and the web-based Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) 6.7 was used to provide biological functional interpretation of the validated targets of hsa-miR-181a-5p. A total of 78 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 65 patients and 13 healthy subjects were collected and examined, including normal endometrium (n=13), endometrial hyperplasia (n=18), and EC (37 type I and 10 type II EC cases). Our bioinformatic studies have showed that hsa-miR-181a might regulate a large number of target genes that are important in the regulation of critical cell processes, such as cell fate, cell survival, metabolism, and cell death. To date, 313 targets of hsa-miR-181a have been validated, and 22 of these targets are cancer genes. The precision of predictions by all the algorithms for hsa-miR-181a-1’s targets was low. Many of these genes are involved in tumorigenesis of various cancers, including EC, based on the DAVID and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. In comparison with normal endometrial tissue, the expression level of hsa-miR-181a was significantly

  19. True 3D kinematic analysis for slope instability assessment in the Siq of Petra (Jordan), from high resolution TLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigli, Giovanni; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Ruther, Heinz; Casagli, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    released, stratigraphic setting and tectonic activity can be recognized. As a consequence, rock-falls have been occurring, even recently, with unstable rock mass volumes ranging from 0.1 m3 up to over some hundreds m3. Slope instability, acceleration of crack deformation and consequent increasing of rock-fall hazard conditions, could threaten the safety of tourist as well as the integrity of the heritage. 3D surface model coming from Terrestrial Laser Scanner acquisitions was developed almost all over the site of Petra, including the Siq. Comprehensively, a point cloud of five billion points was generated making the site of Petra likely the largest scanned archaeological site in the word. As far as the Siq, the scanner was positioned on the path floor at intervals of not more than 10 meters from each station. The total number of scans in the Siq was 220 with an average point cloud interval of approximately 3 cm. Subsequently, for the definition of the main rockfall source areas, a spatial kinematic analysis for the whole Siq has been performed, by using discontinuity orientation data extracted from the point cloud by means of the software Diana. Orientation, number of sets, spacing/frequency, persistence, block size and scale dependent roughness was obtained combining fieldwork and automatic analysis. This kind of analysis is able to establish where a particular instability mechanism is kinematically feasible, given the geometry of the slope, the orientation of discontinuities and shear strength of the rock. The final outcome of this project was a detail landslide kinematic index map, reporting main potential instability mechanisms for a given area. The kinematic index was finally calibrated for each instability mechanism (plane failure; wedge failure; block toppling; flexural toppling) surveyed in the site. The latter is including the collapse occurred in May 2015, likely not producing any victim, in a sector clearly identified by the susceptibility maps produced by the

  20. PHYSICS EDUCATION AND THE INTERNET: A beginner's guide to a physicist starting out on an Internet journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Paul

    1998-05-01

    -linehttp://www.shu.ac.uk/schools/sci/sol/contents.htm Physics humourhttp://quark.physics.uwo.ca/~harwood/humor12.htm Searching for someone's e-mail address?http://www.four11.com SKY publicationshttp://www.skypub.com Planet Sciencehttp://www.keysites.com New Scientisthttp://www.newscientist.com NASA links to the American space programhttp://www.nasa.gov NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratoryhttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov Hewlett-Packardhttp://www.hp.com The Bradford Schools Telescope Projecthttp://www.telescope.org/rti/nuffield/ To contact a professional societyhttp://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/society/overview.html The Schools' Physics Group: post-16 issueshttp://diana.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~pm/Physics/post16.html Sleuth search for physics and chemistryhttp://www.isleuth.com/index.shtml The Particle Adventurehttp://pdg.lbl.gov/cpep/adventure_home.html Acknowledgments I thank colleagues David Robinson and Robin Peach for their help in selecting and validating these sites and William Try, pupil at Bootham School, for preparing and maintaining the department's homepage with hypertext links. Received 21 January 1998

  1. PREFACE: 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Luis; Minotti, Fernando; Kelly, Hector

    2012-06-01

    , Venezuela Leopoldo Soto, Chile Michael Tendler, Sweden Carlos Varandas, Portugal Henry Riascos, Colombia Ivan Vargas-Blanco, Costa Rica Local Organizing Committee Luis Bilbao (Chairman) Fernando Minotti (Vice-Chairman) Luis Bernal, UNMDP Alejandro Clausse, PLADEMA-CNEA Graciela Gnavi, INFIP, CONICET-UBA Fausto Gratton, INFIP, CONICET-UBA Diana Grondona, INFIP, CONICET-UBA Héctor Kelly, INFIP, CONICET-UBA Adriana Márquez, INFIP, CONICET-UBA María Milanese, UNCPBA César Moreno, INFIP, CONICET-UBA Sponsors Instituto de Física del Plasma (INFIP) Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA) Agencia Nacional de Promoción Científica y Tecnológica (ANPCyT) Centro Latino-Americano de Física (CLAF) Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (UNMP) Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (UNICEN) Academia Nacional de Ciencias de Buenos Aires (ANCBA) Conference poster

  2. Effects of disodium fumarate on ruminal fermentation and microbial communities in sheep fed on high-forage diets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y W; McSweeney, C S; Wang, J K; Liu, J X

    2012-05-01

    microbiota after adding DF. Ten of 15 clone sequences from cut-out bands appearing in both the 2nd and the 4th week were 94% to 100% similar to Prevotella-like bacteria, and four sequences showed 95% to 98% similarity to Selenomonas dianae. Another 15 sequences were obtained from bands, which appeared in the 4th week only. Thirteen of these 15 sequences showed 95% to 99% similarity to Clostridium sp., and the other two showed 95% and 100% similarity to Ruminococcus sp. In summary, the microorganisms positively responding to DF addition were the cellulolytic bacteria, R. albus, F. succinogenes and B. fibrisolvens as well as proteolytic bacteria, B. fibrisolvens, P. ruminicola and Clostridium sp.

  3. Geologic map of the Rusalka Planitia Quadrangle (V-25), Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Duncan A.; Hansen, Vicki L.

    2003-01-01

    The Rusalka Planitia quadrangle (herein referred to as V-25) occupies an 8.1 million square kilometer swath of lowlands nestled within the eastern highlands of Aphrodite Terra on Venus. The region (25?-0? N., 150?-180? E.) is framed by the crustal plateau Thetis Regio to the southwest, the coronae of the Diana-Dali chasmata complex to the south, and volcanic rise Atla Regio to the west. Regions to the north, and the quadrangle itself, are part of the vast lowlands, which cover four-fifths of the surface of Venus. The often-unspectacular lowlands of Venus are typically lumped together as ridged or regional plains. However, detailed mapping reveals the mode of resurfacing in V-25's lowlands: a mix of corona-related flow fields and local edifice clusters within planitia superimposed on a background of less clearly interpretable extended flow fields, large volcanoes, probable corona fragments, and edifice-flow complexes. The history detailed within the Rusalka Planitia quadrangle is that of the extended evolution of long-wavelength topographic basins in the presence of episodes of extensive corona-related volcanism, pervasive low-intensity small-scale eruptions, and an early phase of regional circumferential shortening centered on central Aphrodite Terra. Structural reactivation both obscures and illuminates the tectonic development of the region. The data are consistent with progressive lithospheric thickening, although the critical lack of an independent temporal marker on Venus severely hampers our ability to test this claim and correlate between localities. Two broad circular basins dominate V-25 geology: northern Rusalka Planitia lies in the southern half of the quadrangle, whereas the smaller Llorona Planitia sits along the northwestern corner of V-25. Similar large topographic basins occur throughout the lowlands of Venus, and gravity data suggest that some basins may represent dynamic topography over mantle downwellings. Both planitiae include coronae and

  4. HTP Nutraceutical Screening for Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Effects of HDACis on Tumor-suppressing miRNAs by Trichostatin A and Grapeseed (Vitis vinifera) in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    MAZZIO, ELIZABETH A.; SOLIMAN, KARAM F.A.

    2016-01-01

    chinensis), Konaberry extract (Coffea arabica), Uva Ursi (Arctostaphylos uva ursi), Green tea (Camellia sinensis), Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria), Sassafras (Sassafras officinale), Turkey rhubarb (Rheum palmatum), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), gossypol and gallic acid. Next, we investigate the biological consequence of HDACi panel drugs in HeLa cells, where the data suggest predominant effects are anti-mitotic rather than cytotoxic. Lastly, differential effects of TSA vs. GSE at sub-lethal concentrations tested on HeLa cells show 6,631 miRNAs expressed in resting cells, 35 significantly up-regulated (TSA) and 81 up-regulated (GSE), with several miRNAs overlapping in the upward direction by both GSE and TSA (e.g. hsa-miR-23b-5p, hsa-miR-27b-5p, hsa-miR-1180-3p, hsa-miR-6880-5p and hsa-mir-943). Using DIANA miRNA online tools, it was determined that GSE and TSA simultaneously cause overexpression of similar miRNAs predicted to destroy the following influential oncogenes: NFkB, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, MYC, TGFBR1, E2F1, E2F2, BCL21, CDKN1A, CDK6, HIF1a, and VEGFA. Conclusion: The data from this study show that plant- based HDACis are relatively rare, and can elicit a similar pattern to TSA in up-regulating miRNAs involved with tumor suppression of HeLa cervical carcinoma. PMID:28031235

  5. HTP Nutraceutical Screening for Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Effects of HDACis on Tumor-suppressing miRNAs by Trichostatin A and Grapeseed (Vitis vinifera) in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Soliman, Karam F A

    2017-01-02

    ), Uva Ursi (Arctostaphylos uva ursi), Green tea (Camellia sinensis), Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria), Sassafras (Sassafras officinale), Turkey rhubarb (Rheum palmatum), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), gossypol and gallic acid. Next, we investigate the biological consequence of HDACi panel drugs in HeLa cells, where the data suggest predominant effects are anti-mitotic rather than cytotoxic. Lastly, differential effects of TSA vs. GSE at sub-lethal concentrations tested on HeLa cells show 6,631 miRNAs expressed in resting cells, 35 significantly up-regulated (TSA) and 81 up-regulated (GSE), with several miRNAs overlapping in the upward direction by both GSE and TSA (e.g. hsa-miR-23b-5p, hsa-miR-27b-5p, hsa-miR-1180-3p, hsa-miR-6880-5p and hsa-mir-943). Using DIANA miRNA online tools, it was determined that GSE and TSA simultaneously cause overexpression of similar miRNAs predicted to destroy the following influential oncogenes: NFkB, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, MYC, TGFBR1, E2F1, E2F2, BCL21, CDKN1A, CDK6, HIF1a, and VEGFA. The data from this study show that plant- based HDACis are relatively rare, and can elicit a similar pattern to TSA in up-regulating miRNAs involved with tumor suppression of HeLa cervical carcinoma. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation

  7. Hsa-microRNA-181a is a regulator of a number of cancer genes and a biomarker for endometrial carcinoma in patients: a bioinformatic and clinical study and the therapeutic implication.

    PubMed

    He, Shuming; Zeng, Shumei; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The aberrant expression of human microRNA-181a-1 (hsa-miR-181a) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cancers, serving as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor. However, the role of hsa-miR-181a in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma (EC) and its clinical significance are unclear. This study aimed to search for the molecular targets of hsa-miR-181a using bioinformatic tools and then determine the expression levels of hsa-miR-181a in normal, hyperplasia, and EC samples from humans. To predict the targets of hsa-miR-181a, ten different algorithms were used, including miRanda-mirSVR, DIANA microT v5.0, miRDB, RNA22 v2, TargetMiner, TargetScan 6.2, PicTar, MicroCosm Targets v5, and miRWALK. Two algorithms, TarBase 6.0 and miRTarBase, were used to identify the validated targets of hsa-miR-181a-5p (a mature product of hsa-miR-181a), and the web-based Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) 6.7 was used to provide biological functional interpretation of the validated targets of hsa-miR-181a-5p. A total of 78 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 65 patients and 13 healthy subjects were collected and examined, including normal endometrium (n=13), endometrial hyperplasia (n=18), and EC (37 type I and 10 type II EC cases). Our bioinformatic studies have showed that hsa-miR-181a might regulate a large number of target genes that are important in the regulation of critical cell processes, such as cell fate, cell survival, metabolism, and cell death. To date, 313 targets of hsa-miR-181a have been validated, and 22 of these targets are cancer genes. The precision of predictions by all the algorithms for hsa-miR-181a-1's targets was low. Many of these genes are involved in tumorigenesis of various cancers, including EC, based on the DAVID and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. In comparison with normal endometrial tissue, the expression level of hsa-miR-181a was significantly increased

  8. Obituary: John Louis Africano III, 1951-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Edwin, S.

    2007-12-01

    Technical Conference whose attendance expanded dramatically during his tenure. John moved to the NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, in 1998 to work full time on orbital debris projects including the 3.0 meter Liquid Mirror Telescope and the CCD Debris Telescope in Cloudcroft, New Mexico. In 2000 he moved back to Colorado Springs, Colorado, to be closer to his family. From there he continued to support both the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) and AMOS. John was very instrumental in establishing cooperative programs between the ODPO and AMOS, which will benefit both organizations for many years to come. John left an indelible mark on his programs and all those who knew and loved him. The impact of his untimely departure will reverberate for many years. As John's wife Linda put it, "John is now visiting the stars and galaxies he adored from afar." John is survived by his wife, Linda Ann Africano; two sons, James Keith and Brian Michael; a daughter, Monica Lynn Africano; a sister, Diana Smith; and four grandchildren. The author acknowledges valuable input from Brian Africano (University of Colorado at Colorado Springs), Eugene Stansbery (NASA), Mark Mulrooney (NASA contractor), Tom Kelecy (Boeing LTS, Inc.), Paul Sydney (Boeing LTS, Inc.), Kira Abercromby (NASA contractor), and Patrick Seitzer (University of Michigan).

  9. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada national Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 2 of 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation

  10. PREFACE: The IARU International Scientific Congress on Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges and Decisions (10-12 March, Copenhagen, Denmark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    by the IARU universities In keeping with normal scientific practice, a procedure for producing the synthesis report that has been adopted optimises the chances of arriving at a product that will receive a broad backing from the scientific community as being a message that can be sent to the non-scientific community and that explains current understanding in climate change science The Writing Team will also be responsible for writing the book Members of the Writing Team (in alphabetical order) Professor Joe Alcamo, University of Stellenbosch Dr Terry Barker, Cambridge University Professor Daniel Kammen, University of California - Berkeley Professor Rik Leemans, Environmental Systems Analysis Group, Wageningen University Professor Diana Liverman, Oxford University Professor Mohan Munasinghe, Chairman, Munasinghe Institute for Development (MIND) Dr Balgis Osman-Elasha, Higher Council for Environment and Natural Resources (HCENR), Sudan Professor Katherine Richardson, University of Copenhagen Professor John Schellnhuber, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and visiting professor at the University of Oxford Professor Will Steffen, Australian National University Professor Lord Nicholas Stern, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) Professor Ole Wæver, University of Copenhagen 2 Key Messages from the Congress Key Message 1: Climatic Trends Recent observations confirm that, given high rates of observed emissions, the worst-case IPCC scenario trajectories (or even worse) are being realized For many key parameters, the climate system is already moving beyond the patterns of natural variability within which our society and economy have developed and thrived These parameters include global mean surface temperature, sea-level rise, ocean and ice sheet dynamics, ocean acidification, and extreme climatic events There is a significant risk that many of the trends will accelerate, leading to an increasing risk of abrupt or irreversible climatic shifts Key

  11. Mapping scientific frontiers : the quest for knowledge visualization.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-08-01

    Visualization of scientific frontiers is a relatively new field, yet it has a long history and many predecessors. The application of science to science itself has been undertaken for decades with notable early contributions by Derek Price, Thomas Kuhn, Diana Crane, Eugene Garfield, and many others. What is new is the field of information visualization and application of its techniques to help us understand the process of science in the making. In his new book, Chaomei Chen takes us on a journey through this history, touching on predecessors, and then leading us firmly into the new world of Mapping Scientific Frontiers. Building on the foundation of his earlier book, Information Visualization and Virtual Environments, Chen's new offering is much less a tutorial in how to do information visualization, and much more a conceptual exploration of why and how the visualization of science can change the way we do science, amplified by real examples. Chen's stated intents for the book are: (1) to focus on principles of visual thinking that enable the identification of scientific frontiers; (2) to introduce a way to systematize the identification of scientific frontiers (or paradigms) through visualization techniques; and (3) to stimulate interdisciplinary research between information visualization and information science researchers. On all these counts, he succeeds. Chen's book can be broken into two parts which focus on the first two purposes stated above. The first, consisting of the initial four chapters, covers history and predecessors. Kuhn's theory of normal science punctuated by periods of revolution, now commonly known as paradigm shifts, motivates the work. Relevant predecessors outside the traditional field of information science such as cartography (both terrestrial and celestial), mapping the mind, and principles of visual association and communication, are given ample coverage. Chen also describes enabling techniques known to information scientists, such as

  12. Genomes to Life Project Quartely Report October 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Martino, Anthony; Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Geist, Al; Gorin, Andrey; Xu, Ying; Palenik, Brian

    2005-02-01

    .genomes-to-life.org Acknowledgment We want to gratefully acknowledge the contributions of the GTL Project Team as follows: Grant S. Heffelfinger1*, Anthony Martino2, Andrey Gorin3, Ying Xu10,3, Mark D. Rintoul1, Al Geist3, Matthew Ennis1, Hashimi Al-Hashimi8, Nikita Arnold3, Andrei Borziak3, Bianca Brahamsha6, Andrea Belgrano12, Praveen Chandramohan3, Xin Chen9, Pan Chongle3, Paul Crozier1, PguongAn Dam10, George S. Davidson1, Robert Day3, Jean Loup Faulon2, Damian Gessler12, Arlene Gonzalez2, David Haaland1, William Hart1, Victor Havin3, Tao Jiang9, Howland Jones1, David Jung3, Ramya Krishnamurthy3, Yooli Light2, Shawn Martin1, Rajesh Munavalli3, Vijaya Natarajan3, Victor Olman10, Frank Olken4, Brian Palenik6, Byung Park3, Steven Plimpton1, Diana Roe2, Nagiza Samatova3, Arie Shoshani4, Michael Sinclair1, Alex Slepoy1, Shawn Stevens8, Chris Stork1, Charlie Strauss5, Zhengchang Su10, Edward Thomas1, Jerilyn A. Timlin1, Xiufeng Wan11, HongWei Wu10, Dong Xu11, Gong-Xin Yu3, Grover Yip8, Zhaoduo Zhang2, Erik Zuiderweg8 *Author to whom correspondence should be addressed (gsheffe%40sandia.gov) 1. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 2. Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 4. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 5. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 6. University of California, San Diego 7. University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign 8. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 9. University of California, Riverside 10. University of Georgia, Athens 11. University of Missouri, Columbia 12. National Center for Genome Resources, Santa Fe, NM Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. The Doryctinae (Braconidae) of Costa Rica: genera and species of the tribe Heterospilini.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Paul M; Wild, Alexander L; Whitfield, James B

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive taxonomic study is presented for the four genera and 286 species of the doryctine tribe Heterospilini occurring in Costa Rica. The tribe is represented almost entirely by the 280 species of the genus Heterospilus Haliday. Keys for identification of the genera and species are provided and the genera and species are described and illustrated. An interactive key to the species of Heterospilus also was prepared using Lucid Builder. The following new genus and species are described from Costa Rica: Paraheterospilus gen. n., P. ceciliaensis sp. n., P. eumekus sp. n., P. wilbotgardus sp. n., Heterospilus achi sp. n., H. achterbergi sp. n., H. aesculapius sp. n., H. agujas sp. n., H. agujasensis sp. n., H. alajuelus sp. n., H. albocoxalis sp. n., H. alejandroi sp. n., H. amuzgo sp. n., H. angelicae sp. n., H. angustus sp. n., H. aphrodite sp. n., H. apollo sp. n., H. arawak sp. n., H. areolatus sp. n., H. artemis sp. n., H. athena sp. n., H. attraholucus sp. n., H. aubreyae sp. n., H. austini sp. n., H. azofeifai sp. n., H. bacchus sp. n., H. barbalhoae sp. n., H. bennetti sp. n., H. bicolor sp. n., H. boharti sp. n., H. borucas sp. n., H. braeti sp. n., H. brethesi sp. n., H. breviarius sp. n., H. brevicornus sp. n., H. bribri sp. n., H. brullei sp. n., H. bruesi sp. n., H. cabecares sp. n., H. cacaoensis sp. n., H. cachiensis sp. n., H. cameroni sp. n., H. cangrejaensis sp. n., H. careonotaulus sp. n., H. caritus sp. n., H. carolinae sp. n., H. cartagoensis sp. n., H. catiensis sp. n., H. catorce sp. n., H. cero sp. n., H. chaoi sp. n., H. chilamatensis sp. n., H. chocho sp. n., H. chorotegus sp. n., H. chorti sp. n., H. cinco sp. n., H. cocopa sp. n., H. colliletus sp. n., H. colonensis sp. n., H. complanatus sp. n., H. conservatus sp. n., H. cora sp. n., H. corcovado sp. n., H. corrugatus sp. n., H. costaricensis sp. n., H. cressoni sp. n., H. cuatro sp. n., H. curtisi sp. n., H. cushmani sp. n., H. dani sp. n., H. demeter sp. n., H. dianae sp. n., H

  14. The Doryctinae (Braconidae) of Costa Rica: genera and species of the tribe Heterospilini

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Paul M.; Wild, Alexander L.; Whitfield, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A comprehensive taxonomic study is presented for the four genera and 286 species of the doryctine tribe Heterospilini occurring in Costa Rica. The tribe is represented almost entirely by the 280 species of the genus Heterospilus Haliday. Keys for identification of the genera and species are provided and the genera and species are described and illustrated. An interactive key to the species of Heterospilus also was prepared using Lucid Builder. The following new genus and species are described from Costa Rica: Paraheterospilus gen. n., P. ceciliaensis sp. n., P. eumekus sp. n., P. wilbotgardus sp. n., Heterospilus achi sp. n., H. achterbergi sp. n., H. aesculapius sp. n., H. agujas sp. n., H. agujasensis sp. n., H. alajuelus sp. n., H. albocoxalis sp. n., H. alejandroi sp. n., H. amuzgo sp. n., H. angelicae sp. n., H. angustus sp. n., H. aphrodite sp. n., H. apollo sp. n., H. arawak sp. n., H. areolatus sp. n., H. artemis sp. n., H. athena sp. n., H. attraholucus sp. n., H. aubreyae sp. n., H. austini sp. n., H. azofeifai sp. n., H. bacchus sp. n., H. barbalhoae sp. n., H. bennetti sp. n., H. bicolor sp. n., H. boharti sp. n., H. borucas sp. n., H. braeti sp. n., H. brethesi sp. n., H. breviarius sp. n., H. brevicornus sp. n., H. bribri sp. n., H. brullei sp. n., H. bruesi sp. n., H. cabecares sp. n., H. cacaoensis sp. n., H. cachiensis sp. n., H. cameroni sp. n., H. cangrejaensis sp. n., H. careonotaulus sp. n., H. caritus sp. n., H. carolinae sp. n., H. cartagoensis sp. n., H. catiensis sp. n., H. catorce sp. n., H. cero sp. n., H. chaoi sp. n., H. chilamatensis sp. n., H. chocho sp. n., H. chorotegus sp. n., H. chorti sp. n., H. cinco sp. n., H. cocopa sp. n., H. colliletus sp. n., H. colonensis sp. n., H. complanatus sp. n., H. conservatus sp. n., H. cora sp. n., H. corcovado sp. n., H. corrugatus sp. n., H. costaricensis sp. n., H. cressoni sp. n., H. cuatro sp. n., H. curtisi sp. n., H. cushmani sp. n., H. dani sp. n., H. demeter sp. n., H. dianae sp

  15. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    Supplementary Materials The number of supplementary materials that accompany print articles has grown and also become more varied. The new guidelines for lab experiments call for supplementary materials in most cases, so that the actual materials used in lab can be made available. The From Past Issues column edited by Kathryn Williams and many of the technology columns frequently have supplements for JCE Online. An especially interesting supplement that we would like to call to the attention of readers is a collection of videos from the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, based on interviews with nuclear chemists who have discovered and studied the heaviest elements. These movies accompany the Viewpoints article, "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements-One Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee. The titles of the movies are listed below; illustrative stills are shown at the bottom of the page. Researchers involved with the segments about Lawrencium include Robert Silva, Torbjorn Sikkeland, Matti Nurmia, Robert Latimer, and Albert Ghiorso, all of whom are from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (QuickTime 3 is needed in order to view the videos; it can be downloaded free from http://www.apple.com.)

    • A Brief Note about Plutonium, by Glenn Seaborg
    • Plutonium and Why It Was Kept a Secret
    • The Prediction of the Actinide Series, by Glenn Seaborg
    • First Chemical Separation of Lawrencium at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 1970
    • The HILAC or Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator
    • Discovery of Lawrencium
    • How To Collect Lawrencium Atoms
    • The Discovery of Element 106-Finally
    • The Naming of Element 106
    • The Limits of Discovering the Heavy Elements
    • What Good Is a Heavy Element?
    To see these videos, view the Supplements of http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Mar/abs331.html. People: Glenn Seaborg Glenn Seaborg, frequent contributor

  16. 12th WINFOCUS world congress on ultrasound in emergency and critical care.

    PubMed

    Acar, Yahya; Tezel, Onur; Salman, Necati; Cevik, Erdem; Algaba-Montes, Margarita; Oviedo-García, Alberto; Patricio-Bordomás, Mayra; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Ali, Abbas; Mustafa, Alrayah; Abdelrahman, Ihab; Bahar, Mustafa; Ali, Osama; Lester Kirchner, H; Prosen, Gregor; Anzic, Ajda; Leeson, Paul; Bahreini, Maryam; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Hosseinnejad, Houman; Blecher, Gabriel; Meek, Robert; Egerton-Warburton, Diana; Ćuti, Edina Ćatić; Belina, Stanko; Vančina, Tihomir; Kovačević, Idriz; Rustemović, Nadan; Chang, Ikwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Kwak, Young Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Cheng, Chi-Yung; Pan, Hsiu-Yung; Kung, Chia-Te; Ćurčić, Ela; Pritišanac, Ena; Planinc, Ivo; Medić, Marijana Grgić; Radonić, Radovan; Fasina, Abiola; Dean, Anthony J; Panebianco, Nova L; Henwood, Patricia S; Fochi, Oliviero; Favarato, Moreno; Bonanomi, Ezio; Tomić, Ivan; Ha, Youngrock; Toh, Hongchuen; Harmon, Elizabeth; Chan, Wilma; Baston, Cameron; Morrison, Gail; Shofer, Frances; Hua, Angela; Kim, Sharon; Tsung, James; Gunaydin, Isa; Kekec, Zeynep; Ay, Mehmet Oguzhan; Kim, Jinjoo; Kim, Jinhyun; Choi, Gyoosung; Shim, Dowon; Lee, Ji-Han; Ambrozic, Jana; Prokselj, Katja; Lucovnik, Miha; Simenc, Gabrijela Brzan; Mačiulienė, Asta; Maleckas, Almantas; Kriščiukaitis, Algimantas; Mačiulis, Vytautas; Macas, Andrius; Mohite, Sharad; Narancsik, Zoltan; Možina, Hugon; Nikolić, Sara; Hansel, Jan; Petrovčič, Rok; Mršić, Una; Orlob, Simon; Lerchbaumer, Markus; Schönegger, Niklas; Kaufmann, Reinhard; Pan, Chun-I; Wu, Chien-Hung; Pasquale, Sarah; Doniger, Stephanie J; Yellin, Sharon; Chiricolo, Gerardo; Potisek, Maja; Drnovšek, Borut; Leskovar, Boštjan; Robinson, Kristine; Kraft, Clara; Moser, Benjamin; Davis, Stephen; Layman, Shelley; Sayeed, Yusef; Minardi, Joseph; Pasic, Irmina Sefic; Dzananovic, Amra; Pasic, Anes; Zubovic, Sandra Vegar; Hauptman, Ana Godan; Brajkovic, Ana Vujaklija; Babel, Jaksa; Peklic, Marina; Radonic, Vedran; Bielen, Luka; Ming, Peh Wee; Yezid, Nur Hafiza; Mohammed, Fatahul Laham; Huda, Zainal Abidin; Ismail, Wan Nasarudin Wan; Isa, W Yus Haniff W; Fauzi, Hashairi; Seeva, Praveena; Mazlan, Mohd Zulfakar

    2016-09-01

    A1 Point-of-care ultrasound examination of cervical spine in emergency departmentYahya Acar, Onur Tezel, Necati SalmanA2 A new technique in verifying the placement of a nasogastric tube: obtaining the longitudinal view of nasogastric tube in addition to transverse view with ultrasoundYahya Acar, Necati Salman, Onur Tezel, Erdem CevikA3 Pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery after cannulation of a central venous line. Should we always use ultrasound in these procedures?Margarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA4 Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization. A novel approach in emergency departmentMargarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA5 Clinical ultrasound in a septic and jaundice patient in the emergency departmentMargarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA6 Characterization of the eyes in preoperative cataract Saudi patients by using medical diagnostic ultrasoundMustafa Z. Mahmoud, Abdelmoneim SuliemanA7 High-frequency ultrasound in determining the causes of acute shoulder joint painMustafa Z. MahmoudA8 Teaching WINFOCUS Ultrasound Life Support Basic Level 1 for Providers in resource-limited countriesAbbas Ali, Alrayah Mustafa, Ihab Abdelrahman, Mustafa Bahar, Osama Ali, H. Lester Kirchner, Gregor ProsenA9 Changes of arterial stiffness and endothelial function during uncomplicated pregnancyAjda Anzic, Paul LeesonA10 Cardiovascular haemodynamic properties before, during and after pregnancyAjda Anzic, Paul LeesonA11 An old man with generalized weaknessMaryam Bahreini, Fatemeh RasooliA12 Ultrasonography for non-specific presentations of abdominal painMaryam Bahreini, Houman HosseinnejadA13 Introduction of a new imaging guideline for suspected renal colic in the emergency department: effect on CT Urogram utilisationGabriel Blecher, Robert Meek, Diana Egerton-WarburtonA14 Transabdominal ultrasound screening for pancreatic cancer in Croatian military

  17. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    years of Journal issues, available all the time with responses within seconds.

    ·Supplementary materials that are important to only a limited number of our subscribers; materials that augment laboratory experiments are a good example.

    ·Supplementary videos, such as the videos, still images, and excerpts from interviews with nuclear chemists that give fuller meaning to the Viewpoints article "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements- One Atom at a Time" referred to below.

    ·Internet feature columns are more effective in a dynamic medium. Two that are in place are Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum (edited by Theresa Zielinski) and Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems (edited by William Robinson and Susan Nurrenbern).

    ·Buyers Guides have their content updated often and link to other useful sites. There is one for books and software and another for supplies and equipment. Elements Added to Periodic Table Two new transuranic elements have been added to the list in the Viewpoints article "Chemistry of the Heaviest ElementsOne Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee (JCE, 1999, 76, 331). The new elements have atomic numbers 118 and 116. The path to the discovery of these elements was predicted by Robert Smolanczuk, a young Polish theorist whose calculations led him to conclude that a lead-krypton collision technique could produce element 118, which then decays to element 116. Others questioned his results, but Hoffman invited him to join the team at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a decision was made to try out his ideas. The result was almost complete verification of Smolanczuk's calculations. The experimental team was headed by Kenneth E. Gregorich; Darleane Hoffman is one of 15 codiscoverers of element 118. Awards Willard Gibbs Medal Lawrence F. Dahl of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is the recipient of 1999 Willard Gibbs Medal, the highest award of the